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FINN MASTERS MAGAZINE News

MICHAEL STAAL INTERVIEW

SILVA WINS IN SCHWERIN

AND

YEARBOOK

Results

Events

FIRST DANISH world MASTERs

2020


The Winner’s Choice


PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

Contents Contacts, Calendar & Suppliers The Finn Sailor Dashboard Everyone excited for 50th Anniversary World Masters Perfect Score for Vladimir Krutshikh Bidding Clubs for 2022 – Helsinki Fredrik Tegnhed Interview Filipe Silva wins Close Euro Series Nation and Club Cups 2019 Michael Staal Interview Staying Warm Looking Ahead to Gdynia 2020 Masters Events Across the World Venues For 2021 - Puntala and Tihany

Finn Masters Magazine and Yearbook - the official publication of the Finn World Masters ISSUE NO. 7 • MARCH 2020 The Finn Masters Magazine is a non-profit publication that is distributed free of charge to all active Finn masters who are IFA members through their National Finn Association, as well as other interested parties connected to the Finn World Masters around the world. Articles, race results, photographs and reports from countries are always welcome. All advertisement enquiries should also be addressed to the Editor. A media pack is available on www.finnworldmasters.com. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information presented, neither the editor nor the contributors can assume any liability for any errors that remain.

SUBSCRIPTIONS

All those attending Finn Masters events in the two years prior to publication are eligible for a free copy. Extra copies available at events. To check subscription contact media@finnworldmaster.com with your full name and delivery address.

MAGAZINE EDITOR

Robert Deaves, 2 Exeter Road, Ipswich IP3 8JL, England. Mob: +44 (0)7932 047046 Email: media@finnworldmaster.com

COVER PHOTO

Filipe Silva at Schwerin (Pic: Robert Deaves)

IFA WEB SITE www.finnclass.org FINN SHOP www.finnclass.org/shop FINN MASTERS www.finnworldmasters.com

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YEARBOOK Annual Masters Meeting 2019 Minutes About the Finn World Masters Medalists and Winners 1970-2019

29 29 30

ADVERTISERS Allen 22 Art of Racing 32 Devoti Sailing 22 Finnsailing.de 24 Pata Boats 24 Sandiline 2 WB Sails 4 Wilke 2

All of the photos in this issue from the 2019 Finn World Masters in Skovshoved and European Masters in Schwerin can be bought as downloads or prints here: https://robertdeaves.smugmug.com

Masters President’s Message

By Andy Denison, GBR 20

o all Finn master sailors, welcome T to the 2020 Masters Magazine and our 50th anniversary year of sailing the World Masters. This year promises to be amongst the greatest in Finn sailing for the Masters fleet. At the time of writing, we have just passed 200 entries for the World Masters in Holland, hosted by the ever-enthusiastic Dutch sailors and accompanied by some fabulous sponsors, prizes and gifts.

Reconstruction of the IFA in December has paved a pathway for the class to keep us on a strong foothold throughout the coming years. One thing is for sure and that is the Masters fleet will continue to flourish and prosper. We would like to send out a short survey in the coming months to see what the Master sailors want from their events in the future and to make sure that we continue to deliver to the fleet. At the forthcoming AMM I wish to discuss the issue with pre-entering and not cancelling your pre-entry should you be unable to attend the event. I am keen to maintain the pre-entry process as it encourages others to enter, and it also gives a good indication to the OA what they can expect and budget for. Our exiting rule is clear, you enter, pay and sail, failure to pay and not turn up, without notifying the OA, carries a penalty, whereby you will

only be permitted to sail the next masters event after you have paid for the previous. We had a number of no shows without notification at the Finn European Masters in Schwerin last year and this not only caused some financial concerns for the club, but also for the Masters organisation. This situation has not happened for a number of years and we do not want it repeated. My plan is to visit Punta Ala in the next few months, to compile a report and check out the facilities for the Masters in 2021. The window for bids to host the 2022 Finn Masters Gold cup closed on February 1 with one contender. The bid from Helsinki, Finland promises a nostalgic 70th anniversary event on the arena of the first appearance of the Finn Olympics in the Olympic Games. Voting will also take place for a change in the time of year and the venue, as they wish to move the event to later in the year to ensure hospitable conditions. In May, ice can still persist in Helsinki. The Finn Masters Committee is fully supportive of the Helsinki bid, so we hope the AMM will approve the change. In the meantime I hope you all enjoy your sailing and preparation for our 50th Anniversary Finn World Masters at Port Zélande. See you there. Andy Denison Finn Masters President

FINN MASTERS MAGAZINE & YEARBOOK 2020

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Master your performance Our Tiger design is specifically engineered for Masters: Easy to trim, less demanding to hike, the MAXX fabric provides exceptional durability allowing the use of the same sail for several seasons. For more designs, please consult our website. WB-Sails Ltd, Helsinki, Finland. www,wb-sails.fi info@wb-sails.fi Tel. +3589 621 5055


CONTACTS AND CALENDAR

Finn World Masters Committee

Events calendar 2020 2020 15-17/5 29/5-5/6 24-26/7 19-24/8 31/8-5/9 8-11/9 12-13/9 18-20/9 19-20/9 26-27/9 2021 21-28/5 8-11/9

President Masters’ Fleet

Andy Denison (GBR 20) 4 Wickfield Ave, Christchurch BH23 1JB, UK Tel: +44 (0)1202 484748 Mob +44 (0)7802 355 522 Email: andy@denisons.com

Talamone Port Zélande Bad Saarow Moscow Gdynia Lake Travis Karlstad Medemblik Christchurch Aiguablava

FINN WORLD MASTERS Puntala FINN EUROPEAN MASTERS Tihany

ITA NED GER RUS POL USA SWE NED GBR ESP ITA HUN

Henk de Jager (NED 11) Willem Alexanderlaan 3 5263AZ -Vught, The Netherlands Email: henk.dejager11@gmail.com Tel: +31 736 565 008 Mob: +7 701 754 1813

Please check local websites for latest details and information. Further updates also at www.finnworldmasters.com/calendar

Rolf Elsässer (GER 202) Am Honigberg 20 60435 Frankfurt Tel: +49 69 986 626 47 Mob: +49 172 6334163 Email: rolfelsaesser@web.de

BOATBUILDERS AND SUPPLIERS Devoti Sailing www.devotisailing.com Finnports www.finnports.com.au Dinghy Racing Centre www.dinghyracingcentre.nl HiTechSailing www.hitechsailing.com Jibetech www.jibetech.com

CZE AUS NED ITA USA

Petticrows www.petticrows.com Pata Boats www.patafinn.hu Pata Finns Africa www.patafinnsafrica.com Suntouched www.suntouched.co.uk Wilke www.wilke.ch

GBR HUN RSA GBR SUI

MASTS & BOOMS Art of Racing (booms) www.artofracing.co.nz C-Tech www.c-tech.co.nz HIT Masts www.dinghyracingcentre.nl Pata www.patafinn.hu Suntouched www.suntouched.co.uk Wilke www.wilke.ch

NZL NZL NED HUN GBR SUI

SAILS Doyle Raudaschl Dynamic Sails One Sails North Sails Turtle Sails Ullman Sails Victory Sails WB Sails

AUT GBR CRO GBR GER GBR SLO FIN

Supplier directory

Jorge Rodrigues

Marc Allain des Beauvais (FRA 99) IFA France 62 Avenue Camus, 44000 Nantes, France Tel: +33 (0)285 520 330 Mob: +33 (0)6 07 29 27 56 Email: marc@transmer.com Philip Baum (RSA 51) 18 Norwich Drive, Bishopscourt 7708, Cape Town, South Africa Tel: +27 217 611 752 Mob: +27 829 904 399 Email: pbaum@endcliff.com

PAST PRESIDENTS 1978-1992 1992-2008 2008-2013 2013-present

Italian Masters FINN WORLD MASTERS German/Polish Masters Open Russian FINN EUROPEAN MASTERS North American Masters Swedish Masters Dutch Masters UK Masters Catalonia Masters

Georg Oser Rolf Lehnert Fons van Gent Andy Denison

Staff

*Please note that there may be changes in the committee at the AMM

Robert Deaves (webmaster, secretary, magazine editor, media) 2 Exeter Road, Ipswich, IP3 8JL. UK Tel: +44 (0)7936 356 663 Skype: robert.deaves Email: media@finnworldmaster.com

jrsilva@gmail.com

www.raudaschl.co.at www.dynamicsails.com www.onesails.com www.northonedesign.com www.turtlesails.de www.ullmansails.co.uk www.victorysails.com www.wb-sails.fi

OTHER Finnsailing.de www.finnsailing.de HIT Trailers www.hittrailer.nl Marina Dellas www.dellas.de Pantaenius www.pantaenius.com Sandiline www.sandiline.com Waverunna www.waverunna.com Zhik www.zhik.com

FINN MASTERS MAGAZINE & YEARBOOK 2020

BRA

GER NED GER MON SLO NZL AUS

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C2C FINN SAILOR DASHBOARD Sailor Dashboard To gain access to the sailor dashboard register with Club2Class at www.club2class.com/user/Dashboard Dashboard Your dashboard provides an overview of your boats and results. You can set up details about your Finn and related sails and equipment by accessing the My Boat Definitions Toolkit found under ‘settings’. You can then enter details about your Finn, associated sails and equipment.

THE FINN SAILOR DASHBOARD A new service for Finn Sailors powered by Club2Class Richard phillips, GBR 42

T

he Finn World Masters team under the leadership of Andy Denison (FWM President) has been thinking about the development of an easier way for sailors to register for events and to submit information about the boats, sails and equipment they are going to use. The aim is to reduce the time taken up before and during events with sail and equipment checks and enforcing the limitation of equipment rules.

The British Finn Association (BFA) and Christchurch Sailing Club (CSC) have been using an innovative service called Club2Class since early 2018. Club2Class was developed by David Williams of Rigg Williams Ltd. The implementation of Club2Class at CSC and BFA has been managed by Richard Phillips (BFA Membership Secretary). The Sailor Dashboard and building a Finn database has been in development since 2018. Following the FWM in Denmark, David Williams agreed to develop this service with a view to it being used by the Finn Class as an Equipment limitation system at the FWM in 2020, and developed in a way which is consistent with the Club2Class design philosophy. The My Boat Definitions toolkit, found under Settings on the Sailor Dashboard, enables PDF files and images to be uploaded. The data types (date, text, drop down lists, numbers etc) can be validated.

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Standard Finn Definition A standard definition for a Finn, sails, masts, booms and foils is being developed by Richard Phillips in consultation with Klaus Luttkus (FWM Measurer). This includes the main documents and data that are likely to be checked at the FWM in 2020. The measurement team are of course free to check anything. It is anticipated that the Standard Definitions will be reviewed annually and updated to reflect any changes in the Class Rules.

The standard Finn definition is being set up in Club2Class following earlier tests. When finalised and tested it will form part of the online registration process for the FWM 2020 at Port Zélande and perhaps at future FWM and IFA events. FWM 2020 Equipment Check Further details will be circulated to those who enter the 2020 FWM. Competitors are encouraged to register their boats and equipment prior to arrival at the event. Competitors may be permitted to amend the details of sails and equipment registered prior to checking at the event. However, once equipment has been checked, the record will be locked. Any subsequent change of sails or equipment will need to be approved by the Technical Committee. Further Information Videos and information can be found at https://www.club2class.com. Further details and links for FWM 2020 equipment inspection registration will be on finnworldmaster.com.

FINN MASTERS MAGAZINE & YEARBOOK 2020

My Boat Definitions A Finn sailor may wish to record details about the boats they own, the sails, masts, booms, centreboards, rudders and any ancillary equipment trolley, trailer, paddles, tow lines etc. The amount of detail can be determined by each owner and might include photos of sail labels, boats etc, measurement certificates, insurance certificates, mast certificates. Sailors can set up their own definitions for any class of boat. Finn sailors are advised to initially use the Standard Finn Definitions by entering the virtual Finn World Masters (FWM) - Finn Equipment Specification Event on www. club2class.com. This special event contains the forms used for Finn World Masters Events. After completing the free entry for this virtual event, you can clone your entry into ‘My Boats’. You can then add/modify data and add/delete documents or photos. Event Organisers may determine what information is needed for checking at an event. This can be set up on the online registration form for viewing, checking by the measurement team. For example all Finns with corrector weights can be listed and then randomly checked during the event. Sails could be photographed during racing and checked against the photo of sail labels etc. My Boats: This section shows a list of boats that you have set up with a link to the Boat Definitions for that boat. My Classes: This section lists any class that you have elected to follow that makes use of C2C eg your local club handicap or Finn race, Finn open meetings, FWM events....or indeed other Classes that you may wish to follow. My Class Events: This lists the upcoming events for the Classes that you are following. My Special Events: Special events can be defined by Clubs/Classes/Event Organisers eg the FWM. The list of events provided by the Clubs/Classes that you are following will be listed and you can use the “enter” button to register for/enter these events. You can then clone your boat set up into your My Boat section for future reference/use. My Race Results: This is a list of recent races (excluding Special Event races). My Series Results: This is a list of your overall results in recent series (excluding Special Events).


2020 Finn WORLD MASTERS – PORT ZÉLANDE, NETHERLANDS

s this issue goes to print, we have more than 200 A entries for the 2020 Finn World Masters, which will be the 50th Finn World Masters. A lot has changed over those 50 years, and it has grown into one of the most famous and well attended dinghy regattas in the world.

EVERYONE EXCITED FOR 50TH ANNIVERSARY

WORLD MASTERS

Accommodation

The venue is Marina Port Zélande, a very modern and spacious marina located near the south-western corner of The Netherlands, and just a stone’s throw from the North Sea. Marina Port Zélande is situated on reclaimed land inside a huge dam, the beautiful Brouwersdam, with its impressive sandy beaches bordering the North Sea one side and huge and sheltered Grevelingenmeer on the other, where the racing will be held. There is a sluice under the Brouwersdam to keep the Grevelingenmeer salty and maintain its salinity to preserve its original environment, which makes the Grevelingenmeer the largest saltwater lake in Europe. It is a popular place for holidays and water sports. The depth is around 14m and the water is brackish. The surrounding landscape is largely natural areas and quite flat.

Facilities

The marina has all the usual facilities including one large restaurant/bar belonging to the yacht club, together with laundrette, wash areas and a large free parking area. It is proposed to use the quay area in front of the marina facilities for boat storage along the whole length of the marina front. A massive event tent will also be constructed in the region of the restaurant. The owners of the marina have indicated that they will put extra slipway ramps in place for the championship. Launching will be carried out at around 4-5 locations along the quay. Fresh water hoses will also be available.

Just a short walk across from the marina and facing it is the popular Holiday Park Port Zélande - Center Parcs which has a huge array of facilities including food outlets and a supermarket. It is almost a small village, with 700 bungalows on a park covering 27 hectares. It also includes camping sites for tents, caravan and motorhomes. Camping can also be found at Centre Parcs, however the marina is investing in a new camping area at the entrance to the site. This will accommodate tents, motorhomes and caravans (touring) together with all the usual site facilities. For the more adventurous there is also beach side motorhome parking across the road on the seaward side of the dam

Race area

Two race areas have been earmarked for the Masters, a short distance from the marina. Sailing out of the marina you will quickly come to race area 1. Race area 2 will be located further down the Meer. There are some small islands in the Meer.

Social programme

Apart from the usual opening, closing ceremonies and mid week dinner, happy hours are planned for Monday, Wednesday and Thursday. The big event is on Thursday, when there will be a raffle for a brand new Finn, very generously sponsored by Devoti Sailing and Dinghy Racing Centre. Each competitor will get one free ticket, but you can also buy more when you get there. As usual there will be a full partner’s programme, being put together by the Dutch ladies, including a tourist boat trip to the races, a visit to Neeltje Jans, a cycle tour of Zeeland, visits to Rotterdam, Veere, Middelburg, Zierkzee, Kinderdijk and Scheveningen. All bookings can be made on the Sunday during the Meet & Greet.

Entry

The early entry fee is valid until April 15. After that the price increases by 50 per cent. The Dutch class is putting in a huge effort to make this memorial and fun week of Finn sailing. It will be a very special event.

FINN MASTERS MAGAZINE & YEARBOOK 2020

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2019 FINN WORLD MASTERS – SKOVSHOVED, DENMARK

PERFECT

SCORE FOR

VLADIMIR Krutskikh

hese waters are the home of legends and what “T better way to celebrate it than by hosting the biggest regatta for legends – the Finn World Masters.” With these words, Olympic medalist and former world champion, Jonas Høgh-Christensen welcomed nearly 250 Finn sailors to the 2019 Finn World Masters in Skovshoved, Denmark, hosted by the Royal Danish Yacht Club. It was held from 7-14 June.

From the start, the former double Masters world champion, Vladimir Krutskikh, didn’t put a foot wrong, winning each and every race in his group to end the week with a perfect score. The conditions suited him perfectly with a moderate to strong wind most days and a short chop that was a challenge to sail through. The large fleet was split into two groups of around 120, sailing inner and outer loops. Each day the fleets were randomised using a new system introduced this year that allowed eight fleet races and removed all ties without the need for a medal race.

DAY 1

Mike Maier, Krutskikh, and Simon Percival took the race wins on the opening day in an unstable and shifty easterly breeze. Legend, Henry Sprague was first to the top mark in the opening race for Yellow fleet, as the wind peaked at 16-18 knots. Maier was close

behind and soon took the lead to win from Paul McKenzie and Volodymyr Stasyuk. The wind eased towards the end of the race and the second race was sailed in much lighter conditions with some different faces at the front. After rounding the top mark in second Percival took the lead downwind, only to lose on the second beat to Allen Burrell, also from Britain. However, Percival was faster downwind to take the win from Burrell and Ville Aalto-Setälä. Blue fleet did not fare so well. Krutskikh lead throughout Race 1 with Laurent Hay moving up from about fifth at the top to second across the finish, with Uli Breuer a close third. The fleet finished in less than 2 knots of breeze and fighting a strong current. Though a start for the second race was attempted for more than two hours, eventually the race team gave up and sent the tired sailors back to shore.

DAY 2

With the fleets imbalanced, the first race on Tuesday had to wait for several hours for the breeze to arrive and when it did Krutskikh led at the top and extended on the fleet for a comfortable win as the breeze built to 15-16 knots, though it was still very shifty. He rounded ahead of Filipe Silva and Uli Breuer and they finished in that order. Krutskikh was again fastest to the top mark in Yellow group in Race 3, to lead round and win his second race of the day, this time from Taras Havrysh and Christoph Christen. Blue group was a battle between old adversaries, Anthony Nossiter and Maier. Nossiter rounded the top mark in the lead, with Maier in the chasing pack. Up the second beat Maier applied pressure but Nossiter remembered what to do and stayed ahead to take the race win from Maier and Felix Denikaev. After that, Krutskikh led overall from Nossiter, at his first Finn World Masters and Laurent Hay.

DAY 3

Despite several attempts at a start on Wednesday, no racing was possible on the third day. Forecasting Danish weather seemed to be a thankless task. While most forecasts showed strong winds, heavy rain and even the occasional thunderstorm, the reality was in stark contrast. After early rain and wind, a largely windless morning

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FINN MASTERS MAGAZINE & YEARBOOK 2020


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RUS 73 Vladimir Krutskikh - M CZE 1 Michael Maier - GM FRA 75 Laurent Hay - GM AUS 221 Anthony Nossiter - M SUI 5 Christoph Christen - M POR 51 Filipe Silva - M ESP 757 David Terol - M GER 193 Thomas Schmid - GGM AUS 22 Paul Mckenzie - GM GER 707 Uli Breuer - GM UKR 8 Taras Havrysh - M DEN 21 Otto Strandvig - GM NED 29 Bas De Waal - GM SVK 1 Peter Mosny - GM SWE 72 Peter Overup - M RUS 41 Denikaev Felikx - GM USA 74 Henry Sprague - L GBR 2 Allen Burrell - GM NED 1015 Thierry Van Vierssen - GM FIN 234 Ville Aalto-Setälä - M DEN 27 Christian Gunni Pedersen - GM GBR 5 John Greenwood - GGM NED 7 Cees Scheurwater - GM AUS 5 Matt Visser - GM SWE 5 Fredrik Tegnhed - GM

followed and at race time a light southerly was in place for the first time all week, with warm sunshine breaking through the thin, high cloud. The race committee attempted several starts and tried several locations, but fair racing was simply not possible and the fleets were sent home.

DAY 4

FROM TOP: Super Legends: Richard Hart GBR, Pedro Jimenez-Meifren ESP, Ola M Johannessen NOR • Legends: Henry Sprague USA, Magnus Olin SWE, Yury Polovinkin RUS • Grand Grand Masters: Thomas Schmid GER, John Greenwood GBR, Michael Staal DEN • Grand Masters: Michael Maier CZE, Laurent Hay FRA, Paul McKenzie AUS • Masters: Vladimir Krutskikh RUS (missing), Anthony Nossiter AUS, Christoph Christen SUI • Lady: Tina Sperl AUT •Others – Crutch (11th): Taras Havrysh, UKR NOT SHOWN: Nations Cup: 1. France, 2. Sweden, 3. Denmark • Sailing Club Trophy: 1. WSV Het Witte Huis, 2. Kongelig Dansk Yachtclub, 3. SRR Rochelaises • Art of Racing Prize (first Danish sailor): Otto Strandvig

The weather changed on Thursday to bring perfect warm, sunny conditions with nice sailable breezes for the two remaining days. Krutskikh made it five wins in five races on Thursday. Maier was up to second with Christen in third after two more races. The day’s forecast was for light winds later in the day and after a 90-minute delay from the scheduled 12.00 start, the fleet began racing in a steady 12-14 knots. As the day progressed the cloud cleared to leave a beautiful sunny day on the Øresund. Krutskikh dominated Yellow fleet, leading both races at the top and extending for some huge wins. In Race 4, Marc Allain des Beauvais was second at the top and held on to finish second while Christen crossed in third. The wind abated slightly for the next race with Krutskikh building an even bigger lead, to take his fifth win in a row, from Christen and Michel Audoin. In contrast, Blue fleet had two different race winners and many place changes. Filipe Silva punched out of the start in the first race to lead at the top and was never

(1) 1 1 (27) 2 4 5 5 5 (23) 8 2 (7) 6 4 (11) 2 24 3 3 (bfd) 20 9 (18) 14 15 (dnc) 28 (20) 19 10 (37) 4 12 21 2 (28) 10 (47) 3 (30) 24 13 20 7 (50) 18 14 23 9

1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 2 7 (5) 4 5 3 1 1 8 3 3 (16) 3 3 2 7 5 13 1 9 1 (dnc) 7 6 7 6 3 4 9 10 6 8 4 3 (27) 4 6 (15) 10 8 14 5 2 19 6 2 7 9 7 10 8 14 24 (28) 2 5 4 18 10 5 4 6 17 7 20 10 2 3 13 17 32 4 14 27 4 18 (43) 20 6 7 27 (37) 22 13 17 11 11 23 17 25 9 9 13 11 12 26 3 8 28 11 (30) 10 27 11 28 12 9 18 25 (30) 7 12 7 (30) 13 27 19

6 15 19 25 25 34 35 41 43 43 56 57 64 71 75 79 79 83 84 86 89 90 94 94 98

headed to take the race win from Maier and McKenzie. Maier went one better in Race 5, though he had to pass Bas de Waal to take his second race win of the week. Nossiter took third.

DAY 5

Again sailed in near perfect conditions, but with a limited time window to get in the two final races on Friday, it needed to go smoothly with the fleets away without recalls. And smoothly it went with each fleet of 124 boats getting away first time. For the second day running, the subtropical conditions were a delight with 8-12 knots of breeze In the Yellow fleet Silva again rounded first from Maier and McKenzie, and extended for his second win of the week from Maier and Hay. In the final race, Hay led at the top mark for the first time this week from and maintained that to the finish to win from Axel Schroeder and Christian Gunni Pedersen. In the Blue fleet Krutskikh rounded from Taras Havrysh and Nossiter. Nothing much changed until the finish, though Krutskikh extended for a large win to take the title with a race to spare. He also led the final race all the way to win from Peter Overup and David Terol to make it a clean sweep and claim his third Finn World Masters title. His final score of seven wins from seven races is remarkable given the calibre of the

FINN MASTERS MAGAZINE & YEARBOOK 2020

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2019 FINN WORLD MASTERS – SKOVSHOVED, DENMARK 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99

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GER 194 Axel Schroeder - GM 33 (43) 11 16 18 20 2 100 DEN 80 Michael Staal - GGM 31 8 19 4 13 (51) 29 104 GBR 21 Michael De Courcy - GM (51) 45 17 9 9 13 12 105 FRA 38 Michel Audoin - GGM 25 (ufd) 15 8 3 11 46 108 HUN 50 Akos Lukats - M 40 4 12 23 (65) 16 13 108 CAN 115 Derek Mess - GGM 15 27 (37) 25 4 34 10 115 FRA 96 Florian Faucheux - M 21 16 (56) 26 15 17 23 118 GBR 567 Martin Hughes - GGM 17 29 6 (41) 21 21 26 120 SWE 59 Lars Edwall - GGM 41 25 21 (61) 18 5 11 121 FIN 201 Kristian Sjöberg - GM 15 7 39 (42) 40 12 8 121 AUT 333 Gerhard Weinreich - GM 12 12 24 15 15 (44) 43 121 BRA 97 Ricardo Santos - M 34 34 8 12 16 18 (44) 122 GER 711 André Budzien - GM 6 (ufd) 9 12 21 31 44 123 SWE 75 Johan Wijk - GM 24 17 16 34 6 (42) 28 125 FRA 99 Marc Allain d Beauvais - GGM 16 (ufd) 22 2 33 22 31 126 SWE 14 Stefan Nordström - GM 20 6 25 21 37 (40) 17 126 UKR 14 Volodymyr Stasyuk - M 3 33 14 21 38 (41) 18 127 POL 73 Andrzej Romanowski - GM 43 5 16 18 (47) 15 32 129 ESP 337 Miguel Ángel Cabrerizo Morales - M 9 32 43 (44) 8 16 24 132 ITA 2 Marco Buglielli - GM 14 13 32 (39) 32 19 22 132 ITA 4 Francesco Faggiani - GM 6 38 10 (43) 23 23 36 136 SWE 61 Mikael Nilsson - GGM 28 7 10 18 (dnc) 8 66 137 RSA 1 Greg Davis - GGM 25 (58) 25 5 29 17 38 139 NED 81 Gerko Visser - GM 12 8 28 22 36 35 (dnc) 141 ESP 313 Antonio Parra - GM 19 26 29 16 26 33 (dnf) 149 GBR 33 Kieron Holt - M 10 21 26 36 41 (64) 21 155 DEN 7 Martin Mikkelsen - GM (bfd) 62 6 5 24 13 47 157 NED 43 Ronald Van Klooster - GM 22 22 27 32 (43) 34 20 157 DEN 6 Lars Hall - GM 40 21 30 14 34 21 (68) 160 BRA 11 Robert Rittscher - GM 53 (ufd) 23 20 14 41 16 167 RUS 1117 Andrew Bill - GM 35 41 20 (58) 35 29 15 175 GER 111 Rainer Haacks - GM 22 19 (55) 47 19 31 37 175 GER 909 Udo Murek - GM 47 13 35 33 28 (48) 22 178 NED 111 Chris Frijdal - GGM (53) 18 43 35 25 32 27 180 HUN 1 Geza Huszar - M 29 (ufd) 34 27 22 10 61 183 FIN 50 Freddy Markelin - GM (bfd) 74 26 31 19 23 14 187 CZE 75 Vladimir Skalicky - GM 50 (73) 40 24 27 36 18 195 GER 17 Kai Schrader - GM 39 42 21 (53) 24 25 52 203 DEN 246 Jens Kristian Andersen - GM 26 47 30 36 42 22 (51) 203 GBR 635 Simon Percival - M (bfd) 1 5 72 23 19 86 206 NED 780 Jw Kok - GM 33 33 36 15 (48) 42 48 207 DEN 20 Casper Elkær-Hansen - M (60) 50 44 17 31 50 19 211 BRA 32 Pedro Lodovici - M 27 34 11 (scp) 11 9 dne 216 DEN 249 Svend Andersen - GGM 11 64 34 46 37 25 (97) 217 FIN 112 Seppo Ajanko - GGM 18 70 12 (74) 12 67 39 218 GBR 61 John Heyes - GM 50 (74) 39 41 41 26 23 220 ESP 555 Juan Grau Cases - GGM 52 32 59 23 38 20 (69) 224 NZL 15 Greg Wilcox - GM 63 30 44 24 34 29 (64) 224 DEN 24 Jacob Brasse - M 63 16 31 22 (113) 44 49 225 GER 212 Rainer Wolff - GM 41 51 (dnf) 40 47 15 34 228 DEN 39 Jacob Dalgaard Nielsen - M 48 48 49 19 16 54 (63) 234 RSA 51 Philip Baum - GGM 46 23 61 46 (75) 38 21 235 FIN 23 Henri Räty - M (71) 52 45 32 62 28 17 236 NZL 5 Brendon Hogg - GM 54 45 31 14 33 61 (67) 238 CZE 33 Ivan Rames - GM 34 31 42 26 (60) 53 54 240 DEN 298 Henrik Sørensen - GM 55 44 51 37 (dnf) 39 15 241 POL 26 Bogusław Nowakowski - GGM 13 60 36 70 46 24 (78) 249 CZE 67 Josef Jochovic - GM 32 36 (77) 49 66 57 13 253 SWE 12 Stefan Sandahl - GM 42 35 42 40 57 37 (72) 253 SWE 15 Daniel Miles - GGM 57 67 45 (72) 26 33 26 254 GER 60 Thilo Durach - GM 30 (59) 55 45 44 56 25 255 SWE 100 Hp Hylander - GGM 8 (dnc) 33 51 29 69 66 256 USA 117 Michael Mark - GGM 49 46 53 33 (56) 47 28 256 AUT 11 Bernd Moser - GM (bfd) 68 68 45 20 24 33 258 DEN 25 Allan Hansen - M 58 9 46 44 (73) 37 68 262 SUI 12 Franz Bürgi - GM 39 11 (63) 54 45 58 55 262 GER 19 Andreas Bollongino - GM 36 55 41 (56) 39 40 52 263 NED 6 Wobbe De Schiffart - GGM 16 55 19 48 (96) 83 46 267 GER 188 Michael Kluegel - GM 17 71 40 35 71 38 (dsq) 272 AUS 10 John Condie - GM 45 25 35 34 (58) 14 dne 277 GBR 750 Ivan Burden - GM 45 49 49 37 49 49 (dnf) 278 SWE 10 Magnus Olin - L 59 15 56 (69) 51 59 40 280 DEN 14 Henrik Kofoed - GM 49 (ufd) 53 38 22 60 58 280 GER 960 Klaus Antrecht - GGM (70) 46 66 52 31 30 55 280

FINN MASTERS MAGAZINE & YEARBOOK 2020


100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147 148 149 150 151 152 153 154 155 156 157 158 159 160 161 162 163 164 165 166 167 168 169 170 171 172 173

SUI 88 Daniel Mueller - GM (70) 14 67 65 50 64 25 285 RUS 142 Yury Polovinkin - L 57 49 52 (76) 46 58 24 286 GER 103 Ralf-Udo Lemke - GGM 29 75 77 31 48 28 (85) 288 GBR 20 Andy Denison - GM 54 30 65 50 42 47 (70) 288 ESP 39 Jose Maria Pujadas - GGM 19 63 62 62 51 (84) 33 290 GER 289 Lutz Steinemann - M 65 40 29 62 (73) 46 50 292 GER 45 Dirk Sundermann - GGM 36 53 (75) 43 43 74 47 296 GBR 1 Sander Kooij - GM 37 (dnc) 32 dnf 14 43 48 298 FRA 23 Daniel Chédeville - L 75 47 (80) 59 52 45 20 298 SWE 91 Pär Friberg - GGM 46 41 50 64 (74) 45 53 299 NED 88 Chiel Barends - GGM 42 10 63 20 83 82 (dnc) 300 CZE 8 Jiri Outrata - L 61 43 54 (80) 54 66 27 305 SWE 2 Svante Collvin - GM 64 39 58 63 49 (92) 35 308 GER 226 Uwe Fernholz - GM 61 17 61 (91) 36 75 59 309 GBR 77 Stewart Mitchell - GM 68 (77) 60 30 59 35 60 312 GBR 78 Robert Temple - GM 31 61 66 38 61 (76) 56 313 FIN 227 Ronnie Roos - M 44 38 76 65 44 53 (dnc) 320 GBR 51 David Kitchen - GGM 67 (ufd) 33 39 74 46 74 333 SUI 63 Thomas Gautschi - GM 38 44 73 47 (88) 54 77 333 SUI 96 Oliver Wirz - M 125DNE 40 38 42 35 (61) 54 334 GER 175 Michael Möckel - GGM 82 (ufd) 46 89 32 59 30 338 AUT 73 Markus Schneeberger - GM 27 78 28 29 53 (dnc) dnc 339 AUS 68 Jay Harrison - GGM (86) 63 62 57 60 65 32 339 FRA 44 Christophe Deseilligny - GGM (bfd) 59 48 69 62 62 41 341 HUN 51 Istvan Rutai - GM (80) 80 72 57 54 43 40 346 AUS 6 Bob Buchanan - L 78 70 50 (81) 52 67 31 348 NED 11 Henk De Jager - L 51 35 57 54 (80) 78 73 348 DEN 201 Ole Krongaard - GM 77 72 (87) 56 67 36 45 353 NED 73 Maxim Berrens - M 23 (96) 48 94 64 65 62 356 SUI 593 Hans Fatzer - L 48 67 (71) 60 56 62 63 356 RSA 600 Arend Van Wamelen - GM 60 28 76 55 71 (80) 67 357 NED 82 Roel Lubberts - GM (71) 57 65 67 59 60 51 359 NED 71 Nico Van Wirdum - GGM 74 22 86 (103) 50 70 58 360 NED 1009 Pieter Risseeuw - GM 62 65 (82) 48 66 50 72 363 NED 4 Ruurd Baerends - GGM 67 26 78 79 82 (93) 35 367 SWE 28 Lasse Wastesson - GGM (85) 68 85 51 64 63 36 367 DEN 224 Henrik Thomsen - GGM (bfd) 37 54 68 70 63 76 368 GER 122 Holger Krasmann - GM 58 75 (84) 50 58 52 80 373 ESP 99 Gerardo Seeliger - L 24 90 41 (96) 81 68 70 374 GER 43 Ingo Spory - GM 74 64 47 70 45 (77) 74 374 HUN 2 Peter Sipos - GGM 59 86 74 (89) 57 72 30 378 GER 84 Michael Huellenkremer - GGM 73 66 74 (84) 55 69 41 378 FIN 145 Mathias Tallberg - GM 75 62 78 58 (84) 79 34 386 NOR 13 Reidar Fosse - GM 32 66 64 71 91 66 (104) 390 SUI 51 Ueli Appenzeller - GGM 80 65 (90) 74 30 55 89 393 NED 50 Jan Zetzema - GGM (bfd) 93 52 75 85 55 39 399 ESP 260 Victor Serrano Conesa - GM (97) 58 88 75 39 71 69 400 GER 178 Norbert Winkler - GGM 26 57 37 (raf) 94 94 93 401 CZE 222 Petr Vinkl - GM 73 (91) 67 81 77 39 64 401 RSA 2 Alan Serritslev - L 72 84 (88) 63 63 70 50 402 GER 180 Detlef Hillers - GM 56 89 80 52 79 48 (91) 404 SUI 57 Rudolf Baumann - GGM 76 56 70 (98) 84 82 45 413 FRA 63 Alain Renoux - GM 87 56 81 79 (95) 49 61 413 GER 710 Walter Kuhlmann - GM (94) 61 85 49 61 81 81 418 NOR 11 Arne Refshauge - GM 68 42 73 71 85 80 (88) 419 NOR 55 Arild Heldal - GM 62 54 70 68 75 90 (96) 419 DEN 195 Peter Nielsen - GGM 88 60 60 55 55 101 (dnc) 419 FRA 60 Jean François Cutugno - GGM 83 76 79 78 (dnf) 57 49 422 GER 479 Gerd-Uwe Hillers - GM 35 51 64 88 63 (dnc) dnc 425 GER 998 Guido Halterbeck - GM (bfd) 54 47 92 68 93 73 427 NED 931 Hessel Hoekstra - GGM (dnc) 72 68 82 94 52 59 427 CZE 211 Martin Kalos - GM 84 71 51 73 76 79 (86) 434 ARG 1 Ricardo Reyes Anderrson - GGM 64 29 97 (104) 89 85 71 435 SWE 721 Mikael Brandt - L 38 83 58 (dnf) 95 105 57 436 GBR 34 Peter Blick - GGM 98 85 90 85 (dnc) 51 29 438 NED 10 Nanne Boot - GGM 66 (dnc) dnc 59 69 81 38 438 SUI 27 Dominik Haitz - GM 86 77 (94) 61 76 73 65 438 GER 202 Rolf Elsaessser - GGM 72 (ufd) 69 99 96 56 57 449 GER 767 Andreas Demond - GM 83 31 (107) 88 98 74 79 453 GER 62 Uwe Barthel - GGM 69 36 59 78 88 (dnc) dnc 454 SUI 13 Peter Kilchenmann - GGM (90) 85 82 90 77 71 53 458 GER 818 Ross Vickers - M dne (92) 57 83 40 68 92 465 GER 272 Steffen Weiss - GM (104) 80 99 53 65 87 81 465 GER 169 Lutz Gunder - GM 37 (103) 87 92 86 88 79 469

fleet and the challenging conditions. While numbers were down on the previous year, 248 Finns was still a huge fleet of boats and sailors to manage, and the Royal Danish Yacht Club did an amazing job to keep everyone fed, watered and looked after on the water. It is never an easy task to organise such a huge event, but the huge amount of volunteers and club members made everyone feel welcome. Krutskikh explained his victory, “The regatta was very beautiful for me because I had a local coach from Denmark, Christian Rasmussen, who helped me a lot because every day he told me about the forecast, the current, about changes in the wind, so that was very good for me, because he knew some tricks with the wind and clouds.” Though the Masters age category title was dominated by Krutskikh there was a close battle between Christen and Nossiter for second. Nossiter, at his first Masters was so enthusiastic with the organisation and the racing that he bought a boat during the week so he could reignite his Finn career and train for next year. He wants to see all his friends from his Olympic years back in the class, sailing the Masters.

FINN MASTERS MAGAZINE & YEARBOOK 2020

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2019 FINN WORLD MASTERS – SKOVSHOVED, DENMARK 174 175 176 177 178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 217 218 219 220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231 232 233 234 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 241 241 241 241 241

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GER 200 RUS 18 SUI 80 BRA 103 GBR 40 NZL 64 GBR 631 DEN 18 BAH 1 SWE 20 RUS 212 USA 23 DEN 77 ESP 35 GBR 745 GER 256 FRA 30 GBR 42 GER 912 GER 71 DEN 211 GER 155 NED 13 DEN 205 POL 127 GER 505 SUI 65 SWE 21 SUI 54 SWE 734 FRA 748 GER 502 NOR 5 NED 9 AUS 245 GER 876 NED 877 RSA 592 SUI 4 POL 3 USA 155 DEN 825 GER 89 FRA 40 GBR 74 NOR 555 SWE 111 BRA 44 AUT 330 SUI 36 DEN 19 SWE 4 NED 150 USA 32 GER 836 GER 5 NOR 3 FRA 800 SUI 3 ISL 2 GER 322 NED 93 GER 26 USA 13 GER 245 FRA 311 NOR 2 ESP 318 GER 168 GER 471 GER 800 NED 848 SWE 35

Ulrich Dahlhoff Dr - GM 85 (94) 75 86 67 87 78 478 Evgeny Dzhura - M 81 83 84 (86) 82 72 76 478 Attila Szabo - M (100) 82 79 85 69 88 77 480 Luis Mosquera - M 76 53 71 82 (raf) 75 dnc 481 Russell New - M 78 87 (91) 60 86 89 83 483 Maurice Duncan - L 82 76 89 87 (101) 98 60 492 Richard Hart - SL (95) 73 91 76 83 85 85 493 Richard Berg-Larsen - GGM (dnc) 96 dnf 67 72 73 62 495 Pierric Bourbin - GGM 89 88 83 (106) 78 77 80 495 Gosta Eriksson - GGM 101 (102) 97 101 81 76 42 498 Lanfranco Cirillo - GGM 43 48 38 (dnc) dnc dnc dnc 501 James Hunter - GGM 91 81 (dnf) 66 raf 83 56 501 Flemming Bender Jensen - L dne 39 95 64 (97) 97 94 514 Pedro Jimenez-Meifren - SL (dnf) 82 101 93 78 86 75 515 John Colegrave - GGM 69 (dnc) dnc 83 70 86 83 516 Peter Langer-Langmaack - GGM 79 86 86 66 99 (dnf) 106 522 Pollet Yannick - GGM (105) 78 89 97 91 92 75 522 Richard Phillips - GGM 66 79 81 (dnf) 99 101 101 527 Alexander Jena - M 93 (99) 83 87 97 96 71 527 Bernd Blaß - GM (dnc) 103 102 98 93 91 42 529 Einar Olsen - GGM 77 98 103 (raf) 93 78 82 531 Edwin Gast - GGM 79 69 92 77 92 (dnc) dnc 533 Harold Lensing - GGM 81 (104) 102 95 87 89 82 536 Mogens Petersson - L 44 81 108 (dnc) dnc 91 93 541 Jan Kominek - GGM (dnc) 94 94 77 92 94 92 543 Dirk-Udo Eisser - GM (dnc) 91 106 91 101 90 65 544 Thomas Bangerter - GGM 55 52 72 (dnc) dnc dnc dnc 551 Mats R Karlsson - GGM 65 89 69 (ufd) 102 107 dnc 556 Marcin Gregorowicz - M 92 90 98 80 98 (100) 100 558 Peter Bernstein - L 99 (105) 98 94 79 97 98 565 Jean-Claude Lidon - GGM 84 95 (105) 95 104 103 84 565 Hartwig Steege - GGM 56 99 (dnf) 102 100 108 103 568 Frank M Ormstad - GM (dnf) dnc 96 102 80 84 84 571 Jobs Isselmann - L 103 (dnc) dnc 90 68 98 90 574 Kerry Spencer - GGM 96 97 (104) 93 90 104 95 575 Wolfgang Genesius - GM (dnc) dnc dnc 73 53 99 102 577 Lardie Remerie - GGM 89 102 104 99 (105) 102 90 586 Leon Ferreira - GGM (dnc) 95 95 104 100 109 88 591 Jiri Huracek - GGM (dnc) dnc 93 103 90 95 87 593 Jan Okulicz-Kozaryn - L (dnc) 93 101 108 107 95 95 599 Hans Claesson - L (dnf) 101 93 112 104 100 96 606 Tom Vestergaard - GGM (dnf) 100 108 110 105 96 89 608 Günter Kellermann - L (dnc) 101 106 100 106 110 91 614 Joseph Rochet - GGM 52 69 (dnc) dnc dnc dnc dnc 617 Lawrence Crispin - GM 11 (dnc) dnc dnc dnc dnc dnc 632 Stein Atle Haugerud - GM (dnf) 106 100 raf 102 106 94 632 Torsten Jarnstam - L 102 98 99 (raf) 87 dnc dnc 634 Fabiano Vivacqua Jr - GM (dnf) 88 103 96 103 dnc dnc 638 Tina Sperl - Ldy 88 (dnc) 100 100 103 dnc dnc 639 Jens Moecke - GM (dnf) 97 96 97 106 dnc dnc 644 Frank Høyer Rasmussen - GGM (dnf) 100 107 ufd 108 111 99 649 Jan-Erik Florén - L (dnf) dnc 105 dnf 110 99 87 650 Hans Klaassen - GGM (bfd) dnf dnc 84 72 dnf dnc 654 Charles Heimler - GGM 87 (dnf) dnc 105 89 dnc dnc 654 Romeo Goetz - GGM (dnc) 104 dnf 101 107 112 105 654 Herbert Straub - GM 90 87 (dnf) 109 dnc dnc dnc 658 Ola M Johannessen - SL (dnf) 107 110 raf 108 raf 97 670 Yves Zoccola - L (dnc) 84 92 dnc dnc dnc dnc 672 Carlo Lazzari - GM (dnc) 79 dnf dnc dnc dnc dnc 700 Rúnar Steinsen - L (dnf) 105 dnc 113 109 dnc dnc 700 Wilfried Jodorf - GM (dnc) 92 dnf dnc dnc dnc dnc 713 Gelmus Peeters - L (dnf) dnc dnc 107 112 dnc dnc 717 Willi Meister - SL (dnf) dnc 109 dnf 111 dnc dnc 717 Kay Statz - GGM (dnc) 106 dnf dnc dnc dnc dnc 727 Hermann Grube - GM 106 (dnc) dnc dnc dnc dnc dnc 727 Yann Gonzalez - GM (dnc) 107 dnf dnc dnc dnc dnc 728 Harald Vange - L (dnf) dnc dnc 111 dnc dnc dnc 733 Rafael Albaladejo - GGM (dnc) dnc dnc dnc dnc dnc dnc 746 Jack Larsen - L (dnc) dnc dns dnc dnc dnc dnc 746 Harald Wozniewski - GGM (dnf) dnc dnc dnc dnc dnc dnc 746 Gerd Lauszus - GM (bfd) dnf dnc dnc dnc dnc dnc 746 Pax Van De Griend - L (dnf) dnc dnc dnc dnc dnc dnc 746 Christer Jakobsson - GGM (dnc) dnf dnf dnc dnc dnc dnc 746

FINN MASTERS MAGAZINE & YEARBOOK 2020

Maier took the Grand Masters Trophy, passing the early leader, Hay. The 1988 Finn Gold Cup winner, Thomas Schmid was dominant in the very competitive Grand Grand Masters to finish in eighth overall, 14 places ahead of runner up John Greenwood, a double World Masters champion. Henry Sprague continues to defy his age by not only winning his third Legend’s Trophy, for sailors over 70 years old, but to do so while beating hundreds of sailors 20 to 30 years younger than him to finish 17th overall. Former double Legend champion Richard Hart, took the win in the Super Legends, for sailors over 80 years old, finishing in 180th place overall. There were four Super Legends taking part week. All Legends and Super Legends are suitably honoured each year, a remarkable group of sailors who confront the challenge of old age with the unique challenge of the Finn. The championship ended with a great prizegiving and free bar and as the event ended, so did the nice weather, with the traditional Danish weather returning to assist those late in packing up their boats.


BIDDING CLUBS FOR 2022 – HELSINKI

The club can easily accommodate over 300 boats with trailers and cars on its premises. There are two 30-40 metre ramps next to dinghy parks. Camping is possible at HSK with space for 40-50 camper vans, or at NJK just 3 km away. Most of the Helsinki boat equipment shops are located within walking distance as is the WB sail loft. There are many different racing areas available, for all conditions. The nearest one is about 1.5 nm away

2022 BID FROM

HELSINKI t all started in Helsinki in 1952. The Finn was used for the first time in the 1952 Olympics in Helsinki and to Icelebrate the 70th anniversary of that occasion, Helsinki would like to organize the 2022 Finn World Masters.

Helsinki Sail Racing Management (HSRM), in cooperation with the Finnish Sailing and Boating Federation, the Finnish Finn Class sailors and the City of Helsinki would be in charge of the arrangements. HSRM is a joint organisation of the seven leading sailing clubs in Helsinki making large international events happen. The Member Clubs are BS, HSK, HSS, HTPS, M, NJK, SPS with about 7,000 members and 1,500 boats Examples of regattas organised by HSRM and/or its individual member clubs include the Olympic Regatta 1952, Open European Championship for the Olympic Classes 2011, 49er & FX Open Europeans 2014, Dragon Gold Cup 2018, 5.5m Gold Cup & World Championship 2019

Getting to Helsinki 1. By car directly with a ferry from Travemunde to Helsinki, a ferry from Stockholm to Helsinki or driving through Via Baltica + a ferry from Tallinn to Helsinki. We will of course negotiate a deal for the transport of boats to Finland with the ferry companies. 2. By airplane: Helsinki International Airport is just 35 minutes from the harbour Dates A date later than normal is suggested to accommodate for Finland’́s northern latitude. Helsinki is, as it happens, quite far up north, the furthest north where any Finn Olympics has ever been held. We would therefore, to ensure the sea and air temperature are warm enough, apply for a special permission to host the 2022 FWM at the end of June or early July.

Helsingfors Segelklubb (HSK) The HSK harbour including clubhouse, restaurant, saunas, permanent changing rooms etc and is the best venue for dinghy sailing in the Helsinki region. It is located just 4 km from downtown Helsinki.

FINN MASTERS MAGAZINE & YEARBOOK 2020

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FREDrIK TEgnhED INTERVIEW – SWE 5

redrik Tegnhed has a good Finn heritage even if he F only came to Finn sailing later in life. Coming from the ‘Finn hometown’ of Uppsala in Sweden, he grew up

alongside the Finn greats at the Uppsala Kanot Förening (UKF), Rickard Sarby’s home club. The Finn was in his blood from an early age, but he always thought he was too small and it wasn’t until the Finn 60th Anniversary Regatta in Uppsala in 2009 that he finally took the plunge and bought a Finn, and now, as for countless thousands before him, it has become a lifestyle choice for him.

...they taught us

that training

will make a difference... “I grew up and learned to sail on the lake of Ekoln which is the most northern part of the bigger Lake Mälaren. Mälaren is connected all the way to the Baltic Sea via Stockholm. My first sailing club back in 1970 was Uppsala Kanot Förening where Rickard Sarby was active during his life. I started sailing the Optimist and my first coach was Boris Jacobson who was a famous Finn sailor and Olympian in the early days of the Finn. We young sailors got to hear all the time that Boris sailed every day, all year around, if it was open water - they taught us that training will make a difference.”

UPPSALA

“I still like to every year participate in the USS (Uppsala Sailing Association) regatta before summer. I get to go to my home water and sail on the lake Ekoln. The Finn World Masters was held there many years ago but at the size it has now become it would not be realistic. It’s still my favourite place to sail, though I like going to new places.” “Sailing in Uppsala amongst the Finn sailors, and being a smaller person I never even believed that I one day would sail the Finn. Then in 2009 we had the 60th year anniversary regatta in Uppsala. Rickard Sarby designed the Finn in 1949 so 60 years after that Uppsala organised an open Swedish Championship on the Ekoln water outside my old home club. My sailing friend Torsten Jarnstam, who also is from Uppsala and also from UKF but like me now lives in Karlstad, lent me one of his Finns. It was an older Vanguard that weighed at least 130 kg and was originally

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built for Larry Lemieux. The regatta was a success with sailors from several parts of the world and we had really strong winds. I was surprised that I was actually able to handle the Finn, though I tried to avoid gybing as much as possible.” “Later that year just before Christmas I went to Denmark and bought my first Finn, a Devoti from 1996 with Wilke mast that was way too stiff for me and some North sails.” He has sailed dinghies, such as the Europa moth, Laser, OK Dinghy and tried and tested Tornado, Fireball, RS Feva and some local Swedish boats like the C55 and 606. He has also raced on bigger boats to some extent and now the J70. “In comparison to other one man dinghies, I believe the Finn is superior both as an athletic tool and how you can plan your tactics, based on the position you have above the water. I also enjoy the Oscar flag – free pumping rule (though I did not at the beginning), which I think strongly has driven the class to a level that separates it from the others in a positive way.” And so it began.

lifestyle

“To me it’s kind of a lifestyle and also a very good way to stay fit, or a reason to do so. I believe it is so fun and rewarding to be able to train and compete locally on the waters here in Karlstad but also go abroad and meet the absolute best Finn sailors in the world and understand where the limits are and see how much more one can improve and get better. In lighter winds it’s fantastic just to go out on the water and cruise and be ‘high’ above the water compared to for example the Laser, which I sailed before. I think the Finn then gives you such a good overview of the situation on the water and it is really interesting to manoeuvre your way upwind through the wind changes and pressure differences. In the stronger winds the Finn will give you a strong smack in the face that keeps you humble for the task of sailing it. All in all I believe the Finn is a fantastic piece of equipment and I am sure that Rickard is smiling somewhere up in heaven when he looks down on the Finn fleet around the world today.” In his first Finn World Masters in El Balís, Fredrik finished 11th to take the Golden Crutch, narrowly missing the top 10. In Skovshoved he finished 25th. In 2019 Fredrik also won the Swedish Championship in Marstrand. Those who were in El Balís will remember the surprise on Fredrik’s face when he picked up the Golden Crutch. “I was standing at the prizegiving ceremony and had counted all the ‘buckets’ and realized there was only ten and I was the first outsider. I was very disappointed. I stood there with a beer in my hand chatting with Matt Visser, a long time Laser friend from Australia, and I did not really understand I got the Crutch until Matt kicked me and said it was me. For sure this was one of the best moments.”

FINN MASTERS MAGAZINE & YEARBOOK 2020


Of the two events he has done, “Of course Barcelona for me beats Copenhagen since I finished 11th overall and I also won one of the races. Also the surroundings in El Balís were excellent and fun as well as the weather conditions warm and sunny. We had a great time there. Copenhagen was also good however I felt that the starting groups were too big. To me when we grow over let’s say 80 boats it is too many and the length of the start line is way too long.”

interesting job where I am also lucky enough to control my time and workdays and so I can find good opportunities to go sailing.” Earlier interests in diving and flying gave way to sailing. “When I was young I watched everything with Jacques Cousteau, the diver, and was super interested in this. At the age of 35 I took my CMAS diving license and continued scuba diving for a number of years. I also have six take-offs and just as many landings as pilot student in a Cessna 172 but never finished the license.”

Challenge

GREAT FUTURE

“A person can challenge him/herself at home on local water and become the champion there. In the Finn we have the opportunity to go out and meet other skilled sailors around the world. That challenge is fun, teaching and also inspires me to train harder and develop myself and my sailing skill as far as I possibly can.” “I believe and also see that competition grows stronger year by year. I believe it’s a result of travelling around and meeting and sailing against other very skilled sailors. I really hope this will continue even though the Olympics no longer can be a driver for many sailors.” What about this year? “Actually I don’t know yet. Some of my friends I have talked to are thinking about the Europeans instead. That is just after the Swedish nationals, which we have here on our waters outside Karlstad the week before. Just pack the boat and race down to Poland.”

SWEDEN

He explains the class is slowly growing in Sweden again. “It is a little slow maybe but still the curve is pointing upwards. Last year two new guys from the Laser came into the Finn, Stefan Sandahl and Peter Overup. Really good guys and they are ambitious. They are training a lot and that’s really inspiring. We need to keep them humble towards us that are a little older in the class and beat them as often we can.” He thinks the class has had a natural attraction for being the ‘biggest’ one-man Olympic class as well as the toughest. “To sail the Finn you are typically a little older and looking for the challenge to compete against others but also the social part after and around the races that the IFA managed so well to build over the years. It’s ok in our class to be a strong sportsman and have a ‘beer on the pier’ after the race. This to me is really key to continuing.” “I believe we need to keep interacting with each other and meet and train together and exchange experiences and inspire as much as we can. From an IFA standpoint open organized training camps at good locations, for example inside Europe, where we can meet and train together would be one good example. I also believe it is key to keep the development of the materials and techniques as high as possible without this natural Olympic force that has driven the class for so many years. And ensure that we keep a high social positive spirit so other sailors outside the Finn notice all the fun we have, both on and off the waters.” Outside of sailing he works as a sales manager for the Scandinavian region in the pulp and paper business. “My company supplies process solutions 100% focused on paper mills and paper production. It’s an everyday challenge to compete for the customer’s attention and attract them to our products and solutions. It’s a really rewarding and

He believes the Finn class has a great future ahead. “ I am convinced that we need to keep up the development of the Finn and drive it as much a possible without the Olympic ‘force’. We also need to keep attracting good younger sailors into the class. Personally I would like to see gatherings like training camps, maybe an open European series that could attract some good sponsors and maybe there is some money to find there as well. Again I believe it needs to be as easy as possible to get to the venues. I also think we need to show that you don’t have to be one meter 95 cm tall and weigh more than 100 kg to sail the Finn. We have to show that it’s very possible to learn and sail the boat as a smaller sailor. Maybe there is some development on the equipment side needed that can make life at least a little easier for lighter sailors in over 18 knots.” “I think that if the number of competitors keeps growing as in the last years, then we have to divide into smaller groups of maximum 80 boats or so. I also believe that maybe the length of one full week plus the days before can be a bit long. I prefer shorter races but maybe more of them and quick restarts. The social part is also vital so that you have time to meet and interact with the other sailors.” In the future, “I would like to see an open European series and more training camps, and more connection to local national teams and developing these, helping to make good camps and spreading the techniques and skills from better sailors or teams. Maybe there is a possibility to send good coaches to local national team gatherings for enhanced training effect of these.” “I am positive but also realistic. I do believe and hope the class will keep developing and continue being this strong and interesting boat that sailors want to try. Still I believe it will be a challenge. It will be interesting to see the Masters fleet in some years ahead when these guys that today are Olympic sailors are old enough to enter the Masters. It will for sure be a challenge for all the others.”

Top left: In Skovshoved • Left: Winning the Swedish title in Marstrand • Right: In El Balís • Above: Winning the Crutch in 2018

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FINN EUROPEAN MASTERS 2019 - SCHWERIN

FILIPE SILVA WINS CLOSE EURO SERIES

AT SCHWERIN ilipe Silva won the second Finn European Masters, F after a close series that came right down to the final race. Sailed in Schwerin, Germany, from 10-14 September, seven of the eight scheduled races were completed in a range of conditions and some quite pleasant autumn weather.

The event attracted 64 entries from 16 nations, but excluding defending champion Vladimir Krutskikh. Schweriner Yacht Club has a long history of Finn sailing, and previously hosted the Finn World Masters in 2003.

Day 1

Silva took the early lead from Bas de Waal and Volodymyr Stasyuk. With the wind at 12-15 knots and rising to 18-22 knots for the second race, it was a tough day for the Masters fleet, but the smiles as the fleet crossed the finish line said it all satisfaction and elation after a great day of sailing, despite the aching limbs. Silva was the early leader in Race 1, chased by the two Germans, Uwe Thielemann and Budzien. Thielemann took the lead on the first reach and led all the way to the finish to win from Budzien and Silva. However Thielemann was scored UFD, handing the win to Budzien, sailing on his home waters. The wind increased for Race 2, with some great downwind sailing. Thielemann executed a fantastic port end start; well it would have been fantastic, but he picked up a second UFD. Thomas van den Berg led at the top from Ricardo Santos and the two extended on the fleet, with Budzien catching them up in the latter stages. On the second lap the wind increased to 20 knots and apart from a few capsizes, the fleet handled the conditions well. Santos passed van den Berg on the final downwind to lead into the finish,

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but then broached hard into committee boat, inflicting significant damage on his boat. He rerounded and finished ninth, while van de Berg crossed in second, but was UFD, as was Budzien, which left Silva as race winner and overnight leader.

Day 2

The conditions were more benign on Day 2, dropping to 4-5 knots at some points but at other times there were enough gusts to catch out the unwary, with a few sailors testing the water temperature on Schwerin Lake. During the day the wind varied from 4 to 15 knots and everything in between, with larger shifts and more than few clouds passing overhead. De Waal was the early leader in Race 3, rounding the top mark with a nice lead and sailed away from the fleet for what seemed like a certain race win. On the first downwind excessive cloud

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activity sucked away all the breeze and the fleet drifted down to the gate in 4-5 knots. Though de Waal led at the gate, Silva was applying pressure and on the second upwind, closed right up. Silva briefly took the lead on the final downwind, but de Waal just eked out enough to round the final mark ahead to lead into the finish. Maier crossed in third after a big recovery on the first beat. Maier was back on the water on Thursday after carrying out a delivery trip to Kiel on Day 1. After being squeezed out of the start in Race 3, the six time World Masters champion made a better job of it in Race 4 and rounded the top mark just behind Lawrence Crispin. He took the lead on the first reach to extend on the fleet on each leg for a comfortable win. Budzien took quite a few places on the final downwind as the breeze returned in force, while Ricardo Santos, with newly repaired boat crossed in third. The breeze brought the whole fleet down at speed for a fast, packed finish. At the half way stage de Waal held a scant two-point advantage over Silva, while Visser was a sizeable 23 points behind in third.

Day 3

A change in wind direction on Day 3 from the southwesterly of the last two days to a colder north-westerly wind, also meant a change in tactics with the right side favoured at times, but generally being on the right shift into the top mark paid dividends, with very different conditions at the top to the bottom of the course.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64

POR 51 Filipe Silva (M) 2 1 2 8 3 9 (12) 25 NED 29 Bas De Waal (GM) 4 2 1 4 7 11 (21) 29 GER 711 Andrè Budzien (GM) 1 (ufd) 25 2 2 4 1 35 GBR 74 Lawrence Crispin (GM) 7 18 11 5 (26) 2 5 48 CZE 4 Gebhardt Zdenek (GGM) (28) 3 4 14 15 22 4 62 DEN 7 Martin Mikkelsen 18 8 12 21 5 5 (27) 69 POL 73 Andrzej Romanowski 19 6 6 26 6 (33) 6 69 NED 1028 Thomas Van Den Berg 11 (ufd) 18 6 9 16 11 71 BRA 97 Ricardo Santos (M) 6 9 32 3 17 8 (48) 75 NED 81 Gerko Visser 14 5 8 9 13 26 (41) 75 UKR 14 Volodymyr Stasyuk (M) 3 4 16 17 16 25 (50) 81 UKR 10 Valentyn Klymentyev 17 10 10 20 (28) 10 14 81 HUN 7 Antal Székely (GGM) 9 16 21 (dsq) 25 12 2 85 RUS 41 Felix Denikaev 12 30 7 13 4 24 (ufd) 90 DEN 25 Allan Hansen 20 21 9 (43) 10 3 33 96 DEN 80 Michael Staal (GGM) (ufd) 24 13 12 14 6 30 99 NZL 15 Greg Wilcox (26) 11 19 23 24 7 17 101 NED 50 Jan Zetzema 21 17 33 7 23 (42) 8 109 NED 27 Paul Kamphorst 13 12 17 33 8 28 (ufd) 111 CZE 75 Vladimir Skalicky 27 15 30 10 (41) 19 16 117 RUS 333 Dmitriy Akhramenko 29 29 14 24 (40) 14 15 125 NED 111 Chris Frijdal 30 7 5 28 (32) 29 31 130 GER 972 Dirk Zilius 8 27 (40) 27 11 37 22 132 RUS 17 Vasiliy Kravchenko 15 14 35 37 12 (dnf) 20 133 RUS 34 Alexander Kasatov 10 23 22 (ufd) 39 32 13 139 RUS 4 Alexander Banko 24 25 37 15 20 18 (43) 139 GER 6 Ralf Behrens 5 (dsq) 29 30 19 13 47 143 UKR 12 Maksym Krukovskyi 40 19 20 (ufd) 30 35 3 147 CZE 1 Michael Maier (dnc) dnc 3 1 1 1 dnc 148 RUS 51 Mikhail Petriga 39 13 (56) 11 37 41 7 148 RUS 25 Anatoliy Voschennikov 25 34 (46) 36 27 21 9 152 RUS 3 Aleksey Boroviak (42) 38 28 16 18 20 34 154 GER 713 Torsten Haverland 41 22 24 (dnf) 21 15 37 160 NED 746 Marald Van Reijsen 16 31 15 34 29 36 (44) 161 NED 11 Henk De Jager (L) 23 26 (42) 29 33 27 23 161 HUN 51 Istvan Rutai 22 28 23 31 31 30 (49) 165 AUS 6 Bob Buchanan (L) 36 43 (55) 39 35 23 10 186 SUI 65 Thomas Bangerter 34 20 (38) 38 36 38 24 190 GER 717 Uwe Thielemann (ufd) ufd 26 19 22 17 42 197 GER 175 Michael Möckel 33 33 47 22 (dnf) 34 28 197 RUS 142 Yury Polovinkin (L) (50) 35 27 45 43 31 19 200 HUN 69 Stadler Csaba 43 39 41 32 42 (dnf) 36 233 GER 45 Dirk Sundermann 45 46 51 (53) 34 46 18 240 GER 71 Klaus-Dieter Götz 31 37 34 35 (dnc) dnc 32 240 HUN 2 Peter Sipos 51 32 39 40 (53) 43 40 245 GBR 44 Simon Philbrick 38 44 (58) 44 44 45 35 250 AUS 307 Bill Hodder 35 42 52 46 45 39 (ufd) 259 BAH 1 Pierric Bourbin (53) 45 43 50 49 49 26 262 GBR 68 Garry Phare 37 41 (60) 49 48 48 45 268 RUS 189 Sergey Lukin 32 (dnf) 53 urd 38 40 38 272 GER 155 Edwin Gast 46 47 44 51 47 44 (dnf) 279 GER 42 Jürgen Kraft (54) 53 31 52 54 51 39 280 GER 89 Günter Kellermann (57) 49 36 55 55 52 46 293 DEN 77 Flemming Bender Jensen 47 48 59 42 46 (ufd) 51 293 GER 470 Thomas Krbek (56) 52 45 48 50 54 53 302 UKR 121 Anton Svishchov 58 36 (61) 57 51 47 55 304 TUR 33 Ali Turksen 52 50 (62) 54 52 50 52 310 GER 301 Wolfgang Gnann 55 51 54 56 (dnc) dnc 25 312 GBR 19 Simon Hoult 44 (dnc) 49 18 dnc dnc dnc 324 CZE 76 Jiří Dvořák 59 54 (63) 58 56 53 54 334 GER 34 Dieter Borges (dnf) dnc 57 47 dnc dnc 29 346 SUI 3 Carlo Lazzari 48 (dnf) 48 41 dnc dnc dns 350 NED 860 Loek Kruijer (ufd) dnf 50 25 dnc dnc dnc 359 GER 178 Norbert Winkler 49 40 (dns) dns dnc dnc dnc 373

Masters: Filipe Silva, POR, Ricardo Santos, BRA, Volodymyr Stasyuk, UKR Grand Masters: Bas de Waal, NED, Andre Budzien, GER, Lawrence Crispin, GBR Grand Grand Masters: Gebhardt Zedenek, CZE, Antal Szekely, HUN, Michael Staal, DEN Legends: Henk de Jager, NED, Bob Buchanan, AUS, Yury Polovinkin, RUS

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Maier led from the start in Race 5, winning the pin and leading the fleet up the middle right. Silva rounded in second but downwind Budzien came through to round the opposite gate mark level with Maier. Maier escaped up the second beat to lead down to the finish with Budzien close behind again. Silva crossed in third. Race 6 followed a similar pattern with Maier and Budzien fighting for the pin and then fighting for the right. Crispin led round the top again but lost pressure downwind with Maier and Budzien again pulling through to round the gate together. Maier stretched out on the second upwind while Budzien dropped back on the left. Crispin recovered to second at the top and followed Maier down to the finish with Allan Hansen making gains on the second upwind to cross in third. After six races, Silva had retaken the lead from de Waal and Budizen. But it was tight with Silva and de Waal separated by just two points.

Day 4

After three days of great sailing conditions, Saturday was always forecast to be the lightest and trickiest day of the championship and so it turned out to be. It took more than two hours waiting to get Race 7 away and the first attempt at that was abandoned half way up the first leg with a huge wind shift. The next attempt got away first time with Felix Denikaev leading the fleet around the top mark from Antal Székely and Crispin. Székely led at the gate but Budzien was catching up fast. Coming into the final mark he passed Székely and then attacked Gebhardt Zdenek just before the final mark. Zdenek fouled and after doing turns, Budizen led down to the finish line to win from Székely with Maksym Krukovskyi crossing in third. Both Silva and de Waal were back in the pack and ended up discarding the race. After a further wait, Race 8 was started but the wind really wasn’t cooperating and shortly after the top mark, the race was abandoned and fleet sent back to the club. The championship was over. There had been no change in the top three with Silva taking the win, with Bas de Waal second and Budzien in third. Silva was elated at the win. After only three years in the class he said he had no expectations. “It was a great event, a very nicely organised event here in Schwerin. We were expecting a few more boats but a fleet of 65 is still excellent to race against. We had all conditions. Up to 20 knots on two days and today very low winds, so it was a bit of a rollercoaster for me today but I managed to hang on to the lead so it’s very positive for me.” “I started sailing Finn two years ago, so my first regatta was in Spain. And after that I gradually started doing some international events. This is my first victory so it has a special flavour, so I feel very happy.”

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NATION AND SAILING CLUB CUPS 2019 t the 2019 Finn World Masters A two new trophies were introduced: the Sailing Club Trophy, and the Nations Cup.

For the Sailing Club Cup, early leaders WV Randmeer eventually lost out to fellow Dutch club, WSV Het Witte Huis. The Nations Cup was eventually won by France. The best sailor in each age category is used to calculate the total points. Left: Chris Frijdal and Henk de Jager with the Sailing Club Trophy • Right: Michel Audoin collects the Nations Cup for France

Above: Results from Nations Cup Below: Results from Sailing Club Trophy (top 20 from 158)

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INTERVIEW WITH MICHAEL STAAL - DEN 80

a source

of fun and quality time

everal Danish sailors have been very pro-active in S discarding the negativity felt by many about the situation regarding the Finn and the Olympics. They

regard the class as vibrant and healthy and that in reality nothing much has changed for 95 per cent of the fleet. One of those is Michael Staal, from Dragør Sejlklub, just south of Copenhagen.

human capabilities of its sailors’.” Michael came to Finn sailing late in life. “After starting in Optimist in 1970 at the age of 11, one year later I started crewing in a Flipper, which is a scow type two-person youth dinghy with trapeze and spinnaker. Thereafter I sailed my own Flipper for some years until at the age of 18 I switched it for an old Elvstrøm Trapez dinghy. At the age of 21 I began sailing 505s and this is where I got a little ambitious. For a few years a friend and I made some decent international results until I had to retire from the international scene for money reasons.” “Instead I did some budget sailing with my future wife in the 505 for a number of years. When our kids were born we changed to a racing keelboat and did some successful racing and cruising until priorities demanded a pause from having our own boat. Since 2004 we have a 39 feet old and solid cruising sailboat that we use for holiday and weekend sailing in Denmark and neighbouring countries. It is as important to me as Finn sailing. And the purpose of holiday sailing is something else. I don’t mix the two different purposes of cruising and Finn sailing.”

INTO THE FINN

The Finn bug hit in the mid 1990s. ”It was some years into my boatless period in the mid 1990s that some crazy people in my home club re-invented Finn sailing in Denmark. And after some time, they persuaded me to try. Having a legacy in fast two-person dinghies and with a clear opinion all my life about never, ever sitting in a slow boat like a Finn, I was taken

He is quite outspoken on the subject. “Nothing changes for us except we can’t look at 19 very good athletes every four years sailing in strange conditions under the rules of commercial television. For sailing in general it is a huge mistake to believe that the Olympics has any significant impact on who goes sailing.” “The values in and around sailing can only be experienced when you try. That is our strongest asset and this is how we get people to sail the Finn. Put them into a Finn with a life vest on. Our regular activities in our local clubs are the key to show our case and recruit more fools. I don’t see a transition in relation to the majority of Finn sailors.” “Sometimes I feel that having Olympic status is counterproductive to attracting new sailors. It happens when the Finn is portrayed as ‘the most brutal boat that demands nearly ina little by surprise. Despite the low speed it was a nice boat to sail. However the most important part was the camaraderie and culture that reminded me of the old days in the Trapez and 505s. So it was my sailing friends who are guilty in me starting in the Finn.” Today it means a lot for him to be a Finn sailor. “It is my meditation. It is the reason for my exercises on shore – otherwise I would be in poor shape. It is a source of fun and quality of time spent. To some degree it has become a part of my identity. I am not sailing a Finn – I am a Finn sailor.” “The Finn combines the needs of mastering technique with strategy, tactics and your physique to a higher degree than most other dinghies – given your average personal displacement is around 0.1 tons. The Finn Masters gives me the opportunity to test and learn from sailing peers in a large variety of ages, which is unique in sailing.” He has now competed in 11 Finn World Masters. “My first was in Split in 2002 and for that reason memorable. Schwerin, Pwllheli and Kavala are probably the three best organized events

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I remember. I remember La Rochelle for the foul weather and my best result; and Barbados for the nice weather and cold beer.” He is concerned about the demographic progression in the Masters fleet. “The core of the Finn Masters are long time Finn sailors. They daily build the huge following. It is about who we are and to a lesser extent the Finn itself. With the diminishing youth activities around the world, all senior dinghy classes suffer from low succession. Looking at the age distribution in the last ten Masters we can calculate the end of Masters sailing. The Masters age group used to be the largest. Last year it was the GGM age group.” “The Olympic status has nothing to do with our huge Masters following. We might even be better off in the Masters without Olympic status. But I truly believe the Olympics deserve the Finn in the future.”

DANISH GROWTH

But in Denmark, numbers are growing again. “The Finn is today at an all time high in Denmark. We are about to register more than 50 active sailors, which equals close to 10 Finn sailors per 1 million inhabitants. Last year’s Masters in Denmark played an important role in attracting attention to our activities, but it is the continuous efforts of enthusiasts in our community that has attracted so many middle aged and elderly men to our class. Honestly speaking, we are a bunch of old fools nerding with something not many people understand. And we like to pamper our one and only Under 23 year sailor as well as our one and only Olympic candidate.” In terms of the Masters events, “We could pay more attention to some of the basic requests that have the greatest impact when people are coming from far away, such as a decent piece of water to sail on with a weather pattern that usually lies within our limits for a Masters regatta. There have recently been a couple of venues where I consider it to be too much of a compromise.” “If this means we have to restrict the number of participants, then I favour this, and I trust our local fleets will find a good way to share the number of participants they can have.” “I favour venues off the beaten track, such as Schwerin, Pwllheli and Kavala, where there is something to discover apart from the clubhouse and ramps. Mostly you also have a better and more enthusiastic local club crew doing a better job in such places.”

THE OLYMPIC QUESTION

Turning back to the Olympic question he said, “Look at us. We are not brutal beasts. We are accountants, plumbers, consultants, IT nerds, real estate agents and demolishers. And we don’t need Olympic budgets to have fun and be fast.” “We will not keep the people who do it mainly because of funding and fame. If rock stars really believe the Finn is the best

boat – and the only competitive boat – for people over 85 kg, then I expect them to keep on sailing. It is one of the less costly boats to sail competitively, and it is for sure one of the classes where they can learn the most (also from us old fools). And it can never ever be an excuse for them to stop sailing, if they really love sailing.” “Last but not least, it can’t be an excuse to stop sailing when only 19 oddly selected persons once every four years get to sail in a somewhat strange format.” That being said, he thinks the IFA should continue the fight to get back into the Olympics. “But for the benefit of sailors over 85 kg, not for the Finn itself. As mentioned, I don’t believe the Olympic status is a life saver for the Finn Class.” “I would also like the Finn Class to develop good and honest information for local clubs around the world, that is built on best practice examples of how a local fleet of Finns is created and maintained. We know how to do this. Let us tell it to the sailing communities.”

FINN GOLD CUP

Likewise, he thinks the Finn Gold Cup is incredibly important for the class. “The Finn Gold Cup is an institution in the sailing community. This is where the young and most talented sailors fight and become heroes. The Finn Gold Cup is much bigger than the Olympics. We must try to keep it as the pinnacle of our sport, and in sailing, as such.” “I would favour initiatives to create support, and possibly funding, to maintain the Finn Gold Cup as it is. It has a platform within sailing that should make it possible. Compare what, for example, the 505 class is able to do with a sponsor like SAP. Or what the Star class is achieving. We may see lower participation for a period, but let us not dilute this event ourselves. Masters should leave the Finn Gold Cup to the fittest and best. Stay home and do some training with your friends.” “The Finn class should become the nesting place for all future sailing talent over 85 kg until re-instated at the Olympics or another even better boat will be designed for people over 85 kg.” Lately he has had to chance to put some of this into practice. “I am involved in business but today in a more flexible role as a nonexecutive board member. It is only last year that for the first time I started to use the flexibility to do some more sailing. Probably one of my better decisions for a long time.” “I have sailed for 51 years and am still eager and able to learn to be a better sailor.”

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STAYING WARM 2. Stay warm This may seem obvious but it is very easy to sit static and exposed between races. Keep moving or cover up between races to retain heat as metabolic production is reduced. A big offshore type jacket provides a great warm shield to the elements and can be rolled up and stowed away as the next start sequence commences. Keep moving periodically to keep some heat production in the muscles so they don’t stiffen too much. Try starting at max effort cold and your legs will feel like concrete blocks - something that is not advisable!!

ur bodies are complex organic systems. We manage O to keep our complex systems working efficiently in a wide range of environmental conditions. This balance is

known as homeostasis. In order to maintain homeostasis we have many functions and processes which trade with each other and work in combination to react to our changing surroundings.

STAYING WARM

AND RACING

HARDER

FOR LONGER Heat is a particularly important environmental factor. Our bodies are quite sensitive to heat and we like to maintain a core temperature of 37°C plus or minus one or two degrees. If we become too hot or too cold we will instantly start to see a diminishing ability to function.Muscle coordination and concentration are impacted at both extremes. When racing in a cold environment it is important to try and give your body the best chance to cope. While it will have a number of mechanisms to retain heat and maintain core temperature, these may have a detrimental effect on performance. Numb hands and stiff muscles very quickly inhibit our ability to perform actions well. One step farther and we lose muscle control to shivering as an attempt to raise temperature through some metabolic heat production. Next we become groggy and our concentration will slip. At this point we are in trouble.

3. Warm Drinks A flask with a warm drink is a fantastic way to warm up from the inside. An old trick some of us used to use during frostbite racing in the Northern Hemisphere was to make a sort of juice tea. Using our standard sports powder or cordial we simply mixed it with hot water and kept it in a flask for between races. Even if we didn’t drink it all holding it kept our hands from going numb. I would not recommend tea or coffee as it they don’t always combine well with digestion during exercise. 4. Get warm Something overlooked is actually getting warm in the first place. A cold day onshore doesn’t always help us. On your way to the start do some efforts of work to get the muscles warmed up. Activity increases heat production increasing core and muscle temperature. This is what is called a warm-up and should be completed regardless of ambient conditions. On a cold day, this is even more important and may take a little while longer. Studies have shown warm muscles function significantly better than cold ones. For the most part staying warm is a mixture of common sense, experimentation and being proactive. If you allow yourself to sit and get cold, that’s exactly what will happen. Once you cool down it is harder to warm back up if wet and exposed to windchill. Be smart, be proactive in staying warm and follow our tips and let your competitors make the mistakes. Remember that staying comfortable will make a big difference to how you race but also to how you enjoy your day.

So how do we prevent this situation? 1. Wear adequate clothing While temperatures may seem reasonable, wind chill can be a huge contributing factor to losing body temperature. A simple wind smock or windbreaker can have a huge benefit in reducing heat loss through convection. Where ambient temperatures are low regardless of wind chill, insulation is key to prevent heat loss. Garments that have thermal properties will retain heat better than others. Chose thermal type clothing if you are worried about the cold. Anything exposed is also more susceptible to heat loss so think about head, hands and anything which can feel the wind. A good hat and gloves can have a very significant impact.

ChEck out Ross’s website for more INFORMATION ON fitness and performance Instagram: hamiltonsport Twitter: @hamiltonsport Web: hamiltonsport.com

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Finn european Masters 2020 – GDYNIA, POLAND

he 2020 Finn European Masters will be held in T Gdynia, Poland from August 31 to September 5. Gdynia can rightfully be referred to as the sailing capital

The region

Gdansk-Sopot-Gdynia - the Tricity area, is now connected with common infrastructure. Gdansk is the old Hanseatic town with its rich history. Sopot, the host of Masters in 2014, is well known, the Polish Brighton. For centuries, Gdynia remained a small farming and fishing village on the Baltic coast. At the beginning of the 20th Century Gdynia became a seaside resort town and experienced an inflow of tourists. After Poland regained its independence in 1918, a decision was made to construct a Polish seaport in Gdynia, between the Free City of Danzig (a semi-autonomous city-state under joint League of Nations and Polish administration) and German Pomerania, making Gdynia the primary economic hub of the Polish Corridor. It was then that the town was given a more cosmopolitan character with modernism being the dominant architectural style and emerged as a city in 1926. At that time Gdynia grew from the beginning, as a new, modern organism. Now it is easy to travel 100 years back in time by walking through the city. In the Tricity you can find old and new history, with its significant architecture, and atmosphere of nowadays.

of Poland. Every year a number national, European or World championships are held there. This is due to the excellent conditions in terms of both the wind and the infrastructure.

LOOKING AHEAD TO gdynia 2020

Connections

The championship will have an excellent location in the city centre with exciting sailing and recreation facilities. In September the average temperature is 23-25°C, water temperature is 17-19°C and average wind speed is 11 knots. The racing area is partially protected from the open sea and offers perfect sailing conditions. It is very close to Sopot, where the 2014 Finn World Masters was held. Equipment Inspection and registration will be held from August 31 to September 1, with an eight race series held from September 2-5.

Gdynia is very well connected with an international airport just 20 minutes away by car offering regular flights to most hub airports. There is an international ferry terminal with regular connections to Sweden as well as several container terminals in Gdynia and Gdansk. The marina in Gdynia is the largest and most up-to-date in Poland. One of its strengths is the location in the city centre. It is one of the beauty spots of Gdynia, busy with sailors from early spring to late autumn. The organisers have a wealth of experience of hosting major regattas There is an abundance of accommodation nearby including 2-4 star hotels and private accommodation, all within a five minute walk from the marina.

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Masters events across the world

UK Masters

Dutch Masters

Italian Masters

UK Masters 12-23 October, Warsash SC

Open Dutch Masters Championships July 5-7 • Port Zélande

Italian Masters Championship May 24-26, Foria

A dismal forecast didn’t deter 25 hardy sailors from travelling to Warsash for the 2019 UK Masters. Saturday brought wet, cold conditions with a breeze that varied from 3-8 knots, but provided four great races. Defending champion, Lawrence Crispin took two race wins while Simon Percival and John Greenwood took one each. After a great Finn dinner Saturday night, Sunday dawned with a rising 25 to 40 knots and all racing was abandoned. David Howlett provided coaching for everyone over the weekend, and also presented the Traveller’s Trophy prizes.

Almost 60 talented Finn sailors took the chance to test the water, facilities and the surroundings of Port Zélande, the venue of the 2020 World Masters. Driving to Port Zélande is a road trip itself: you will encounter the beauty of the southwest of the Netherlands. During the three days of racing we had wind NW 9-12 kn, often really shifty and difficult to read. There were 57 Finns from GER, BEL, SWE, POR and even CZE. Ages from youngsters to legends. As training for 2020 a couple of former Finn sailers re-entered the our class. The races were very good: we had the best (no kidding) race committee in years, the water was warm, the waves were great and the wind was challenging. The best sailor won: Roy Heiner: as re-starter in the Finn he sailed a perfect series.

The Italian Master Championship took place in Forio on beautiful Ischia island, in the gulf of Naples. All the seven scheduled races were completed in a range of conditions, with sun and light wind in the first two days and with a cold strong wind with rain on Sunday, in conditions unusual for the place and time of the year. Anyway everybody was happy with the venue and the organization and the fight for the championship was very tight, with the top three ending in just two points. Enrico Passoni showed his pace, experience and tactical excellence winning with a string of top results (3-3-41-3-1-4). Second was Giacomo Giovanelli who won three races and third Tommaso Ronconi, who became Master this year. The Master meeting voted for the 2020 Italian Masters to be held in Talamone, Tuscany.

1 NED 93 2 NED 94 3 NED 64 4 NED 972 5 POR 51 6 NED 98 7 GER 707 8 NED 81 9 NED 27 10 NED 29

1 ITA 6 2 ITA 202 3 ITA 234 4 ITA 2 5 ITA 5 6 ITA 67 7 ITA 60 8 ITA 960 9 ITA 33 10 ITA 3

1 GBR 74 2 GBR 5 3 GBR 2 4 GBR 635 5 GBR 10 6 GBR 61 7 GBR 76 8 FIN 201 9 GBR 567 10 GBR 33

Lawrence Crispin, GM John Greenwood, GGM Allen Burrell, GM Simon Percival, M Robert Deaves, GM John Heyes, GM Fred van Arkel, GM Kristian Sjoberg, GM Martin Hughes, GGM Kieron Holt, M

8 14 18 26 31 35 38 39 40 40

Australian Masters Woollahra Finn Masters 2019 Woollahra Sailing Club, 5-7 October 1 BER 9 2 AUS 2 3 AUS 5 4 JPN 6 5 AUS 10 6 AUS 231 7 AUS 32 8 AUS 302 9 AUS 68 10 GBR 88

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Rockal Evans Rob McMillan Matt Visser Hajime Kokumai John Condie James Bevis Marcus Whitley Peter Wallace Jay Harrison Kai Holdgate

7 11 23 27 28 34 36 48 55 64

Roy Heiner, GM Tijmen van Rootselaar, S Wietze Zetzema, S Tobias Kirschbaum, S Filipe Silva, GM Nanno Schuttrups, S Uli Breuer, GM Gerko Visser, GM Paul Kamphorst, GM Bas de Waal, GM

M: POR 51, Filipe Silva, 68; GM: NED 93, Roy Heiner, 19; GGM: NED 939, Peter Vollebregt, 107; L: NED 8, Rodrick Casander, 271

FINN MASTERS MAGAZINE & YEARBOOK 2020

19 22 60 67 68 69 78 78 83 92

Enrico Passoni Giacomo Giovanelli Tommaso Ronconi Marco Buglielli Francesco Cinque Gino Bucciarelli Riccardo de Sangro Giorgio Ricci Bastiaan Brouwer Massimo Paccosi

15 16 17 26 30 33 35 40 55 74


Russian Masters Open Russian Vasiliy Kravchenko writes: The 11th traditional international regatta Open Russian took place in Moscow from August 27 to September 1, with 41 athletes aged from 14 to 70 years from nine regions of Russia taking part. 22 Masters were competing for Russian Finn Masters. Nature gave the participants and organisers some nice warm and sunny weather and a moderate wind with a complex picture of the gusts and shifts, which made the game very interesting. The Race Committee was very fast and well organised as they managed to carry out seven nice long races during first two days of the regatta. The next days did not allow any starts unfortunately due to an anticyclone which came to Moscow. In the standings by age categories, the

Swedish Masters Sola Cup The Swedish Masters was sailed as part of the Sola Cup from Sept 14-15 in Karlstad and was the final of the four regattas that make up the Sweden Cup 2019. Top 3 Masters: 1 Lars Edwall, 2 Fredrik Tegnhed, 3 Stefan Sandahl. Winners in the various age categories: Master: Jonas Andersson, Grand Master: Fredrik Tegnhed, Grand Grand Master: Lars Edwall and Legend: Peter Bernstein.

winners were as follows: Masters: 1 Yuri Bozhedomov; 2 Dmitry Petrov; 3 Alexander Laukhtin. Grand-Masters:1 Alexander Kasatov; 2 Felix Denikaev; 3 Anatoly Voschennikov. Grand-Grand-Masters: 1 Michael Petriga; 2 Sergey Bolotin; 3 Alexey Borovyak. Legends: 1 Yury Polovinkin Top 10 Masters

2 RUS 575 4 RUS 32 5 RUS 131 6 RUS 171 8 RUS 34 9 RUS 41 14 RUS 25 16 RUS 17 17 RUS 51 19 RUS 4

Bozhedomov Yuriy M 15 Petrov Dmitriy M 23 Laukhtin Aleksandr M 44 Kravchenko Aleksandr M 54 Kasatov Aleksandr GM 60 Denikaev Felix GM 66 Voschennikov Anatoliy GM 87 Kravchenko Vasiliy M 94 Petriga Mikhail GGM 96 Ban’ko Aleksandr GM 107

At the end of the regatta a race dedicated to the memory of outstanding yachtsmen Viktor Potapov, Andrei Balashov, Valentin Danilov and Alexander Chumakov was held separately. The winner of the race was Kirill Kolyachenko.

NA Masters The 2019 Finn North American Masters Championships was held 11-14 April at Buccaneer Yacht Club on beautiful Mobile Bay. Twentyseven competitors representing thirteen states were treated to three breezy days of racing, as well as some breezy practices leading up to the event. 1 USA 12 2 ITA 117 3 USA 117 4 USA 1138 5 USA 47 6 USA 303 7 USA 40 8 USA 61 9 USA 1201 10 USA 27

Stephen Landeau Derek Mess Michael Mark Scott Griffiths Robert Kinney Joe Chinburg Charles Rudinsky Lee Hope David Brockbank Michael Entwistle

Polish Masters Polish-German Finn Masters Nationals August 1-4, Szczecin Bob Nowakowski writes: The idea of organising the Polish Finn Masters together with Germans was suggested by the Finn sailor from Poznan, Marek Jarocki, a year ago at the Finn World Masters in Spain. Until now, Germans did not organize regattas exclusively for the Masters, so it seemed that this could work. Polish Finn Association, as the initiator, organised the first event in Poland in Szczecin, hoping the next year’s regatta will be held in Germany. 23 sailors took part in the regatta, including six from Germany and one from Slovakia. We think that after this year’s first experiences, next year’s regatta will be much more numerous.

On the first day, because of no wind, no race could be held. On the second day there were three races in very variable wind conditions. On this day, the German Fabian Lemmel from Berlin proved to be the best, but the fight for next places was very fierce. On the third day, Andrzej Romanowski won all races and he also became the winner of the regatta. Slovak Petr Mosny was third. 1 POL 73 2 GER 501 3 SVK 1 4 POL 100 5 POL 26 6 POL 38 7 GER 30 8 GER 175 9 GER 972 10 POL 23

Andrzej Romanowski Fabian Lemmel Peter Mosny Marek Jarocki Boguslaw Nowakowski Juliusz Reichelt Ralf Heim Michael Mockel Dirk Zilius Piotr Pajor

10 10 19 21 23 29 33 36 39 43

10 18 22 25 30 35 43 61 62 68

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VENUES FOR 2021 - PUNTALA AND TIHANY

TIHANY, HUNGARY ihany, Lake Balaton will host the 2021 Finn European T Masters. It is a favourite place for Finn masters. Those who visited ‘THE Marina’ in the past want to return, writes Istvan Rutai.

PUNTALA, ITALY he 2021 Finn World Masters returns to Punta Ala in Italy, ten years after it was last held there, and T remembered as one of the best venues the Masters had ever visited.

It will be organised again by the Centro Velico Punta Ala at the beautiful PuntAla Camping Resort, a 27 hectare camping site and holiday park located in a Mediterranean pine forest adjacent to the an unfeasibly beautiful and long beach. During the summer months (April-October), there is a regular afternoon thermal breeze, which makes sailing pleasant and fun. The sea surface is never too rough and it allows good sailing even with strong winds; protected from strong currents and rough waves. The organisation has held many other international events over the years. During the summer months the water temperature is between 18° and 24°C. The waters are clean and certified by international organisations which control the quality of the environment. The Gulf of Follonica, in front of the Island of Elba, encloses an area of the Mediterranean Sea well protected from strong currents and very strong winds. Following the trends of the eco-tourism sector, in synergy with the sensitivity of environmental issues – the PuntAla Camping site works to recreate a ‘natural lifestyle’, an approach that has been acclaimed and rewarded by national and international environmental organizations. For more information about services and accommodation, please visit the website www.campingpuntala.it

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The club is located in the middle of Lake Balaton, on the edge of a peninsula. In September the water temperature is 22-24°C, the wind blows between 2-4 Bft. Our race team is fully optimised for Finn sailors, and we organise the Finn nationals very frequently. Our club’s main activity is youth sailing. We have 70 kids, including six junior Finn sailors. The marina building is completely rebuilt, and we now have a huge hall for rainy weather (though this is quite rare in September), plenty of restrooms, jury rooms, workshop. Beer tap, and local wines are always at the sailor’s disposal. After the races, snacks are served every day. For morning warm ups, and any postponements, we have an excellent viewpoint café bar, just in the entrance of the harbour. We have a wide range for accommodation: camper parking, clubhouse rooms (note the beds are 190 cm long), local B&Bs, 3-4-star hotels. They are all in walking distance. Around the lake there are plenty of nice attractions to visit (castles, monastery, spas, wineries), and Budapest is only 1 hour drive. Hungary is a home of Pata boats, so if you are interested to rent a high quality dinghy, feel free to contact us. Just before the European Masters in 2021 we will have the nationals, so it’s a great opportunity to get familiar with the local conditions in a 50-60 boat fleet.

FINN MASTERS MAGAZINE & YEARBOOK 2020


MINUTES OF ANNUAL MASTERS MEETING - JUNE 2019

Annual Masters Meeting MINUTES Held at Skovshoved Havn, Denmark • JUne 12, 2019 Meeting opened at 10.06am Present President: Andy Denison Secretary: Robert Deaves Committee: Philip Baum, Marc Allain des Beauvais, Rolf Elsässer, Henk de Jager Around 150 sailors were present. The President welcomed the Finn Masters then announced the sad news that Juri Saraskin had passed away on Monday. The meeting stood and held a 1-minute silence in respect. 1. Apologies None received. 2. Approval of the 2018 Minutes Last years minutes approved by the meeting. No matters arising. 3. Bid presentations for 2021 Bid presentations were made to host the 2021 Finn World Masters from the Royal Varuna Yacht Club, Pattaya, Thailand, and Puntala, Italy. Three bids were received for the 2021 Finn Masters Europeans: Biscarosse, France, Motril in Spain and Tihany, on Lake Balaton, Hungary Members present moved to an area to cast their votes in ballot boxes, over seen by Chairman of the jury.

About the Finn World Masters

F

inn sailors of the age of 40 and above are called ‘Masters’ and are divided into age groups: Master (40-49), Grand Master (50-59), Grand Grand Master (60-69) and Legend (70 and above). 

Each year they sail the Finn World Masters and Finn European Masters. Also existing are the large local groups of Finn sailors, organsing national or club level Masters regattas. The binding factor characterising these Finn sailors is that all have a sport-loving, collegial and institution based on friendship and

4. President’s report Last year President visited Port Zelande to compile the report for the magazine and website. The President also attended the first Finn Masters Europeans in Split to be part of the opening ceremony and generally oversee the organisation to be to the Master’s satisfaction. He thanked the club for their hospitality. Money was used from the event to buy new trophies for each of the age categories. Over the winter the President sat down with Ray New, Steve Hayles and Richard Phillips to look at the random selection process. He thanked Ray New for attending the Masters for a few days to oversee the registration and set up the random selection of the fleets. The President announced that it was being discussed that the 2020 Gold Cup in Palma could be an open event to attract as many sailors as possible, including Finn Masters. He asked for a show of hands of those that may be interested in attending and received a positive response. The President talked about the new voting process and how it was more accurate for choosing a venue. In the past it was felt that the old system of a ‘show of hands’ was open to abuse. The President said that two new trophies had be obtained for the Nations Cup and the best sailing club, and he thanked Richard Phillips for instigating and seeing through the scoring process of these two new categories. Thanks were also given to Jan Kingma and Liz Burrell and he hoped that they both would continue with their efforts.

6. Election of officers Henk de Jager agreed to another term of four years. The President said he was happy to continue should the masters be happy.

5. Announcement of winning bids The 2021 Finn World Masters was awarded to Puntala, Italy. The 2021 Finn European Masters was awarded to Tihany, Hungary.

12. Any other business No matters presented. The President closed the meeting at 11.17.

7. Accounts The report showed a balance of around EUR 13,000. The main expenditure over the past year was EUR 4500 on medals for the next five years and new trophies. Copies of the accounts were available at the meeting. 8. Magazine and website Masters present were happy with the website and magazine. 9. Address from IFA Tim Carver, from the Executive Committee of the International Finn Association, spoke to the meeting on plans to attempt to ‘rebalance the slate’ of Olympic events, with several proposals to bring the Finn back to the Olympic programme. These will be elaborated on in the coming weeks. He reiterated that work continues to reinstate the Finn, working constructively with World Sailing. 10. Address from President of Honour The meeting then heard briefly from Gerardo Seeliger, who spoke about his intention stand for the job of President of World Sailing in 2020. 11. Finn World Masters 2020 Jan Zetzema gave an update on the organisation for Holland 2020 World championship at Port Zelande, The Netherlands.

The date of the next meeting is 31st May 10am at Port Zelande.

respect. Note: If, in a specific year, you reach(ed) the age as listed, the accompanying title is applicable from January 1 to December 31 of that year. All the rules and governing documents for the Finn Masters and the championships can be found in the Finn World Masters Rules and Event Manual, which can be downloaded from the Finn Masters website at https://www.finnworldmaster.com/about/documents Category

2020

Jan.1 – Dec. 31 Master 40-49 Born 1971-1980 Grand Master 50-59 Born 1961-1970 Grand Grand Master 60-69 Born 1951-1960 Legend 70+ Born 1950 or earlier Super Legend 80+ Born 1940 or earlier Lady 40+ Born 1980 or earlier

2021

2022

Jan.1 – Dec. 31 Born 1972-1981 Born 1962-1971 Born 1952-1961 Born 1951 or earlier Born 1941 or earlier Born 1981 or earlier

Jan.1 – Dec. 31 Born 1973-1982 Born 1973-1982 Born 1973-1982 Born 1952 or earlier Born 1952 or earlier Born 1952 or earlier

NOTE: all ages and years are inclusive of that year

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MEDALISTS AND WINNERS 1970-2019

Finn World Masters

1970-2019

1995 Malcesine, Garda, Italy 1 Larry Lemieux, Canada 2 Kurt Shimitzek, Germany 3 Wolfgang Gerz, Germany

2009 Maubuisson, France 1 André Budzien, Germany 2 Jurgen Eiermann, Germany 3 Laurent Hay, France

1996 La Rochelle, France 1 Roland Balthasar, Germany 2 Wolfgang Gerz, Germany 3 Walter Mai, Germany

2010 Split, Croatia 1 Michael Maier, Czech Republic 2 André Budzien, Germany 3 Christen Christoph, Switzerland

1997 Cervia, Italy 1 Wolfgang Gerz, Germany 2 Larry Lemieux, Canada 3 Minski Fabris, Croatia

2011 PuntAla, Italy 1 Michael Maier, Czech Republic 2 Allen Burrell, Great Britain 3 Uli Breuer, Germany 2012 Pwllheli, Wales 1 Michael Maier, Czech Republic 2 Allen Burrell, Great Britain 3 Laurent Hay, France

1970 St Moritz, Switzerland 1 Mel Oskamp, Netherlands 2 Othmar Reich, Switzerland 3 Worn Clark, South Africa

1983 Port Carmargue, France 1 Heini Unterhauser, Italy 2 Frank Roth, Switzerland 3 Herbert Herwig, Germany

1971 Medemblik, Holland 1 Andreino Menoni, Italy 2 Othmar Reich, Switzerland 3 Mel Oskamp, Netherlands 1972 Gargnano, Garda, Italy 1 Mel Oskamp, Netherlands 2 Andreino Menoni, Italy 3 Beda Zingg, Switzerland

1984 Lago di Caldaro, Italy 1 Walter Mai, Germany 2 Palle-Steen Larsen, Denmark 3 Friedrich Müller, Germany

1998 Castelleto di Brenzone, Garda, Italy 1 Larry Lemieux, Canada 2 Minski Fabris, Croatia 3 Wolfgang Gerz, Germany

1985 Seebruck, FR Germany 1 Jørgen Lindhardtsen, Denmark 2 Klaus Stuffer, Italy 3 Henning Wind, Denmark

1999 Maubuisson, France 1 Larry Lemieux, Canada 2 Greg Davis, South Africa 3 Jean Paul Gaston, France

1973 - Not awarded   1974 Port Carmargue, France 1 Andre Mevel, France 2 Mel Oskamp, Netherlands 3 Vernon Stratton, Great Britain

1986 Lagi di Bracciano, Italy 1 Heini Unterhauser, Italy 2 Klaus Stuffer, Italy 3 Georg Oser, Switzerland

2000 Weymouth, England 1 John Greenwood, Great Britain 2 Larry Lemieux, Canada 3 Andrew Cooper, Great Britain

1987 Les Embiez, France 1 Peter Raderschadt, Germany 2 Walter Mai, Germany 3 Ivor Ganahl, Switzerland

2001 Kingston, Canada 1 Larry Lemieux, Canada 2 Hein-Peter Okker, Netherlands 3 Eberhard Bieberitz, Germany

1988 Lido degli Estensi, Italy 1 Hans Fatzer, Switzerland 2 Jiri Outrata, Czechoslovakia 3 Kurt Schimitzek, Austria

2002 Split, Croatia 1 John Greenwood, Great Britain 2 Minski Fabris, Croatia 3 Larry Lemieux, Canada

1989 Torbole, Garda, Italy 1 Peter Raderschadt, Germany 2 Kurt Shimitzek, Austria 3 Mikael Brandt, Sweden

2003 Schwerin, Germany 1 Eberhard Bieberitz, Germany 2 André Budzien, Germany 3 Roman Teply, Italy

1990 Altenhein, Switzerland 1 Mikael Brandt, Sweden 2 Friedrich Müller, Germany 3 Jiri Outrata, Czechoslovakia

2004 Cannes, France 1 Larry Lemieux, Canada 2 André Budzien, Germany 3 Michael Gubi, Austria

1991 Port Carmargue, France 1 Kurt Schimitzek, Germany 2 Jochen Lollert, Germany 3 Hermann Heide, Germany

2005 Bracciano Lake, Italy 1 Silvio Santoni, Italy 2 André Budzien, Germany 3 Allen Burrell, Great Britain

1992 Uppsala, Sweden 1 Roland Balthasar, Germany 2 Herman Heide, Germany 3 Peter Vollebregt, Netherlands

2006 Lake Balaton, Hungary 1 Michael Maier, Czech Republic 2 André Budzien, Germany 3 Michael Gubi, Austria

1993 Lake Bracciano, Italy 1 Peter Vollebregt, Netherlands 2 Walter Mai, Germany 3 Jan Bjornberg, Sweden

2007 Murcia, Spain 1 André Budzien, Germany 2 Agustin Juarez, Spain 3 Allen Burrell, Great Britain

1994 Diessen, Germany 1 Roland Balthasar, Germany 1 Jiri Outrata, Czech Republic 3 Walter Mai, Germany

2008 Medemblik, Netherlands 1 André Budzien, Germany 2 Mihail Kopanov, Bulgaria 3 Han Bergsma, Netherlands

1975 Port Carmargue, France 1 Andre Mevel, France 2 Othmar Reich, Switzerland 3 Erich Kaspareth, Italy 1976 Port Carmargue, France 1 Andre Mevel, France 2 Laszlo Zsindely, Switzerland 3 Othmar Reich, Switzerland 1977 Port Carmargue, France 1 Georg Oser, Switzerland 2 Heinz Reiter, Germany 3 Andre Mevel, France 1978 Port Carmargue, France 1 Heinz Reiter, Germany 2 P Lebois, France 3 Georg Oser, Switzerland 1979 Port Carmargue, France 1 Karel Hruby, Czechoslovakia 2 C Sturm, Switzerland 3 Andre Mevel, France 1980 Lake Lipno, Czechoslovakia 1 Georg Oser, Switzerland 2 Karel Hruby, Czechoslovakia 3 Jiri Maier, Czechoslovakia 1981 Port Carmargue, France 1 Gy Wossala, Hungary 2 Georg Oser, Switzerland 3 Frank Roth, Switzerland 1982 Lake Neusiedl, Austria 1 Georg Oser, Switzerland 2 Ivan Hoffmann, Czechoslovakia 3 Friedrich Müller, Germany

MASTERS

(President’s Cup, Presented 2014) 2014 Aleksandr Kuliukin, Russia 2015 Vladimir Krutskhik, Russia 2016 Rafael Trujillo, Spain 2017 Vladimir Krutskhik, Russia 2018 Giacomo Giovanelli, Italy 2019 Vladimir Krutskikh, Russia

GRAND MASTERS

(Finn Veteran Gold Cup - Trophäe Marktgemeinde Kaltern 1984) 1984 Walter Mai, Germany 1985 Jørgen Lindhardtsen, Denmark 1986 Heini Unterhauser, Italy

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1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001

Peter Raderschadt, Germany Hans Fatzer, Switzerland Peter Raderschadt, Germany Mikael Brandt, Sweden Kurt Schimitzek, Germany Roland Balthasar, Germany Peter Vollebregt, Netherlands Roland Balthasar, Germany Larry Lemieux, Canada Roland Balthasar, Germany Wolfgang Gerz, Germany Jiri Outrata, Czech Republic Hans-Günter Ehlers, Germany

Luksa Cicarelli, Croatia (1st GM)

FINN MASTERS MAGAZINE & YEARBOOK 2020

2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

2013 La Rochelle, France 1 Michael Maier, Czech Republic 2 André Budzien, Germany 3 Erik Lidecis, USA 2014 Sopot, Poland 1 Michael Maier, Czech Republic 2 André Budzien, Germany 3 Akeksandr Kukliukin, Russia 2015 Kavala, Greece 1 Vladimir Krutskikh, Russia 2 Dmitry Petrov, Russia 3 Giacomo Giovanelli, Italy 2016 Torbole, Italy 1 Rafael Trujillo, Spain 2 Vladimir Krutskikh, Russia 3 Michael Maier, Czech Republic 2017 Barbados 1 Vladimir Krutskikh, Russia 2 Laurent Hay, France 3 Rafael Trujillo, Spain 2018 El Balís, Spain 1 José Luis Doreste, Spain 2 Antonio Poncell, Chile 3 Giacomo Giovanelli, Italy 2019 Skovshoved, Denmark 1 Vladimir Krutskikh, Russia 2 Michael Maier, Czech Republic 3 Laurent Hay, France

*For the Austrian Hungaria Cup (Presented 1982 by Peter Mohilla and Gy Wossala.)

Henry Sprague, USA (1st GM)

Eberhard Bieberitz, Germany Jiri Outrata, Czech Republic Marin Mrduljas, Croatia Eberhard Bieberitz, Germany Marin Mrduljas, Croatia Ilias Hatzipavlis, Greece Francresco Cinque, Italy Michael Gubi, Austria Marc Allain des Beauvais, France Rob Coutts, New Zealand André Budzien, Germany Michael Maier, Czech Republic Yuri Tokovoi, Ukraine Michael Maier, Czech Republic


2017 2018 2019

Laurent Hay, France Antonio Poncell, Chile Michael Maier, Czech Republic

GRAND-GRAND MASTERS

2016 2017 2018 2019

Pedro Jiminez-Meifren, Spain Gerd Bohnsack, South Africa Gus Miller, USA Richard Hart, Great Britain

LADIES

(Ladies Trophy presented 2012) 2006 Bozena Smidova, Czech Republic 2007 Bozena Smidova, Czech Republic 2008 Bozena Smidova, Czech Republic 2009 Brigitte Devilliers, France 2010 Brigitte Devilliers, France 2011 Sabine Breuer, Germany 2012 Sabine Breuer, Germany 2018 Tina Sperl, Austria 2019 Tina Sperl, Austria

GOLDEN CRUTCH 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019

Han van Vierssen, Netherlands Horst Klein, Germany Rolf Lehnert, Germany Herbert Sondermann, Germany Jürgen Kraft, Germany Lucio Nodari, Italy Dieter Borges, Germany Hans-Günther Ehlers, Germany Jiri Outrata, Czech Republic Kurt Schimitzek, Austria Kurt Schimitzek, Austria Herbert Sondermann Claudio Bosetti, Italy Louie Nady, USA Mladen Makjanic, Croatia Peter Raderschadt, Germany Martin Plecity, Czech Republic Nicola Menoni, Italy Bernd Moser, Austria David Potter, Great Britain Laurent Hay, France Francesco Cinque, France Bas de Waal, Netherlands Arwin Karssemeijer, Netherlands Panagiotis Davourlis, Greece Raymond Hall, New Zealand Alexiy Marchevskiy, Russia Henry Sprague, USA Martijn van Muyden, Netherlands Antonio Poncell, Chile Fredrik Tegnhed, Sweden Taras Havrysh, Ukraine

Geest Trophy 2017 2018

Peter Langer-Langmaack, Germany Hubert Sparer, Italy

EURO CUP 2011-2017

2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

Ian Ainslie, South Africa Minski Fabris, Croatia Igor Frolov, Russia Felix Denikaev, Russia Ian Ainslie, South Africa Ian Ainslie, South Africa André Budzien, Germany

Balaton Balaton Balaton Balaton Balaton Balaton Balaton

FINN EUroPEAN MASTERS 2018 Split, Croatia 1 Vladimir Krutskikh, Russia 2 Karlo Kuret, Croatia 3 Michael Maier, Czech Republic

2019, Schwerin, Germany 1 Filipe Silva, Portugal 2 Bas de Waal, The Netherlands 3 André Budzien, Germany * NOTE: These lists generally represent the engraving on the trophies. Some trophies appear to have been used for various categories over the years. Where there are inconsistencies or lack of engravings, other names are displayed in italics. It seems some sailors won categories but the trophies were presented to others. Please send any updates, additions or corrections to media@finnworldmasters.com.

1970 18 1971 13 1972 14 1973 20 1974 20 1975 7 1976 ? 1977 28 1978 37 1979 29 1980 30 1981 38 1982 51 1983 48 1984 103 1985 111 1986 83 1987 94 1988 100 1989 101 1990 103 1991 97 1992 85 1993 127 1994 140 1995 132 1996 120 1997 131 1998 132 1999 148 2000 90 2001 32 2002 134 2003 158 2004 191 2005 168 2006 184 2007 136 2008 229 2009 264 2010 167 2011 282 2012 133 2013 285 2014 230 2015 204 2016 355 2017 133 2018 352 2019 246

(Finn World Masters Trophy Builded by Ralf Kratz SV Biblis Germany) 2000 Luksa Cicarelli, Croatia Mike Till, Great Britain (1st GGM) 2001 Louie Nady, USA (1st GGM) 2002 Minski Fabris, Croatia (1st GGM) 2003 André Budzien, Germany 2004 Larry Lemieux, Canada Alan Tucker, South Africa (1st GGM) 2005 Friedrich Müller, Germany 2006 Friedrich Müller, Germany 2007 Luksa Cicarelli, Croatia 2008 Luksa Cicarelli, Croatia 2009 Jørgen Lindhardtsen, Denmark 2010 Luksa Cicarelli, Croatia 2011 Michael Brandt, Sweden 2012 Pascal Tetard, France 2013 Henk de Jager, Netherlands 2014 Henry Sprague, USA 2015 Francesco Cinque, Italy 2016 Marc Allain des Beauvais, France 2017 Marc Allain des Beauvais, France 2018 José Luis Doreste, Spain 2019 Thomas Schmid, Germany

SUPER LEGENDS

LEGENDS

(Legends Trophy presented in 2012) 2006 Walter Mai, Germany 2007 Seigfried Bohl, Germany 2008 Walter Mai, Germany 2009 Walter Mai, Germany 2010 Richard Hart, Great Britain 2011 Howard Sellars, Great Britain 2012 Howard Sellars, Great Britain 2013 Friedrich Müller, Germany 2014 Richard Hart, Great Britain 2015 Henry Sprague, USA 2016 Howard Sellars, Great Britain 2017 Henry Sprague, USA 2018 Friedrich Müller, Germany 2019 Henry Sprague, USA

Attendance at

Finn World Masters 1970-2019

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