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WITH US!

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THE MARCH OF THE EMPEROR FIM SUPERBIKE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

GIOVANNI SALA INTERVIEW

GAVE OVER! MONSTER ENERGY AMA SUPERCROSS AN FIM WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP


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Editorial RIDE

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No slight return MotoGP goes back to Silvertone PADDOCK MOTOGP

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MotoGP Results Guide The reference book! FIM INSIDE RIDE

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The March of the Emperor FIM Superbike World Championship RIDE

18-21 Publishing Director: Guy Maitre

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Orange crush Championship under Austrian grasp at halfway point FIM Motocross World Championship FIM INSIDE

Chief Editor: Isabelle Larivière

STANDINGS

Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme 11, route Suisse – 1295 Mies – Suisse Tel : +41-22 950 95 00 – Fax : +41-22 950 95 01 @ : info@fim.ch website : www.fim-live.com

Game Over! Monster Energy ama Supercross, an fim World Championship

Photos: Dario Agrati David Reygondeau Stan Perec/ Marc Robinot Courtesy Werner Haefliger Eric Malherbe Ray Archer Frank Hoppen Scooter Grubb FIM Archives & Collection C.Lavery (Vintage) Photo Milagro Lay-out & Printing: OIKO SERVICE srl via Po 74 66020 S.Giovanni Teatino Chieti - Italy FIM Magazine n° 73 Issued May-June 2010

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PADDOCK ENDURO

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Interview Giovanni Sala

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FIM INSIDE FIM WOMEN CAMPAIGN

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VINTAGE

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Past issues available on request The articles published in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the official position of the FIM.

Interview Leslie Porterfield Speed is breathtaking! 1913 Six Days Reliability Trial The first one TECH TALK

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The content of this publication is based on the best knowledge and information available at the time the articles were written.

Long-life GP engines How cutting costs has challenged & stimulated race engineers GALLERY ENDURO

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Leon Haslam An inherited name

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ROAD BOOK JULY/AUGUST

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EDITORIAL Dear Readers,

Vito IPPOLITO FIM President

As you know, the FIM is committed to caring for the environment and to making motorcycle riding a safe, environmentally friendly and enjoyable activity. Thanks to the great cooperation of the organisers, the promoters and also the National Federations, the World Environment Day was celebrated in the framework of the agreement between the FIM and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) at all FIM events (MotoGP in Mugello, Italy – Motocross MX1/MX2 in St-Jean d’Angély, France – Motocross Sidecar in Wschova, Poland - Trial in Motegi, Japan – Speedway in Copenhagen, Denmark) taking place on the weekend of 5-6 June. In this issue you will find an update on some initiatives carried out during this important day by the FIM, teams and National Federations in order to raise awareness of the importance of respecting the environment. Moreover, some joint meetings have been organised between the Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme, the Union Internationale Motonautique, the Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile and the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale, along with the participation of a UNEP representative, with the aim of working together and sharing information and expertise in order to improve their environmental policies and develop the application of alternative energies in their respective sports. More and more electric events are being organised around the world showing the interest from the organisers and riders to compete with electric motorcycles. Last year, the FIM supported the FIM Ride Green Eco Enduro, an initiative from the DMU, and this year, several events are taking place like the FIM e-Power International Championship. My first mandate as FIM President will end with the FIM Congress in October. During my current mandate, we were able to develop and implement many projects on issues such as the environment, alternative energies, public policy, road safety and the promotion of women in motorcycling. We are now focusing on the development of touring. Furthermore, together with all its promoters and other partners, the FIM is continuing to work hard to meet its objectives of reducing costs in order to mitigate the impact of the world financial crisis. At the same time, although this also means a great deal of work, it must adapt the sport and its technical regulations within the championships as the “show must go on”. All these objectives are part of the Strategic Plan that we have been developing during these past two years. It is clear that the FIM needs to adopt the structure, governance and functioning principles that are most suited to reach its ambitious mission, goals and objectives. I hope you enjoy reading this latest version of our magazine.

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NO SLIGHT RETURN MOTOGP GOES BACK TO CLASSIC SILVERSTONE “THIS WAS A COMMON SORT OF RACETRACK FOR US. WE’D GO FROM HERE TO ASSEN, AT EIGHT KILOMETRES, AND SPA FRANCORCHAMPS. YOU GUYS SHOULD GET USED TO IT AND ENJOY IT ... AND RIDE THOSE BUMPS.”

The speaker was Randy Mamola, twice a winner at Silverstone back in a former life; now a leading light in the MotoGP charity Day of Champions, on the eve of the race. The new generation of riders didn’t need any urging to see the positive side of the latest and longest addition to their calendar. They were enjoying it already. The bumps just added to the challenge. “Fantastic track,” said Casey Stoner. “Interesting and hard to learn,” said Dani Pedrosa. “Beautiful – the lap takes a long time, it’s wide and difficult to understand,” said Lorenzo, who would go on to win the race by miles. In an era when most new race-tracks are tight, twisty and crammed into a small area, and all of them are computer-designed and somewhat clinical, the return to the classic British airfield circuit was like a breath of fresh air. By tradition, that fresh air came at a low temperature and at some speed, as a north wind also brought smatterings of rain sweeping in across the acres. That also was well in line with the traditions of Silverstone. Happily, race-day stayed dry. Silverstone Grand Prix 1985 - 500cc race .///

MotoGP’s return to the track in the heart of rural middle England – between university town Oxford and the industrial belt of Birmingham and Coventry – was the latest twist in the history of one of the World Championship’s core events. The series began in 1949 with the Isle of Man TT, already then the oldest race in the world. Racing’s mood changed as speeds rose, and by 1976 the old Mountain Circuit was adjudged too dangerous for the World Championships. The British GP was instituted in its place, at Silverstone from 1977. It stayed there for the next nine years, and the nature of the circuit as well as the talent of the time led to some spectacular and all-time classic battles. One was the breathtaking duel between Britain’s Barry Sheene, the popular Rossi-style superstar of his era, and the invading American maverick Kenny Roberts in 1978. They toyed

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Silverstone Grand Prix 1982 - Starting grid 500cc.///

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Silverstone Grand Prix 1986 - 250cc race .///

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Silverstone Grand Prix 1986 - 500cc race winner, Wayne Gardner (Honda).///

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The closeness was of course most especially apparent in Moto2 and another new winner, the fourth in five races. Frenchman Jules Cluzel, benefited from a last-lap slip by ex-125 World Champion Thomas Luthi, who was second by 0.057 of a second. Julian Simon and Scott Redding also crossed the line before another half-a-second was out .///

with one another all race long, even exchanging rude signs on the long Hangar Straight. At the finish, Roberts won by 0.03 of a second, in spite of a death-defying last-corner lunge by Sheene that took him out onto the grass verge at more than 200 km/h.

That last corner, Woodcote, was a classic in its own right: a 160plus km/h right-hander approached at top speed. It was so wide that in the 250/350-classes of the day bikes would sometimes run in four or more abreast. On the last lap. The layout was not unique. After the 1939-1945 World War: several race-tracks had sprung up using airfield perimeter roads. Silverstone was still special: this had been a heavy bomber base a long runway. This meant a sprawling long circuit accomplished at a very fast gallop. There were few slow corners, but plenty of difficult fast ones. Exactly the sort of track that favours close motorcycle racing, with lots of slipstreaming and wide corners, that allowed riders to use creative lines. Britain’s grand prix moved north in 1987, to Donington Park, for a stay of 23 years.

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The return to Silverstone was not only special for sentimental reasons. The circuit had undergone a second major revamp. This not only created fine spectator areas and facilities. It also remodelled the circuit infield section, cutting out some very slow twists, restoring a lot of the character of the original track. And returning a semblance of the old Woodcote corner – though no longer -approached at anything like top speed. The paddock was full of F1 figures, ranging from championship contender Mark Webber and commentator/ex-driver Martin Brundle to designer Adrian Newey: all anxious to see this first major international tryout of a new circuit they would be using themselves for the first time in a fortnight. The track didn’t disappoint. It was good for close bike racing, giving chances to catch up, and to overtake. It was also challenging: the bumps and speed caught out several riders in practice, including Dani Pedrosa (twice), Andrea Dovizioso, flying satellite Honda rider Randy de Puniet and stellar rookie Ben Spies.

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Jorge Lorenzo wrote his own script. He was on his top form and proved it from the first lap; he pulled away to win by almost seven seconds .///

The closeness was of course most especially apparent in Moto2, where big jostling battles took place down the whole 40-strong field, and another new winner, the fourth in five races. It was Frenchman Jules Cluzel, who benefited from a last-lap slip by ex-125 World Champion Thomas Luthi, who was second by 0.057 of a second. Julian Simon and Scott Redding also crossed the line before another half-a-second was out. The only problem with MotoGP was that Jorge Lorenzo had written his own script. In the second GP without injured superstar teammate Valentino Rossi, leading on points, the Fiat Yamaha man was on his top form, on pole position, alongside two rivals, de Puniet and Pedrosa, both of whom had crashed trying to beat him.

Pedrosa did indeed drop back to eighth; the battle for second saw them still scrabbling for position through Woodcote: Dovizioso, Spies (the Superbike champ’s first rostrum), Hayden and Stoner, all within seven tenths, and de Puniet still barely a second adrift. What a thriller. What a tribute to the riders of the good old days. And what a return to a great track. Even if the 125s that closed the day did look a little lost on Silverstone’s vast acres, they still came up with a Briton on the rostrum (Bradley Smith was third, behind Marquez and Espargaro); and even if the strong crowd of 70,000 sometimes looked thinly spread. Well, it always was a bit like that at Silverstone.

It’s a big place, in every sense of the words. It was time to drive home his advantage, and Jorge proved it from the first lap. He for once out-started Pedrosa, and when the factory Honda man pushed ahead twice, he moved straight back in front again. His Yamaha was fluid over the bumps and the sweeping corners, and he pulled away to win by almost seven seconds.

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by Michael Scott

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PAD D OCK

“My goal was to provide journalists with a practical and accessible working tool compiling maximum results and statistics. This work has been praised by the Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme who awarded me with the FIM Motorcycle Merit diploma. This is the best prize I have ever received in my life!” - says Werner Haefliger .///

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PADDOCK

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THE REFERENCE BOOK MOTOGP RESULTS GUIDE

THE MOTOGP RESULTS GUIDE IS THE ULTIMATE WORK OF REFERENCE! Werner Haefliger tells us the story of this reference book that began 20 years ago. “I was Press Officer in Formula 1. During the European Grand Prix at Brands Hatch in 1983, two Italians qualified on the first line. The journalists in the press room wondered when such an event had last happened. It took us more than four hours to find the answer: the Grand Prix de France 1953! “explained Werner. “There were no statistics at that time in Formula 1. I then started to develop small notebooks delivering “stats” for journalists, and as from 1986, I started to look at motorcycle racing history”. A very thorough work for Werner, since the Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme (FIM) did not really have proper archives before 1960. He had to research various media, read newspapers, magazines, records, listen to old radio broadcasts in different places in Europe. “I had to contact many different people in different countries to help me gather the necessary information, a considerable amount of work but really exciting - I think more than 7000 hours!” Werner continued. “Many great people supported me during this long period of time like Braakmal Egbert, former Director of the Assen circuit, members of the FIM and Maurice Büla, first as a rider and later as a witness of Grand Prix Racing from 1949 until 2005 to whom I

dedicated this book, just to name a few. I spent many hours in the FIM’s archives during my spare time and in my holidays. Fortunately, I was supported by my wife and also by my stepfather. He was a retired watchmaker (now deceased) and he established and developed through my notes all the statistics between 1992 and 1995. My wife participated in checking the data” smiled Werner. “My goal was to provide journalists with a practical and accessible working tool, compiling a maximum of results and statistical analysis. The MotoGP Results Guide now attracts more and more people such as former riders, team managers and many passionate people. The first edition published in 1987 was a 500-page book. Over the years and after an accumulation of data, it reached 2000 pages and a weight of 1.5 kg in 2003! This year, Werner Haefliger entrusted the printing of his book to the world’s leading publisher of the Holy Bible in order to ensure the best possible compromise between light paper and print quality. The MotoGP Results Guide now weighs 800 grams but delivers tons of information! by Isabelle Larivière

The 2010 edition of the MotoGP Results Guide is available in the FIM Store at www.fim-store.com! .///

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FIM INSIDE

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LEISURE MOTORCYCLING 2010 FIM MOTOCAMP

IF YOU ENJOY MOTORCYCLE TOURING AND CAMPING WITH OTHER LIKE-MINDED BIKERS, THEN THIS EVENT IS FOR YOU! This annual event is being organised by the Slovak Motorcycling Federation (SMF) in central Slovakia in the tourist centre of Donovaly, from 25- 28 August. Meet up with old friends and make new ones: excursions, entertainment and much more... FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO WWW.MOTOCAMP2010.SK OR CONTACT SMF@SMF.SK

2010 INTERNATIONAL RIDE TO WORK DAY

scooter to work and show everyone the advantages and responsible use of resources by taking part in this activity. The FIM is again sponsoring a Photo Contest to encourage participation in the RTW Day event. Take some interesting photos of riders using their machines to ride to work this June 21st and enter them in the contest. There are great prizes to be won such as a free pass to a sporting event, free subscription to the FIM Magazine Ride with Us!, FIM Vintage items and many more... the winning entries will be published on the FIM website and in the FIM Magazine Ride with Us! REMINDER FIM PHOTO CONTEST DEADLINE JULY 21! Did you ride your motorcycle or scooter to work on June 21 ?

day to demonstrate that motorcycles are an important form of transportation as well as recreation. Fellow employees, politicians and the general public will be aware of the commuting motorcyclist.

June 21st, 2010 marked the 19th Annual International Ride To Work Day. The FIM embraced this event throughout its affiliated federations to demonstrate support for road and street riding activities worldwide.

Scooters and motorcycles require much less space to park and manoeuvre in busy cities and relieve traffic congestion. In addition, they use less fuel, cause less pollution and have little impact on the road and bridge infrastructure.

The RTW Day originated in the USA and is now an international event. Riders throughout the world will be riding their scooters and bikes to their workplace on this

The FIM encouraged street riders to participate in this event held worldwide on June 21 in 2010. Ride your motorcycle or

Additional information on this event can be found at: www.ridetowork.org 21 July is the DEADLINE for sending to info@fim-live.com your photos of riders using their machines to ride to work on June 21. Great prizes to be won! Winning entries will be published on the FIM website and in the FIM Magazine Ride with Us!

by Maggie Sutton

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THE MARCH OF THE EMPEROR FIM SUPERBIKE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP THE 2010 FIM SUPERBIKE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP IS KEEPING ALL ITS PROMISES. HARD FOUGHTR ACE S, SURPRISES AND AC TIONPACKED EVENTS, AND HALF W AY T H R O U G H T H E CHAMPIONSHIP, MAX BIAGGI IS IN THE LEAD, RIDING HIS EXCEPTIONAL RSV4 APRILIA.

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At the end of the races at the Miller Motorsport Park, the seventh rendez-vous of the 2010 season, Max Biaggi has just taken the lead of the provisional classification. Since his arrival in Superbike back in 2007 it is the first time that the Roman has been on top of the general classification. Senior rider of the class (39 years old on June 26), Max Biaggi has been building up his success for over a year. He wants this World title, for himself, in order to enter into history, in order to be the first Italian rider to clinch the Superbike title, and without doubt to retire at the top ending a breathtaking sporting career. As a rider who has not been crowned World Championship since 1997 (4th title

in the 250cc class), he has been working very hard with Aprilia for more than a year on the tuning of a RSV4 designed and made at the height of the rider’s talent. Max Biaggi never leaves anything to chance. In fact he gathered around him part of the technical team that was already working at Aprilia during his successes in 1994, 95 and 96. This staff allows him to move “in a family” with total confidence and to ride an extraordinary motorcycle. One year after the comeback of the Italian manufacturer in Superbike, Aprilia and Biaggi made a third double win in Miller’s races after those in Portimão and Monza. Still in Miller, Leon Camier, Max’s teammate who is discovering the World Championship

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After the race at the Miller Motorsport Park, Max Biaggi leads the provisional classification. Since his arrival in Superbike back in 2007, it is the first time that Max Biaggi is on top of the general classification .///

and most of the circuits, placed the second RSV4 on the second step of the rostrum in the second race. A double win for Biaggi, a double win for Aprilia and a double lead in the Championship as Biaggi is leading the riders’ classification and Aprilia is leading the manufacturers’ classification. A 100% Aprilia in mid-championship, which even so may not mask the attacks of the adversaries, beginning with the Leon Haslam and Suzuki team combination. BY ELIMINATION

Just one little mistake, a simple crash during a race in Miller, cost his leadership place of leader to Leon Haslam. The British

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rider, top man of the Alstare Suzuki team, had been irreproachable all through the first half of the season holding the first place since the opening of the Championship. “Leon has matured” his father Ron Haslam likes to note. It is certainly the secret of his regularity as he totalises at mid-season ten rostrums, three of which are wins in 14 races. With less than half the number of wins as Biaggi, Haslam is only 15 points behind the Roman. The two leaders have opened a big gap between them and their followers. Jonathan Rea third, Carlos Checa fourth and Noriyuki Haga fifth, are all more than 100 points behind Biaggi. This trio is however achieving good performances as

all three have won at least one race in 2010, while Michel Fabrizio on the second factory Ducati is completing the list of winners in the current season. This season remains particularly open with seven manufacturers officially entered and motorcycles which have undergone little evolution between 2009 and 2010 and thus are all at the edge of their performances. Moreover it is not rare to note differences of less than one second per lap during practice between the first 15 riders. It was in Kyalami that the statisticians who keep the Championship updated pointed out the smallest time difference ever registered between the four riders on the first row of the starting

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Senior rider of the class (39 years old on June 26), the Roman wants this World title to enter into history, in order to be the ďŹ rst Italian rider to clinch the Superbike title .///

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The British rider, Leon Haslam top man of the Alstare Suzuki team, had been irreproachable all through the first half of the season holding the first place since the opening of the Championship. He totalises at mid-season ten rostrums, three of which are wins in 14 races .///

grid: 125/1000th of a second. But if, during practice and race, the differences are often very small, in the Championship the distances in points have widened. Looking closer, the 2010 season seems to operate by elimination. At first it was James Toseland. In Australia, during the first event of the season, the double Superbike World Champion crashed heavily. Returning to Superbike on the R1 machine which was 2009 Champion with Spies, he would need some weeks to come back. He would climb the first degrees of the rostrum in Valencia and since then he is still running after his first victory in 2010.

At Honda, the balance is a little bit better and all hopes rest on the young Jonathan Rea. There was a first alert in Portimão where his CBR had a mechanical failure which forced him to retire. In Monza, Rea was in hell with a double crash, synonymous with a double zero. This leaves him far behind in the Championship. On the same weekend, Biaggi achieved a double win and scored 50 points. Things were not much better in Miller where the Ten Kate rider crashed in a spectacular manner during practice. Weakened, he ended the first heat in 14th after another crash at the beginning of the race and finished eighth in the second heat.

The main victim of this first part of the

Last resistance fighter, Carlos Checa could have come back closer to Biaggi and Haslam Championship is the Ducati factory team. in the United States. The problem was that Noriyuki Haga was the shadow of himself, the Spaniard was betrayed twice by the with qualifying practice frequently beyond electronics of his 1198R when he was clearly the third row on the grid, and below-average leading the race in front of Biaggi, unable to performances in Portimão, Assen, Monza At Honda all hopes rest on Jonathan Rea ./// resist him in regularity. and Kyalami. The outcome is not really more brilliant for his teammate Michel Fabrizio, only All these racing facts and action-packed in tenth place of the provisional classification while he was fighting events show how much the riders and techniques are getting closer for the 2009 title almost until the end. The Italian started his season to the limit of what is possible in Superbike. In this game, Aprilia and with a double rostrum in Australia before collapsing completely and Biaggi are the strongest – for the moment. The remainder of the satisfying himself with classifications around the tenth place, with 2010 season promises a lot of surprises and in the middle of the the exception of Kyalami where he clinched a splendid victory in the season, only the smartest may say who will be the Champion. first heat before finishing unexpectedly eighth in the second heat. by Eric Malherbe This disarray of the red team leaves Carlos Checa with the role of leader of the Ducati riders in the classification.

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ORANGE CRUSH

CHAMPIONSHIP UNDER AUSTRIAN GRASP AT HALFWAY POINT ON A CHILLY EVENING IN FEBRUARY, WHILE SNOW LAY STREWN ACROSS COUNTRYSIDE OF NORTHERN ITALY, A SWEATY CLAMOUR WAS EVIDENT INSIDE THE LA FAVORITA HOTEL BEFORE THE FIRST MAJOR INTERNATIONAL

The combination of Cairoli’s talents and guile with the main attributes of the 350SX-F (lighter, bet ter for corner speed) has created a Formidable opponent for the rest of the world’s best! .///

PRE-SEASON RACE MEETING AS THE RED BULL KTM TEAM WAS PRESENTED TO A COPIOUS GATHERING OF MEDIA AND INVITED GUESTS. The sight of FIM MX1 and MX2 World Champions Tony Cairoli and Marvin Musquin with their other team-mates in new colours was partially the main draw. The other star in the spotlight was the brand new 350SX-F; the motorcycle the Austrian manufacturer was hoping would subvert the MX1 domain of 450cc four-strokes through its blend of manoeuvrability and power. Fast forward almost five months and the effect of the seven rider factory squad has been immense on the three categories as the world championship tips into the second half of the calendar. The combination of Cairoli’s talents and guile with the main attributes of the 350SX-F (lighter, better for corner speed) has created a formidable opponent for the rest of the world’s best. After round eight of the fifteen race series the 24 year old had claimed Grand Prix wins in Italy, Holland and America and missed the podium only twice. A manageable cushion of 65 points had been forged in the standings as the flamboyant racer chases his second crown in a row and the fourth of his career.

The figures and performances of Cairoli – a fantastic battle with fellow 350SX-F rider Mike Alessi at Glen Helen in California one of the highlights so far – have been the main talking points of the championship to-date but ‘222’s capabilities have been outshone in MX2 where Musquin has looked practically unbeatable with a phenomenal seven wins from eight. Crucially KTM have dominated the class with only startling 15 year old debutant and Red Bull teammate Jeffrey Herlings upsetting the Frenchman with an undisputed double moto haul at his home Grand Prix for round three. The site of the three orange machines of Musquin, Shaun Simpson and Herlings spearheading the pack around the first corner has become another defining image of the 2010 competition. Meanwhile Steffi Laier continues to exert her control in the third ever FIM Women’s Motocross World Championship and up until round five of seven in Germany the World Champion and Red Bull KTM rider had been undefeated. 18

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In MX2 Musquin has looked practically unbeatable with a phenomenal seven wins from eight .///

While KTM have cosily nestled into the opening paragraphs of a great many press reports across the globe in 2010 there have been other scenes, characters and story tangents to grab attention. The Austrian saga rolls onwards but there have been entertaining deviations from the main plot. After naturally taking a few Grands Prix, Yamaha’s brand new YZ450FM evolved to the point where it would no longer abstain from the MX1 winner’s circle and David Philippaerts success in France for the Yamaha Monster Energy factory crew was swiftly followed two weeks later by Ken De Dycker’s double in Germany for round eight (the Belgian only the second rider to go 1-1 this season after Cairoli). Max Nagl proved that KTM’s 450SX-F is equally capable to its junior sibling and was shadowing his team-mate in the standings until a practice crash in France snapped his left collarbone and he dropped down in the standings.

Aside from the emergence of impressive rookies like Frenchmen Xavier Boog (Kawasaki Racing Team), Anthony Boissiere (TM) and Russian Evgeny Bobryshev (CAS Honda) who have all appeared in the leading group it is perhaps Clement Desalle (Rockstar Teka Suzuki) that has posed the biggest and consistent threat to Cairoli.

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If the stylish Belgian had not flipped his RM-Z450 and dislocated his right shoulder at round three then the title chase would undoubtedly be closer. Desalle won his first race at Mantova for round two and amazingly returned from his shoulder ailment after two weeks to win the Grand Prix of Portugal, round four, and the first time a KTM was dislodged from the top step of the rostrum.

An important moment in the MX2 competition came ten minutes before the chequered flag of the second race at Bellpuig in Catalunya. An electrical fault on Ken Roczen’s Teka Suzuki Europe machine caused a DNF and robbed the sixteen year old German of his first triumph. The misfortune continued with racing incidents in the USA and France, all the while Musquin persisted with his speed and spoils. Roczen is second in the championship but with a 77 points gap after round eight knows he needs the intervention of fate to stop his rival’s barrel roll to a resounding title defence. With three consecutive podiums Zach Osborne (Bike it Cosworth Yamaha) has returned from his 2009 injury wilderness while the likes of Steven Frossard (CLS Kawasaki), Simpson, Joel Roelants, (JM Racing KTM), Arnaud Tonus (Teka Suzuki Europe) and of course Herlings have added to the excitement of a class that from 2010 does not field a rider over the age of 23.

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KTM have dominated the class with only startling 15 year old debutant and Red Bull teammate Jeffrey Herlings upsetting the Frenchman with an undisputed double moto haul at his home Grand Prix for round three .///

STANDINGS AFTER TEUTSCHENTHAL: The trip over the Atlantic to Glen Helen was a surprising and late addition to the calendar but the visit to the fast and hilly circuit for the first time since 1992 was eagerly anticipated by a great many in the paddock. The subsequent dice between Cairoli and Alessi (the World Champion even winning with a broken gear pedal and feathered the bike for the second half of the first moto in third gear), the resurrection of former World Champion Ben Townley and the novelty of Grand Prix racing again echoing through the Californian scrub made round six one of the defining meetings of the year. The packed crowds in Holland, France and Germany, the high standard of Sevlievo to open the Championship and the exciting lines and bumps of Valkenswaard also created other stand-out impressions from 2010’s initial forays. The action highlight? It has to be Philippaerts and Desalle’s duel for third position in the first race of the French Grand Prix. At least half a dozen place changes from two of the hardest and most unforgiving riders in the field cranked up the tension and was a splendid visual reminder of just how frenetic, gripping and encapsulating the sport of motocross can be.

FIM MX1 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP TOP TEN: 1. Antonio Cairoli (ITA, KTM), 341 points; 2. Clement Desalle (BEL, Suzuki), 276 p.; 3. David Philippaerts (ITA, Yamaha), 267 p.; 4. Ken de Dycker (BEL, Yamaha), 251 p.; 5. Maximilian Nagl (GER, KTM), 248 p.; 6. Steve Ramon (BEL, Suzuki), 237 p.; 7. Xavier Boog (FRA, Kawasaki), 217 p.; 8. Tanel Leok (EST, Honda), 182 p.; 9. Davide Guarneri (ITA, Honda), 165 p.; 10. Evgeny Bobryshev (RUS, Honda), 149 p. MX1 MANUFACTURERS: 1. KTM, 370 points; 2. Suzuki, 326 p.; 3. Yamaha, 320 p.; 4. Honda, 249 p.; 5. Kawasaki, 244 p.; 6. TM, 116 p.; 7. Aprilia, 116 p.; 8. CCM, 11 p.; 9. Husqvarna, 4 p. FIM MX2 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP TOP TEN: 1. Marvin Musquin (FRA, KTM), 365 points; 2. Ken Roczen (GER, Suzuki), 288 p.; 3. Steven Frossard (FRA, Kawasaki), 268 p.; 4. Jeffrey Herlings (NED, KTM), 241 p.; 5. Zach Osborne (USA, Yamaha), 233 p.; 6. Shaun Simpson (GBR, KTM), 225 p.; 7. Arnaud Tonus (SUI, Suzuki), 214 p.; 8. Jeremy van Horebeek (BEL, Kawasaki), 209 p.; 9. Joel Roelants (BEL, KTM), 183 p.; 10. Jake Nicholls (GBR, KTM), 158 p.

by Adam Wheeler MX2 MANUFACTURERS: 1. KTM, 392 points; 2. Suzuki, 305 p.; 3. Yamaha, 277 p.; 4. Kawasaki, 276 p.; 5. Honda, 65 p.; 6. TM, 18 p.

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/// F IM INSIDE

WOMEN IN MOTORCYCLING INTERNATIONAL WORKING GROUP WORLD CONFERENCE ON WOMEN & SPORT IN SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA.

The Lausanne Network for Women in International Sport (LNWIS), founded in 2006 by Lilamani de Soysa, co-opted member of the IWG (*) and Brigitte Zufferey from the Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme (FIM) was invited to attend the International Working Group World Conference on Women and Sport (IWG), hosted in Sydney, Australia, in May. Members of the Lausanne Network which is comprised of a number of international sporting federations based in the region of Lausanne, Switzerland, where the International Olympic Committee has its headquarters, outlined their vision and concrete actions already taken to increase the contribution, visibility and influence of women within international sport. Brigitte Zufferey and Stefy Bau, representatives for the FIM’s Commission for Women in Motorcycling (CFM) and Frédérique Trouvé representing the newlyformed Women & Motorsport Commission (WMC) within the FIA (Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile), attended the conference. Brigitte Zufferey presented the CFM’s achievements during the last 4 years and particularly the brand new “Women Ride” Marketing Campaign. The fact that the development of the presence of women in motorcycling-related activities is one of the 15 top priorities of the FIM’s Strategic Plan that is being currently developed and implemented was also mentioned and was extremely well received by the audience. Stefy Bau presented her achievements, not only as former World Motocross Champion but also as Team Manager for the FIM’s Women’s Motocross World Championships in 2008 and 2009. Frédérique Trouvé presented the WMC’s goals and objectives, highlighting how the commission is committed to establishing policies that will strengthen women’s roles in motor sport. She also outlined how the commission plans to play an active role in the development of specific actions and campaigns. Alejandra Gabaglio, from the International Table Tennis Federation (ITTF), explained in a very lively presentation, the incredible

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From left to right: Stefy Bau Former World MX Champion CFM Motocross Expert, Anne Gripper, Director of the June Canavan Foundation, Frédérique Trouvé, FIA WMC Manager, Brigitte Zufferey, FIM HR Manager and CFM Coordinator, Alejandra Gabaglio, ITTF Women Working Group Member America and TT Professional Coach .///

achievements made during recent years for women in Table Tennis, including the successful implementation of “Equal Prize Money” for men and women for all ITTF approved events. Last but not least, Anne Gripper, former anti-doping Manager of the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI), currently Director of the June Canavan Foundation, explained about the annual scholarship offered to female candidates to the AISTS Management in Sport masters degree which takes place in Lausanne, Switzerland. The 5th IWG World Conference in Sydney offered a unique opportunity for participants from around the world to share experiences, strengthen international connections and find ways to stimulate action at local, national and international levels. The presentation made by the Lausanne Network in Sydney – including information on the June Canavan Scholarship - is available on the FIM website: www.fim-live.com (Women Ride – Latest News).

More information on the IWG can be found at: www. iwg-gti.org The next related event is the 6th IWG World Conference in Helsinki, Finland in 2014!

* The IWG was established in 1994 at the 1st World Conference on Women and Sport held in Brighton, England. As an independent co-ordinating body consisting of representatives of key government and non-government organisations, its vision is to realise a sustainable sporting culture that enables and values the full involvement of women in every aspect of sport. The FIM, represented by Ms B. Schoeman, CFM President; Mr G. Maitre, FIM CEO and Mr F. Zerbi, former FIM President, signed the Brighton Declaration in June 2006 in Geneva, Switzerland. by Brigitte Zufferey

FIM MAGAZINE .73 /// MAY J UNE 2010


LIVE WORLD MX ON MOTORS TV!

Design KYRRIEL - Photos: Massimo Zanzani

2010 FIM MOTOCROSS WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS LIVE MX1, MX2 & WOMEN’S MX For more information:

www.motorstv.com


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S TA N D I N G S

GAME OVER! THE DICE ARE THROWN…

4 TEAMS , 4 FORMER RIDERS , 4 TEAM MANAGERS , 4 OPINIONS AND YET ONE WINNER …WE SAT DOWN WITH THE BIG 4 IN LAS VEGAS TO GET THEIR VIEW ON THE 2010 “MONSTER ENERGY AMA SUPERCROSS , AN FIM WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP”. REMEMBER THE ARTICLE IN FIM MAGAZINE 71 ON THE UPCOMING SUPERCROSS SEASON? WELL, THEY ARE BACK FOR ANOTHER EXPERT TALK ON THE OUTCOME OF THE CHAMPIONSHIP! GENTLEMEN, YOU HAVE THE FLOOR...

“IT WAS A GREAT SEASON FOR US” Roger De Coster Rockstar Makita Suzuki Riders: Ryan Dungey and Matt Moss Fact: The Suzuki Team started off the season with only one rider whereas all its contenders were fielding two! Moreover, Ryan Dungey was this season’s “Rookie”. Not an easy situation to handle and yet, they prevailed!

FIM: Tell us about the 2010 season Roger De Coster: I think we got the title because Ryan was really prepared; he was fit and ready to go from round one. We can say the same thing about our motorcycle; our settings were good. Everybody did his job on the team and Ryan came through. We talked before the season. I thought he would be on the podium consistently and that there would be a small chance of winning the championship if we could limit the damage on the bad days. He was able to do that; it worked out our way and his way. The main reason is that we started the season prepared and that he did not get injured. He benefited from being consistent and won when the opportunity to win was there. FIM: You started the season with only one rider. How difficult is it to manage this sort of situation? R.D.: Matt Moss was winning the Supercross championship in Australia when we contracted him and then he hurt his back and wrist. Everybody thought the back would be the biggest problem but it turned out to be the wrist because the surgery he got went wrong and he ended up missing

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the entire Supercross World Championship. It is difficult to keep the sponsors and it is also difficult for the factory as you gamble so much money and efforts and it can all go up in smoke in the first round! FIM: How does winning this championship compare to winning the FIM Motocross of Nations with Ryan? R.D.: It is different of course. The “Nations” is only one event so it’s different from a seventeen-round championship. The Nations helped to establish Ryan as a top rider in the main class and for him to mature. People do not realize how much pressure there is on a rider representing his country. There are only three riders per country, and if one of them makes a mistake, you are pretty sure that the team is not going to win. It was an important step in Ryan’s career. FIM: What is your message to the competition for next year? R.D.: We just want to stay humble. Every year is a different year and with injuries things can change pretty quickly. We just have to keep doing our work and hope for the best!

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The star that rocked the Monster Energy AMA Supercross, an FIM World Championship: Ryan Dungey .///

“A LITTLE INCONSISTENT” Erik Kehoe Honda Red Bull Racing Riders: Andrew Short and Davi Millsaps Fact: Considered an outsider at the beginning of the season, the Honda Team repeated its performance of last year placing one of its riders (Davi Millsaps this time) on the third spot of the podium. Moreover, another Honda rider took second, albeit from a different team (Kevin Windham/Geico Powersports Honda).

FIM: Tell us about the 2010 season Erik Kehoe: We had some ups and downs; we had some really good high notes with Davi’s win in San Diego. We had some really good results; we had a podium sweep in Salt Lake City. We also had some downsides with Andrew Short breaking his ankle and Davi having a couple of injuries to work through. We have had some good and not so good races! FIM: Even so, there was something for Honda to cheer about with Trey Canard and Kevin Windham? E.K.: For Honda it has been a good year. Trey Canard coming over to the Supercross class was definitely a highlight for our season; he has a very bright future. We looked forward to helping him on the east coast races. He rode really well. Kevin Windham has been doing a real good job. I think that if he had been a little bit more consistent at the beginning of the championship, he might

FI M M AGAZINE .73 / // MAY JU N E 2010

have been in the title hunt. Overall it has been a very good season for Honda, but our team needs to work on consistency to win the championship. FIM: How do you rate Ryan Dungey’s performance this year? E.K.: I thought he was very strong. He came out at the beginning of the season very strong and ready. I knew that he was going to be good but I was surprised at how strong and consistent he was. FIM: What is your message to Ryan Dungey for next year? E.K.: Let us see if he can repeat that! (smiles). We are working on our plan for the future right now. I know that Ryan Dungey has a two-year deal. We also want to win next year; very badly so. We are going to work very hard to go after that championship.

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Ryan Villopoto was a strong contender for the Championship until an injury ended his season prematurely .///

“DYNAMIC BUT ALSO DISAPPOINTING” Mike Fisher Monster Energy Kawasaki Riders: Chad Reed and Ryan Villopoto Fact: The Kawasaki Team confirmed its challenger’s status until three rounds before the end when a nasty crash took Ryan Villopoto out of the title hunt. Chad Reed, their other star rider, never got a chance. He was sidelined already in the second event!

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FIM: Tell us about the 2010 season Mike Fisher: We had high expectations of Chad Reed and Ryan Villopoto. Chad immediately had a failure when he collided with another rider in the first round. In the second round he collided with another rider and then broke his hand. Ryan started out maybe not in the best condition he wanted to be. So, he was not mentally ready to race to win. But when he did finally get himself together he was ready to win. And still he made a few mistakes and ultimately a big mistake which caused him to break his leg and be out for the remainder of the season. So it was very dynamic because many riders were racing for the lead at different times; Stewart, Dungey, Reed, Hill and Villopoto who was maybe not so fast in the first round, but I knew he would be there. There were five or six guys that were really fast in the early part of the season and then it went down at the end of the season to one rider, and it was Dungey. So it was dynamic in that sense but also disappointing with all these injuries and other problems.

FIM: Chad was out as of Phoenix until Daytona. Can you tell us more about that? M.F.: Chad recovered from his broken hand. He was training to get ready for Daytona but he fell and injured his thumb. So in Daytona, he did only practice because he did not feel ready to race. He waited a few weeks longer and finally felt much better and started racing again but that was about the time his wife was to have a baby. I think his body was OK but mentally he was not. FIM: And how about Ryan (Villopoto) now? M.F.: Ryan had two surgeries. The first one was about five hours and the second one over six, so it was long. It was quite a severe injury. The surgeon was one of the best in the country for that type of injury. He said the operation was successful with 100% recovery but it is going to take Ryan a long time to come back, five months; four at the best to go back training. It is going to be tough for him.

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With ups and downs, Davi Millsaps managed the third spot of the podium .///

After a quit start Kevin Windham came charging through the ranks and claimed spot of best Honda rider and runner-up in the Championship .///

FIM: How do you rate Ryan Dungey’s performance this year? M.F.: I think he did a great job. He showed a lot of maturity because winning this championship is pretty difficult in any class but even more in this one. There is a lot of pressure, a lot of riders and games they play with each other. It is also a long series with seventeen rounds. For somebody who is young and new in the class it is pretty incredible that he did that well. FIM: What is your message to Ryan Dungey for next year? M.F.: I think it is true that he outlasted everybody. He was fast at the beginning and he was fast at the end. So I think that next year it will be the same. I doubt there will be this many injuries because people will think about it more and maybe take more care knowing how this year went. I think that it will be more difficult for him. For my team, I certainly think that we will win; I really feel we will win the championship next year.

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“EYE OPENING AND A LITTLE BIT OF A DISAPPOINTMENT” Larry Brooks, Team San Manuel Yamaha Riders: James Stewart and Josh Hill Fact: The defending Yamaha Team started off real well with its champion winning the season’s opener. But James Stewart injured himself in the second round. He courageously rode the third one and then it was all over! Surprisingly, Josh Hill kept the team’s hopes for a win alive but as the season went on he was not able to live up to the high expectations…

FIM: Tell us about the 2010 season Larry Brooks: The season started out great, pretty much the way we thought it would start out. As the season started rolling things changed dramatically for us with James Stewart getting injured in the second event. Even if the risk is obvious in Supercross, we never thought that it would happen. And it happened…We had to deal with it the whole season. It was a long season without our champion. Then Josh Hill took over the lead role in the series. I always felt that Josh could win. Those were two big surprises. FIM: How about Josh? L.B.: Josh started the series out strong beginning on the podium every weekend; he rode great! Then there was the race in Atlanta where he crashed in time practice and injured his ribs. It seems like that took the wind out of his sails. I feel it went from a physical injury to a mental injury. He is now kind of struggling with his mind where he belongs and trying to really get his feet back on the ground. Having seventeen races in a row in nineteen weekends which is really difficult, it just meant that he never had time to regroup. It just built and built, bigger and bigger. Hopefully he can get his feet back on the ground pretty soon but right now it is a big struggle.

Josh Hill started strong, then somewhat fell back before fading away near the end .///

FIM: How is James doing? L.B.: James is doing better. He is still not released to ride a motorcycle yet. This has been dramatic for our team not having our number one rider, but things like this happen. We are hoping that he will be back pretty soon. FIM: Can you remind us what kind of injury he had? L.B.: He had a broken scaphoid in his right wrist. They put a double threaded screw in it to pull the bone together. The bone was broken at the furthest point away from the blood supply. Actually there was just a little bit of blood supply; it is going to be a timeconsuming injury. It is just a shame that it happened in the series and to the defending champion also. FIM: How do you rate Ryan Dungey’s performance this year?

do not prepare correctly for Supercross. Ryan Dungey is smart; he hung around champions. He was at James Stewart’s house and lived with Ricky Carmichael. That’s very intelligent for a young rider and you cannot take it away from him. You only need to pat him on the back and congratulate him! FIM: What is your message to Ryan Dungey for next year? L.B.: To Ryan I would only have to say, wait until next year! I think that we are going to come out swinging next year. James Stewart will be healthy and wanting to race. Last time he had a little bit of time off - he went on a 24-0 in the outdoor series. I never take anything away from a champion; they don’t win championships for nothing. You have to really respect them. Ryan rode a great season and gained a lot experience, he could be a great competitor. It is going to be fun; I always enjoy a great battle.

L.B.: Ryan rode really well, he came into the championship prepared. A lot of riders

WHAT IS NEXT? After an eventful 2010 Championship, all the teams will return to base. Some will take a rest, others will compete in their national outdoor championship. Whatever; the fact is that they will also be furbishing their arms and getting ready for the 2011 battle. Team Suzuki and Ryan Dungey will certainly not rest on their laurels but they will feel the pressure. Will they succeed once again? The good results of Honda riders must have boosted Team Honda’s confidence for a brighter future. They have what it takes to win but will they be able to fit all the pieces of the puzzle together? After a season of bad luck, Team Kawasaki will be in

a combative mood. Will they be able to break the spell? Never underestimate Team Yamaha; they will want to seek revenge and recapture their crown. Will we see the resurrection of the fallen champion? And then, there will be some newcomers like Trey Canard and Christophe Pourcel. Which team will they be joining and can they repeat Ryan Dungey’s stint? For the answers to all this and much, much more, stay tuned to the “AMA Supercross, an FIM World Championship”. In the stadiums as of 8 January 2011!

by Isabelle Larivière & Dirk De Neve

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RIDE

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/// GALLERY

“As a track inspector I have a lot of experience and I can say that I am widely respected by all the people I have to deal with. Basically, I tr y to create an atmosphere of trust and friendship, based on a shared enthusiasm for our sport. This, coupled with a strong desire on my part to find a solution, makes it easier for me to get people to accept changes.” - says Giovanni Sala

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GIOVANNI SALA INTERVIEW

ALLOW ME TO START WITH A FEW INTRODUCTORY REMARKS ABOUT THE ROLE OF THE TRACK INSPECTOR AT ENDURO EVENTS

Enduro has a number of specific characteristics which set it apart from other events which are organised at the same location and on the same circuit. In our case, the races are assigned every year to different organisers in different locations. As a result of this, we basically have to start from scratch each time. It is important to note that all the professionalism that we have in enduro, from the teams to the individual riders, rests on the shoulders of non-professional organisers. As a result, all the preparatory work for the races is done by enthusiasts who fulfil their dream of being able to organise a world event on their own home ground. However, in their normal lives, they have other occupations, and that means that they have to take time away from their work in order to turn their dreams into reality. Enduro is definitely the most difficult event to organise. Designing a route with an average length of between 50 and 60 km involves going through an enormous amount of red tape, submitting requests to the authorities, obtaining authorisations, then choosing a suitable location for the paddocks and providing all the requisite services to the teams, such as electricity, water, press room, working area for the time-keepers and the jury, offices for the riders where they can carry out all the preliminary activities, and of course the ‘Parc Fermé’ area. Apart from preparing the course, one needs to organise the special tests (of which there are usually 3, but sometimes as many as 5), then 6000 wooden poles have to be stuck in the ground and the tapes and banners also have to be set up. Obviously this has to be done in natural areas, i.e. areas which have no facilities and so services have to be brought in. At the same time, it is important that spectators can gain access to the areas in question. It is therefore easy

FI M M AGAZINE .73 / // MAY JU N E 2010

to understand that there are big differences with the other disciplines where races take place on permant tracks or courses which are relatively easy to manage. In the case of enduro, the track inspector is in a completely different situation. Clearly, the inspector will have quite a difficult task if he needs to ask for a modification to the course.

In 2006, Giovanni finish third in the Paris Dakar .///

FIM: How did you become a track inspector? Who employs you? Giovanni Sala: My job as track inspector was something that developed gradually. I first started out in a semi-official capacity. In 2005, I was racing in the world championship when Alain Blanchard (FIM Enduro World Championship promoter) asked me if I would consider helping him to raise the technical level of the world enduro events. As the golden period of my racing career was coming to an end, I thought the matter over and decided to accept Alain’s proposal.

For the first two years, I was actually a parttime track inspector. I continued to race in the Italian championships, but then I realised that the inspections and the need to work things out with the organisers were making increasing demands on my time. Sometimes I had to carry out pre-inspections before the event. So I decided to give up racing and to accept a contract from the FIM. FIM: What exactly is your role? G.S.: There are various aspects to my job. First, I may be asked to carry out a preinspection. This involves verifying the layout of the track and the location of the special tests. I make sure that everything is up to the standard of a world championship event. I make recommendations on how to improve safety and how to make sure we put on a real show people want to watch. The next phase starts when I arrive on site on the Wednesday before the race. I get on my motorcycle and go the entire length of the track, making sure that all the details are right, that the signposting of the track is in place, that any danger areas, intersections and road-crossings are clearly marked, and that the signs are up for the special tests. I check the time it takes to go from one checkpoint to the next. I also make sure that the organisers have prepared the entry to, and exit from, the special tests correctly, that the transponders have been properly buried, but most important of all, I commit to memory all the parts of the track that can deteriorate as a result of mud or difficult inclines. In such cases I ask that marshals equipped with walkie-talkies be positioned at these sites so that they can tell me if there are any changes to the condition of the track. The final phase is probably the most delicate one and it is during the event itself. This is a time when I am in permanent contact with the riders and organisers; I am on the alert, making sure that everything is

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/// GALLERY

"I am in regular contact with the riders. For example in the days preceding the event when the riders come and inspect the specials, I ask them for their opinion and once I have preridden the course, if necessary I organise a brief ing session. During the race, we stay in contact so that there is a real-time exchange of information on the latest developments." - adds Giovanni Sala

going according to plan. I also have to keep an eye on the weather as this could complicate things, because in the event of rain, we have to move sharply because the time between one lap and the next is about one hour, which gives us very limited time to act. If the weather is good, on the other hand, everything is much easier, even though it would be wrong to think that you can just drop your guard. FIM: Could you describe a weekend working on a race? G.S.: As I was saying, the weather conditions can have an important impact. Starting on Friday morning, we begin with a meeting of the jury. I explain the characteristics of the track and the special tests, and I tell them, depending on whether it is an Xtreme enduro or an enduro test, whether the first lap will be timed; I give a summary of the shortcomings that have been brought to my attention by the organisers, then I and the jury watch as the riders pre-ride the course. I get on my motorcycle which is equipped with an on-board camera which will be used for the images that will be broadcast later on television. In the evening I attend the Super Test and make sure that everything is running according to plan. On Saturday, depending on the situation, I go to the sites where there could be problems or where there is a greater risk, i.e. where the Extreme test takes place. I might attend a time check to see whether any of the riders have a problem and I make sure that they arrive within the prescribed time limit, and I ask them if they ran into any new problems on the section. If there are no problems, I just sit back and enjoy the show, particularly the specials. I also check that the marshals are doing their job to maintain the poles and tapes. I look to see if the ground

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has deteriorated or if some other complication has arisen. If that happens, I get together with the organiser’s men and we correct the problem by making whatever minor changes are required. Once the race is over, I go and talk to the riders and ask them if they had any problems with the track or the specials to report. If any problems do come to light, I go and get the equipment and any materials that may be necessary from the club representatives and we make more substantial modifications to the part of the track that has been worn down. That way, the track is back to a normal condition for the Sunday. FIM: Is it difficult to get yourself accepted by the riders; you were after all a KTM rider G.S.: This is no longer an issue. At the beginning there was some controversy about my work with KTM. Then, at a meeting with the team managers, I explained that if an event was well prepared and if my work serves to enhance safety and to make the event into an entertaining show and everything runs smoothly, all the riders benefit, and it doesn’t matter which team they ride for. FIM: Can you tell us what are the major changes that have taken place in the Enduro World Championship since you started? G.S.: Enduro used to be quite different. The races and the paddocks were prepared on non-asphalted fields and the level of services provided was quite low. The specials often took place in areas which were difficult for the public to gain access to. The criteria applicable to the design of the course were left to the discretion of the organiser. As a result, safety aspects were not given too much importance. It used to be quite difficult getting from one place to the

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next. During the specials the riders were often forced to push their motorcycles and there were no maximum times set for the race, so that riders often raced for 9 hours and more. The motorcycles were not as reliable as they are today, which meant that the rider had to be a good mechanic unlike the situation today; mechanics were not allowed to work on the motorcycle during the event. What has probably changed the least is the sports side of things. Enduro is a discipline where you are actually racing against yourself, or rather against time. Obviously, during the race, all the riders have their own little ruses which they use to win, but once the race is over, everyone gets on well in the paddock. FIM: How do you see the future of the Enduro Championship? G.S.: The Championship is definitely going to have a rosy and interesting future. We now have races and riders that are really exciting to watch. The promoters are doing a good job and helping the sport to grow. The media, too, are doing their bit, and so we have spectators who are interested and feel involved. The enduro market is one of the most important for off-road vehicles, so that manufacturers and teams are highly motivated and the federations have many enthusiastic licence-holders. That said, it is really important that all the officials work together to help improve this discipline. Not only does that mean bringing on board those who don’t want things to change, but also we need to remember that the environmentalists have us in their sights and they claim that our sport is harmful to nature. They don’t recognise the fact that enduro motorcycles have to meet the requirements of the Highway Code; nobody is allowed to use special fuels and emissions must comply with EEC standards. Unfortunately, the fact that we race in a natural environment means that we are not well regarded (even though it seems to me that it

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is more environmentally-friendly to race on dirt tracks rather than asphalt!!!). Unfortunately there aren’t any precise rules applicable to amateur and sports users, and as a result we are always a little on the defensive. FIM: What are your long-term projects? Are you still enthusiastic about your role? Are you engaged in any other activities, and if so what are they? G.S.: My long-term project is LL Racing. I started the business with my former mechanic, Mr Luzzana, some time ago. I realise that having ridden so many miles, I cannot continue riding for the rest of my life. For the time being, I am excited about my role in the FIM EWC. Working in enduro has given me so much, and it gives me pleasure to see that thanks to my work, things are improving. This is a source of great satisfaction for me. After a career in enduro, there are not many opportunities to continue working in this sector, and to have been taken on as a track inspector gave me the possibility of staying close to the motorcycle world and to the races that fascinate me. As far as riding is concerned, I also have other activities I am involved in when there are no EWC races. One is the TRX 910 School, which is my private enduro school. I am also a guide for KTM Adventure Tours. Having raced for so many years, remaining close to the competitions as a track inspector gives me pleasure. But after 30 years of motocross, rally and enduro competitions, I no longer have the stamina (I am also too old) to compete with other riders. I am also tired of having to train all the time. I am now beginning to rediscover the pleasure of riding my motorcycle without the competition part, without any hurry or having the stress of beating the clock! by Isabelle Larivière

CAREER Gio was born in Bergamo on 23 november 1963. He made his debut on a Fantic Motor 125 motorcycle and won his first championship title in 1981. He switched to motocross in the senior category. He won the backing of the Italian Motorcycle Federation and joined that small group of riders who were allowed to participate in the FIM World Motocross Championship in Dalecin (Czech Republic). But at the beginning of the 1990s, he was back doing the occasional enduro race. In 1991, he joined the Farioli KTM team and started climbing the ladder of world championship titles. In eight years he won a total of 46 world championships titles, became five-times World Champion, and twice runner-up. And then there was the special classification in 1998 which again Gio won. He was voted the fastest rider in the enduro World Championship. He participated in the great Dakar adventure where he became one of the main players in the official KTM Gauloises team. Because of team requirements, he assumed the task of “flying helper” for his team mates. In spite of this, he won one the stages and came 7th overall, and was in the top position among the Italian competitors.

class, which is quite different from the 250 cc 2-stroke bike that he had always ridden and which had brought him so many victories. He was engaged in a duel with Mario Rinaldi, which kept all the fans in suspense right up to the last minute. At the last race in Czech Republic Gio managed once again to win the World Championship title. From 2000 onwards, he started devoting most of his time to rallies in Africa, testing and racing his new LC8 and managed at the same time to win his 4th team title during the International Six Days Enduro event in Spain. Over the next few years he participated in the individual world championship with the small 250 4-stroke bike, and in 2003 he came an honorable 2nd, and notched up his 8th stage victory in the Dakar rally. In 2004, he participated in the Dakar rally in the International Gauloises Team with Meoni and Cox and the next year he joined the Repsol Team with Marc Coma but fell victim to a mechanical problem immediately after the first stage. In 2006 he made another attempt and finished 3rd in spite of a serious accident. He also won the Italian Championship title which gave him a place in the history books as the oldest champion at the age of 46. Giovanni Sala and Alessandro Gritti are the only ones to have achieved that kind of success.

1999 marked a turning point in his racing career: for the first time he won the Enduro World Champhionship in the 400 cc 4-stroke

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INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENT COMMISSION WORLD ENVIRONMENT DAY

FIM CELEBRATION

In the framework of the agreement between the FIM and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), the FIM celebrated this important date at all FIM events taking place the weekend of 5-6 June.

The FIM initiative involved all MotoGP, Moto2, 125cc, MX 1&2, MX Sidecar, Trial and Speedway riders who displayed huge banners to make the public and fans aware of the importance of respecting the environment and showing their interest in this matter. FIM Environmental Delegates were nominated at all the following events and enjoyed a great collaboration from the organisers, promoters and National Federations to set up this celebration.

MotoGP in Mugello, Italy .///

The events concerned by this celebration were the MotoGP in Mugello, Italy; MX1, MX2 in St-Jean d’Angély, France; MX Sidecar in Wschova, Poland; Trial in Motegi, Japan and Speedway in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Great media exposure and riders’ personal involvement such as Toni Bou, FIM Trial World Champion, gave to this celebration a great opportunity to extend the FIM’s message promoting sustainability within the motorcycling world. Moreover, the FIM will soon publish in various languages (English, French, Spanish, Italian and German) an illustrated guide about environmental issues in motorcycling events to promote sustainability. This illustrated guide will be distributed for free to all Continental Unions and National Federations to give them a tool in order to continue the promotion of good practices regarding the environment and its protection.

Riders’ personal involvement such as Toni Bou, FIM Trial World Champion, gave to this celebr ation a great oppor tunit y to e x tend the FIM’s message promoting sustainabilit y within the motorcycling world!.///

MX1, MX2 in St-Jean d’Angély, France .///

Trial in Motegi, Japan .///

Speedway in Copenhagen, Denmark .///

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FMN ACTIVITIES

Many National Federations participated in the celebration of the World Environment Day around the world. The MSA (South Africa) organised tree planting with public schools in Gauteng & KwaZulu Natal Provinces; published an article to support the World Environment Day in the Motorsport World newspaper; spread environmental awareness messages during the Wesbank National Race Meeting at Kyalami Circuit and participated in the Gauteng Motorshow with a stand where the importance of environmental compliances at all motorsport meetings were illustrated. The MSA (South Africa) organised tree planting with public schools in Gauteng & KwaZulu Natal Provinces .///

The Swedish Federation (SVEMO) promoted electric motorcycles during Sala’s celebration of World Environment Day with the participation of a Swedish elite rider (Markus Eriksson) in order to show politicians, fans and motorcyclists that electric events could already take place reducing the environmental footprint of motorcycle races. In Latin America, the Cuban and Brazilian Federations also organised very positive actions to promote environmental awareness. In Cuba (FCM), a group or riders decided to ride along the “costa de arrecifes” to collect waste and clean up the area (including beaches). This action was taken with the support of local authorities and also included the participation of

The Swedish Federation (SVEMO) promoted electric motorcycles during Sala’s celebration of World Environment Day with the participation of a Swedish elite rider (Markus Eriksson) .///

neighbours and young people with the aim of developing a pedagogical approach regarding environmental issues. In Brazil, during the final round of the Latin American Championship held in Cacoal Rondonia, the CBM (Brazilian Federation) organised a tree-planting with the participation of state government members, local authorities, press and other partners in order to compensate for emissions during the race. In addition, an office desk was installed in the paddock with the aim of promoting sustainability for the riders and teams. by Alex Goldenberg

In Brazil, during the final round of the Latin American Championship held in Cacoal Rondonia, the CBM (Brazilian Federation) organised a tree-planting with the participation of state government members, local authorities, press and other partners .///

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SPEED ? “Breathtaking” Leslie PORTERFIELD © FIM / BANDITO / GOOD-SHOOT / SCOOTER - 2010

F I M S P E E D WORLD RECORD HOLDER


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MOBILITY,TRANSPORT, ROAD SAFETY AND PUBLIC POLICY NEW EU DRIVING LICENCE DIRECTIVE - PROBLEMS FOR RIDERS GET NEARER!

Getting a new licence to ride a motorcycle (in the EU and some other countries that follow EU law such as Norway) will soon become more complicated. Although there is no scientific evidence it will have any effect on road safety there will be new tests and or training as a rider moves between new, “stages.” The EU Directive requires either an additional test or additional training. It does not require both, but some governments are intending to do just that! This is a common thing to happen with EU law and this type of extra complication is often called, “gold plating.”

both a guide to the new law, and recently have written letters to all Secretary-Generals explaining the next steps. I hope the message will also go out to young riders interested in Trial and Enduro to get their road license as soon as they can by starting on an A1 (125cc) motorcycle as soon as possible”.

Is there anything FIM can do? Well the discussions in Brussels are now at an end and effective action to ensure the law is brought in with the least effect against motorcycling requires work by our national federations. FIM Director of Public Affairs John ChattertonRoss adds: “The recent election in the UK means that the new government is thinking again. I have written in support of the British Motorcyclists Federation to both the British Transport Ministry and also to the Deputy Prime Minister of the UK. I have done this in co ordination with the BMF. To help other federations I have written NEW FIM DATABASE IS EXPANDING

CEO Guy Maitre recently wrote to all FMNs asking for specific contact details for a person to whom we can send information on non sports matters which are becoming increasingly important to the FIM. - They often affect the sport too! Within a couple of days we had twenty two replies and after a reminder we now have replies from forty four federations.

The award for the fastest response goes to the Russian Federation - well done Moscow! This is very encouraging and Anne-Marie Gerber will continue the follow up work to ensure we obtain as near a complete database on this important subject as possible.

FIM ASIA BUILDING NEW LINKS TO PROMOTE ROAD SAFETY

Following a United Nations-India conference last January the FIM in Asia has moved quickly to establish new links with partners working in Asia to promote road safety.

The Indian conference focused not only on Indian needs but also the wider picture in South East Asia. Contacts have been made with a key advisor to the Asian Development

Bank which works with governments of the region. NGO support of the kind the FIM can offer is always welcome as we can help spread the message of road safety.

ROSA - “ON THE ROAD, ALL TOGETHER AND ALIVE.”

The ROSA project - part financed by the EU- reached its second edition at Mugello. The project (led by RFME and supported by DORNA Sport and a consortium of other partners) has two aims. First to bring experts together during the racing season to develop ideas on, “best practice” in road safety for motorcycling. Second to use MotoGP as a vehicle for passing positive messages across to fans. RFME’s Andres Perez Rubio wrote to FIM President Vito Ippolito to once again thank him for his support at this second event - the first was at Jerez in April. Andres is a former Spanish champion in road

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racing and GP rider. Today he is famous in Spain as a campaigner for motorcycle safety and his views are frequently sought by authorities across Europe. In his racing days he once bought a Yamaha racing motorcycle from President Vito Ippolito’s father. - Even pioneering linked braking he designed for use in racing to good effect. Today he brings his vast experience to assist everyday riders. We wish ROSA continued success throughout the season. The next edition will be at the Dutch TT. by John Chatterton-Ross 37


/// F IM INSIDE

MARKETING/COMMUNICATIONS NEWS FIM WOMEN RIDE CAMPAIGN

LESLIE PORTERFIELD SPEED IS BREATHTAKING!

LESLIE PORTERFIELD (FIM S P E E D W O R L D R ECO R D HOLDER), LIVIA LANCELOT (FIM WMX WORLD CHAMPION) AND LAIA SANZ (FIM WOMEN’S TRIAL WORLD CHAMPION) HAVE ALL PARTICIPATED IN THE FIM CAMPAIGN “WOMEN R I D E ” F O R P R O M OT I N G WOMEN IN MOTORCYCLING. LESLIE WELCOMED THE FIM IN HER BIKES’ SHOP IN DALLAS (TEXAS). When I succeed in performing a feat and come back with a new record It’s such a big achievement! .///

FIM: When did you discover the motorcycling world?

FIM: As a kid were you Barbies or motorcycling?

Leslie Porterfield: When I was sixteen years old I bought my first motorcycle as a means of transportation. I was never exposed to motorcycles or grew up around motorcycles but when I found that first motorcycle I really fell in love with it, it was great.

L.P.: Well, I definitely played with my brothers’ toys a lot more than Barbies!

FIM: At what age did you start racing? L.P.: I took my first road race school and got my road racing licence at nineteen years old. So I’d been riding for three years and found the competitive side of it. FIM: Did you get your passion from somebody else? L.P.: I was introduced to racing by friends of mine after I started riding my first motorcycle but I hadn’t been exposed prior to that. I didn’t have any family members; it’s been something that I’ve kind of picked up on my own and just really fell in love with.

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FIM: And can you explain to us how it started for you? L.P.: Well I started out when I bought my first bike and I think one of the biggest things was everybody said I’d never be able to ride it. I was a small girl; there’s no way I would ever be able to ride it, so I took it as a challenge and I really fell in love with it, I absolutely enjoyed it. I never would have pictured then that motorcycles would be such a big part of my life now. FIM: The bikes are the same for both female and male riders. From a physical point of view, how do you deal with this?

some great advantages in being smaller and more streamlined, especially for what I do; for setting land speed records. I can tuck behind the fairing a lot better, a lot easier than some of the bigger, muscular guys. FIM: What kind of training are you doing? L.P.: Well I ride quite a bit. I ride off-road, I stay in shape, I workout quite a bit, and so I try to keep myself in good shape and keep on two wheels to get prepared. FIM: What do you say to people who think that motorcycling is not for girls? L.P.: I think they’re wrong. I really believe that motorcycling is for everyone and more and more women are buying motorcycles and it’s a great trend.

L.P.: I think I have some advantages being smaller. There are some disadvantages in just not being as muscular, but there are

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In many ways it is a “plus” to be a woman in the motorcycle world, it is still very much a man’s world, but I think it’s changing! .///

FIM: Did you choose this sport for passion only or because it is even more challenging to compete against male riders - it is rather a man’s world isn’t it? L.P.: It is more of a male sport, and I know even when I started riding there were very few women on the road, and it seems like every year there are more and more women, but I picked it up because it’s a passion of mine. Going to Bonneville and setting records is definitely a great passion of mine. So even though it is a male dominated sport I have done really well, it is not a problem for me at all. For me it is good to have a mixture of male and female riders. I like competing against men and I can say that some of them are very gracious, really! I am gonna be out there as long as I can!

venues. I have done some off-road racing, some road racing. I race road cars as well. I like a lot of different aspects of it, but doing Bonneville was always a dream of mine and setting a land speed record. FIM: Did you enjoy it? L.P.: I love it. I feel very fortunate. I feel like I’m living a dream. FIM: Why did you choose this discipline in particular? L.P.: I heard about it and read about it in books, read about it in magazines, watched it on TV, and it was one of those things that I always wanted to do, wanted to do for many years. And I finally got the opportunity to build a bike capable of setting a record and head out there.

FIM: Have you already experienced racing in any other motorcycle sport and did you enjoy it?

FIM: How do you feel when you succeed in performing a feat?

L.P.: Yes, I have raced several different

L.P.: Oh. It’s the biggest rush to get out there

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and set a record, and go really fast and do it safely, and come back with a new record. It’s such a big achievement. FIM: Have you ever sustained any serious injuries? L.P.: Yes, I had one pretty nasty accident in 2007 when I broke seven ribs, punctured a lung and had a concussion and got transferred by helicopter into the hospital in Salt Lake City. So that was quite a physical setback but I was back on the bike in about eight weeks. I was a little sore and wasn’t quite up to speed, but I did get back on the bike and the following year I set several records. FIM: After this accident what kept you riding? L.P.: I kept riding because I knew that it was achievable, and I knew that I could get there, I could set these records and it was just a setback.

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/// F IM INSIDE

Going to Bonneville and setting records is definitely a great passion of mine... .///

FIM: Is it a “plus” to be a woman in the motorcycle world today? L.P.: In many ways it is. Sometimes it has its drawbacks; some people don’t expect you to really know what you’re talking about and it is still very much a man’s world, but I think it’s changing quite a bit. FIM: Do you think that the view of women in motorcycling has changed much in recent years? L.P.: I think it’s changing, every year it’s changing. It’s more and more accepted, there’s less of a stigma attached to it. Just in having my own dealership I see more and more women coming in and buying motorcycles, and buying gear, and riding their own bikes, which is great to see. And it’s not just one particular type of woman. It’s women from all walks of life and they aren’t just buying one motorcycle, they aren’t just buying little bikes or scooters, they’re buying all sorts of motorcycles whatever suits them

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if they do touring riding. I have sold several Goldwings and big touring bikes to women. It’s a great thing to see how the mentality is changing and keeps progressing. FIM: It seems that the woman’s market is one of the new targets for the motorcycle industry? What is your opinion about this especially in the US market? L.P.: Oh, yes, I think it’s really come along; there are a lot more versatile motorcycles that are great for most women’s physiques; there are a lot more products available for women and catered to women, all the motorcycle gear, everything else. So I think it’s really finally kicking in where a lot of people are now marketing to women. FIM: What kind of difficulties did you experience in your career coming up through the ranks and becoming a champion? L.P.: Well, I experienced lots of difficulties, what with my accident and the fact that a

lot of people said that I wouldn’t be able to do it, that I was crazy to go out and try to set all the records and do what I have done, so there was a lot to overcome. Sometimes it’s hard to keep that faith and with all the obstacles to really believe in yourself enough to go for it and do it. FIM: You already hold world speed records and a few women are entering this competition to beat you. Do you think that it will be difficult to keep your leading position? L.P.: Oh, there’s always competition that’s for sure, so I know that it’ll be hard to stay on the top, but I’m glad to have that competition. Without it, it wouldn’t be such a big success. So it’s great to see more women out there competing for records, and competing in all different aspects of motorcycling. And I love it, I think I’m gonna continue, it’s never fast enough, you know [laughs]. So I’m going to keep doing this for

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Motorcycles are always gonna be a big part of my life. I’ve got my motorcycle dealership here, so I know I’m gonna be in this for a long time! .///

as long as I can because I enjoy it so much and I know there’s always more I can do to the motorcycle or something I can learn and do better myself every year, to go faster and do better.

for fun, it is what I do for work, it is what I do for transportation. It is quite a passion of mine.

FIM: How do you see your future after your career as a rider? Would you like to stay involved in motorcycling? What’s your plan?

L.P.: Oh yeah, if I had a daughter I would definitely encourage her to ride if that is what she wanted to do - I would definitely encourage her because I have learned so much from riding motorcycles and being around the people who ride motorcycles. Most of them are very passionate about what they do and I have a different mindset than some people. So I think it is very important to follow those dreams and do whatever makes you happy, and I would definitely encourage her to ride motorcycles!

L.P.: Well, motorcycles are always gonna be a big part of my life. I’ve got my motorcycle dealership here, so I know I’m gonna be in this for a long time, and I travel a lot by motorcycle, take a lot of trips. I will keep doing pretty much the same thing I’m doing now. I think I’ll be doing Bonneville and setting records for a long time though. FIM: In your every day life, do you ride a bike more often than drive a car?

FIM: Would you allow your daughter to ride a motorcycle?

The FIM Women Ride campaign is promoted through the FIM Communication Platform (FIM-LIVE. COM, the FIM Magazine Ride With Us!, FIM YouTube Channel, the FIM TV Magazine – FIM Moto Show) and official Championship programmes. If you need more information about the campaign please contact Isabelle Larivière at isabelle. lariviere@fim.ch.

by Isabelle Larivière

L.P.: In my everyday life? Mostly motorcycles, this is what I enjoy the most. It is what I do

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/// VINTAG E

1913 SIX DAYS RELIABILITY TRIAL THE FIRST ONE

Carlisle and the Lake District in the north of England welcomed the first International Six Days Reliability Trial, held in August 1913. It was the first official FICM event in the history, but it was the 11th Six Days’ Reliability Trial held in Great Britain. The first one took place in 1903 – year of the foundation of the British Federation.///

The FICM – Fédération Internationale des Clubs Motocyclistes – was officially founded in December 1904. However, it went through some difficulties in the early days and it was necessary to wait until 1912 and a reformation of the FICM in November in London in order to have, this time, things really moving. Following the suggestion of Mr J. Nisbett, Vice-President of the AutoCycle Union (ACU), the delegates agreed on promoting a international motorcycle event which would be held under the aegis of the FICM. The subject was a reliability trial (the word Endurance was used in French), based on the resistance of the machines manufactured at that time quite far from what can exist today, as one may imagine – to the road conditions of those days. Asphalt was notably very rare.

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According to the report of the meeting held on December 1912 in Paris, following a suggestion of Mr Etienne Boileau (French, but working for the ACU), the ACU was in charge of organising this event and drafting the rules – what was already done: it was enough just to take existing rules and a trial event as these famous six days of reliability existed: these were the Six Days’ Reliability Trial held in Great Britain since 1903, year of the foundation of the British Federation, the Auto-Cycle Council – which would become the Auto-Cycle Union in November 1907. On the programme of these Six Days of 1913, the words “with which is incorporated the First International Touring Trial” were added to the title of the event, as well as the following sentence just below: “under the classification rules of the Fédération

Internationale des Clubs Motocyclistes and the open competition rules of the ACU”. Here are a few extracts of what were the first sporting rules in the FIM history, which received some amendments during the meeting held on 25 October 1913 at the Automobile Club de France in Paris. “A Motorbicycle is defined as a vehicle comprising a frame, two wheels and a suitable engine. Motor vehicles with more than two wheels, and weighing without oil, fuel and water, less than 300 kg, are included in the term Motorcycle. The divisions and classes into which motorcycles are divided by the FICM are as follows (cylinder capacity not exceeding - minimum weight without oil or fuel):

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VINTAGE

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Charles Collier (left) was the founder of the Matchless factory with his brother Harry. He was a member of the British team who took part in the 1913 Six Days driving a 964cc twin-cylinder Matchless with sidecar..///

Division 1: 250cc – 40 kg; 350cc – 50 kg; 500cc – 60 kg; 750cc – 70 kg; 1000cc – 80 kg” (a minimum diameter for tyres is established for each class). Division 2, Motorbicycles with sidecars: 350cc – 80 kg; 500cc – 100 kg; 750cc – 110 kg; 1000cc – 120 kg. All vehicles in division 2 must be fitted with a clutch or other “free engine” device Division 3, Cyclecars: all three or four wheeled motor vehicles other than motorbicycles with sidecar, carrying one or two persons and of a maximum weight of 300 kg (without liquid): 750cc – 150 kg; 1100cc – 175 kg. All vehicles in division 3 must be fitted with a clutch or other “free engine” device, and with a change-speed gear. The minimum weight for any driver or passenger carried by either a motorbicycle or any other class of motorcycle is uniformly fixed at 60 kg. This weight may be made up, if necessary, by ballast”.

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Concerning the equipment, “for all Speed Trials, motorbicycles must be equipped as follows: two brakes, working independently, one toolbag, efficient mudguards projecting beyond the tyre at least 10 mm each side, and embracing at least 120 degrees of the front wheel and 180 degrees of the circumference of the rear wheel, one saddle or seat, one stand, one efficient silencer – the use of a free exhaust is permitted in Speed Trials, and the exhaust gases must not be so directed as to raise the dust; uncovered exhaust ports in the cylinder walls are forbidden. In Reliability Trials, the motorbicycles engaged must be genuine touring machines, equipped accordingly. In addition to the equipment specified above they must also be furnished with: one carrier, weighing not less than 800 gr., and presenting a total supporting area of not less than 600 cm2; one or more fuel tanks with a minimum total capacity of 5 litres; one or more oil tanks of a minimum total capacity of one litre.”. For sidecars and cyclecars, the differences are: the saddle or seat for a passenger; the mudguard for rear wheel(s) must embrace at least 120 degrees of the circumference of the rear wheel.

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/// VINTAG E

The course must be published at least one month in advance, with details (hills, other difficulties), and also communicated to the participants; the controls must be indicated by banners stretched over the road. The dates – known for a long time – were from 19 to 23 August 1913, and the venue was the Lake District near Carlisle (in the north of England). The participation of foreign teams was obviously necessary in order to respect the international character as well as the credibility of the FICM itself – which was much more difficult than it is today. The rules stipulated different colours for each participating country and the eleven FICM member countries – including the United States and Canada - were listed. In fact, only one team travelled to take part in this first FICM trial, France. The programme of these first Six Days mentioned the following entries:

• France: team participating with the colour blue. Entrant: Union Motocycliste de France.

• Mr Guilloreau on a Clement-Gladiator 350cc, twin-cylinder, 2.75 HP • Mr Gabriel on a Clement-Gladiator 498cc, twin-cylinder, 4 HP • MM. Bourbeau and Devaux on a Bedelia Cyclecar, 1100cc, twin-cylinder, 8 HP

• Great Britain: team participating with the colour green. Entrant: Auto-Cycle Union.

• W.B. Gibb on a Douglas 350cc, twin-cylinder, 2.75 HP • W.B. Little on a Premier 499cc, single cylinder, 3.5 HP • C.R. Collier on a Matchless with sidecar, 964cc, twin-cylinder, 8 HP • The French team members quickly retired from the competition. The British team received the permanent silver Trophy offered by the British Cycle & Motor Cycle Manufacturers & Traders Union Ltd. W.B. Gibb and Charles Collier also earned a gold medal.

The official programme of the 1913 Six Days’ Reliability Trial included the general conditions of the event, the preliminary and the f inal regulations – c alled today the supplement ar y regulations.

Many people considered the course as very difficult, even prejudicial to the interest of the manufacturers entered, as the exaggerated difficulties of the chosen terrain had a negative influence on the performances. With vehicles of that time, weighing up to 300 kg, a mountain course with a barely designed lane must have been difficult. The press qualified the first day’s course as very difficult, but a child’s play compared to that of the second day…

There were 162 entries (one non-starter) – all British competitors racing in this well-known trial except for the Frenchmen. 51 got a gold medal, 21 a silver one and 27 a bronze one; 62 retired. The following events, as from 1920, strictly run as international FICM event, would have a lot less participants and a low number of national teams for some years… by Marc Pétrier Photos: FIM Archives/Coll. C. Lavery

The first ISDT Trophy, made of solid silver, 35 inches high and weighing 18 kilos, was presented as a permanent Trophy for the competition amongst the constituent members of the FICM by the British Cycle & Motor Cycle Manufacturers & Traders’ Union Limited. This Trophy disappeared in 1939 at the end of the Six Days held in Salzburg.

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Beside the individual entries – all British riders - , two teams were taking part in the international part of the event, France and Great Britain, with three members in each team (driving two motorcycles and one sidecar or cyclecar).

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/// TECH TALK

One change suggested by the factories themselves, has taken full effect from 2010: a restriction to six engines per rider for the full 18-race MotoGP season .///

LONG-LIFE GP ENGINES

HOW CUTTING COSTS HAS CHALLENGED & STIMULATED RACE ENGINEERS THE FINANCIAL CRISIS OF One change 2008/9 WROUGHT DEEP AND LASTING M O T O G P.

CHANGES SOME

TO

WERE

IMMEDIATE – THE CUT IN T E S T ING A ND PR AC T ICE SCHEDULES OF 2009; OTHERS ARE ONGOING – LIKE THE NE X T-GENER ATION TECHNICAL RULES.

suggested by the factories themselves, has taken full effect from 2010: a restriction to six engines per rider for the full 18-race MotoGP season. This was one of a range of economy measures and proposals announced after a GP Commission meeting at Geneva in February, 2009. The manufacturers association (MSMA) speculated on banning carbon-fibre brakes and a policy of one bike per rider – both ideas that were dropped in a vigorous schedule of rule-changing meetings in the coming months. The proposal to limit engine numbers, however, was fully decided.

The restrictions came in halfway through 2009: from the Czech Republic GP at Brno, riders would have only five engines for the last seven races. For 2010, the restrictions bit deeper. Over the full 18-race calendar, each rider would be allotted only six engines. Going over that allocation would mean a penalty, ultimately (after sundry different ideas) decided as being a start from pit lane.

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Racing die-hards were alarmed: racing engines had always been free. “If we had a problem with an engine, we would take another one out of the back of the truck,” explains Jerry Burgess, Rossi’s crew chief at Fiat Yamaha. There were fears that top speeds and lap times would suffer, as engines were detuned for longer life; that riders would be spending spells in the pits during practice in order to save mileage, and even of frequent engine blow-ups, as riders eked the last drops of power out of old engines in practice. Four races into the season the result has been different. Of course, there may be blow-ups coming at the far end of the season, but everyone is keeping to schedule so far, with engineers tackling the new task without barely breaking stride. FIM MotoGP Technical Director Mike Webb, a former two-stroke 500-class mechanic, has had his own reservations swept aside. “I was a bit sceptical at first because I thought it would cost a lot more to develop the

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TECH TALK

long-term reliability. But the factories said: the cost is already there because we already employ the engineers. We will just tell them to do a different job. “From that side, it’s worked ... and talking to the senior factory engineers it’s made a huge difference in component life and taught them a fair bit, which they can pass on to production engineering guys.”

Questions to the major factories as to how much costs had actually been reduced and how many fewer engines were actually being built met with no immediate answers, these things being as usual shrouded in secrecy. It is also hard to establish how much of the cost is in the design and how much in the component parts. But there have certainly been significant savings, if only in engine numbers and materials.

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Over at Ducati, the 2010 engine was actually an improvement: revised cylinder firing intervals had made a Bigger Bang engine giving riders more feel and more traction. “It’s not just the engine, it’s the whole package,” said Nicky Hayden, of his carbon-chassis machine. “But for sure the engine feels stronger and works better.” Nor were there engine complaints at Honda. That factory’s end-ofyear 2009 engine was already planned out to 2010 specifications, and there has been little change for this year to the factory machines. As for the satellite riders, against all expectations, last year’s overcautious rev limit has in fact been raised by some 500 rpm this year. Now and then in the latter part of 2009 riders (especially Stoner) chose not to go out in some wet practice sessions, to save engines, but there has been none of this in 2010.

The real judge is the stopwatch, and no significant change in performance is Normal practice in previous observable over the first four years, according to factory races, compared with 2009, mechanics, was to use one when engine use was still new engine for every race. free. Top speed figures have That would mean each rider not so far been affected. would get at least 18 for a full The difference was highest year, plus any more used for at Qatar, where last year The engines are sealed by means of wiring and identication tabs. ./// testing, damaged in crashes Pedrosa’s Honda clocked or over-revved and blown 338.67 km/h, and this year up. Say 24 per annum, plus Stoner’s Ducati topped out or minus. at 329.1 km/h. At the slower tracks of Jerez and Le Mans speeds were much closer last year to Now each rider gets just six for the races – and even if he uses the this, and actually faster this year at Jerez. And at Mugello, with its same number again in testing or destroyed in crashes, he is still only fearsomely long straight, this year’s 345.7 (Hector Barbera, Ducati) was not much slower than Pedrosa’s 349.3 of last year. use half the number of engines as before. So how have the new rules affected various people in the paddock? THE RIDERS The greater impact on riders came halfway through last season, when the first long-life engines arrived at Brno. Rossi put it succinctly: “It feels a bit flat;” while others like Colin Edwards bemoaned new restrictions in rev limits. The 2010 engines are second-generation long-lifers, and now riders spoke of a restoration of power, in spite of lower rev ceilings. Rossi described his 2010 M1 as “feeling like my last-year’s bike” (meaning that from the start of the year). It is as Webb explained: having dropped the rev ceiling, re-engineering work was then directed to restoring previous levels of power.

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Nor have lap times suffered. Pole position times have been better everywhere except at Jerez, where Lorenzo was less than threetenths faster last year than this. And Pedrosa has set new lap records at two out of four races, at Jerez and Mugello. THE PIT WORKERS Fiat Yamaha’s Jerry Burgess, crew chief to Rossi (and World Champions Mick Doohan and Wayne Gardner before him), explains what the changes have meant behind the pit wall. “Less work for us, really. “We seldom see the inside of an engine now – only if you ask to. It’s a unit that you bolt in. We work on the gearbox, put the oil in, change the clutch plates every now and again and clean it ... and away you go.

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/// TECH TALK

FIM MotoGP Technical Director Mike Webb and Jordi Perez, IRTA MotoGP Technical Assistant .///

“It certainly puts more pressure on the engineers to really think about temperatures, oil pressures, frictions – all the things that wear components out. “There are still things we can do ... on the externals of the engine. We can improve the exhaust pipe, the airbox ... also the mapping of course, but that doesn’t make horsepower, it only controls the horsepower. With the exhaust you can possibly improve top-end. “Every other time I’ve been motorcycle racing, if you needed more parts you went to the truck and you put them in. It is a complete reversal of the way we’ve gone racing in the past. “It doesn’t matter how they change the rules, you’ve just got to work smarter within the rules they give you.” THE ENGINES: CHANGED?

HOW

HAVE

THEY

The new rules give designers a new emphasis to take into account. As FIM technical chief Mike Webb explains, the job is not so much to make sure the engine will go the distance – most of the old ones would

48

have done that without falling apart. It is to achieve longer running without the power dropping off as the mileage increases. “The first thing was to reduce peak rpm, then to engineer things so it still makes good power through its life.” Fiat-Yamaha’s Burgess reports that this has been achieved with that company’s classleading M1. “The engine holds the power for longer, following on from similar work in F1. “Now we know we have to do close to 2,000 with practice engines, and 1,200 on race engines. With the previous engine, 1,200 km was achievable in the past, with a four-percent power loss. The new engine does it with a one percent power loss.” Burgess and his fellow engineers are bound by secrecy on the actual techniques employed, but the example of F1 shows that it is careful attention to detail that makes the difference: friction is managed by optimisation of bearings and pistons, both in design and more importantly with careful use of materials. Attention is also paid to cooling to avoid local hot-spots.

The other factor is careful management of engine use. Webb: “The sensible crew chiefs are keeping the lowest-mileage of their engines in rotation as race-day engines, and the higher mileage for free practice.” Four races in, Dorna’s records showed that all but four riders were still using their first pair of sealed engines (see separate panel). WHAT WILL FAIL AND HOW TO STOP IT “With any of these engines, the higher up you engine you go the more fragile it gets,” says Mike Webb. “It is valve gear – the valves and their actuating mechanisms – that used to need the most maintenance. Further down, the crankshaft and bearings and so on are pretty robust, so the top end is where you normally have a problem.”

There is another spectre: that of crash damage. Obviously a very major crash that bends the chassis risks also damaging the engine casings: they are also vulnerable to direct impact. Gravel traps and safety barriers minimise this sort of accident, but the risks to the engine remain even in a minor spill: the same gravel traps mean that dust and stones go flying, and if any of this finds its way into the engine, it is usually terminal.

FIM MAGAZINE .73 /// MAY J UNE 2010


TECH TALK

///

Fiat Yamaha’s Jerry Burgess, crew chief to Rossi (and World Champions Mick Doohan and Wayne Gardner before him), explains: “Now we know we have to do close to 2,000 with practice engines, and 1,200 on race engines. With the previous engine, 1,200 km was achievable in the past, with a four-percent power loss. The new engine does it with a one percent power loss.” .///

Keen observers will note that this year’s Ducati Desmosedicis have a mesh grille over the top exhaust pipes under the back of the seat. This is not some exotic exhaust tuning: simply a stone-guard. Those exhausts have an almost direct line-of-sight connection to the rear cylinders’ exhaust ports and valves. After a crash, you can see Ducati mechanics peering anxiously into the exhaust ports and even down the sparking plug holes using medical spy-glasses, checking for debris or damage. The inlet side is better protected: airbox intakes are filtered, and even if the airbox itself should be smashed in a crash, the throttle butterfly valves will be closed, blocking off the inlet tracts and valves.

But one change in practice was necessary. Back when new engines could be used as required, engine management systems were set to keep the engine running after a crash, idling at 3,000 rpm, so that an uninjured rider might pick it up and get going again. The risk is two-fold: firstly the oil circulation will stop if the engine is on its side, causing internal damage; secondly dirt might be sucked into the inlet. Yamaha’s approach is explained by Burgess.

FI M M AGAZINE .73 / // MAY JU N E 2010

“In the old days we would set it to not shut down in the race – so if the guy ended up 30 metres from the bike he could still get himself together and get back to it. Now for the race it might be set to run on for a short time. But for practice we disconnect it completely, because saving the engine is much more important.” So what happens if a team breaks out a new engine, and the rider does render it unusable crashing it on his first lap? That’s just bad luck. You don’t get another engine.

HOW THE SYSTEM WORKS

depending on design. The cam covers, so they can’t do top-end maintenance; the cylinder head to the cylinder; and the crankcase halves. Nobody has a design with separate cylinder barrels; they are all cast into the crankcase, so that’s one piece. “ Traditional wire-and-lead seals are used, as well as security stickers. Webb’s assistant Jordi Perez checks engine numbers against each bike’s coded timing transponder number before and after each session. A race-track staff of 20 – mainly local volunteers – monitors the pits constantly, to ensure among other things that transponders are not switched from one bike to another.

A sealed engine becomes part of the allocation of six the moment it leaves pit lane for the first time. Access to engine innards is impossible. Mechanics can change clutches and transmission ratios, and remove the sump to drain the oil. Intake – the fuel-injection systems – and exhaust are fully accessible. But the valves and valve operating gear are not. The programme is run by Mike Webb. “Engines are sealed in three to five places,

In this way, use of each allocated engine is monitored at every GP. They may not even be started away from the track, to prevent factory teams dyno-testing each engine. Webb’s staff seal up either inlet or exhaust ports before each engine leaves the circuit, and remove the seals again when they arrive at the next one. It is relatively straightforward, but timeconsuming – especially bearing in mind that there are another 45 or more sealed Moto2 engines that also need to be monitored.

49


/// TECH TALK

Access to engine innards is impossible. Mechanics can change clutches and transmission ratios, and remove the sump to drain the oil. Intake – the fuel-injection systems – and exhaust are fully accessible. But the valves and valve operating gear are not. .///

CONCLUSION

So far, the doubts and fears have been swept aside. There were still plenty of races to go, however; the far end of the season is where failures are likely to happen. This leads to Webb’s only reservation. “Technically, it’s a good thing. The only thing I am a little concerned about is if we see a lot of failures and penalties at the end of the season, and it affects the championship.”

WHO HAS USED THE MOST ENGINES?

• After the first four races, all but four riders had used only two of their six engines.

• One exception was significant: Casey Stoner had not only gone to his third engine, one of the others was formally withdrawn from the allocation. That means he had just five left.

• Another rider, Rizla Suzuki rookie Alvaro Bautista, used his At the same time, the technical challenge is intrinsic to the sport. It has always been vital for engineers to build a bike not only fast enough to win races, but strong enough to be sure of finishing them. The new rule extends the sight-lines. Instead of just finishing races, the engines must be strong enough to finish whole seasons, As Burgess put it: “It’s the first time we’ve ever had to consider the last race of the season before the first race of the season.”

third engine at the first race at Qatar. Suzuki was the only team to incur a penalty last year for exceeding the fiveengine limit; but this also reflects a different strategy, having engines of different specifications available for different circuits.

• The other two are Yamaha pair Lorenzo and Edwards, both opening the third box at Mugello. This was considered routine; Rossi would probably also have taken a new engine for qualifying and the race.

It is also another example of how race engineering can be of direct benefit to production motorcycles: longer-life engines benefit everybody.

Mike Webb sums it up. “It’s changed from being a cost-cutting exercise into something quite useful.” by Michael Scott

50

FIM MAGAZINE .73 /// MAY J UNE 2010


Life is a series of moments—nothing more, nothing less. At every instant we all have the choice: Seize the moment and let your spirit soar, or let it pass. If you ride a GSX-R1000, it’s clear where your heart is pointed: the ultimate experience, and the taste of victory that accompanies it. Introducing the next generation of the top-performing sportbike. With superlative power, a lighter, more compact chassis, and more responsive suspension. Every moment from here on is more distance between yourself and every would-be competitor.

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52

GALLE RY

FIM MAGAZINE .73 /// MAY J UNE 2010


GALLERY

///

LEON HASLAM AN INHERITED NAME

IT IS DIFFICULT TO BEAR A NAME AS PRESTIGIOUS AS HASLAM. BUT LEON IS DOING WELL. AGED 27, RON HASLAM’S SON IS WINNING HIS PROMOTION AS A TOP LEVEL RIDER. BUT, BEYOND EVERYTHING ELSE, WHAT REMAINS IS THE SPIRIT OF A FAMILY INTIMATELY LINKED WITH COMPETITION.

FI M M AGAZINE .73 / // MAY JU N E 2010

53


///

GALLE RY

In the FIM Superbike World Championship, Leon Haslam is for the moment the only one to resist Max Biaggi and his Aprilia in the run for the title .///

Leon, son of Ron. The Haslams are not a family, they are a clan. United, close, today they rally round Leon in his ascension to the top of motorcycle sport. Riding Motocross and scooter competitions when he was a kid; youngest rider to ride a 500cc Grand Prix machine (18 years old in 2001); 2004 Rookie of the year in British Superbike and runner-up in the 2006 English Championship, here is this big fan of Eric Cantona and English football was propelled into 2009 in the World Superbike with the whole baggage and principally his whole family: dad Ron, mom Ann and his girlfriend Olivia. Each one has their own place, and this stability offers Leon the possibility of going forward. The Alstare Suzuki team in the World Championship has understood this very well by accepting the presence of Ron beside his son in the pits. “He does not disturb us in our work”, explained one of Leon’s mechanics. “On the contrary, he is very respectful. Ron is a professional mechanic and he could do our job. But he never allows himself to make any remarks”. And when he is not in the pits, the former Grand Prix star walks with his camcorder in hand around the track to film his son. Later, they will analyse together, hidden from everyone’s eyes in the family camper, the strengths and weaknesses of Leon over one circuit lap. It seems that the spirit of the Continental Circus has not completely disappeared and certain parts of the glorious past of motorcycle sport remain, away from

54

money and communication stakes, to bring its science to younger people. And it works!

In order to understand how and why this family spirit works in the Haslam family, it is necessary to look at the past. Ron is the youngest son in a family of ten brothers and sisters, each one very close to the others. He started naturally to have an interest in motorcycling because two of his brothers, Phil and Terry, were already racing. A passion and a talent would make of him one of the most extraordinary English riders in TTF-1 and in 500cc Grand Prix. He would obtain many good results in Grand Prix as a Honda factory rider during the 80s, then riding the famous Elf, and he would add the TTF-1 title and a win on the Isle of Man to his list of achievements. It was therefore natural that his son Leon, born in 1983 and immediately plunged into the world of competition, would become a rider. For Leon the answer was yes. For “Rocket” Ron Haslam not at all! It was not an easy task for Leon to convince his parents Ron and Ann Haslam that he wanted to race motorcycles. At first they were totally against it. “I did not want Leon to race because of his name or because of my career”, Ron says. “I really tried to push him to do something else in order to be sure that he would not go racing for me.

FIM MAGAZINE .73 /// MAY J UNE 2010


GALLERY

///

Leon, son of Ron. The Haslams are not a family, they are a clan. United, close, today they rally round Leon in his ascension to the top of motorcycle sport...S .///

I noticed then that he wanted to do it for himself”. Ron and Ann knew perfectly well what dangers Leon would have to confront if he entered competition. They knew it so well because Phil and Terry, the two elder brothers that Ron had always considered as his fathers in the absence of the family chief, were killed in racing. Ann, his mom, passed thirty years of her life in the shadow of racing. There is nothing strange in the fact that she is a bit nervous when her son enters the track. Frequently sitting in front of the monitors in the circuit press room, Ann takes note of Leon’s lap-chart, concentrating and somehow alone in the world with her fears mixed with passion. “Racing is fascinating, and all that you want is to be on the rostrum or not very far away”, Ann says. “I have always lived for it. When Ron was racing, I never confessed my fears to myself. But I also lived that race in Assen from which Terry, Ron’s brother, never came back. You live in hell in those moments. I have done everything to keep Leon away from racing. I don’t want to see my child breaking even a leg and see him suffer. I am afraid, I am afraid that he will hurt himself, and I think that nobody can wipe out this concern. I try to stay relaxed, but I am not…”

For the young Haslam generation, racing is thus always a family affair. After his uncles and his father, Leon took up the torch and reached the highest level. For his first year riding a factory motorcycle In the FIM Superbike World Championship, he is for the moment the only one to resist Max Biaggi and his Aprilia in the run for the title. “Racing is like a family circle”, Leon says. “The fewer people there are in the circle, the better it is. In my circle, there is the team and the people who work in it; my father, my mother, Oli, my coach Kirk Gibbons and my manager Chris Herring. They are all people I believe in and who offer me the possibility to give my best. They make me happy. If one of them was not there or could not be there, I think I would be less happy and I would certainly not be the best person I can be”. But, beyond all of them, Ron remains the most important in the eyes of Leon. Not as a father, but as a partner. “In my mind, we are more like brothers”, Leon confesses. And not only during the races, because when the motorcycles are back in the pits, the Haslam family hits the road and goes back home, to the family farm restored by Ron and Ann where they all live together, bound by this love that belongs certainly to the people who know the value of a real family. by Eric Malherbe

FI M M AGAZINE .73 / // MAY JU N E 2010

55


“My bike helps me save lives every day.” Bubacarr Jallow, a health worker in the Gambia

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T: +44 (0)1604 889 580

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E: rfh@riders.org

UK REGISTERED CHARITY NO. 1054565


ROAD BOOK

///

J U LY 03

10

FIM SPEEDWAY WORLD CUP RACE OFF 1

FIM SPEEDWAY YOUTH GOLD TROPHY 250cc

O S T RO W POLAND

SLANY CZECH REPUBLIC

18

25

FIM ROAD RACING WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP GRAND PRIX

FIM ROAD RACING WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP GRAND PRIX

SACHSENRING GERMANY

LAGUNA SECA UNITED STATES

FIM SIDECAR WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

FIM SPEEDWAY WORLD CUP RACE OFF 2

LONIGO ITALY

SACHSENRING GERMANY

FIM SPEEDWAY WORLD CUP RACE OFF 3

FIM MOTOGP ROOKIES CUP

SACHSENRING GERMANY

TOGLIATTI RUSSIA FIM SIDECAR MOTOCROSS WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

ST MAMET FRANCE

11

QTEL FIM ENDURANCE WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP 8 HOURS OF SUZUKA

FIM SUPERBIKE & SUPERSPORT WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

SUZUKA JAPAN

BRNO CZECH REPUBLIC

FIM SUPERMOTO WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

FIM SUPERSTOCK 1000cc CUP

ANDORRA ANDORRA

BRNO CZECH REPUBLIC

04 FIM ROAD RACING WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP GRAND PRIX

CATALUNYA SPAIN FIM MX1 & MX2 MOTOCROSS WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

UDDEVALLA SWEDEN FIM MX3 MOTOCROSS WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

LA BANEZA SPAIN FIM SIDECAR MOTOCROSS WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

GENK BELGIUM

07 – 10 FIM SPEEDWAY YOUTH GOLD TROPHY 80cc

VOJENS DENMARK

10 FIM WOMEN’S TRIAL WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

ST-MICHEL DE MAURIENNE FRANCE

FIM MX3 MOTOCROSS WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

OREHOVA VAS SLOVENIA FIM SIDECAR MOTOCROSS WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

STRASSBESSENBACH GERMANY FIM SUPERMOTO WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

SANKT WENDEL GERMANY SPEA FIM TRIAL WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

ST-MICHEL DE MAURIENNE FRANCE

SPEA FIM TRIAL WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

BALDASSERONA SAN MARINO FIM JUNIOR TRIAL WORLD CUP

BALDASSERONA SAN MARINO FIM YOUTH TRIAL WORLD CUP 125cc

BALDASSERONA SAN MARINO

24 FIM e-POWER INTERNATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP

FIM JUNIOR TRIAL WORLD CUP

LAGUNA SECA, UNITED STATES

ST-MICHEL DE MAURIENNE FRANCE

24-25

FIM YOUTH TRIAL WORLD CUP 125cc

GORZOW POLAND

ST-MICHEL DE MAURIENNE FRANCE

13

FIM SPEEDWAY WORLD CUP – OPENING

FIM LONG TRACK YOUTH GOLD TROPHY 250cc

TALLINGTON GREAT BRITAIN

FIM LONG TRACK WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP – FINAL 3

FIM GRASS TRACK YOUTH GOLD TROPHY 125cc

FIM SPEEDWAY WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP GP

MARMANDE FRANCE

TALLINGTON GREAT BRITAIN

CARDIFF GREAT BRITAIN

17

FIM SPEEDWAY UNDER 21 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP - QR2

GUESTROW GERMANY FI M M AGAZINE .73 / // MAY JU N E 2010

SPEA FIM TRIAL WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

FOPPOLO ITALY FIM JUNIOR TRIAL WORLD CUP

FOPPOLO ITALY FIM YOUTH TRIAL WORLD CUP 125cc

FOPPOLO ITALY

26 FIM SPEEDWAY WORLD CUP – EVENT 2

KINGS LYNN GREAT BRITAIN

29 FIM SPEEDWAY WORLD CUP – RACE-OFF

VOJENS DENMARK

31 FIM LONG TRACK WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP – QR 2

WERLTE GERMANY FIM SPEEDWAY WORLD CUP – FINAL

VOJENS DENMARK

FIM SPEEDWAY UNDER 21 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP – FINAL 1

GDANSK POLAND

57


/// ROAD B OOK

AUGUST 01

11-21

21

28 - 29

FIM SUPERBIKE & SUPERSPORT WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

FIM CROSS-COUNTRY RALLIES WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

MAXXIS FIM ENDURO WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

SILVERSTONE GREAT BRITAIN

RALLY DOS SERTOES BRAZIL

FIM SPEEDWAY WORLD CUP GP QUALIFYING MEETINGS – CHALLENGE

VOJENS DENMARK FIM SUPERSTOCK 1000cc CUP

FIM CROSS-COUNTRY RALLIES WORLD CUP - QUADS

SILVERSTONE GREAT BRITAIN

RALLY DOS SERTOES BRAZIL

FIM MX1 & MX2 MOTOCROSS WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

FIM CROSS-COUNTRY RALLIES WORLD CUP - WOMEN

LOMMEL BELGIUM

RALLY DOS SERTOES BRAZIL

22 FIM MOTOGP ROOKIES CUP

BRNO CZECH REPUBLIC FIM MX1 & MX2 MOTOCROSS WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

SERRES GREECE FIM JUNIOR ENDURO WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

SERRES GREECE FIM YOUTH ENDURO CUP 125cc 2-STROKES

SERRES GREECE

CAMPO GRANDE BRAZIL

FIM MX3 MOTOCROSS WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

FIM MX3 MOTOCROSS WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

SCHWEDT GERMANY

VANTAA FINLAND

FIM SIDECAR MOTOCROSS WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

FIM JUNIOR MOTOCROSS WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

KIVIOLI ESTONIA

DARDON-GEUGNON FRANCE

FIM VETERAN MOTOCROSS WORLD CUP

LOMMEL BELGIUM

14

29

FIM SPEEDWAY WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP GP

FIM ROAD RACING WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP GRAND PRIX

MALILLA SWEDEN

INDIANAPOLIS UNITED STATES

FIM SPEEDWAY UNDER 21 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP – FINAL 2

FIM SUPERMOTO WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

DAUGAVPILS LATVIA

TRISCINA ITALY

15 08 FIM MX1 & MX2 MOTOCROSS WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

LOKET CZECH REPUBLIC FIM SIDECAR MOTOCROSS WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

KEGUMS LATVIA FIM WOMEN’S MOTOCROSS WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

LOKET CZECH REPUBLIC

FIM ROAD RACING WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP GRAND PRIX

BRNO CZECH REPUBLIC FIM SIDECAR WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

KNOCKHILL GREAT BRITAIN

FIM LONG TRACK WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP - FINAL 4

EENRUM NETHERLANDS

25 - 27 FIM MOTOCAMP

FIM SIDECAR MOTOCROSS WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP

DONOVALY SLOVAKIA

PENZA RUSSIA

28

FIM TRACK RACING SIDECAR 1000cc WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP – FINAL

FIM SPEEDWAY WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP GP

GORICAN CROATIA

COVENTRY GREAT BRITAIN

58

FIM MAGAZINE .73 /// MAY J UNE 2010


O F F I C I A L G E A R PA R T N E R


The FIM Magazine - Ride with Us - N° 73