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WOMEN IN MOTORCYCLING NEWSLETTER

Issue #3

Editorial – A controversial question… You all know the movie “How to lose a guy in ten days”… Well it seems that I have made my own version of it called “How to lose 8 kilos in few months”! That´s right, in just a few months I have lost almost 15% of my weight. And how did I do it? Simply motorsport – nothing else! I started to train ATV Supermoto for our Finnish TV programme (by accident I was also signed up for the Yamaha racing team and am competing right now) and man has it been fun, but also extremely tough!

The reason I am telling you about my personal weight situation is the fact that still these days motor sport is often considered as not a true sport because there is a machine involved. Well after every training session when I have sweated like in no other physical exercise, my hands are cramping and I feel like I can´t even stand by myself, I wish those people who underestimate the demand of motorsport would come and try it. In many disciplines they wouldn´t need more than 10 minutes and that would be enough to take its toll on them!

But what if we had grid boys? Would that change our thinking about men in motor sport? I guess the answer is no: we need both men and women in motor sport, no matter what their roles.

At the moment we have women´s classes in some disciplines. Whether we should have our own series in every discipline is also a controversial question because some female riders prefer to compete themselves and others amongst the guys. Anyway in the end we just have to get a maximum of fun out of it and if we can’t beat all the guys at least we can enjoy the time we spend with them. This is exactly what I am doing when competing as an only woman against a field of men, several of whom happen to be also multiple Finnish champions. Enjoy your riding! By Nita Korhonen, CFM Director

In the motor sport world there are many obstacles and doubts we have to face all the time, and being a woman in this world can sometimes be even harder; especially when the typical and most visible woman at the race has always been the grid girl. FÉDÉRATION INTERNATIONALE DE MOTOCYCLISME 11, ROUTE DE SUISSE - CH - 1295 MIES

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WOMEN IN MOTORCYCLING NEWSLETTER

MX

Issue #3

MX

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Sunlit clouds filled the blue skies of Maggiora for round three of the FIM Women’s Motocross World Championship. Despite a line-up of strong contenders such as Australian women’s motocross champion Meghan Rutledge, British Ladies class champion Natalie Kane and ex WMX world champion Stephanie Laier, there was no stopping Chiara Fontanesi as she continues to take this season by storm, adding yet another double victory to her so far perfect season. Meghan Rutledge was in the prime position to show what she’s made of. Unfortunately for the young Australian Rutledge she couldn’t keep the bike on two wheels, crashing on the opening lap of the race and handing over the lead to the defending champion Chiara Fontanesi. Meanwhile behind Fontanesi the race was heating up as Natalie Kane and Stephanie Laier engaged in a fierce battle for second. While the ex-world champion Laier kept Kane honest she never seized the opportunity to pass. After leading every lap this weekend local hero Chiara Fontanesi took the victory, standing on the second step of the podium was Natalie Kane followed by Stephanie Laier. After a fall in race two Meghan Rutledge managed to fight her way from outside the top twenty back to an outstanding ninth place allowing her to finish fourth overall. Francesca Norcera kept the Italian fans happy being the second Italian to finish inside the top five for fifth. WMX Championship Top Ten: 1.Chiara Fontanesi (ITA, Yamaha) 150 p. / 2.Meghan Kat Rutledge (AUS, Kawasaki) 118 p. / 3.Natalie Kane (IRL, KTM) 117 p. / 4.Stephanie Laier (GER, Kawasaki) 116 p. / 5.Nancy Van De Ven (NED, Yamaha) 82 p. / 6.Anne Borchers (GER, Suzuki) 76 p. / 7.Britt van der Wekken (NED, Honda) 73 p. / 8.Francesca Nocera (ITA, Suzuki) 63 p. / 9. Nina Klink (NED, KTM) 57 p. / 10.Justine Charroux (FRA, Yamaha) 53p

Grassroots

Meet the AMA WMX’s newest Ripper: Courtney Duncan On 18 May, the fans at the Red Bull Hangtown Motocross Classic (AMA Women’s Motocross) were treated to a sound that hasn’t been heard for quite some time: a 125 two-stroke at full tilt, laying waste to the competition. Piloting the machine was 17-year-old New Zealander Courtney Duncan, who rode to a perfect 1-1 score in her first race as a pro. Courtney had this to say about her stunning debut. So you haven’t even been to a National before, let alone race one. How does it feel to have gone 1-1 at your first? “It was crazy! I didn’t know what to expect. I’ve only seen it on TV, and I didn’t know how big the crowd was going to be. It was a really cool experience, and I’m just super-thankful to be able to race one. It’s a dream come true! Coming into the race, where did you think you might end up? Did you think there was a chance you might win? “To be honest with you, I had no idea. I went in wanting to win, I just didn’t know if I could. I’ve never even ridden with most of those girls, so I didn’t know if I’d be competitive. But I knew I’d been working hard at MTF and I had a good 125, and was going to give it everything I had. To come away with the win was pretty special.” Did you get a chance to watch the 450 and 250 races? “I got a chance to watch the 450 motos, and just to watch Ryan Villopoto, Ryan Dungey and James Stewart was great. I’ve looked up to those guys since I was a little kid, and to get the chance to watch them live was just amazing. I have so much respect for them and I love watching them. You can learn a lot from riders like that. Just watching them on different parts of the track, you can definitely pick up a lot.” You’re here without your parents, right? “Yes. My parents are at home working to keep me here, and I owe a lot to them. It’s definitely hard being away from home, but it’s just one of those things. If you want to make your dreams come true, and if you really want to make it, you have to sacrifice things. I appreciate everything my family does for me. They’ve been very supportive since day one and I wouldn’t be here without them.” Will you be racing the rest of the WMX rounds? “Yes, that’s the plan. It’s exciting!”

Chiara Fontanesi - ©Youthstream

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Source: Racerxonline

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WOMEN IN MOTORCYCLING NEWSLETTER

Issue #3

TRIAL

TRIAL

FIM Women’s Trial WC Round in Andorra: “Bristow makes amends on day two”

FIM Women’s Trial Training Camp: “Girls prepare for new season” Grossheubach (Germany) was the venue for the recent Women’s Trial Training Camp. Here more than twenty female riders gathered in order to enjoy an intense three day session to be ready for the new season with the 2013 FIM Women’s Trial World Championship getting under way in Andorra. Organised and led by FIM Women’s Adviser Iris Oelschlegel, the riders of all abilities from novice through to expert and ages ranging from seven right up to fifty-two were put through their paces. With one instructor for every five riders, the women were treated to a pair of three-hour intensive sessions. Even the younger age group aged between seven and nine on their automatic machines enjoyed a full and rewarding opening day. These riders focused on practising the new non-stop rules which they will apply at round one of the 2013 FIM Women’s Trial World Championship. Away from the intense training sessions the riders and their support teams enjoyed a special dinner on the evening of the second day, when over fifty like-minded people sat, ate and discussed the sport of Trial, although the discussions were always punctuated with much laughter. Commenting on the three days of activity the event organiser and former FIM Women’s Trial World Champion Iris said, “I would like to thank all the riders who attended this FIM Women’s Trial Training Camp for their support and commitment. The girls worked extremely hard and made good progress as they worked on the various different parts of their riding. There was an incredible family atmosphere and it was a great opportunity to bring together so many female riders of all ages and abilities. I hope we can organise something similar again later in the year, as there is certainly a lot of interest from all the Women riders in continuing the training process.”

Grassroots

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Emma Bristow (Sherco) dominated the second and final day of the opening round of the 2013 FIM Women’s Trial World Championship held in Sant Julia de Loria, Andorra. Day one’s winner Rebekah Cook (Beta) simply had no answer to her fellow British rider’s performance on day two. The battle between Cook and Spain’s Sandra Gomez (Ossa) was much closer with only four marks separating these two female protagonists after another tough day of competition in the mountains of Andorra. The British contingent had even more to celebrate, asides taking two out of the three podium places, when Katy Sunter (Gas Gas) achieved her best ever result and grabbed fourth position after beating Mireia Conde (Beta) on a tight and tense tie-break. Thanks to Nikita Smith (Gas Gas) the British riders outnumbered the Spanish four to two in the top six, as the fifteen year old excelled to score her highest ever, placing in sixth. France’s Marilyne Journet (Beta) finished just a single mark behind the young British challenger to add a seventh place. Spain’s Elisabet Solera (Gas Gas), Martina Balducchi (Scorpa) from Italy and Germany’s Theresa Bäuml (Ossa) completed day two’s top ten taking eighth, ninth and tenth places respectively. For the second day in a row all twenty-three female starters made it to the finish, which was an achievement in itself given the length and severity of the course let alone the eighteen sections that were ridden twice again on day two. Bristow’s route to victory was relatively uncomplicated and went someway to offsetting her third place yesterday, caused as she rushed to finish on time after having realised that she had set her watch incorrectly. The next FIM Women’s Trial World Championship event will take place in France in early September. Source: Jake Miller

FÉDÉRATION INTERNATIONALE DE MOTOCYCLISME 11, ROUTE DE SUISSE - CH - 1295 MIES

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WOMEN IN MOTORCYCLING NEWSLETTER

Issue #3

ROAD RACING

ROAD RACING

Historic Victory for Woman Motorcycle Racer Maria Herrera in CEV Repsol Class

Yui WATANABE (#46) competing in the FIM Red Bull MotoGP Rookies Cup

Young Spanish rider Maria Herrera (SPA-KTM) made history on 26 May by winning the second Moto3 round of the 2013 Spanish Championship CEV Repsol Class at Motorland Aragon. She dominated the race and achieved her first win on the CEV Repsol podium, becoming the first female rider to place first in the three year history of the Moto3.

Yui fell in love with two wheels early. She explained: “When I was 5 years old, my father bought me a pocket bike. I immediately fell in love with riding the bike. Step by step, I improved my riding technique, and now I can join the Rookies Cup. I am so excited!” At school her favourite subject is Japanese and when she is not racing she enjoys listening to music. Yui’s hero is Valentino and she wants to be “a strong rider!” “During 2012, she says, “I learned an important thing: I must take in a lot of information in a short time during the race weekend. I like the Rookies races because there is no difference of performance between the bikes: it is all down to the rider.” Regarding 2013 she says: “For this year I want to get better results than 2012. I don't want to make the same mistakes as last year, especially crashing! Also I want to enjoy the racing more than last year.”

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The young woman from Toledo first made a small piece of history by qualifying for a front row start, the first female rider to do so in any CEV round. Her grid appearance for the CEV Repsol Moto3 race was boosted by the presence of Álvaro Bautista by her side until the start of the race along with world championship rider and recent Moto3 winner Alex Rins who acted as her “umbrella boy” for the day. Maria has been training together with the talented Álvaro Bautista for many years and showed great promise from the start, collecting excellent results in various smaller Cups along the way which eventually secured her a spot with the highly experienced Repsol CEV Team last year.

grassroots

ABOUT Yui’s performances In 2012: 22nd FIM Red Bull MotoGP Rookies Cup. Best result 11th in Race 2 in Brno. Though she failed to score a top 10 finish her improvement towards the end of the season was dramatic and finally she featured in the battle towards the head of the field during the Aragon weekend, hopefully a sample of what 2013 will bring. In 2011: 15th 125cc All Japan Championship, Honda RS125R, 8th 3rd round at Motegi, 13th 5th round at SUGO, 12th 6th round at Autopolis 2010: 22nd 125cc All Japan Championship, Honda RS125R In 2009: 2nd Sugo 125 GP Championship, Honda RS125R, 1 x 1st, 3rd Motegi 125 GP Championship, Honda RS125R

Rumours hinted that she would join the World Championship as early as 2013, but while fellow Spaniard Ana Carrasco made the step up with Team Calvo this year to become the first female regular in the Moto3 World Championship, Maria deicided to stay in the Spanish Championship for a second full season to collect more experience. Source: cevrepsol

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ENDURO

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FIM Women’s World Cup

SIDECAR

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Interview with the “Ladies Team Suisse”

Spain’s Laia Sanz (KTM) got off to a winning start in her defence of the Women’s Cup with victory on day one. Behind her, Great Britain’s Jane Daniels (Husaberg) held off France’s Juliette Berrez (Yamaha) to claim second position. Australia’s Jessica Gardiner (Sherco) ended her day in fourth. France’s Audrey Rossat (KTM) rounded out the top five.

Taking her second win of the weekend, Laia Sanz (KTM) comfortably topped the Women’s Cup class. Australia’s Jessica Gardiner (Sherco) capitalised on a crash by Britain’s Jane Daniels (Husaberg) on the final enduro test to finish second. With Daniels third, France’s Juliette Berrez (Yamaha) finished fourth while Australia’s Jemma Wilson (Honda) rounded out the top five. Laia Sanz is in good form after making the switch to a KTM this year. She secured a 1-1 result in the two opening rounds of the 2013 Women’s championship.

Source: enduro-abc.com

Issue #3

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Sophia Kirchhofer hails from the Swiss Canton of Argau. She is 31 years old and works in an architects’ office. She started riding her own bike, a CBR 600 and one thing leading to another began “racing for fun” and went on circuit. Anna Burkhard is Swiss too and works as a chef in a home for the elderly. She is 45 years old and has been in sidecar racing since 2004, always as a passenger. Sophia started sidecar racing as a passenger 5 years ago. She rode with Peter Schröder and was Anna’s replacement. When Peter Schröder said he wanted to stop racing as he was getting old, the rider’s mechanic had the idea of setting up a women’s sidecar team. He’s the one who gave Anna and Sophia the bike and prepared the engines. Sophia and Anna have been riding together for 3 years now. Last year, they took part in a couple of races but weren’t permanent riders. They rode in Oschersleben twice and knew that if they went fast they could qualify and try for the World Championship. Taking part in the WC is a huge challenge for the two ladies. When it comes to riding alongside the male teams, they say it’s no problem. The guys were happy when the ladies’ team qualified and atmosphere among all riders is good. Regarding mechanics, Anna and Sophia do several things themselves and they have Mr Peter Küng taking of their engines. It is interesting to note that the team has also a female mechanic.

©ladies-team.ch

When it comes to training, they point out that it is complicated to get training time on circuits: it is expensive and most of the time motorcyclists are not very keen to ride with sidecars. Sidecar is not a very well-known discipline but Anna and Sophia hope that it will get more popular. They say that more and more women are taking up this sport and mention the example of the Team Ms Estelle Leblond and Mr Sébastien Lavorel, where Estelle (2012 F2 Sidecar National Champion) is the rider. Anna and Sophia are hoping to do well this year and to take part in next year’s World Championship. Source: Isabelle Larivière

FÉDÉRATION INTERNATIONALE DE MOTOCYCLISME 11, ROUTE DE SUISSE - CH - 1295 MIES

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WOMEN IN MOTORCYCLING NEWSLETTER

Issue #3

Portrait of a Legend – Majorie Cottle The relative scarcity of female competitors in motorcycle sport has meant that those few trespassing in this predominantly male domain have always attracted considerable publicity. During the 1920s and 1930s there was no lady motorcyclist more celebrated than Marjorie Cottle.

Born in 1900, Marjorie Cottle was one of Britain's best known motorcyclists in the 1920s. She competed regularly in races and reliability trials, and was considered to be one of the best riders in the country – male or female. She was also the star of Raleigh’s famous 1924 publicity stunt, in which she rode a 2¾hp solo model around the coast of mainland Britain. She demonstrated that physical strength was not crucial for operating a motorcycle that it was possible to be as engaged in her exploits as a professional motorcyclist. Despite the fact that Ms Cottle and other female riders had proven themselves the equal of male competitors, the Auto-Cycle Union announced a ban on women in road racing in 1925, citing the bad publicity that might ensue should one be seriously injured in a crash. The ban did not apply to trials and it was in this area of motorcycle sport that lady riders shone.

In 1925 Cottle, together with Louie McLean and Edyth Foley, had won individual gold medals at the International Six Days Trial, an achievement that led to the ACU grouping them in a semiofficial national team for the Vase category in following year’s event. They finished equal first with no marks lost, dropping to 3rd place after special tests to determine the winners. Promoted to full Vase status for 1927 but given no chance of success by contemporary commentators, the trio rose to the challenge by winning that

category outright, beating Denmark into 2nd place with the all-male Great Britain team finishing 3rd. By 1930 she had become so famous and well respected a rider that when she was not selected in 1930 to ride in the ISDT team by the ACU there was a national outcry that went as far as the popular papers of the time. By the end of the decade 1930, an official of the manufacturers’ trade association had to admit that 25,000 of Britain’s estimated 700,000 motorcyclists were female. In 1939, Majorie was entered in the infamous ISDT in Austria, which by then had been annexed by Germany.

Despite the worsening political situation in Europe, the German organisers went ahead with the event but a telegram arrived from the War Office in London and the remaining British contingent, including Marjorie Cottle, was escorted to neutral Switzerland and safety. Britain and Germany were at war nine days later. After the war Marjorie gave up competing and worked for BSA (Birmingham Small Arms Company) as a motorcycle sales representative. She sadly passed away in 1987. Marjorie will also be remembered for her good words: in an article called “Motor Cycling for Beauty” in the Evening Standard (UK), 25 September 1928, she wrote: “Once, not so very long ago, the woman motorcyclist was regarded as something of a crank or a freak. Times have changed, and motorcycling as a sport is becoming more and more popular with women. It has been conclusively proved that motorcycling is not harmful to women… It will make them hardy and strong, and although the powder puff is not a part of the girl motorcyclist’s make-up it can always be hidden away for use when occasion demands it”. Source: speedtracktales

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WOMEN IN MOTORCYCLING NEWSLETTER

Issue #3

WOMEN IN THE CHINESE MOTORCYCLE INDUSTRY The motorcycle industry has, for the main part, long been regarded a man’s world. So let’s take a closer look at the female influence on the motorcycle industry in China. One of the biggest influences on any industry is the media that supports it and in China there is a huge female input in that region. Lucy Cheng is the owner and editor of i-motor, the biggest Chinese language motorcycle media outlet. She affirms that there are women in every position from company owner down to production line worker and in every aspect of the industry including media. If there is a lack of females in the industry at any time it is just a matter of their choice as opposed to discrimination. It is true that there are no Chinese ladies currently competing in motorcycle sports but then, there is not yet any major participation by men in motorcycle sports in China either. As motorcycle sport grows I guarantee you will see the emergence of capable Chinese women riders and technicians at race tracks.” There are an estimated 200,000 woman motorcycle riders in China, most riding scooters under 125cc. Ma Cong of the Chongqing custom bike society is an exception. She relates: “It’s quite rare for women in China to ride bigger bikes but I have been in love with Harley Davidson motorcycles for years. I’m considering open pipes but I’m not sure because I attract a lot of attention already and I’ve had some traffic incidents with guys looking at me.”

ZhongLi owns a small supermarket and regularly delivers groceries on her 50cc Lifan scooter. “For me the scooter is my main means of transport. I regularly change the oil and filters and tighten the drive chain because my husband doesn’t know how to do it! A lot of ladies around here get together to do maintenance on the scooters and cubs that we ride. If we left it to our husbands they would take the bikes to a mechanic. We prefer to maintain them ourselves to save a bit of money!”

Zo Fu, Chief Editor of ChinaMotor Magazine reports. “More often than not, when I am reporting on a new motorcycle product the head of the publicity and advertising company for the motorcycle factory is a lady. Their knowledge of the new products is at least equal to the men that we deal with. It’s not just Chinese women who are employed either; I remember years ago Shineray employed a Swedish lady as the general manager. Yan Haimei, Benelli CEO

Recently a woman, Yan Haimei, was installed by Qianjiang as the CEO of Benelli” Li Lian is an 18 year old assembly line worker at the Liyang motorcycle factory in Chongqing and for her men and women have the same opportunities to progress and it seems that women are quicker on the production line!” Rio Wang CEO of Fuego Power agrees. “I wouldn’t think twice about hiring a female for any aspect of the operation. My GM is a female, and three quarters of the export staff are female. Their motorcycle knowledge is on a par with the guys even though they are a bit reluctant to get on and ride sometimes”. It’s not just the traditionally powered 2wheeler industry that is graced by the “fair sex”; the electric scooter industry also benefits. Yadea is the biggest EV export company in China and is captained by Nancy Zhou as GM. She says: “As the EV industry is still relatively in its infancy, there are huge opportunities for women, as the industry has not taken on a male-orientated culture in the same way as the standard motorcycle industry. It’s also the case that many women prefer to ride an electric scooter.” To conclude it seems that in the Chinese motorcycle industry, women hold some of the top positions and this trend is not likely to change. Source: David McMullan

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WOMEN IN MOTORCYCLING NEWSLETTER

Issue #3

EUROPE’S FASTEST WOMAN

NEWS FROM THE FIM FAMILY

Motorcycling mum Jo Stevenson became the Europe’s fastest woman after clocking up 243.5mph on a turbo-powered bike.

FIM AFRICA is pleased to announce the appointment of two new ladies to the FIM AFRICA Women In Motorcycling Commission: LAUREN BRANCH Lauren is from Botswana. Given her experience and involvement in motorcycling, Lauren will undoubtedly be a very valuable member of the FIM AFRICA Women in Motorcycling Commission. SHELLEY VERWEY Shelley Verwey is from Zimbabwe and is mainly involved in the leisure/touring side of motorcycling. Shelley believes that training days for total beginners would provide the perfect opportunity to increase the number of female riders even further.

©Jack Frost

Jo Stevenson, 40, from Rotherham, south Yorkshire (UK) took up biking just five years ago. Mum-of-one (Ella, 13 years-old) Jo, who rides a Suzuki Hayabusa, had an interest in motorcycles as a teenager but only took it up after watching racing at Santa Pod with her fiancé.

INSPIRATIONAL STORY The life of a female US Motor Officer: what it takes to be among the elite few

She said: “My dad always had bikes and I can vaguely recollect wanting one when I was about 17 but my mum said over her dead body. My mum is proud of me now but doesn’t want to know how fast I’ve gone. Jo became Europe’s fastest woman in May by accident when she borrowed electrician Dave’s turbo bike. She said: “I knew I had gone faster because it took longer to stop. I saw the end of the runway looming towards me”.

Since her record, Jo Stevenson has been appointed a Rotherham Ambassador in recognition of her achievements in the sport and of her support of the borough. She is now supporting a national motorcycle event aimed at making bikers safer and reducing casualties on the roads and is urging fellow motorcyclists to drive safely on the town’s roads.

Being a female US Motor Officer in a massively male-dominated field provides a true feeling of accomplishment. Tina says that she does not feel there is any “special” treatment but underlines that she gets some extra respect for doing it. She declares: “I have to work twice as hard as my male counterparts to reach my goals, but I know I can do it, and I have overwhelming support from my fellow motors”. Often Tina comes across citizens whose first words are, “Wow, I’ve never seen a female motor cop. Cool!” She adds “I just have to laugh and appreciate the compliment. She mentions that it is especially rewarding when she encounters other females who give her a thumbs up! She concludes by saying that it seems women have to work harder to reach their goals, especially when choosing a professional field dominated by men. Tina highlights that she is proof that women can reach those goals and expectations if they want to. She finishes with very positive words: “Don’t ever give up and do what it is you want to do!”

Source: motorcyclemonthly

Source: Tina Leman

Jo, who runs a portable appliance testing firm, achieved her feat at a Top Speed event at Elvington Airfield, near York. She said: It’s the adrenaline I love, the rush is amazing. I shake before a run because I’m a little scared and afterwards because of the adrenaline. It was brilliant, an amazing feeling.” She concluded by saying “I will try again to get sponsorship now and breaking 250mph would be a dream.

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Issue #3

CALENDAR AND EVENTS TO COME 2013 WOMEN TRAINING CAMPS ROAD RACING 4-5-6 October 2013 SPAIN - Albacete For more information regarding this training please contact us at: women@fim.ch

2013 FIM COMPETITIONS FIM WOMEN’S MOTOCROSS WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP 211/05 25 August 2013 211/06 01 September 2013 211/07 15 September 2013 211/08 22 September 2013

GREAT BRITAIN - Matterley Basin CZECH REPUBLIC - Pacov FRANCE - St Jean d' Angely PORTUGAL - Fronteira

FIM WOMEN'S TRIAL WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP 304/02 31 August-1 September 2013 304/03 06 September 2013

FRANCE - Isola 2000 FRANCE - La Chatre

FIM WOMEN'S TRIAL DES NATIONS 312/01 07 September 2013

FRANCE - La Chatre

MAXXIS FIM WOMEN'S ENDURO WORLD CUP 406/04 7-8 September 2013

FRANCE - St Flour

FIM INTERNATIONAL SIX DAYS' ENDURO (ISDE) 401/01 30 September-05 October 2013

ITALY - Olbia

FIM WOMEN'S CROSS-COUNTRY RALLIES WORLD CUP 810/05 23 July-4 August 2013 810/06 28 September-5 October 2013

BRAZIL Rally dos Sertoes EGYPT

FIM WOMEN'S BAJAS WORLD CUP 815/04 15-18 August 2013 815/05 13-15 October 2013 815/06 01-02 November 2013

HUNGARY - Hungarian Baja MOROCCO - Baja du Maroc PORTUGAL - Baja Portalegre 500

Contact us at: women@fim.ch Share with us your comments, stories and ideas!

FÉDÉRATION INTERNATIONALE DE MOTOCYCLISME 11, ROUTE DE SUISSE - CH - 1295 MIES

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FIM Women in Motorcycling Commission Newsletter - Issue 3 (2013)  

FIM Women in Motorcycling Commission Newsletter - Issue 3 (2013)

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