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ADVENTURE RUNS IN FINLAND

WORK WISELY, WORK LESS

Business issue

ACCESSIBLE ART IN BRUSSELS

SLOW TOURS IN BASQUE COUNTRY

Trends, destinations and insights for travellers • September 2014

Your l na perso y cop

FINN LIT

GOES GLOBAL

LONDON’S ROOF GARDENS GROW BUSINESS OFF THE TOURIST TRACK

IN DELHI

Winning a

Moomin wedding


TO BREAK THE RULES, YOU MUST FIRST MASTER THEM. IN 1993, AUDEMARS PIGUET CHANGED THE WORLD OF THE SPORTS WATCH FOREVER. THE POWERFUL ARCHITECTURE OF THE ROYAL OAK OFFSHORE BECAME THE ULTIMATE STATEMENT IN PERFORMANCE HAUTE HOROLOGY. THE 2014 ROYAL OAK OFFSHORE COLLECTION MOVES THE GAME ON ONCE MORE; THE HAND-ENGRAVED 22 CARAT GOLD OSCILLATING MASS NOW VISIBLE THROUGH THE SAPPHIRE CASEBACK, A WINDOW ONTO 139 YEARS OF HOROLOGICAL MASTERY.

ROYAL OAK OFFSHORE IN PINK GOLD. CHRONOGRAPH.


EDITORIAL

BY PEKKA VAURAMO CEO OF FINNAIR WWW.FINNAIR.COM

The first next-generation Airbus A350 XWB will join the Finnair fleet in 2015.

PRODUCER Amanda Soila ART DIRECTOR Sirpa Ärmänen SUB-EDITOR Anna-Maria Wasenius

CONTENT MANAGER Kati Heikinheimo REPROGRAPHICS Anne Lindfors, Tuukka Palmio ENGLISH TRANSLATION Wif Stenger SUBMISSIONS bluewings@sanoma.com EDITORIAL OFFICES Lapinmäentie 1, 00350 Helsinki, Finland, Postal address P.O.Box 100, 00040 Sanoma, Finland, tel. +358 9 1201, fax +358 9 120 5988, e-mail firstname.lastname@sanoma.com ADVERTISING SALES Media Assistant Sirkka Pulkkinen tel. +358 9 120 5921 PUBLISHER Sanoma Media Finland Oy Custom Publishing PRINTED BY Hansaprint, Turku, Finland 2014 PAPER UPM Valor 61g, Cover paper Lumi Art 200g CIRCULATION 60,000 ISSN-0358-7703

JUHA SALMINEN

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Pia Hytönen

The importance of being modern

F

innair will be the first European airline to fly the Airbus A350 XWB, the next-generation long-haul aircraft that sets new standards in passenger comfort and environmental performance. Our new flagship aircraft is also a smart investment: the A350 enables up to 25 per cent savings in CO2 emissions compared to the previous generation of aircraft in its class.

Looking into the future – the first A350 will join our fleet

next autumn – I was also reminded of Finnair’s past. Back in 1923, Finnair’s founders had the idea to start passenger and mail service with the then state-of-the-art Junkers F13. In its day, the Junkers F13 was the most comfortable, safe and reliable aircraft in existence. It helped bring the young nation of Finland closer to the world. Today, Finland has earned its place in the global economy as a centre of high-tech inno-

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Arja Suominen arja.suominen@finnair.com FINNAIR HEAD OFFICE Tietotie 11 A, Helsinki-Vantaa Airport, 1053 Finnair, Finland, tel. +358 9 81881, Postal address: P. O. Box 15, 01053 Finnair, Finland CUSTOMER FEEDBACK www.finnair.com > Information and services > After the flight or by mail: Customer Relations, SL/08, FI-01053 FINNAIR. www.finnair.com www.finnair.fi www.finnairgroup.com

vation, design and environmental responsibility. This September issue of Blue Wings focuses on the theme of “back to business,” a topic we explore with articles on the rise of Finnish Literature exports, the changing nature of workspaces, and the business potential of green rooftops. Happy reading and we look forward to welcoming you on board! Pekka Vauramo President & CEO


SEPTEMBER 2014

18

72 42

22

BOOKISH BUSINESS IN FRANKFURT

28

WEDDINGS AT MOOMIN WORLD

38

TOP 5: REINVENTING BRITAIN

42

GREEN ROOF POTENTIAL

46

DELHI BEYOND THE TOURIST TRACKS

52

WISEN UP YOUR WORK

60

ART MADE ATTAINABLE

67

FISHY FEASTS IN BARBADOS

72

EASE INTO BASQUE COUNTRY

All eyes are on Finland as the world’s most important book fair approaches

Three lucky couples celebrate their big day with the lovable characters

A sneak peek at the UK’s most exciting urban developments

London businesses discover the benefits of rooftop gardens

Step into the lesser-known side of India’s capital

Simple solutions for a better and happier working life

New talents highlight the Accessible Art Fair in Brussels

The Caribbean island gets together for fresh seafood celebrations

Cultural and culinary treats for slow travellers

ON THE COVER: CHIEKO AND NIKI JOUKANEN AT MOOMIN WORLD PHOTO BY: VUOKKO SALO

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TRAVEL COLUMNS 8

12

NEWS

HOTELS

STYLE

BUSINESS

SPORTS

HELSINKI

Route and fleet additions

Business

Autumn accessories

New co-working

Adventure running on the rise

The Old Market Hall reinvented

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retreats

SEPTEMBER 2014

14

16

trends

18

20


IN THIS ISSUE

REGULARS

Vietnam, p. 6 Helsinki, p. 16, 20 Lapland, p. 18 Frankfurt, p. 22 Britain, p. 38 London, p. 42 Delhi, p.46 Brussels, p. 60 Barbados, p. 67 Basque Country, p. 72

6

TRAVEL MOMENT

40

ALEXANDER STUBB

58

TIINA ROSENBERG

70

THIS MONTH AROUND THE WORLD

80

FINLAND IN FIGURES

46

FLYING FINNAIR

60

New border crossings

82

Before and during the flight

83

In-flight entertainment

85

Helsinki Airport

86

Maps and destinations

88

Corporate responsibility

92

Fleet

94

Frequent flyer benefits

95

67

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TRAVEL MOMENT BY VILLE PALONEN

STREET BARBER HANOI’S OLD QUARTER, also know as 36 Streets, is a world of its own. Narrow alleys are packed with tiny shops selling handicrafts, antiques, dried fruit and weasel coffee – one of the world’s most exclusive coffees made from beans that have passed through a civet cat’s digestive system. Motorbikes are

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everywhere, all of them loaded with impossibly high towers of bags, sacks and boxes. Hanoi’s residents don’t waste a single square metre of pavement. Sidewalks are covered by small cafés selling pho noodle soup and bia hoi fresh beer. Even barbers take advantage of the public space.


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TRAVEL NEWS

COMPILED BY KATJA PANTZAR KATJA PANTZAR

Preveli Beach on the Greek Island of Crete.

ISLANDS IN THE SUN

T

he Mediterranean boasts some of the world’s best beaches including Preveli Beach on the Greek island of Crete, which is just one of the ten new Finnair scheduled routes for summer 2015. Preveli is renowned for its natural beauty, as the Megalopotamos River flows into a lagoon onto the beach, which is tucked away in a cove. In co-operation with Suntours and other tour operators, Finnair will fly to Paphos, Cyprus; Palma de Mallorca, Spain;

Dalaman, Turkey; Heraklion and Chania on Crete, Rhodes and Kos in Greece; and Catania, Sicily, and Naples in Italy. The only non-Mediterranean destination is Innsbruck, Austria. Mediterranean flights start up between March 31st and May 28 and run to the start of the winter season. “Customers with access to beach houses in the Mediterranean, and those

wishing to customise their own holiday, have asked for better air only seat access from Helsinki. These new routes will give Finnair and Suntours customers better and more options to the most popular sun destinations,” says Finnair’s chief commercial officer Allister Paterson. FINNAIR.COM

NORTHERN EUROPE’S BEST AIRLINE FOR FIFTH YEAR Finnair has been named Northern Europe’s Best Airline at the World Airline Awards for the fifth straight time since 2010. The awards, organised by Skytrax, are based on an independent survey of about 18 million travellers from more than 160 countries. The oneworld alliance, to which Finnair belongs, has been named the World’s Best Airline Alliance for the second year running. Finnair remains the only airline in the Nordic countries with a four-star Skytrax rating. WORLDAIRLINEAWARDS.COM

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CONCERT IN THE AIR

One hundred and fifty lucky Finnair Plus members won free tickets to a three-and-a-half hour VIP gig with popular Finnish rapper Cheek in the skies over Finland in late July. With a “Cheek 1” flight code, the plane took happy music fans along the west coast of Finland to Ivalo and above the east coast via Joensuu and Kuusamo back to Helsinki.


JOFAMA.COM/FASHION


TRAVEL NEWS

COMPILED BY KATJA PANTZAR PHOTOS BY JUHA SALMINEN AND FINNAIR

One of the Airbus A350 test aircraft recently visited Helsinki Airport during its worldwide route-proving tour.

The spacious layout features dynamic ambient lighting to create a relaxing atmosphere.

FIRST IN EUROPE TO FLY

NEXT-GENERATION AIRCRAFT

F

innair will begin operating its first A350 XWB (extra-widebody) aircraft in 2015, initially serving Shanghai, Bangkok and Beijing, with Hong Kong and Singapore A350 service to be added in 2016. The first airline in Europe to fly the next-generation aircraft, Finnair holds 11 firm orders and eight options for the A350, which will form the backbone of long-haul fleet expansion plans. The eco-smart design of the A350 brings more than 25 per cent improvement in fuel efficiency and operating costs over the previous generation of aircraft in its class, significantly reducing Finnair’s carbon footprint.

THE SPECS

The A350’s spacious interior layout features large panoramic windows and comfortable seating arrangements in both classes. Gradual changes in dynamic ambient LED lighting ease customers into a relaxing flight experience and help create a calming and 10 BLUE WINGS

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fresh atmosphere. All Finnair A350s will also be equipped with Wi-Fi. The 297-seat configuration includes 46 seats in Business Class in a 1+2+1 layout, ensuring direct aisle access for all Business Class passengers. The Zodiac Cirrus III seats convert to fully flat beds, while a 16-inch touch-screen inflight entertainment system comes programmed with films, TV shows, music and other digital content on demand in numerous languages. Seats in Business Class also come equipped with AC and USB power outlets. Economy Class features comfortable Zodiac Z300 slim-line seats with a 31-inch seat pitch in a 3+3+3 layout. At the front of the Economy Class cabin are 43 Economy Comfort seats, with comfier headrests, high-quality headphones and four extra inches of legroom. All seats in Economy include an 11-inch touch screen inflight entertainment system and USB power outlets.

MORE AMERICAN DESTINATIONS Finnair has launched codeshare flights with transatlantic joint business partner US Airways, providing customers increased access to American cities including Charlotte, Philadelphia and Phoenix as well as more possibilities for members of both frequent flyer programmes to earn and redeem points.

MEALS DESIGNED FOR YOU Business Class passengers on long-haul flights departing from Helsinki can pre-order meals, with a changing selection of menu options that bring together the fresh tastes of Finnish nature with Mediterranean culinary traditions created by award-winning chefs. Economy Class passengers on European flights can pre-order a tasty meal for €10 with options ranging from smoked salmon to chicken korma and beef burgundy. WWW.FINNAIR.COM ->MANAGE BOOKING


TRAVEL STAYS

COMPILED AND WRITTEN BY KATJA PANTZAR

MATTI IMMONEN

HEALTHY HOTELS

Designer Tuuli Sotamaa at the new Hotel Hanasaari

A FRESHLY UPDATED CROP OF HISTORIC PLACES TO STAY IN GREATER HELSINKI OFFER BUSINESS AND LEISURE TRAVELLERS A UNIQUE RANGE OF ACCOMMODATIONS.

T

he striking sea view – complete with requisite Nordic birch trees and rays of sunlight dancing off the water – is framed by a large window in one of the 61 newly renovated rooms at Hotel Hanasaari on a small island eight kilometres from central Helsinki. “We wanted to bring nature into the rooms,” says designer Tuuli Sotamaa. She, along with her brother Kivi Sotamaa, have given a modern makeover to the rooms that were originally created in the 1970s by their father, well-known designer and professor Yrjö Sotamaa. Sister-and-brother team Ateljé Sotamaa created nine different types of rooms and designed more than 20 pieces of furniture and lights, some of which were made by artisans in India. “Making furniture parts became a development project that offered new types of well-paid work

for artisans in Mumbai,” says Tuuli. In keeping with a consistent Finnish design theme – nature’s ability to calm and refresh mind, body and soul – each piece tells a story. A lamp that looks like a small sea creature creates a lace pattern of shadows on the walls. “The Starfish Light bring to mind the ethereal underwater world of the Baltic Sea,” says Kivi. The end result is a work of art in the hotel, which is part of the Swedish-Finnish Cultural Centre that promotes arts and cultural co-operation between Finland and Sweden. The centre was a gift from Sweden to Finland, as it was built using funds accrued when Sweden forgave wartime debts owed it by Finland. WWW.ATELJESOTAMAA.NET WWW.EBOUTIQUE.SOTAMAA.NET WWW.HANAHOLMEN.FI

3 WELLBEING BOOSTS 1. NATURE THERAPY Take a walk in the woods to lower your blood pressure and stress levels

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2. FUNCTIONAL EXERCISE Ride your bike or walk instead of driving a car

SEPTEMBER 2014

3.MIND OVER MATTER De-clutter your thoughts through practices such as digital detox (turn off all electronic devices), mindfulness and meditation.

OLD WORLD GLAMOUR

Housed in a grand old manor that dates back to the 1300s, Hotel Haikko Manor recently underwent a massive renovation and update of its offerings, which now include a personal butler service for guests. In addition to a Japanesestyle Yorokobi pool department, Haikko’s super cold treatment room at -110 degrees Celsius offers the same refreshing health benefits as ice swimming, but without having to get wet. Haikko is in Porvoo, one of the six medieval towns in Finland, about 36 kilometres from Helsinki Airport. WWW.HAIKKO.FI HAIKKO

INSPIRED BY NATURE

The outdoors is also strongly present at Långvik Congress Wellness Hotel, nestled in the woods of Kirkkonummi, near the seashore about 30 kilometres from downtown Helsinki. The stylish spa hotel with a 3,000-square metre conference and banquet space was once the training centre of the Finnish KOP bank. It now houses 96 hotel rooms, an in-house cinema, and a top-flight spa with a pool looking out over the forest. WWW.LANGVIK.FI LÅNGVIK


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TRAVEL STYLE

TEXT BY AMANDA SOILA PHOTO BY JARMO ÖSTERMAN

AUTUMN ESSENTIALS

1

A NEW WAVE OF FINNISH ACCESSORIES IS ALL ABOUT FUNCTIONALITY AND CLEVER MATERIALS.

1

BAG PERFECTION To complete its successful line of men’s accessories, LUMI has brought a new bag to market this autumn. With its rich plum colour, elegant design and just the right number of pockets, Jules is a handy companion for somebody who has to dash from airport to boardroom. LUMIACCESSORIES.COM

2

5

4 3

2

SUPER SCARF If a good shawl is one of the most versatile items you can pack, Balmuir’s Helsinki twin scarf is doubly practical. With the two-tone scarf you get two looks with one accessory while the light cashmere keeps you warm from the sudden chill of autumn nights. BALMUIR.COM

3

SCALE APPEAL Helsinki-based designer Liisa Saarni’s smart bags, belts, purses and passport folders tap the vastly unrealised potential of fish leather. The durable and soft material usually ends up as industrial waste but its newly found luxe-appeal is catching on around the world. GALATEIA.WEEBLY.COM

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TIMBER COVERS Modern technology meets nature in the state-of-art wooden covers for smartphones, iPads and laptops produced by Oulu-based leather and wood goods company Lastu. LASTUCASE.COM

THE RETURN OF THE POCKET SQUARE

Helsinki-based FatCloth has brought the pocket square into the 21st century with their modern multipurpose cloths, which remain sleek and tidy while doubling as practical eyeglass or gadget cleaning clothes and hankies. THEFATCLOTH.COM


OSLO TEEMA

TEXAS

Our mission is to make the world a more comfortable place by producing long-lasting furniture in an ecologically sound way. Our both collections, Pohjanmaan and Luonto, are handcrafted with respect for Finnish carpentry traditions and the multiplicity of nature. Please, sit down and sense what quality really means.

www.pohjanmaan.com


TRAVEL BUSINESS

TEXT BY TIM BIRD PHOTO BY AMANDA SOILA

TOP 5 ADVANTAGES CO-WORKING HUBS

1 2 3 4 5

Cuts operating costs, for real estate and facilities Encourages an innovative environment Provides productive contact with like-minded people  Lends itself to flexible and increasingly mobile working habits Offers a formal and credible setting for smaller companies to hold meetings

Co-working space HUB13 recently moved into new premises in Helsinki’s Kaisaniemi.

CO-WORKING

COMES OF AGE

S

haring space is an increasingly popular option in Helsinki, especially for startups finding their way in the business scene. There are more and more opportunities to brainstorm on a daily basis with like-minded entrepreneurs and innovators – and to keep the rent down – in boutique districts such as Punavuori as well as converted industrial spaces close to the Hietalahti shipyards, to name two of many.

CO-WORKING – A QUICK HISTORY The term “co-working” is credited to “gaming guru” Brian DeKoven who coined it in 1995 in reference to his discussions about working together as equals. One of the first co-working spaces was opened in New York’s West 24th Street also in 1999, and 42West42 is still going strong. The global Impact Hub network (part of which HUB13 in Helsinki is also), was launched in London in 2005 and has grown to embrace 7,000 members across 6 continents.

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“We see co-working as the next step in shared office spaces,” says Ola Sundell, CEO of HUB13, a Helsinki-based office space Hub that has moved to bigger citycentre premises in summer 2014. Sundell is keen to point out that HUB13’s vision is more than simply providing a shared office and facilities. “In an increasingly mobile and virtual world, the need in physical spaces is for hybrid solutions, serving as offices, for meeting and events, or startup Hubs as we call them.” The international Hub network was conceived and launched in London in 2005. Sundell says that the co-working Hub must be a venue for actual business and achieving results, not just a forum for ideas. He names “throwable” microphone developer Catchbox, queuing app Mobile Queue and hearing device innovator Braci as success stories nurtured through HUB13’s lean launch path. HUB13 runs the Finnish chapters of the International Business Model Competition and the Lean Startup Meet-up. FOSTERING INNOVATION

One of the freshest additions to Helsinki’s co-working scene is GE Healthcare Finland, which is in the process of preparing

office space to offer to startups in its premises in Helsinki’s Vallila district. According to Mikko Kauppinen of GE Healthcare, it’s all about fostering innovation. “We are unique in that we are focused on health technology so the companies in our space must be in that field.” Innovation has to be more than a single person’s inspiration, says Kauppinen. “It’s more complex and derives from teamwork – co-working space is good for that. People have more energy when they can talk to like-minded people. And for a smaller company to be in a working in a GE Healthcare campus area gives confidence and credibility.” HUB13.FI

GEHEALTHCARE.FI

Creative space with Regus With 2,000 workspaces in 750 cities in 100 countries, including six cities in ­Finland, Regus, a new Finnair Plus partner, is well established in the co-working and shared office market and was one of the first international companies to recognise the need for more flexible offices. l regus.fi/finnairplus


If you can dream it ,

we can do it.

American Express Services Europe Ltd, filial - sivuliike, 00070 AMERICAN EXPRESS, Finland. Y-tunnus 1036910-0. American Express Services Europe Limited, Belgrave House, americanexpress.fi/platinumcard 76 Buckingham Palace Road, London, SW1W 9AX, United Kingdom. Rekisteröity: England & Wales Reg. no 1833139. American Express Services Europe Limited on Financial Conduct Authority/United Kingdom valtuuttama maksupalvelujen toimittaja Payment Services Regulations 2009 [ref. no 415532] mukaisesti. Copyright © 2014 American Express Company. KaikkiExpress oikeudet pidätetään. Copyright © 2014 American Company. Kaikki oikeudet pidätetään.


TRAVEL SPORTS

TEXT BY MATTHEW MITCHELL PHOTO BY INKA SALMIRINNE

MOST POPULAR AUTUMN RACES

A scenic and challenging climb at the Pyhä Tunturimaraton marathon in Lapland, one of three major races north of the Arctic Circle

NUUKSIO CLASSIC MARATHON (42 km only): Just a 30-minute drive from Helsinki, Nuuksio National Park is a trip to the wilderness without the travel. The marathon holds a max of 450 runners and in 2014 sold out in less than a day. NUUKSIOCLASSIC.COM

VAAROJEN ULTRA (Koli National Park): Established in 2006, the race (with both a 43 km and 86 km version) is the longest running ultra-marathon in Finland. This year’s race of 800 participants is the largest trail race in the country; it sold out within a few hours. VAAROJENMARATON.FI

MORE INFORMATION on races in Finland, including the upcoming 2015 schedule: TRAILRUNNING.FI

ADVENTURE RUNNING: A phenomenon that includes all manner and distances of trail races typically set in rugged, non-urban environments. These races are demanding and often require each runner to be selfsupported, meaning that they carry all they will require from food to water and first aid supplies.

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FINLAND HITS

THE EXTREME TRAIL

A

dventure running is taking hold in Finland and around the world. Once considered a niche sport, trail running and ultra-marathons have hit the mainstream, as runners seek to challenge themselves with longer distances while exploring new, non-urban destinations. Finland’s vast wilderness is ideal for more adventurous races and events spread across the country from the national parks just outside Helsinki to the arctic fells of Lapland. “The interest and demand for trail races in Finland is growing non-stop,” says Eero Lumme, Race Director for Northern Ultra Trail Service (NUTS) in Finland. Currently there are tens of races arranged around Finland, with the season stretching late into autumn and races varying between 21 and 160 kilometres. In 2014, six trail races from across the

country came together for the first time to make up the Trail Tour Finland, bringing together some of the most talented runners in the country and beyond. The first champion will be crowned in October. “In 2015 we’ll be adding shorter races and also a separate series for the ultra distance,” Lumme says. Compared with major city marathons, the adventure runs are smaller events with some races attended by fewer than 100 runners. This makes the events more intimate and runners forge a unique camaraderie as they share responsibility for looking out for one another along the way. FINNAIR FLIES to Joensuu several times every day


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TRAVEL HELSINKI

TEXT BY DAVE DUNNE PHOTOS BY AMANDA SOILA AND RESTAURANT STORY

Restaurant Story utilises the bright centre of the building.

NEW LIFE

WITHIN OLD WALLS

H

elsinki’s Old Market Hall is back open for business after an extensive refurbishment of the beautiful 125-year-old building. The Market Hall has seen all the momentous occasions in Finland’s history, but the City of Helsinki, which owns the building, also wanted to breathe a little fresh air into the walls. With this in mind some new faces are to be seen, along-

HELSINKI HIGHLIGHTS THIS MONTH WORKSHOPS, FASHION SHOWS, exhibitions, seminars and galas are firmly in sight now, as Helsinki Design Week approaches. One interesting installation is the PEFC Woodworks x Laser Cut Studio, which will be set-up in Esplanadi Park, in the centre of Helsinki, from September 12–14. People can tweet or send a digital message and a selection of those will be engraved by laser on Finnish birch wood triangles, as part of a demonstration of wood’s journey from forest to household items. (September 4–14). HELSINKIDESIGNWEEK.COM

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side some who are very familiar to natives of Helsinki and regular visitors to the city. “It was our duty to keep it traditional, yet try to refresh it for new customers and generations,” explains Timo Taulavuori, from the City of Helsinki, who oversaw the €16 million project. The concept now also caters to those who would like to stop and have a bite to eat, and perhaps a coffee or a glass of wine. But of course you can still purchase the delicacies such as fresh fish, baked goods and fruits and vegetables, which have made this

LOVE AND ANARCHY – The Helsinki International Film Festival – kicks off this year on September 18 and promises to be the marvellous celebration of filmmaking that it has been for nearly 30 years now. Previous years have seen guests such as Danny Boyle, John Woo, Gaspar Noé, Baz Luhrmann and Jacques Audiard, and the festival has always been an outlet for more inventive and controversial films that might not normally be seen in Finnish movie theatres. (September 18–28). HIFF.FI

E. Eriksson fishmongers has been around since 1880.

place so famous over the years. Newcomers include Café-Tienda Espana, traditional butchers Annan Villiliha, Röntgen Café and Conditorie, Scandinavia Café and Restaurant Story. But even the new Mari’s Smoothie stands seamlessly alongside Tuula Paalanen’s cheese shop and E. Eriksson’s fishmongers – whose history is bound in the very cement that keeps the old red bricks together. VANHAKAUPPAHALLI.FI

THE HELSINKI COMICS FESTIVAL is the largest of comics festival in northern Europe. The theme this year is LGBT comics, with artists such as Olivier Kugler, Sascha Hommer, Anna Haifisch and Birgit Weyhe bringing a dash of colour to this year’s event, and with works from Tove Jansson and Touko Laaksonen, a.k.a. Tom of Finland, also on display. (September 5–7). SARJAKUVAFESTIVAALIT.FI


MARKET HALL TOP 3 TOTALLY FRESH STORY A newcomer and centrepiece of the rejuvenated market hall is Restaurant Story. Founded by four young Finnish guys with tons of experience, Story is a relaxed place serving Nordic marketplace fare. Eggs Benedict and a beer is a popular order. Story have an extension on the market hall’s opening hours on Friday and Saturday, so you can enjoy great food, music and views on the terrace a little later.

SOUP, AND ONLY SOUP Soppakeittiö (Soup Kitchen) serves only soups; all day, every day. Bouillabaisse is a constant, but the other soups alternate daily – with a vegetarian option and one chicken or meat option. The huge and filling portions have gained Soppakeittiö glowing reviews and a busy lunch hour.

OLDER THAN THE WALLS Kalakauppa E. Eriksson fishmongers were on this patch since before the Old Market Hall existed; since 1880 in fact. They were one of the first stalls in the market and are stronger than ever today. Juha Lindberg – who runs the place now – has created a bistro opposite the stall, and oysters and Champagne are a favourite here. The caviar on sale is actually Finnish; from Varkaus in the east of the country.

Story offers relaxed, Nordic market food..

Haluatko energiasi tuulesta?

Tuulisähköä kotiisi helposti www.vantaanenergia.fi/tuuli ja liitä sähkösopimukseesi • Klikkaa pienellä lisämaksulla tuulisähköosuus 1 000 kWh/vuosi. Yksi tuulisähköosuus maksaa vain 2,00 €/kk. • Saat sertifikaatin todistuksena ilmastomyönteisestä • energiaratkaisustasi.

Vantaan Energia on Suomen suurimpia tuulisähkön tuottajia.

www.vantaanenergia.fi


THE FINNISH

LINES

A NEW GENERATION OF WRITERS IS CHALKING UP SERIOUS INTERNATIONAL INK. IN THE LEAD UP TO THE WORLD’S MOST IMPORTANT BOOK AND MEDIA SHOW, THE FRANKFURT BOOK FAIR - FINLAND WILL BE THIS YEAR’S GUEST OF HONOUR FOREIGN RIGHTS SALES HAVE ALREADY TRIPLED. BLUE WINGS FINDS OUT WHY.

I

TEXT BY KATJA PANTZAR ILLUSTRATIONS BY SATU KETTUNEN

H ONES TO WATC

liciously billed As Red As Blood, de Tattoo meets as “Girl with Dragon st instalfir e Snow White,” is th e trilogy by hit W ow ment of the Sn author Salla Finnish young adult been garnering Simukka that has praise with al much internation eady sold by alr es tri nt coun rights to 43 differe . lbäck and her team her agent Elina Ah lsinki Noir He of t bu de e th November sees al mysrt of the internation (Akashic Books), pa n years te d rte sta at series th tery and crime city is ry set in a Noir. Each new sto ago with Brooklyn thin Helwi hood or location specific neighbour nki Noir lsi He , on es Thomps sinki. Edited by Jam stselling be ing lud inc rs h write features top Finnis books e a Lehtolainen, whos crime novelist Leen . es ed in 30 languag have been publish

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f Finnish literature were a fine wine, the year 2009 would be a vintage Bordeaux – the type the world’s most influential wine critic Robert Parker raves about. In 2009 several unprecedented events took place. Journalist and filmmaker Elina Hirvonen’s novel When I Forgot received a glowing front cover write-up in the New York Times Book Review. Finnish Estonian author Sofi Oksanen’s historical war novel Purge won both the Runeberg and Finlandia Prizes before snagging several prestigious international prizes in the following years including the Europe Book Prize and the Prix Fémina. (To date, Purge has been translated into more than 40 languages, making it one of Finland’s best-selling titles of all time with


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more than one million copies sold worldwide.) And 2009 was also the year the country’s first international literary agency, the Elina Ahlbäck Literary Agency, opened its doors, and Finland signed an agreement with the world’s most important book and media fair, the Frankfurt Book Fair, to be the Guest of Honour country in 2014. “Frankfurt is an absolutely unparalleled opportunity,” says Iris Schwanck, director of FILI, the Finnish Literature Exchange, which supports the publication and promotion of literature abroad and leads the Frankfurt effort. Close to 175,000 book professionals from around the globe will attend the annual October fair and 89 per cent of those have the right to buy and sell rights – which is where potential growth lies for a small country such as Finland with its population of 5.4 million people. Iceland, the Guest of Honour country in 2011,

OF GRANTA’S BEST YOUNG FINNISH NOVELISTS

under 40 top Finnish writers TWENTY OF the nguage a special English-la will be published in n of the itio ed land, the Finnish issue of Granta Fin furt nk Fra e th r magazine fo prestigious literary anta, Gr d rea ers ak -m decision Bookfair. “Literar y of gree in this means a de so being included e big future th are e es Th d. ee nt attention is guara y them and bu , em Believe in th names of Finn Lit: commuLiisa Riekki, Otava’s follow them,” says itor is Granta Finland’s ed nications director. Aleksi Pöyry. GR ANTA .COM

is still reaping the benefits from the international exposure that it received in increased book sales and a continuing interest in Icelandic culture. This October it’s Finland’s turn in the limelight. “The world media will be focussing on Finland during the Fair,” says Liisa Riekki, leading book publisher Otava’s communications director. DRAFTING SUCCESS Like the carefully cultivated environment for growing vines to produce the best grapes for the finest wines, the conditions for taking Finnish literature abroad have been primed for a long time. Schwanck, the grande dame of Finnish Literature, has championed the export of Finnish culture for close to four decades. “Ever since we signed the Frankfurt Book Fair deal five years ago, our goal has been the breakthrough of Finnish literature, not just in Germany but internationally,” says Schwanck. “We thought if we could sell rights to 100 titles to the German market this year – the average is 20 or 30 annually – that would be great. However, according to the most recent figures, we’ve already sold 130 titles as of June.” The potential for rapid growth is also recognised by the Elina Ahlbäck Literary Agency. “My target is to tenfold the export of Finnish literature within five to ten years,” says literary agent Elina Ahlbäck, whose powerhouse of top authors includes a new generation of young female writers who are landing significant international deals. One of them is Emmi Itäranta, 38, whose recently released debut novel Memory of Water is a dystopian page-turner set in a futuristic Lapland, where China rules Scandinavia and water is a scarce commodity. Young Noria dreams of becoming a tea master like her father, but an authoritarian regime and a dangerous family secret threaten her future. Memory of Water has received rave reviews including a starred one from Publishers’ Weekly, nicknamed the “bible of the book biz.” Published in the US by Harper Voyager (part of HarperCollins, one of the world’s top English-language publishers), Memory of Water was given a first print run of 50,000 copies – high for a first-time Finnish author. THE BACKSTORY “I always look for something totally unique with international potential, whether it’s the characters, atmosphere or setting. And I saw that immediately in Emmi’s book, which was written in both Finnish

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FRANKFURT HIGHLIGHTS FINLAND IS the Guest of Honour at the world’s leading event for the publishing and media industries, the Frankfurt Book Fair, with 50 Finnish authors in attendance including Emmi Itäranta, Katja Kettu, Sofi Oksanen, Riikka Pulkkinen and Juha Itkonen, 38, whose fifth novel Hetken hohtava valo (“A Momentary Glow”) translated by Stefan Moster will be published this fall in German by Munich-based Droemer Knaur. Like many of Itkonen’s award-winning books, A Momentary Glow is set in different parts of the world. This intensely wise yet sensitive family saga, which traverses five decades and three generations, has a strong German connection. “I lived in Munich for a year with my family and actually wrote part of the book there,” says Itkonen, who speaks fluent German.

Itkonen was born in the ’70s, as were writers Sofi Oksanen, Katja Kettu and Emmi Itäranta. “I do think our generation is internationally-minded by default. Certainly the digital age has made a difference, but I think we also approach the world in a more openminded way where borders are less relevant than they were for our predecessors,” he says. Itkonen is rumoured to be one of the top 20 writers under 40 in Granta’s Best of Young Finnish Novelists (see textbox), which will be unveiled at the Frankfurt Book Fair. Frankfurt Book Fair October 8–12 BUCHMESSE.DE FINNLANDCOOL.FI

Emmi Itäranta

Juha Itkonen

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and English,” says Ahlbäck, who has sold translation rights to the title to 15 territories. Though Memory of Water was initially published in Finnish in early 2012 by independent publishing house Teos and won several domestic literary prizes, Itäranta, who has lived in the UK since 2007, had also written the book simultaneously in English. This was a huge asset as the manuscript could be shown to editors without acquiring a translation, which takes time and money. Several factors have given the Finnish book business an international boost in the last decade, according to Schwanck, who also credits an international stall of talented translators as being key. “The ability to sell foreign rights has improved in Finland greatly: to think poor Mika Waltari [his bestselling novel Sinuhe (The Egyptian) was published in 1945, topped American bestseller charts in 1949, and

MOOMINANNIVERSARY

ist and writer Tove In 1948 visual art by the Associated Jansson was asked mic strip. Her Press to create a co e Moomintrolls, th s, lovable creation one of the went on to become n cartoon characworld’s best-know ildren’s books and ters appearing in ch ntenar y of is year marks the ce animated films. Th with special ich will be marked Jansson’s birth, wh Fair and elsethe Frankfurt Book Moomin events at the Englished has just publish where. Penguin UK and Love by rk Wo : on Tove Janss language biography nally published the book was origi Tuula Karjalainen; i. in Finland by Tamm TOVE100.COM

was later made into a Hollywood film] handled selling the rights to his own books and made almost nothing on the Hollywood deal for Sinuhe! Other books were translated over the years, but I don’t believe it was a financially viable business,” says Schwanck. “Now, in 2011 and 2012 the increase of foreign rights sales was 60 per cent. We’re not speaking of billions of euros, but we are speaking of growth,” she says. BRAVE NEW WORLD Themes in Finnish literature have shifted from an inward-looking insular focus in the 1980s on the move from an agrarian to an industrial society and from country to city, says Schwanck, citing comic novelist Arto Paasilinna’s breakthrough in France 30 years ago. “Back then they had to come up with a term for Paasilinna’s writing – le roman écologique – the ecological novel – that type of categorization is no longer necessary, as Finnish fiction fits into the international cannon,” she says. Though the younger, under-40 generation is perhaps more global in their outlook, they have not forgotten the past. “History is a big, long-term trend,” says Riekki, who in addition to her role at Otava is active in the Finnish Book Publishers Association. “We have young writers such as Katja Kettu (The Midwife) and Sofi Oksanen (Purge and When Doves Disappeared) writing about the Second World War, the Cold War and the Civil War. It has been a popular topic in Finnish literature dating back to Väinö Linna’s The Unknown Soldier. Now there’s a new generation of young 30-something writers writing about it,” says Riekki. Purge is the story of two women forced to confront the horrors of the past against the backdrop of Sovietoccupied Estonia, while The Midwife is set in Second World War Lapland and charts the love affair between a local midwife and a Nazi SS officer. Sold into 14 different territories, The Midwife has sold more than 80,000 copies in Finland alone. While the Scandinavian crime fiction Nordic Noir boom represented by Swedish writer Stieg Larsson’s Millennium trilogy and others has not hurt, Finn Lit is in a category of its own. “As we are between two different cultures – East and West – we have a unique vantage point,” says Schwanck. “And the future looks very bright: it’s fabulous that Finnish literature has found an international readership.” WWW.FINLIT.FI WWW.AHLBACKAGENCY.COM WWW.OTAVA.FI OGA.OTAVA.FI

FINNAIR FLIES to Frankfurt twice daily.

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BOOKS IN NUMBERS in Finland

More than

20 million books are sold a year, which is about four books a person

Source: www.finlit.fi

New book titles published in 2012:

11,513

75

per cent of the population are classified as active readers

Consider it solved Finland's leading expert in building services will reach Your energy goals.

Total sales of trade books

â‚Ź173.8 million in 2012, net sales of textbooks

â‚Ź89.8

million when print and digital sales of textbooks combined


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MOOMIN WORLD IN NAANTALI FILLED WITH JOY THIS SUMMER, AS THREE COUPLES WERE MARRIED IN ONE BIG WEDDING CEREMONY. THE LUCKY COUPLES WERE WINNERS OF A SOCIAL MEDIA COMPETITION ORGANISED BY FINNAIR AND FLEW IN FROM JAPAN TO FINLAND TO SHARE THEIR SPECIAL DAY WITH THEIR FAVOURITE MOOMIN CHARACTERS.

L

TEXT BY LAURA IISALO

PHOTOS BY VUOKKO SALO

ast autumn Finnair decided to give three lucky couples in Japan the experience of a lifetime: Business Class flights to Finland and a summer wedding ceremony with the Moomins. The competition was

set up on Facebook and 40 couples applied by sending in videos and sharing their stories. Three couples were chosen, and one year later the celebrations took place at Moomin World in Naantali, Finland. Apart from being Moomin fans, each couple has a unique love story to tell.

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Kuniyasu and Rosa raise a toast with Moominmamma, Moominpappa and their wedding guests.

ADVENTURES IN YOKOHAMA Three years ago Japanese engineer Kuniyasu Takagi was on a two-year work assignment in Finland. He was renting a room from the owner of a Japanese restaurant Yasukon Keittiö in Turku and one evening the owner introduced him to a Finnish girl named Rosa Pirinen, who was having dinner with her sister. “I remember thinking that she was very cute and I was impressed that she could speak Japanese,” Kuniyasu says. The affection was mutual and Rosa agreed to meet Kuniyasu again. Their friendship quickly turned into a relationship but after his two-year commission Kuniyasu had to return home. He asked Rosa if she wanted to move to Japan, but insisted that she should finish her graphic design studies first. “That was Kuniyasu’s way of proposing,” Rosa laughs. 30 BLUE WINGS

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Rosa did as intended and after her graduation she moved to Japan in July 2013. “We got married almost straight away in September. Our wedding was a typical Japanese ceremony and I wore a kimono,” Rosa explains. Not all of her relatives could attend the wedding in Japan, however. “Taking part in the Moomin wedding was our way to celebrate with my family and show them how happy we are together,” Rosa says. The Japanese-Finnish couple now lives in Yokohama, the second largest city in Japan, and are expecting their first child in September. They are both drawn to the Moomin lifestyle. “One day we would like to build a house and live in a small village like the Moomins do. The Moomin characters are very adventurous and like to spend time in the mountains and the woods; just like us,” Rosa explains. The outdoorsy couple often goes on road cycling trips together. “Actually Kuniyasu is just like Snufkin; very philosophical and thoughtful. He is different to typical guys and because of that we have lots of interesting conversations,” Rosa says.


“TAKING PART WAS OUR WAY TO SHOW HOW HAPPY WE ARE TOGETHER.” SEPTEMBER 2014

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The couple with their favorite Moomin characters Thingumy and Bob.

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“WE WANT TO LIVE LONG TOGETHER AND STAY IN A GOOD RELATIONSHIP.”

MOOMIN ATTRACTION When Mami Hagiwara and Kyoumi Takahashi met 24 years ago, it was love at first sight, although it took them a while to realise this. Mami, who was working as an editor of a magazine, asked art graduate Kyoumi to do some illustrations for her. Soon after that the two women moved in together and they have been inseparable ever since. Japanese law doesn’t allow same-sex marriage but Mami and Kyoumi had been thinking of having a party to celebrate their life together. “Japan is a conservative country but even if we can’t get married, we would still like to have same rights so that we can take care of each other if something happens. Maybe eventually the law will change,” Kyoumi says. The Moomin wedding was an unexpected opportunity for the two women. “We never thought that this could actually happen. We couldn’t have done this on our own and that’s why we are so happy,” Mami says. To say that Mami is a Moomin fan is an understatement. She even has a blog devoted to the Moomins, which she has been writing for ten years. “Moomin characters are very cute and they all live happily together,” she explains. In the beginning Kyoumi thought that Mami was a little crazy with her Moomin obsession but she has grown to love the Moomins too. Now their house in Tokyo is crammed with books and mugs; anything with a Moomin character on it. “We could probably open a Moomin store if we wanted to. Once we had a TV crew come to film our Moomin-filled home. The Moomins bring a lot of happiness and fun into our lives,” she says. They even admit to wearing Moomin t-shirts most of the time. Mami and Kyoumi’s families couldn’t attend the wedding but some of their friends came from Japan to celebrate their big day. Following the ceremony the two women decided to stay a little longer. Mami and Kyoumi have visited Finland before but they wanted to spend 15 days exploring the country once more and to take part in the Helsinki Pride festival. After that the happy couple headed back home to continue their life together: “We just want to live long together and stay in a good relationship. That’s all,” says Mami.

Mami and Kyoumi wore matching Marimekko outfits and painted nails.

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IT WAS A VERY TOUCHING MOMENT WHEN CHIEKO TOLD NIKI ABOUT HER BREAST CANCER.

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Chieko and Niki currently live in Japan together and dream of having their own house.

FROM ILLNESS TO HAPPINESS

The 11th of March 2011 was a shocking day for Chieko Joukanen. In the morning she found out that she had breast cancer. After her visit to the doctor she went home and felt the earthquake that was shaking Japan. “I didn’t know if my life was going to continue so I decided then and there that I wanted to at least be useful and do something right,” she says. In April, after her surgery, Chieko decided to start offering Japanese lessons to foreigners. The first prospective student she met was Niki Joukanen. The Finnish man had just moved to Katsura to study the Japanese martial art kendo. Chieko didn’t know much about Finland but they started to educate one another. “Some things are different in Finland and Japan, but they are both quiet and peaceful cultures that appreciate living in harmony with the nature,” says Niki. Chieko and Niki became friends. Despite being in the middle of cancer treatment Chieko went out hiking and climbing mountains with Niki. There were times when she was ill with high fever but she never told Niki it was because she had cancer.

“I like taking photos but Chieko never wanted to be in them. I later learned it was because she was wearing a wig at the time,” Niki says. “One day I tried to get her to take off her hat for a photo and that’s when she told me everything. It was a very touching moment.” Niki’s original plan was to stay in Japan for one year. “Then came the time when I was supposed to go back to Finland but I just couldn’t leave because of her,” he says. Chieko told Niki that he should marry a healthy woman; Niki didn’t agree and stayed in Japan. “Niki has a pure heart,” Chieko says. Two years ago Niki and Chieko got married in Japan. Niki’s family couldn’t travel all the way to Japan and that’s why they decided to take part in the Moomin wedding. “I want to live long with Niki and I want his family to know how grateful I am for having him in my life,” Chieko says. Niki tells that they are currently trying to decide whether they stay in Japan or move to Finland. “In the future we would like to have our own house and to just have a stable, normal family life,” he says. l FINNAIR FLIES daily to Nagoya, Tokyo and Osaka. SEPTEMBER 2014

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THE MOOMIN WEDDING CELEBRATION is a collaboration between Finnair, Naantali Spa Hotel, Naantalin matkailu travel association and Moomin World. The wedding package includes flights, accommodation, makeup, hair, flowers, transportation and a wedding menu. MUUMIMAAILMA.FI/EN

WATCH THE MOOMIN Wedding Celebration video on Finnair’s YouTube channel. YOUTUBE.COM/FINNAIR

Find a selection of Moomin products at Finnairplusshop.com

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A MEMBER OF THE ADDTECH GROUP


TOP 5 URBAN DEVELOPMENTS IN THE UK

BATTERSEAPOWERSTATION.CO.UK

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FINNAIR FLIES to London Heathrow several times daily and to Manchester twice daily.

GETTYIMAGES

1

POWER AND THE GLORY Battersea Power Station on the south bank of the River Thames will see a major development that transforms the London landmark into a new vibrant district with a tube station, hotels, cafés, offices and 3,500 new homes by 2019. Originally opened in 1933, the coal-fired power station was designed by the architect responsible for the UK’s iconic red telephone boxes. It has also featured in Alfred Hitchcock and Beatles films and on an album cover for UK rock band Pink Floyd.


TOP

URBAN DEVELOPMENTS

REGENERATION ON A MASSIVE SCALE IS UNDERWAY IN THE UK’S MAJOR CITIES, ON LAND, WATER AND UNDERGROUND.

CROSSTRAIL

TEXT BY SIMON FRY

4

3

CITY SLICKERS Current Premiership champions Manchester City FC submitted plans for a football academy in 2011 to remediate up to 32 hectares of coal mining-contaminated land in east Manchester. When completed, it will provide new youth academy and first team training facilities, 16 football pitches, school and accommodation and a 7,000-capacity arena. Opening in autumn 2014, the academy will host youth team matches and Manchester City Women’s Football Club. Two hectares will also house a sixth form college and leisure centre. MCFC.CO.UK/THE-CLUB/ CITY-FOOTBALL-ACADEMY

MANCESTER CITY

CROSSRAIL.CO.UK

LIVERPOOLWATERS.CO.UK WIRRALWATERS.CO.UK CLYDE GATEWAY

2

TUNNEL VISION Eight gigantic tunnel boring machines with names like Phyllis, Ada and Ellie have been digging since 2009 to create 21 kilometres of tunnels and 10 new stations under central London as part of the £14.8 billion (€18.5 billion) Crossrail programme. Excavation has unearthed a 14th-century plague burial ground while a lift at Bond Street Station will allow Mayfair auction house Bonhams to receive vintage cars direct from Heathrow Airport. Crossrail, Europe’s largest infrastructure project, will provide easier travel across London when open in 2018.

ON THE WATERFRONTS Peel Waters is the collective name for two developments on either side of north-west England’s River Mersey: Liverpool Waters and Wirral Waters. Both will take around 30 years to realise with retail, office, leisure and residential developments centred on historic docklands. Liverpool Waters covers 60 hectares and requires £5.5bn (€6.9 billion) of investment. At 200 hectares, Wirral Waters is the UK’s largest regeneration opportunity. The plans also include the building of a 55-storey skyscraper named Shanghai Tower, which would become the tallest building in the UK outside of London.

5

BONNIE CLYDE “The 2014 Commonwealth Games’ impact will reach across Scotland but the epicentre is in the Clyde Gateway area,” says Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond. Glasgow’s bid for the games was the catalyst for the 20-year, £1.5bn (€1.9 billion) project, covering 800 hectares of land, of which almost half was vacant, derelict or contaminated six years ago. New homes, sports and community facilities, offices and factories, planned green spaces and improved transport links have been constructed with further legacy planned. CLYDEGATEWAY.COM

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EUROPEAN VOICES BY ALEXANDER STUBB

Smarter than you think

O

ver the summer Thompson talks of three major shifts: I read Canadian sciinfinite memory, dot connecting and ence and technology explosive publishing. We rarely record writer Clive Thompthings anymore - smartphones, hard son’s Smarter Than drives and memory sticks do it for us. The You Think: How Techtools make it easier for us to find connecnology is Changing tions between everything - pictures are Our Minds for the Bet- linked to events, people and news. They ter. It’s one of the best books I have read encourage more communication and about the connection between thought publishing. and technology. Blogs, chats, Twitter, Facebook and the Human beings are inherently conservlike have increased the flow of informaative. Our natural reaction is to fear the tion. People write more than ever before. new and unfaAnd we all know miliar. Much of that writing is one it has to do with of the best ways TECHNOLOGY IS GOOD our survival genes. of developing the Throughout hisbrain. It forces us FOR YOUR BRAIN. tory we had to be to articulate, to wary of dangers think. lurking behind the Google Glass, corner, or a tree, as the case might be. the wearable computer, is probably the Greek philosopher Socrates was scepmost striking example of how modern tical about writing. He thought it technology is changing the way we think. would kill the Greek tradition of It will allow us to wear spectacles that are oral debate and dialectics. The like a second brain. church feared the printing As the world flashes by, we wear our press would interfere with glasses (or contact lenses) and take notes its monopoly of interpreting effortlessly with a tiny keybord in our scripture. Today, authoritar- hand. We can record and search for inforian regimes are doing their mation effortlessly. Remember that meetbest to try to prevent the ing two years ago? No, I don’t either, but internet revolution. with a simple search I can recall what Thompson believes that happened. technology is changing the All of this might sound scary, but is it way we think. It pushes us really? I don’t think so. I think it sounds towards new forms of behav- exciting. We are getting a transactive iour, moving away from tramemory with the computer as our superditional ways of thinking and smart companion that expands our world. doing things. Technology has So, don’t reject the new. Embrace it. I actually produced new human am an immigrant to the world of inforintelligence - we learn more and mation technology. My children are digiretain information for longer. tal natives, they have grown up with techEvery new tool shapes the nology. It’s their way of communicating, way we think and what we their way of thinking. I, on the other hand, think about. The printed word am having a hard time keeping up, but I enlarged our stores of knowlshall do my best. Now where is my smartedge. Newspapers made the phone? l world smaller. The telegraph made it even smaller. Television brought it into our homes. The internet brought Alexander Stubb is the Prime Minister of it into our hands. Google Finland and tries to keep up with technological Glass will bring into our advances through his children. brains.

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We are using less raw materials, less water and less energy to make lighter papers – yet you get the same enjoyable reading experience. Renewable, recyclable and biodegradable paper is one of the few truly sustainable products of our time. On UPM paper, great ideas can really take off. Are you ready to go to new heights? Witness it first hand with www.upmpaper.com.

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YOUR SMART CHOICE


SMART BUSINESSES WITH GREEN ROOFS ROOF GARDENS ARE NOT JUST ABOUT PRETTY VIEWS, THEY HAVE SURPRISING BUSINESS BENEFITS INCLUDING BOOSTING EMPLOYEE SATISFACTION AND REDUCING ENERGY BILLS. TEXT AND PHOTOS BY AMANDA SOILA

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H

igh above the busy streets of London’s commercial districts unused roof spaces are getting a fresh start. A number of businesses are turning their rooftops into gardens in a groundbreaking scheme by inmidtown - the business improvement district that covers the central London boroughs of Bloomsbury, Holborn and St.Giles. With a goal of making the area London’s most sustainable commercial district, inmidtown has encour-


Left: Olswang’s plants grow in handy pocket habitats, ideal for rooftop conditions. Above: Gardening club members Jacob Gilkes, an associate in the tax group and legal personal assistant Alison Delaney tend to the garden during lunch hour. The garden is also home to 30,000 bees.

aged and helped local companies getting started with their gardens. “We have actively reached out to our businesses in the area and described the benefits that the green roof option could have on both their employees and the environment,” says Tass Mavrogordato, CEO of inmidtown. So far the scheme has been adopted by four major organisations in the area. Encompassing a total of 250 square metres of garden, two of the roofs produce fruits and vegetables, while the other two are used to grow wildflowers to support the local bee population. Part-funded by a £15,000 (about €19,000) grant from the Greater London Authority, the project is part of Mayor of London Boris Johnson’s ambition to “green” London’s grey spaces, increasing environmental and economic resilience and helping to ensure the city remains a great place in which to live, work, invest and visit.

LAW AND BEES The steady sound of midday traffic rumbles along High Holborn, but up on the roof of international law firm Olswang headquarters members of the gardening club spend their lunch hour looking after the lush garden that has become the company’s pride and joy. Olswang is one of the four companies involved in inmidtown’s green roof project, and with constant praise and the several notable awards it has won, the law firm’s garden is a real success story. With support from inmidtown, Olswang first started with beekeeping in 2011 and created a garden with wildflowers to provide a suitable environment for the bee population. Soon however, they expanded into growing vegetables and herbs too. “It’s been absolutely great” says Linda Zell, who is head of corporate responsibility. “A lot of an organisation’s environmental policy can feel remote when you sit in an office in London, so it has been fantastic to bring nature to the workplace.” SEPTEMBER 2014

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HAPPY WORKERS AND CURIOUS CLIENTS Currently Olswang’s garden and bees are tended by the 12 regular members of the firm’s gardening club, eight trained beekeepers and a number of occasional helpers from within the office. And while some passionate green thumbs come to water the plants even on their free time, the company encourages every employee to spend five per cent of work time on corporate responsibility activities, such as gardening. The gardening club members are not the only ones who get to enjoy Olswang’s green oasis; other employees regularly make their way to the garden and even hold client meetings there. Due to constant interest from curious clients, the company has started arranging weekly tours to the garden and the beehives.

POTENTIAL BENEFITS OF ROOF GARDENS

1 Reduces storm-water runoff as part of sustainable drainage systems

2

3

Increases roof lifespan

Reduces energy use

5 Lessens the urban heat island effect

6 Increases biodiversity

4 Helps with climate change

7

8

Improves air- and waterquality

Reduces sound transfer

Source: greenroofguide.co.uk

9 Creates amenity space

POTENTIAL SAVINGS Although green roofs are by no means a novel idea, the trend has definitely increased during the past few decades globally. The benefits of green roofs go far beyond enhancing city landscapes. A recent report by American NGO Green Roofs for Healthy Cities states that green infrastructure, such as green roofs, can directly reduce energy consumption in buildings used for heating and cooling by improving insulation and shading, while the improved air quality directly contributes to better health and well-being of employees. The report also notes, that “even seeing green infrastructure can result in healthier office workers, reducing absenteeism and improving bottom line productivity.” The definite positive effects of the garden have been noted by Olswang too. “The garden has been great for employee engagement” says Laura Davies, corporate responsibility executive. On a more tangible note, the garden herbs, edible flowers and salads are used in the company’s canteen and in the kitchen of the neighbouring Rosewood Hotel. Delicious business indeed!

FINNAIR FLIES to London Heathrow several times every day.

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TOP 3 SKYLINE GARDENS IN LONDON THE CLASSIC

A NEWCOMER

HIP AND HAPPENING

The grand old dame of the UK’s green roofs, The Roof Gardens above Kensington High Street are impressive not only for their age – 76 this year – but size too. Covering 6,000 square metres, the gardens consist of three themed gardens, over 70 full-size trees, a stream stocked with fish and four resident flamingos. The gardens were originally built above Derry and Tom’s department store between 1936 and 1938 and are still amongst the largest roof gardens in Europe. While the walls of the 6th floor block the view – and the sound of traffic – the Babylon Restaurant on the 7th floor boasts a spectacular view over the rooftops of London.

The South Bank - one of the busiest spots in all of London - has recently got a fresh dash of green to its concrete ranks. The Queen Elizabeth Hall Roof Garden is barely visible from the riverside below, but offers spectacular views over the nearby sights of the London Eye and Big Ben. Open to anybody free of charge until late night, the garden is still a surprisingly quiet spot. No wonder it has been dubbed as “the best kept secret in London”. Designed in 2012 by the Eden Project, the formerly concrete rooftop now grows a variety of vegetables and salads in tidy allotments, as well as fruit trees and wild flowers. A café-cum-bar run by Company of Cooks serves food and drinks, but you can also set out a picnic on the lush grass.

The North East London district of Dalston has in recent years risen from a fading suburb into a vibrant hub for creative folks. Amidst the grainy mix of council estates, bustling street markets and eccentric clubs, the Dalston Roof Park offers a rather different view over London. Created by the innovative Bootcamp Company - atop of their premises in a former factory building - the garden is as lively as the surrounding neighbourhood, hosting daily events from gigs to film screenings and urban yoga classes. Pop-up street food stalls round out the offering. For daytime visitors, there’s a café serving lunch, while a bar opens in the afternoon.

Perfect for: Take a break from shopping with a walk in the garden and a cocktail with a skyline view.

Perfect for: Mellow evening picnics watching the sun set behind the London skyline.

ROOFGARDENS.VIRGIN.COM

SOUTHBANKCENTRE.CO.UK

The Roof Gardens above Kensington High Street consists of three themed gardens and a rooftop restaurant.

Perfect for: Starlit screening of Wes Anderson films.

BOOTSTRAPCOMPANY.CO.UK

The Queen Elizabeth Hall Roof Garden is a quiet oasis above the busy Southbank Centre.


DELHI HAS ITS FAIR SHARE OF CLASSIC TOURIST ATTRACTIONS BUT MANY OF THE MOST REWARDING EXPERIENCES ARE LESS OBVIOUS.

DISCOVERING OFFBEAT DELHI TEXT AND PHOTOS BY TIM BIRD

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Rickshaw drivers are waiting for customers in Gurgaon, the business and finance city to the west of Delhi.

SEPTEMBER 2014

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H

allo sir, are you waiting for the cinema? Only I am thinking you will not be understanding anything because the film is dubbed in Hindi.” It was nice of the young man and his girlfriend to warn me, but it is too late, I have already bought my ticket for The Life of Pi at the Delite Diamond cinema in Delhi. The price: a mere 160 rupees (about 2.25 euros) for a reclining seat in Star Class. I have read the book on which the film is based,

HEAVENLY HAVENS

so the news of the language version doesn’t worry me too much. In any case, it’s worth the fee just to gaze, before the lights dim, at the ceiling, an ornately painted dome that’s worthy of a Moghul palace. Not even the baby crying in lowly Gold Class, or the loud mobile phone talk from the fellow in the next seat, spoil my bonhomie. BEYOND THE TOURIST TRACKS One needs to know that even in the most withdrawn corners of India’s capital a little anarchy is possible. Just getting around the city can turn into an urban adventure, involving exhilarating rickshaw rides and comical linguistic misunderstandings. The Red Fort, the India Gate, the Lotus Temple, the Jama Masjid mosque and Hamayun’s Tomb are classic attractions that make the challenges worthwhile. But it pays to look beyond the beaten tourist tracks and experience the different side of Delhi. With this mission in mind, I find myself opposite the Delite cinema again at 6 am the next morning. My appointment is with Jaspreet Singh Chawla, a guide with DelhiByCycle, which organises tours by bike along five different central Delhi routes. Mine will be the “classic recipe,”

Shanti Home: comfortable, stylish, friendly

There are enough top-flight business hotels and down-at-heel budget stays in Delhi, but appealing mid-range overnight options are multiplying. The Shanti Home, a comfortable and friendly boutique hotel in the Janakpuri district, is 30 minutes by metro from the central hub Connaught Place. Rooms with AC and fans and free WiFi are themed according to Indian regions. The menu at the rooftop Lantern restaurant includes excellent tandoori dishes. SHANTIHOME.COM

Atul and Sheetal are charming hosts at the Thikana guesthouse, ten minutes by rickshaw from Haus Kaz. Thikana is a stylish B&B, elegantly decorated, with a treetop view from the roof terrace. There is surely no calmer or more civilised base in Delhi. In the same neighbourhood is Serene, a B&B guesthouse providing similar comfort and shelter from Delhi’s urban calm and hosted by the gentlemanly Dhruv Puri. THIKANADELHI.COM SERENEDELHI.COM

For these and more options, get hold of author Fiona Caulfield’s Love Delhi guide; the insider’s guide par excellence. LOVETRAVELGUIDES.COM

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The sun rises over Old Delhi.


the Shah Jahan Tour, and I am joined by half a dozen adventurous souls from Germany and the UK. The early start means that we are eased gently into the gathering morning turmoil of the old city. Delhi’s traffic is notoriously chaotic, but as we weave through the honking rickshaws, wandering cows and buses a kind of spontaneous instinct takes over. “The only few, small accidents we have had are when cyclists try to use their cameras or phones while moving,” Jaspreet says. HIDDEN LABYRINTH Much of the route winds through the labyrinth of alleys and passages of Shahjahanabad, known as Old Delhi (not the Old Delhi), which was one of seven cities that merged to become modernday Delhi. The Shah Jahan tour is an eponymous tribute to the founder of this 17th century district, passing relics of once-handsome haveli mansions and sprawling mosques, inhaling the gingery steam of masala chai and dodging carts and barrows. Jaspreet stops the cycling convoy at strategic spots to explain local history and leads us to the rooftops above the wholesale chilli market where the peppery dust induces vigorous coughs and sneezes in tourists and workers alike. The tour finishes up at Karim’s Mughal restaurant, a Delhi institution, for a late breakfast of spicy mutton, dal and naan. The

cyclists share a gaze of slight disbelief at having cycled through the Delhi traffic. “Most middle class people in Delhi think that cycling is beneath them,” says Jaspreet. “But you’ve been through places tourists would never go through otherwise.” We cycle back to the Delite cinema and I jump in a rickshaw to New Delhi Station and my next appointment. Kailash Yadav from the Salaam Baalak Trust is there to take a group of tourists to a different part of the old quarter on a Street Kids Tour. Accompanying us is trainee guide Sam, a 17-year-old girl from Bangladesh whose tales of a broken home and unrealised dreams of big-city Delhi fame and fortune are typical of the at least 200,000 children who live on the capital’s streets. REAL DIVERSITY We drop in at a contact centre, a few rooms above a police station where children, mostly boys and aged up to 18, engage in reading and writing lessons and can even watch a donated TV, useful distractions from the skid row of drugs and petty crime that might otherwise await them. A doctor and nurse await young patients in a makeshift clinic: respiratory infections and stomach complaints are the most common ailments, the doctor reports. Miriam, a French volunteer, distributes crayons and oversees a drawing class at the Trust’s main centre. The boys know enough

Jaspreet Singh Chawla guides an early morning DelhiByCycle tour.

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Seventeenyear-old Sam came to Delhi from Bangladesh in search of a better life.

ONCE DIVIDED DELHI HAS EVOLVED INTO A SINGLE ENTITY, BUT THE DIFFERENT CHARACTERS OF DISTRICTS REMAIN DISTINCT.

basic English to explain that they come from different far-flung points of India, although many are from the poor state of Bihar in the north-east. “Children jump on a train to Delhi because they think some kind of Bollywood dream can come true here, or because they want to become engineers or professors, and to escape child abuse or family poverty,” says Kailash. “As many as 70 per cent end up addicted to drugs or glue.” This encounter with Delhi’s poor underbelly is a timely reminder of the range of wealth and fortune that exists in the capital. The Salaam Baalak Trust aims to demonstrate the variety of the city, to make visitors aware of its diversity rather than weigh them down with conscience. But invitations to volunteer or donate to the Trust’s good work attract a generous response. THE COOL SIDE The separate communities of the once divided Delhi have evolved into a single entity, but the different characters of districts remain distinct. The Delhi that I enter in the trendy Haus Kaz area in the south is quite different from the one I’ve been exploring so far. The well-swept suburbs of the south, with their welltended parks and gardens, feel like they could be in another country, never mind city, from the cacophonic jumble of Old Delhi. Haus Kaz is the best known of Delhi’s fashionable pockets but still surprises visitors with the variety of its restaurants and the off-beat style of its boutiques. Spilling into a maze of alleyways on either side of a single main street, Haus Kaz Village attracts designers and architects, artists and gourmets, as well as a more affluent class of shoppers snapping up retro suitcases at the Nappa Dori boutique or sampling portions of biryani at the Golconda Bowl. Even so, main courses at Zo’s, a favourite of the cool set, such as a late lunch of Moroccan-style chicken and couscous, still give change from 500 rupees (a little more than 6 euros). I descend to the basement of Mrs Kusum Jain’s Cottage of Arts and Jewels, established for 25 years, making it a veteran of the Haus Kaz scene. Mrs Jain sits camouflaged by a cornucopia of antique ornaments, Bollywood posters, jewellery, maps and clothing. Atmospheric backstreets of Old Delhi 50 BLUE WINGS

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LATE DATE AT THE GATE Later I visit Khan Market, centrally placed on the southern edge of the radial New Delhi plan devised by the architect Lutyens to stamp early 20th century


The 42-metre high India Gate commemorates Indian soldiers who lost their lives in the First World War.

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British authority on the Indian capital. Khan Market is Haus Kaz’s trendy cousin, brimming with bookshops, bars and restaurants as well as in-vogue shops such as Fabindia, stocking everything from dazzling saris and elegant men’s kurta shirts to organic teas and snacks. The shelves at Good Earth are ablaze with designer fabric motifs of tropical fruit, peacocks and poppies. Startled by the contrast between fashionable Haus Kaz and Khan Market and Old Delhi’s humbler energy, I head for a steadying reference point at which to end the exploration. I take the advice of Delhi businessman Ajay Puri and head for the heart of “Lutyens Delhi” and India Gate, the Delhi version of the Arc de Triomphe or Marble Arch. “You can still approach the gates of Rashtrapati Bhavan, the presidential palace, although it is a high security area, and then look back towards India Gate,” Ajay says. “It’s an amazing view, with the North and South Block (colonial government office buildings) on your left and right respectively, and the road down Raisina Hill towards India Gate passing through the lawns. Best go just before dusk. Then go on to the Gate, stroll in the lawns and buy an ice cream from one of the myriad carts lined up there – like a good Dilliwala or Delhi native.” l FINNAIR FLIES to Delhi three times every week.

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Being constantly connected is not as efficient as we think it is.

DETOX YOUR WORKING LIFE 52 BLUE WINGS

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MULTITASKING AND CONSTANTLY CHECKING EMAILS ARE COMMON WAYS TO COPE WITH THE EVER-INCREASING PACE OF WORKING LIFE. A FINNISH BUSINESS COACH QUESTIONS THESE POPULAR METHODS AND SAYS TRUE EFFICIENCY LIES IN OUR BIOLOGY.

I

TEXT BY KATI HEIKINHEIMO

PHOTO BY ISTOCK PHOTO

n developed societies we enjoy many benefits our ancestors could not have imagined and most of us can focus on issues beyond basic physiological survival. So how come so many of us are exhausted, unsatisfied or even depressed? Why does life seem so difficult? Because it is hard – tremendously hard – when you consider what the human body and brain are evolutionary adapted to, says Sampo Sammalisto, business coach and former gene researcher. “The modern way of living is strikingly different to what our bodies and brains have adapted to over millions of years. It is totally unnatural to remain stationary for most of the day, not to mention handling a constant flow of information and the continuous psychological stress caused by abstract, long-term projects,” says Sammalisto. A popular Finnish speaker, blogger and author, Sammalisto specialises in identifying, testing and coaching behaviours that alleviate the clash of our caveman genes with the environment we live in.

REGAINING CONTROL The world has changed, but our minds and bodies haven’t. How can we make this equation work for us?

“The feeling of autonomy is crucial for our wellbeing. Therefore, it helps to realise that in fact each of us has substantial control over how we work and live every day,” he says. In his work as a coach, Sammalisto brings it to a concrete level, suggesting new patterns for everyday activities ranging from email management and optimal use of mobile devices to nutrition, sleep and exercise. One of the common behaviours Sammalisto puts to question is multitasking. Many of us admit being addicted to it, jumping back and forth between tasks and having too many of them running parallel. Yet, it is a scientific fact that our brains are incapable of true multitasking. For example, it is physically impossible to read and listen at the same time. “What we actually do is switch-tasking. We move from one thing to another seemingly fast. However, this is extremely inefficient, since it takes quite a long time to refocus and recover the thoughts that preceded the interruption,” he says. According to New York-based knowledge economy research and consulting firm Basex, up to 30 per cent of our working time is lost in recovering from these transitions. Sammalisto suggests we can decrease this

SIMPLE TIPS FOR SOUND SLEEP If you had to single out one decision that has the most impact on wellbeing, what would it be, Sampo Sammalisto? “Prioritise sleep over most other things in life. Minimise the elements that lower the quality of sleep and maximise those that improve it.”

1

NO COFFEE AFTER LUNCH

This can have a major impact, since caffeine affects the quality of sleep. Even after 10 hours of coffee consumption there may be as much as 25 per cent caffeine left in your system.

2

OFF-SCREEN EVENINGS

Blue light emitting screens – LED TV, mobile phone, computer and tablet should be turned off at least two hours before bedtime. Blue light reduces the production of sleep hormone melatonin.

3

TAKE OUT THE BLUE

If watching television or writing a blog is your favourite way to relax, there is luckily a solution: special glasses that eliminate the blue component of light. Another option is the computer program f.lux that changes the display’s colour spectrum.

4

SKIP ALCOHOL

A night cap might help you to fall asleep, but it is good to know that even one glass will significantly decrease the regenerative quality of sleep.

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amount by planning and scheduling our activities and sticking to that schedule. BABY STEPS The biggest obstacles to improving our lives are our habits. It takes a lot of conviction to change our ways. Hence Sammalisto recommends taking small steps at a time. We might be inspired by testimonials of total life makeovers, but for most people, seemingly minor changes have the greatest impact. For those prone to change resistance, a noteworthy approach is to pilot the new behaviour. “I advise trying one new habit at a time for a four week trial period. Trying to change many habits at once leads to a two to ten times lower success rate. Also using aids like recurrent calendar reminders helps in the beginning,” Sammalisto says.

OUR BRAINS ARE INCAPABLE OF TRUE MULTITASKING

RETHINKING EMAIL Emailing has been an integral part of our work and private lives for more than a decade – of course we master the tool. Incorrect, says Sammalisto. The way most of us use it is extremely inefficient and consequently creates unnecessary stress. According to Sammalisto, email is not to be used as a real-time responsive chat. He only reads his messages twice a day at (calendar-booked) specific times. In between, the mail service is offline. Others learn quickly that if they really need to get their message across, they must call or text.l

IN HIS POPULAR BLOG and recently published book (Viisas pääsee vähemmällä, available in Finnish - the title roughly translates to “The wise work less”) and in his popular blog (viisaampaa­tyota.com), Sampo Sammalisto lists numerous ways to harness our caveman biology to survive and even thrive in modern working life.

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TESTING, TESTING Blue Wings’ Content Manager Kati Heikinheimo decided to put some of Sammalisto’s work-related tips into practice.

BETTER TIME MANAGEMENT On Monday morning, I do as Sammalisto recommends and start by opening my Outlook calendar. It’s not easy to go straight to the calendar function instead of opening the inbox - even for a little peek - but I succeed. I make a preliminary plan for the day and the week, meticulously reserving a time for each task in my calendar. Until now, most appointments have been meetings set by other people. This procedure allows me to feel more autonomous. During the day, when I notice a task takes longer than estimated, I move my blocks of time around so that the end result better reflects reality. This will also be a huge help when I fill in the monthly form that tracks how much time I spend on each of my projects. I also install RescueTime, an application that will track all activity on my work and home computers, as well as my mobile devices. Remarks after four-week pilot: I thought that I concentrate very intensively on one task at a time, but actually I often check my email, jump from one document or project to another, and glance at Facebook, for example. Having scheduled a certain time for a task forced me to stick to the plan and not wander. As well, I realised that I tended to underestimate the amount of time particular tasks require. No wonder it feels as though the days fly by - my expectation of how many tasks I should accomplish in one day has been unrealistic.


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*Access to preferred or pre-reserved seating is in accordance with the individual policy of the oneworld member airline operating the flight. First and business class check-in desks and lounges are not available at all airports. Fast track is not available at all airports. oneworld benefits are available only to passengers on scheduled flights that are both marketed and operated by a oneworld member airline (marketed means that there must be a oneworld member airline’s flight number on your ticket). airberlin, American Airlines, British Airways, Cathay Pacific, Finnair, Iberia, Japan Airlines, LAN, Malaysia Airlines, Qantas, Qatar Airways, Royal Jordanian, S7 Airlines, SriLankan Airlines, TAM Airlines and oneworld are trademarks of their respective companies. TAM Airlines (Paraguay) is currently not a part of oneworld. Some limitations and exceptions may apply. For more information, visit www.oneworld.com/benefits.

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EUROPEAN VOICES BY TIINA ROSENBERG

Bidding farewell to summer

I

n August, when many of our Ateneum covers her career extensively, friends in southern Europe are including, for example, her 1930s surrestill enjoying a holiday on the alist period and 1950s modernist era. It beach, we Finns have already also presents lesser-known gems such as returned to our offices. Sumher satirical anti-militarist illustrations in mer holds a special place in Northe magazine Garm and impressive pubdic hearts; although magical in its lic murals. sunny nights and delicate colours, I’m a long-time fan of Tove Jansson, it is also usually too short, and the weather and have a particular appreciation for is often unpredictable. By late August we the way in which she depicted her home are often experiencing the crispy mornisland, Klovharun, and its shifting atmosings of early autumn. phere throughout the seasons. The sea was But no matter one of her favourite the weather, the motifs, and depicFinnish summer is tions of her life on rich with culture, the island together particularly in its with her life partfestivals that give ner Tuulikki Pietilä IN SOME OF JANSSON’S a burst of energy hold a central role ISLAND PAINTINGS THE to various regions: in Jansson’s body of APPROACHING AUTUMN there is chamber work. music in Kuhmo, In some of JansFEELS ALMOST TANGIBLE. opera in Savonson’s island paintlinna, jazz in Pori, ings the approachdance in Kuopio, ing autumn feels theatre in Tamalmost tangible. pere, rock music There is no other in various parts of the country – and, season that reflects a sense of melanchoin late August, the jewel in the festilia and transience quite as poignantly as val crown, the Helsinki Festival (until the late summer and early autumn. This August 31), which offers a magnififeeling, which hits many of us around this cent line-up of circus, dance, music, time of year, is wonderfully captured in theatre, visual arts and children’s Tove Jansson and composer Erna Tauro’s programming in Helsinki. song “Höstvisan” (“Autumn Ballad”). In As we return from our summer the song, the speaker’s loved one is told to cottages to Finland’s urban cenhurry up: the days are getting shorter mintres, we also have the opportunity to ute by minute, and the blooming summer enjoy our museums. The Ateneum will soon be in the past. l Art Museum in Helsinki, for example, will wrap up a 100th annivertove100.com sary exhibition of Tove Jansson (1914-2001) on September 7th Tiina Rosenberg is the rector of the before it moves on to tour various University of the Arts in Helsinki for the locations in Japan through autumn 2013–2017 term, and currently on leave of of 2015. Jansson was internationabsence from her professorship at the ally known as the creator of the University of Stockholm. Her research has Moomins, but although these charfocused on feminist theatre, performance acters are extraordinary, she also cre- studies, feminist theory, gender and sexuality, ated a diverse and impressive array and critical theory. of other work. The exhibition at

58 BLUE WINGS

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a Sanoma Company

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ja voita matka kirjeenvaihtajakaupunkiimme.

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A portrait by Kim De Molenaer, a young Belgian photography talent who is one of the participating artists in this year’s Accessible Art Fair in Brussels.

M ISSION ACCESS IBLE INSTEAD OF FOOD, FASHION OR CARS, MANY CITIES NOW HOST FAIRS THAT EXHIBIT AND SELL CONTEMPORARY ART. WHAT’S BEHIND THIS GROWING PHENOMENON? TEXT BY ANU PIIPPO

60 BLUE WINGS

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ACCESSIBLE ART FAIR October 16 –19, 2014 Cercle de Lorraine (Place Poelaert 6, Brussels) ACCESSIBLEARTFAIR.COM

Jean-François Debongnie: DEBONGNIE.COM

Pedro Correa: PEDROCORREAPHOTO.COM

B

russels may bring to mind bureaucratic structures but the Belgian capital is also one of those cities where consuming and purchasing art have gained thoroughly new forms. Art has a high visibility around the city, as it is created in collaboration and bought directly from artists. Art is deeply ingrained in Belgium’s heritage. Western parts of the country were home to such artists as Jan van Eyck, Pieter Brueghel the Elder and Peter Paul Rubens. Post-independence masters included James Ensor, Paul Delvaux and René Magritte, the subject of a museum that opened in downtown Brussels five years ago. Moreover, comics, the “ninth art form,” have long had a strong status in the country. At least in the good times, Belgium has no shortage of purchasing power. Emperors, popes and affluent merchants have been indirectly replaced by EU institutions, which continuously attract new people to the city. Large companies such as beverage giant Anheuser-Busch InBev have set up offices in or near Brussels as well. Something has changed, however. Galleries are no longer the only meeting places for the artists and buyers. Art fairs, founded by artists or independent curators, are gaining a stronger foothold. They are helping to diminish art’s elitist image and lowering the threshold for purchasing artworks. REASONABLE LUXURY A hall at a luxury hotel on Brussels’ fanciest shopping street is bustling. Fifty artists have hung their artworks on the walls of their own individual booths. Members of the public are wandering around, stopping to study the works. The cheapest go for a few hundred euros, while the price ceiling has been set at 10,000 euros. The Accessible Art Fair was founded by Stephanie Manasseh, a Canadian-born arts curator, less than a decade ago. It has grown from a tiny exhibition of nine artists and 300 visitors to a 50-artist, 5000-visitor event.

“I created the Accessible Art Fair as I saw that there was a gap in the market,” she says. “Talented artists without gallery representation didn’t seem to have outlets in which to show their works to an art-buying public.” The Accessible Art Fair may offer reasonable prices, but its setting is deliberately prestigious. “I thought that by presenting the art in a luxury setting, I could make the luxury of buying art accessible,” says Manasseh. “As my mother is an artist, I grew up with art around me and it came to me that people like her and other artists needed a platform that brought the right kind of people, with the budgets and the inclination to buy art, to come to them,” she continues. During the first few years, Manasseh chose the artists herself, but as the event grew, she begun to rely on the help of a jury set up for this purpose. Many would-be exhibitioners have been left out of the event, as Manasseh is determined to keep it at a reasonable size. “I try to bring something new every year to maintain the public and media interest. This year our goal is to particularly introduce artists under 30. For the first time we’re including also young gallery owners in the event,” she explains. So what kind of public does the event attract? According to Manasseh, visitors range from homemakers to art collectors. The largest individual group consists of English-speaking expats, followed by Flemish (Dutch-speaking) Belgians. A MEANS TO SURVIVE The Accessible Art Fair is by no means one-of-a-kind. According to The Art Newspaper, one of the leading international publications in the field, there are at least 278 art fairs in the world. Large, established art fairs include New York’s Armory Show (thearmoryshow.com), ExpoChicago (expochicago.com), and Art Basel, which is held in Switzerland, Miami and Hong SEPTEMBER 2014

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Pedro Correa is known for his impressionistic photography. Jean-Francois Debongnie’s large canvases with floral themes will be seen at the fair this October.

ANNA-MARIA WILJANEN’S TOP 3 ART WORLD TRENDS

1 2

ALL EVENTS that include the public, such as photo sessions. INCLUDING the public in art marketing, such as It’s Time We MEt, a marketing campaign organised by New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art in 2009. The museum launched its first visitor-contributed photography-contest and a jury picked the best ones that were used in the museum’s marketing campaign. THE ARMORY SHOW, a fair staged each March since 1999 in a landmark Manhattan building.

3

Kong (www.artbasel.com). In the Nordic countries, a major event is Stockholm’s own Affordable Art Fair. “I don’t believe that it’s a matter of a passing phenomenon that was brought about by the economic recession,” says says Anna-Maria Wiljanen, executive director of Finland’s UPM-Kymmene Culture Foundation. “Art, like other phenomena, must renew itself. Bringing works to everybody’s reach and various kinds of audience participation are a life line for art,” continues Wiljanen. 62 BLUE WINGS

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The UPM-Kymmene Culture Foundation, established by UPM-Kymmene Oyj, is one of the most prominent art foundations in Finland. The task of the foundation is to raise awareness of the nearly 700 valuable artworks in its possession and to preserve the cultural heritage associated with the Finnish Forest Industry. There have been efforts to lower the threshold to buy and sell art by moving sales to the web. Moreover, various artists’ studios arrange regular open houses. The new marketing channels may affect what type of works sell best. Paintings and photos of the right size capture the attention of passersby, while two-dimensional and colourful objects sell well online. It is a different story, naturally, for installations, performance art and film which pose challenges for galleries. “They require visibility, and it’s often expensive to participate in art fairs. On the other hand, small galleries can have a presence at fairs through shared booths, for instance,” notes Wiljanen. Organising art fairs requires a lot of resources and cooperation. For instance the Brussels Accessible Art Fair gains marketing support and potential visitors through the American Express cardholder programme. “Networking has played an integral role in growing my business,” says Manasseh. “It’s important to establish a trusting relationship with our public so they feel they are buying art from the right place.” SALES AND CONTACTS Jean-François Debongnie and Pedro Correa will both be showing their works at the Brussels event the coming October. For Debongnie and other veterans, the Accessible Art Fair is just one channel to sell their art, while for newcomers such as Correa the event is a potential breakthrough.


Both share an international background. Belgianborn Debongnie lived and worked in Singapore for 20 years, while Correa, originally from Spain, moved to Brussels as a child with his family and eventually decided to stay in the city. Correa grew up with an artist mother and a teacher father. He first trained as an engineer, studying art alongside his day job. Gradually -The New York Times he became more and more fascinated with photograFebruary 2014 phy, eventually leaving his job. The world Correa portrays in his works is practically only a stone’s throw from his sales booth. “My central theme is the city,” he says. “It’s a universal concept, a place where millions of people live together. Sometimes you just have to look a bit further to see the beauty.” A novice artist rarely has a chance to present his or her art in a gallery. When Correa heard about the art fair from a friend who had sold all his works there, he was naturally interested and has now participated twice.

“THE ART FAIR MERRY-GO-ROUND KEEPS TURNING, AND FOR THE MOMENT AT LEAST, THERE’S NO SIGN OF IT SLOWING DOWN.”

The Accessible Art Fair offers reasonable prices, but its setting is deliberately prestigious.

News_Novosti_Yle_BlueWings_215x140_CMYK_v2.pdf 1 11.8.2014 12:34:22


“I like the feedback from the buyers,” says Correa. “Meeting them also affects my work, and which works I choose to show in an event and how I display them.” Debongnie has shown his large works, made with a technique adopted from calligraphy, at the fair several times. “I read about it in the paper after I’d just returned to Belgium. At that time all the other events were very small joint efforts with a few artists at most, and so I became interested in the Accessible Art Fair immediately. For an artist, this kind of event is great both economically and personally. Besides sales, attending it gives you new contacts,” he says. This is exactly where the event’s bonus lies. Unlike traditional gallery-type sales channels, the fair provides art sellers and buyers an opportunity to really meet. Artists have a chance to talk about their work process and ideas, while buyers learn about the background of the works. At best, seller and buyer form a personal bond. “I’m always excited about meeting people – after that I want to go back in the studio and paint,” says Debongnie.

USEFUL LINKS Listings of art fairs: ARTFAIRSINTERNATIONAL.COM ART-COLLECTING.COM

New York-based blogazines that cover art:

PHOTO PEDRO CORREA

ARTFCITY.COM HYPERALLERGIC.COM

ALL ABOUT THE ART “Museums used to stand for something old, dusty, boring and barely relevant to real life,” wrote Fiammetta Rocco in a December 2013 issue of The Economist. “Those kinds of places still exist, but there are far fewer of them, and the more successful ones have changed out of all recognition. The range they cover has broadened spectacularly and now goes well beyond traditional subjects such as art and artefacts, science and history. ...One of the biggest draws is contemporary art.” This is actually quite understandable. As The Economist points out, people now have more choices than ever as to how to spend their leisure time. The share of people going on to higher education has risen dramatically in recent decades in the affluent world, and in some developing countries, too. Even the younger generations can be lured into museums when electronic entertainment begins to lose its appeal. If museums are turning into places where you can learn and discuss – and have sleepovers, as at the British Museum – why couldn’t the same happen elsewhere in the art world, too? If you are willing to go see contemporary art at museums, perhaps you might be inclined to buy a reasonably-priced piece for your home? After all, the goal of the Accessible Art Fair is to put the artworks themselves into the spotlight. “Accessible means making art accessible to those who don’t feel comfortable going to galleries,” says Manasseh. “It means making it accessible to artists who don’t have gallery representation. It means making art accessible to all.” l FINNAIR FLIES to brussels several times every day.

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FISHY BUSINESS

IN BARBADOS

AT THE WILDLY POPULAR FRIDAY NIGHT FISH FRY IN THE TOWN OF OISTINS IN BARBADOS, THE SCENT OF GRILLED SEAFOOD USHERS IN THE ISLAND’S BEST PARTY. TEXT BY EEVA PUHAKAINEN

PHOTOS BY GETTY IMAGES

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The small fishing town is amazingly crowded on weekend evenings.

S

pending a week on the Caribbean island of Barbados in the Lesser Antilles, the mention of “Oistins on Friday” becomes impossible to avoid. It seems as if everyone from shopkeepers and waiters to taxi drivers calls out a cheerful “Will we meet at Oistins?” or “See you in Oistins!” as parting words. And indeed, the Oistins Fish Fry, beloved by locals and tourists alike, should be a recommended activity for everyone. The event, marked by freshly caught comfort food and upbeat music, takes place both Friday and Saturdays, with Friday known as the livelier of the two nights. Barbados is a small community. This means that no matter where you stay, the tiny fishing town of Oistins on the southern tip of the island is reachable either by taxi or local bus. The bus ride is an experience in itself: it’s not uncommon for the driver to be singing out loud to entertain the passengers, with or without assistance from the radio, or for the number of passengers to be twice the recommended capacity. The trip costs next to nothing: the fixed price of a bus ticket is two Barbados dollars (0.72 euros) no matter where and how far you are going. And you couldn’t go far, since the coastline of Barbados is 97 kilometres (60 miles) in total. Before stuffing yourself with seafood, a late afternoon swim comes recommended. Miami Beach,

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marked by its golden sand, is located just around the corner from the Oistins Fish Fry field. Those who arrive early will also get the opportunity to spot local fishing boats and fishermen weaving their nets. DANCE IN THE MOONLIGHT By sunset the party begins and the queues to vendors selling grilled and fried tuna, swordfish and other local treats grow longer. Considering the population of Oistins itself – only about 2,000 – the size of these crowds is amazing. There are vendors everywhere as well as locals and tourists, families and groups of friends huddled around hundreds of long tables. Everyone is welcome: one can spot unruly dreadlocks, mothers carrying infants and retirees enjoying the atmosphere. There is no dresscode, but wearing comfortable (read: good for dancing) shoes comes highly recommended. Beyond food, the Fish Fry in Oistins is about music. While the band plays traditional Caribbean music on one side of the huge, open square, two DJs spin tunes on the other. Here you are more likely to hear gangsta rap-inspired tunes than the island’s own girl, Rihanna. No matter what music you choose to groove to, you will soon realise that carrying on an audible conversation is a mission impossible in the later hours: so you might as well dance with a glass of rum punch or a local lager in your hand.


TOURISTS AND LOCALS LOVE OISTINS. That is, if you are not busy scarfing down on fried seafood treats. The portions of catch of the day, fresh grilled fish or seafood, are enormous. They are usually served in Styrofoam boxes and paired with grilled potatoes or sweet potatoes, salad, macaroni pie and homemade sauces. The food is cooked in a woodburning grill and the aroma floating over the square is mouthwatering. The recipes are closely guarded secrets: vendors are not likely to reveal their combinations of spices or recipes for side dishes either. On the other side of Maxwell Coast Road, which marks the boundary of the fish fry area, a local Kentucky Fried Chicken stands alone in the darkness, filled with bright, industrial light and nothing else: there is not a single patron inside. Meanwhile, dancers at the fish fry are returning to the grills for second helpings. l

Prawns on skewers are grilled at Oistins famous Fish Fry.

BARBADOS FACTS ⋅P  opulation of 287,000 ⋅ Covers an area of 430 square kilometres (166 square miles). ⋅S  ituated about 168 kilometres (104 miles) east of the islands of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, and 400 kilometres (250 miles) northeast of Trinidad and Tobago. ⋅ The town of Oistins is situated in the parish of Christ Church on the southern coast of island.

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THIS MONTH AROUND THE WORLD WHERE TO GO, WHAT TO DO AND SEE COMPILED AND WRITTEN BY MIRVA LEMPIÄINEN

Queensland ballet The American Ballet Theatre is currently performing in Australia for the first time in its 75-year history. There will be a total of 13 performances of “Swan Lake” and “Three Masterpieces” at the Queensland Performing Arts Centre in Brisbane. The season also includes side events, such as film screenings and dance classes. Until September 7 QPAC.COM.AU/ AMERICANBALLETTHEATRE

New fruit trends

Alternative festival

Nordic food

Green matters take centre stage at the Asia Fruit Logistica, a fresh produce trade show in Hong Kong attracting more than 370 exhibitors. Last year’s fair was attended by 6,500 global industry decision-makers. The most successful produce businesses are given Asia Fruit Awards on Sept. 2 at the Asiafruit Congress, the partner event of Asia Fruit Logistica.

The 10th annual Transylvania Calling takes 2,000 international festival-goers on a psychedelic musical journey in the wild mountains of Romania. During the week more than 100 international artists will perform on the Main Dancefloor Lunar Stage, and there will be workshops, DJs, games, movies, art and cultural interaction.

Fresh Scandinavian flavours were a big hit last year at the first ever North Food Festival in New York. This year’s rematch brings even more Nordic chefs to NYC, including Sasu Laukkonen and Sami Tallberg of Finland. On the agenda are cooking classes, a Nordic street food fair, a hot dog creating championship and a Faroe Islands style dinner.

September 3–5 ASIAFRUITLOGISTICA.COM/EN

September 8–15 TRANSYLVANIA-CALLING.COM

September 12–20 NORTHFOODFESTIVAL.COM

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THIS MONTH AROUND THE WORLD

MVPHOTOS

African tourism

Gorilla Run

Global business leaders and top African hoteliers discuss the future of the African tourism industry at the 8th Annual Hotel Investment Conference Africa. The more than 60 conference speakers in South Africa’s Johannesburg include Zimbabwe’s Minister of Tourism Walter Mzembi, Andre Pottas of Deloitte and Arthur Gillis of the Marriott group.

London becomes a playground for hundreds of mountain gorillas – or at least people dressed as the furry endangered animals. The 11th Great Gorilla Run raises funds for biodiversity conservation projects in Africa. Only 800 people are permitted to participate in the 8 km race to symbolise the 800 mountain gorillas left in the wild.

September 14–16 HICA.CO.ZA

September 20 GREATGORILLARUN.ORG

ISTOCKPHOTO

Peace Day

Moon viewing

September 21 has been the United Nations’ International Day of Peace since 1981. This year’s theme is “The Right of Peoples to Peace,” as 2014 marks the 30th anniversary of the General Assembly’s peace declaration that is still timely today. Argentina celebrates with a poetry contest while Italy organises sports competitions and Nigeria recognises peace-loving citizens.

Since ancient times, Japanese people have gathered on the banks of Kyoto’s Osawa Pond every autumn to observe the harvest-season full moon. Dragon-headed boats with their onboard tea ceremonies float on the water at dusk and flute music fills the air. A Harvest Moon Festival concert takes place at the pond’s Daikaku-ji temple, which dates back 1,200 years.

September 21 UPF.ORG/UNITED-NATIONS/ PEACE-DAY

September 22–24 KYOTOGUIDE.COM/VER2/ THISMONTH/MOON10.HTML

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SLOW TRAVEL THE BASQUE WAY THE TINY ENCLAVE OF THE BASQUE COUNTRY SANDWICHED BETWEEN SPAIN AND FRANCE IS FAMOUS FOR THE IMPRESSIVE GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM IN THE REGION’S BIGGEST CITY BILBAO. BUT NATURAL WONDERS, AN ANCIENT LANGUAGE AND UNIQUE CULTURE WITH TRADITIONAL GASTRONOMIC DELIGHTS CREATE ONE OF EUROPE’S TOP SLOW-TRAVEL DESTINATIONS.

L

TEXT BY PETE BALDING

ike the close-to-home concept of slow food, slow travel encourages living as the locals do even if you are thousands of kilometres from home. Take a local bus or train, or rent a car or bike. Spend more time in the smaller regions. Get a feeling for the place, its history, its culture, its flora and fauna. Walk in nature. Sample the local fare. Ask questions and show inter-

PHOTOS BY HERNAN PATIÑO

est. Do these things, slow-travel advocates claim, and you will have a far more enjoyable and memorable journey. Europe in general is ideal for the slow traveller with its abundance of fascinating places, well-maintained services, and extensive infrastructure, but few places compare to the Basque Country where a lot is packed into a very small space. The Basque Autonomous Community of Spain has well-kept urban centres with flourishing industries, bucolic countryside, expansive nature preserves, and a well-educated, multilingual population (a lot speak Basque and Spanish and many have a third or fourth language, too) in an area one tenth the size of Scotland. A DELICIOUS LITTLE PROTEST Sometimes a simple food or dish can be an entryway into a whole culture like haggis is for Scotland. In the Basque Country this honour falls on the pintxo, a popular bar snack similar to Spanish tapas.

Traditional pintxos are a popular bar snack. 72 BLUE WINGS

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Stunning mountainsides at Urkiola Natural Park. SEPTEMBER 2014

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THE LANGUAGE IS SO ANCIENT THAT IT HAS NO SURVIVING LINGUISTIC RELATIVES.

Ondarroa is just one of the many picturesque towns on the Basque coast.

THE BASQUE COUNTRY FACTS NAME IN BASQUE: Euskadi NAME IN SPANISH: País Vasco AREA: 7,234.8 km² POPULATION (2013): 2,178,949 OFFICIAL LANGUAGES: Basque and Spanish CAPITAL: Vitoria-Gasteiz GDP per capita in euros (2012): 29,460 Only one country in the EU, Luxembourg, has a higher PPP (Purchasing Power Parity) than the Basque Autonomous Community. In recent years the community has consistently outperformed the rest of Spain economically thanks to its highly developed industry which accounts for 24% of GDP. Source: en.eustat.es

The dramatic Bodegas Ysios winery near Laguardia.

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Gilda, a classic but simple pintxo, is a tasty snack of peppers, olives, and anchovies. “It was named after the [1946] Hollywood film starring Rita Hayworth,” says local guide Esther Vázquez. And eating it is a delicious little protest since the movie about a voluptuous femme fatale was banned as too risqué in Franco’s Spain. Franco was particularly hard on the independent-minded Basques. Just 40 years ago his regime still restricted the use of the Basque language, a language so ancient that it has no surviving linguistic relatives. Gilda is just one of the many pintxos offered in the Basque bars. Locals stop by for an after-work glass of fresh txakoli sparkling wine with family and friends and enjoy the snacks held together with a toothpick. Thus the name: pintxo means thorn or spike. More exotic varieties are available too, with young chefs creating new pintxos with unexpected ingredients like sea urchins. The famous Basque Country wine region of Rioja Alavesa produces some of the highest quality wines in the world. With 50 plus wineries and over three


TIPS FOR THE SLOW TRAVELLER HOTEL GAMETXO: This charming rural hotel in Ibarrangelu is close to the popular Laida and Laga beaches and the incredible 10th century hermitage at Gaztelugatxe which sits precariously on a narrow rocky peninsula. INFO@HOTELGAMETXO

HOTEL ARBE: This modern seaside hotel near the gorgeous village of Mutriku and the Flysch Geopark offers an incredible sea-view breakfast of freshly baked bread and pastries with homemade preserves. HOTELARBE.COM

PARADORS ARGOMANIZ AND HONDARRIBIA: There are two paradors (luxury hotels located in renovated medieval castles and monasteries) in the Basque Country. Argomaniz is near the southern Basque city of Vitoria-Gasteiz and the Rioja Alavesa wine region. Hondarribia is near the French border and the seaside city of Donostia-San Sebastian. WWW.PARADOR.ES/EN

HOTEL VIURA: This avant-garde hotel in Villabuena de Álava is near Laguardia and is a great base for exploring the La Rioja Wine Route.

CASA RURAL ETXEGORRI DE OROZKO: This sturdy stone rural house offers authentically rustic yet very comfortable accommodation at the entrance to Gorbeia Natural Park. ETXEGORRI.ORG

LA CEPA: Do as the locals do and try the Gilda pintxo and a glass of txakoli at this popular bar in Donostia-San Sebastian. BARLACEPA.COM

RESTAURANT GANDARIAS: Reserve a table at this popular restaurant in Donostia-San Sebastian which is famous for its traditional Basque dishes. RESTAURANTEGANDARIAS.COM

RESTAURANT PERRETXICO: The city of Vitoria-Gazteiz is famous for its fine dining, too. Experience the cuttingedge cuisine of Chef Josean Merino at this foodie-friendly restaurant. PERRETXICO.ES

HOTELVIURA.COM

The Hospedería de los Parajes boutique hotel in Laguardia is simply divine.

Pintxos cover the bar at La Cepa in Donostia – San Sebastian.

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Climbers rappel from the clifftop near Laga beach.

FIFTY MILLION YEARS OF EARTH’S HISTORY IS LAID OUT LIKE PAGES IN A BOOK.

thousand hectares of vineyards to meander through, the La Rioja Wine Route gives plenty of opportunities to sample the award-winning Crianza and Reserva wines. Picturesque villages like Laguardia, whose ancient streets are built on top of a labyrinth of wine cellars, offer fine dining and accommodation. The Basques have a well-earned reputation as brilliant seafarers, so seafood is prominent on many menus while locally-raised livestock and produce from small, family-owned farms, caserios, ensure the highest quality ingredients for the most discerning slow-food gastronome. Milk from the latxa sheep, a small Basque breed, is used to produce the renowned 76 BLUE WINGS

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Idiazabal cheese. The reputation for good Basque food has not gone unnoticed with more than 25 Michelin star restaurants in this relatively small region. NATURAL HISTORY WONDERS The striking beauty of the Basque coast on the Bay of Biscay with its near vertical layers of sedimentary rock known as flysch is one of the great natural wonders of the world. The area around the towns of Zumaia, Deba and Mutriku form the 89-square-kilometre UNESCO Geopark. Besides being a sight to behold, the flysch contains: “Fifty million years of Earth’s history is laid out like pages in a book,” says Geopark scientific director Asier Hilario. Through studying the formations and the fossils they contain, he explains, scientists find hard evidence of previous mass extinctions, major changes in sea levels, and drastic climate change. It’s invaluable information that can have a huge impact on our understanding of the Earth’s future and our survival as a species. THE HIGH COUNTRY From the Basque coast rise the mighty Pyrenees and its surrounding ranges. The Basque Country has two natural parks nestled in the highlands that will entice the casual hiker and challenge the serious climber.


Gorbeia Natural Park, established in 1984, takes its name from the 1,482-metre mountain at its centre. Gorbeia is steeped in local mythology and the summit was a traditional meeting place called a montes bocineros. Except for a few small villages, the area is mostly uninhabited but contains some Casas Rurales or rural houses that offer accommodation. The nearby Urkiola Natural Park is a popular hiking and climbing destination with several marked trails and some dramatic peaks that rise abruptly from the valley floor. On sunny weekends and holidays many families visit from the nearby cities of VitoriaGazteiz and Durango to have picnics surrounded by the spectacular scenery. While slow travel is compatible with the ethos of ecotourism and attractive to the frugal traveller, the main goal is not to save the environment or to save money; instead it is to savour the unique local culture and cuisine in a deeper and more responsible way. And once the Basque Country gets deep under your skin the memories of this amazing little corner of Europe will last a long, long time. l

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ECONOMIC STRUCTURE Employed persons by industry, 2nd quarter 2014

FINLAND IN FIGURES

MANUFACTURING Food prod. and textiles 14%

Construction  and energy Miscellaneous services

FOREIGN TRADE 2013 EXPORTS BY PRODUCTS BY ACTIVITY: 55,903 MEUR (per cent of total)

14%

34%

20%

Forest industry prod

Other manufactured goods 22%

8%

25%

Chemical ind prod

11%

Electric and electronics

Agriculture

4%

16%

Other industries

IMPORTS BY USE IN 2013: 58,168 MEUR (per cent of total)

Energy Capital goods

Metal and engineering products 48%

Trade and hotel

Transport and communications

MONTHLY TEMPERATURES AND RAINFALL IN HELSINKI 2013 MEAN MAX MIN RAINFALL AVERAGE 1981-2010

Intermediate goods

Financial and business services

16%

10%

13%

Machinery and equipment

Forest products 15%

14%

14%

Metals and metal products

Manufacturing

0

C 0 C 0 C mm

I

II

III

IV

V

VI

VII VIII

IX

X

XI

XII

52

36

38

32

37

57

63

56

76

70

58

-4,9 -1,8 -5,2 3,1 12,6 17,5 18,1 17,2 12,6 7,5 4,7 2,3 3,3 6,0 4,3 12,9 22,6 28,6 25,6 25,5 20,3 14,4 9,4 7,8 -22,6 -9,4 -18,4 -5,9 2,1 9,0 11,3 8,6 0,3 -3,1 -7,0 -10,3 80

Non-durable goods Durable consumer goods 0%

5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35%

EXPORTS AND IMPORTS (MEUR) TOTAL 2013 SWEDEN GERMANY RUSSIA USA NETHERLANDS CHINA GREAT BRITTAIN FRANCE

EXPORTS

55,903 6,477 5,411 5,354 3,559 3,463 3,170 2,898 1,767

IMPORTS

58,168 6,656 7,323 10,519 1,959 3,348 3,737 1,836 1,915

POPULATION 5.5 mil­lion, giv­ing an av­er­age den­sity of 18 people per sq. km of land area; an­nu­al ­growth ­rate 0.5%­ Life ex­pec­tan­cy: men 77.8 and women 83.8 years. As in most oth­er in­dus­tri­al coun­tries, t­ he middle-aged ­groups predominate. Av­er­age house­hold s­ ize: 2.1 persons. 54% of the households ­live in single-family hous­es; 44% in apart­ment b ­ locks. 85% are urban-dwellers, ­with 1 mil­lion in the Hel­sin­ki Area, which includes Es­poo and Vantaa.

Oth­er ma­jor cit­ies in Finland in­clude Tam­pere, Tur­ku, Ou­lu and Jyväskylä. Languages: 89.3% ­speak Finn­ish; 5.3% Swedish. Religion: 75% are Lu­ther­an; 1% Orthodox. Education: 81% of the pop­ul­a­ tion aged 25 to 64 ­have com­ plet­ed upper secondary or tertiary ed­u­ca­tion and 37% (the highest percentage in the EU countries) ­have uni­ver­sity or other tertiary qualifications.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON CURRENT TRENDS IN FINLAND, SEE:

80 BLUE WINGS

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AREA 390,920 sq. kil­o­me­tres or 150,900 sq. m ­ iles, of ­which 9% is fresh water; land area is 303, 909 ­sq. kil­o­me­tres or 117,337 sq. miles. There are 188,000 lakes. 6% of the l­and is ­under cul­ti­va­tion, ­with bar­ley and ­oats the ­main crops. Fo­rests (main­ly ­pine and ­spruce) cov­er 68% of the country. GOVERNMENT Sove­reign par­lia­men­tary re­pub­lic ­since 1917. From 1809– 1917, au­ton­om ­ ous G ­ rand D ­ uchy with­in the Rus­sian Em­pire; be­fore ­that ­part of the King­dom of Swe­den for centuries. The pres­i­dent is elect­ed eve­r y six years. The new president of Finland, Sauli Niinistö took office in March 2012. The 200 mem­bers of Par­lia­ment are elect­ed for fouryear terms. Finland has been a member of the European Union since January 1995. WORKING LIFE 80% of wom­en aged 25–54 are employed outside the home. Av­er­age month­ly earn­ings, 1st

quarter 2014: men 3,593 euros; women 2,976 euros. Un­em­ploy­ment ­rate 9.2%, in June 2014 according to Labour Force Survey. ECONOMY GDP 2013: 193 billion euros, the annual change in volume -1.4%. Annual inflation rate as of February 2014: 0.9%. Currency: Euro.

GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT PER CAPITA 2013* (EUR)

Nominal

Adjusted for Purchasing Power Standard

NORWAY 75,900 49,200 DENMARK 44,400 32,100 SWEDEN 43,800 32,700 USA 40,000 39,900 FINLAND 35,600 28,700 GERMANY 33,300 32,000 FRANCE 31,300 27,800 UK 29,600 27,200 EU27 25,900 25,800

Eurostat

Source: Statistics Finland

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FINNAIR INFO HOW TO USE THE AUTOMATED BORDER CONTROL GATES

Place your passport with the info page face down on the reader. Please wait while your passport is being read for biographical and biometric data. When the scan is complete, the gate will open.

日本人で、ICパスポート(※)をお持ちの方 は、2012年5月から試験的に、出入国審査場において 自動化ゲートをご利用頂けます。 ヘルシンキ空港のシェンゲンエリアから、日本に向 けて出国される際にお使い頂くことが可能です。 まず、パスポートの顔写真ページを読み取ります。 該当ページを開き、読み取り機に向けて置いてくだ さい。 こちらで個人情報と生体認証データを読み取ります。

Enter through the gate and turn right. Please remove your possible backpack and stand on the footprints on the floor. Remove your glasses and hat. Stand still and look directly at the screen keeping your face visible. The camera will compare your facial image with the biometric feature scanned from your passport. Wait until the second gate opens. The border check for EU, EEA, and Swiss nationals is completed when the gate opens. Third country nationals must now move towards the border guard, who will check your entry stamp and mark your passport with an exit stamp.

Smooth crossings

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二番目のゲートが開いたら、出入国審査官のカウン ターにお進み下さい。パスポートの入国スタンプを 確認した後、出国スタンプを押印致します。 ご協力頂きまして有難うございます。 ※ ICパスポートとは、2006年3月20日から申請受付 を開始したIC旅券、つまり冊子中央にICチップ及び 通信を行うための。 アンテナを格納したカードが組み込まれているバイ オメトリック・パスポートのことです。

www.finnair.com/jp

대한민국 전자여권을 소지한 승객께서는 유럽에서 한국으로 입국 시, 헬싱키 공항에서 자동출국심사 서비스를 이용 하실 수 있습니다.

Have a nice journey!

ARRIVING AND DEPARTING passengers at Helsinki Airport can use the 30 automated border control gates. Fifteen of these are located in the departure hall. The Finnish Border Guard’s automated border control helps serve growing passenger volumes at Helsinki Airport. EU, EEA and Swiss nationals with biometric passports can take advantage of the automated border control gates. Third country nationals, who

ゲートが開いたら中に入り、右を向いてください。 カメラで顔認証を行い、パスポートの顔写真と照 合します。

are exempt from the visa requirement and hold a biometric passport, may also use the automated border control upon departure. The service is available for Canadian, Japanese, South Korean and U.S. citizens. The automated border control is monitored by a border guard ensuring secure border crossings. Please note that passengers travelling with an infant, baggage trolley or wheelchair must use the manual border control line.

우선, 전자여권의 사진 페이지를 인식장치에 올려주시기를 바랍니다. 이 과정에서 여권정보가 시스템에 자동 인식됩니다. 첫 번째 게이트가 열리면 안으로 들어가 오른쪽에 위치한 카메라로 안면인증을 거치게 됩니다. 이후 마지막 게이트에서 출입국관리 직원의 출국확인도장을 받으시면 됩니다. 보다 간편하고 빠른 본 자동시스템의 많은 이용 바랍니다. 대한민국 전자여권은? 2008년 8월 25일 이후 발급된 여권으로 표지 하단부에 전자칩과 안테나가 내장 되어 있는 여권입니다.

www.finnair.com/KR


FINNAIR INFO BEFORE THE FLIGHT

BEFORE DEPARTURE

Speed up your takeoff! CHECKING IN TO your Finnair flight is quick and easy. You can save time and reduce hassle by checking in at a self-service kiosk at the airport, online 36 hours before departure or by text message. Find out more about our check-in services at WWW.FINNAIR.COM. IN CASE A FLIGHT IS DELAYED OR CANCELLED, Finnair will make every effort to keep you informed via SMS or e-mail. Please make sure that you have provided Finnair with up-to-date contact details. Find out more information on flight disruptions at FINNAIR.COM/FLIGHTINFO.

Finnair in a nutshell • FINNAIR IS NUMBER ONE in air traffic between Northern Europe and Asia. • IN 2013, Finnair carried 9.3 million passengers.

Feeling hungry? FINNAIR OFFERS Economy Class customers on European scheduled flights the option to select and pre-order a meal to enjoy onboard. Choose from five delicious options: a fresh salad with smoked salmon, an all-day breakfast enchilada, beef burgundy, pasta bolognese and chicken korma with rice. The price of each meal is ten euros when purchased online. Go to WWW.FINNAIR.COM and select “My Booking” latest 72 hours before your flight. Choose a meal, and pay using a credit card. You will get a confirmation email and an EMD receipt. The pre-order meal is an optional, chargeable service available for Economy Class customers travelling on scheduled short-haul flights operated by Finnair and on AY2000-series flights operated by Flybe, with the following exceptions: flights within Finland, to/from Baltic countries, to/from Stockholm, to/from St Petersburg, to/from Dubai and Madrid-Helsinki return flights.

• CLOSE TO ONE AND A HALF MILLION passengers fly between Asia and Europe via Helsinki each year. • IN 2013, THE NUMBER OF PASSENGERS on scheduled flights totalled 8.5 million. Domestic travel accounted for 1.6 million passengers. Passenger total on leisure flights was nearly 768,000. • IN 2013, FINNAIR TRANSPORTED more than 146,000 tonnes of cargo. • ESTABLISHED IN 1923, Finnair is one of the world’s oldest operating airlines. • FINNAIR’S ROUTE NETWORK includes more than 50 international destinations.

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FINNAIR INFO DURING THE FLIGHT

IN THE AIR

Welcome aboard! SAFETY

PERKS FOR KIDS

• Safety information is presented by the cabin crew at the start of each flight. This information is also listed on the safety instruction card in your seat pocket.

• Children are offered puzzles or colouring books on intercontinental scheduled flights and leisure flights.

• Safety belts must remain fastened when the “Fasten safety belt” sign is on. For safety reasons we recommend keeping them fastened even when the sign has been switched off. • Passengers may use MP3, CD or DVD players as well as laptop computers when the “Fasten safety belt” sign is off.

• Music and video entertainment is available on intercontinental scheduled flights and leisure flights. • On the Airbus A340-300 and Airbus A330-300 aircraft, games are available as part of the personal entertainment system. MEALS • Meals or snacks are served on most international flights. Pre-order meals are available for Economy Class passengers on most European flights. • Complimentary non-alcoholic beverages are available on scheduled flights.

ENTERTAINMENT • Inflight entertainment on intercontinental scheduled flights and leisure flights includes music, movies and an Airshow programme, which allows passengers to track their flight on a map. • On scheduled flights, headphones are available free of charge. On leisure flights, the entertainment fee includes headphones.

• Alcoholic drinks are for sale in Economy Class on European scheduled flights, except on routes to and from Riga, St. Petersburg, Stockholm and Tallinn. • In Economy Class on intercontinental scheduled flights we serve a hot meal with complimentary wine and beer. • On European and intercontinental scheduled flights, coffee, tea, juice and soft drinks are complimentary. • In Business Class all drinks are free of charge. On leisure flights, there is a charge for all beverages. • On flights to and from northern Finland, alcoholic beverages are sold after 9 am.

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Inflight shopping • You may order products in advance from our large and affordable pre-order assortment at www.finnairshop.com. On most flights we also have onboard sales items. The selection varies by route. • Tax-free products, alcohol and tobacco are sold on aircraft flying to and from destinations outside the European Union. These include all intercontinental flights, as well as Ekaterinburg, Geneva, Moscow and Zurich. On flights within the EU, products are affordable but not tax-free. • Due to limited space onboard, alcohol and tobacco products are not for sale on flights operated with Embraer aircraft, but these products may be ordered through the pre-order service. • Gift items, cosmetics, fragrances and confectionary are sold on scheduled flights to and from the following destinations: Amsterdam, Barcelona, Berlin, Brussels, Budapest, Dubrovnik, Düsseldorf, Ekaterinburg, Frankfurt, Geneva, Hamburg, Ljubljana, London, Madrid, Manchester, Malaga, Milan, Moscow, Munich, Nice, Paris, Prague, Rome, Venice, Vienna and Zurich. • SHOP WITH POINTS Pamper yourself with Finnair Plus points at www.finnairplusshop.com


FINNAIR INFO INFLIGHT ENTERTAINMENT

This month´s inflight picks BW pcksof the month

Movies

Movies, TV, music and games onboard SIT BACK, RELAX AND ENJOY your flight with your personal entertainment system. Use your handset or touchscreen to choose from 72 movies, 150 TV shows, 24 music channels, up to 200 CD albums and 15 games. From films to news and sports, there’s always something for you to enjoy, including programs from Hollywood, Asia and around the globe. Available language tracks include English, Japanese, Korean, Thai, German, French, Italian, Spanish, Swedish and Finnish, depending on the program, as well as Finnish and Chinese subtitles. We also offer family films and cartoons on all international and leisure flights. Selection may vary by aircraft type. You can also create a music playlist from up to 200 CDs (on select aircraft). Most entertainment systems also include a satellite phone for texting and emails, and a power outlet so you can use your own laptop computer or personal entertainment device. The system also offers an Airshow moving map that displays the progress of your flight.

Personal entertainment systems are available on Airbus A330 and Airbus A340 aircraft. Headphones are free of charge on intercontinental scheduled flights. On leisure flights (AY1000 series) there is an entertainment fee including headphone rental (on Boeing 757, €5.00 per person including return flight; on Airbus A330 and A340 aircraft, €8.00 per person per flight). Most Airbus A340 aircraft and all Airbus A330 aircraft are equipped with an electricity socket, telephone and the option to send SMS & email messages via the Inflight Entertainment System (not available for inbound SMS to the US or Canada). Messages cost $2.00 each. Calls cost $7.00/first minute and $3.50/ every 30 secs thereafter.

Entertainment/communication systems may vary by aircraft.

Ella ja kaverit 2 Paterock Ella’s friend Pate has a hard time learning multiplication tables, so he decides to be a rock star so that he doesn’t need to study any more. Soon the music industry has big plans for Pate. (Rating NR)

X-Men: Days of Future Past The ultimate X-Men ensemble fights a war for the survival of the species across two time periods, as the characters from the original trilogy join forces with their younger selves. (Chinese Subtitles, Rating PG-13)

More Latest Movies

Personal entertainment system

The Other Woman Carly learns her boyfriend is married. When another affair is discovered all three women team up for revenge. (R

NEW IN-FLIGHT ENTERTAINMENT SYSTEM

The Fault in our Stars Two teenagers fall in love whilst attending a cancer support group. (PG-13)

Finnair has introduced a new easy-touse in-flight entertainment system for the wide body fleet. Aircrafts will have the new system gradually during the Autumn 2014.

Garden State A young man returns to his hometown to attend his mother’s funeral, and embarks on a journey of self-discovery. (R)

TV-series Vikings Action Glee Comedy-drama Modern Family Sitcom

Entertainment content is easy to discover and access by only one click.

Radio

All the different type of entertainment (movies, music and games) can be found from the top row navigation icons. Music mixes on the fly Nokia Mixradio ffers a wide variety of music on Finnair’s long-haul flights. Mixes feature genres such as jazz and hip-hop and artists from regions including India and China. SEPTEMBER 2014

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FINNAIR INFO BEFORE AND AFTER THE FLIGHT HELSINKI AIRPORT

TRANSFER SERVICE

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32a

31x 31

31a-e 30

HOW TO TRANSFER • Check your gate and departure time on the airport monitors.

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• If your baggage has not been checked through to your final destination, collect it from the baggage claim area and go to check-in and security control.

SHOP

Security control

Finnair Tax-Free Shop

FINNAIR LOUNGE FINNAIR PREMIUM LOUNGE

AIRPORT SHOPPING

Finnair Plus members receive special discounts at the Finnair Tax-Free Shop when presenting their membership card.

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2ND FLOOR

37a-d

GROUND FLOOR

AUTOMATED BORDER CHECKS are available to passengers with biometric EU, EEA or Swiss passports. Place your passport on the reader with the photo page down, then pass through the first gate, turn towards the monitor, and wait for the second gate to open.

NON-SMOKING Smoking at Helsinki Airport is prohibited outside of designated smoking rooms.

SHOPPING Receive special offers for airport services when you show your Finnair Plus card. You will recognise our partners by the Finnair Plus symbol. Helsinki Airport features more than 30 shops and boutiques and various restaurants and cafés. 86 BLUE WINGS

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Borde contro

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Border control

SHOP

SHOP

2ND FLOOR

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CHILDREN Children’s playrooms offer videos, microwave ovens and baby care facilities.

SHOP

Transfer Service 3

• All Finnair and Flybe departures are located in the same terminal.

WIRELESS INTERNET is available free of charge. An eService Bar is located across from gate 21.

Border control

LONG-HAUL AREA NON-SCHENGEN

• If you don’t have a boarding pass for your connecting flight, please contact the transfer service desk. • Most passengers transferring from nonEU countries to EU countries have to go through security and passport control. Please note that liquids are restricted in carry-on baggage.

SHOP

LOST AND FOUND INQUIRIES, Lentäjäntie 1 (next to terminal T2, street level) Open Mon-Fri 09:00-17:00 and Sat 09:00-15:00. Tel 0600 41006 (1,97€/min +local network charge) WWW.LOYTOTAVARA.NET

SHOP


WALKING TIME GATE 24-30: 7 MIN

is closed for renovation from July until the autumn. We apologise for inconvenience.

T2 29

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FINNAIR LOUNGE ABOVE GATES 23–26

Restaurant & Deli Fly Inn

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FINNAIR LOUNGE 26

SHOP Finnair Tax-Free Shop

23

GATE AREA

Security check

er ol

CHECK-IN 240–270

CHECK-IN 201–232 SHOP

SHOP

Security check

22

Finnair Service Desk

GROCERY

21

20

SH

OP

SCHENGEN AREA

24

25 Transfer Service 2

SHOP

1ST FLOOR

19

Tourist info

18

Pharmacy

17 16

Transfer Service 1

15

CHECK-IN 101–114

14

Security check

Baggage storage

T1

GROUND FLOOR

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GATE AREA 12

2ND FLOOR

11

FINAVIA

SHOP BUS CONNECTIONS The Finnair City Bus to the Helsinki railway station leaves from Terminal 2 every 20 minutes, stopping also at Terminal 1. Travel time is about 30 minutes. Price: €6.30

1ST FLOOR

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INTERNATIONAL FLIGHTS FROM HELSINKI

Great Circle Estimated Distances Flight km Times

ALGHERO 2473 03:35 AMSTERDAM 1525 02:35 ALANYA/GAZIPASA 2722 03:45 AQABA 3494 05:05 ARRECIFE 4518 05:55 BANGKOK 7912 09:45 BARCELONA 2632 03:55 BEIJING 6325 07:55 BERGEN 1112 03:30 BERLIN 1123 02:00 BIARRITZ 2581 03:45 BILLUND 1060 01:50 BODRUM 2572 03:55 BRUSSELS 1651 02:40 BUDAPEST 1481 02:20 BURGAS 1982 03:00 CATANIA 2636 03:45 CHANIA 2756 03:50 CHONGQING 6736 08:40 COPENHAGEN 895 01:40 DALAMAN 2639 03:40 DELHI 5229 06:50 DUBAI 4537 05:55 DUBROVNIK 2027 03:00 DÜSSELDORF 1512 02:25 EKATERINBURG 2098 03:05 FARO 3480 04:45 FRANKFURT 1543 02:35 FUERTEVENTURA 4578 06:05 FUNCHAL 4310 05:45 GENEVA 1994 03:00 GOA via Sharjah 6739 10:15 GOTHENBURG 785 01:25 HAMBURG 1172 02:00 HANOI 7478 10:10 HÔ CHI MINH CITY (Saigon) 8510 10:50 HONG KONG 7821 09:35 INNSBRUCK 1701 02:35 IRÁKLION 2777 03:55 KAZAN 1521 02:30 KAVALA 2159 03:15 KERKYRA 2331 03:25 KIEV 1171 01:55 KOS 2620 03:45 KRABI 8350 10:20 KRAKOW 1186 02:00 LANGKAWI 8560 10:25 LAS PALMAS 4700 06:10 LISBON 3369 04:50 LJUBLJANA 1713 02:40 LONDON 1863 03:10 MADRID 2950 04:25 MALAGA 3357 04:35 MANCHESTER 1817 03:00 MIAMI 8342 11:10 MILAN 1953 03:05 MINSK 740 01:25 MOSCOW 876 01:40 MUNICH 1577 02:30 NAGOYA 7780 09:40 NAPLES 2283 03:25 NEW YORK 6626 08:45 NICE 2202 03:25 NIZHNIY NOVGOROD 1189 02:10 NORRKÖPING 530 01:30 OSAKA 7751 09:30 OSLO 766 01:30 OVDA 3457 04:30 PALMA DE MALLORCA 2777 04:00 PAPHOS 2898 04:00 PARIS 1900 03:05 PHUKET 8312 10:05

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Great Circle Estimated Distances Flight km Times PISA PONTA DELGADA PRAGUE PREVEZA PUERTO PLATA RHODES RIGA RIMINI ROME SAMARA SANTORINI SEOUL SHANGHAI SINGAPORE SKIATHOS SPLIT ST. PETERSBURG STOCKHOLM TALLINN TARTU TEL AVIV TENERIFE NORTE TENERIFE SUR TOKYO TORONTO TROMSØ VARADERO VARNA VENICE VERONA VIENNA VILNIUS WARSAW XIAN ZAKYNTHOS ZÜRICH

2093 03:20 4316 05:50 1322 02:10 2397 03:25 8417 11:15 2668 03:45 382 00:55 1993 03:00 2235 03:25 1698 02:35 2660 03:40 7050 08:40 7410 09:05 9272 11:30 2353 03:30 1956 02:55 301 01:00 400 01:00 101 00:30 245 00:50 3230 04:25 4691 06:10 4745 06:10 7849 09:45 6619 08:50 1081 02:00 8665 11:40 1911 02:55 1847 02:55 1903 02:55 1462 02:30 633 01:15 940 01:40 6421 07:50 2526 03:55 1781 02:45

SCHEDULED DESTINATIONS LEISURE DESTINATIONS PARTNER-OPERATED CODE-SHARE OR MARKETING DESTINATIONS SEASONAL ROUTE  EW SCHEDULED N SEASONAL ROUTE NEW SCHEDULED DESTINATION IN 2014

Atl Oc antic ean

DOMESTIC FLIGHTS FROM HELSINKI IVALO JOENSUU JYVÄSKYLÄ KAJAANI MARIEHAMN KEMI/TORNIO KITTILÄ KOKKOLA/PIETARSAARI KUOPIO KUUSAMO OULU PORI ROVANIEMI SAVONLINNA TAMPERE TURKU VAASA

931 01:35 360 01:00 235 00:45 464 01:00 282 00:55 609 01:30 823 01:25 391 01:05 335 01:00 667 01:15 514 01:05 214 00:40 697 01:20 281 00:55 143 00:35 150 00:35 348 00:55

Bay of B isca ya


Arct ic

Ocea n

Nor weg ian S ea

Nort

h Sea

Rostov-on-Don

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Arctic Ocean FINNAIR-INFO WORLD MAP

Finnair Plus members earn Plus points from travelling on any scheduled flight with a oneworld airline.

Atlantic Ocean

Pacific Ocean

Ocea n Atlantic Ocean

oneworld: more than 800 destinations 90 BLUE WINGS SEPTEMBER 2014


Arctic Ocean

Nizhniy Novgorod

Taiwan

Pacific Ocean

Indian Ocean

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FINNAIR INFO CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY

Society and the environment Finnair wants to be the number one choice for quality- and environmentally-conscious travellers. The airline collaborates with many environmental and humanitarian organisations, and invites its frequent flyers to participate in these efforts by donating Finnair Plus points. Here are a few other examples of Finnair’s societal involvement in a changing world:

GENERATING CLIMATE CONVERSATION

• From 1999 to 2009, Finnair cut its carbon dioxide emissions per seat by 22 per cent. By 2017, it intends to reduce this number by another 24 per cent; total reductions per seat from 1999 to 2017 will equal as much as 41 per cent. Finnair supports the International Air Transport Association’s (IATA) goal of zeroemissions air travel by 2050, as well as a global emissions trading scheme. • Finnair flies one of the youngest fleets in the business. The average aircraft age is 9.9 years. Operating with new aircraft cuts back on fuel consumption and emissions by 20 to 30 per cent. The airline also flies the shortest routes between Europe and Asia via Helsinki, reducing fuel consumption. Passengers and cargo are carried on the same flights.

ON SEPTEMBER 23RD, UN Secretary General Ban Kimoon is hosting a one-day Climate Summit in New York. Although aviation is not officially on the agenda, this high-profile event presents an opportunity to generate discussion around ways in which airlines can help slow down climate change. The next set of major climate talks will take place in Paris in late 2015, while the next assembly of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) will happen in 2016. A model for a global emissions trading model is expected during the assembly. Finnair supports the International Air Transport Association’s (IATA) goal of a global emissions trading scheme and carbon-neutral air travel. Last year Finnair was certified as a Stage 1 operator in the IATA Environmental Assessment Program, a new system designed to independently assess and improve an airline’s environmental management; Stage 2 of the programme is currently being implemented. Finnair has reduced its per-seat emissions by about a third since 1999, and flew its first biofuel flight in 2011. The airline is currently working on several biofuel projects. Last year global air travel generated about two per cent of total global human CO2 emissions. However, per-passenger emissions have been reduced by more than 70 per cent since the 1950s. Maintaining a modern, fuel-efficient fleet is one of the most crucial ways in which an airline can reduce its environmental impact. Finnair flies one of the world’s youngest fleets, and in 2015 will become the first airline in Europe to welcome a new Airbus A350 aircraft.

• HOTT (House of Travel and Transportation), which houses Finnair’s headquarters near Helsinki, has received the esteemed LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Platinum international environmental certification. The system ensures that a construction project meets the strictest requirements for environmental efficiency. HOTT is owned by pension insurance company Ilmarinen, and Finnair is the primary tenant. • Finnair employees are offered continuous training and development opportunities. The company also conducts an annual employee wellbeing survey, participates in campaigns promoting equal treatment at the workplace, and places a strong focus on occupational safety.

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FINNAIR INFO ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY

DID YOU KNOW? Alternative fuels could help reduce aviation emissions by as much as 80 per cent.

HOW YOU CAN HELP At pointshop.finnair.com, members of Finnair’s frequent flyer programme can donate points to the following organisations: ☛ The Finnish Association for Nature Conservation

• Finnair prioritises recycling: assess and improve an airline’s for example, the airline has environmental management. donated cabin crew uniforms, Strongly believing that, as with blankets and other textiles to safety, the whole sector would Uusix and GlobeHope, compabenefit from a more systematic nies that turn used materials approach to environmental into design items. management, Finnair is part of • Finnair Group collaborates a pilot group of IATA member with environmental manageairlines participating in the ment company Ekokem on programme. waste management, including • Finnair is a member of United waste sorting, recycling and Nations Global Compact, a reuse. Materials such as cardcorporate responsibility initiaboard, paper, plastic and metal tive that comprises more than are recycled at Finnair, while 8,000 businesses. Participating hazardous waste is properly companies agree to make huprocessed. Material not suitman rights, fair labour standable for reuse is transported ards, environmental responsito Ekokem’s facilities for bility and anti-corruption core energy production. parts of their operations. • The recycling process begins • In 2011 Finnair signed the United onboard, where cabin attendNations Women’s Empowerants sort the waste generated ment Principles that encourage during the flight. companies to promote gender • In 2013 Finnair was certified equality and women’s empoweras a Stage 1 operator in IATA’s ment. The principles are the reEnvironmental Assessment sult of a collaboration between Program (IEnvA), a new envithe United Nations Development ronmental management sysFund for Women and the United tem designed to independently Nations Global Compact.

☛ The Association of Friends of the University Children’s Hospitals ☛ The Cancer Society of Finland ☛ The Finnish Red Cross ☛ UNICEF ☛ The Baltic Sea Action Group ☛ Hope

FIND OUT MORE Finnair has published an annual overview of its sustainability efforts since 1997. The 2013 Annual Report – Finnair’s first to integrate sustainability indicators with financial reporting – measures and accounts for Finnair’s financial, economic, social and environmental performance and explains its impact on business results.

www.finnairgroup.com/ annualreport2013 BLOGS.FINNAIR.COM

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FINNAIR INFO FLEET

AIRBUS A340-300 Number 7 Seating capacity 270/269/261 Length 63.6 m Wingspan 60.3 m Cruising speed 890 km/h Maximum cruising altitude 12,500 m AIRBUS A330-300 Number 8 Seating capacity 297/271/263 Length 63.6 m Wingspan 60.3 m Cruising speed 890 km/h Maximum cruising altitude 12,600 m AIRBUS A321 (ER) Number 11 Seating capacity 197–209 Length 44.5 m Wingspan 34.1 m Cruising speed 840 km/h Maximum cruising altitude 11,900 m AIRBUS A320 Number 10 Seating capacity 165 Length 37.6 m Wingspan 34.1 m Cruising speed 840 km/h Maximum cruising altitude 11,900 m AIRBUS A319 Number 9 Seating capacity 138 Length 33.8 m Wingspan 34.1 m Cruising speed 840 km/h Maximum cruising altitude 11,900 m EMBRAER 190 Operated by Flybe Number 12 Seating capacity 100 Length 36.2 m Wingspan 28.7 m Cruising speed 850 km/h Maximum cruising altitude 12,300 m EMBRAER 170 Operated by Flybe Number 2 Seating capacity 76 Length 29.9 m Wingspan 26.0 m Cruising speed 850 km/h Maximum cruising altitude 12,300 m

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FINNAIR PLUS PARTNER BENEFITS FOR FREQUENT FLYERS

Finnair Plus Partner Benefits this month: COUNTLESS BENEFITS FOR MEMBERS!

Kuva iStock

HOTEL DEALS The world leader in booking accommodation online, Booking.com, offers over 440,000 properties in 200 countries. You can earn 1 award Finnair Plus point per 1 euro for your stay as a Finnair Plus member. Use Booking.com hotel search button on Finnair's main website.

Airlines Travel Credit Card Insurance Restaurants Shopping Wellness Golf Entertainment Charity Leisure time

Kuva iStock

Kuva iStock

finnair.com

NEW PARTNER

REGUS CARD Finnair & Regus offer you the opportunity to take care of your office space needs and earn Finnair Plus points at the same time. Apply for the Regus Businessworld Preferred membership card free of charge and start enjoying exclusive benefits right away.

THE ECONOMIST Subscribe to The Economist by October 31st and earn up to 12,000 Finnair Plus points. Stay up-to-date on what’s happening around the world and plan your next flight with Finnair with this subscription offer. Available in print only, digital only or as a print and digital package.

LANGUAGE DIRECT COURSE Language Direct offers live lessons via phone or Skype in 41 languages. Have a qualified native speaking instructor design a language course for you. The course gives you the flexibility to choose when, where and what you study! Earn up to 22,500 Finnair Plus points.

regus.fi/finnair

economist.com/FinnairPlus

finnair.com/pluspartners

MORE THAN 300 PARTNERS!

Not yet a member? Find out how to join on the next page ➝

More Finnair Plus offers: finnair.com/plus SEPTEMBER 2014 BLUE WINGS 95


FINNAIR PLUS FREQUENT FLYER BENEFITS

Our Frequent Flyer Program

Join now and receive points for this flight! GET THESE BENEFITS • A head start on special flight sales • Exclusive members’ prices on offers • Earn and use points on Finnair, oneworld and partner airline flights • Earn and use points on numerous worldwide partner services EARN POINTS from both Finnair schedule and leisure flights. Points can be used to purchase award flights, pay for additional baggage and upgrade Finnair flights from Economy to Business Class. Points can also be earned and used for oneworld scheduled flights. AS A FINNAIR PLUS MEMBER YOU EARN points when purchasing products and services from any one of our Finnair Plus partners. The extensive partner network makes it possible for you to earn and use points even when you are not travelling. Products and services range from hotels, restaurants and car rentals to products purchased in the Finnair PlusShop, where you can place orders online.

JOIN FINNAIR PLUS for free at finnair.com/plus or by filling out an application found as an insert in this magazine.

Join using this QR code and get 500 extra points from your next Finnair flight. ➝

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS 1. Can I use my Finnair Plus points as payment in the Finnair Tax-Free Shop? You can redeem a gift voucher of 20 or 50 euros in advance at finnair.fi/pluspartners. You can use the voucher for paying for tax-free purchases in the Finnair Tax-Free Shop at Helsinki Airport until September 30. From October 1 vouchers can be used for paying for tax-free purchases on Finnair flights.

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SEPTEMBER 2014

DO YOU HAVE A QUESTION? SEND IT TO US: PLUS.NEWS@FINNAIR.FI

2. Why have i not received the Finnair plus electronic newsletter? Please make sure that your email address is up to date by logging into your Finnair Plus account. You can also check whether you have permitted the sending of newsletters or other email communication.


FINNAIR PLUS FREQUENT FLYER BENEFITS

Finnair Plus Tier benefits There are four Finnair Plus tiers: Basic, Silver, Gold and Platinum. Move to higher tiers by collecting tier points on Finnair or oneworld flights.

BASIC BENEFITS

SILVER BENEFITS RUBY

• C lassic and Any Seat flight awards • T ext message check-in for Finnair flights •P  ayment for excess baggage charges with points •W  aiting list priority based on tier •P  lusShop and partner service purchases with points •D  iscounts and points for partner services •P  oints for credit card purchases

• All Basic level benefits • 10% points bonus on Finnair flights • Business Class check-in with Finnair • Priority Lane* security checks • One extra piece of baggage free of charge • Finnair lounge access when flying with Finnair • 10% discount on purchases made in Finnair Shops and on flights outside of the EU

GOLD SAPPHIRE

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PLATINUM EMERALD

• All Basic and Silver level benefits

• A  ll Basic, Silver and Gold level benefits

• 1 5% points bonus on Finnair flights • C onfirmed seat 48 hours before Finnair flights (European or intercontinental for Business Class, intercontinental for Economy Class)

• 2 5% points bonus on Finnair flights

MOVE TO HIGHER TIERS 40,000 tier points or 24 scheduled flights*

•N  o expiration of points during tracking period • Oneworld First Class check-in and lounge access

•D • Priority Lane* security  iscounted travel checks upgrades for family members • T ravel class upgrades for Finnair flights • Special baggage free of charge on Finnair flights • Oneworld Business Class and Frequent Flyer lounge access + 1 guest

90,000 tier points or 54 scheduled flights*

150,000 tier points or 92 scheduled flights* *Finnair and other oneworld scheduled flights

*For example: Helsinki, Stockholm-Arlanda

More Finnair Plus information: finnair.com/plus

Did you know? FINNAIR’S NEW PREMIUM LOUNGE WITH FINNISH DESIGN STYLE AND COMFORT IS NOW OPEN THE PREMIUM LOUNGE, designed by the Helsinki firm dSign Vertti Kivi & Co., is a showcase for classic Nordic design in harmony with Finnish nature, with dynamic changes in light, colours and video projections in tune with the seasons and time of day. Meals and drinks are plated on Marimekko tableware or served in Iittala Ultima Thule glasses. Selected furniture in the lounge includes legendary Tulip and Womb chairs created by Eero Saarinen.

The space features different areas for working and relaxation and comfortably seats up to 122 guests. The customers will also enjoy access to completely new private shower suites, as well as a Finnish sauna. The Premium Lounge is open to Finnair Plus Gold and Platinum members and their guests only, as well as to frequent flyer cardholders with equivalent status at a fellow oneworld airline.

SEPTEMBER 2014 BLUE WINGS 97


FINNAIR PLUS PLUSSHOP

Finnair PlusShop offers The online Finnair PlusShop stocks more than 3,000 items and delivers around the world. Pay with Finnair Plus points, money or a combination of both. Items are shipped to your home or to your nearest post office.

Discount

-15 %

SAMSONITE ERGO-BIZ -BAGS –15 %

7 bags to choose from!

FINLAYSON PAJATSO BED SET × 2

NOKIAN JALKINEET HAI RUBBER BOOTS

MARJA KURKI MEN'S LEATHER BELT

€96, 3 colours Member offer €79 + 1,000 points

€65, new season colours Member offer €49 + 1,000 points

€49, black/chrome or brown/chrome Member offer €39 + 1,000 points

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE.

Shop online: www.finnairplusshop.com 98 BLUE WINGS

SEPTEMBER 2014


FINNAIR PLUS PLUSSHOP

Finnair PlusShop offers

ARTEK AALTO E60 MOOMIN STOOL

€240, 3 different prints Member offer €199 + 1,000 points

TI SENTO MILANO BRACELET

SOREL MAD MUKLUK MID II SHOE FOR MEN

HAGLÖFS ARES JACKET FOR MEN & HAGLÖFS ARES Q JACKET FOR WOMEN,

€155 Member offer €95 + 1,000 points

€169,95, black or brown Member offer €119 + 1,000 points

€349, black Member offer €199 + 1,000 points

ARABIA TOVES ANNIVERSARY JAR SET

KLIPSCH GIG PORTABLE BLUETOOTH MUSIC SYSTEM

€99, includes 3 jars, sizes S, M & L Member offer €79 + 1,000 points

€199, black or white Member offer €169 + 1,000 points

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE.

Shop online: www.finnairplusshop.com SEPTEMBER 2014 BLUE WINGS 99


TAG HEUER CARRERA CALIBRE 1887 Steve McQueen’s legacy is timeless. More than an actor, more than a pilot, he became a legend. Like TAG Heuer, he defined himself beyond standards and never cracked under pressure.

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Blue Wings Business issue September 2014  

Blue Wings Business issue September 2014