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OF THE ~APANESE

MIUTARY ADMINISTRATION

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EJit,J by THE JAPANESE MIUT ARY ADMINISTRAnON

by MhNlU. Nm NITI SHIMBUN SHh. INC.


TH E OFFICIAL JOUR NAL ~

OF

TH E JAPANESE MIL ITARY ADMINISTR ATION

by

TH E JAPANESE Ml LlT AR Y ADMINISTRAT ION

P,.:nwJ ana Publuhtd by MANILA NlTI NIT! SRIMBUN SR'\., INC .


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"l짜hite coal,lJ fUI"11ifiTtil1g the 'motive power f01' 1I 11l1fion's i11.d'llstrial machinenJ, assumes (l IlOSifio11 of puramount im1)ortance in wurtime economy, The fact that N1'?Jpon engineers have debu.ilt seven of tile world's lal'gest turbines (l.1uZ installeel them at the SIliTto (S h1Lileng) dam (wd powerhouse UCI'OSS the Yalu ,,-i'ver for the Ya/'U. River Power Co, 81:gnifies a trium. ph fa.,. sC';entific Ni1)pOn , The tlO'bine pictu'red above is capable of generathlD 150,000 h,p" being co'usiderably /arum' than those of Boulder dum across the Colorado river in the United States, hitherto cOll!~ide)'ed th e la1'gest in fhe 'Worlel, none of which generates mOre than 115,000 fl ,1), Despite wa?,time diffi(mlties, the engillee)'S of the Suiho dam completeci U,e project in less tham foul' yem's, afte)' stm't i11{} it in 19!tB, It /ws been 8lt1JPlui'l1f/ 011 abunciallce of elect/'icity 1.0 Chosen alld It-1anchoukuo

shlCe August, 19.$1,

,~igned and


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A mong the modern ind'ust'ries of Nip1)01t, the sp'illlning incl'ustry was the eadiest t.o establish a Ii-I'm foundation . T hus, d'l.('rft/[1 the yea'rs wh en Nippon '/Vas known for i ts light industries, t he Spi1l11irtO crnnpa.ni es fanned the p1'incipal industry of the 'JU~tion. Th e S'l.t.peTior cituructfwist1CS of the imdustry 1Jl'oviding neceSSCl/ry tuea'ring apPu1'el for th e pea· ple 1Iave been maintained, if not imp)'o'Ved, even under the long-tenn 1.ual'thne system from the poi'nt of vie1.v of general ex pansion of industrial p1·oduction. A larue 'I1'll'mber .~_ of women ha v e replaced nlen in this -industry, releasing the lattm' fo',. emplo'yment else~~ where. The 'm ajority of the spinn'ing 'mills as seen lIe)'e have facilities JOI' th e proc7uc~ ___ idml of S1Jnthetic {(" brics , 'tnanuiactw"ing all types of sY'Ilthetic yw)"n j'l'orn 1ml1),

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If the (Jill /omotive illd:"s /ry is al1 ;l1 deo' of a nation's st,'en(l th, then Ja1Jan has It h'ighly "'.1Jecluble ,'a/il1(1, H el' 1,,'ogl'ess in Ih i8lield has ad:"anced to such a" ex tent thai she no longe,. has need 10 impo,'1 cal's of /0,'eig1l ?nake, Equipped with self路delJel1dellt Japanese m.ethods of prOd1tctiou wnd tec/t1riqu.e, hundreds of 'motOl' C{O'tl , trlLcks, b'us8eR, tanks and amwl'ed .a"8 {(I'e rolled off th e COI/" t,'y',. a8,.e1ll bt1/ plant.s clail1/, as this 1Jictu)'e shows,


Thanks to the g"eat eftorts "'nde by Nipponese shilJbuilde,'s si?>ce the law e1lCo",路, agino the i"dus路t ry tvas passed in 18.9.5, Nippon today occupies a unique position as (t

The jJhoto,q,'aph de1,ictillg a stage ;'1 the bnilding of a fleet of "'ade ships is a testi路 monlJ that ,J芦pam ;s desthled to dom;n(t(.e the seas.

1na,r"itim.8 nation.


TABLE OF CONTENTS Pages Kalatas sa Sangbayanang Pilipino ng Kataastaasang Pinuno ng Hukbong Panglabas ng Hapon sa PHipinas ....... _...... . ....... vji-ltiv Address to the Filipino People by the Commander-in-Chief, Japanese Expeditionary FOl'ces to the Philippines ......... _. .. _....... xv-xx Speech delivered before the Chairman and Commissioners of the Philippine Central Administrative Ol'ganization by the Commanderin-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, August 6, 1942 _.. _. __ . . ... ___ ........... _. _. _. . . . . . . . . . . . .

x.,<i

Speech by the Director-General of the Japanese Military Administration at the inauguration of the Philippine P,;me Commodities Distribution Control Association, on July 24, 1942 .......... xxii-xxiii Speech by the Director-General of the Japanese Military Administration regarding the fundamental policy on the readjustment of the sugar industry and the increased production of cotton, August 10, 1942 ............â&#x20AC;˘........â&#x20AC;˘.. . ...... . ....... . .... . xxiv-x.'<v Address by the Director-General of the Japanese Military Administration on the occasion of the Second Convention of Provincial GovernOl'S and City Mayors, Manila, August 12, 1942 ......... xxvi-xxxiii Address by the Director-General of the Japanese Military Adminiso'ation at the first graduation ceremony of the Constabulary Academy, August 29, 1942 . ... ............................. xx.'<iv-x."-'<V Section 1.

Affairs concerning Intel;or ....... . ..................... Instruction (No. 49) concerning the text books to be used in the public high schools in the Philippines ................ Instraction (No. 58) concerning religious education in the public schools ........... _. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Instruction (No. 61) concerning the reopening of public agricultural high schools in the Philippines ........... . . . . Inso'uction (No. 62) concenling the text books on agricul ture for the agricultul'al high schools in the Philippines .. , Military Ordinance (No. 13) concerning official language for public use ..... . ................... _. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Notification concerning physical and medical examination, inspection and vaccination ....... . .......... . ... _. . . . . . .

1 1 10 11 11 14 16


Pages ection 2,

Affairs concerning COlUmunications " ' , " ' , " " , " " ' , ' , Military Ordinance (No, 20) concerning regulations for travelling in and out of the Philippines ,,""",","""'" Notification concerning reopening of southern I'ailways , , , , ' Nutification concerning reopening of Batangas branch line Notification concerning operation of Northern main line, , , , Administrative Ordinance (No, 9) conceming the restriction of the usage and operation of motor vehicles " ' , " " " , ' , ' Militsr)' Ordinance (No. 16) concerning prohibition of manufacture or production of wireless telegraph or telephone apparatus .. ,"", ... " .. ,"" , ., . . ,",., .. ,"", ... ,.. Military Ordinance (No, 17) concerning ,'estriction and pro' hibition of listening into I'adio broadcasts .,"""',...... Notification (No, 8) conce1'ning registration of ship carpenters ",. " ... ,", . .. ".,", .. , ",., .. ,.,',.,."., .. Notification concerning prohibition of navigation on the Marikina ,River , .,',.""',.,.,',.".,,' , ... . , .. ,',.,', . . , Notifies ion concerning transportation on the rivers Pasig and San Juan, . . , , . , ,_ . , , ... , , , . , , , , , , , . , . , , . , . , , , , , , , , Notification eoncel'ning lifting of prohibition of navigation on the Madkina River .. ".'.,"."" " ,." .. "' ,"", .,

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Affairs conce1'ning Industries ,.,' , .""""',.".,"'.,. J\[ilitary Ordinance (No, 14) concerning the control of the impOlt and export business of the Philippilres ""',.,,'" Military Ordinance (No. 15) concerning the control of prime commodities ", .. . ,.,"', .. ,""",. ," " " " , .. ,.,,'" Notification (No.9) concerning the kind of prime commodities " . ,',.,",'".,.,',',.",.".,.,., " """,',. Notification (No, 14) conce1'J1ing the kind of prime commoditi"s , . , " " " " " " " " , " . " , " , ' , .. ".,"',.,.," Administrative Ordinance (No, 10) concerning the organization of the Philippine Prime Commodities Distribution Control Association '., .. ,.,.,"" , .... ,",', ... , .. , . . '. Outline of the policy on the readjustment of the Philippine sugar industry .,.,., .. , " " , " " " " " " ' , " " , . , .. ,.,' Outline of the policy on the projects for the increase of cotton production "', ... ,.,', .. ,.,""', ". ', .. ,., .. , , '

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Section 4, Affairs conceming Finance ",.,"""",., .. ".".".,' Notification concerning the safety deposit boxes in enemy banks " ."', . . ,"",.,',.,""',.,.,',." .. ,"",.,... Notification conceming I'elease of contents of safety deposit boxes .""' .... ,", .. , . . ,""',.,.,",." ... , .. ".,.,' Administrative Ordinance (No, 11) concerning liquidation of the banks of hostile countries " " " " , " , " ',.," " ',.,.

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20 21 21 22 22 23

24 25 27 27 28 29 32

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Pages Section 5.

Affairs concerning Judiciary ... .. ... .......... . ..... ... . Announcement concenting punishment of violators of mili · tary laws .. . ........ . ...... . .... . . .. . . .. ......... . .... Section 6. Affairs concerning Provisional Release of Filipino war·prisoners ...... . ............ ........... ... . ... . ......... . . Notification concenting provisional release of Filipino war· prisoners . ........... .. . ... .. .... .. .... ......... .... ... Proclamation concerning treatment of Filipino war'prisoners Section 7. Affairs concerning Maintenance of Peace and Order ...... Announcement concerning confiscation of arms, printing machines, lltc. ........ .. . . . . ........................... Section 8. Executive Orders by the Chairman of the Philippine Exe· cutive Commission (Nos. 42. 43, 49, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61 , 62, 63, 64, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86) ............ . . .. ... ............... Executive Order No. 42 . Defining the organization, jurisdiction, POwel'S and duties of provincial governments and officials . .. ... .. ..... .. . .. . .. Executive Order No. 43. Defining 'the organization, jurisdiction, powers and duties of municipal governments and officials ........... ...... ... . Executive Order No. 49. Extending the period for payment of the fixed and percentage taxes including municipal license taxes ................... Executive Order No. 57. Extending the period of registration of all religious organ· izations or orders and their members and properties ....... Executive Order No. 58. Declaring ineffective maximum working hour and minimum wage laws ............................................. Executive Order No. 59. Amending certain sections of Executive Order No.4. ..... Executive Order No. 60. Extending the period for registl'ation of aliens for the year 1942. ............................................. Executive Order No. 61 . Authorizing the refund or credit for future taxes of any amount paid on or before June 30, 1942, as penalty. . . . . . . . Executive Order No. 62. Extending further in certain cases the period for filing ap' plications for renewal of authorization to solemnize mar' riages ................................................. Executive Order No. 63. Prescribing rul1lS and regulations governing the issuance of motor vehicle driver's licenses ..... ... ..... .. ............ iii

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57 60 60

61 61


Pages Executive Order No. 64. Registration and operation of motor vehicles in the provinces EX'i!Cutive Order No. 66. Fixing the schedule of annual fees for the registration of aliens .... . ........................................... . Executive Order No. 67. Imposing annual fees for the registration of radio receiving sets _.. __ ... _.. _............. __ .. . .. . ...... . . .. ... . Executive Order No. 68. Imposing specific taxes on distilled spirits, wines, fermented liquors and d'e natured alcohol . . __ , .................. .. .. . Executive Order No. 69. Providing for the payment of the unpaid real property taxes for 1941, and previous yea;'s in three installments and t he conditional remission of the penalties thereof _.. . ... _.. . . Executive Order No. 70. Providing 01' the lnanner of payment of the penalty in case of delinquency in the payment of the l eal property tax for 1942 in the City of Manila . Executive Order No. 71. Imposing residellfe' taxes on individua s and corporations ... Executive Order No. 72. Providing for the creation of the "Public Employees Life Insurance" and tne liquidation of the Government Service Insurance Sysrem ....... __ . _...................... . _.. . Executive Order No. 73. Requiring the registration of radio receiving sets and regulating the use thereof ... _. _............ _...... . _... . Executive Order No_ 74. Supervision of provincial governor over offices of the Centl'al Administrative Organization in the province _. . ... _. _.. . . Executive Order No. 75_ Defining the organization, jurisdiction, powers and duties of city governments and officials .... __ ........ _.... . .. . Executive Order No. 76. Defining the organization, jurisdiction, powers and duties of the City of Manila .. . ....... . . _. _.. _. ....... . .. . _. .. .. . Executive Order No. 77. Creating district and neighborhood associations and defining their powers, duties and responsibilities '" _.... _.... .. . . Executive Order No. 78. Supervision of the mayor over offices of the Central Administl'ative Organization in the chartered cities . . .... .

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Pages Executive Order No. 79. Extending the period of registration of motor vehicles and payment of registration fees therefor in certain provinces and chartered cities ... ... ........... .. ...... ........ ... Executive Order No. 80. Extending the period for the registration of radio receiving sets under Executive Order No. 73 ... .......... ......... Eorecutive Order No. 81. Regulating fishlng and the sale of fish ........... ....... Executive Order No. 82. Reducing by thirty per centum the tax on all permanent plants and/or trees .................................... Executive Order No. 83. Suspending the operation of certain provisions of the leave law and providing for sick leave ............ ..... .. ...... Executive Order No. 84. Abolishing the province of Batanes and annexing its mun, icipalities to the province of Cagayan; segregating the municipali,ties of Baler and Casiguran from the province of Tayabas and annexing the same to the province of Nueva Ecija; segregating the municipaH of Infanta from the province of Tayahas and annexing it tio the province of Laguna; abolishing the province of Marinduque and annexing its municipalities to thoe province of Tayabas; abolishing the province of Romblon and annexing its special lllunicipalities to the province of Capiz ............. Executive Order No. 85. Subjecting homesteads to ordinary land tax upon the ex' piration of one year from the date of the approval of the application .. ' ................. Executive Order No. 86. Extending the period for the payment of rasidence taxes for 1941 which became due on April 30, 1942, in localities outside the City of Manila .. " ........

105

Basic Policy Outlined f01' East Asia Structure .. America's First Offensive Proves a Miserable Failu1'e ..... Mounting Obstacles Face United States Government, o' . . .

107 115 119

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Kalatas sa Sangbayanang Filipino: Ang mithiin sa Lupalop ng Magkakasamang Kasaganaan a Lalong Malaking Silangang Asia ay magtayo sa ila lim n g diwa ng pagkakapalirang pangda igdig, ng isang matatag a t matibay na balangkas sa pamamagitan nang pagsasanib sa A sia ukol sa mga taga A sia, at lumikha n g isang pa la gian a t n an a natiling lupa lop ukol sa kaligayahan ng mga m am amayan sa loob ng purok na may pagkakaugnay sa heograpia. Ang paraa n upang maisakatuparan ang mithiing ito ay walang iba kungdi pagisahin ang mga mamamayan sa ilalim ng pamamatnugot n g Hapon, at sa pagpapatibay sa bigkis ng pagsasama ay luma lakad patungo sa kahahaa n ng landas ng kaunlaran sa ka buhayan at sa kapamayanang kagaya ng iisang pangkat n g m ga mamamayang tuwirang may malasakit sa kanilang sari lin g kabutihan at na ninindigaf\ sa iisang mithiin . Ang dakilan g p angarap ng Hallon sapul nan g itatag ang Imperio a y "Iikhain a n g daigdig na isang T ahanan. " Ang layunin ay m akitan g a n g bawa't bayan a f ang bawa't hansa ay nagkakamit n g kanila ng kaukulang kataynan sa ilalim ng ara)". Matatag kong pa na nafig na ang pagbahagong tatag sa S illm gang A sia , sa pa mam a gitan ng lalong rl.atalik na pagsasamahan n g ka nyang mga mamamayan. na an Hapon an g nagdudulot n g sigla , ay h ah an long hindi lamang sa pagtata tag sa pama h a la an n g sama-samang kahutihan at kasaganaan, kungdi sa p agtatatag din n g nananatiling kapayapaan ng mga tao. Ang tag lay na mithiin ng Hapon ay buung liwa n a g na sumikat sa ilalim ng dakilang pamamahala ng Kanyang K ilda kilaan, ang Emperador, at namalagin g hindi nan gun gulimlim sa buung 2600 taon ng kanyang kasaysayan; at ma liwa nag na mapapansin sa takbo ng mga pangyayari kung pa an ong a n g mithiin ay papatuloy na patungo sa katuparan . Ang pagpasok ng Hapon sa digmaan sa Lalong Malaking Silangang Asia ay ibinunsod, sa isang dako, ng pangangailangang takdaan ang lakas ng anglo-amerikano na nakalimot sa mataas na aral at sa paguukol ng kanilang sarili sa mapagimbot na pagkakilala sa nakapangingibabaw na sangkap sa kabihasnan ay nagsipangahas na pagtaksilan ang Silangang Asia sa palagiang paniniki!: upang itaboy sa malayo at sa lahas ng Silangang A sia ang kanilang mapangluEig na lakas. Na hinahangad naming maisakatuparan ang adhikang ito ay mangyari pang nauunawaang mahuti. Subali't ang mahalagang matuwid ay may maim na

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kaugnayan sa mga kasalukuyang suliranin sa kahuhayan at likas na kayamana n. Hindi mapagaalinlanganang nasasalig ito sa pasiyang maglatag ng Lupa lop ng Magkakasamang Kasaganaan sa Lalong l'Ialaking Silangang Asia. Lubhang mahalaga na sumanib ang bayang pilipino sa dakilang mithiing ito a t sa dakilang misiong ito kung lubusan g nauunawaan nila ang pangunang I<ahulugan ng digmaan sa Lalong Malaking Silangang Asia at ang hindi maiiwasang tunguhin nito.

-lI_ Ang mah inahong pakikitungo na siyang ginamil ng Hapon sa paldkipagtala tasan sa mga kapangyariha ng anglo-amerika no sa nakamang mga panahon. ay hindi bunga sa ano man!! paraan. ng kowala n niya ng lakas na pangbansa. Ito'y sapag 路 ka't umasa siya na ang mga l<apanayari h ang yao n ay maaaring sa ana mang paraan. ay sllmai lalim ng isang pagbahago al matututong lumalikod sa kanilang tusong pamamaraan sa p amamagitan n'tl, paba\igtad na pagpapakahll\ugan sa kataru ngan . Subal;'t ang kapangrarihang anglo-amerikano ay hindi lamang nabigon isaalang-a la ng ang kanilang p a ninikil, kungdi sinadya pang Ikulan ng maling pa lagay ang makatuwiran g milhiin ng H apon at buung tigas na ipin ilit ang ka nilang mga paraan sa panghahad la ng: at sa huli sa hindi pagpansin sa lunlunin ng mabuling hangaring pangdaigdig ay nagpatuloy sa kanilang mga pags is ikap sa paninikil sa pamamagitan ng mga tiwaling pagkilos sa Iikod ng tabing a t sa hayagan. Nan!! lumaon ay sumapi l s ila sa y ugto ng pagbabanta sa kalagayan ng Imperiong H apo nes. Ang simulain sa pangungubkob n:1 ABeD ay siyang matibay na katunayan ng pangyayari. Nagabala sa ila lim ng isang matagal na maling paniniwala al dahil sa walang malay sa Iihim na lakas n a naka tago sa loob ng balangkas ng bansang Hapones ay ibinunsod ang kanilan!! sarili na gumawa ng kamangmanga n na humukay ng sarili ni Ia n!! libingan. Natatalos ninyong la ha t na sa wala pang anim na buwan n!! digmaan ay hawak n a ng H apon ang kapangyarihan sa Pa siDiko. a t ang la ha t ng himpila n ng panglulupig na anglo-a merikano sa Silangang Asia ay lobusang napawi nIl lakas nl! mga hukbong Imperial. Kung may ilan sa inyo na taglay p a ang paniniwalang nasira ang kapayapaan ng Pilipinas sa pagdating ng hukbong hapones. ang ganyang liwaling palagay ay ma ituturing lamang na isang bunga n!! hindi maaplllang pro-

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Amerikanismo. Ang kasalukuyang dahilan ng digmaan sa La long Malaking Silangang Asia ay utang. sa diwa. sa mga simulaing panglabas ng anglo-amerikano, lalo na sa simulaing panglabas ng Estados Unidos. Kaya, ang pananagutan sa pangwawasak at hirap na taglay nito ay ganap na likha ng nagpasimula sa digma, ang Estados Unidos. May kaugnayan dito, dapat na banggiting ang Estados Unidos sa pagtataguyod sa kanyang kapangyarihan sa Pilipinas bilang kanyang lupain, ay itinatag at sinanay ang hukbong Pilipino upang makidigma sa Hapon. Dahil dito, sa gawa at sa teoria. ang Pilipinas ay aming kaaway. Subali't ang aming bayan, bagama't itinuturing na a ng Estados Unidos ang aming tiyak na haway, ay hindi Wnuring ang bayang Pilipino sa ganyan at sa halip sa mahabang paguusap, kung maaaring maunawaan ng bayang Pilipino ang aming mga dakilang mithiin at tutulong sa, amin sa pagtatatag sa Lupalop ng Magkakasamang Kasaganaan sa Lalong Malaking Silangang Asia, ay pagkakalooban nl! kaukulang pagsasaalang-alang ang isang patakaran sa pagkakaloob ng kasarinlan. Lubusan ninyong mauunawaan sa isang katibayang iro kung paano naiiba ang dil!IDaang ito sa lahat ng mga iba a t kung paano ito ay isang dakilang digmaang ibinunsod sa satigan ng dakilang aral na pinanindigan ng Hapon sapul sa pagkatatag ng bansa. Sapol sa pal!lulunsad sa Pilipinas na kasama nfil hukbong na sa ilalim ng aking pamumuno, ay pinagkalooban ko ng mahahalagang utos ang aking mga kawal. na bagaman kaaway natin ang mga hukbong amerikano, ay lalling pakikitunguhan na may kalakip na kagandahang loob at kaluwagan ang mga walang malay na mamamayang pilipino at tumalikod, nang walang makatuwirang dahilan. sa pallsasapanganib sa kanilang ikinabubuhay sa araw-araw. Sa iba't ibang pook ng larangan ay naging mataimtim na hangarin ko na iligtas kahi't na ang buhay ng mga kawal na Pilipinong nangangako ng pagtatapat sa Estados Unidos at buung dahas na nakikipaghamok laban sa amin sa ilalim ng pamumunong Amerikano. Ang malalaking pagsisikap na ginawa ko upang maiwasan ang hindi kailangang pagbububo ng dugo ay isang bagay na dapat rna 路 natiling sariwa pa sa inyong ala-ala. Sa halip, ang pangwawasak sa mga bayan at nayon sa pamamagitan ng panununog ay gawa ng hukbong Amerikano. na wala sa kalagayan, ay itinaguyod ang kanilang walang matuwid na mga paraan sa "paninira". Walang pangyayari na

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,inira nil' hukLong J-1apones dng tahanan nil' mga mamamayang "alang malay 0 sinulsulan ang mga ito nil' apoy kungdi sa katangitanginlt makalu"irang daJ.ilan: al maisusumpa ko ito sa lJios at sa Langit. Gayon man, sa kabil a nil' aldng makataong patakaran at ng aking paulit-ulit na tagubiling sumuko, mga sampung Iibong Pilipino, n tl naniniwala sa "tagumpay sa wakas" ng Amerikano. ang nagpilit sa kanilang wa lang saysay na paltsalungal hanggang sa " akas. Ang bunga ng walang katuturang pakik ibakang ito a) human tong hindi lamang sa malalaking pnltka lagas sa kanila kungdi sa paglikha rin nil' daltda!! na pagpapakasakit nil' tao sa hukbong Imperial. Kung hindi nakaukil sa aking puso ang mithiing p aglitiwala sa ikatutupad nil' pagtatatag ng Lalong lalaking Silangang Asia . I,aipala ay naging madali sa akin na isailalim ang lahat ng mga ka\\al na Pi li pin o sa maramihang pagpawi. Bakit iisiping isa!!awa anI{ haga), nu mahirap nn isipin at harapin ang gawain ,a pa(!habagong t ala~ nil' kapa yapaan sa Pilipinas? Ang suliraning ito ay \pinauubaya ko ;.a mga maaaring makaunawa sa p"takaran nit Inga dakilang simula in. gayo n. lunay na napawi a ng mga lagablab nil' digmaan ,a Pilipinas. anlt ma la laldng palata\ldaan ng kapayapaan ay unti-lInting nasasaksi han sa buung bayan. Subali't isang kasawiang tuna) din naman na hindi pa masasabing naghaharing lubos ang kaayusan at kaligta.an sa buung kapuluan. Ang SI.liraning ito ay ma halaga. Kung ngayon ay hindi pa ninyo natatalos ang katuturan ng Lupalop nit ]\'lagkakasamang Kasa!lanaan sa Lalonlt Malaking Silanltang A -ia at ang misiong ga(!ampanan ng Pilipinas. ay hindi lamang ilatambad ninyo ang im ng 11Igmok na ka tang ian kllnl!di hindi malalaon ay muli kayo n!! mababalik sa mga kalagayang dati. gayon man. iyan ang t nl1~ i ng paraan upang mabaynran a n g mga kawalan at mapawi ang kawalan ng lwligta,a n. Na sa buung bayang Pilipino na magbangong taglay ang walang pasubaling lapang at humarap sa malakinl! gawain sa palttatayo ukol sa hinaharap. :"Jguni't sa sa nda lin g madama ninyo ang ating kapasiyahan sa pagtataguyod ng Di gmaan sa Lalong Malaking Silangang Asia na aldbat ang layu nin g makalikha nil' bagon!! kasaysayan ng d a igdig ay mada li ninyong mauunawaan kung Ilaano a ng in aasah a n sa kakaya ha n ng Pilipinas sa d"ko ng politika. ekonomika. at industri a. Lubos kong nauunawaan na kayo ay dumaran as ng mga kagipitan at kahirapan sa buhay ninyo sa araw -araw. Subali't ang gayong mga kahirapan ay


hindi maihihiwalay sa mga digmaang nakatalaga sa pilglikha ng bagong kasaysayan. Ang pagsilang ay karaniwa n 路nang may kahalong kirot. Sa katotohanan ay iyan din allg mga tiising dinadanas ng mga araw na lumipas nang pagsikhayan ninyo. ngun;'t hindi ipinagtagumpay. ang pagtatatag ng isang bagong Pilipinas. Ngayon. sa paglulungating makapagtatag ng isang bagong lalaking Silangang Asia ay dumaranas din ng gayon!! mga kahiTapan ang lahing Hapones na tinutulungan ng hind i magaga ping pasiya. At sa malayong Europa. ang mga mamamayang Aleman at Italiano ay gumagawa rin ng gayon sa pagsasakit nilang matupad ang kanilang hangarin sa pagtatatag ng isang bagong kaayusan sa Europa. Maging sa kabila ng dako ng Pasipiko ay mayroon ding mga kal~irapan. bagaman walang masasallit ang pagsisikap nila . dahil sa pagkakaligaw sa landas ng sarili na rin. nilang mga estadista. Kung ihahAmbing sa iba ay higit na roapalad kayo. Sa i ang panahon. bilang pallna sa inyong kapasiyahan at pananalig. ay pinananabikan kong makita ang pagbabangon ng isang diwang pangbansa na katimbang ng kinauukulang pagkakataon. Maaaring marami ang hindi mabilang n a m~a mamamayang walang malay na dah-il sa lagablab ng digmaan ay nangagsipagtiis sa pagkawalay sa kanilang mga minamahal. Maaaring ang iba ay siya na ring nakasaksi sa pagka'ugnaw sa apoy ng kanilang mga kayamanan. Maaaring n apaka rami pang iba na gayong hindi nila kasalanan, ay napala)' at naglaboy nang walang nilalayon at hindi nalalaman ang lil;kuan sa mga pagla lakad nila. Gayon man ay may isa ng pe路 raan lamang upang mabayaTan ang mga nawala at na n g m s pawi ang panganib. Ang buung bavang Pilipino ay dapat tumindig ng buung lakas ng loob na hindi magagapi at b al;ngan ang dakilang gawain sa pagtatatag ukol sa hinaharap.

-IIIa pagtatatag ng bagong Pilipinas. ang unang hakbang ay a llg paglalatag ng saligang espiTitual 0 sa diwa na siyang rna 路 halagang sandigan ng kultura 0 kabihasnan. at sa paligid niyan ay nasasalig ang politika. ekonomia. industria. at pagtuturo. 4.no ang saligang espiritual na iyan 7 Mangyayari iyan sa pagbabalik ninyo sa kinagisnang mga gawi a t ugali ng lahi. sa lantay ng mga alamat na Pilipino. matapos na maalis ang maskera ng kultureng kanluran. Una ay sa ilalim n g ka pang-

xi


yarihang Kastila at .aka ang panahon sa loob ng 40 taon sa ilalim n!! pamarnahalang Amerikano. ang buhay ng mga Pilipino. bilang mga Silangllnin. ay napawi upang maiangkop sa mga hangarin ng mga Amerikano. Bilang bunga niyan. ang mga alamat na Silanganin. ng katauhan at moral ay nakatkat. Ang lahing Pilipino ay bumaling upang sumunod sa pamumuhay na maginhawa. gumami t ng higit sa nagagawa at inakay sa mga karangyaan at kaalibughuan na inalagata ang nauukol sa kasalukuyan at nalilimutan ang kinabukasan. Ang matatag nilang mga katangian sa pagka labi ay nawala at naging mabubuting manggagagad sila ng pamamaraan sa buhay Amerikano na ulila sa pagaladata sa darating. Lubhang kailangan na ang mga taong may lunggatiin ay magdilidili at buhayin sa pangaraw-ara\\' oa buhay nila ang magagandang kalooban at ugali at ang pagka matapat at walang gulat. rnatalino at masipag at masinop at matipid na s iyang nagpapagalaw sa mga uga ng mga lahing Silanganin. Ang paf\lamalakad ng â&#x20AC;˘ merikanong itinuturing na ang Pilipinas ay b'atong tuntllngan lamang nila sa pananalakay sa Silangan. ay hllmubog sa paraang hindi nagunita ng mga Pilipino ng pasiya s~ pagsamba sa mga bagay Europeo at Arnerikano sa pamamagitan nan!! pagsira sa magagandang katangian at kaloobang nakahahalina sa m!!a mamamayan ng Silan!!an sa buhay nilll sa araw-araw. Ginulo nila ang balangkas ott knisipfln na siyan!! na!!pflpa!!alaw sa mIla mamamayan upang mahilig sa materialismo. Ang masamang ugali sa pagpapakilala ng labis nn pagpapahalaga sa mga babae na likha ng kaugaliang Amerikano ay nagbunga nang pagkasira sa rnatanda nang simulaing dinakila sa Silangan tungkoI sa paggalang sa puno ng maganak. At ang kakulangan sa diwa ng kasipagan 0 ubos-kayang paggawa oa hindi masusunduan sa mIla mamamayan sa tTopiko ay nakatangay sa kanila upang upang rnahilig sa materialismo. Ang masamang ugali sa paglilimayon. Ang moralidad ay naging kalayawan; ang diwa ng katapangan ay pinalitan nf! hilig sa sugal at espekulasion. Ang mga simulaing demokraliko ay humantong sa mga kaga litan at tunggalian sa politika na a ng ibinunga ng lahat ay ang malimit na pagkapinsala ng mga kapakanan ng bayan dahil lamang sa pangangailangan sa polilika. Ibig kong magsalita ng tuwiran. Habang hindi ninyo rnagaf!awan!! mapalaya ang inyong sarili sa pataw ng Amerikanismon~ iyan na nakapinsala sa inyong buhay at kakayahan

xii


ay magpapatuloy kayo sa pagkasiTa sa diwa hanggang sa katapusan ay madala kayo sa bingit nang pagkapawi ng inyong lahi. Pagbalikwasin ang inyong saTilil Hinahamon ko. lalonglalo na, ang mga kabataan na siyang nakatalagang babalikat ng mga panagutan ng bagong Pilipinas, Ang muling pagsilang ng Pilipinas ay maisasagawa na lamang sa pagpawi sa inyong mga saTili ng nagpapaurong na mga "lakas" ng kulturang Amerikano na nasasalig sa pagpapahalaga lamang sa sarili (individualismo), liberalismo at demokrasia, at sa pagiging tunay na lahing Sllanganin sa pamu!;,

-IVLubhang napakaliwanag na ang pagtatatag ng bagong Pilipinas nang naaalinsunod sa mga bagong kalagayan ay hindi maaaring pabayaan, kahi't isang araw lamang, Ang buhay sa araw-araw ay dapat maging lig~a s at matatag at butlin ang pagtatayo ng isang bansang nauukol sa pagsasaka at ang mga panukala sa pagpapaunlad sa industria ay dapat ihanda, Hanggang sa ngayon, ang mahlgpit na kailangan sa sandaling ito ay mabisang maisagawa sa tulong ng bago a t masiglang diwa, ang himagsikan sa pagbabago sa pamumuhay ninyo sa ara\.v-Bra'\v.

Lubhang kailangang maunawaan na ang tunay na pa{!sasarili ay hindi isang bagay na pakilang tao lamang. Ang diwa niyan ay nasasalig sa pagpapabuti sa kakayahan sa pamumuhay sa saTili. Ang unang kailangang hinihingi upang maging isang lahing nagsasarili ay ang (>agbabalikwas ng diwang matatag at mapagbuu na siyang kai langan at ang bawa't tao ay magigising sa pagkakilala na siya ay isang bahaging kaugnay ng Lalong iVlalaking Silangang Asia. Ito ang umaakay sa pagwawaksi sa maginhawang pamumuhay sa araw-araw. Madaling dapat ninyong tuusi n ang matandang paraan ng pamumuhay na kinakailangan at nakikilala sa ugaling nagsasandig ng pagasa sa tulong na espiritual at ekonomiko ng ilia, Dapat kayong magsimula nang pamumuhay na akibat ang pagtitiwala at pananalig na angkop sa lahing Silanganin at tuklasin ang ganap na pagpapabuti sa isang tunay na kulturang Pilipino, Ang paglulunggati sa 'pagsasarili nang walang pagpapakasakit upang maging kaTapal路dapat sa karangalang iyan ay walang saysay kung paanong iyan ay isa ring kabiguan.

xiii


-\'Kung paanon!! hindi maaaring palitan ng leo pardo ang kanyang mga batik ay hindi ninyo maaaring mabago ang katotohanang kayo ay mga Silanganin. Bakit kayo susunod sa mga ipinagagawa ng Europa at Amerika. na taglay anr! diwang mababa sa sarili? DlImatinr! na ang panahong dapat ninyong ipakila[a na kayo ay isang [ahing Silanganin at dapat ninyon!! pakinabangan ukol sa inyo na kasama ng ibang mga kauring lahi na kalapit sa heograpia. ang angkop na dapat ninyong kalagyan sa hayusang pangdaigdig ng mga bagaybaga)' Ang panahon ay malakas na nananawagan upang ita(lllyod ang isang dakilang himagsikang espiritual. Kung wala niyan. ang maluwalhating hinaharap ng bagong Pilipinas ay taha.ang hindi mangyayari. Ika 31 ng Hulio. 1942.

KATAASTAA ANG PIl'\ruNO HlIkbong PanglalJas '19 Hapon so Pilipinas

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Address to the Filipino People: The ideal of the Greater East Asia Co-prosperity Sphere is to establish, under the spirit of universal brotherhood, a firm and enduring structure by consolidating Asia for the Asians. and to create a permanent and lasting sphere of happiness and well-being for the peoples within the great area having geographical affinity. The process to realize this ideal is none other than by the related peoples uniting themselves under the leadership of Japan, and by solidifying the bond of union. marching forward along the road of economic and political progress as a unit of peoples directly concerned with their own well-being and holding to a common ideal. The great aspiration of Japan since the founding of the Empire has been "To make the Universe a Home." The aim is to see every people and every na tion acquire their righbful po itions under the sun. It is m y Firm conviction that the reconstruction of East Asia "dth closer relations among its peoples. with Japan as their spiritual sup port, will bring about not only th realization of the state of mutual well-b ing and prosperity, but also the establishment of an enduring peace among mankind. The ideal held by Japan has shone brilliantly under the august rule of His j'vlajesty the Emperor and has remained undimmed throughout the 2600 years of her history; and it is clearly observable by the train of events, how the ideal has steadily approached realization. Japan's participation in the Greater East Asia War was motivated in one respect by the need to discipline the Anglo-American Powers that have been heedless of high principle, and becatise in choosing to abandon themselves to the haughty concept of the superiority of material civilization. they dared to tyrannize East Asia "dth permanent oppression; it was to drive out their malignant influence far and away from East Asia. That it was our intention to accomplish this is, of course, well understood. But the profounder motive has little to do with the transient problems of economy or natural resources. It lies unquestionably \vilh the determi. nation to establish the Greater East Asia Co-prosperity Sphere. It is imperative that the Filipino people identify themselves with this great idea and this great mission if they would clearly comprehend the essential meanin!! of the Greater East A sia War and its ine\路itable course. -

xv


II The modest attitude with which Japan had constrained to deal with the Anglo-American Powers in the past decades. was not in any way due to her lack of national strength. It is because she had hoped that those Powers might somehow undergo a transition and Jearn to desist from their arrogant tactics by a conscientious reversion to justice. But the Anglo-American Powers not only failed to recons ider their transgressions. but they deliberately chose to misinterpret the cause of Japan. and persisted obstinately in their ways of obstruction; and in ignoring the precept of international good faith . continued their efforts at oppression by nefarious activities both behind the scenes and in the open. They tinally arrived at the point of threatening the very existence of the Japanese Empire. The ABeD encirclement policy is a dear evidence of the fact. Laboring under a perennial delusion and in being ignorant of the latent p wer deep within the structure of the Japanese nation. they brought it upon themselves to commit the stupidity of digging theIr own graves. You a II kn w that within less (han 6 months of the war. Japan holds the upreT(lacy of the Pacitic. and all the bases of Anglo-American ggression in East Asia have been completely wiped out by the T(light of the ImJilerial Forces. If there are some among you who still hold to the belief that the peace of the Philippines was broken by the coming of the Japanese Forces. such a superficial viewpoint can only be considered as the product of a ohronic pro-Americanism. It is not worth the effort to redeem such people from their illusion. The actual cause of the Greater East Asia WaJ' is attributable. in essence. to the Anglo-American foreign policies. particularly to the foreign policy of the United States. Hence. the responsibility for the devastation and the ch.aos it engendered lies squarely with the instigator of the war. the United States. 1n this respect. it should be mentioned that the United States in exercising its sovereignty over the Philippines as her territory. organized and trained the Philippine Army to fight Japan. Therefore. both actually and theoretically. the Philippines was our enemy. But our country. although regarding the United States as our specific enemy. did not consider the Filipino people as such. and rather went so far as to say that if the Filipino people were able to understand our supreme motives and would collaborate ~vith us in the construction of

xvi


the Greater East Asia Co-prosperity Sphere. due cons idera tion would be given to a policy of according independence. You can readily see from this sin gle fact how this war differs from all others and how it is a n exa lted war w aged upon the basis of the great principl e upheld by Japan since the found a tion of the country. Upon la nding in the Philippi nes with the Army under my command. 1 gave explicit orders to my men. thou gh th e American forces are our enemy, always to treat the innocent Filipino people with bndness a nd con sidera tion and to refra in , without just cause. fyom endangering their daily existence. On the various sectors of the front , it was my express d es ire even to save the lives of the Filipino soldiers pledgin g loyalty to the United States and furiously fighting against us under American command. The fen 路ent efforts I made to preven t unnecessary blood hed is a matter tha t mu st be still fresh in your

memo~.

In diTect contrast, the d evastation of towns a nd villages bv incendiarish. was the work of the American forces who. o~t of spite. caTried out their purposeless "scorched ea rt'h " tacti cs. Under no circumstances h ave the Japan ese Army des troyed homes of innocent people or set them on fire un less for exceptional justifiable reasons; and 1 can swea r to this by God and Heaven. Nevertheless. and despite my hum ane policy and my repeated advice to capitul a te. tens of thousands of Filipinos. believing in some " ultim ate victory" by th e America ns. persisted in their futil e opposition to the end . The senseless resistance resulted not only in their own heavy cas ualties but also in the incurring of additional acrifices of the men of the Imperial Forces . If it were not that 1 bore in my heart the ideal and the faith in the rea lization of the establishment of Greater East Asia. it might have been simple for me to subject all the Filipino soldi ers to wholesale extermina tion . \;Yhy forebear to carry out what was diffi cult to foreb ear. and turn to the task of the reconstruction of peace in t he Philippines? This question 1 leave to those of you who are able to understand the meaning of great principles. Today. it 'is true that the flames of w a r have sub sided in th e Philippines, and auspiciolls indications of p ea ce are gradually evident throughout the country. But unfortunately, it is a lso true that as yet it cannot be said that order and security prevails completely over the whole archipelago, This point is import-

xvii


ant. If now you fail to become conscious of the significance of the Greater East Asia Co-prosperity Sphere and the important share to be borne and the duty and the mission to be performed by the Philippines. you will not only be exposing a decadent aspect. but soon you will return once again to the conditions when you were helpless under the fetters of American control and be utterly of no consequence in the new framework rising in accompaniment with the dynamic changes in the international situation. But once you are able to perceive our determination in the prosecution of the Greater East Asia War with the idea of creating new world history. you would spontaneously come to understand how much is being expected of the political. economic. and the industrial capacity of the Philippines. I am fully aware that you lire experiencing inconveniences and hardships in your daily lives. But such distresses aTe inseparable with wars that ate destined to create new history. Birth is usually accompanied by pain. In reality it is but the same kind of a su ffering you kderwent during former days when you sought. without success. to create a new Philippines. Today. the Japanese people in aspiring to the construction of a new Greater East Asia are overcoming similar difficulties with an indomitable will. And in distant Europe. the peoples of Germany and Ita ly are doing the same in thei1' struggles to accomplish their aim of establishing a new order in Europe. Even on the other side of the Pacific. there are people likewise undergoing hardships, although in their case. in a doomed struggle. as a result of their being misled by their own statesmen. In comparison with others. you are infinitely more fortunate. At such a time. in anticipation of your resolution and your determination. I am eager to see the rise of a national spirit equal to the occasion. It may be that there are countless numbers among the innocent people who. on account of the ravages of war. have been suffered to separate from their dear ones. Others may have been witnesses to their own fortunes go ing up in flames. There may a lso be numerous others. who through no fault of their own. are wandering aimlessly knowing not where to torI). There is. however. only one way to recompense for the losses and to banish insecurity. It is for the entire Filipino people to rise with a dauntless courage and to turn to th e great task of building for the future .

xviii


III In the construction of the new Philippines, the first step must necessarily be the laying of the spiritual foundation which is the vital nucleus of culture, and around which politics, economy, industry. and education are based. Wha t is that spiritual foundation? It comes of your return to the original racial characteristics, to the pure Filipino traditions, after ridding the masque of Occidental culture. First under Spanish rule, and then for a period of 40 odd years under American domination . the life of the Filipinos , as Orientals. was obliterated to suit the designs of the Americans, As a result, the Oriental traditions of humanity and morals were effaced. The Filipino people turned to follow an easy-going life, consuming more than producing, and were led to hedonism and extravagance, conscious only of today, and oblivious of the morrow. Their sound racial characteristics were lost and they became the bold imita ors of the American way of life which is devoid of introspection, It will be for persons with aspirations to retrieve and re\ive in their daily lives, the manners and the customs. and the innate qualities of honesty and fortitude, diligence and hardworking and fru gality and thrift. that pulse in the veins of we Oriental people , The American policy that considered the Philippines only as a stepping stone for their aggression in the Orient, cultivated, in a manner unperceived by the Filipinos, the disposition to worship things European and American by divesting the virtue and the charm peculiar to the people of the Orient. from their daily life . They infused the frame of mind which propelled the people to materialism . The corruptive custom of showing excessive esteem toward the weaker sex. which was produced by the American influence, led to the breakdown of the timehonoured principle of the East to respect the head of the family. And the deficiency of the spirit for hardworkin g which is the common failing among the peoples of the tropics, served to make of them a people disposed to idleness and pleasure-seeking. Morality became vanity; the spirit of valor was replaced by the ardor for gambling and speculation. Democratic ideas solicited the entertainment of political bickerings and struggles which all too often sacrificed the interests of the people for sheer political expediency. I propose to speak frankly. So long as you are unable to free yourself from the obsession for that Americanism which has undermined your life and vitality. you will continue to de-

xix


teriorat e >pJritllall" and \\ ill fina ily be led to the very brink of racial extinction. Arou,e yo ursehesl I cha ll enge pa rticu la rI, the ,ounger generation "ho are destined to shoulder the re<pon,ibilities of Ihe new Phi lippines. T he reb idh of the Philippines tan only be accomplished by shedd ing yourselves of the degeneratin!! influence of American cu lture wh ich is ba sed upon ind,,·idualism. libera li sm . and democracy, a nd b y hecoonin!! onl'e more a genuine Oriental people. IV II is on'" too eviden t th at the conslruction of a new Philip pines in co nformi ty with the new cond it ions cannot b e n eglected even for a single day. Dai ly life must be made secure, a nd th e foundation of an agricu ltura l country conso lida ted, a nd pla ns be made for the developmen t of industry. Bu t by far the most 1JT<",in!! need of the moment is to effect, with a new, vib ra nt 'pirit, a revolutionary change in your dai ly existen ce. It is ne e9sary to under tand that true independ en ce is not m ere ostentation. Its essenre lies in t he perfection of the capacity for self-suste,nance. The lir t requisite necessary 10 becom e a n independent people is the wakening to the n eed of (\ reso lute and c ns truetive spirit. a d for each individ ua l to awaken to the c nsciousness that he is an in tegra l pa rI of Greater East Asi. This include. the aba ndonm ent of th e eas' ·. d ay to day, manner of Iidn!! . You mus t speedily liqUida te Ihe old way of life characterized by th e hab it of d ep endin g IIpon olhers for economic and piri luaI upport. You m us t heein to live with the confidence and the conviction b efi tti ng an Orienlal people and seek the perfection of a truly Filipino cu ltllTe. To 10nJ!' for independence wi thout striv in g to qua lify for Ihat honor is as u se less as il is yain.

V A s a leopard cannot change its spots. you cann ot a ft er th e fact that 'ou are Orienta l . \ Vhy should you follow th e dictates of Europe a nd America with an in feri ority compl ex ? The time ha s come 10 assert yourselves as an Ori enta l peopl e and to gain for yourselves. in company w ith other kindred races havinJ!' geographical affinity. your proper place in the unh'crsal order of th ings. The t imes trongly call for a grea t "piritual re, olution. \ Vilhout it. a r;! loriou s future for th e n ew Phi lippines would be an ai>,olule impossih ilit v. July 3 I . t<)42. •

THE COMMANDER-TN-CHIEF. Japanese Expedi tionary Fo rces to tI,e P/, ilippines. xx


pecci, delivered before llle Cltai"man and Commissioners of I.he Philippine Cenlral Administrative Organizalion by II,e Commande,.-in -CI,ie! of the Impe"ial Japanese Forces in I[, e Philippin es, August 6. 1942. At the entry of our forces into Manila, you did not lose tim e to pledge your loyalty to His Imperial Majesty's forces and to take up the task of governing this country under our lYli litary Administration. regardless of yOUT personal interests. Since then . you have surmounted various diHiculties and ach ieved successful results. Learning a ll tha t you ha ve thus made up to now, I cannot but a d mi re your co urage and apprecia te your eflorts. Howe r, it is not an easy task for you to clear the Philippines of sinister influences, particularly given by the United States of America during scores of yea rs in the past. and to restore to this country its original virtues. leithe r will it be an undertaking of a day to securc happiness and well-being for th~ Filipinos and make them contribute towards peace and common prosperity of East Asia.

I. therefore, caIl upon you to disregard minor differences among yourselves and to unite yourselves on important i ss,,~ s to avoid partisanship and bring a bout refonn s in all branches of service; to eradicate the ex isting tendency towa rd materialism and epicureanism, and to foster among the people the virtues of simplicity and vigor. Further. I trust you to maintain peace and order by stabiliZing the public se ntiment and to revive industries with the united efforts of oHicials and the people. Thus you shall proceed to achieve the great historic enterprise of establishing a New Philippines. I wiIl make my best efforts for the reconstruction of this country, with all of you under my command: and I urge you to follow my wishes as I have just expressed and to endeavor for the penetration of good administration under the guidance of the Director-General of the !Vlilitary Administration.


Speech h y ti,e Director-General of the Japanese Milita ry Administration. at the Inaugu ration of the P hilippine Prime Commodilies D istribution Con trol Association. on July 24. 194 2 . Gent lemen: I celebrate with you the organization of the Philippine Prime Commodities Distribution Control Association and its launching inlo an important undertaking. The time has come w h en we mus t put an end to the dependence of the Philippines upon th e American m a rket and establish a solid economic system in order th a t this country may perform her mission as a member of the Greater E ast A sia Co-Prosperity Sphere. To do this . it is most impera tive tha t theimporta: t natural resources of th e country m nst b e developed and her industries adjusted to harmonize with the general prografu of development of Greater East Asia. To attain tQis objective. it is ell so most impera tive tha t the nation's econbmic life must be tabilized a nd w e cannot emphasize too much the importance of insurin g a n a dequate supply of articles of daily need and their fair distribution among the consumers. By making the associal'ion function as a centra l organ ization and establishing and promoting a provincial distributing system. we hope to IIdjust the supply and demand of prim e commodities. regu late their consumption lind control their prices. thus making it possib le for large consum ers such a s organizations engaged in the developmen t of im porta nt natural resources and the general consuming pub lic to obtain prime commod ities on a basis of equitab le distrib u tion of su ch prime commodities. [n Japan we h ave experienced ma ny difficulties in carryin g out the controlled p lan of distribution and w hile we have partly su cceeded in estab lishing a solid founda tion for the nation's welfa re in lhis way. we a re still tryin g. The Philippines can not expect to be an excep tion ; w e must be prepared to trave l a th orny way.

xxii


Since no state can carry out her national policy successfully without first stabilizing the nation's economic life. this task before us must be accomplished at any cost and we must. therefore. be determined to execute it with all our force no matter what difficulties may arise, We earnestly hope. therefore. that everyone of you will perform your share and do all that is in your power to attain the purposes of the association for the happiness and welfare of the nation,

xxiii


Speech hy the Director-General of the Japanese Military Adminis/mtion regar路ding fundamental polic}' on readjustment of the sugar indus/r')' and tile increased production of collon . August to. 1942.

"le

''e

J take pleasure to give some instructions regarding the fundamental policy of the Army on the readjus tment of the sugar industry and the increased production of cotton . As vou a ll know . the suga r po licy is one of the mos t importani problems now confronting the Filipino people. The Army sincerely hopes that the losses resulting from the readjustment of the sugar industry w ill b e minimized and the future prosperity be secu red by making best use of the existing equipmen t or by converting this industTY into other kinds of industry. After making a ca reful study. we h ave come to adopt the poli~ie which are set forth in the attached papers. H owever. since these are but thEl genera l principles of the projects. we are ~o i ng to give you 1l10re detailed instruction ; in connection with the actual execution of these projects. We shou ld like you to read these papers concerning the readjustmen t projects. But you should realize that it is unavoidable for the Filipino people to suffer some of these losses. Moreover. it must be known that cotton cu lture into which a part of sugar cultivation is going to be converted. is a new industry for the country. affecting. to no small extent. the economic life of the Filipino farmers . Of course. we earnestly desire th a t these losses wi ll be sha red in fair proportion among all the parties concerned. and are taking into consideration the compensation. if need be. and we a re also ready to give you the necessary guidance and direction for the increased production of cotton. We hope that the members of the Executive Commission who are leaders of the Filipino people will realize the policy adopted by the Army and make efforts to make it clear to everv citizen of this cou ntry. -

Lxiv


As is clear to all. it is the American selfis h and crafty po licy that has caused the Philippine sugar industry to run upon a deadlock. But, having been freed from the American domination. the Philippines has regained the freedom to develop the cotton cultivation and to secure its market in the CoProsperity Sphere. According to the proposed projects. farmers a nd manufacturers may have some troubles and pains in th e course of transition. but they will no doubt enjoy due prosperity and happiness , once these projects will h ave been launched into e-xecution successfully. The readjushnent of the sugar industry and the increased production of cotton are great tasks confronting the Filipinos. The Filipino people have now a good chance to show in deeds. and not in words only. how they a re worthy of being a member of the Greater East Asia Co-Prospherity Sphere. We earnestly hope that you. members of the Executive Commission . will do your utmo.t to carry them out most effectively.

xxv


ADDRESS BY THE DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF THE JAPANESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION ON THE OCCASION OF THE SECOND CONVENTION OF PROVINCIAL G O VERNORS AND CITY MAYORS. MANILA. AUGUST t2. t942. Gentlemen: It gives me great pleasure. at the opening of the second convention of Provincial Governors a nd City Mayors. to meet with you and address you for the first time since my appointment to the post of Director-General of the Milita ry A dministration. I am most gratiried to note that since you have assumed your posts. your participation in the Administration has b een whole-hear d and sincere. The present stage in the prosecution of the War of Greater East Asia is of u tmost gravity and importan~ and it must be stressed that not the slightest hesitation or c~mplacency can be permitted. It is therefore the moment for You to take fuI! cpgnizance of the state of affairs and to r'Tder your utmost in the establishment of a Sphere of Co-pro~perity in Greater East Asia with Japan a s its nucleus. Japan is at present sparing no sacrifice or effort in the great task of reconstructing Asia for the Asiatics a nd it follows that the Philippines should likewise expend its energies in fulfilling its obligations as a member-nation of Asia. Yet there are still some who. cOlltinuillg in their blind admira tion for the power of things material and a life of pleasure-seeking and unrestraint. would draw superfioial comparisons b etween the policies of Japan and those of the United States of America Such complacent dreams of the past must strictly b e guarded against.

To you. who are the centres of leadership in the New P hilippines. I take this opportunity to explain . with the firm conviction that your best endeavours will foll ow. some fundamental points of administrative policy.

The FIRST is: MORAL R EFO RM IN ALL BRANC HES OF GOVERNMENT SERVICE. This subjeot was dealt with a t length in the address of the

xxvi


Director-General at the previous meeting so it will not be necessary for me to elaborate much further. It is apparent that good government cannot be expected without the renovation of the sense of duty among all officials. Merely increasing the number of officials or the strengthening or augmentation of the administrative organization without giving due consideration to the human element would only result in a faulty structure built on sand. Looking back on past events. it cannot be said that all was well in ~his respect. There have been cases of negligence among administrators and orÂŁicials to realize fully their respective positions and responsibilities. Further. there have been some unfortunate relapses which have been brought up before the judicial authorities. This is truly regrettable in the light of the urgent need for reforms in the performances of duty in official circles. I call upon you first to self-examination before Urging you to stricter sut>ervision of your subordinates. For to admonish without worth,iness is wo~se than no admonishment at all. I ask of you to take the initiative in ~xemplary conduct for the reno\'ation of the sense of duly in those who work under you and to strive for the maintenance and rise of strict official discipline.

SECOND: TIiE PURSUANCE OF AN ACTIVE AND POSITIVE ADMINISTRATIVE POLICY. It has been noted with regret that since the enforcement of Military Rule there are. as yet. some among you who. in the execution of official duties. would resort to conservatism. passivism and negative dependence . The cardinal precept for government is ready comprehension of the trends among the people followed up by promp't and positive execution of administrative measures suited to these currents. In order to follow this prece{lt it will be necessary to call for the active participation of all departments and branches of the AdministTation and the rejection of passivism and complacency. The reason for the fundamental renovations which have been made in the system of provincial government and the resultant centralized powers with which you have been vested is none other than the expectation that such steps would result in the positive development of the administrative structure and

xxvii


in refreshed activitie on your pa rt. You a re there fore urged to reflect on the trend of affairs and. correcting th e undesirable ways of the past. to strive with a new ou tl ook for active execution of administrative po licies and duties. Furthermore. in order to e limina te a ll gaps and differe nce in the carrying out of admi nistra tive measures. I req ues t of you to consolidate your contacts and ties wi th the Branch Office of the lVlilitar\, Admin istration under w hose jurisdiction you a re . p la(ed .

THIRD: lA I?'JTENA 'CE OF PE CE AND O RDER. The importance o f main taining peace a nd order w as particularly stressed at the previous meetin~ a nd you w ere urged to exert your elves to regain. as rapidly as po sible. a state of normalC\ in your respective districts. With the ~xcepiion of some loca lized cases where con ditions could be bettered. the outlook in genera l is good. P eace and order being the ba ic requiremen ts of government. th eir maintenance cal\not be disregarded fo r even the sli ghtes t interval of time. You are therefore admon ished to rea lize your responsibilities under the new s),steln and to strive to utilize to the fullest extent the police forces w hi ch have been placed under your con trol. For this it will Fi rst be necessary to in still in these forces that sense of duty which w ill ('all -~ them to respond stead fas tly to any call by keenly supen'ising thei r education a nd training. VVith special a ttention in th is res pect. you a re urged to look to the prompt strengthen ing and reorga nization of the police forces w ith whic h YOll w ill mai ntain peace a nd order.

FOURTH: T H E C R EATIO 1 OF T H E " DI S TRICT A '0 NEIG HBOURHOOD ASSOCIATION S " SYSTElVI. The re is no necessity for en largin g furth er upon the importance of maintainin!! peace and orde r. In para llel with the newly organized po lice force. a system whereby the general popu lace may protect and defend ti, emselves a nd. at the same time. assume responsibi lity for the preve ntion of va rious crimes and untoward inciden ts in the ir resp ecti ve d istricts h as been inaugurated by an Executi\'e O rder.

Lxviii


Thi "District and Ne-ighbourhood Associations" System will "Iso be an aid to the development of the ability of autonomou self-defense within the respective units. As the smooth working and operation of this system rests wil h you. you are expressly enjoined to make clear to the public the fundamental benefits to be gained therefrom and by obtaining their active participation to attain the desired results.

FIFTH : R E NOV A T ION Al"O CO SOLIDATIO OF LOCAL GOVER ]\ IEl'\JTS. The most urgent requirements in loca l governments today are simplification and speed -up of routine matters and unbiased and appropriate action. To this end th e organization of local governments mu t be re-novated and strengthened. With tbis in view. a basic amendment of the loca l laws and statutes of provinces. c itie- and municipalities has been effected whereby you ha\'e been enabled to be apPointed the local centres of administrativ autl\Ority. At the same time as you are heads of local bodie . you ha" e con ferred upon you the capacity of lower members of the Central Administrative Organ. In this latter capacity you are newly entrusted with the responsibility of supervi sing education. hygiene. industry and public works. etc .. in your espective loca lities. The gravity of your duties i thus only too apparen t and in expecting of you your utmost exertions in their fulfilm ent. 1 look forward to strident reforms in all branches of governm ent.

SIXTH: RENOVATIO I AND OEVELOPME IT OF EOUCATIO . Although this subject was dealt with at the previous meeting I would call your attention again to this all-important matter. particularly as at th a t time not a single school in the whole of the Philippine. was as yet officially opened. Today. with many elemenlary schools and secondary agricultural schools open to pupils and students. this question dealing with educa tion looms up with increasing importan ce. It is c1eor that with the daily increase in the number of schools opened and students attending. an education which does not a pply to the new status of the Philippines would not only be de-

xxix


trimental but woulc! lead to the impossibility of hoping for the resurrection of the nation. I therefore admonish you to follow c10selv the fundamental principles that were laid before vou at the I~s t convention. . Among these is to be specially noted the stress laid upon the propagation of the Japanese language which la te ly has been designated one of the official languages of the Philippines, \~hen it is realized that the J apanese language is destined to become the common tongue within the vast limits of the Greater East Asia Co-prospertiy Sphere and that in the reconstruction of the Philippines there will be no other medium than Japanese for the introduction of oriental culture and new knowledge, the importance of acquiring the language will require no furLher em{lhasis, You yourselves must set an example for the genera l public by striving to gain a knowledR'e of Japanese and making use of it.

SEVENTH:

n-

READJUST\tEt Ai\'D CO ' SOLID TIO T OF LOCAL FINA CE. For the smooth working of local government a sound local finance is indispensable. In tim es of emergency as at present, it i. nalLTmlly difficult to obtain revenues comparable to those collected under normal conditions. Moreover, you are be<et with many problems which are the product of the times. However, it must be realized that an attitude of passivity and complacency at this juncture would result in hopelessness for the development of a financially sound nation. The Central Administrative Organ has since last May planned to meet its administrative and o ther expenditures strictly by its revenues. This has meant stringent curtailments in general administrativ .. expenses on one hand , while on the other, huge sums are being paid out to various urgent undertaking such as the restoration of commun ication facilities and the development of industTies throughout the whole archipelago. This should be a shining example to a ll local governments. Here , is must be pointed out that, in the desire to excel. there is the possibility of the levying of faulty taxes which cause unnecessary irritation and disruption of finance. The utmost care must therefore be exercised to prevent such occurrences and it is deemed advisable whenever possible to follow

xxx


precedents in all taxation. Whenever new levies are contemplated. these should be enforced only on the approval of and in accord with the central authorities. Inasmuch as you are responsible for the establishment of a sound local finance which is essential to the reconstruction of the Philippines. much is expected of you in this direction also.

EIGHTH: READJUSTIvIEl\r:r OF PRODUCTION. Of paramount importance is the C(.uestion of self-sufficienq in foodstuffs of the;e Islands. And this problem must Le solved mainly through your endeavours. The Central Administration is at present executing a cam 路 paign for increased I?roduction of grains and foodstuffs in general. and as the planting and growing of rice which is at present un er way will have much to do with the food situation later. you are urged to take personal interest in the guidance of the fal'lTlers and further to note well the actual supply and demand of rice in order to exercise adequate control. Prices and the supply and demand of rice and grains must be adjusted; first. by prohibiting export from areas under your jurisdiction and second. in areas with surplus supply by selling to the "NARIC" and in deFicient areas by buying from "NARIC" together with control of consumption through the production of substitute foods. Even before the outbreak of the present war. Philippine sugar was doomed to withdrawal from the American market. And with the coming of the Greater East Asia War. due to the impossibility of exports to the United States and to the surplus production of sugar elsewhere within the Co-prosperity Sphere. Philippine sugar production has come face to face with a severe crisis which must be averted as quickly as possible. It has therefore become necessary to limit sugar production to the amount consumed within the islands and at the same time to utilize existing plantations and facilities for the production of goods which will find a ready market within the Co-prosperity Sphere. In line with this policy. some sugar centrals and alcohol refineries have been directed to the manufacture of fuel alcohol which was formerly imported. while others have been allocated to the manufacture of high quality fuel suitable for export to Japan. With regard to plantations. a part of these will be

xxxi


utilized for inlensive cu ll i" a tion o f ~ugar cane for fuel production while Ihe remainder wi ll be converl ed into coltongro\\ in g areas.

Thu a fundamen ta l read jus lme nt and ra tiona liza tion will take place in Ihe agricultural policy of the P hilippines. en a bling it to fulfi l its ob ligations as a member of the Greater East A sia Co-pros peri ty Sphere a nd at th e same Lim e to a ssum e a posit ion of la li ng security and p rosp erity. D espil e Ihe fact that th e co nd ition s for co llon cultivation in the Philipp ines. a re exce llent. producli on has hitherto b een negligib le. Th is is ma inly due to the self-interested Ameri can policy of suppressing a ny deve lopments in Ihis fi eld. With the coming of the present w ar. the Philipp in es ha s b een released from such unnatura l oppress ion and th e vast ma rket for collon withj n the Co-prosperity Sp here lies open b efore y OIl .

nd er Ihese circum stances. the Japa nese A rmy h as d efin ed a fi ve-yea r pl a n for colton p roduction in the Philippines a nd work is a lrea.J under way. However. as the people of th e Philippin es are not as yet well-acquain led w ith cotton-growin g and a< th e m e l~ds in use a l prese n t ar.. o f th e most primitive type. th e leader h ip a nd guida nce of Ja pa n. wh o h as many years of E'xperien e beh ind her. 'vi II b e necessa ry for the contemp lated production . It h as there fore been d ec ided to sum mon promoters a nd experts from Japa n a nd Ihus to !live the F ilipino farm" " Ih e necessar) encotlragement a nd guida nce. \ Vith the foregoing in mind, you a re enjoined to obtain the support of the agricul tural popul a tion under you a nd to strive for th e success of the program ou tlined . \ Vith respect to olher vita l commod iti es a nd the ir distri b Ulion the "Ph il ippines Prime Commoditi es Di stribution Con Irol A <soci ation" has been estab li shed w ith a v iew to developing reso urces a nd stabilizing da ily life hy Faci lita ting smoot], di stribution of commodi ties and sleady in g the ir pri ces. H ere ,,1,0. your co-opera tion an d gtlidance is ex pected.

N INTH Clod {ina liy com es: RE TO R ATTON AND r-. IA IN T E lANC E OF COl'l . l'vIUNICATIONS 10 TRJ\ NSPORTATION. Th e mooth w orkin g of commun ica tion s a nd tran sportation is on e of Ihe prereq ui sit es 10 peace a nd order . production and econom ic a ct ivity. 0 th e need for prompt res loration anJ

xxxii


good maintenance of these vital arteries requires no further elaboration and much is expected of your active co-operation in this particular sphere. In pre-war times great dependence was placed upon the United States for the communications and transportation within these Islands. The most urgent requirement at the present stage is therefore the reorganization along national lines of these systems. particularly on land . The adjustroent of motor transport to the available supply of substitute fuel. accessories and parts; the utilization and maintenance of rail transport; the u se of human and animal means of conveyance; the utilization of inland navigation ; these are but some examples o( what should be done. Needless to say. such steps will be modified b y local conditions. Of great importance are the repair and maintena nce of bridrtes and water routes and in this work it is urged th at. besides full compliance to plans made by the Centra l Administration. exemplary efforts he made to stimulate in the people under your jUllisdiction a spirit of labour-service for the public good. \Vith respe t to marine transpo.tation. the Japanese A rmy is at present fully" occupied in active efforts to restore sea traffic especially within the archipelago where the problems of efficiency and priority are b eing intensively studied. Unlike tran sportation on land it is difficult. if not altogether impossible. to find substitute forms of traffic. You are therefore urged to gUide and superv ise all owners and operators of a ny type of shipping to comply strictly with the requirements of the Japanese Forces. In the reorganization of transport and communica tions it is inevitable that the inconveniences and disadvantages suffered by a small section of the population will have to be waived in favour of more pressing and important d emands. These faots should be clear to you and it is expected of you to clarify the situation to the satisfaction of the general public. I have spoken to you briefly on a few of the fundamental points of administrative policy which I had in mind and. with the hope that I have gained your clear understanding. I repeat again my wish that you will follow these policies in your respective local governments in a spirit co inciding perfectly with the tide of the times. August 12th. the 17th Year of Showa.

xiii

XJ{..


ADDRESS BY THE DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF THE JAPANESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION AT THE FIRST GRADUATION CEREMONY OF THE CONSTABULARY ACADEMY ON AUGUST 29. 1942. I feel extremely bappy to offer you my hearty congratulation on this historic day of the first graduation ceremony of the Constabulary Academy. After a stiff examination as to your personal qualifications. you have been admitted into this Academy w.ith a view to devoting your life to the maintenance of the public peace. as the backbone of the Constabulary force of the New Philippines under the Japanese Military Administration. And now you are about to perform your new role as peace officers. haYing completed the specified curriculum. which you have all undertaken ,vith unflagging e{forfs and sincerity. I am ful1X aware that you are all pleased with your task and you f~el privileged and pr ud of this opportunity to serve vour count . The fundameptal duty of the Constabulary is to maintain peace and order and welfare of the State. and to enforce strictly a ll the policies thereoF. After all. we can expect any tangihle effects of the administrative. economic. industrial. educational and other activities. only after the general restoration of public order has been effected. VYe are thus hastening the formation of the Constabulary Force to syncluonize with the adjusl:1JTlent of all administrative functions in order to regenerate the government for the establishment of the Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere. Your duly. therefore. is vital and paramount. At the outset of yom new career when you are about to assume yom official dulies . I shall outline the points which you ought and must obey all the time to the letter and spirit. 1. As your fundamental duty. you must see to it that peace be maintained. the welfare of the masses be attained. and the happiness of the people insmed. 2. Strictly comply with the laws and orders and carry out the instructions hom your superior officers wi.thout the slightesl failure and perform all within your jurisdiction with vigom and positiveness.

xxxiv


3. Discharge your responsibility to the fullest extent, reallizing the importance of the functions entrusted to you. 4. Observe discipline, be courteous, be kind to one another and trust your fellow workers regardless of your ranks, and mutually cooperate among yourselves. 5. Enhance the spirit of service and sacrifice, always mindful ' of your duty as officers of peace. 6. Try always to cultivate courage and endurance which will enable you to overcome all the difficulties you might encounter in the fulfillment of your duties. 7. Be alive to the sense of honor. lead a simple a nd frugal life and avoid taking a ny action which may be considered indecent or covetous. 8. Do not disclose anything in unpublished documents or under consideration. unless explicitly instructed by higher a uthorities. The above-mentioned points a re the essenti a ls of the code of duties of the Constabulary, which should be the norm for yo ur private as w ell as public life. As model officers of the Constabulary. everyone of you should incessantly exert your e ffo~ts to lead your life in com pliance with the alore-going points and carry out your duties without being misled by the m asses or committing partiality through the influence of partisans of old politics. You shall devote yourselves to the establishment of a new political order and to the strengthening of peace and order. in harmony with the fundamental principles of the Military Administration. I sincerely hope that you will in this way form the b ackbone of the New Philippines Constabulary and respond to the honour now a ccorded to you as first graduates of the Constabulary Academy.

xxxv


Section 1. Affairs Conceming the Department of Interior (Tmnslation) INSTRUCTION NO. 49 (July 11, 1942) M,,, Claro M. Recto Commissionel' of Education, Health and Puhlic Welfare.

/nstmction Conceminu the Textbooks to be used in the Public High Schools in the Phil;,ppines.

In conformity with the examination by the Textbook Examining Committee, I hereby <\esignate the textbooks to be used for the time heing in the public high schools in the Philip!;>ines (as No.1 annexed hereto) and at the same time point out the parts to be eliminated in the texts (as No.2 annexed hereto) . The utmost care should he exercised in dealing with the matter to renovate education in the Philippines in order to meet the changed circumstances. DIRECTOR路GENERAL OF THE JAPANESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION.

No. 1. The following texthooks shall be used in the public high schools in the Philippines, (FIRST YEAR) Philippine Prose and Poetry-Volume 1 Genel'al Mathematics Philippine High School Readers-Book Elementary Algebra (SECOND YEAR) Philippine Prose and Poetry-Volume II Plane Geometry Philippine High School Readers-Book 1I General Scienee for Philippine Schools

[1]


(THIRD YEAR) Philippina Prose and Poetry-Volume III Applied Arithmetic for Philippine High Schools Second Course in Algebra New Civic Biology Laboratory Manual for New Civic Biology (FOURTH YEAR) A National Language-English Vocabulary Silas Marner Principles of Economics applied to t he Philippines New Practical Physics No. II.

The parts to be eliminated in the textbooks are as follows:

Title of Te xtbook; Philippine Prose a n d Poetry, Volume I Antho,.; Bureau of Education Grade 01' Yea,'; (1) Page

I Line

Front-cover

Front路cover Title-page

Title-page 68 10-21 iI路81 all 109 15-20 122126 all

, "Commonwealth of the Philippines"

76 367 367 3U

464 465

I L ine I

I Remarks

"Department of Public Insh:uction" "Bureau of Education" Burea u 0 Education Official Seal "Commonw'Calth of the Philippines" " Department of Public Instruction" "BU1'eaU of Education" Bureau of Education Official Seal Reference to Mabini's taking the oath Cayetano S. Arellano Reference to Benjamin Franklin The Filipino Woman in War and in Peace

Title of Te.ttbook: Genel'al Mathematics Author: Tan and Perez Gmde or Year: (1) Page

Subject: Reading

J;'ARTS TO BE ELIMINATED

Subject: Mathematics

PARTS TO BE ELIMI NATED

I R emarks

Problem (39) (40) The Graph of t he density of population T he bar graph of overseas trade of the Philippines The tabl~s of military forces and national wealth Problem: (1) (14) Referenc~ to Telegraphic Transfer

[2]


Title of Textbook: Philippine High School Readers Book I Alltho,': Mendez Grade or Yea,': (J) Subject: Reading Pa.g. 5·6

all

How to Vote Right

7·9

all

Customs as a Basis for Law

17·19 all 28-32 all

A Boy Police Force Evangeline a Tale of Acadie

34·35 all

Thrift

40 ·42 all

A Private Library All Your Own

67-68 all

China, The Senior Nation

71·73 all

The Children of Topsy·Turvy Land "However nothing is - be obvious"

82

91· 100

25-00

all

115· 116 all

119· 120

I Remarks

PARTS TO BE ELIMINATED

Li".

VI.

Stori e~

of Achievement

l'he Story of C. E. Hughes A Youthful Actm' The Whistle

all

A Letter of Condolence

121· 123 all

Life in Old New York

128_

130

all

Ichabod Crane

141· 142

all

Reference

to

American influence over P. I.

143· These pages contain stories and plays written by Ameri· 204 all ______ ca_ns and Englishmen so that all shall be eliminated.

Title of Te x tbook: Elementary Algebra Autho,': Edgerton and Carpenter Grade 0" Year: (I) Page

I Line I

PARTS TO BE ELIMINATED

S u bject: Algebra

I R emlVl'ks

All the illustrations in the texts shall be eliminated. All the numerical calculations about U. S. cUlTency in the texts shall be changed for the Philippine currency.

[3]


Title of Te:utbook: Philippine Prose and Poetry Volume II Author: Bureau of Education Subject: Reading Grade or Year: (II)

I Line

PARTS TO BE ELIMINATED

Front'cover

"Commonwealth of the Philippines" "Department of Public Instruction" "Bureau of Education" Bureau of Education Official Seal Bureau of Education Official Seal "Department of Public Instruction" UBul'eau of Education" Bureau of Educa tion Official Seal Andres Bonifacio The Meaning of Labour What is an Educated Filipino?

Page

Front'cover Title 'page

Title'page 67-78 all 84,90 all 91 ,59 all 96119 all 144' 173 all 212_ 213

I L ine I

Frontispiece 51 66 186 264 275 383 387

Remarks

The Filipino Soul The Husband of Mrs, Cruz The Amel'ican

Title of T .,'lbool.-: Plane Geometry Authol": Strader and Rhoads G,',/le 01" Yea,': (II) Page

I

Subject: Geometry

PARTS TO BE ELIMINATED

I Rema,'ks

All the numerical calculations about U, S, cunency in the texts shall be changed for the Philippine currency, Picture (The Central Stair Hall of the Libl'ary of Con' gress) Picture (Delaware River Bridge) Picture (The Naval Radio Station) Picture (The Lincoln Memol'ial and Washington Monument) Geometric Figures Picture (The reading room of the Library of Congress) Picture (The Wilson Dam) Pictul'e (Thoe Bridge of St. Johns)

[4]


Title of Textbook: Philippine High School Readers Book II A "tho,.: Mendez GI'ade 0,. Yea,': (III) Subject: Reading Pag~

13-18 53-77 99103 109114

117_ 118 118路 119 119120 152路 158 158166 171. 179

I

I Rema"'c8

PARTS TO BE ELIMINATED

Line all all

Tbe Birth and Evolution of tbe Filipin" Flag III Stories of Achievement

all

Aristocrats of the Woodland

all

A very Frank Letter A Letter to his Son Two letters to J. D. Johnston A Letter of Indignation

all

The Speech at Gettysbu rg

all

England to America

all

Consecration to Country

all

Christmas Eve

all

David Copperfield

all

The Tourn:lment at Winchester America's Reply The POOl' Voter on Election Day

185 all 209 239240

Index of AuthQrs and Title

Title of Te., .tbook: General Science fOl' Philippine Schools At,t"ol": Brown and Aldecoa GI"lL,!e

Pau路 17 129 152 281

Line

13-15

I

01"

S u bject: Science

Yeal' : (II)

PARTS TO BE ELLI'JINATED Figure (Riding on the Air) Figure (U. S. Navy Submarine) "The U. S. leads - new ones" Figm'e (The Standard路Time Zones of U. S.)

[5]

I Remarks


Title of T e.ctbook: Philippine Prose and Poetry, Volume III Aldho,·: Bureau of Education Subject: Reading Gmde of Y ear : (III) Page

I

PARTS TO BE ELIMINATED

L ine

I

Remarks

"Commonwealth of the Philippines" " Department of Public Instruction" " Bureau of Education" BUl·eau of Education Official Seal " Commonwealth of the Philippines" " Department of Public Instruction" " Bureau of Education" Bureau of Education Official Seal " Filipino flag - Sunday"

Front·cover

Front·cover Title·page

Title·page 152 84-85 241 · 260 all 316· 318 a ll

Remember the Fourth 1 8 96

T itle of T extbook : Applied Ar ithmetic for Philippine High Schools A lIth o,· : Vid al A . Tan Subject: Mathematics Gmde 0'· Y ea>": (III) Pnge

51 113 114 121 ' 22 123 126 127 139 163 178 186 197 200

L ine

I

PARTS TO BE ELIMINATED Doll ar ( $) and cent ( ¢ ) in the texts shall be changed for peso (P) and centavo (c) Problem: (18) (22) (24) Proble"\: (26) (34) P robl em: " Local and Standard Time" P robl em: (9) (11) (12) Problem: (16) (17) Problem: (18) Problem: (21 (22) Problem: (16) Picture of University Hall "Time Draft" Problem: (19) "Fees for Money Orders" "Traveler's Check"

[61

I

RelllO'l·ks


Title of Te x tbook: Applied Arithmetic for Philippine High Schools A u thor: Vidal A. Tan Grade <no Yea,·: (III) S u bject: Mathematics Page

I lAne I

204 231 252 267 270271 all 340. 341 all 353 355 357 367

PARTS TO BE ELIMINATED R ema,-k s Problem: (1) (2) (5) Picture of New York Stock Exchange Building II Homesteads" " Rural Agricultural Cooperative Association" Unit XII "Fishing" "Import Duties" Probl em: (7) (23) Problem: Problem: (37 ) (8) Problem:

Title of Tex tbook: Second Course in Algebra A u tho,·: Edgerton and Cal·penter Grade 0'· Y ear: (III) Page

55 232 233 373 387 439 499 · 504

I lAne I

all

PARTS TO BE Ef/MIN ATED The numerica l ca lcula tions a bout U . S. currency in t he texts shall all be ~limin ated . (35 ) Problem: (21) Problem : ( 22) Problem: (22) Problem: Problem: (16) Problem: (18) Probl ems :

(269) -

(300)

Ti tle of Te x tbook: New Civic Biology A u tho r : Hunter and Uichanco Grade or Yean·: (III) Page

I lAne

308 3-7 309 7·13 407. 408 all 409· 410 all

Subject: Algebra

,

PARTS TO BE ELIMINATED " London and New York-Illinoi s River" "In Manhatta n - City incin. r a tor" "Two Notorious Families" "Blood Tells"

[7]

S u bject: Biology

I R e'1lla,·k s


Title of Textbook: Labol'atory Manual for New Civic Biology AlIth!>l': Hunter and Uichanco Subject: Biology Grade 01' Year: (III) Page

Line

I

I Remarks

PARTS TO BE ELIMINATED

110

Questions about the Pure Food Act

111

Method'Using the charts made by the American Medical Association,

Title of Textbook: A National Language-English Vocabulary Autho,-: Institute of National Language St.bjece: Tagalog Gmde 0" Yea,': (IV) Page

I Line I

Covel'

Eagle of the Commonwealth Seal

ritle-page

"Conul1onwealth of the Philippines"

Title' page 3 all

Eagle of the Commonwealth Seal Letter of 'I'l'lu;smittal

5 Footnote

(1)

Remarks

(2)

Title of Te~' lbook: Silas Marner AlIt"o,' : (rl,orge Elliot Grade 0" Year: (IV) Page

I

PARTS TO BE ELIMINATED "Commonwealth of the Philippines"

Jovel'

I Line I

XIII, XXXIX

Subject: Reading

I Remarks

PARTS TO BE ELIMINATED

all

Introduction

Title of Textbook: Principles of Economics Applied to the Phil. Anthol' H, H, Miller Grade Page

I Line I

43. 44 all 82, 85 all

01'

Yea,': (IV)

St,bject: Economics

PARTS TO BE ELIMINATED Timidity of Capital Money

[8]

I Remarks


~路itl.

of T.xtbook: Principles of Economics Applied to the Phil. Author: H. H. Miller Grad. or Ye,.,.: (IV) Subject: Economics

Page

I Line I

8993 all

PARTS TO BE ELIMINATED

Banking System

160161 all

Idleness and Recreation

162

Control of Consumption

262265 all 268

18-29

I Remarks

The Markets for Coconut Products "At present -

the U. S." (13)

(14)

269

Problem:

289294 all

Markets for Philippine Sugar

294296 all

Can the Output of Ph ' ippine Sugar be Increased?

296298

all

bowloping FOl'eign Markets

299302

all

Marhts for Phi;ippine Tobacco

406_ 408 all

DispLsal of Public Land

409411

The American Method of Distributing the Public Domain.

all

514618 all

Org-anized Labour in the Philippines

526

Fir 136.

527633 all

Ph.;; ppine Trade with the U, S.

543545 all

':hin.se Control of Domestic Commerce

557_ 659 all 563

Trade with the U. S.

The Individual and the Social Theory of Economics Cuner.cy: PI Phil. currency Cl rrency

[9]

=

$0.50 U. S.


Titl. of Te",tboo": New Practical P hysics AuthO?·: Black and Davis Grade 0,. Yea,.: (IV) Page

I Line

Fly-leaf 3 all 99 105 107 175 190 196 428 all 429

Subject: Physics

I

PARTS TO BE ELIMINATED

Remarks

Picture (Ford Monoplane) Unit of Measurement Fig. 95. Weather map of U. S. Fig. 103. U. S. Army balloon Fig. 105. The Los Angeles moored to a mast (3) Problem: (5) Problem: (7) (4) (3) Pl·oblem: Long-distance transmission of power Fig. 399. Transmission lines in California

(Translation!( INSTRUCTION No. 58 (J ul y 31, 1942.) The Honorable Chairman of the EJ<ecutive Commission, Manila. Re: Religious h'8tl"uctio·n in Public Schools. Sh·: You are hel·eby instructed to undel·stand as follows concerning the religious education in public schools; 1.

The so called religious education in pub]"ic schools shall not be allowed in conformity with the Instruction No. 35, concerning the textbooks used by private elementary schools.

2.

The provisions of Sec. 927 and Sec. 928, of the Revised Administrative Code concerning religious education in public schools shall be understood to be cancelled. Respectfully, DIRECTOR·GENERAL OF THE JAPANESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION.

[10]


(T"am81ation) INSTRUCTION NO. 61 (August 3, 1942.) Mr. Claro M. Recto Commissioner of Education, Health and Public Welfare.

Inst?-uction concerning the "eopening of the public agricultu1'al high 8chool. in the Philippines. The public agricultural high schools sha11 be r eopened as soon as possible acting on Insn'Uction N.c. 2 concerning the reopening of schools in the Phil 路 i路ppines and paying attention to the fo11owing points. 1. The spirit of the new educational pl'inciples shall be fully unders tood. 2. Students shall be instructed to be in accord with the new agricultural course of the Philippines departing fl'om old customs. 3. Every school shall have its cha r acteristic feature according to the local conditions the school as we11 as to the new agricultural course of the Philippines. DIRECTOR路GENERAL OF THE JAPANESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION . --+--------

INSTRUCTION NO. 62 (August 3, 1942. ) Mr. Claro M. Recto Commissioner of Education, Health and Public Welfare.

Instruction conce'~'ing the textbooks on ag,-icultu"e for the agr icultu"al high schools in the Philippines. In conformity with the examination by the Textbook Examining Committee, I hereby designate the textbooks on agriculure to be used for the time being in the agricultural high schools in the Philippines (as No.1 annexed hereto) and at the same time point out the parts to be eliminated in the texts (as No.2 annexed hereto). Tha utmost care should be exercised in dealing with the matter to reo novate education in the Philippines in order to meet the changed circumstances. DIRECTOR路GENERAL OF THE JAPANESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION.

[11]


No. I The following textbooks shall be used as the textbooks on agriculture for the agricultural high schools in t he Philippines: Farm Crops of the Philippines. Introduction to the Agricultural Economics in the Phil ippines. Animal Husbandry. Tropical Horticulture. No. II The parts to be eliminated in the texts are as follows: Title of Te xtbook : Farm Crops of the Philippines Author: N. Sadorra Gl'ade 0" YeaI': Page

I

Line

Subject: Agriculture

I

PARTS TO BE ELIMINATED

Front-cover

Remarks

Commonwea lth of the Philippines of Public Instruction Bureau of Education Bu\-eau of Education Official Seal Cqmmonwealth of the P)1ilippines De artment of Public Instruction Bureau 0 Educat ion Bureau of Education Official Seal 2. production 1. Climate Question 1. All these factors - cultivation, etc. It may be ........ .. . of our country

Departmen ~

Front-covel' Title路page

Title'page 45 all 53 10路28 56 80 11-14 80 28-32

Title of T ex tboo/" Farm Crops of the Philippines Aut.ho,路: N. Sadol'l'a Grade

Page

I Line I

180 12-23 257258 all 258 all 6259 8

01'

Su bject: Agriculture

YeaI':

PARTS TO BE ELIMINATED According to -

and Italy

(2) One路crop farming in the Philippines (3) Specialized farming in Louisiana Object. -

3-

262

5

All these -

free of duty.

[12]

I

Remarks


(Titl. 01 T.x tbook) Farm Crops of the Philippines (Autho,.) N. Sadorra Grad. 0)' Y.a,.: Subject: Agriculture Page ' Lin. PARTS TO BE ELIMINATED , R.marks 15· 265 16 (3) b. to grow - at all times. 9· 6. Manufactured brooms 303 16 6· 14

1.

Important countries growing cotton.

Titl. 01 Te xtbook: Introduction to Agricultural Economics in the Phil. Author: D. Maulit Grade 0)' Year: Subject: Agriculture P :...a::.:g:..:e-'..,.=L:...i,,:....:.....!._ _ _......;:P:..:A.=R = T.= S_ T.:. O_B c:....:, E_ .E.:....:: L.:..IlI:..:1.:./:..N.:..A:..:T:...E:..D .:......_ _ _ _', -R .",a1·ks Front·cover Commonwealth of the Philippines Department of Public Instruction Bureau of Education Front·cover BUl'eau of Education Official Seal Title'page Commonwealth of the Philippines Department of Public Ins tr uction BUl'eau of Education Title'page Bureau of Education Official Seal 201 all Marketing Sugar. 207 all Foot·notes 1. 2. 208. 209 all Free Trade 210 all Foot-notes 1. Titl. of T.x tbook: Introduction to Agricultural Economics in the Phil. Author: D. Maulit a.·ade or Yea)': Su bject: Agriculture Page Lin. PARTS TO BE ELIMINATED , R.marks 211· 214 all Philippine' American Trade Relations 235· 237 all Agricultural Cooperation in Other Countries 251 6·12 The importance - Social conditions 267 4·13 For the secondary - economic life. 273 Questions on the Text 4, 17 279. 290 all Appendix B, 307· Appendix E. 311 all

[13]


Title of Textbook: Animal Husbandrr A1Ithor: Agustin & Montellano Grade 01' Year:

Subject: Agriculture

I

PARTS TO BE ELIMIN.4.TED Page I IAne ~~~~--~----------The English - favorite hobbies 5-8 12

Early breedars of animal in England

18

15·31

22

3·5

The types -

64

18-21

This is -

the United States

his home stock

86

36-37

, as in the United States and England

195

35·37

Plans of barns -

224

5-9

For description -

Washington. D. C. England

Title of Te x tbook: Tropical Horticulture Allthor: F. O. Cevallos Grade 01' YeoI':

I

Page

Line

I

Re11U:wks

Subject: Agriculture

PARTS TO BE ELIMINATED

2

13-17

The total value -

257

17-18

Market gardene)'s -

268

27·29

In some parts -

310

all

Appendb:

I

Remarks

the United States. Vegetables.

shipping stations.

C.

MILITARY ORDINANCE NO. 13 (July 24, 1942.) MILITARY ORDINANCE CONCERNING OFFICIAL LANGUAGES FOR PUBLIC USE

The official languages for public use in the future shall be Japanese and Tagalog languages. However, for the time being, the use of the English language will be allowed. COMMANDER·IN-CHIEF OF THE IMPERIAL JAPANESE FORCES.

[14]


NOTIFICATION (August 14, 1942.)

CONCERNING PHYSICAL AND MEDICAL EXAMINATION, INJECTION AND VACCINATION Headquarters for the Defense of Manila will make an inspection of all the employes of hotels, restaurants and other establishments in the City of Manila and vicinity handling foodstuffs. These employees will be required to undergo injection and vaccination, as well as physical and medical examin:>.tion, to determine whether they a'" germ carriers. All the people concerned are reques ted to go through the exa minations in accot'dance with instructions given by the Manila Branch of the Japa nese Military Administration and city health office. HEADQUARTERS FOR THE DEFENSE OF MANILA.

[15]


Section 2. Affairs Concerning Commlmications MILITARY ORDINANCE NO. 20

MILITARY ORDINANCE CONCERNING REGULATIONS FOR TRAVEL· ING IN AND OUT OF THE PHILIPPINES SEC. No.1. These r~gulations al'e arranged for the management of the common travellers with the exception of either military men Or civilians at· tached to the Ar";y or Navy, who travel in and out of the Philippines with non·military purposes. SEC. No.2, For the time-being, with the exception of those who are specially permitted by the Commander·in ·Chief of the Imperial Japanese For· ces, people are not allowed to travel to any part outside the Philippines. SEC. No. 3. Common Japanese and other citizens besides Japanese who wish to travel to other southern l'egions now under Military Administration or any parts of Japan, should apply to the Commander·in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in compliance with the attached Form No, 1, Filipinos through the Governor (Mayor), Chief of the Executive Commission, Director· General of the Military ~dministration, and other than Filipinos through the Branch Director·General and Dit'ector-General of the Military Administration, SEC. No.4. The Comma nder-in ·Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces, in case he has granted the permit of travel in t he aforementioned article, informs (reports) to the Commander·in' Chief of the Imperial Japan~se Forces (if the destinations are any parts of Japan, to the Minister of War) the travelling destination (if necessary Via·) SEC. No.5. Omitted SEC. No.6. Those common persons who will be permitted to travel in parts outside t he Philippines should fall under each of the following: (a) That the traveling purpose is recognized as necessary and reason· able. (b) That he or she be of good reputation and tbat be or sbe could be relied upon as not to disturb peace and to create suspicion of espionage. (c) Tbose who took an oath not to commit any anti·Japanese act at bis 01' her place of destination, or during tbe voyage. (d) Those under the age of fifteen should be accompanied by adults. SEC. No.7. Anyone permitted by afore-mentioned articles must carry with him or bel', the traVeling pass issued by the Office of the Commander· in 'Chief, as pel' Form No.2. SEC, No.8. Omitted.

[16]


SEC. No.9. The passing area of the common persons on any ship or airplane in the Philippines (from the Philippines to outside parts or from outside parts into the Philippines) should be only in Manila and Davao. SEC. No. 10. In tbe passing area regulated by the aforementioned article, there will be ol'ganization of censors as arranged by the separate regulation to conduct the travelers. SEC. No. 11. Those permitted to travel may be allowed to make use of military ships, provided, in this case, they will be treated as passengers and should pay table expenses. SEC. No. 12. The baggage of the travelers should only be of mirumum quantity of necessary belongings. SEC. No. 13. Other than each of the above-mentioned article, the general regulations pertaining to the passage in general, and the Military Regulations of the carrying of private money, are applicable. COMMANDER-IN -CHIEF OF THE IMPERIAL JAPANESE FORCES.

NOTIFICATION (July 4, 1942.)

NOTIFICATION CONCERNING REOPENING OF SOUTHERN RA!tWAYS Beginning July 5, part of the main southern line of the Manila Railroad Co., starting from Paco station via Malicboy to Aloneros, Tayabas, will be open to the public. The names of the newly reopened stations between Malicboy and Alonel'os are as follows: Malicboy, Padre Burgos, Yawe, Agdangan, Panaon, Sumit, Sian, Gumaca , Camahaguin, San Vicente, Lopez, Hondagua, Calauag, Sumulong and Aloneros. The schedule of trains is as follows: Train Numbe,'

Type of Car

Stal路ting Station

Time of Departure

No. No. No. No. No. No.

Mixed Mixed Mixed Mixed Mixed Mixed

Malicboy Aloneros Lopez

1:50 9:03 7:40 6:13 7:31 7:15

1 2 3 4 11

12

AJoneros

Lopez Malicboy

p.m. a.m. a.m.

p.m. p.m. a.m,

Desana_ tion Aloneros Malicboy Aloneros Lopez Hondagua Lopez

Time of A,~-ival

5:58 12:50 8:48 7:21 7:46 '1:30

p.m. p.m. a.m. p.m. p.m. a.m.

COMMANDER-IN -CHIEF OF THE IMPERIAL J AP ANESE FORCES.

[17]


NOTIFICA TION (July 30, 1942.)

NOTIFICATION CONCERNING REOPENING OF BA TANGAS BRANCH LINE The railroad stations at Muntinglupa and Bioan, and the Batanga s branch line will be reopened to the public beginning on t he 1st of August. At the same time some changes in the time table of t he main southern I ine will take effect. 1. Names of the newly-opened stations of the Batangas branch line are as follows: Calamba, Sto. Tomas, Tanauan, Malvar, Lipa, San Jose and Batangas. 2. The time-table is as follows:

SOUTH MAIN ROAD FROM MANILA TO SAN PA BLO FROM LEAVE AT Manila 8:30 Manila ... .. . . . . . .. . .. . 15:00 San Pablo . . .... . ... . . 9:33 San Pablo ..... .. .. _. . . 13:30

TO ARRIVE AT San Pablo .......... . 12:36 San Pablo .... . ..... . 19 :14 Manila ............. _ 13:46 Manila ...... . ...•... 17:32

ATANGAS BRAN H L INE Manila ...... . . .... ....• 7:20 Batangas . .. . . ........ , 14 :40 3. Classification of train: Mixed.

I\atangas _.... . . . .. . . l')l:anila ...... . ...... .

12: 49 20:07

COMMAND ER-IN -CHIEF OF THE IMPERIAL J APANESE FORCES

NOTTFICATION (July 19, 1942.)

NOTIFICATION CONCERNING OPERATIO N OF N ORTHERN MAIN LINE Beginning July 21, 1942, the Japanese Army will l'esume the operation of the North main line between San Fabian and North San F ernando, the San Jose b1"8nch line and the Carmen line of the rai lroa d. Kind of trains: mixed passenger and freight. Stations reopened: in the North main line, San Fabian, Damortis, Santo Tomas, Agoo, Aringay, Cava, Bauang, and San Fernando, La Union; in the San Jose branch line: Tarlac, Victoria, Guimba, Munoz, and San J ose; and in the Carmen branch line, San Fernando, Pampanga, Guagua, Lubao and Carmen.

[18J


NORTH MAIN LINE

N"mb ... of Trains No. 21 No. 22

Sta,路ting Stations San Fabian Sa n F ernando, La Union.

Starting

Time of Destination A.-rival 9:20 a.m. San F ernando, 12:03 p.m. La Union. 1:40 p.m. San Fabian 4 :23 p.m. Ti'me

SAN JOSE BRANCH LINE

No. 71 No. 72

Tarlac San Jose

8:00 a .m 12 noon

San J ose Tarlac

10:58 a.m. 2:58 p.m.

DEL CARMEN BRA NCH LINE

No. 46 No. 46

San F erna ndo, Pa mpanga. Del Carmen

9 :60 a .m.

Del Carmen 11 :20 a .m. San Fernando, 11:50 a.m. Pampanga 1:20 p.m.

COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF OF THE IMPERIAL JAPANESE FORCES.

ADMINISTRATIVE ORDINANCE NO.9 (July 6, 1942.) CONCERNING THE RESTRICTION OF fJ'HE USAGE AND OPERATION OF MOTOR VEHICLES.

ART. 1. Effective on and after August 11, 1942, all usage and operation of Motor Vehicles, either for official, public or personal purposes, is strictly prohibited except when such vehicle sha ll fall under one of the followi ng categories and the approval for its usage and operation has been duly granted by tbe Japanese Military Administration: (1) Vehicles used by Government, Municipal, a nd /or public offices. (2) Vehicles used for transpOl'tation of essential goods and commodities. (3) Vehicles used as public conveyances. (4) Voehicles u sed by newspapers and similar agencies in pursuit of their duties. (5) Vehicles used for transporting patient$ and by physicians in any of the foregoing, but deemed of special importance by the Japanese Military Administration. ART. II. Application for the permit described in the foregoing article shall be made on forms especially provided for this purpose, by fh'm, factory, or other legal person through their respective provincial offices. In t he case of the City of Manila, application is to be made through the Bureau of Transpol'tation , Department of Public Works & Communications, and in the case of other chal'tered cities, through the office of t he Mayor.

[19]


ART. III. Upon approval, a permit for operation and usage of motor vehicles together with an identification sticker will be issued. The permit and stickel' mentioned in the foregoing paragraph shall be valid in every pl'ovince and municipality. ART. IV. Any person and/ol' persons operating motor vehicles in violation of the stipulations in Art. 1 of the foregoing, shall be punished severely. ART. V. The present administrative ordinance shall take effect in the provinces and municipalities listed hereunder: Ilocos Norte, Ilocos Sm, La Union, Pangasinan, Nueva Vizcaya, Mountain Province, Tarlac, Nueva Ecija, Pampanga, Bulacan, Zambales, Cavite, Batangas, Laguna, Tayabas, Rizal, City of Manila, City of Cavite, City of Ba路 guio, City of San Pablo. -Supplementary StipulationsART. VI. Effecti"" on August 10, 1942, Sections 1 and 2 of the Proclamation pertaining to the restriction of the usage of motor vehicles and declaration of ownership andlor possession of motor vehicles, gasoline, etc., issued January 14, 1942, will be considered null and void. ART. VII. Any person and lor persons to whom permit for operation and usage has already been granted under the provisions of the Proclamation men路 tioned in Art. VI, shall be considered as having been granted permit under Art. I of the present administrative Ordinance; and therefore such permits shall be valid. DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF THE JAPANESE MILITAR'Y ADMIN.ISTRATION

MILITARY ORDINANCE NO. 16 (July 23, 1942.)

CONCERNING PROHIBITION TO MANUFACTURE OR PRODUCE WIRELESS TELEGRAPH OR TELEPHONE APPARATUS. (1) It is prohibited to manufacture 01' produce Wireless Telegraph or Telephone Apparatus. (2) All the materials and Parts of the above-mentioned apparatus will be purchased by the Japanese Forces. Anyone who possesses until now the aforesaid materials Or parts, except those which have already been purchased, should report thereon to the Headquartel's of the Utiyama Corps, Nielson & Co., 70 Cristobal, Paco, Manila, and apply for further instructions. (3) Anyone who violates the above-prescribed articles shaH be severely ' llunished in accordance with the military law. (4) The l'epairing of radio receiving sets and sales of the parts for repall'lng thereof (except those which have been purchased by the Japanese Forces) shall exclusively l'emain to be allowed as heretofore. COMMANDER路IN 路CHIEF OF THE IMPERIAL JAPANESE FORCES.

[20]


MILITARY ORDINANCE NO. 17 (July 24, 1942.)

MILITARY ORDINANCE CONCERNING RESTRICTION AND PROHiBI· TION OF LISTENING IN TO RADIO BROADCASTS Article 1. Hereafter, listening in to overseas radio broadcasts otber than those by government stations in the Empire of Japan and by Station (calling sign KZRH) of the Japanese Forces in the Philippines, shall be strictly pt·ohibited. Article 2. Despite the possibilities or impossibilities of listening in to those broadcasts as prescribed in Article 1, the general usage of antennas (excluding earth wh·es) shall be prohibited, but short antennas in the houses (about 2 meters or less in length) shall be allowed. Article 3. Any person who owns, possesses or borrows radio receiving sets shall register the apparatus as prescribed in the provisions of the Exe· cutive Order. Articl~ 4. Any person who fails to follow the restriction and prohibi· tion provided for in Articles 1 and 2, or neglects to register in accordance with Article 3, shall be severely punished. Article 6. This Military Ordinance shall take effect on August 1st, 1942. Article 6. The restriction and prohibition prescribed in Articles 3 a nd 4 of the proclamation concerning prohibitio n of wireless telephone and telegraph communications, issued on January 31st, 1942, shall be repealed here· after. . COMMANDER·IN ·CHIEF OF THE IMPERIAL JAPANESE FORCES.

NOTIFICATION NO.8 (August 4, 1942.)

CONCERNING REGISTRATION OF SHIP CARPENTERS Sec. 1. Ship carpenters who have experience in ship building shall be requh-ed to report the matter mentioned below, in a prescribed form, to the Commissioner of Public Works and Communications through the nearest mu · nicipal, city or provincial government office, as promptly as possible \vithin the period between August 4 and August 15 (in the case of localities other than Luzon, between August 4 and September 16). 1. Name and addt·ess; 2. Place and date of birth; 3. When and where educated, naming school or academy; 4. Diseases or physical defects or disabilities suffered Or still suffers fl'om;

[21]


5.

Detailed information as to experience and training; rate of wages received, length of time in each office or firm; positions held, and reasons for separation ; 6. Present position and salary; 7. Name and addl'ess of present employer; Sec. 2. The prescribed registration form shall be obtained from the mu' nicipal, city or pl'ovincial office upon request. Sec. 3. This notification shall cover the following provinces and cities; 1. Manila, 2. Province of Cavite, 3. Province of Albay, 4. Province of Camarines Norte, 5. Province of Rizal, 6. Mindoro (mainly al'ound Calapan) 7. Iloilo, 8. Cebu, 9. Zamboanga, 10. Davao. DIRECTOR路GENERAL OF THE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION.

NO TI F ICATION (July 17, 1942.)

CONCERNING PROHIBITION OF NAVIGATION ON THE MARIKINA RIVER Effective today, navigation of small vess'e!s, boats, etc., on the Marikina River will be prohibited, excepting the regions near the Marikina and Vargas bridges. HEADQUARTERS FOR THE DEFENSE OF MANILA.

NOTIFICATION (July 21, 1942.)

CONCERNING

TRANSPORTATION ON PASIG AND SAN JUAN

THE

RIl' ERS

The water tl"ansportation on the rivilrs Pasig and San Juan which has been prohibited shall be re-opened to the public starting today. However the transportation on river Marikina excluding the section of Marikina and Vargas bridges shall be prohibited for the time being. HEADQUARTERS FOR THE DEFENjSE OF MANILA.

[22]


NOTIFICA TION (July 28, 1942.)

CONCERNING LIFTING OF PROHIBITION OF NAVIGATION ON THE MARIKINA RIVER The prohibition of navigation on the Marikina Rivel路 is hereby lifted beginning July 28, 1942.

HEADQUARTERS FOR THE DEFENSE OF MANILA .

[2~]


Section 3. Affairs Concerning Industries MILITARY ORDINANCE NO. 14 (July 24, 1942.)

ORDER CONCERNING THE CONTROL OF THE IMPORT AND EXPORT BUSINESS OF THE PHILIPPINES. ARTIOLE I.-The import and export business of the Philippines shall be controlled by the Imperial Japanese Army for the time being. ARTICLE 2.-No one shall bring into, or carry away from, the Philippines, goods except under the following conditions: (1) When he enters 01' leaves the Philippines, in which case he may ca rry goods for his personal use; (2) When he has a permit from the Director-General of the Military Administration 0,' (3) When he is otherwise authorized by the Army. ARTICLE 3.-Goods to be exported shall be supplied to the Army by the suppli~rs designated by the Army and imported goods shall be sold by the Army to purchasers, d',signa ted by the Al'J,n y, 'except in the cases prescribed in the next preceding article. ARTICLE 4.-The Suppliel's and Purchasers provided for in the next preceding ..... rticle shall form and organize the Philippine Import and Export Con路 trol Association hereafter to be known as the Association. ARTICLE 5.-Under the control and supervision of the Director-General of the Military Administration, tha Association shall: (1) Cooperate with the Army in handling the import and export business; (2) Exercise control over its membel's in supplying export goods to the Army and in buying import goods from the Army; and (3) Conduct such other business as may be necessary in the attainment of its purposes. ARTICLE 6.-In the Articles of the Association, the following provisions shall be embodied: (1) Purposes. (2) Name. (3) Address of the Main Office. (4) Regulations regarding its membership. (5) Regulations l'egarding its business and conduct thereof. (6) Regulations regarding its officers. (7) Regulations regarding meetings. (8) Regulations regarding accounting. (9) Regulations regarding its intel'llal organization.

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ARTICLE 7.-The Association shall have the following officers: a Managing Director, Directors and Auditors all of whom shall be appointed by the Director·General of the Military Administration. ARTICLE S.-The Association may asses its members to cover its expenses or part thereof, in accordance with the provisions of the Articles of the Association. ARTICLE 9.-The Association may whenever it may need additional capital, require its members to invest in the business of the Association with the approval of the Director·General of the Military Administration. ARTIOLE 10.-The Association may collect commission on business handled by it or fees for the use of its equipment. ARTICLE 11.-The Association may promulgate regulations regarding the control of the business of its members. ARTICLE 12.-The Association may provide for the punishment of its mambers for violation of the A,·tieles of the Association or the regulations regarding the control of its members in accordance with the pl·ovisions of the Articles of the Association. ARTICLE 13.-The Artieles of the Association, the annual budgat and the annual financial statement, the method of assessing its members and the d.i s· position of other important matters shall have the prior approval of the Dh·ector·General of the Military Administ ration. ARTICLE 14.-Any person who violates the pt·ovisions of A,·tiele 2 hereof shall be punished according to Militat·y Law. APPENDIX This Order shall tllk:e effect on the date' of its promUlgation. DIRECTOR·GENERAL OF THE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION.

MILITARY ORDINANCE NO. 15 (July 24, 1942.)

CONCERNING THE CONTROL OF' PRIME COMMODITIES ARTICLE I For the purpose of adiusting the supply and demand of prime commodities in the Philippines, regulating the consumption thereof, and keeping their prices at a proper level, the following regulations of control by the Army are hereby pt·omulgated. ARTICLE II The kind of prime commodities that are subiect to this ordinance shall be determined by the Director·General of the Military Administration . ARTICLE III The Director·General of the Military Administration may issue such orders as may be necessary for t he control of prime commodities to persons

[25]


engaged in the production, or manufacture, or processing of such commodities, or any organization of such persons, regarding the production, or manufacture, or processing of such commodities. ARTICLE IV The Director-General of the Military Administration may issue such orders as may be necessary for the control of prime commodities to persons who are producers, manufactl1r~rs, pl'ocessors, dealers, depositors or distributors of prime commodities, or suppliers of export goods or purchasel's of import goods, or any organization of such persons, (hereafter to be known as prime commodity dealers) regarding the sale, deposit, storing, holding and other disposition 01' transfer of such commodities. The necessary provision for the issuance of such orders shall be made by the Dil'ector·General of the Military Administration. ARTICLE Y The Director·General of the Military Administration, if he deems it necessary, may order prime commodity dealers to entrust, manage jointly (including fOl'ming associations), alienate or amalgamate their business or equipment, or pa ·t thereof. The necessal' provision for the issuance of such orders shall be made by the Director-Genel'al of the Military Administration. ARTICLE VI The Director-Gene 'al of the Military Administration may issue such orders as may be necessary for the control of prime commodities to those wh<> use, hold Or consume .uch cOlllllloditjes regarding the use, holding or rOI'Rumption thereof. ARTICLE VII The Dil'ector-General of the Milital'Y Administration may send such person or persons designated by him to factorie., business establishments, stores warehouses, Or other places of business to examine the business affairs, supply of prime commoditizs, papers and books etc. thereof. ARl'lCLE VIII The persons designated by the Director·General of the Military Administration shall form and organize an association or associations for the control of the distribution of prime commodies. The necessary provision regarding the organization of the associations for the control of the distribution of prime commodities shall be made by the Direct.or·General of the Military Administration. ARTICLE IX Noone except the association provided for in thc next preceding article or persons designated by the said association, shal1 deal in Or distribute or store prime commodities as a business. P-ersons holding a permit of the Dir. ector-General of the Military Administration shaH be exempted from this pl·ohibition.

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ARTICLE X The Director-General of the Military Administration may delegate his authority prescribed in this ordinance to any appropriate branch of the Gov-

el'nment. ARTICLE

XI

Any person who violates this ordinance or the orders issued thereunder, shall be punished in accordance with Military Law_ ApPENDIX

This ordinance shall take effect on the date of its promulgation, provided the Director-General of the Military Administration shall decide the date a nd manner in which th" provisions of Article IX shall be enforced. DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF THE JAPANESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION.

NOTIFICATION NO.9 (July 24, 1942.)

CONCER ING THE KIND OF PRIME COMMODITIES In accordance with the provisions of Article II of the Order Concerning the Control of Distribution of Prime Commodities, the prime commodities hereby covared are the following: 1. Low grade cotton fabrics and manu~actures thereof 2. Matches 3. Salt 4. Tobacco products 5. Lard and Soap 6. Paper DIRECTOR路GENERAL OF THE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION

NOTIFICATION NO. 14 (August 18, 1942.)

CONCERNING THE [(IND OF PRIME COMMODITIES Notification No. 9 regarding prime commodities which are to be con' tl'olled in their distribution, in accordance with the provision of article II of the Orde r concerning the Control of Distribution of Prime Commodities, the said notification shall be amended as follows: 1. Low grade cotton fabrics and manufacture thereof should be changed to

Cotton textiles and ma:::ufactul'e tnereof. DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF THE JAPANESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION.

[27]


ADMINISTRATIVE ORDINANCE NO. 10 (July 24, 1942.)

ORDER CONCERNING THE ORGANIZATION OF' THE PHILIPPINE PRIME COMMODITIES DISTRIBUTION CONTROL ASSOCIATION. Article I.-The Philippine Prime Commodities Distribution Control Association shall be organized by members designated by the Director-General of the Military AdministJ:ation in accordance with the provisions of Article VIII of the Order Concerning the Control of Prime Commodities. Each member so designated shall invest a certain amount in the Association. Article Il.-This Association shall have a legal personality. Article IlL-This Association shall engage, subject to the supervision of the Director-General of the Military Administration, in the following business in order to carry out effectively the control measures provided for in the Order Concerning the Control of Prime Commodities. 1. Purchase, acquisition by transfer, transportation and storing of prime commodities; 2. Distribution of prime commodities; 3. Standardization and fixing of prices of prime commodites; 4. Investigation into and reporting upon the condition of production, hold路 ing and distribution of prime commodities; and 5. Any other bus' ness necessary for the control of distribution of prime commodities. This Association m y, when necessary, be permitted by the Director路 Genera! of the Military Administration to distribute and handle other com' modities not stipulated in the Order Concerning the Control of Prime Commodities. Article IV.-The regulations regarding the business enumerated in the next preceding article and the conduct thereof shall be prescribed from time to time by the Board of Directors of the Association with the approval of the Director-General of the Military Administration. Article V.-The Office of the Association shall be located in the City of Manila Article VL-The Association, when deemed necessary, may establish branch offices or agencies outside of Manila. Article VIl.-In the Articles of this Association, the following provisions shall be embodied: 1. Purposes 2. Name 3. Location of office 4. Names of members and the regulations governing their investments in the Association. 5. Regulations regarding its business and the conduct thereof. 6. Regulations regarding officers. 7. Regulations regarding meetings.

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8. Regulations regardi ng its int21'nal OIoganization. Article VIIL-The Association shall have ihe following officers: 1. One President 2. One Chairman of the Board of Directors 3. Dil'actors (An E xecutive Committee consisti ng of three directors shall be appointed from among them) 4. Auditors Article IX.-The officers of the As ociation enu merated in the next preceding article sha ll be designated from among the members by the DirectorG<!neral of the Military Administration; provided that when deemed necessary, the Di rec tor-Gen"ral may appoint officers of the Association who are not members of the Association. Article X.-The term of office of the officers shall be two years; provided, that they may be reappointed. Article XL-The P resident and the Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Association shall represent the Association and supervise its business. The a uthority of t he officers and employees shall be provided for in the Articles of Organization of the Association. Article XII:--The expenses of the Association shall be paid from the investment of t he members and the income of the business. A rticle XIIL- mendments to the articles of association, budget of income and expenses. alloca 路on of investment and other important matCars sha ll reo quire tbe approval of he Director General of t he Military Admini tration. ArticJ.a XIV.-The Association may punish any member who violates the Articles of Association r a ny rules and regulations promulgated thereunder in accordance wi th the Articles of the Association.

APPENDIX This ordinance shall take effect on t he date of its promulgation. DIRE CTOR-GENERAL OF THE MILITARY ADMINISTRATfON.

THE OUTLINES OF THE POLlCY ON THE READJUSTMENT OF THE PHILIPPINE SUGAR I NDUSTRY GUlDING PRI NCTPLE

The development of the Philippine sugar industry in the past is not to be attributed to more favou.-able natural conditions an d higher technical stan d路 ards than those of other remarkable sugar producing coun tries of the worl d, which would ha ve enabled this country to be a dominant factor in th e world ~ugar market, but to the policy adopted by the United States of encouraging the sugar indus try in the Philippines for the sole purpose of supplying the needs of the United States. Upon finding, however, that the Phi lippine sugar indu stry was proving to be prejudicial to the interests of American capital, they selfi shl y maneuvered to close the American ma,路ket, which was the only

[29]


outlet for Philippine sugar whose production America had once sO vigorously encouraged, hy the ruse of offering independence, and the Philippine sugar industry was thus brought face to face with complete ruination. And, when the Filipinos tried to rationalize the industry or to convert it into othel' kinds of industry, not only did America give them no support, but also obstructed the e:recution of the readjustment projects because it would directly affect her cotton and petroleum policies. ACcol'dingly the Philippine sugar business could neither go forward nor retreat. Now the outbreak of the Great East Asiatic War has suddenly severed the Philippines from America, with the resul tant loss of the American market, which would have been the inevitable destiny of the Philippine sugar industry, destroying the pre-war basis of this industry. It must be realized, however that what was most pernicious was not the unavoidable loss of the America'n market, but the selfish and crafty policy adopted by the Americans of obstructing the rationalization of the sugar industry 01' its necessary conver_ sion into other industries. The Greater East Asiatic War has completely removed the dire influence of this self-seelUng American policy of duplicity and has brought the industry that was driven to bankruptcy, to the threshold of rehabilitation. The selfish policy of the Americans by which they intended to deprive the sugar industry, which they had formerly encouraged to meet their own requirements, of its ole market to save their own ,"conomy, has already been carried into effect, causing a new econom ic chaos in this country. Now the Filipino people \!lust take pains tb overcome t his great trouble and this is the only and unavoidable way for the Filipinos if they are to follow their normal and l'easonable economic life again, in the future. The damaging influence of the dissimulating American policy is all too evident. It is for the Filipino people to see with thanks the liberating as well as the constructive force associated with the outbreak of the present war which has given to the Philippine sugar industry the freedom for l'eadjustment, independent of the oppressive policies of America. And, loolUng forward to the future of this country they should make plans for industrial development on the basis of the geographical conditions as well as on the basis of the natural resources of the country. To attain this objective, the Filipino people should first recognize the kinds of industry which are best suited to this country in connection with her natural conditions as well as her existing equipment and facilities and technical standards and which will turn out products that will find ready markets in the Philippines and other countries in the Co-Prosperity Sphere, and then should make plans for the readjustment of the sugar industry in accordance with t hese considerations. Under the present circumstances, we cannot expect much of the exporta_ tion of sugar, and accordingly, the sugar industry ,viII have to be maintained and encouraged only to meet the local demand so far as th'e manufacture of sugar is concerned. But in view of the necessity of attaining self-sufficiency in liquid fuel and plant fibre in the Co-Prosperity Sphere, th'e surplus capacity of the sugar industry must be diverted to the manufacture of high octaned

[30]


liquid fuel and alcohol which are products that can be made from sugar-cane. In this way considerable numbers of existing factories can be operated and sugar cultivation can still be continued to a certain extent. Th'O balance of the sugar lands not needed for sugar production can be u sed for the increased production of cotton which will be the best crop suited to tbe soil and the climatic conditions of this country and will find a l'eady market in the Philippines and other countl'ies in the CO-Pl'osperty Sphere. For the reorienta tion of the basic industries of the Philippines, Japan is ready to give necessary aid and guidance in order that this country may perform her mission as a member of the Greater East Asia Co· Prosperity Sphere and enjoy a rightful share of profi£"'and prosperity. II-RESUME OF PROJECTS 1.

Pl'ojects fo,' 8"'ga,' factories.

(1) Sugar factories shall be maintained only to manufacture sugar necessary for local consumption and those unnecessary shall be readjusted. (2) Existing equipment of tbe factories to be readjusted shall be ap' plied to the manufacture of other goods than sugar to the utmost; all the alcohol distilleries shall be maintained so as to attain self·sufficiency in liquid fuel which has hitherto been imported ; some of the factories to be readjusted shall be changed into alcohol distilleries which use sugar-cane as raw material . (3) Of the facto~ies to be readjusted, those which are enemy properties shall be applied to the manufacture of high octaned liquid fuel, thereby serving to the maintena ce and rehabilitation of sugar cultivation.

2.

Pl'ojects t01' Bltga',' la'lds.

(1) Apart of sugar lands shall be maintained to secure only the ra w material supply necessary fOl' the manufacture of sugar for local consump ' tion. (2) For the purpose of readjusting the sugar industry, maintaining and promoting sugar cultivation and attaining self· sufficiency in liquid fuel, a part of sugar lands shall be maintained to secure the supply of the neces ' sary material for tbe manufacture of high octaned liquid fuel and alcohol. (3) For the purpose of rehabilitation of the Philippine agriculture which can no longer count on sugar manufacture and increas",d production of cotton by making the utmost use of the Philippine natural resources, thereby securing self'sufficiency in cotton in this country and its market in other parts of the Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere, the balance of sugar lands not needed for above purposes shall be applied to cotton culture. 3. The above·mentioned projects shall be carried into effect in the course of five years (1942,1946), and the surplus sugar lands over those employed for the execution of these projects in 'Overy year shall be applied to the culti va tion of good crops. nI-MEASURES 1. Sugar factories shall be readjusted in accordance with the degree of the reduction of sugar pl·oduction. The method of readjustment is as follows:

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(1) Factories which are enemy properties shall stop their opel'ation pro vided, by so doing they do not menace the livelihood of the farmers engaged in sugar-cane cultivation. (2) Factories seriously damaged by the war shall be closed. (3) OLher factories not corresponding to those mentioned in the above two sections shall be closed by such ord~rs as may be decided, taking into consideration the equipment and capacity of factories, the production of sugar-cane and the conditions relative to the purchasing of sugar·cane. Z. At the beginning of the execution of the cotton projects, 120,000 hectares of the sugar lands to be converted shall be applied to cotton cultivation. 3_ Strict quota system shall be adopted for the amount of production of s ugar and alcohol by each manufacturer and the area of sugar lands of each cultivation. 4. For the purpose of rebuilding th« Philippine sugar industry and securing the necessary material fol' th manufacture of high octaned liquid fuel and alcohol, whose production should be incl'eased, the following measures shall be taken: (1) Improvement of equipment for manufacture of sugar and alcohol. (Z) Techni<;.al improvement of the manufactu}'e of sugar and alcohol. (3) Intensification of Philippine agriculture by means of the impI'ovement of cultu",1 methods and g'aeds, encouragement of the use of fertilizers and adoption of roLation. 6. For Lhe purp e of n1aintaining and promoting of the sugar cultivation, necessary measur for the improvem«nt of soi l and reformation of land tenure s hall be taken. 6. The method of disposition of surplus sugar shall be determined after careful investigation is made of the actual cil'cumstances_ 7. The losses which may accrue from the readjustment of sugar industry shall be shared in fair proportion, but in some cases part of the losses may be compensated, if need be. 8. To calTY out the sugar projects in the Philippines systematically and under good control. The Philippine Sugar Association shall be forlned and organized and the existing suga r organizations shall be liquidated and be absorbed into the association.

OUTLINE OF POLICY ON THE PROJECTS FOR THE INCREASE OF COTTON PRODUCTION GUIDING PRINCIPLE

In the Philippines cotton is cultivated in a limited area by very Pl'lllll' tive methods. Accordingly its yield is meager and it is wholly inadequate to contribute to the general economy of the farmers. Under such circumstance it is natural that the Philippines was forced to depend upon imports from the United States for the major portion of its cotton and cotton goods supply III ol'der to meet the requirement to clothe her people.

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How.ever, when we check various reports and data and take into considthe results of the investigation as well as the experiments conducted in the provinces, we fiud that the natural condition for the growing of cotton in the Philippines is highly promising, and with respect to its marketing we are in a position to guarantee its ready absorption both within the country and in th" Greater East Asia Co·Prosperity Sphere. Heretofore the production of cotton in this country was almost totally neglected because it was directly subject to the economic policy of America. At first, the Unted States compelled this country to develop the sugal· in· dustry by reducing the production of cotton, which was then cultivated on a larger scale, to conform not only with her policy of insuring her own food supply but also to prevent conflict with her own agricultural policy. Later, in order to protect her capitalists of the sugar industry, she sought to shut out Philippine sugar from that American market upon which the Philippin e sugar industrl' was totally dep'andent for its existence; this she did by resorting to the ,·use of offering independence. When the Philippines was compelled to the point of fundamentally adju sti ng her sugar industry the United States hindered such a movement both directly and indirectly because sh e had no desire to see a shift to the production of cotton. Laboring under such conditions and under American domination, the cultivation of cotton, however profitable an indus ry it Illay be and however it might I'ead the Philippines to prosperity, would never have developed, while the sugar industry was a thing already doomed. By the outbreak of Greater East Asia War, the export of sugar to America became impossible, but in the light of the American policy, the Philippine sugar industry in reality was long si nce destined to such an end. It is but the natural faue that awaited the sugar industry in the Philippines. But now, having been freed from American domination , the Philippines has gained the freedom to develop the cultiva tion of cotton which could not otherwise have been possible. Under the new regime, Philippine cotton will not only find market in its own country but it can expect a much larger market in the Greater East Asia Co·prosperity Sphere. The success of cotton cultivation in the Philippines will be a decisive factor in insuring the permanent prosperity of the Philippines and with it she will hold one of the key positions as a member of the Greater East Asia eo·prosperity Sphere. Though natural conditions may be well adopted for the growing of cotton, such matters as land improvement, the technical guidance of cultiva_ tion, the development of superior varieties, and the elimination of pests and diseases must be encouraged with the aid of abundant capital and experi"nced technical experts, for a speedy increase in production. Present conditions in this country, however, do not favor the success of this most urgent undertaking. For an immediate largescale production it requires not only the services of the qualified leadership and guidance of the foremost J apanase cotton growers provided with many experienced technical experts and abundant fund and their affiliated organizations, but also a campaign to stimulate the growing of cotton among landowners and fanners. ~ration

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AYALA LIBRARY


II.

RESUME OF PROJECTS

P"odllctiol! Schedule. (1) The first step aims at the production of 1,500,000 piculs of ginned colton by planting on an area of 450,000 hectares for the five years period from 1942 to 1946. For 1942 it is planned to place 12,000 hectares of sugar lands under cultivation to produce an estimated crop of 37,000 piculs of ginned cotton. (2) In conformity with the policy on the readjustment of sugar industry, t he surplus of sugar lands shall be devoted to cotton culture as the first step and later, suitable idle lands and secondary forest la nds shall be used. 1.

2.

Organizations fo,' increa.sed p,路oduction. A. Cotton growing entel路prises. (1) i Japan<!se f inns in charge of cotton growing (hereafter to be known as cotton growers). Kanegafuti Boseki K. K. Dainihon Boseki K. K. Toyo Boseki K. K. Daiwa (Kurasaki) Boseki K. K. Kureha Boseld K. K. Toyo Menka Boseki K. K. Toyo Takushoku K. K. Taiwan Takushoku K. K. (2) Work of Cotton Growers. 1. Planting 2. Finance 3. Purchase 4. Ginning 5. Baling 6. Tt"ansportation 7. Other work relative to the entire processing of cotton. (3) For temporary measure the working area for the year 1942 for Cotton Growers sha ll be as per attached data in annex. (4) System of orga ni zation in charg.. of cotton growing shall be as follows; (a) Contract growi ng between farmers and Cotton Growers, (this is a mor e general case). (b) Individual growing, later to be assigned to contract planting. (c) Direct cul tivation by Cotton Growers. B. Guiding and controlling institutions. (1) The Philippine Cotton Growers Association. For the purpose of carryi ng out experiment a nd research with regard to cotton; guidance and control of Cotton Grower s; training and education of cotton experts Or tech路 nicians. The Philippine cotton Gl'owers Association shall be organized unde,' supervision of the Army in c1os~ cooperation with the Nippon Cotton Growers Association.

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(2) Officers of the Institution. Officers of the Philippine Cotton Grow_ ers Association shall be composed of the officials of the Office of Military Administration, the officials of the Philippine Executive Commission, the Cot· ton Growers and the members of the Nippon Cotton Growers Associa tion, etc.

3.

p",.chase of cotton. (1) To allow the Cotton Growers to purchase not only products of the contract cultivation but also those from the general farmers by dividing them into distt;cts. (2) Purchasing prices. The price of cotton shall be fixed at an advantageous rate by taking into consideration the cost of production and by comparison with other fann pro· ducts. 4.

Regn/atio"s in ,·ega,·d to land. (1) For the land required for the experimental station and seed farm of the Philippine Cotton GrowerS Association, public lands shall be leased without charge. (2) The lease or purchase of land necessary for the experimental sta· tions and seed fann of the Philippine Cotton Growers Association and for land directly managed by thoa Cotton Growers mu st be based on the principle of a free contract. However, if such measures fail to attain their object, necessary orders shall be promulgated for compulsory adoption. Other in_ stallations besides lan~ shall he handled in the sa me way. (3) In the ev<!nt land owners fail to cooperate by r efusing to comply with the request to improve the cultivation of land, necessary measures shall be adopted so that the Ootton Growers may execute such plans in theil· pl ace. (4) Any laws governing the agricultural land which interfere with the development of cotton growing shall be revised. 5.

Ot/..,· ,·eo,,{ations fOI· the Tncl·eCtsec/ Proc/uction of cott01l.

(1) Improvement of land. Irrigation system shall be developed for areas where the cotton produc· tion can be increased by ir';gation. (2) Improvement of tenancy. In order to insul·e the steady growth of cotton cultivation, the tenancy of farmers shall be improved. (3) Improvement of agricultural management The Cotton Growers shall render necessary guidance and assistance for the l·otation of crops and for other agricultural management in order to realize the rationalization of cotton production.

ANNEX 1.

Dist,·ict No.1

Districts to be taken up by the Cotton Growers in 1942.

Areas

Provinces

1,500 Ha.

Cavite Part of Batangas

Cotton Growers Dainihon Boseki

K.K.

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Dist)'ict

PJ'oviuces

No.2

Laguna Batangas (Part)

No. S No. 4

A,路ea.

Co t t all

. 1,50.0. Ha .

Cotabato (Part) Mindanao Pampanga Bataan (P art)

1,50.0. 1,50.0.

La Union Tarlac

.

Occidental N egros Manapla) Bacolod) Districts

No.6

Occiden tal Negros VictQ.rias) Talisay) Disel路iets Cota b a~o (Part) Minda nao

Kanegafuti Boseki K. K. Kurasiki Boseki

K.K. Daiwa Boseki 1C. K .

Pangasinan

No.5

GI路o tue)'~

1'oyo Tokushoku K . K.

1,50.0.

Ta iwan 1'akushuku K.K.

1,50.0.

Kureha Boseki K. K.

No. 7

Occiden tal egros La Carlota distriCits

1,50.0.

No.8

Occi den tal N egros Bi na Jbaga n \listricts

1,50.0.

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... n

Toyo Menk;> K K. Toyo Menka K. K.


Section 4. Affairs COIlcemilzg Finance NOTIFICATION NO.6 (July 1, 1942.) CONCERNI NG SAFETY DEPOSIT BOXES I N ENEMY BANKS

It is hereby requested that t hose who used to have rented Sarety Depo' s it Box(es) from, 01' lodged the box(es), case(s) or contain'.r( s ) for safekeeping with the undermentioned banks, have to attend t he resp'ective bank on 16th, Jul y, 1942, in order to get the contents released, provided: 1. They at'e Japanese, Filipinos and non -belligerent people (including non-hostile Chinese). 2. Bringing themselves the key (01' keys if in duplicate), receipt of lodging (or any document to certify' the lodging in case there is no receipt), Residence Certificates for Filipinos, Aliens Certificate of Registration for non-belligerents. N. B. The 10d~eJ: of those (box(e. ), case(s) or containers for safekeeping with these banks should prdouce the "Application for the release of the safety deposit in t1!e enemy banks" with the name, address, sex, national ity, safe-keeping bank, 'particulars of items lodged a nd details of the containers, to the Finance Department of The Japanese Mil itary Administration Office from to-day up to 10th, Jul y, 1942. The Names of the banks:National City Bank of New York. P eople's Bank and Trust Company. Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China Hongkong and Shangha i Banking COl路pol'ation. Netherland India Commercial Bank. China Banking Corporation . Philippine Bank of Communications. OFFICE OF THE JAPANESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION

NOTIFICATION (July 24, 1942.) CONCERNlNG RELEASE OF CONTENTS OF SAFETY DEPOSI'l'; BOXES.

The contents of the Safety Deposit Box or things under safe custody with the following offices of the Peoples Bank & Trust Company shall be released. The users of the box or clients except the national s of hostile

[37]


countries are hereby notified to apply to the offices with keys, residence certificates and/or Alien Certificate of Registration on the respective dates: Peoples Bank & Trust Co., San Pablo Branch. July 28th, 1942.-9 a. m. Peoples Bank & Trust Co., Baguio Branch, Aug. 1st, 1942.-9 a. m. Peoples Bank & Trust Co., San Fernando Branch, Aug. 3rd, 1942.-9 a. m. DIRECTOR·GENERAL OF THE JAPANESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION. ADM INISTRATIVE; ORDINANCE NO. 11 (August I, 1942.)

RE:-THE LIQUIDATION OF THE BANI(S OF HOSTILE COUNTRIES 1. The following seven banks of hostile countrics are hereby declared to be in a state of Iiquidation:(1) The National City Ba nk of New York. (2) Peoples Bank & Trust Company. (3) The Chartered Bank of India, Australia & China. (4) The Hongkong & Shanghai Banking Corporation. (5) Nederlandsch Indische Handelsbank, N. V. (6) China Banking Corporation. (7) Philippine Bank of Communications. 2. The Bank of Taiwan, Ltd., has been a ppointed liquidator of the above banks. 3. All loans, advances a nd other receivables of the banks are hereby declared due and payable not·withstanding the terms and conditions of the contract. Debtors are given from today until September 30, 1942, to pay the prin· cipal a nd intJerest of their obligations. All payments made thereafter shall be charged additional interest at 3'70 pel' annum, except only in special cases where the same may be waived. 4. Loans, advances, coll ection items, etc., in foreign currency shall be collected at t he last pI·evailing exchange ,·ate in 1941. 5. In case the bills of exchange, drafts Or other documents be lost, burnt or their whereabouts unknown, the liquidator may make use of the books of accounts and/or records of the banks as the debtor by satisfactory counter evidences shall show otherwise. 6. Securities pledged a nd /or properties mortgaged in favor of the banks may be sold at auction sale when necessary to liquidate, wholly or partially, any loan Or other advances, except in certain special cases. 7. T he r unning of the prescriptive period on all outstanding obligations due to the a bove banks shall be deemed suspended effective as of December 8, 1941. DIRECTOR-GENERAL OF THE JAPANESE MILITARY ADMINISTRATION

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Section 5. Affairs Concerning Judiciary ANNOUNCEMENT (Ju ly 21. 1942.)

CONCERNING PUNISHMENT OF VIOLATORS OF MILITARY LAWS The execution was carried out immediately after the death sentences were handed down by a court martial on July 14. Of those executed for violating military laws, 17 were Filipinos and there was a pro-Chungking Chinese. The condemned men were punished for such acts as looting military ammunition and other equipment, conducting anti-Japanese propaganda, assaulting Japanese soldiers, and circulating false rumors agaist the Imperial Japanese Forces. Military autholities e"pressed regret for the Philippines that this incident has occurred because, despite the fact that the youth of the land are a n important factor in the establishment of the New Philippines. they were compelled to take such a measure. It was revealed that the Imperia l Japanese Forces ha ve been forced to impose severe punishment on similar violations in the past because it has considered t hese kinds of violation of military laws as extt路emely harmful to the cause of the Greater East Asia Co' Prosperity Sphere. However, the authorities expect to \vipe out these kinds of violators more effectivel y by imposing severe punishment on future violations. They also expresS'ed the hope that the Filipinos will not commit a big error a nd wm recognize sincerely the present situation. The 18 men condemned and their crimes for which they were executed were: In Mandaluyong: 1. Bayani Gabriel, 21 years old; 2. Filemon Geronimo, 20 years; 3. Pacifico del Rosario, 23 years; 4. Isabelo Agrario, 28 years; 5. Tirso Bautista, 22 years; 6. Martin Mercado, 19 years; 7. Gregorio Agellon, 19 years; 8. Jose Gabriel, 19 years; 9. Felipe Geronimo, 17 years. These men were executed for having robbed milital'y properties in Mandaluyong, which were under the custody of the Imperial Japanese Forces, the

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value of which amounted to 1'7,200. The robbery took pla ce between the beginning of March and middle of June on 15 different occas ions. In Caloocan: 1. Luis Dangnnaco, 28 years; GC"ardo de Guia, 27 years a nd 3. Enrique Samala, 19 years. In Malabon, Rizal: 1. Alberto Roberto, 22 years old; 2. F el ix Tongco, 17 years ; and u. Emeterio Tongco, 21 year s. All these six men were execu ted for having engaged in looting private houses. On May 27, sur prised by a J apanese sentry whil e looting, they at路 tacked the sentry. One of them armed with a " b.. lisong" assaulted and kill ed the sentry. In Gapan, ' ueva Ecija: 1. Gela"io Bendivel, 55 years old; 2. ;\Iario Gonzales, 28 yeal'S and 3. Fausto de Santos, 31, years. The fhst two wer found to h ave spread false ru mo rs against the Imperial Japanese Forces on 10 differen t: occasions du ri ng the period from earl y February a nd beginnin~ of May th is year. Besides, Bendivel a nd Gonzales gathered the unemployed and gave them arms w hi ch t hy stole from the r esid 路 ents, and later held an anti路Japanese parade. In Rizal, N'ueva Ecija: 1. Ta n Ken, Chinese, 42 years. Since the Sino路Japanese war, Tan Ken, Chinese, 42 years, ha d been l'aising fund s for Chiang Kai 'shek's war chest. When the Grea t East Asia war broke out Tan Ken s pread false rumors agai nst the Imperial Japanese Forces in the P h ilippines. He also supplied the remna nts of the USAFFE in hiding in the mountains near his residence wi th g roceries. Thi s constituted an anti-Japanese act. HE ADQU ARTERS OF THE IMPE RI AL JAPANESE FORCES.

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Section 6. Affairs COllceming Provisiollal Release of Filipillo War-Prisoners NOTIFICATION (July 26, 1942.)

CONCERNING PROrISIO.VAL RELEASE OF FILIPINO WAR路 PRISONERS. Provisional release will be granted for the second tima to sick Fili路 pino prisoners of war. The purpose of the Army in taking this step was clearly defined at the time of the first release. It is to be noted that the coming release will be granted on the conditions same as la st time. As to the lljanner in which the release will be conducted the detailed instructions given last time must be observed. The following Should also be noted: 1. The provincial governors and the mayor of Manila, accompa路 nied by their secretaries, are to attend the conference to be hel d on July 28th, 9 :00 a . m. at University Club, to recah 'e the list of sick prisoners and to discuss the detail s of the release. 2. The relatives or receivers will carry raincoats 01' umbrellas in this rainy season. 3. Care must be taken not to give released pri soner much food or drink at a time so that t heir s ickness may not get worse. The military authorities will provide special train for the transporta. tion of the sick prisoners and their custodians; (1) Between Manila and Sta. Cruz (2) Between Manila and Batangas (3) Between Manila and Capas Custodians and accompanying officials from Batangas, Lagu na and Cavite provinces are to board a tTain at Manila station Capas路ward. The schedule for the release of prisoners at Capas will be as f ollows: July 30th-Prisoners from Tarlac JUly 31st--Prisoners from Pampanga August Ist--Prisoners from Bulacan and Cavile August 3rd-Prisoners from Riza l August 4th-Prisoners from Man ila (1st group) August 5th-Prisoners from Manila (2nd group) August 6th-Prisoners from Zambales and Laguna August 7th-Prisoners from Batangas

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The schedule for the release of prisoners confined in Bilibid Hospital will be as follows: August 2-Prisoners from Tarlac, Pampanga, Bulaca n, Cavite, Rizal, Ma nila, Zambales. To a ssemble at 9:00 a. m. and get in touch with officers in charge. August 6-Prisoners from Laguna. To assemble at 2:00 in the afternoon and get in contact with officers in charge. August 7-Prisoners from Batangas. To assemble at 2:00 in the after_ noon and get in contact with the officel's in charge. Complete recovery or death of each pl'isoner must be repQrted to the Commandant of the Luzon Commissariat by the provincial governors, Manila and m'unicipal mayors. In the same manner, the above officials are to report to the Commandant of the Luzon Commissariat any change of civil status of the released prisoners of war. HEADQUARTERS OF THE LUZON COMMISSARIAT.

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PROCLAMA TION (August 7, 1942.)

RE: The TREATMENT OF FILIPINO W AR·PRISONERS. The Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines which have heen taking steps since June of temporarily releasing Filipino prisoners, incl uding the sick, the wounded as wall as the healthy, whose families were cooperating in the service of the Japanese forces such as in actual operations, military ad · ministration and rear army services, have now determined the fundamental policy in treating these Filipino prisoners, considering the present situation that Filipinos have greatly shown willingness in establishing a New Philip' pines under the present milita ry administration. The policy in detail is as follows: 1. The Filipino prisoners whose families have cooperated with tho Japanese military authorities in actual operations, military administration, a s welI as in rear army services, shall he released temporarily. 2. Wounded and sick prisoners shall he released temporarily in order to look after their health in their own homes. This rule applies only to prisoners in whose provinces peace and order have been restored. 3. Prisoners whose circumstances do not allow them to he released such as tbose patients who live in provinces where peace and order have not heen l·estored or those who have no families to look after them, as well a s prisoners who have heen crippled, shall be released temporarily under the custody of the Philippine Executive Commission. The Commission s halI have the re_ . sponsibility of taking care of such prisoners, through public associations ac' cording to their capacity for accommodation. 4. Prisoners other than those mentioned above shall be trained and educated for a short time as pioneers in the estahlishment of the New Phil · ippines. Upon completing their training and education, they shall be released temporarily or permanently, and assigned to the Philippine Constabul ary or to th~ deVelopment of Philippine industry. 5. Affairs relating to the treatment of the above·mentioned prisoners shalI be placed in charge of the following: For Luzon island-The chief of the concentration camp for Filipino prisoners in Luzon, For Visayan islands-The Supreme Commander of the J apanese Forces in the Vi sayan Islands. For Mindanao island-The Commander of the Japanese Quartermaster Corps of South Philippines. 6. Up to August 7, 1942, prisoners of the folIowing areas have been released: Provinces of Pampanga, TarIac, Cavite, Bulacan, Rizal, Zambales, Laguna, Batangas, and the Cities of Manila and Davao, and the island of Cebu. Although the aim of the Imperial Japanese F01·ceS regarding the release

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of Filipino prisoners b as been manifested in previous annot1l1cements those wbo are to be released temporarily or permanently their families as well as t he provincial authorities connected with these prisoners must understand the true aim of the Japanese Forces and follow stl-ictly the regulations and the artieles of the pledge; and furthermol-e we expect them to take an active part in cooperating together in establishing peace a nd order in the provinces; to serve and do their best in carrying out the true aims of the pl"eSent mil itary administration_

CO:IIlHAKDER-IN-CHIEF OF THE IMPERIAL JAPANESE FORCES_

[HI


Section 7. Affairs Concerning Maintmance of Peace and Order ANNOUNCEMENT (J'uly 19, 1942.) CONCERNING CONFISCATION OF ARMS, PRINTING MACHINES, ETC.

Recently there have been some persons among the people of the Philip_ pines, who, not realizing the present situation under the military administt·ation of the Imperial Japanese Forces and still beguiled by false American propaganda, have continued fifth ·column activities in respon se to the prompt· ings of a few small groups of the remnants of the USAFFE. Such conduct wiII disturb the lives of peaceful people, who are cooperat· ing \vith the military administration, and wiII be a gt·ave obstacle to the establishment of the, New Philippines. Therefore, the Imperial Japanese For· ces, with a view to decisively sweeping away such repl·ehensible persons, carried out resolutely sirl"ultaneous searches in the nOl·thern districts of the city of Manila early on the morning of Jul y 19 (Sunday), at 6 a. 111. At the same time the Imperial Forces confiscated arms, printing machines and parts thereof, speci I typewriters, transmitters, wireless communication . apparatus and parts thereof (except radio receiving sets) etc., which were kept in concealment by these unlawful rascals, and eradicated the injurious causes of fifth·column activities. By these above·mentioned actions of the Imperial FOl·ces, peace and order in the city of Manila have been particularly improved. Consequentl)', we hope earne~t1y that law·abiding citizens should, ,vithout blindly believing absurd rumors, endeavor all the more in their daily occupations to be peaceful , placing their full hearted confidence in the administration of the Imperial Japanese Forces. Moreover, if any law·abiding citizen secretly hides any kind of the a bove_ mentioned machines and the parts thel·eof, he must willingly report their whereabouts to the nearest office of the Imperial Japanese Forces. To such a person who makes a voluntary report, the J apanese Forces wiII grant proper facilities according to the kind of the objects, in appreciation of his deed. But, in spite of such benevolent warning, if anyone continues to keep in concealment any kind of these apparafus, the Japanese Forces \ViII search him thoroughly and \vill severely punish him in accordance with the milita ry Jaw. COMMANDER FOR THE DEFENSE OF MANILA.

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Section 8. Execlttzve Orders by the Chairmall of tbe Pbilippille Executive Commissioll OFFICE OF THE CHAIRMAN OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMISSION MALACANAN PALACE BY THE CHAIRMAN OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMISSION EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 42 DEFINING THE ORGANIZATION, JURISDICTION, POWERS AND DUTIES OF PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENTS AND OFFICIALS. Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central AdministI'ative Organization by Order No. 1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commander路in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recomfllendation of the Executive Commission, the organization, jurisdiction, powers, duties and functions of the provincial governments and officials are hereby detemlined and defined as follows: 'I'ICLE I-GENERAL PROVISIONS

SEC. 1. T er";/orial application; situs and territory 0/ provinces.-The provisions of this Order shall apply to all provinces. Until otherwise pro ' vided by law or order of the Chairman of the Executive Commission, the number, general location and territory of the pl'ovinces shall be as at present fixed by existing law: Provided, That the province of Romblon shall be governed by the provisions of this Order and the four special municipalities comprised in said province by Executive Order No. 43. SEC. 2. Subprovinces abolished.-The subprovinces and their governments are hereby abolished and their territories annexed to the provinces to which they belong. SEC. 3. Duties and /lmc!iolls of 7n路ovinces.-Unless otherwise hel'ein provid~d. the administrative duties and functions of the provincial government shall be continued as heretofore, insofar as they may be consistent with the demands of the Impel'ial Japanese Forces and the needs of the Central Ad路 ministrative Organization. ARTICLE II-PROVI NCIAL OFFICES AND OFFICERS I N GENERAL

SEC. 4. Chief officials of pJ'ovincial goverJIment.-The chief officials of the provincial government are the provincial govel'l1or, the provincial treasurec and the provincial fiscal.

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SEC. 5. The govemol'; lJowe,'S and dnties.-The governor shall be the chief executive and administrative officer of the province and shall be responsible for the efficient administration of the government thereof. As such it shall be his duty to exercise, in conformity with law, general supervision over the government of the province and of the municipalities therein, and his decision on administrative matters within his jurisdiction shall be final, unless revoked or modified by the Commissioner of the Interior. He shall be responsible for the faithful execution within the province of all the laws, orders, and proclamations issued hy competent authority. He shall have the power to promulgate provincial ordinances, after consultation with the provincial hoard, and submit a copy thereof through the Director of Local Governments to the Commissioner of the Interior. Such ordinances shall be effective thirty days after the receipt thereof by the Director of Local Governments, unless the Commissioner of the Inoorior finds the same or any provision thereof to be in violation of existing Jaws, orders, proclamations or insb'uctions or not in conformity with sound government policy, in which case he may disapprove or modify said ordinances or any portion thereof. He shall appoint, with th approval of the Commissioner concerned, all the subordinate officers ana employees in each provincial office, upon recommendation of the chief provinc'al official concerned, in accordance with the Civil Service Law and Regulations. SEC. 6. Acting Govern01路.-In the event of sickness, absence, or other temporary incapacity of the provincial governor, the powers, duties, and functions thereof shall be exercised by the provincial treasurer, and in the absence or incapacity of the latter, the Commissioner of the Interior shall designate any other official of the province to act in his place. SEC. 7. The p"ovincial boa,路d.-There shall be a provincial board composed of the chief provincial officials and two other members possessing the necessary qualifications to be appointed by the Chairman of the Executive Commission, which shall serve in an advisory capacity to the provincial governor. The members of the provincial board, who are not officers or employees of the Government receiving a fixed compensation or salary from public funds, may be allowed per diems in accordance with the rates fixed and rubject to the limitations prescribed in Executive Order No. 13 dated March 12, 1942, in addition to actual and necessary traveling expenses for attendance at the sessions of the board. The board shall hold sessions upon call of the governor. Such sessions shall not be public. SEC. 8. The p1'ovincial t,路easu,-.,-; powe,'s and duties.-The provincial treasurer shall be the chief financial officer and assessor of the province. He shall bave general supervision over the offices of municipal treasurers in the province and it shall be his duty to collect all taxes, fees and charges throughout the province whether they are national, pt'ovincial or municipal; have charge of the disbursement of provincial funds and other funds the dustody and disbursement of which may be entrusted to him by competent authority; acquire for the provincial government all necessary supplies, rna路 tet'ials and equipment for which appropl'iation has been authorized by com-

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petent authority; have custody and supervIsIon of all provincial funds and pl'operty, including the provincial buildings and grounds; assess all real property in the province and perform the duties of provincial assessor prescribed in the Assessment Law; and prepare financial statements which may be required by the governor. SEC. 9. The provincial fiscal; powel'8 and duties.-The provincial fiscal shall ba the law officer of the province and the legal adviser of the provincial government and its officers and of the mayors of the municipalities in the province. Unless othenvise provided, he shall discharge the powers and duties provided in paragraph (a), Section 24, Article IV of Executive Order No.4, dated February 5, 1942. SEC. 10. Act'ing officers.-Upon the occasion of the absence, illness, suspension, or other temporary disability of a provincial officer, the Commis' sioner concerned may designate any other provincial officer or employee to perform temporarily t he duties of the position. SEC. 11. Suspension and "emoval of p"ovincial olficers.-Any chief provincial officer may be suspended from office by the Commissioner concerned for disloyalty, dishonesty, oppression, or misconduct. Immediately after the order of" suspension is received by the provincial officer concerned, the said Commissioner shall order the investigation of the cause of suspen~jon. The investigation shall be terminated within twenty days and the complete recol路d of the case, with the comment and recommendation of the Commissioner, shall be submitted to the Ghairman of the Executive ComIT'jssion within fifteen ays after the termination of the investigation. As the circumstances may warrant and upon the recommendation of the Commissioner concerned, the suspended officer may be reinstated or removed by the Chairman of the Executive Commission. SEC. 12. Sala,'Y during sltspension.-When a provincial officer is suspended he shall receive no salary from and after the date of his suspension, unless so provided in the order of suspension; but upon subsequent reinstatement of the suspended person or upon his exoneration, if death should render reinstatement impossible, any salary so ,vithheJd may be paid in whole or in part upon order of the Commissioner concerned approved by the Chairman of the Executive Commission. ARTICLE III_PROVlNCIAL FINANCE SEC. 13. SOUl'ces of provincial income.-The province shall have same sources of income as at present provided in existing laws, except as modified hy executive orders of the Chairman of the Executive Commission. The S'Urcharge on all the public works undertaken under the supervision of the provincial engineer and al'chitect as at present provided by existing law and regulations shall accrue to the province. SEC. 14. Provincial fu"ds.-All revenues and receipts accruing to the provincial government, including the contributions of the municipalities for health and agricultural purposes as l'equired by existing law and the surcharge on all public works mentioned in the preceding section shall constitute

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and be accounted fOr as one fund to be known as the general fund and the same shall be available for the payment of all obligations of the 'pl·ovince. SEC. 15. The p"o1)incial bu dget. -The provincial annual budget shall be prepa red in such forl11 and detail as may be prescribed by the Director of Local Governments, and shall be s ubject to the limitations 01' restrictions imposed by Executive Order No. 13, dated March 12, 1942, and by other orders, proclamations or instructions issued by competent authorities. It shall show in detail the receipts and expenditures of the province in con· formity with the classification of accounts prescribed by t he Auditor General and Director of the Budget, a nd shall contain all the information necessar y for a clear and accurate presentation of the needs of the province and the condition of its finances. On or before the fifteenth day of the ninth month of each fiscal year the provincial treasurer shall submit to the governor certified itemized statements of all receipts and expenditures pertaining to the prececling fiscal year and the first six month s of the cunent fi scal year and a detailed estimate of the revenues and receipts from all sources for the ensuing fiscal year. Upon the basis of such statement of receipts the governor shall, after con · sul tation with t e p"ovincial board, make detailed appropriations covering the estimated expenclitures of the province for the ensuing fiscal year, bu t in no case shall uch appropriations exceed the estimated receipts. The appropriations for salaries and wages sha~ specify the positions, the number of each class, the re:;pective designations, the salary l'8tes authorized for the cunent fiscal year, and those proposed for t he ensuing year. The statement of receipts and expenditures for the pl'eceding fiscal year a nd the first six months of the cunent fiscal year, together with the estimate of r eceipts and appropriations by t he governor for the ensuing fi scal year, shall be known as the provincial budget, a nd a copy thereof shall be sub · mitted, t hrough the Director of Local Governments, to the Commissioner of the Interior who shall approve, disapprove or modify the same or a ny part thereof. The hudget of a province shall not become effective until approved by the Commissioner of the Interior. Changes in the estimate of income and appropriations may be effected from time to time during the year by supplemental budgets, which shall be prepared in the same manner provided above in the case of annual budget. If for any reason, the provincial budget for any fi scal year cannot be made effective before the beginning of the said year, the salaries of all permanent officers a nd employees of the province a nd expenses necessary for the operation of the provincial government may be paid on the basis of the budget for the preceding fiscal year until the new budget is a pproved. In case a reduction of salaries and wages is adopted as an emergency measure, s uch reduction shall be general a nd based on the exi sting l'8tes of salaries and wages and the percentage of reduction shall be uniform for simil ar rates of salaries and wages. The expenses of the office of the provincial engineer and architect, in· eluding the salaries of its personnel shall be provided in the provincial budget .

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SEC. 16. Disbw'sement of prouincUtI fund.-Disbursements of provincial funds shall be made by the provincial treasurer upon properly executed vouchers in accordance with the appropriations made in the budget. Within fifteen days after the close of each month, the provincial treasurer shall furnish the governor a statement of the appropriations, expenditures and balances in the provincial fund for the said month. The total disbursements shall in no case be in excess of the actual collections plus fifty pel' centum of the uncollected estimated revenues. SEC. 17. Overdrafts.-In case of an emergency caused by typhoon, em路thquake 01' any other public calamity which may seriously affect the collection of revenues in the province during any year, the Director of Local Governments with the approval of the Commissioner of the Interior may authorize the provincial treasurer to continue making disbursements from any fund in his possession in excess of the limitation herein provided, under such conditions and limitations as the Chairman of the Executive Commission may, upon the recommendation of said Director of Local Governments approved by the 'Commissioner of the Interior, prescribe for the purpose. SEC, 18, A~otlnting,-The accounts of the province shall be carried in the manner which the Auditor General and Director of the Budget may prescribe. AR'NCLE IV-MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS

SEC, 19, Continuit of laws, etc,-All laws and executive 01'del'S or parts thereof relating to provmcial governments which are not in conflict herewith are hereby continued in force until further orders: P,'ovided, That the~' are not inconsis tent with the present circumstances under the milita]')' adl111nistration.

SEC. 20. R elation of this Orde,- to p,-io1' law.-Such provisions of this Order as incorporate prior laws shall be deemed to be made in continuation the]'Gof and to be in the nature of amendments thereto, wi thout prejudice to any right already accrued, SEC. 21. At<thority of Di,'ecto1' of Local Gove,..,,,ments to isslle regulations. -The Director of Local Governments shall have power to promulgate, when ever he may see fit to do so and with the approval of the Commissioner of the Interior, all rules, regulations, orders or instructions, not contrary to law nor to orders and proclamations issued by competent authol;ties, necessary to regulate the proper working and harmonious and efficient administration of the provincial governments_ He shall exercise general supervision over the activities of the provincial governments and for this purpose, he or his duly authorized representative shall make frequent inspections of the provinces a]]d see to it that existing orders, proclamations and instructions are duly complied with, and make his reports to the Commissioner of the Interior who shall, as the circumstances may warrant and when advisable in the public interest, take such steps as may be necessal'Y towards improving the administration of the province.

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SEC. 22. Beuinninu of o"uanization of pTo1>ince.-A provincial govel'llment shall be deemed to be organized under this Order upon the assumption of office by the governor and the provincial treasurer by virtue of appointments extended to them by the Chairman of the Executive Commission, and beginning said date the provisions hereof shall have full force and effect in that particular province. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 18th day of May, 1942. (SGD.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chair'man of the E xecti'l,Lve Com'mission APPROVED by the Director路General of the Japanese Military Administration on August 4, 1942.

EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 43 DEFINING THE ORGANIZATION, JURISDICTION, POWERS AND DUTIES OF MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENTS AND OFFICTALS. Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organi~ation by Order No.1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commander'in-Cllief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recommentlation of the Executive Commission, the organization, jurisdiction, powers, duties and functions of the municipal governments and officials are hereby determined and defined as follows: ARTICLE I~GENERAL PROVISIONS

SEC. 1. TenitoTial application; municipal bOlLlld"ries.-Th", prOVlSlons of this Order shall apply to all municipalities. Except as otherwise provided herein, the municipalities shall continue to have their present boundaries. Any conflict regarding the same shall be decided by the Commissioner of the Interior whose decision shall be final. SEC. 2. Municip"l diskicts abolished.-The municipal districts a nd their governments are hereby abolished and their territories annexed to the mun icipality to which they are contiguous Or constituted into new municipalities as the Chairman of the Executive Commission, upon recommendation of the Commissioner of the Interior, may approve. SEC. 3. Creamon and consolidation of netv municipaNties.-The Commiss ioner of the Intel'ior may, with the approval of the Chairman of the Ex.cutive Commission, separate 01' subdivide a municipality into such portions as may be required and create new municipality or municipalities out of said pOl路tions, tl'ansfer one portion of a municipality to another, consolidate Or merge two or more municipalities i nto one, name any new nlunicipaJity so created, and change the seat of government of any municipality to any place therein as the public welfal'e may require.

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SEC. 4. Dulies and illllctioli s of mllllicipalilies.-Unless otherwise herein provided, the adminislrative duties and functions of the lllunicipal government shall be continued as heretofore, insofar as they may be consistent with th e demands of the Imperial Japanese Forces and the needs of the Central Admini strati ve Organization. ARTICLE IIAND

MUNI CIPAL Ot' FlCES IN GENERAL

OFFICERS

SEC. 5. C fti ef officials of nntnicipal go ve,."",ent.-The chief officials of the municipal government a re the mayor and the municipal treasurer. SEC. 6. The ",allor; potuers a,n d auties.-The mayor shall be the chief executive and administrative officer of the municipal government and as such it shall be his duty to exercise, in conformity with law, general super路 vision over local administrative affairs in the municipality. He shall be responsible for the faithful execution within the municipality of all the laws, orders and proclamations issued by competent authority. He shall have the power to promulgate municipal ord ina nces, after consultation with the municipal board, and submit a copy thereof to the provincial governOl路. Such ordina nces shall be effective thirty days after the receipt thereof by the provinci al gove nor, unless this official finds the same or any provision t hereof to be in viol1/.tion of existing laws, orders, pl'Oclamations or instruc' tions, or not in confo :rnity ,vith sound government policy, in which case he may disapprove or mo ify said ordinances or any portion thereof. He shall lend h is assistance a nd give support to the provincial treasurer and shall supervise his deputies in the municipality in the collection of taxes; shall cooperate with the health authorities in the enforcement of sanitary laws and regulations in force in the municipality; and shall appoint, upon recommendation of t he chief of the municipal office concerned, all the subor' dinate officers and employees of t he municipality, in accordance with the Civil Service Law a nd R egulations, subject to the approval of the Provincial Governor. Until the Provincia l Inspector of Constabulary is appointed for each province, he shall issue orders relating to police or to public safety, and take necessa ry steps for the purpose of avoiding conflagrations, flood s and t he effects of storms or other public calamities. SEC. 7. Acting ""01/o,路.- 1n the event of sickness, absence, or other temporary incapacity of the mayor, the powers, duties and functions of the office shall be exercised by the municipal treasurer. SEC. 8. The municipal tream"e,'; powers and duties.-The municipal treasurer shall be the financial officer of the municipality and with respect to the collection of revenues shall be err-officio deputy of the provincial treasurer. It shall be his duty to collect and l'eceive all moneys due or accruing to the municipality and, except as otherwise especially provided, all other government revenue collectible thel'ein; have charge of the disburse路 'ment of municipal fund s and other government funds the custody and disbursement of which may be entrusted to him by competent authority; acquire for the municipal government all necessary supplies, materials and,

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equipment for which appropriation has been duly authorized; act as custodian of all municipal property including buildings and grounds; and perform such other duties not inconsistent with law as may be assigned to him by the provincial treasurer. Soc. 9. The municiTJal boa.-d.-There shall be a municipal board in each municipality composed of the chief municipal officials and such number of councilors possessing the necessary qualifications as may be appointed by the Commissioner of the Interior in accordance with the cl ass of the municipality as follows: Fot· first, second and third class municipalities, 4 members; For fourth and fifth class municipalities, 2 members. The board shall serve as a n advisory body to the mayor and shall, upon call of the mayor, hold sessions which shall not be public. The members of the municipal board who are not officers or employees of the Governn1ent receiving a fixed com' pensation or salary from public funds may be allowed per diems in accord_ ance with Executive Order No. 13 dated March 12, 1942, for actual service rendered in addition to actual and necessary traveling expenses for attendance at the sessions of the board. SEC. 10. The bal,,.io lieutenants.-There shall be a banio li eute na nt for each duly organized barrio of the municipa lity, to be appointed by the mayor with the approval 'If the governor. He shall assist the mayor in the pel" formance of his func~ions within the I>arrio and may he assigned such duties as the mayor may deenl fit. H e shall receive no compensation but, in the discretion of the Commissioner of the Interior, ma y be given allowance for transportation expenses. SEC. 11. Suspension and ".,noval of "tl",icipal officers.-The maYOr may b~ suspended from office by the governor for di sloyalty, di shonesty, oppress ion or misconduct. Immediately after the order of suspension is r ece ived by the suspended officer, the governor shall order the investigation of the cause of uspension. The investigation shalt be terminated within twenty days and the complete record of the case, with the comment and recommenda· tion of the governor, shall be submitted to the Director of Local Governments who will make the proper recommendations to the Commissioner of the In · terior for the reinstabement, dismissal, suspension 01' further suspension of the municipal officer concerned, as the facts shall warrant. The municipal treasurer shall he suspended, r emoved or otherwise disci · plined administratively in accordance with the Civil Service Law and Re' gulations. SEC. 12. Salary dw-inu 81!8pension.-When a municipal official is su pended, he shall receive no salary from and after the date of suspension, unless So provided in the ot'der of suspension; but upon subsequent reinstate· ment of the suspended officer or upon his exoneration, if death should render reinstabement impossible, any salary so "ithheld may be paid in whole 01' in part upon order of the Commissioner of the Interior. ARTICLE III-MUNICIPAL FrNA'NCE

SEC. 13.

SOW'CBS

of municipal incll??t6.-The municipality shall have the

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same soul'ces of income as at pl'asent provided in existing laws, except as modified by executive orders of the Chairman of the Executive Commission. SEC. 14. Municipal /unds.-AII moneys accruing to the municipal govermnent shall constitute and be accounted for as one fund to be known as the municipal general fund, and the same shall be available for the payment of all obligations of the municipality. SEC_ 15. The 11Iunicipal budget.-The municipal annual budget shall be prepared in such form and detail as may be prescribed by the Director of Local Governments and shall be subject to the limitations or restrictions imposed by Executive Order No. 13 dated Manh 12. 1942, and by other orders, proclamations or instructions issued by competent authorities. It shall.show in detail the receipts and expenditures of the municipality in conformity with the classification of accounts prescribed by the Auditor Gener:'.! and Director of the Budget, and shaH contain all the information necessary for a clear and accurate presentation of the needs of the municipality and the condition of its finances. On or before the fifteenth day of the ninth month of each fiscal yea I' the municipal treasurer shall submit to t he mayor certified itemized statements of all receipts and expenditures pertaining to the preceding fiscal year and the first six months of the current fiscal year and a detailed estimate of the revenues and receipts from all sources for the ensuing fiscal year. Upon the basis of such statement of receipts the mayor, shall, after consulta路 tion with the munjcip I board, make detailed appropriations covering the estimated expenditures ?f the municipality for the ensuing fiscal year, but in no case shall such appropriations exceed the estimated receipts. The appropriations for sa laries and wages shall specify the positions, the number of each class, the respective designations, the salary rates authorized for the current fiscal year, and those proposed for the ensuing year. The statement of receipts and expenditures for the preceding fiscal year and the first six months of the current fiscal year, together with the estimate of receipts and appropriations by the mayor for the coming fiscal year, shall be known as the municipal budget, which shall be submitted, through the provincial treasurer, to the provincial governor, who shall approve, disapprove, or modify the same or any part thereof. The budget of a municipality shall not become effective until the same is approved by the provincial governor. Changes in the estimates of income and appropriations may he effected from time to time during the year by supplemental budgets, which hall be prepared in the same manner provided above in the caSe of annual budget. If for any reason, the municipal budget for any fiscal year is not approved before the beginning of the said year, the salary of all permanent offic-ers and employees of the municipality and expenses necessary for the operation of the municipal government may be paid on the basis of the budget for the preceding fiscal year until the new budget is approved. In case a reduction of salaries and wages is adopted as an emergency measure, such reduction shall be general and based on the existing rates of salaries and wages and the percentage of reduction shall ba uniform for similar rates of salaries and wages.

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SEC. 16. Disbursement of municipal funds.-DisbUl"sements of municipal funds shall be made by the municipal treasurer upon p roperly executed vou chers in accordance with the app,·opriations made in the budget as approved by the provincial governor. Within fifteen days after the close of each month, the municipal treasurer shall furnish the mayor a s tatement of t he appropriations, expenditures and balances in the municipal fund for the said month. The total disbursements shall in no case be in excess of the actual collections plus twenty-five per centum of the uncollected estimated revenues. SEC. 17. Ove,·dmfts.-In case of a n emergency caused by typhoon, earthquake or any other public calamity which may seriously affect the collection of revenues in the municipality ·during any year , the provincial governor may authorize the municipal treasurer to continue making disbursements from any fund in his possession in excess of t h e limitation herein provided, under such conditions and limitations as the Commissioner of the Interior, upon the recommendation of the Director of Loca l Governments, may prescribe for the purpose. SEC. 18. L imitation "pan amo)",t ea·pendable for sala,·ies ILnd wlLges.Except upon prior approval of the Commissioner of the In terior, the amount of municipal funds that may he expended during a ny f iscal year for salari es a nd wages of municipal officials and employees of every description shall not exceed the follow in!\.: forty per centum in first class municipalities; fifty per centum in secon~ class municipali ties; sixty per centum in third class municipalities; seventy per centum in a U 0 her cla sses of munc.ipalities, of the an nual municipal income during the sai d f iscal year, exclusive of a ll balances carried forwara from preceding years, and a ny and all appropriations, loan, or gifts made from t he other branches of t he Government or from private funds. SEC. 19. Acco""ting.-The accounts of the municipality shall be carried in the manner which the Auditor General and Director of the Budget may prescrihe.

ARTICLE IV-MIS CELLANEOUS PROVISIONS

20. Continuity of IlLws, etc.-All laws, executive orders and ordi nances or parts thereof ,·elating to municipal governments which are not in conflict here,vith are hereby continued in force until f urt her Ol·ders: Provided, That they a re not inconsistent with the present circumsta nces under the mil it.:Jry administration. SEC. 21. RellLtion of this O,.de,- to prio,- IILIO.-Such provisions of t hi s Order a s incorpora te prior l aw s shall he deemed to he made in continuation thereof and to he in the nature of amendments thereto, without prejudice to a ny right already accrued. SEC. 22. Authority of Director of L ocal Governments to ,·egullLte.-The Director of Loca l Governments shall h ave power to promulgate, whenever he may see fit to do sO and with the approval of the Commissioner of t he Interior, all rules, regulations, orders or insh·uctions, not contrary to law nor to orders and proclamations issued by competent a uthorities, necessary to regulate the proper working and harmonious and effici ent administration of SEC.

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the municipal government. He may, with the approval of the Commissioner of the Interior, )'evoke, repeal or modify the decision of the mayor in any matter under his jurisdiction, including any item or provision of the municipal budget, ",hen advisable in the public interest, SEC, 23, B egillning of organization of municipalitY,-A municipal government sh all be deemed to be organized under this Order upon th'e assumption of office hy the mayor and the municipal treasurer hy virtue of the appointment extended to them by the Commissioner of the Interior, and heginning said date th e p rovisions hereof shall have fulJ force and effect in that partic_ ula r municipality. Done III the City of Manila, Philippines, this 18th day of May, 1942. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Cha';"man of the E"'eC'ltmve Commi$sioll APPROVED by the Director Gene ral of the Ja panese Military Admini stration on August 4, 1942. EXECUTIVE ORDER No. 49 E XTENDI NG THE PERIOD FOR PAYMENT OF THE FIXED AND PER CENTAGE TAXES INCLUDING MUNICIPAL LICENSE TAXES U nder the a uthority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Adminis_ trative Organization bi Order No.1 of the Commander-in路Chief of the Im peri al J apanese Forces in the Philippines and pursuant to existing law, the period for the pa ym ent of the percentage taxes for the fourth quarbar of 1941 as well as the fixe d taxes which were payable on or befol'e January 20, 1942, a nd the mu nicipal license taxes which were payable on 01' before January 25, 1942, is, upon the recommendation of the Commissioner of Finance, hereby extended without penalty to June 30, 1942. If such taxes are not paid by June 30, 1942, the p enalties which would have accrued had there been no exte nSion shall thereafter be collected. Payments heretofore made of said taxes with penalties shall not be affected by the extension hel'ein granted. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 6th day of June, 1942. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chairman of the Exeo"titl. Commission EXECUTIVE ORDER No. 57 EXTENDING THE PERIOD OF REGISTRATION OF ALL RELIGIOUS ORGANIZA TIONS OR ORDERS AND OF THEIR MEMBERS AND PROPERTIES Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No. 1 of the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recommendation

[56]


of the Commissioner of the Interior, the period for the regis tration of all religious organizations Or ordel's and of their members and properties, which is to expire on June 30, 1942, as provided in Executive Order No. 47, dated June 1, 1942, is hereby extended to September 30, 1942, for religious organizations, their members, and their properties, in the Visayas and Mindanao, and to August 31, 1942, for those in other localities. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 27th day of June, 1942. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chairman of the E x ecutive Commission APPROVED by the Commander-in路Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines on June 21, 1942.

EXECUTIVE ORDER

Np. 58

DECLARING INEFFECTIVE MAXIMUM WORKING HOUR A TD MINIMUM WAGE LAWS Pursuant to the, authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No. 1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, all existing laws prescribing ma'ximum daily Or weekly working hours in industries and occupations 01' fixing minimum wages for laborers 01' workers . as well as all orders or regulations in connection with the same, are hereby declared ineffective as being inconsistent with the demands and exigencies of the new order. All pending cases in court, civil Or criDrinal, ari sing from or based upon the provisions of such laws, orders Or regulations, shall accordingly be quasbed or dismissed. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 27th day of June, 1942. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chairman of the E x ecutiv e CommisS'ion APPROVED by the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines on June 28, 1942.

EXECUTIVE ORDER

No. 59

AMENDING CERTAIN SECTIONS OF EXECUTIVE ORDER NO.4 SO AS TO TRANSFER THE SUPERVISION OF MATTERS PERTAINING TO MARRIAGE FROM THE BUREAU OF RELIGIOUS AFFAIRS TO THE BUREAU OF THE CENSUS AND STATISTICS ; THE IS-

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SUING OF DE ATH CE RTIFICATES AN D BURIAL PERMITS FROM THE BU REAU OF THE CE NjSUS AND STATISTICS TO THE CITY OF MANI LA; AN D THE EFFECTUATION OF LAWS RELATING T O THE RE GISTRATIO N OF LANDS AND THE SUPERVISION OVER THE RE GISTERS OF DEEDS, FROM THE BUREAU OF LANDS TO THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE; TO ASSIGN TO THE BU RE AU OF SCIENCE THE FU NCTION OF MAKING INVESTI GATION S FOR THE PROMOTION AN D DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNICAL I N DUSTRIES AND RESEARCHES IN PURE AND APPLlED SCIE NCE ; TO THE BUREAU OF COMMERCE AND INDUSTRIES, THE FUNCTIO N OF REGISTERING PARTNERSHIPS AND ASSOCI ATIO NS AND AUTHORIZING AN D LICENSING CERTAIN BROKERS ; AND TO THE NATIONAL LIBRARY, THE F UNCTION OF ESTABLISHI NG AND ADMINISTERING A GALLERY OF ARTS AN D HISTOR Y A~~D OF ASSISTING IN THE PRESERVATION OF PERMANE N T P UBLIC WORKS AND MONU MEN TS OF ARTISTIC OR HISTORICAL VALUE. Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as H ead of tbe Centml Administ rative Ollg'an ization by Order No_ 1 of the Commander-in-Cbief of tbe I mperial Japanese Forces in t be Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the E X'e ut ive Commission, the second paragra ph of Sect ion 11 and Sections 12, 19, 30, 32_ 33 and 43 of E xecutive OrdE\'-' No. 4, dated F ebruary 6, 1942, are hereby amend-ad to r ead as f ollows: " SEC_ ]].

BW'eatl oj R eligiolls Afl ai1's. - x x x

"It shall a ttend to matters of pr oprietary character of churches and re' ligious or ders or organizations and t o such otber matters and act ivities a s do not relate to the freedom of rel igion and cul t and shall exercise supervisi on over ma tters p ertain ing to the r egistration of priest s and mini sters." " SEC. ] 2. B" reall 01 th e Ce nslIs and S tatistics.-The power s and duties of this Off ice shall be to coll ect by enUl.n eration , sampling 01' other methods, and compH. and publish stati stics a nd other information concerning popu ' lation, agricultural conditions, t he area and production of crops, the number of li vest ock, t he production of li vestock pr oducts, exports, imports, commerce, industrial and commercial enterprises, prices, -empl oyment wages, stocks of commodities, agricult ural a nd other properties, social and economic institutions, and such other statistics a s it may be directed t o collect. It shall also supaI'vise matters r elating to marriage, perform the duties of Civil Registrar Gener al, includi ng all t hose her etofol'e perform ed by the local civil registrar for the Cit y of Manil a except those havi ng reference to the issuance of death cer tificat eÂŁ a nd burial p-errilits, and shall undertake the registration of aliens heretofor e attended to by the Bureau of Immigration." "SEC. 19. The Department of Justice shall perform its function s under the executive au thority of the Commissioner of Justice who shall have executive supervision and administrative control over the Bureau of Justice, the Bureau of Prisons, the Court of Appeals, the Courts of First Instance, the

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Provincial and City Fiscals and Sheriffs, the Justice of the Peace and Municipal Courts and the Code Committee, and shal1 take charge of the effectuation of the laws relative to the l'egistration of lands, including super' vision over the registers of deeds, "The Commissioner of Justice shal1 be the Legal Adviser of the Government, and e""offimo Legal Adviser of al1 government·owned and controlled business enterprises, and upon propel' request, sball give advice in the form of written opinions, on any question of law, to the Commander·in·Chief of t!le Imperial Japanese Forces or his r epresentative, the Chairman of the Executive Commission, the respective H eads of the Departments, th'e chiefs of the organized bureaus and offices, the trustee of any government institution, and any provincial fisca1." "SEC, 30, Bureau of Lands.-It shall be charged with the administration and di position of public lands-no classified as timber lands Or mineral lands-and of all other public real property not placed under the control of any other branch, department, bureau or office of the Government; a nd shal1 conduct s",'veys of the public domain and other publ ic property, cadas· tral surveys and official surveys of private property," "SEC. 32. B""eOllI of Smence.-It shall be its function s, a mong others, to make investigations :(01" the promotion and development of technical industries, conduct researches in pure and applied science and do wOl'k of scientific nature and to coordinate and make available the r e ults thereof as permanent contri· butions to knowledge. It shall also be charged with the acquisition, adminis· tration, preservation and maintenance of a museum containing natural history specimens, and all other objects which, by l'ea son of their archaeological, scientific Or industrial value should be permanently preserved, for the benefit of science and culture in general." "SEC. 33. B""eau of Com.nerce and Ind"sfries.-It shall be the duty of this Bureau to promote, stimulate, control and further the development and expansion of the domestic and foreign trade of the Philippines; to encourage the establishment and deV'elopment of the household induskies and cooperative enterprises; to provide for the registration of corporations, partnerships, associations, trade marks and patents; to provide for the registration of, and the granting of permits to sell, securities in accordance with existing laws; to make investigation concerning the nature, organization, and l'esources of the business of all persons; to establish commercial and produce exchanges; to authorize and license real estate, stock, exchange, merchandise and ship brokers; to compile, compare and publish the tariffs of other countries in languages known in this country; and in general, to promote the commerce and industries of the country." "SEC. 43. National Libmry.-The powers, duties and functions of the National Library shall, among others, be the preservation of all books, libraries, and library material or equipment belonging to the institution or confided to its custody; the acquisition, by purchase, loan, or gift, of additional books, libraries or other material contributory to its ends and purposes; the

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supplying of adequate reading facilities to the public in the City of Manila, and so far as practicable, the extension of such facilities into the provinces. It shall also be charged with the acquisition, organization, preservation, ad· ministration, and maintenance of a gallery of art and history containing pic. turee, paintings, sculptures, portraits, maps, charts, photographs, and all other objects which, by reason of their artistic, historical 01' commemorative value, should be permanently preserved as a memento of, and out of vene' r:ltion for, the great men of the country, 01' as a testimony of the national history and culture, 01' for the benefit of culture in general. It shall also cooperate in the work of preserving all permanent public works and monu' ments of al"tistic or historical value, which are owned by the Government or any of its political subdivisions, and make an accurate record thereof." Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 30th day of June, 1942. (SGD.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chairman of the E xecutive Commi.'ls-ioll APROVED by the Commander·in·Chief of the Imperial J apanese For~es in the Philippines on July 1, 1942. EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 60 EXTENDING THE PERIOD FOR REGISTRATIO OF ALIEKS FOR THE YEAR 19<12 Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administl'ative Organization by Order NIo. 1 of the Commander·in·Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and in accordance with his proclamation dated April 1, 1942, t he period within which aliens may apply for registration Or make the annual report for the year 1942, in accordance with the provisions of Executive Order No. 25, dated April 1, 1942, is, upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, hereby extended to Septem' bel' 30, 1942, with regard to aliens residing or stranded outside the City of Man ila. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 13th day of July, 1942. (SGD.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chairman of the E .'I:ecutive CommisI<;on EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 61 AUTHORIZING THE REFUND OR CREDIT FOR FUTURE TAXES OF ANY AMOUNT PAID ON OR BEFORE JUNE 30, 1942, AS PENALTY Under the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Adminis· trative Organization by Order No.1 of the Commander·in·Chief of the 1m' perial Japanese Forces in the Philippines and pursuant to existing law, the

[60]


refund or credit for future taxes of amounts paid on or before June 30, 1942, as penalty incident to the payment of the pel'centage taxes for the fourth quarter of 1941, the fixed taxes which were payable on January 20, 1942, and the municipal license 路taxes which were payable on January 25, 1942, is, upon the recommendation of the Commissioner of Finance, hereby a uthorized. Executive Order No. 49 dated June 6, 1942, is hereby modified accordingly. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 14th day of July, 1942. (SGD.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chai"man of the E xecutive Commission

EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 62 EXTENDING FURTHER IN CERTAIN CASES THE PERIOD FOR FILING APPLICATIONIS FOR RENEWAL OF AUTHORIZATION TO SOLEMNIZE MARRIAGES Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No. 1 of the Commander-in -Chief of the Impedal Japane!\e Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the Commissioner of the Interior, the period for filing applications for renewal of authorizatiQn to sol'emnize marriages for the year 1942 under the Marriage Law, as amended, is hereby furth er extended to September 30, 1942, with regard to bishops, priests 01' ministers now residing or sU'anded in the Visayas and Mindanao. The authorization issued to such bishops, priests and ministers for the year 1941 will be considered valid up to September 30, 1942. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 16th day of July, 1942. (SGD.) JORGE B_ VARGAS Chairman of the E x ecutive Com,nission

EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 63 PRESCRIBING RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNINi<i THE IS SUANCE OF MOTOR VEHICLE DRIVER'S LICENSES Pursuant to the authority confe1'l'ed upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No. 1 of the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon recommendation of the Executive Commission, the following rules and regulations governing the issuance of motor vehicles driver's licenses are hereby promulgated: 1. Holders of licenses for driving motor vehicles issued in the City of Manila may apply for the renewal of said licenses in the Bureau of Transportation on 01' before July 31st of each year. Any license not r enewed on or before July 31st of each year shall become invalid.

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2. New applications for licenses to operate motor vehicles may also be filed with the Bureau of Transportation and shaH contain such information respecting the applicant and his ability to operate motor vehicles, as may be required by the Director of Transportation. Any person who is not under 18 years of age and with n01111al sight and heari ng may be issued a driver's license after passing a test to show his ability to dl~ve motor vehicles, and an examination to show his knowledge of traffic rules and regulations and the mechanical construction and operation of motol' vehicles, given by the Director of Transportation or his deputies. An applicant who presents a motor vehicle driver's license issued in a foreign country may, in the dis路 cretion of the Director of Transportation, also be granted a Philippine driver's license without further requirements. Each applicant for a professional driver's license s haH present three (3) copies of a recent and readily recognizable photograph of said applicant, one路i nch square in size, and a medical certificate of his normal sight and hearing issued by any duly licensed physician, or by the physcian of the Bureau of Transportation who shall issue the same free of charge. 3. The Bu):eau of Transportation may likewise issue student's pel111its, good for six months, to pel'sons not under 18 years of age, who desire to learn to operate motor vehicles. The Director of Transportation may, in hi s discretion, 1"~quil'e S}X lllonths' operation as a student, as a prerequisite to the approval of an application for a chauUeur's license. A student operator who applies for a re~lar license but fails to prove competent in the test路 shall continue as a stud~nt for at least three additional months. No student's permit shall authorize the pel'son to whom the same is issued to operate a motor vehicle in any public highway, unless accompanied by some person carrying a regular license for the current year to operate such motor nhicles. 4. Holders of licenses to operate motor vehicles issued in localities outside the City of Manila may apply for the renewal of said licenses in the office of the proper provincial or city engineer not later than August I , 1942. Until further orders from competent authorities, no new driver's licenses or student's permits, or renewal of the latter, in any locality outside the City of Manila shall be issued. 5.

The following fees shall be collected from drivers Or applicants for

dl"ivel"s licenses:

For professional license (one year) ...................... . P2.00 2.00 For nonprofessional license (one year) ................... . 1.00 For student's permit (six months) . . _................... . For duplicate license or permit .......... , . ............ " 1.00 (e) For change or status from nonprofessional to professional driver and vice versa ................ ......... . . ...... 1.00 6. Any person who operates a motor vehicle without the necessary license for the current year, or with an invalid license, shall be punished by a fine of fifty pesos. (a) (b) (c) (d)

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7. The provisions of the Revised Motor Vehicle Law and other laws and orders relating to motor vehicle driver's licenses which are not in conflict herawith shall continue to be in force, provided that they are not inconsistent with the present circumstances under the Military Administration. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 16th day of July, 1942. (SGD.) JORGE B. V ARGAS Chai,."nam of the E x eczttive Com1nis"ion APPROVED hy the Director General of the Military Administration on July 13, 1942.

EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 64 REGISTRATION AND OPERATION OF MOTOR VEHICLES IN THE PROVINOES Pursuant to the authority confetTed upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No.1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commander' in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese F orces in the Philippines, and upon the recomll\endation of the Executive Commission, the following rules and regulations governing the registr ation and operation of motor vehicles in the provinces :,nd chaftered cities enumerated in Administrativa Ordinance No.9 of the Director General of t he Japanese Military Administration, are hereby promulgated for the information and guidance of all concerned:

1. Effective August 6, 1942, and not later than August 11, 1942, owners of motor vehicles in the provinces and chartered cities mentioned hereunder who are provided with new permits to operate them as required by the rules and regulations of the Military Administration as embodied in Administrative Ordinance No.9, should register the same wth the District Engineer of the province or chartered city, as the case may be, and shall pay the prescribed fees therefor to the Provincial or City Treasurer of the following provinces and chartered cities: Batangas Bulacan Cavite and City of Cavite Laguna and City of San Pablo

Nueva Ecija Pampanga Pangasinan Tarlac Tayabas Mt. Province &

City of Baguio 11ocos Norte Ilocos Sur Nueva Vizcaya Zambales La Union

II. Except as otherwise specifically pl'ovided herein the following annual registration fees of motor vehicles shall be collected: (A) Plivate automobiles Fees (I) Five路passenger capacity or less, per annum, payable by semester .......................... . . . ...... . P120.00

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(I-a) (2) (3)

(B)

(C)

(D)

For five-passenger cars of physicians, per annum, payable by semester .... . .......... . ............. Six to eight-passenger capacity, per annum, payable by semester ....... _. .......... _. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . When th'e passenger capacity exceeds eight, the vehicle wiJJ be classified as bus or truck and charged accordingly.

AutocaleBas amd garage cars (1) One to five-passenger capacity, pel' annum, payable by semester . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (2) Six to eight-passenger capacity, per annum, payable by semester .............. _. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (3) When the passenger capacity exceeds eight, the vehicle wiJJ be classified as bus or truck and charged accordingly. Moto,' trucks with or without trailerB (1) Private trucks (T) ..... _.. .. . ........ ... ..... .. pel' kilogram, pel' annum, based upon the gross weight of the truck or trailer, payable by semester. (2) Trucks for hire (TG) ........................... that of "T", payable quar1lerJy. (3) PasS'en er busses for hire (TPU) .. _.... _. . . . . . . . . that of "T", payable quarterly. (4) Undertaker or funeral cal' (U) ............ _.. . .. that of "T", payable quarterly. (5) Motor vehicles under special classification........ as that of "T" plus P25.00 for less tban 26 passenger and PI00.00 for 26 or more passengers capacity. Motorcycles and 1I,otor 8coote?'S (1) Three passengers 01' less, pel' annum. . . . . . . . . . . . .. (2) Motorcycles or motor scooters for mOre than three passengers wiJJ be considered as automobiles and charged accordingly.

60.00 240.00

120.00 240.00

Fee. P 0.04

Twice Twice Twice Same

P 36.00

III. The following fees shall be charged for identification plates: (A) For each number plate for identification of any vehicle .... P 1.00 (B) For one "Agent" plate for use of automobile dealers.... 10.00 IV. Payment of registration fees must be made: On Or before August 11, 1942, for the third quarter or second semester. On 01' befol'e September 15, 19942, for the fourth quarter. V. The following vehicles shall be exempt from the payment of the fees hereinabove prescribed: (A) All motor vehicles owned Or operated by the Imperial Jap-

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anese Forces and the Philippine Executive Commission, or any of their brancbes, agencies, instrumentalities or subdivisions. (B) All motor vehkles in storage or not in use. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 17th day of July, 1942. (SGD.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chairman of the Executive Commi88io71 APPROVED by the Director General of the Military Administration on July 16, 1942.

EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 66 FIXING THE SCHEDULE OF ANNUAL FEES FOR THE REGISTRATION OF ALIENS Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Ol·ders Nos. 1 and 3 of the Commander·in·Chief of the Imperial J apan-ese Forces in the Philippines, and in accordance with his Proclamation dated April 1, 1942, the following rules govel·ning the schedule of annual fees for the registration of aliens in the Philippines are, upon the recommendatiol' of the Executive Commission, hereby promulgated: SECTION 1. Schedule of annual fees.-Every alien subject to the pro· visions of the Alien Registration Law and required by Executive Order No. 25 dated April 1, 1942, to report before May 31st of every calendar year shall pay to the Bureau of the Census and Statistics, if residing in the City of Manila, or to the office of the respective city or municipal treasurer, if residing in another locality, an annual fee in the form of documentary stamps based upon the gross income received during the preceding calendar year, as follows: P 1.00-in the case of children below 14 years old, and aliens whose gross income does not exceed Pl,OOO.OO; P 1.50-in the case of aliens whose gross income exceed Pl,OOO.OO but does not exceed P2,500.00; P 2.00-in the case of aliens whose gross income exceeds P2,500.00 but does not exceed P4,000.00; P 2.60-in the case of aliens whose gross income exceeds P4,000.00 but does not exceed P5,000.00; P 3.00-in the case of aliens whose gross income exceeds P6,000.00 but does not exceed P6,000.00; P 4.00-in the case of aliens whose gross income exceeds P6,000.00 but does not exceed P7.000.00; P 5.00-in the case of aliens whose gross income exceeds P7,000.00 but does not exceed P8,000.00; P 6.00-in the case of aliens whose gross income exceeds P8,000.00 b'ut does not exceed P9,000.00;

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P 7.00-in the case of aliens whose gross income exceeds P9,OOO .00 but does not exceed PI0,OOO.00 ; P 8.00-in the case of aliens whose gross income exceeds PI0,OOO.00 but does not exceed P11,OOO.OO; P 9.00-in the case of aliens whose gross income exceeds ['11,000.00 but does not exceed P12,OOO.00; PIO.OO-in the case of aliens whose gross income exceeds PI2,OOO .00. SEC. 2. Date of payment of increased fees.-The difference between the annual fees prescribed herein and those fixed in Executive Order No. 25 shall be paid on or befol'e October 31, 1942. Hereafter the annual fees shall be paid within the period prescribed in Executive Order No. 25. SEC. 3. I nconmsient lJrovisions modif'ied.-Such provision s of Executive Order No. 25 as al'e inconsistent with this Order are hereby modified ac· cordingly. SEC. 4. Effecfivity.-This Order shall take effect upon its appl'Oval by th~ Commander·in·Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 24th day of July, 1942. (SGD.) JORGE B . VARGAS Chairman of the Executive Contlni.sion APPROVED by the Directol' General 01' the Military Administrallion on July 24, 1942.

EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 67 IMPOSING ANNUAL FEES FOR THE REGISTRATION OF RADIO RECEIVING SETS Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No. 1 and in connection with Order No. 3 of the Commander·in·Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, the following rules governing the payment of the annual registration fees on l'adio r eceiving sets are hereby promulgated: SECTION 1. Annual fees to he l)aid.-The annual fees for the registration of radio receiving sets imposed by section 297 of the National Internal R'evenue Code are hereby increased by one hundred pel' centum. SEC. 2. When to pay the fees; surcharge for late paymeut.-The dif· ference between the annual fees prescribed in this Order and those imposed by section 297 of the National Internal R evenue Code shall, in the case of radio receiving sets acquired during the period from January 1, 1942, to the date of the approval of this Order, 01' of those the anniversary payment of the fees of which falls within the sai d period, be paid on 01' before August 15, 1942, and , within thirty days from the anniversary date, in the case of ra dio receiving sets the anniversary payment of fees of which fall s

[66]


after the approval of this Order. In all other cases, tha annual fees pre, · cribed in this Order shall be paid within the period prescr ibed in section 298 of the National Internal Revenue Code. Any fee due under this Order which is not paid within tbe period prescribed sball be increased by a surcha,·ge of twanty per centum thereof. SEC. 3. Inconsistent p,·ovisions modifiecl.-Such provisions of Chapter VIII of Titl e VIII of t he National In ternal Revenue Code as ara inconsistent with this Order are hereby modified accordi ngly. SEC. 4. Effectivity.-This Order shall take .. ffect upon its a pproval by t he Commander·i n·Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines. Done in t he City of Manila, Philippinas, t his 24th day of July, 1942. (SGD.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chairman of the E xecutive Co·" ,mission APPROVED by the Commander-in· Chief of the Imperial J a panese Forces in the Philippines on July 24, 1942.

EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 68 IMPOSING SPECI~ o, TAXES ON DISTILLED SPIRITS, WINES, FERMENTED LIQUORS AND DENATURED ALCO HOL Pursua nt to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Orga nization by Order No. 1 and in connection with Ordar No. 3 of t he Commander·in·Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recomm-endaton of the Executive Commission, the following r ul es and regulations governing t he imposition of specific taxes on distilled spi rits, wines, fermented liquors and denatured alcohol are hereby promulgated: SECTION 1. Specific (a ", on distilled spirits.-On distilled spirits there shall be collected, 'axcept as hereinafter provided, specific taxes as follows: (a) If producad from sap of the nipa, coconut, cassava, camote, or buri palm, or from the juice, sirup, or sugar of t he cane, per proof liter, fifty ·fi ve centavos. (b) If produced from any oth·ar material, per proof liter, one peso and eighty·five centavos. This tax shall be proportionally increased for any strength of the spirits taxed over proof spirits. uDisti1l ed spit,its", as here used, includas all substances known as ethyl a lcohol, hydt"ated oxide of ethyl, or spirits of wine, which are commonly produced by the fermentation and subsequent distillation of gmin, starch, molassas, or sugar, Or of some sirup or sap, including all dilutions 01' mixtul'es; a nd the tax shall attach to this substance as soon as it is in existence as

[67]


such, whether it be subsequently separated as pUl'e Or impure spirits, or be immediately or at any subsequent time transformed into any other substances either in process of original production or by any subsequent process_ "Proof spirits" is liquor containing one-half its volume of a lcohol of a specific gravity of seven thousand nine hundred and thirty-nine ten-thousandths at fifteen degrees centigrade. A proof liter means a liter of proof spirits. SEC. 2. Specific tax on ",ines.-On wines and imitation wines there shall be collected, pel' liter of volume capacity regardless of proof, the following taxes: (a) Sparkling wines, two pesos and thirty centavos_ (b) Still wines containing fourteen pel' centum of alcohol or less, thirty centavos. (c) Still wines containing more than fourteen per centum of alcohol, sixty centavos. Imitation wines containing more than twenty-five per centum of alcohol, or fifty proof, shaH be taxed as distilled spirits_ SEC_ 3. Specific tao; on fennented liquQ1-s.-0n beer, lager beer, ale, porter, and oth er fermented liquors (except tuba, basi, tapuy and similar domestic f ermented liquors), there sball be collected, on each liter of volume capacity, twenty centa os_ SEC_ 4. Specific tao; on denatU?'ed alcohol.-路On denatured alcohol to be used for motive power, there shall be collected, pel' liter of volume capacity a tax of two and one-half centavos; P"ovided, That if alcohol is denatured with a substance subject to specific tax, the amount of the tax paid on the denaturant shall be credited to the specific tax due on the denatured alcohol. For purposes of this s'ection, the removal of dena tured alcohol of not less than one hundred eighty degrees proof (ninety per centum absolute alcohol) shall be deemed to have been removed for motive power, unless shown to the contrary. SEC. 5. inconsistent provisions modified.-Such provisions of the National Internal Revenue Code as are inconsistent with this Order are hereby modified accordingly. SEC_ 6.

Effectivity.-This Order shall take effect on August 1st, 1942.

Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 28th day of July, 1942. (SGD.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chai"man of the Eo;ec1ttive CQ1Dn,ission APPROVED by the Director General of the Military Administration on JUly 28, 1942

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EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 69 PROVIDING FOR THE PAYMENT OF THE UNPAID REAL PROPERTY TAXES FOR 1941, AND PREVIOUS YEARS IN THREE INSTALLMENTS AND THE CONDITIONAL REMISSION OF THE PENAL· TIES THEREOF. PUl'suant to the authority conferred upon me as H ead of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No. 1 of the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and' upon the recommendation of the ExecutiV'e Commission, it is hereby ordered that-1. In the discretion of the taxpayer, the unpaid r eal property taxes for the year 1941 and previous years may be paid in thl'ee installments, as follows: The first installment consisting of one-third of the total unpaid taxes must be paid on Or before the thirty-first day of August, 1942, the second installment consisting of one·third of the total unpaid taxes on or before the thirtY'first day of October, 1942, a nd the third installment consisting of the l'emaining one-third of the total unpaid taxes on or before thc thirty-fh'st day of Decamber of t he same year. 2. The penalties which have accrued on such ,unpaid taxes are hereby rcmitted subject to the condition that if the taxpayer concerned fails to pay the first and second installments on or before the thit·ty-first day of October, 1942, or the third installment on or before the thirty-first day of December of the same year 1942, the remission shall be considered revoked with respect to such taxpayer and the penalties which would have accrued had there been no remission shall be collected. Amounts paid on or before the date of the pl'omulgation of this Executive Order as penalty incident to the pay· ment of such taxes shall be refunded or credited for future taxes. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 29th day of July, 1942. (SGD.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chairman of the E",eClttive C<mtmission APPROVED by the Director·General of the Military Administration on July 31, 1942.

EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 70 PROVIDING FOR THE MANNER OF PAYMENT OF THE PENALTY IN CASE OF DELINQUENCY IN THE PAYMENT OF THE REAL PROPERTY TAX FOR 1942 IN THE CITY OF MANILA. Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No. 1 of the Commander-in·Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, a nd upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission. it is hereby ordel'cd that the penalty for delinquency in the payment of the real pl'Operty tax for the y..ar 1942

[69]


in the City of Manila, which has been authorized to be paid in three installments under Executive Order No. 54, dated June 20, 1942, shan be as follows: In case any installment is not paid on or before the dates specified in Executive Order No. 54, the said installment shall be delinquent and the taxpayer shall be subject to penalty of ten cent of the amount of installment du'e if payment is made dul'ing the first or second month of the delinquency, and thereafter, to an additional penalty of two per cent for each month, or a fraction thereof, of delinquency, but in no case shall the total penalty exceed twenty-four per cent of the installment due. The taxpayer may make paltial payment on any installment at any time before the expiration of the term fixed for the payment thereof without penalty, a nd such amount paid shall not lYe subject to penalty even if the taxpayer becomes delinquent for failure to pay the entire amount of the installment due within the prescribed period. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 30th day of July, 1942. (SGD.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chairman of Ihe E xecuti1Je Cm",,,;â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘ io>! APPROVED by the Director General, of the Military Adminis -ation on July 31, 1942, EXECUTIVE ORDER NO, 71 IMPOSING RESIDENCE TAXES ON INDIVIDUALS AND CORPORATIONS Pursuant to the authol-ity conrerred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No, 1 and in connection with Order Nb_ 3 of the Commander-in-Chiaf of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, the following rules and r egulations governing the imposition of residence taxes on individuals and corporations are hereby promulgated: SECTION 1. Persotls liable to residence lax.-Every inhabitant of the Philippines over eighteen years of age who has been regularly employed on a wage or salary basis for at least one calendar month during any calendar year at the rate of not less than fifteen pesos a month, or who is engaged in business or occupation, or who owns real property with an aggl-agate assessed value of one thousand pesos or more, or whose gross income during the preceding calendar year amounted to five hundred pesos or more shall pay an annual residence tax of one peso, and an annual additional tax which in no case s hall exceed one thousand pesos, in accordance with the following schedule: (a) For every two thousand five hundred pesos worth of real property in th'e Philippines owned by such person during the preceding year, the valuation to be based upon the assessment rolls of the municipality where the property is situated, one peso; and

[70]


(b) For every five hundred pesos of gross income derived by such person from his business, profession or occupation in the Philippines dul'ing the preceding year, one peso. For the purposes of the additional residence tax, dividends received by any individual from any corporation subject to tax under section two hereof shall form part of his gross income, but income derived from real property subject to tax under subsection (a) shall not be con si dered as palt of hi s gross income. In the case of husband and wife, the additional tax herein imposed shall be based upon the total property owned by them, or upon the total gross income derived by them. Filipino citizens and aliens who, due to absence from the Philippines or some other cause, are not subject to the basic residence tax, shall n<!vertheless pay the additional residence tax if they own real propetty or receive income in the Philippines. SEC. 2. Entities lin,ble to "esidence tax.-Every corporation, no matter how created or organized, whether domestic or t'esident foreign, engaged in or doing business in the Philippines shall pay an annual residence tax of ten pesos and an annpal additional tax which, in no case, shall exceed two thou ' sand pesos, in accordance with the following schedule: (a) For every two thousand five hundred pesos worth of real property in the Philippines owned by it during the preceding year, the val uation to be based upon the a'Ssessment rolls of the municipality where the t'eQl prop' erty is situated, one pe 0; and (b) For every five hundred pesos of gt'oss income derived by it from its business in the Philippines during the preceding year, one peso. For the purposes of the additional residence tax, dividends received by a corporation from another corporation liable to tax under this section shall form part of the gross income of the recipient to the extent of fity per cent of such dividends, but income derived from its real property subject to tax under subsection (a) shall not be considered as part of the gross income of said corporation. SEC. 3. Delinition.-When used in this Order(a) Unless otherwise provided, the term "gross income" has the same meaning as that term is defined in the Income Tax Law. The tenn does not include those items of income which are exempt from income tax. (b) The tet'm "corporation" includes partnerships, joint-stock compa' nies, joint accounts (cuentas en participacion) , associations Or insurance companies, no Ina tter how created ot' organized. (c) The teml "resident foreign" when applied to a corporation means a foreign corporation engaged in trad e Or business ,vithin the Philippines or having an office or place of business therein. (d) The term "inhabitant" includes estates held in trust of a deceased person or estates of such person during the period of administration, but such estates shall be subject only to the additional residence tax provided for herein

[71]


SEC. 4. E",emptions.-The following shall not be taxed under this Order: (a) The Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces and members of his staff; (b) Commissioned officers of the Imperial Japanese Army and Navy; (c) Enlisted soldiers, sailors and marines of the Imperial Japanese Army and Navy; (d) Officers and employees in the service of the Army and Navy who have come to the Philippines under orders of the Imperial Japanese Government; (e) Transient visitors when their stay in the Philippines does not exceed three months; (f) Imbeciles and insane persons; and (g) Those serving sentence of more than one year in a public prison. Provided, however. That persons mentioned in paragraphs (e), (f), and (g) shall pay the additional residence tax if they own real property or receive income subject to such tax. SEC. 5. Residence csrtificILtes.-It shall be the duty of the Director of Customs and Internal Revenue to prescribe the form of residence certificates to be issued as receipts for payments of the residence taxes established in this Order. Other fo~ms of residence certificates issued as receipts for payments of residence tal< and whkh are not in accordance with the prescribed form shall not be valid and shall not be recognized as proof of payment of the taxes establi shed in this Order. P ersons a nd entities not liable for the payment of the residence tax may secure optional residence certificates upon their payment of fifty centavos and one peso, respectively. The optional residence certificate may be used by such persons and entities for purposes of identification. SEC. 6. P eriod of payment.-The difference between the basic and additional residence taxes imposed in this Order and those prescribed in the Residence Tax Law shall be paid on or before October 31, 1942. If the difference is not paid within the said period there shall be added to the unpaid amount a surcharge of five per centum every month or fractional part thereof but in no case shall the surcharge exceed twenty-five pel' centum: Provided, however, That in case the taxpayer is not in a position to pay the taxes imposed in the Residence Tax Law and in this Order by reason of internment or confinement in prison, hospital or other institutions, or due to causes beyond his control, he shall have a period of twenty days within which to pay the taxes, without being delinquent, such period to be counted from the date of his release from such internment or confinement or when such causes have ceased to exist. Subsequent payments of the taxes prescribed in this Order shall be paid within the period prescribed in the Residence Tax Law. In addition to the penalty, the delinquent shall be deprived of the privileges granted him by the Residence Tax Law until he shall have paid the deficiency basic and additional residence taxes prescribed in this Order.

[72]


SEC. 7. Porti01l8 01 the Re8'idence Tao: LOtW retained.-Such provlslons of the Residence Tax Law as are not inconsistent with this Order shall remain in full force and effect. SEC. 8. Elfectivity.-This Order shall take effect upon its approval by the Commander-in-Chie'f of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines and shall apply to all inhabitants residing in the Philippines on or after January 1, 1942, and to all corporations engaged in, Or doing business therein on or after the said date. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 31st day of July, 1942. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chairman 01 the Eo:ecutive Commis8'ion APPROVED by the Director-General of the Japanese Military Admini stration on August 1, 1942.

EXECUTrvE ORDER No. 72 PROVIDING FOR THE CREATION OF THE "PUBLIC EMPLOYEES LIFE INSURANCE" ANlD THE LIQUIDATION OF THE GOVERN_ MENT SERVICE INSURANCE SYSTEM. Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Ad 路 ministrative Organization by Order No.1 and in connection with Order No.3 of the Commander路in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, the following rules and regulations governing the creation and operation of a new gov 路 ernment insurance institution and the liquidation of the Government Ser vice Insurance System are hereby prescribed: 1. There is hereby established as of May 1, 1942, a new government insurance institution to be known as the "Public Employees Life Insurance," or briefly the "Public Employees," which shall be under the executive supervision and administrative control of the Commissioner of Finance. 2. Except as otherwise provided in paragraph 4 hereof, membership shall be obligatory upon permanent employees of the following: (a) Central Administrative Organs and Judicial Courts (b) City of Manila (c) Corporations and institutions which may be required by the Commissioner of Finance. (d) Provinces, cities, municipalities and other government agencies or instrumentalities which may later join the "Public Employees" in accordance with such rules and regulations as ma,y be duly prescribed .

[73]


3. The monthly premium payable by the employee and the government shall be as follows:

Monthly Sala7"y

Percentage of Monthly Salary ___

_

!!y the Erltploye:: By the Government

I

Under P50.00 .......... ............. P50 - P99.99 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 P100 or more . . .. . . .. . . .. ...•... . .. .

------

3% 4%

3'10

5 ~/O

1%

2 tyc

Extra premiums due to the occupational hazard of t he insured shall be paid by the Government. Premiums payable by t he Government sh all b e included in its budget. 4. Insurance shall take effect as of May I, 1942, if t he insured was in the government service on that date and his policy in the Government Service Insurance Sys tem was in force on December 30, 1941, in which case no medical examination shall be required. In other cases, insurance shall take effect on the first day of the calendar month immediately following that during which the prospective member passed the medical examination: Provided, That the effectiv date of his insurance shall not be earlier than May I, 1942, nor shall it be eaI'~er than six mon ths following his permanent appointment in the service of th Government. In all cases the insurance shall take effect only on the first day of a calendar month. 5. Upon dismiss for caruse of the insured, the benefits under h is membership policy shall be forfeited, except that portion of the cash value corresponding to t he pI'emium rate payable by him on said policy, less his ind·ebtedness thereon. 6. The "Public Employees" shall defray its expenses from its income, but any deficit incurred due to an epidemic or to "force majeure," shall upon certification of the Commissioner of Finance be paid by the Central Administrath,e Organs and Judicial Courts. 7. The budget of the "Public Employees" shall be a special budget, independent from the general budget of the Central Administrative Organs and Judicial Courts. 8. Subj ect to the approval of the Commissoner of Finance, the Director of the "Public Employees" shall have the power to adopt rules and regulations for the administration of the "Public Employees" and the transaction of its business; to requit·e physicians employed by the Government Or by any of its agencies or instrumentalities to render such assistance as may be needed in connection with the medical examinations of employees and t he settlement of any claim covered by the terms of any policy issued by t he "Public Em· ployees"; to prescribe the form s of life insurance and annuity and fix the premium rates, conditions, and provisions thereof; and to a u thorize the is· suance theI·eof when so determined. 9. The provisions of Commonwealth Act No. 186 are h ereby declared inolYerative as of December 31, 1941, and the "Public Employees" is h ereby

[74]


authorized and directed to liquidate the Government Service Insurance Sys' tern as of that date. The Director of the "Public Employees", subject to the approval of the Commissioner of Finance, is hereby authorized to make rules and regulations for the purpose of liquidating the Government Service Insurance System. 10. The policies issued by the Government Service Insurance System are hereby terminated as of December 31, 1941, and the net cash surrender value of each \vill be paid without interest whenever the assets of the System in the Agricultural and Industrial Bank and its other assets will permit. And deficit resul ting from the liquidation of the System shall be equitably apportioned among the said policies by the Actuary of the "Public Emplo路 yee "; but any surplus resulting therefrom sha ll be used by the "Public Em_ ployees" for the welfare of its member. 11. NO claims 01' obligations dter December 30, 1941, except expenses due to its liquidation, will be recognized 01' paid by the Government S'ervice Insurance System; however, if incurred before December 31, 1941, they will be recognized, but paid only as provided in paragraph 10 hereof. lZ. All the properties and assets and all facilities, equipment, leases, choses in action, contracts, and other obligations and instruments as well as nil records and other papers belonging 01' appurtenant to the Government Service Insurance System and all pel' onnel certified by the Director as needed by the "Public Employees" are hel'eby transferred for liquidation and other purposes to th' "Public Emplo)'ees", which shall hereafter exercise full control and authority over the same. 13. Except as herein othenvise provided, the "Public Employees" shall not be subj'ect to the provisions of any existing law nor to those of any rule 01' regulation which may hereafter be prescribed unl ess it is otherwise ex' pressly provided in such law, rule or regulation. 14. The following terms as used in this Order shall be taken in thc sense indicated below: (a) "Employe," includes all persons in the service of the Government. (b) "Government" embl'aces a bureau 01' office of the Central Admin 路 istrative Organization, the Supreme Court, the City of Manila, and a COl" poration, institution, munjcipality, city, province, agzncy 01' instrumentality which joins 01' is joined with the "Public Employees" under the provisions of this Order. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 31st day of July, 1942. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chairmam 0/ the E ~t"ecut.ive Com:mission APPROVED by the Director General of the Japanese Military Administration on August 1, 1942.

[75]


EXECUTIVE ORDER

No,

73

REQUIRING THE REGISTRATION OF RADIO RECEIVING SETS AND REGULATING THE USE THEREOF Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the CentJ:al Administrative Organization by Orders Nos, 1 and 3 of the Commander,in. Chief of the Impel'ial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and in connection with Military Ordinance No, 17, dated July 24, 1942, and upon the recom' mendation of the Executive Commission, it is hereby ordered that: 1. In addition to the l'egistration required under the National Internal Revenue Code and Executive Order No, 67, dated July 24, 1942, all owners, manufacturers, dealers, posseSSOl'S, repail'ers, and lessees of radio receiving sets having possession thereof shall register the same with the Metropolitan Constabulary in the case of sets in the City of Manila and with the cone, sponding city Or municipal mayor in the case of sets in localities outside the City of Manila, 2, Those persons who have l'egistered their sets befol'e the promulga' tion of this Order shall register them again in accordance with the provL sions h~reof, The sets to be l'egistered shall not only be those in actual use but also those in storage or out of service, and those that are in stock by any manufacturer, dealer or repairer, The registration shall be made in accordance with the attached Form No, 1 which shall be accomplished in duplicate, The Moctropolitan Constabulal'y Commander and the corre' sponding city and mun cipal mayors shaH cause the verification, if necessary, of the data furnished by the registrant in said form, especiaHy with respect to th~ number of tubes and frequency bands of the sets, 3, The registraton herein required must be made not later than August 15, 1942, in the case of radio receiving sets in the City of Manila, and not laber than August 31, 1942, in the case of sets in localities outside the City of Manila, 4, The owner or possessor of any radio receiving set must report to the Metropolitan Constabulary or the corresponding city or municipal mayor, as the case may be, any change in the ownership, possession, or location of such set within five (5) days after such change takes place, and the new owner or possessor of sai d set must locgister the same within five (5) days after acquiring ownershi p or possession thereof, 5, The provincial governors shaH supervise the registration of radio receiving sets in their l'espective provinces, The governors, the Metropoli' tan Constabulary Commander, and corresponding city mayors shall make a repOl't of the registration in their provinces or cities in accordance with the attached Tables "A" and "B" (Form No, 2) to the Commissioner of the Intel;or in time for the latter to receive the reports not later than Septem' }yer 10, 1942, and shall submit ,vith such report the original of Form No, 1 duly accomplished, as provided in paragraph 2 hel'eof, The Commissioner of the Interior shaH consolidate such reports and submit the consolidated report to the Chairman of the Executive Commission not later than Sept' ember 20, 1942,

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6. As prescribed in Military Ordinance No. 17, dated July 24, 1942, issued by the Commander-in·Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces, no person shall use any radio receiving set to listen in to overseas broadcasts other than those by government stations in the Empire of Japan and hy station KZRH of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, nor shall any person use antennas (excluding earth wires) in such radio l'eceiving set except short antennas of not more than two meters in length inside the house. 7. Any violation of the provisions of this Order shall be punished by imprisonment of not more than six months or a fine of not more than six hundred pesos, or by both, in the discretion of the COU1·t. When the offender is a firm or corporation, the manager or president th..reof or person charged ,vith the management of such firm or corporation shall be liable to the pen · alty herein prescrih<!d. The penalty herein provided shall be without pre' judice to any penalty which may be imposed hy the Military authorities for violation of military laws. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 5th day of Aug;tlst, 1942. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chairman of the E x ecutive CO?lt7nission APPROVED by the Director Genel'al of the Japanese Military Administration on August 5, 1942.

FORM NO.1 REGISTRATliON OF RADIO RECEIVING SETS Under Executive Order No. 73 PROVINCE OR CITY OF . . . . . ... ... ... . .. . . MUNICIPALITY OF ..... . .. . . . ..... . .. . Date ............ .. . ..... . . . 1.

NAME AND ADDRESS OF REGISTRANT . .. . . . . . •. .. ...•... ..

2.

STATE WHETHER REGISTRANT IS OWNER, MANUFACTURER, DEALER, POSSESSOR, REPAIRER OR LESS.EE ........... . .... .... . . ............ . . (See Instructions below) N'ATIONALITY OF REGISTRANT ..... . .... . ....... .. . . .... •. . LOCATION OF THE SET ......... . .. . . .. ....... .... . .. .. .... . . DATE OF REGISTRATION UNDER THE NATIONAL INTERNAL REVENUE LAW ... . . . . . . . . . .. .. ... . LICENSE NUMBER

3. 4. 5. 6.

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7. 8.

SERIAL NUMBER ..................... . ..................... . NAME OF MANUFACTURER .... . ... . .. . .................... . 9. MAKE OR BRAND AND TYPE OF THE SET .................. . 10. NUMBER OF TUBES USED ........... . ........•.............. 11. TYPE OF ANTENNIA USED, IF ANY ........................ . 12. FREQUENCY BANDS COVERED ............................. . (Whether of short wave, medium wave, long wave or a combination of t wo or all waves.) 13. NAMES OF BROADCASTING STATIONS TO WHICH LISTENING WAS DONE BEFORE AUGUST 1, 1942 .............. . ................. . .......... .. 14. CONDITION OF THE SET .... . . . ............................. . (Wh'ether the set is in working condition, or out of service) 15. OTHER INFORMATIVE MATTERS ....... . .. . ........ .. ... . .. . Signature of R-egistrant INSTRUCTIONS Every radio r eceiving set should be r egistered separately. Sets under rlU>air shall be registered by the owners themselves and not by t he r epairer s. 3. In case the l'egl,Stran t is engaged in two or more enterprises, such as t ha t of manufa cturer, dealer or r epairer, he Or she shall l'1!gister the set or sets according to his or he~· principal business. 4. In case the r egistrant, who is engaged in a radio enterprise as manu' factureI', dealer or r epa irer, owns Or possesses a set or sets for his private fusa Or not connected with his or her business, he or she shall register such set or sets as owner or possessor and not as enterpriser. 1. 2.

FORM

No. 2

SURVEY ON THE REGISTRATION' OF RADIO RECEIVING SETS Under Executive Order No. 73 PROVINCE OR CITY OF .......... .. Dabe

g

TARLE " A"

-------.-------------umbe1' h'.tl~'ction8

1.

Registrants in general not falling under II. (1) Number of registrants. (2) Number of receiving sets ...... . .. . . ..... .

[78]

Radio receiving sets un' del' repair by repairers shall be entered under this column.


NUfI,ber

II.

Radio enterprisers

1

(1)

Number of registrants

(2)

Number of receivin g sets ................ .

Manufacturers

(a.)

(1)

Number of regis trants ........... .

(2)

Number of receivin g sets ......... . ... .

Radio dealers

(b)

(1)

Number of regis tranl;,; ........... .

(2)

Number of receivin g sets . ...... . ... .. .

III.

(1)

Number of l·egis trants .... . . . . . .. .

(2)

Number of receivin g sets .... . ........ .

Those radio receiving sets owned or posses· sed by the enterprisers as their own, shall be entered on a column under radio registrants in general.

3.

Those radio .·ece.'v· ing sets which are un· der repair by the reo pairers but belonging to others shall not be entered in this column. Only those l·eceiving sets belonging to them shall be entered.

\

\

Repairers

(c)

2.

'.

~

. J.

Instl"ltctions In case it is difficult to distinguish the enterpriser because he or she is engaged in two or more occupations, such enterpriser shall be entered in the col · umn according to his or her principal business,

Total (1)

Number of registrants

(2)

Number of receivin g sets ......... . . . .... .

Gove-rnor 0,· City Ma.yo,· or M etropolitlJln Constabulary Co,mna.nder Note:

In case a person owns two or more receiving sets, the number of registrants shall be entered as one and the number of receiving sets shall be entered as two or more.

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FORM

No.2

SURVEY ON THE REGISTRATION OF RADIO RECEIVING SETS Under Executive Order No. 73 PROVINlCE OR CITY OF .................•.. Date ........ ... •. .......... ,.

TABLE ·" B" Number

1.

Nationality . . ........ .. ... . ........... ...........................

II. Number of tubes 4 tubes Or below ..... 5 tubes ............ .. (e) 6 tubes ............. '. ~ (d) 7 tubes .. ... . .. . ..... .~ " (e) 8 tubes . . ............ (I) 9 tubes .............. \ \ (g) 10 tubes . . . ........... ~ (h) 11 tubes .. . ........ ... \ ( i) Over 11 tubes ......... III. Frequency bands covered (a) Short wave . . . . . . . . . . I (b) Medium wave ... . .... (e) Long wave ........... (d) All waves ... . .. . ... . (e) Combination of long and medium waves ... (f) Combination of long and short wa ves . . .... (g) Combination of medium and short waves ...... IV. Other principal matters to be noted (a) Name s of rnanufac. (a) (b)

'. •, ,

,~ ~ ,I ,

(b)

(e)

(d)

~~~:s, t':;d~ .. ;';;,:kS-.!

I

.-

.. and types ... . . . ...... Names of the broadcasting stations to which li stening was done before August 1, 1942 . .. Other informative matters ....... . . . .... . ..

G01Jernen- Or Citl/ Mal/en- enMetropolitan Con8tabulary Commander

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EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 74 SUPERVISION OF PROVINCIAL GOVERNOR OVER OFFICES OF THE CENTRAL ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION IN THE PROVINCE Pursua nt to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No. 1 and in connection with Order No. 3 of the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese FOl'ces in the Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, it is hereby provided that-1. The Provincial Governor shall, subject to the control and supervision of the Department Head concerned, have administl'ative supervision over all the offices and officers of the Central Administrative Organization in the province. However, all orders or regulations governing the performance by any officer of the Central Adminisbrati"", Organization in the province of functions related to local government administration shall be issued by the Department Head after consultation with the Commissioner of the Interior, who shall accordingly give all such orders 01' regulations of the Department Head to the Pro 'ncial Governor: Provided, That a ny misconduct in office or dereliction of auty committed by the Governor in connection therewith shall be reported b:( the Department Head concerned to the Commissioner of the Interior who shall immediately order the investigation according to law. 2. The Provincia! Govemor shall appoint, with the approval of the Department Head cone rned, all the subordinate officers and employees in eacb provincial office and offices of the Centt'al Administrative Organization in the province, whose salaries are payable from provincial funds, upon recommendation of thoe chief provincial official or the chief of the office in the provi nce of the other Departments of the Central Administrative Ol'ganization concerned, in accordance with the Civil Service Law and Regulations. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 5th da y of August, 1942. (SGD.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chai1'Tnan of the Executive Commission APPROVED by the Director General of the Japanese Military Administration on Arugust 4, 1942.

EX$CUTIVE ORDER NO. 75 DEFINING THE ORGANIZATION, JURISDICTION, POWERS DUTIES OF CITY GOVERNMENTS AND OFFICIALS.

AND

Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No. 1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commander路 in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, the organization,

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jurisdiction, powers, duties and functions of city governments and officials, except those of the City of Manila, are hereby determined and defined as follows: ARTICLE I-\GENERAL PROVISION

SEC. 1. Territorial application; situs and territory of ciMes.-The pro,asions of this Order shall apply to the cities of Bacolod, Baguio, Cavite, Cebu, Davao, TIoilo and San Pahlo, and such other cities as may hereafter be created by law or order of the Chairman of the Executive Commission. Except as otherwise provided in other executive orders, any existing char· tered city not mentioned herein shall be considered abolished and the territo· ries within its jurisdiction shall revert to their former status as municipality or municipalities and shall be annexed to the province of which such terri to· I~es originally formed part; but in the case of the city of Tagaytay, all the territory within its jurisdiction shall be constituted into a municipality and shall belong to the province of Cavite. Until otherwise provided by law or Ol'der of the Chairman of the Exe· cutive Commission, the general location a nd territory of the cities shall be as at present establish ed and pl'<lscribed by law. SEC. 2. Dut'es and functions of the citY.-Unless otherwise herein provided, the admi~istrati ve duties and functions of the city government shall be continued as heretofore insofar as they may be consistent with the demands of t he Imperial Japanese FOl'ce~ and the needs of the Centt'al Administrative Organization. ARTICLE II-CITY OFFICES ANI) OFFICIALS IN GENERAL

SEC. 3.-Chief officials of the city; appointment.-The chief officials of the city are the mayor, the treasurer-assessor, th'e fiscal, the health officer, the engineer and the fire brigade officer. They shall be appointed or de· signated by the Chairman of the E xecutive Commission, upon the I'ecom' mendation of the Commissioner concerned, The appointment of the mayor shall, in accordance with the provisions of Section 53 of Executive Order No.4, be subject to the approval of the Commander·in·Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces, SEC. 4, The mayor.. powers and duties.- The mayor shall be the chief executive and administrative officer of the city and shall be responsible for the administration of the government of the city, He shall have general control and supervision over the various offices of the city, subject to the authority and supet'vision of the Department Head concerned, and shall be respo nsibl e for the enforcement and faithful e"."ecution within the city of all laws, orders, proclamations and ordinances promulgated by competent authority, His decisions on administrative matters within his jurisdiction shall be final, unl ess revoked or modified by the Commissioner concerned, He shall have the power to promulgabe city ordinances after consultation with the city board, and submit a copy thereof, thr<rugh the Director of Local Governments, to the Commissioner of the Interior. Such Ol'dinances shall be effective thirty days after the receipt thereof by the Director of Local

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Government, unless the Commissioner of the Interior finds the same or any provision thereof to be in violation of existing laws, ordel's, proclamations or instructions or not in confromity with sound governmental policy, in which case he may disapprove or modify said ordinances or any portion thereof. Unless othenvise provided by competent authol'ity, he shall have the power to grant and refuse municipal licenses or permits of, all classes in conformity with the law and ordinances and to revoke the same for violation of the conditions upon which they were granted or for any good reason of general interest. It shall be his duty to take such emergency meaSUl'es as may be necessary to avoid fires, floods and the 'effects of storms and other public calamiti-as. Except as otherwise specifically provided by law or executive order, all subordinate officers and employees in each office of the city shall be appointed by him, upon recommendation of the chief of t he office concerned, in accordance with tbe Civil Service Law and Riegulations. SEC. 5. The acting mayor; powers a.n d duties.-Upon t he occasion of the sickness, absence, suspension or oth-ar temporary disability of the mayor, the powers, duties and functions thereof shall be exercised by the city trea· surer'assessor, a d in the absence Or incapacity of th'G latter, by the city fiscal. SEC. 6. The city boa,·d.-There shall be a city board to be composed of o.ll the cbief city officials and four other members possessing the necessary qualifications to be aPl!0inted by the Chairman of the Executive Commission, which shall serve in an advisory capacity to the city mayor. The members of the city board, who are not officials or employees of the Government receiving a fi",ed compensation or salary from public funds , may be allowed per diems in accordance with the rates fixed and subject to the limitations prescribed in Executive Order No. 13 dated March 12, 1942, in addition to actual and necessary traveling expenses for attendance at the sessions of th'e board. The board shall hold sessions upon call of the mayor. Such sessions shall not be public. SEC. 7. The city treasu,·e·r·assesso,·; pow.,', and duMes.-The city trea' surer-assessor shall be the chief financial officer , assessor and financial ad· viser of the city. He shall collect all taxes and other dues throughout the city, wheth'er they are national or local; have charge of the disbursements of city funds and other funds, the custody of which may be entrusted to him by competent authority; acquit'e for the city all necessary supplies, matel~als and equipment for which appropriations have been authorized by competent authority; bave custody and supervision of all city funds and property, including buildings, cemeteries, grounds, and the like; assess all real property in th'e city and perform the duties of city assessor required by law and regulations; prepare financial statements which may be required by the mayor; and discharge such other duties as may be assigned to him by competent authority. SEC. 8. The city fiscal; powers and dutie •.-The city fiscal shall be the law officer and legal adviS'<!r of the city and its officers. Unless other·

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wise provided, he shall discharge the powers and duties provided in para 路 graph (a), Section 24, Article IV of Executive Order No.4, dated February 5, 1942. SEC. 9. The city health officer; powers and d"tie8.-The city health officer shall have immediate supervision and control over the health and sanital'y conditions of the city. He shall execute and enforce all laws, ordinances and regulations relating to public health and cause to be pl'O' seClUted all violations thereof and perform other necessary duties with reo ference to the health and san itation of the city. Subject to the authority and control of the mayor, he shall take such emergency measures as may be necessary for the control and eradication of epidemics in the city and for t he suppression and removal of the cause or causes of any infectious or contagious disease, which might menace the heal th of the inhabitants of the city; and shall pel'iol'm such other duties as may be authorized by the Director of Health or other competent authority. SEC. 10. The city enginelM'; 1>OWel'8 and d"ties.-The city engineer shall have charge of all the surveyi ng and engineering work of the city; shall perfOl'lll such services in connection with public improvements, or any work entered upon or projected by the city as may require the skill and experience of a civil engineer ; and shall di scharge such other duties as may be required by the Director of Public Works or other competent authority. SEC. 11. The fire Migade officor.- The fire brigade officer shall be in charge of protecting the city against fire. H e shall take all measures necessa ry for the prevention of fire . SEC. 12. Acting officors.-Upon occasion of the absence, illness, suspen路 s ion, 01' other temporal'y disability of a chief city official other than the mayor, the Commissioner concerned shall designate another city official 01' employee to perform temporarily the duties of the position. SEC. 13. SI<S1)ol1Sio71 and ,路emoval.-Any chief city official may ba sus' pcnded from office by the Commissioner concerned for disloyalty, dishonesty, oppression 01' misconduct. Immediately after the order of suspension is re' ceived by the city official concerned, the said Commissioner shall order the investigation of the cauS'e of su spension. The investigation shall be terminat路 ed within twenty days and the complete record of the case, with the comment and recommendation of the Commissioner, shall be submitted to the Chail1nan of the Executive Commission within fifteen days after the ter' mination of the investigation. As the circumstances may warrant and upon the recommendation of the Commissioner concel'ned, the suspended official may be reinstated Or removed by the Chairman of the Executive Commission. SEC. 14. S"/""Y d",-ing 8U8']>ension.-When a city official is suspended he shall receive no salary from and after the date of his suspension, unless so provided in the ol'der of suspension; but upon subsequent reinstatement of the suspended official or upon his exoneration, if death should render reinstatement impossible, any salary so withheld may be paid in whole or in part upon order of the Commissioner concerned approved by the Chairman of the Executive Commission.

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ARTICLE III-CITY FIN.ANCE SEC. 15. Sources of income.-Until otherwise ordered by competent authority, thel'e shall be no change in the sources of income nor in the rates of taxation at present provided in the city by existing laws or ordinances. SEC. 16. Geneml f"nd of citY.-AIl moneys heretofore accruing to the city shall hereafter constitute and be accounted for as one fund to be known as general fund of the city and shall be available for the payment of all its obligations. SEC. 17. The city budget.-The city annual budget shall be prepared in such fonn and detail as may be pl'escribed by the Director of Local Governments, and shall be subject to the limitations or restrictions imposed by Executive Order No. 13, dated March 12, 1942, and by other orders, proclamations or instructions issued by competent authorities. It shall show in detail the receipts and expenditures of the city in conformity with the classification of accounts prescribed by the Auditor General and Director of the Budget and shall contain all the information necessary for a clear and accurate presentation of the needs of the city and the condition of its finances. On or before the fifteenth da y of t he ninth month of each fiscal year the city treasurer-assessor shall submit to the mayor certified itemized statements of all receipts and expenditures pe~tai ning to the preceding fiscal year and the first six months of the current f i cal year and a detailed estimate of the revenues and receipts of the city :firom all SOUl'ceS for the ensuing fiscal year. Upon the basis of such statement and estimate, the mayor shall, after consultation with the city boal'd, make detailed appropriations covering the estimated necessary expenditures of the city for the ensuing fiscal year , but in no case shall such appropriations exceed th'e estimated receipts. The appropriations for salaries and wages shall specify the positions, the number of each class, the respective d'esignations, the salary rates authorized for the , current fiscal year and those proposed for the ensuing fiscal year. The statement of receipts and e>.-penditm-es for the preceding fiscal year and the first six months of the current fiscal year, together ,vith the estimate of receipts and appropriations by the mayor for the ensuing fiscal year, shall be known as the city budget, and a copy thereof shall be submitted, through the Director of Local Governments, to the Commissioner of the Interior who shall appl'ove, disapprove or modify the same or any part thereof. The budget of a city shall not become effectiv" until approved by the Commissioner of the Interior. Changes in the estimates of income and appropriations may be effectred from time to time during the year by supplemental budgets, which shall ba prepared in the same manner provided above in the case of annual budget. If for any reason the budget for any fiscal year is not approved before the b'eginning of the said year, the salaries of all pennanent officials and employees of the city and expenses necessary for the operation of the city government may be paid on the basis of th,. budget for the preceding fiscal year until the new budget is approved. In case a reduction of salaries and wages

[85]


is adopted as an emergency measure, such reduction shall be general and based on the existing rates of salaries and wages and the percentage of reduction shall be uniform for similar rates of salaries and wages. SEC. 18. Disbursement of city I,mds.-Disbursements of the city funds shall be made by the city treasurer路assessor upon properly executed vouchers in accordance with the appropriations made in the budget. Within fifteen days after the close of each month, the city treasurer路assessor shall furnish the mayor a statement of the appropriations, expenditures and balances in th~ city funds for the said month. The total disbursements shall in no case be in excess of the actual collections plus twenty路five per centum of the uncollected estimated revenues. SEC. 19. Qverdrafts.-In case of an emergency caused by typhoon, earthquake 01' any other public calamity which may seriously affect the collection of revenues in the city during any year, the Director of Local Governments with th'e approval of the Commissioner of the Interior may authorize the city treasurer-assessor to continue making disbursemen ts from any fund in his possession in excess of the limitation herein provided, under such conditions :md limitations as the Chairman of the Executive Commission may, upon the recommendation of said Director of Local Governments approved by the Commissioner of the Interior, prescribe for the purpose. SEC. 20. Accou ting.-The accounts of the city shall be carried in the manner which the A ditol' General and Director of the Budget may prescribe. ARTICLE IV-MISCELLA.NEOUS PROVISIONS

Authority of Di,-ector 01 Local Governments to issue regulations.-The Director of Local Governments shall have power to promulgate, whenever he may see fit to do SO and with the approval of the Commissioner of the Interior, all rules, regulations, orders 01' instructions, not contrary to law nor to orders and proclamations issued by competent authorities, necessary to regulate the proper wOl'king and harmotrious and efficient administration of the city gO'9"ernments. He shall exercise general supervision over the activities of the city governments and for this purpose, he 01' his duly authorized representative shall make frequent inspactions of the cities and see to it that existing orders, proclamations and instructions are duly complied with, and make his reports to the Commissioner of the Interior who shall, as the circumstances may warrant and when advisable in the puhlic interest, take such steps as may be necessary towards improving the administration of the ci ties. SEC. 22_ Continuity of laws, etc.-All laws, executive orders and ordi路 nances or pal'ts thereof relating to city governments which are not in conflict herewith are hereby continued in force until further orders; Provided, That they are not inconsistent with the demands of the Imperial Japanese Forces and the needs and requirements of the Central Administrative Organization. SEC. 23. Relation of this Order to p-rioJ' law.-Such provisions of this SEC. 21.

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Order as incorporate prior laws shall be deemed to be made in continuation thereof and to be in the nature of amendments thereto, without prejudice to any right already accrued. SEC. 24. Beginnitng of o"gan;zatWn of city.-The city government shall be deemed to be organized under this Order upon the assumption of office by the mayor and the city treasurer-assessor by virtue of appointments extended to them by the Chairman of the Executi~ Commission, and beginning said date the provisions hereof shall have full force and effect in that partie路 ular city. Done in the City of ManHa, Philippines, this 6th day of August, 1942. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chairman of the Executive Comm;s,,;on APPROVED by the Director-General of the Japanese Military Adminishration on August 8, 1942. EXECUTTIVE ORDER No. 76 DEFINING THE ORGANIZA';I'ION, JURISDICTION, POWERS AND DUTIES OF THE CITY OF MANILA Pursuant to the aut hority confelTed upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No. ~ in connection with Order No. 3 of the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperia l Japanese Forces in the Philip路 pines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, th-e ol'gan. ization, jurisdiction, powers, duties and functi ons of the City of Manila a re hereby determined and defined as follows: ARTICLE I-GENERAL PROVISIONS SEC.!. Territo?'1I of city,-The City of Manila shall have all the terri' tory comprised in the City of Manila proper, Quezon City and the municipalities of Caloocan, San Juan Mandaluyong, Makati, Pasay and Paraiiaque, all of which are hereby abolished as separate cities and municipalities and made an integral part of the City of Manila; and the,'<!after the aforemen tioned municipalities shall, for all legal and practical intents and purposes, be considered as completely detached from the Province of Rizal from and after their incorporation in the City of Manila . SEC. 2. Duties and functions of city.-Unless otherwise herein provided, the administrative duties and functions of the government of the City of Manila sball be continued as heretofore insofar as they may be consistent with the demands of the Imperial Japanese Forces and the needs of the Central Administrative Organization . ARTICLE II-CITY OFFICES AND OFFICIALS IN GENERAL SEC. 3. Chief officials of the city; appointment.-The chief officials of the city are the mayor, the assistant mayor, the treasurer, the assessor, the fiscal, the health officer, the engineer and architect and the fire brigade

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commander. They shall be appointed or designated by the Chairman of the Executive Commission upon recommendation of the Commissioner concerned. The appointment of the mayor shall, in accordance wth Sectin 53 of Exe· cutive Order No.4, be subject to the approval of the Commander·in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces. SEC. 4. The mayo)'; powers and duties.-The mayor shall be the chief executive and administrative officer of the city and shall be responsible for the administration of the gOV'ernment of the city. He shall have general con· trol and supervision over the various offices of the city, subject to the authority and supervision of the Department Head concerned, and shall be responsible for the enforcement and faithful execution within the city of all laws, orders, proclamations and ordinances promulgated by competent authority. His decisions On administrative matters within his jurisdiction shall be final, unless revoked or modfied by the Commissioner concerned. He shall have the power to promulgate city ordinances, after consultation with the city board, and submit a copy th'ereof, through the Director of Local Governments, to the Commissioner of the Interior. Such ordinances shall be effective thirty days after thc,receipt thereof by the Direcor of Local Governments, unless the Commissioner of the Interior finds the same or any provision thereof to be in violation of existing laws, orders, proclamations Or instruc. tions or not in conformity ,vith sound governmental policy, in which case he may disapprove or modify said ordinances or any port ion thereof. Unless otherwise rovided by competent authority, he shall have the power to grant and refuse municipal licenses Or permits of all classes in conformity with the law and ordinances and to revoke the same for violation of the conditions upon which they were granted or for any good reason of general interest. It shall be his duty to take such 'emergency measures as may be necessary to avoid fires, floods and the effects of storms and other public calamities. Except as otherwise specifically provided by law Or executive ord'er, all subordinate officials and employees in each office of the city shall be appointed by him, upon recommendation of the chief of the office concerned, in accordance ,vith the Civil Service Law and R'egulations. SEC. 5. Assistant mayor.-The assistant mayor shall assist the mayor in the performance of his duties and shall perform such other functions as the mayor may assign to him. In the event of absence, siclmess, or other temporary incapacity of the latter, the powers, duties and functions of the office shall be exercised by the assistant mayor. SECl 6. The city board.-Thel·e shall be a city board to be composed of all the chief city officials and six other members possessiong the necessary qualifications to be appointed by the Chairman of the E~ecutive Commission, which shall serve in an advisory capacity to the city mayor. The members of the city board, who are not officials or employees of th<e Government rec· eiving a fixed compensation or salary from public funds, may be allowed per diems in accordance with the rates fi~ed and subject to the limitations prescribed in Executive Order No. 13 dated March 12, 1942, in addition to actual

[88]


and necessary traveling expenses for atbandance at the sessions of the board. The board shall hold sessions upon call of the mayor. Such sessions shall not be public. SEC. 7. The city trelUl1Lre.路; powers and duties.-The city treasurer shall be the chief financial officer and adviser of the city. He shall collect all taxes and other dues throughout the city whether they are national 01' local; have charge of the disbursement of city funds and other funds, the custody of which may be entrusted to him by competent authority; acquil'! for the city government all necessary supplies, materials and equipment for which appropriations have been authorized by competent authority; have custody and supervision of all city funds and property, including buildings, cemeteries, grounds, and the like; prepare financial statements which may be required by the mayor; and perform such other duties as may be assigned to him by competent authol"ity. SEC. 8. The city a8Se"801'; pow",rs and duties.-The city assessor shall perform aU the duties required of such officer by the Assessment Law in force in the city. SEC. 9. The m'ty liscal; powers and duties.-The city fiscal shall be the law officer and legal adviser of the city and its officials. Unless otherwise provided, he shall discharge the powers and duties provided in paragraph (a), Section 24, Article IV of Executive Order No.4, dater February 5, 1942. He shall have such number of assistants as may be duly provided for in the budget of the city. SEC. 10. The city health oflice.' ; powers and duties.-The city health officer shall have immediate supervision and control over the health and sanitary conditions of the city. He shall execute and enforce all laws, ordi ' nances and l'!gulations relating to public health and cause to be prosecuted all violations thereof and perform other necessary duties with refel'ences to the health and sanitation of the city. Subject to the authority and control of the mayor, he shall take such emergency measures as may be necessary for the control and eradication of epidemics in the city and for the suppres' sion and removal of the cause 01' causes of any infecticrus 01' contagious disease, which might menace the health of the inhabitants of the city; and shall perform such other duties as may be authorized by the Director of Health or other compatent authority. SEC. 11. The city enginee,' and architect; powe," and duties.-The city engineer and architect shall have charge of all the sUl'veying and engineering work of the city and shall perfol'm such services in connection with public improvements, or any work entered upon or projected by the city as may require the skill and experience of a civil engineer. He shall also supervise the architectural features of all constl"Uction work in the city and shall dis_ charge such other duties as may be l'equired by the Director of Public Works or other competent authority. SEC. 12. The lire brigade co.mnander.-The fire brigade commander shall be in charge of protecting the city against fire. He shall take all measures necessary for the prevention of fire.

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SEC. 13. Acting ollicialB.-Upon occasion of the absence, illness, suspen路 sion, or other temporary disability of a chief city official other than the mayor or the assistant mayor, the Commissioner concerned shall designate th'e city official or employee who shall perform the duties of the position. SEC. 14. SUB1,ension and ,路/Mnoval.-Any chief city official may be suspended from office by the Commissioner concerned for disloyalty, dishonesty, oppression 01' misconduct. Immediately afber the order of suspension is received by the city official, concerned, the said Commissioner shall order the investigation of the cause of suspension. The investigation shall he termi. nated within twenty days a nd the complete record of the case, with the comment and recommendation of the Commissioner, shall be submitted to the Chairman of the Executive Commission within fifteen days after the termination of the investigation_ As the circumstances may warrant and upon the recommendation of the Commissioner concerned, the suspended official may be reinstated 01' removed by the Chairman of the Executive Commission. SEC. 15. Sa/wry du,-ing 8uspension.-When a city official is suspended h'e shall receive no salary f,'om and after the date of his suspension, unless so provided in the order of suspens ion; but upon subsequent reinstatement of the su spended official 01' upon his exoneration, if death should render reinstatement impss'ble, any salary so ,vithheld may be paid in whole 01' in part upon order of th'a Commissioner concerned and approved by the Chairman of the Executive Commission. ARTICLE

I II-CITY

FINANCE

SEC. 16. Sources of income.-Until otherwise ordered by competent authority, the,,,, shall be no change in the sources of income nor in the rates of taxation at present provided in the cities and municipalities incorporated in the City of Manila; and any bus iness, occupation, profession or establishment taxable in any of said entities but not in another shaH not be taxed in the latter. SEC. 17. Gene"ul fund 01 city.-All moneys heretofore accruing to tbe cities and municipalities incorporated in the City of Manila shaH hereafter constitute and be accounted for as one fund to be known as general fund of the City of ManUa and shaH be available for the payment of all its obligations. The e ntire proceeds of the real property tax collectible in the municipalities hereinbefore mentioned shall accrue to the City. SEC. 18. The city budget.-The city annual budget shall be prepared in s uch form and detail as may be prescribed by the Director of Local Governments, and shall be subject to the limitations 01' "estl'ictions imposed by Executive Order No. 13, da ted March 12, 1942, and by other orders, proclamations or instructions issued by competent authorities. It shall show in detail the receipts and expenditures of the city in conformity with the classification of accounts prescribed by the Auditor General and Director of the Budget and shall contain all the information necessary for a clear and accurate presentation of the n eeds of the city and the condition of its finances. On or before the fifteenth day of the ninth month of each fiscal year the city treasurer shall submit to the mayor certified itemized statements

[90]


of all receipts and expenditures pertaining to the preceding fiscal year and the first six months of the current fiscal year and a detailed estimate of the revenues and receipts of th'e city from all sources for the ensuing fiscal year. Upon the basis of such statements and estimate, the mayor shall, after con_ sultation with the city board, make detail'ed appropriations covering the esti· mated necessary expenditures of the city for the ensuing fiscal year, but in no case shall such appropriations exceed the estimated receipts. The appro· priations for salaries and wages shall specify the positions, the number of each class, the respective designations, the salary raOOs authorized for the current fiscal year and those proposed for the ensuing fiscal year. The state· ment of l·eceipts and expenditures for the preceding fiscal year and the first six months of the current fiscal year, together with the estimate of l"eceipts and appropriations by the mayor for the ensuing fiscal year, shall be known as the city budget, and a copy th"reof shall be submitted, through the Director of Local Governments, to the Commissioner of the Interior who shall approve, disapprove or modify the same or any part thereof. The budget of the city shall not become effective until appl"Oved by the Commissioner of the InOOrior. Changes in the estimates of income and appropriations may be effected from time to time during tbe year by supplemental budgets, which shall be prepared in the same manner provided above in the case of annual budget. If, for any reason, the budget for any fiscal year is not approved before the beginning of the said year, the salaries of all permaD'ent officials and em· ployees of the city a,\d expenses necessary for the operation of the city government may be pail:! on the basis of the budget for th.. preceding> fiscal year until the new budget is approved. In case a reduction of salaries and wages is adopbed as an emergency measure, such reduction shall be general and based on the existing rates of salaries and wages and the percentage of reduction shall be uniform for similar rates of salal;es and wages. SEC. 19. Di.b",....."ent of city funds.-Disbursement of the city fund s shall be made by the city treasurer upon properly 'executed vouchers in accordance with the appropl·iations made in the budget. Within fifteen days a,fter tha close of each month, the city treasurer shall furnish the mayor a statement of the appropriations, expenditures and balances in the city funds for the said month. The total disbursement shall in no case be in excess of the actual collections plus twenty·five per centum of the uncollected estimated revenues. SEC. 20. Ove,·dnJ,ft•.-In case of an e mergency caused by typhoon, earth· quake or any other public calamity which may sel·iously affect the collection of revenues in the city during any year, the Director of Local GoV'ernntents with the approval of the Commissioner of the Interior may authol;ze the city treasurer to continue making disllursements from any fund in his pos· session in excess of the limitation herein pI·ovided, under such conditions and limitations as the Chairman of the Executive Commission may, upon the recomm'andation of said Director of Local Governments approved by the Com· missioner of the Interior, prescribe for the purpose. SEC. 21. Aacounting.-The accounts of the city shall be carried in the manner which the Auditor G'erreral and Director of the Budget may prescribe.

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ARTICLE IV-MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS

SEC. 22. Authority of Directo>' of Local GoveI'nments to issue "egulatiolls.-The Db'ector of Local Governments shall have power to promulgate, whenaver he nlay see fit to do so and with the approval of the Commissioner of the Intel'ior, all rules, regulations, orders or in tt-uctions, not contrary to law nor to ol'ders and proclamations issued by competent authorities, necessary to regulate the proper working and harmonious and efficient administration of the city government. He shall exercise general ,supel'vision over the actio vities of the city government and for this purpose, he Or his duly authorized representative shall make frequent inspections of the city and see to it that existing orders, proclamations and instl-uctions are duly complied with, and make his reports to the Commissioner of the Interior who shall, as the cir' cumstances may warrant and when advisable in the public interast, take such steps as may be necessary towards improving the administration of the city. SEC. 23. Assessment.-The assessment of all real property within the boundaries of Manila shall be made in accordance with the assessment law in force in the City of Manila, but the rate of the tax to be collected thereon shall be that in force in the cities and municipalities composing the City of Manila at the time of their incol'poration therein until otherwise directed by competent authority. The present assessed values of such properties shall continU'e until they are revised in accordance herewith. SEC. 24. O,路dinancs.-Until otherwise ordered by competent authol;ty, and unless in conflict with this Order and the demands of the Imperial Jap' anese Forces in the Philippines and the needs and requirements of the Cen路 tral Administrative Organization, all city and municipal ordinances in force on the date of the organzation of the City of Manila shall continue to be in force, but their territorial application shall remain the same as before the organization of said city. After thirty days from the date of notification by the Commissioner of the Interior, such ordinances of the former City of Manila as are contained in the notification shall have force and effect in the other component parts of Manila. SEC. 25. COlltinuity of laws, etc.-All laws, executive orders and ordinances or parts thereof relating to the city government which are not in conflict herewith al'" hereby continued in force /Until further orders; p,路o路 vided, That they are not inconsistent with the demands of the Imperial J ap' anese Forces and the needs and requirements of the Central Administrative Organization. SEC. 26. Relation of this Ol'de,' to 1"''';0'' law.-Such provisions of this Order as incorporate prior laws shall be deemed to be made in continuation thereof and to be in the nature of amendments thereto, without prejudice to any right already accrued. SEC. 27. Beginning of organization of city.-The city government shall be deemed to be organized under this Order upon the assumption of office by the mayor, the assistant mayor and the city treasurer by virtue of ap'

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pointments extended to them by the Chait路 man of the Executive Commission . and beginning said date the provisions hereof shall have full force and effect in the City. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 6th day of August, 1942. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chaitman of the E xecu t ive Comntlssioll APPROVED by the Director路General of t he Japanese MUital'Y Administration on August 8, 1942.

EXECUTIVE ORDER No. 77 CREATING DISTRICT AND NEIGHBORHOOD ASSO CIATIO NS AND DEFINING THEIR POWERS, DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES. Pursuant to the authority conferred u pon me as Head of the Central Ad路 ministrative Organization by Order No.1 a nd in connection with OJ'der No. 3 of the Commander-in-Chief of the Imper ia l J a panese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, the following rules and regulations governing t he cr eation of district and r egu ' lations governing the creation of district and neighborhood associations and defining their powers, duties 'Ind responsi bilities, are hereby p}'omulgated: CSA'PTER L

O,.uahdzation of Disflrict an d N eiUhbo" hood Associations w"d The i,. S"p""vision and Contl'ol SECTION 1. There shall be created a system of district and neighborhood associations in accordance with the provisions of these ru les and }'egulations fpr the purpose of providing means for self-protection under joint l'esponsibiJity and thus insuring the stability of the life of the people, through the maintenance of peace and ol'der in area 01' areas under the jurisdiction of such district or neighborhood associations. SEC. 2. District and neighborhood associations shall be organized b)' city and municipal mayors in accordance \vith the following standards : p"ovided, however, That with regard to families situated in group 01' r2sidents living together within mining fi elds, factories 01' enterprises, all of whom cannot he organired into a district 01' a neighborhood association in accord路 ance with the provisions of these rules and regulations, special measures lila)' he considered. (1) Neighborhood associations shall be o}'ganized on the basis of a round ten families each (not less than five nOr more t han fifteen families) and district associations, on the basis of around ten neighborhood associations each (not less than five nor mOre than fifteen neighborhood associations). In case the number of famili es is less than five, t hese families may be in -

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corporated with the neighborhood association in their vicinity. In case the number of neighborhood associations is less than five, they may be incorporated with the adjoining district association. (2) District associations shall be organized as much as possible in accordance with the territorial jurisdiction of adnrinistrative districts of cities or municipalities. In case the number of families in a district of a city or municipality is not sufficient to constitute a dish'ict association, said city or municipality shall constitute a district association. In case, however, the number of families in a district is more than what is required for a district association, they shall be subdivided into seveml district associations. A neighborhood association shall be organized from among families situated near each other within the area 01' areas under the jurisdiction of a district association. (3) In case mOl'e than two families are living together within a house, each house shall constitute a member unit of a neighborhood association: Provided, h01Vevel', That two or more houses may be grouped together to con' stitute a member unit of a neighborhood association, depending upon tbe ci rcumstances. SEC. 3. The city or municipal mayors shall, upon the completion of the organization of dlsh'ict and neighborhood associations, require the heads of families to jointly prescribe rul'es and regulations governing district and neighborhood associations as soon as possible, which shall be subject to the approval of the city mayor, in the case of a city, or of the provincial governor, in the case 0 municipalities. The matters to be prescribed in the rules and regulations mentioned above sball be, in general, as follows: (1) Name of district or neighborhood association and area or areas under its jurisdiction; (2) Matters concerning time table for duty and method of service of each member; (3) Matters regarding meetings of district Or neighborhood associa路 tion; (4) Matters relating to expeuditures of a district 01' a neighborhood association; (5) Matters concerning punishment for negligence of duty, etc; (6) Matters regarding reward to, and relief of, persons who merit such reward or are in need of such relief within a dish'ict or a neighborhood association; and (7) Such other matters as al'" considered necessal'y for the efficient and successful operation of a dish'ict 01' a neighborhood association. SEC. 4. The name of a dish'ict or a neighborhood association shall be known, as follows: (1) Neighborhood Association No ............ . (2) Dish'ict Association No......... of the municipality of ......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . , Province of .............................. .. SEC. 5. District 01' neighborhood associations shall be under the direction and control of the provincial governor concerned as well as of the citr and municipal mayors concerned.

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CHAPTER II

Officials of Distr;ct and Neighborhood Associations; Thei,' Duties and Res' ponsibilities and those Heads of Fannilies SEC. 6. There shall be a pl'esident in a district association and a leader in a Il'eighborhood association. The president of a district association shall be designated by the city 01' municipal mayor fl'om among the appropriate candidates within a district 01' a neighborhood association concerned, with Cle consent of the director of the branch office of the Military Administration: Providsd, however, That those who come within any of the following heads shall not be designated as president of a district association nor as leader of a neighborhood association: (1) Those who have no regular profession or occupation or those who do not own real estate; (2) Those who al'e illiterate; (3) Those whose residence in an area 01' areas under the jurisdiction of a district or a neighborhood association has been less than one year; J (4) Those who are below twenty years of age; and (5) Ex'conVicts. Any person designated in accordance with the foregoing provisions shall not be allowed to refuse the said designation without justifiable cause. SEC. 7. The positions of president of a district association and leader of a neighborhood association shall be honorary, and they shall not be allowed to receive any compensation in any form nor under any name: P,'ovided, however, That this prohibition shall not apply in the case of reimbursements for actual expenses defrayed or return of actual good 01' goods furnished by the officers concerned. SEC. 8. The term of office of the president of a dish'ict association or the leader of a neigbborhood association shall be two years. In the case of a vacancy created due to death 01' resignation of tbe officer concerned before the termination of his or her term of office, the successor shall serve the remaining term of his or her predecessor. SEC. 9. The duties of the president of a district association shall be as follows: (1) To remonsh'ate to 01' prevail upon residents within the area or areas under his jurisdiction not to commit illegal or unlawful acts. (2) To direct leaders of neighborhood associations to take necessary measures for the guarding of the aI'ea or areas under his or her jurisdiction and to hold himself or herself responsible with regard thereto; (3) To establish a system of rotation duty so as to post guards at important points Or send I'esidents on patrol for the purpose of keeping strict lookout or surveillance of the territory under hi s or her jurisdiction; (4) In case of the receipt of a report concel'lling bandit or bandits or suspicious character or characters, to immediately report the sallie to the Constabulary officers 01' to the nearest army force ; (5) To assist, in compliance with the directions of the Constabulary

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officcrs, ill the apprehen ion of bandit or bandits, and SUSpICIOUS character or characters; and in case of need, to take necessal'y meaSUl'es for the appreh~nsion of such elements; and (6) To prepare a family census register of l'esidents who have established their dwellings within the area or a1'2aS under his or her jurisdiction a nd to conduct periodical 01' temporary family surveys fl'om time to time in order to verify the movcment of the members of the families at all times, SEC_ 10, The duties of the leader of a neighborhood association shall be as follows: (1) To direct heads of families to guard area or areas under his 01' her jurisdiction a nd to hold himself or herself responsible with regard thereto; (2) To require heads of famili~s 01' members thereof to be on guard at all times against bandit 01' bandits 01' suspicious character 01' characters; (3) In case of the receipt of a report concerning bandit or bandits or suspicious character 01' charactel's, to immediately report the same to the police officers, the president of t he di trict association to which he or she belongs, and to other competent authoritres, (4) To assist, in accol'dance ,,;th the directions of Constabulary officers, in the apprehension of bandit or bandits and suspicious character or characters; and in case of n<!'2d , to take necessary measures with regard to the apprehension of the said elements; and (5) To report to the president of the district association matters respecting any change in the members of a family, which he or she may have come to know pel'sonally Or through information l'eceivedfrom the resident or residents who are members of the neighborhood association of which he or she is the leaeler, SEC. 11, The duties and responsibilities of heads of families shall be as follows: (1) To receive directions of the president of a dish'ict association and of the leader of a neighborhood association with regard to the guarding of the areas or areas under the juriseliction of the neighborhood association of which they al'e members, (2) When on duty by themseh路es 01' through the member or members of their famili",s, to be on guard against activities of bandit or bandits or suspicious character 01' chal'acters; (3) In case of discovel'y of bandit 01' bandits 01' suspicious character Or characters, to report the same immediately to the Constabulary officers, the leader of a neighborhood association, 01' other competent authorities; and (4) In case of any change in the family census register, such as birth, death 01' other family events, to report same to the leader of the neighborhood association to which they belong, CHAPTER III

Census Taking In taking t he census, as referred to in the next preceding chapter, not only hall the movements of the present residents within an SEC, ]2,

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area or al'<!>lS be surveyed but also the character and conduct as well as the living conditions of such l'esidents shall be obsened. SEC. 13. The president of the district association shall take the census of residents in the district under his or her jurisdiction in June and December of every year: PI'ovided, That the census shall also be taken every time when th" mayor of a city or municipality orders him or her to do so. The leaders of neighborhood associations shall take th'e census of the residents within the area or areas under their jurisdiction eV'ery other month. In conducting the survey mentioned in the next preceding section, tbe president of a district association shall carry along with him the family census register while the Leader of a neighborhood association shall conduct his survey based upon the "monpai" (a wooden resid"ntial plate). SEC. 14. Upon completion of the survey mentioned in the foregoing section, the lead"r of a neighborhood association shall make a l'eport to the president of the district association to which he or she belongs; and in turn, the pl'esident of a district association shall make a report thereof to the city or municipal mayor concerned. SEC. 15. The head of each famil Y' shall, for the convenience of the one taking the family census, display a "monpai" in a conspicuous place at the entrance of his 01' her house and shall promptly make corrections thereof in case any movet'lent among the members of his or her family, such as birth, death, and other family events, has taken place. SEC. 16. In case of the discovery of a t y such movement of the members of a family as indicated in the next pl'E!ceding section, within the area or areas under his 01' her jurisdiction, the leader of a neighborhood association shall make report thereof to the president of a district association, whereupon the latter shall make adjustment of the family census register by making the necessary entries therein. The same step shall be taken in case a report is made by the heads of families themselves, concerning the movement of the mambers of their own families. SEC. 17. The form of a "monpai" and the family census regi ster shall be prescribed I a tel'. CHAPTER IV

E " penses 0/ Distl';ct and Neighborhood Associations 18. Expenses incurred for a district or a neighborhood association shall, in principle, be borne by the heads of families and shall be imposed and collected by the president of a district association in January of every year. The share of such expenses to be borne by a head of family shall be debarrnined and apportioned by the city Or municipal mayor concerned after taking into consideration the financial and other circumstances of the head of family concerned. The dues to be borne by a head of family may be paid by installments depending upon the circumstances. SEC. 19. The budget for th'e next fiscal year of a district association shall be prepared by its president during the month of December of the previous year, shall be posbad for publication at a conspicuous place, and shall be subject to the prior approval of the city or municipal mayor concerned. SEC.

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SEC, 20, The pl'esident of a district association shall prepare a financial statement and submit a report to the city 01' municipal mayor concerned regarding the expenses of the association, within one month after the lapse of the fiscal year, The financial statem'e nt shall be posted for publication at a conspicuous place, SEC, 21. The president of a district association shall provide himself with the necessary books of accounts (the l'egister of collections and the register of expenditures) so tbat the revenues and eXp'enditures may be shown in a clear manner, SEC, 22, The dues to be paid by the members of a district Or a neighborhood association and the fines imposed on account of negligence or other faults shall be placed in the custody of the pI'esid~mt of a district association, Such dues and fines shall be deposited in the Postal Savings Bank or in a stable banking institution, SEC, 23, The office of the l~der of a neighborhood association shalI be located at his or her residence and that of the president of a district associa' tion, at his or hel' residence or at some other appropriate locality, CHAPTER V

Penal Provision8 SEC, 24, The pI'esident of a district association 01' the leader of a neigh, borhood a ssociation sha I be punished by a fine of not more than fifty pesos when: (a) He or she commits injustice in ahuse of his or her authority; (b) He or she diVlllges the secrets of the member 01' members of the association which he 01' she has come to know because of his or her office, for no justifiable cause; and (c) He 01' she has violated the provisions of this Executive Order, SEC, 25, In case any resident within an area 01' areas under the jUl'isdiction of a district association establishes connection ,vith, 01' follows or tries to folIow the directions of, 01' conceals or assists or tries to assist a bandit 01' bandits, not only shall the resident concerned be punished in ac' cordance with existing laws or orders, but the leader of the neighborhood association as welI as the president of the district association concerned shall also be punished by a fine of not more than ten pesos: Provided, however, That said fines shalI not be imposed in case the leader of the neighborhood association or the president of the district association concerned tul'ns the criminal over to the authorities, SEC, 26, In caSe a resident of the al'ea or areas under the jurisdiction of a neighborhood association turns out to he a felonious criminal, the head of each family shalI be punished by a fine of not more than ten pesos within the neighborhood association: Provided, howeve,', That said fine shall not he imposed in case the heads of families shall turn the said criminal over to the autho)'ities,

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SEC. 27. A fine of not more than twenty pesos shall be imposed in the following cases: (1) Those who have failed to perform their duties by not making prompt report, as required in this Order. (2) Those who refuse to follow the directions of the Constabulary officers upon the apprehension of subversive elements or who fail to render cooperation despite the request to do so, without justifiable cause. CHAPTER VI

S"pplernentary P"ovi8iollS SEC. 28. The area or areas whel'e provisions of this Executive Order shall be enforced and the date of tbeir enforcement shall be prescribed later. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 7th day of August, 1942. (SGD.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chairman oj the E x ecutiv e Commis8ion APPROVED by the Director-General of the Japanese Military Administration on August 8, 1942.

EXECUTIVE ORDER

No. 78

SUPERVISION OF THE MAYOR OVER OFFICES OF THE CENTRAL ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION IN THE CHARTERED CITIES. PUl'suant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative Organization by Order No.1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, it is hereby provided that1. The Mayor shall, subject to the control and supervision of the Depal路tment Head concerned, have administrative supervision over all the offices and officers of the Central Administrative Organization in the City" However, all orders or regulations governing the performance by any officer of the Central Administrative Organization in the City of functions related to local gov';nmllnt administration shall be issued by the Department Head after consultation with the Commissioner of the Interior, who shall accordingly give all such ordel's or l'egulations of the Department Head to the Mayor: Provided: That any misconduct in office or dereliction of duty committed by the Mayor in connection therewith shall be l"eported by the Department Head concerned to the Commissioner of the Interior who shall immediately order the investigation according to law. 2. The Mayor shall appoint, with the approval of the Department Head concerned, all the subordinate officers and employees in each City office and offices of the Central Administrative Organization in the City whose salaries

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are payable from City funds, upon recommendation of the chief city official Or the chief of the office in the City of the other Departments of the C<!n· tral Administrative Organization concerned, in accordance with the Civil Sarvice Law and Regulations, Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 7th day of August, 1942. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chairman of the E ,'eclIlive Commission A PPROVED by the Di rector·General of the Japanese Military Administration on Augu st 8, ] 942.

EXECUTIVE ORDER No, 79 EXTENDING THE PERIOD OF REGISTRATION OF MOTOR VEHICLES AND PAYMENT OF REGISTRATION FEES THEREFOR IN CER. TAIN PROVINCES AND CHARTERED CITIES. Pursuant to th~ authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Administrative O"ganization by Ol'der No. 1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commandel··in·Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philip' pines and in accordanc with Information No. 39, dated August 5, 1942, of the Director Gene ral of the Military Administration, the period for the reg' istration of motor vehicles in certain provinces and chartered cities, as pro· vided in section 1 of Executive Order No. 64, datzd July 17, 1942, is hereby ex tended to September 1, 1942, and the dates for the payment of the regis· h'ation fees ther efor , a s required in section 4 of said Exeoutive Order are hereby changed as follows : On or before September 1, 1942, fo,' the third quarter or second semester. On 01' before October 5, 19-12, for the fourth quarter, Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 11th day of August, 1942. (SGD.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chairman of the E a'eC1,tive Com'mis8ion

EXECUTIVE ORDER No. 80 EXTEN'DING THE PERIOD FOR THE REGISTRATION OF RADIO RECEIVING SETS UNDER EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 73 Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of tha Central Administrative Organization by Order No, 1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the l'ecommend· a tion of the Executive Commi ssion, the period for the registration of radio

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receiving sets under Executive Order No. 73, dated Aug ust 5, 1942, is bereby extended to August 31, 1942, in tbe case of radio receiving sets located in tbe City of Manila and to September 15, 1942, in the case of sets in localities outside the City of Manila. The provincial governors, the Metropolitan Constabulary Commander, and the city mayors concerned sha ll submit the reports of the registration in their provinces or cities, together with the originals of the l'egistration forms duly accomplished, to the Commissioner of the Interior in time for the latter to receive the reports not later than September 30, 1942, and the Commissioner of the Interior shall s ubmit the consolidated report to t he Chair路 man of the Executive Commission not later than October 10, 1942. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, t his 15th day of August, 1942. (SGD .) JORGE B. VARGAS Chai r'man of the E xecutive Commission APPROVED by the Director-General of the Japanese Military Administration on August 15, ;1.942.

EXECUTfVE ORDER

No. 81

REGULATING FISHING AND THE SALE OF FISH Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as H ead of the Central Administrative Organization hy Order NO.1 in connection with Order No. 3 of the Commander路in-Chief of the Imperia l Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon recommendation of the E xecutive Commission a nd in accordance with Information No. 45, dated August 24, 1942, of the Director General of the Military Administration, it is hereby ordered that fishing and the sale of fish caught in fishponds and other fish beds shall be governed by t he following rules and regulations: 1. Owners of fishponds and other persons in every province should first obtain a permit from the Provincial Governor, Or the municipal mayor concel'1led acting as his deputy, before fishing in the fishponds or other fish beds in the province or before selling the fish caught therein. Such permit may be obtained by making application therefor in writing with t he Provincial Governor or the proper municipal ma yor. 2. In issuing the pel'mit herein provided, the Provincial Governor 01' the municipal mayor concerned shall be guided by the needs of the Imperial Japanese Forces stationed in the province who shall have priority in buying the fish. Such permit shall authorize the per son to whom the same is granted to sell to others ,vithin 01' outside the limits of the province t he fish that is not needed by the military authorities. The Provincial Governor shall make the necessary representations and arrangements ,vith the military a uthorities in the province to pl'ovide with luilitary passes, whenever necessary, those persons granted permits who desire to sell fi sh outside the province.

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3. All fish to be bl"ought to lI>Ianiia shall, wheth~r they be for military or civilian use, be sold or marketed through the Manila Fishermen's Association. 4. The Pro\rincial Governor shall, f,·om time to time, make a report to th~ Director of Local Governments respecting the enforcement of this Order, together with such recommendations as he may deem necessary to make. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 25th day of August, 1942. (SGD.) JORGE B. VARGAS Cha.i1·man 0; the Executive Commission

EXECUTIVE ORDER

No. 82

REDUCING BY THIRTY PER CENTUM THE TAX ON) ALL PERMANENT PLANTS AND/OR TREES Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Centl·aJ Administrative Organization by Order No.1 of the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese FOl·ces in t he Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Qommission, the real property tax on all perman·ent plants and/or trees on any taxable ,·eal property fOl" the calendar year 1942, is hel"eby reduced by fuirty per centum. Done in the City f Manila, Philippines, this 26th day of August, 1-942. (SGD.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chairman 0; the ExecuUve Com1niseion APPROVED by the Dil"ector General of the Japanese Military Administration on August 26, 1942.

EXECUTIVE ORDER

No. 83

SUSPENDING THE OPERATION OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS OF THE LEAVE LAW AND PROVIDING FOR SICK LEAVE Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Cenu·al Admirustrative Organization by Orders Nos. 1 and 3 of the Commandel·-inChief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the l"ecommendation of the Executive Commission, it is hel·ehy ordered that: 1. The operation of the Leave Law (Sections 268, 270, 271, 274, 275, 284, 285, 285-A, 286, 293, 294, and 295 of the Re\rised Administrative Code) is· suspended. 2. After at least six months of continuous, faithful, and satisfactory ser\rice the Chairman of the Executive Commission Or proper Head of Deparbnent, or the Chief of office concerned in the case of local governments, may, in his discretion, g·.. ant to each regularly and pel·manently ap-

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pointed officer or employee of the Central Administrative Organs and Judicial COIll'ts, or of the government of any province, chartered city or municipality sick leave of thirty days for each year of service with full pay, inclusive of Sundays and holidays: Provided, That such sick leave will be granted only on account of sickness on the part of the employee not due to vicious and immoral habits, intemperance, or willful misconduct, or by reason of the deatl\ of any member of his immediate family. The words "any member of his immediate family", as used in this Ordel', shall be construed to refer only to the parents, spouse, and children of the officer or employee concerned. 3. Sick leave shall be cumulative and any pal·t thereof which may not be taken within the calendar year in which earned may be carried over to the succeeding yeal'S: Provided, That the sick leave that can accumulate to the credit of any officer or employee shall, in no case, exceed five months : Provided, j<u·th.,., That upon sepamtion from the service of any officer or employee, any accumulated sick leave to his credit shall be forfeited. 4. Payment of salary to an officer or employee for any absence during his first six months of service pl'operly chargeable to sick leave shall be withheld until such leave may prop'erly be taken under the provisions of this Order. However, the Chairman of the Executive Commission Or proper Head of Depal'tment, or the Chief of office concerned in the case of local governments may direc.t that payment for such absence be not withheld if not in excess of the sick, leave to his cl·edit. 5. This Order shall take effect as of January 23, 1942. Done in the City of llanila, Philippines, this 27th day of August, 1942. (SGD.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chai,.,nan oj tI,. E.-ecuti". Commission APPROVED by the Commander·in·Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines on August 27. 1942.

EXECUTIVE ORDER

No. 84

ABOLISHING THE PROVINCE OF BATANES AND ANNEXING ITS MUNICIPALITIES TO THE PROVINCE OF CAGAYAN; SEGREGAT· ING THE MUNICIPALITIES OF BALER AND CASIGURAN FROM THE PROVINCE OF TAYABAS AND ANNEXING THE SAME TO THE PROVINCE OF NUEVA ECIJA; SEGREGATING THE MUN · ICIPALITY OF INFANTA FROM THE PROVINCE OF TAYABAS AND ANNEXING IT TO THE PROVINCE OF LAGUNA; ABOLISH· ING THE PROVINCE OF MARINDUQUE AND ANN'EXING ITS

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MUNICIPALITIES TO THE PROVINCE OF TAYABAS; ABOLISHING THE PROVINCE OF ROlVlBLON AND ANNEXING ITS SPECIAL MUNICIPALITIES TO THE PROVINCE OF CAPIZ_ Pursuant to the authority conferred upon me as Head of the Central Admirustrative Organization by Order No_ 1 in connection with Order No_ 3 of the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, it is hereby ordered thatL The province of Batanes is abolished and the municipalities comprising the same as well as the territory thereof shall be annexed to the province of Cagayan, 2, The municipalities of Bal'e r and Casiguran, province of Tayabas, and the territories thereof al'e segregated from said province and shall be a,nnexed to th'e province of Nueva Ecija, 3, The municipality of Infanta, province of Tayabas, and the territory thereof are segregated from said province and shall be annexed to the province of Laguna, 4, The provipce of Marinduque is abolished and the municipalities com_ prising the same as well as the territory thereof shall be annexed to the province of Tayabas, 5, The province of Romblon is abolished and the special municipalities comprising the same a well as the terdto~y thel'eof shall be annexed to the province of Capiz, 6_ The personnel, funds, equipment, materials, ,'ecords, and other properties pertaining to the provinces, municipalities and special municipalities which have been annexed to another province as provided herein shall be transferred to, or merged with the personnel, funds, equipment, materials, records, and properties of the province to which the same have been annexed, to be used for the same prurpose or purposes for which they were originally intended_ The transrer of personnel, funds, equipment, mate,~als, records, and pl'operties herein authorized shall be made by the Auditor General and Director of the Budget 01' his authorized representatives, 7_ The provinces to which municipalities 01' special municipalities have been annexed as provided herein shall assume the obligations, Or proportionate share thereof, as the case may be, of the municipaliti'es or special municipalities annexed and of the corresponding abolished provinces in such manner as the Auditor General and Director of the Budget may recommend a,!d the Chairman of the Executive Commission may approve, 8, The officials and employees of the provinces abolished and of the murucipalities or special municipalities annexed to another province as provided in this Order, whose services may no longer be required, shall be l'etired from the service under such terms and conditions as the Chairman of the Executive Commission, with the advice of the said Commission, may prescribe and the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines may approve,

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9. This Order shaU take effect thirty days after its approval by the Commander·in·Chief of the Imperial Japanese FOl'ces in tbe Philippines. Done in tbe City of Manila, Philippines, this 31st day of August, 1942. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chair",an 0/ the E x ecutive Commis,,;on APPROVED by the Director·Genel·al of the Japanese Military Administration on August 31, 1942.

EXECUTIVE ORDER

No.

86

SUBJECTING HOMESTEADS TO ORDINARY LAND TAX UPON THE EXPIRATION OF ONE YEAR FROM THE DATE OF THE Ap· PROVAL OF THE APPLICATION. Pursuant to the authol'ity conferred upon me as Head of the Oentral Adminjstrative Organization by Order No.1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commander-in·Chief of the Imperial J aparrese FOl'ces in the Philip' pines, and upon the l'ecommendation of the Executive Commission, it is herehy ordered that1. Lands granted under the homestead provisions of the Public Land Law shall be subject to ,'eal estate tax beginning with th'e year immediately following the expiration qf the period of one yea\' from the date of the ap' proval of the application. 2. This Order shall be applicable to all lands covered by homestead applications approved prio'r to the date hereof: P"ovided, howeve,', That if the land is declared for taxation for the first time no back taxes shall be assessed against the homestead, the provisions of Section 13 of the Assess' ment Law to the contrary notwithstanding. 3. Such provisions of existing laws as are inconsistent with the provi· sions of this Executive Order are hereby revoked or modified accordingly. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 3rd day of September, 1942. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chia,-n.an 0/ the Execu tive Commis,,;on APPROVED hy the Directol'-General of the Japanese Military Administration on Septemher 2, J942. EXECUTIVE ORDER

No.

86

EXTENDING THE PERIOD FOR THE PAYMENT OF THE RESID· ENCE TAXES FOR 1941 WHICH BECAME DUE ON APRIL 30, 1942, IN LOCALITIES Ot:TSIDE THE CITY OF MANILA. Pursuant to the suthority conferred upon me as Head of the Central

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Administrative Organization by Order No.1 in connection with Order No.3 of the Commander-in-Chief of the Imperial Japanese Forces in the Philippines, and upon the recommendation of the Executive Commission, it is hereby ordered that in localities outside the City of Manila, the basic and additional residence taxes corresponding to the year 1941 which were payable without penalty on or before April 30, 1942, may be paid, without penalty on or before October 31, 1942, together with the amounts payable under Exedutive Order No. 71, dated July 31, 1942. Amounts paid on or before the promulgation of this Executive Order as surcharge or penalty incident to the payment of residence taxes corresponding to the calenilar year 1941 shall be refunded or credited for future ta>ees. Done in the City of Manila, Philippines, this 7th day of September, 1942. (Sgd.) JORGE B. VARGAS Chai,.man of the E xeclItive Commission APPROVED by the Director路General of the Japanese Military Administration on September 2, 1942.

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BASIC POLICIES OUTLINED FOR EAST ASIA STRUCTURE The basic policies for the construction of ke~' industries in the Greater East Asia Sphere were adopted at the fifth general meeting of the Greater East Asia ConstL-uction Council held at the Premier's official residence at 1 :30 p. m., July 23, accol'ding to an announcement issued by the Board of Information at 4 :30 p. m. the same day. Premier Hideki Tojo, president of the council, other Cabinet members, and all councilors were present. The announcement follows: "The matter that came up for discussion was tire answer of the council of the question put by the Government about the basic policies to be followed in the construction of a system of mining industry and electric power in Greater East Asia and of Greater East Asia banking, finance and trade, all based on the fundamenta l policy for building Greater East Asia economy which had already been approved. "The answers wel'e approved without dissent. The meeting was ad 路 journed at 4:30 p. rn." After the meeting, President TeHchi Suzuki of the Planning Board, who is secretary路general the council , issued a statement, the substance of which was in translation as follows: At today's fifth g eral meeting of the Greater East Asia Construction Council, approval was gjven to the answer I!repared by the fifth division to the question regarding the basic policies to be followed in the construction of a system of banking, industry, and e lectric power for Greater East Asia, and to the answer prepared by the seventh division to the question relating to the basic policies to be followed in th'e construction of a system of banking, finance, and trade for Greater East Asia. 1.

Policy

The construction of mining, industl'y, and electric power in Greater East Asia is to be in accordance with the basic policy for constructing Greater E3st Asia economy. The project is designed to ensure that there will be a compl'ehensive display of the economic power of Greater East Asia, permitting the completion of the autonomous national defense productive power necessary for the defense of Greater East Asia, and the placing of Greater East Asia in a superior position with regard to new world economy. The immediate object of the project is to bring about a speedy increase in the power for conducting the Greater East Asia War. 1.

II.

Policy fol' Ca"l'ying Out Construction

The construction is to be carried out in a series of periods. In the first period, efforts will be made to increase the power for conducting the war, SecUl'e the livi ng of the people, and lay the ground for the development of industries in the futul'e, Special efforts will be made to increase the out_ 1.

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put of iron, steel, coal, oil, othel' fueJ oils, coppaI' , aLuminum, ail'planes, mer路 chant vessels, fertilizer, and electric power, In the second period, efforts will be made to expand important national defense industries, During this period, it is planned to build comprehensive Greater East Asia industry, 2, Measures for the construction of industry will be in accordance with the basic policies followed in the administration and guidance of various ,'egions, and steps will be taken to see that these measures will be compatible with economic, living, and industrial conditions in these regions, 3, Preparatory to the launching of m easures fOl' the constl'uction of industry in the various regions of the Greater East Asia Sphere, efforts will be made to reorganize and rationalize industry in a comprehensive manner in Japan, which is to be the nucleus of the sphere, 4, Measures will be enforced to increase the power for conducting the war by expanding defense industries, basic industries, and the power industry, As for industries which are ess2ntial to the conduct of the war, steps which will permit these industries to develop in an organic manner will be taken, Japan is to db'ect the enforC'ement of all measures for construction in the sphere, As for industri,es essential to th maintenance of the living of the people, efforts will be made 0 ensure that their autonomous character will not be impaired, 5, The machinery for control according to industries will be strengthened in a manner which will not affect the peculiar conditions of the various regions of the sphere with the object of achieving continuity in measures for the construction of industr~' and facilitating the planned execution of the work, 6, Measures will be enforced to increase phenomenally the number of high-class technicians, The management of labor will be so adjusted as to make possible a n improvement in the qualit~, of mining workers, especially young men employed in mining, 7, Administrative reforms will be carried out to ensure the compl'ehensive planning of the construction of Greater East Asia industry, 8. A thoroughgoing investigation will be made into the resources in the sphere preparatol'Y to the determination of measures to be adopted for clarifying the position of the resources of Greater East Asia in the world for ensuring the resources of Greater East Asia in the future,

III.

Index of COllstl'uction ;n VIL1'ioU8 Regions

I. In Japan, stress will be laid on the precision industry, machinery industry. and arms industry, a nd measures will be adopted for the marked extension of these industries, Efforts will be made to expand the heavy in_ dustries, the chemical industry, and mining, Steps will be taken to increase the output of el'e ctl'ic power which furnishes the motive power of these industl~es,

2, In Manchoukuo, efforts should be made in tbe development of mining and electric'power indust!'ies as well as iron and chemical enterprises, The

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machinery industry is to be expanded in accordance with the necessity arising out of national defense and other purposes. Light industry should be fostered in accordance with the domestic requirement. 3. In China, endeavol's should be made in fostering mining and salt industries, while in North China, exertions are necessary in bettering l'iparinn works and electric-power generation, at the same time striving to realize an epochal improvement in connection ,vith iron enterprises and chemical industry. Light industri-as in this country should be developed in contrast to the progl'ess made in the Japanese industry by effecting mutual adjustments. 4. In the Southern Regions, priority should be applied for the time being for the promotion of mining and oil industries, exerting, on the other hand, efforts to foster val~ous manufactUl~ng industries of different products. In parallel with the development in hydro-electric generation, efforts should be made in expanding the aluminum industry. In the field of light industries in this region, adjustments should be made in the existing installations, endeavoring in the meantime to realize their e"'Pansion in accordance with the existing condition of resources.

IV. Principles fo,' E &tdbHS'hment of Key IndJust1';es 1. In effecting a new expansion in the i"on enterprise, priority should be placed on Manchoukuo and North China in conformity ,vith the existing condition of materials, particulal'ly coal and iron ore, gradually e>''Panding the sphere of construction to Central China and the Southem Regions. Furthermore, efforts should be exercised in realizing greater development in various special iron entel'prises by taking into account the peculiarities of materials and other factors of different regions. 2. With regard to the coal mining problem, ways and means of achieving an epochal development, chiefly in NlOrth China, Manchoukuo, etc., should he studied by taking into consideration the current condition of resources. Simultaneously, apal路t from assul~ng the necessary supply to other localities, greatest efforts should be made in attaining self路sufficiency in the South. As regards special coal required as l'aw material, the priority policy should be employed in respective districts in increasing the output. At the same time, adequate measures must be taken to adjust consumption. 3. Main efforts in exploiting oil should be concentl'ated on the Southern Regions, but the development of oil fields in Japan Pl'Oper must also not be overlooked. In producing synthetic oil, special emphasis should be laid on Manchoukuo, Karafuto, Hokkaido and North China. It is likewise necessary to perfect various prepal'8tions for its speedy expansion, and to strive toward achieving replenishment in producing liquid fuel from plan~s, fat, etc. 4. In view of the prevailing condition in the problem of materials, the a1uminum industl路y, for the time being, should be expanded only in Chosen and lIfanchoukuo. Efforts, however, are to be exerted in establishing this industry on a sound basis in North China at a later da te. In the Southern R egions, the experts should endeavor to develop electric power generation. Tn expanding the magnesium industl路y, materials found in Chosen, 1II8n_ choukuo, etc. should be utilized.

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5. For the expansion of non·ferrous and non·metallic industries, special efforts should he exerted in boosting the production of already exploited mines found in difrerent parts of the Greater East Asia Sphere. Furthermore, prospecting for mineral ores for which shortages are anticipated should get under way without any delay. On the other hand, in order to dispose of mines producing inferior·quality Ol'eS, improvements should urgently be made in the technical field. In refining non·ferrous and non-metallic wares, efforts should be made at home to utilize the existing plants to their maximum capacity and to increase such plants most urgently at tire spot. Considerations should also be giv(;n in removing the establishments now operating at home to the actual areas in case of necessity. 6. In order to be able to keep pace with the remarkable developments currently being made at home, improvements should be made in the machinery indJustry to stamp out the production of inferior quality products. In thi connection, particular atflention is to be paid in effecting technical improve' ments, unification of standards, control over dispatch of roders, etc. 7. Devotion should be exercised in making the most of coal, electric power, organic and inorganic materials, while at the same time striving to attain a broad expansion and development in the chemical field in order to cope with the rapidly increasing demand for military materials, high'grade fuel, fertilizer, clothing, medicine and dlllgS, etc. With reference to the cement, industry, further endeavors must be made in exploiting this fi'l!ld as much as possible at the front so as to meet the demand for various constructive works. 8. Ways and means should be studied to realize an autarchy in the fibrous industry at various suitable places \vithin the common prosperity sphere. At home, the chemical fibrous industry should be expanded to the highest pitch but other fibrous industries should be confined within a sphere wherein assurance can be given to meet the military and civilian demand so that these industries may be removed subsequently in a planned method to various places within the Co·Prosperity Sphere. 9. DeV'l!lopment in the electric-power industry should be made in line with national defense and industrial development plans, directing chief effort to' ward expanding the hydro'electric field . Particulal' e ffort is to be spent in completing the undertakings which have already gotten under way. Moreover, a planned inV'l!stigation should be conducted urgently in ex· ploiting hydro·electric powe,' generation in North China as well a - in tbe Southern Regions, sta rting on the proj ects as soon as the survey is made, In generating coal-power electricity in the coal producing districts, the experts should study how best to ma ke the most of low·grade coal so that demands can be met adequately in the important zones. Furthermore, centering around Japan Proper, ins titutions as well a the policy for electric power should be regulated, thus contributing toward unifying the cUlTent of technique as well as materials and to standardize machinery and a pparatuses.

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PRINCIPLES IN CONNECTION WITH MONEY MARKET, FINANCE AND TRADE IN GREATER EAST ASIA

I. Policy The fundamental policy for money market, finance and trade in the Greater East Asia bloc should be based on the spirit of " Bakko Iehiu." For the purpose of developing all function s of the financial economy of Greater East Asia, thus establislring composite national defense economic power for this sphere, it is necessary that: 1. The inhabitants of different districts within the Co路Prosperity Sphere realize that th<! construction of Greater East Asia is their common object and that therefore, they should cooperate with a firm determination to share all joys and sorrows. 2. Japan, as the leading nation in this sphere, should make utmost efforts in putting into practice various policies, while the countries within the common prosperity sphere, in turn should extend fullest cooperation toward this end in all fields. In binding the Japanese Empire and the val~ous Southern Regions, this ideal should be adopted as a foundation. 3. For the achievement of this policy, political, economic, social and other circumstances in various districts in the South should not be judged uniformally. Where necessary, the goal should be attained step by step so as to make progress in line with various changes and developments taking place in each district. II. Money ill ,.ket (a) In order to es ablish and develop a composite national defense economic power for Greater East Asia, eiforts should be made to utili..., to the fullest extent the funds found in this sphere collectively and eff<!ctively. (b) A sphere of money market centering around Japan should be created so as to bind the whole of the Greater East Asia bloc solidly and organically_ (c) In establishing a combination between Japan and various Southern districts in the field of money market, the old idea of basing the policy simply on funds for the put'pose of settlement, should be dropped. Instead, efforts should be made in adjusting the settlement with a new conception, at tbe same time controlling problems concerning money mal'ket with countries other than in tbe Co-Prosperity Sphere. (d) In various districts within tbe common prosperity sphere, exertions should be made in accumulating and strengthening the funds on a collective basis, and simultaneously, to adopt meaSU1'es in the money market befitting each district in order to stabilize the livelihood of the inhabitants and to develop the industries in the countries witbin the Co-Prosperity Sphere. (1) Stl1l111la.路y. 1. Banking system for issuing notes and currency system shall be established by properly dividing the different areas within the Greater East Asia Co-Prospel'ity Sphere in accordance with the actual conditions existing concerning tbe Government fOl'm and political economy. The notes issued by the note-issuing banks in the different areas within the Co-Prosperity Sphere shall be made the only legal currency within such areas and tbe standard of their value shall be based on the yen.

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2. The exchange rate of the currency circulating within lhe areas to the yen shall not only be equally fixed, as the collective plan of the materials a nd labor of Greater East Asia can be effectively achieved, but, at the same time, maintaining it shall be considered. 3. The mutual settlement of accounts in the different areas within the Co·Prosperity Sphere or the settlement of accounts by these areas within the Co· Prosperity Sphere with t hose outside the Co·Prospel'ity Sphere shall, as a principle, be based on the yen. 4. The fundamental plan concerning the revenu es and expenditures bear· ing on trades 01' not on trades outside the Co·Prosperity Sphere of the entire areas of G,'eater E ast Asia, as well as mutual revenues and expenditures plan in the diffel'ent areas within the CO'P"osperity Sphere or l'evenues and expenditures plan of these al'eas within the Co· Prosperity Sphere shall be well formulated, and exchange control shall be put into force under the leader· sbip of the Japanese Empire in order to ca1'1'y out such plans. At the same time, the different areas within the Co·Prosperity Sphere shall under the legitimate leadel'ship of the Japanese Empire and in accord_ a nce with the actual conditions existing, the necessary control such as adjust· ment of funds shall be put into pI'actice and, moreover, the different areas within the Co-Prosperity Sphere shall endeavor to increase their savings of funds and to maintain a self·supply system. 5. In regal'd to the value of currency in the different areas within the Co-Prosperity Sphere, efforts shall be directed toward maintaining and securing it so that there shall be no hindrance in the expansion of the national economic power and, at the same time, as regards the commodity pri<res in the different areas within the Co-Prosperity Sphere, t he incI'eased production, interchange of materials and adjustment of labor through the channel of Greater East Asia shall be so made that they may be carried out without any hindrance, thu s placing on an equal basis the burdens of the different areas regarding their respective economic construction of Greater East Asia, whil e the control of such value shall be made in accordance with the actual conditions as existing in the different areas. 6. The monetary organ of the differe nt areas within the Co-Prosperity Sphere shall be well a1'1'anged in keeping \\~th the progress of the monetary control on the part of the J apanese Empire in accordance with the actual industrial and economic conditions as existing in such areas. 7. In regard to th~ Chinese as well as local banks, those which are not hostile and which are possessed of sufficient funds shall be made to engage in the local ch'culation of money. 8. Investments in the different areas within the Co-Prospel'ity Sphere or those to be made outside the Co-Prosperity Sphel'e shall be contI'olled under the leadership of the Japanese Empire. III.

Finance

(1) Policy. In order that the collective national defense and economic power of G"eater East Asia shall be secured and developed, with the Japanese Empire as its nucleus, the financial power of the different areas within the

[1] 2]


Co· Prosperity Sphere shall be taken into consideration, and the comprehensive and effective adjustment and operation of such power in Greater East Asia shall be effected. (2) Summa.'Y. In regard to the annual t·evenues of the different area within the Co·Prosperity Sphere, stress shall be laid on such measures devised for the security and development of the Greater East Asiatic Collective Na· tional Defense Power and Economic Power and, simultaneously, the popular liv-elihood in such areas shall be made secure. Hence, each area within the Co·Prosperity Sphere shall maintain independence of its finance and, with the Japanese Empil·e as its nucleus, the different areas within the Co-Prosperity Sphere of Greater East Asia shall bring about adjustment of its collective finance through the cooperative efforts of all the areas within the Co·Prosperity Sphet·e. 2. As regards the annual revenues of the different areas within the Co· Prosperity Sphere, thought shall be given to adoption of taxations under the most simplified taxation system based on equity throughout the entire areas within the Co·Prosperity Sphere, with particular attention given to the actual conditions as existing or systems as found in such areas, thus avoiding the general application of such taxation to them. 3. With respect to the issuance of national bonds in the areas within the Co· Prosperity Sphere of Greater East Asia, control shall be put into practice based on the colIective plan, in accordance with the monetary measures devised in such areas, and funds required for the upkeep of the finance shalI be secured by means f pro1'er method in accordance with the actual conditions as prevailing in such areas. IV.

T,·ado

L The objective of trade within the sphe,·e of Greater East Asia shall lie in strengthening the national defense power throughout its entire areas, acceleration of their development, as well as security of the livelihood of alI the peoples living within such areas, as well as putting Greater East Asia on a self·supply and self·sufficiency basis. 2. Thus, a collective fundamental plan shall be formulated regarding trades, in consonance with the permanent industrial constmction plans of the different ar<!as within the Co·Prosperity Sphere, and thus trades based on the highest degree plan shall be maintained. 3. In carrying out this planned trade, a prompt and adequate accomplish · ment shall be effected under the guidance and control of the Japanese Empire. (2) Su11tmary. 1. The trade plan within the Co ·Prosperity Sphere shall be formulated by taking into consideration first the collection demands of sup· ply power, national defense, industries as well as the national livelihoods of the diffet·ent areas within the sphere of Greater East Asia, and the maintenance of a collective and effective supply power shall be considered. 2. The trade plan within the Co·ProspeL"ity Sphere shall he in consonance with the indu trial constt-uction plan of Greater East Asia, and the supply of important materials from the different areas ,,~thin the Co·Prosperity Sphere to the Japanese Empire and the supply of such materials required for (1)

POliC1J.

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the development of the natural resources in these areas shall be of primary impol路tance, and in regard to consumption of materials a self-supply system as well as mutual connections shall be established, and thus the principle oi reciprocity shall be maintained between these areas and the Japanese Empire. 3. In l'egard to the trade plan which concerns those outside of the Co-Prosperity Sphere, contact with them shall be made with definite plan stressing the strengthening of the collective national defense and economic powers of such areas within the Sphere, and, moreover, economic cooperation with neighborly States shall be made. 4. In regard to trade with the Japanese Empire, prompt and forceful prosecution of the trade plan permeating thl'oughout the entire regions of Greater East Asia shall be effected, and the mutual trade relations among each region in the Co-Prosperity Sphere shall also be maintained in accordance with a definite plan. 5. In regard to trade within the Co-Pro perity Sphere, the difference of prices of trade materials in the Japanese Empire shall be adjusted on a unitary basis, with the operation of the exchange policy being continued in order, and thus the planned trade within the Co-Prosperity Sphel'e shall not fall short of success in contributing toward the smooth operation of the commodity price policy.

Imports, Exports Controlled 6. Control shall be imposed on all imports and exports in the different areas within the Co-Prosperity Sphere under the guidance and supervision of the Japanese Empire in order tbat what has been set forth thus far may be put into practice. 7. Pl'ovision shall be made that maintenance of organic relations hall be effected between the trade organ of the areas within the Co-Pro perity Sphere of Greater East Asia and the Japanese Empire. 8. Concerning collection and distribution of materials in the regions \vithin the Co-Prosperity Sphere, tbose engaged in business in the Japanese Empire shall see to it that they shall be properly distributed to various important places. 9. All taxation of customs shall be properl~' adjusted so that the planned trade of the areas within the Co-Prosperity Sphere shall be made easier to achieve by taking into considel'ation the commodity prices and others outside of the Co-Prosperity Sphere from a financial standpoint, between the areas within the Co-Prosperity Sphere and those outside of the Co-Prosperity Sphere, while taxation of customs between the areas within the Co-Prosperity Sphere and those outside of the Co-Prosperity Sphere shall be controlled under the guidance of the Japanese Empire.

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AMERICA'S FIRST OFFENSI VE PROVES A MISERABLE FAILURE The Battle off the Solomons was the first large-scale naval offensive launched by the American and British navies, which have suffered a series of abject defeats since the very opening of the War of Greater East Asia, declared Captain Hideo Hiraide, sectional chief of the Navy Press Section of the Imperial Headquarters, in his 15-minute I-amo speech broadcast at 7:30 p_ m_ on August 10 on the subject "About the Battle off the Solomons." The gist of Captain Hiraide's radio speech follows: As you are already well aware, Impel~al Navy Units launched intensive attacks upon the joint American-British Fleet which appeared in the vicinity of the Solomon Islands since AugtUst 7, and dealt a stunning blow to its warships and transports. Because of the fact that the Japanese Units are enlarging their operation and no further details have been received thus far, I am not yet in a position to make a concise explanation of the battle. I believe, however, that a detailed report will be had in the near future in succession, and that the reports will be announced in due order. 'Today, I should like to explain rougbly the significa nce of the pl-esent operation_

Allies in Quandatry Following succe'!;sive war reverses, both America and Britain have ex perienced severe military, political and economic blows and this situation is becoming more pronounced than ever before. These countr ies have seen the need of breaking thro gh this deadlocked situation. As a result, they are resorting to various measures to encourage the demoralized public. It will be seen that it was not without I-eason that the American authorities recently were talking of a big counter-attack against Japan. They knew for certain that it would be impossible to stimulate the spirit of their people by merely talking of operations against Japan. They began to pin great hopes to an air offensive agains t Japan conducted from bases in China. The operations started by the Imperial Army Air Force in advance of the enemy dashed these America n hopes to t he ground. Next they got it into tbeir head to engage in operations aga inst Japa n in the area of Otori Island_ But they could not do anything because of the perfect Japanese defenses in this area. President Roosevelt, of aU our antagonists, conceived the idea of I'estraining in the Pacific area Germany and Italy which were overhelmingly dominant in EUl'Ope_ This led to the decision to send a strong unit to the Aleutian Islands from which to operate against Japan. This unit was formed by what battleships, cruisers, destroyer s and naval forces which remained to America and Britain_ This patched up fleet, escorting convoys, came out to the area of the Solomon Islands. On board the transports there seemed to be some of the marines which it had taken America many years to train_ Speaking of action the American Navy Depart-

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ment told the world that it would be the first major offensive assumed bv the United States. All t his will show what great things America was expecting from the move.

B,-illiant Resu lts A chieved The results which have been obtained by the Imperial Forces in the present battle are brill iant. Seventeen enemy war vessels are known to have been sent to the bottom. As for the enemy transport sh ips, 11 of them have thus far been sunk. The damage sustained by us is slight, as will be seen from the Imperial Headquarters communique announcing the resul ts obtained by the Japanese in the battle. That is to say, the scout planes of the Imperial Forces discovered the Anglo-American combined fleet in the waters off Solomon Islands early 011 the morning of August 7 and reported immediately to the Japanese fleet and air units. Our f igh ter plalles left th eir base at Ollce and launched a daring attack on the enemy warships as well as on the transports. The enemy planes took off from their vessels to intercept the fierce attack, but during the en$uing dog-fight, mOre than 41 enemy craft were sent crashing to the sea in flame. On the following day, our torpedo-plalles cornered the enemy f leet, and braving a terrific sqpall which started just about that tillie, carried out their death-defying attacks on the enemy inflicting serious damage on the enemy vessels which , by thi s time, were fleeing in all directions. No sooner had the u nit of the t orpedo路planes finished its deadly attack than OUr surface shi ps sta rted a terrific and incessant bombardment. With the advent of nightfall, t he attack on the enemy was intensified, and, like Nob'unaga Oda at the Battle of Okehazama, the Commander him self assuming the lead, carried the f ight into the enemy formation, wiping out the enemy capital s hips and scoring a decisive victory. The striking blow thus dealt on t he enemy, having more strength than our fleet, is attributable partly to the fact that the enemy was caught nappi ng , bu t it vel'ifies once aga in that there is a world of a diffel'ence between the superior str ategy employed by the Japanese Forces and that of the enemy. Through this naval battle we could clearly see t hat the strength of the enemy sea forces had been positively lowered and that any frantic efforts to be put up by the enemy to a ugment their sea and air forces would prevail in no way. The outcome of the battle exercises fan'eaching effects upon not only the Pacific but also the Atlantic war situation. The loss of many cruisers and transports on the enemy's side w ill mean that the Axis side's move to destroy the enemy's transportation facilities is going on successfully. The United States first denied the fact of the Japanese operation in the Aleutians. It later admitted the operation but said that no damage was inflicted by the operation. More recently, the country has been obliged to :>nnounce the facts about the Aleutians. suggesti ng at the same time that

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Japanese successful operation around the islands would have a serious bear· ing on the Soviet'Japanese relation. The American way of fabricating war news is now an old story. The first falsified news concocted by the United States authorities about the War of Greater East Asia was that only two American battleships were sunk by the Japanese Navy at Pearl Harbor. A "Macassar Naval Battle" was a mere concoction of the American Navy, in which they aUeged to have scored a great victory. As to the result of the Java Sea Battle, the shameful defeat of the U. S. Navy was concealed from the American general public as long as possible. Regarding the present Battle off the Solomons, the ever·lying American Government seems to be admitting the real results as far as their loss of transports is concerned. It is to be noted, however, that the American public is gradually awakening to the true state of the war situation, despite their Government's effort to cover up the American defeats. The Roosevelt Administration in this con· nection, should be strictly blamed for deceiving the general public about the true state of their losing war. which is partly due to the general under· estimation of Japan's power among the American citizens, based on the Government's falsified news about Japan and its real strength. The l'eveJatio", to the American general public of the true result of the present Battle off the Solomons if made by the United States Government, will be a real eye· opener. It wiU make the American citizens l'ealize that they have so far be deceived by their Government to believe that the Japanese Navy had been annihila ted in the Pacific. The Government the n will have no courage t face their people. The pity is that every da y the Government is approaching this very disgraceful state. The day is quite neal' when the same Government cannot keep the general public ignora nt of the real situation any longer. The Battle off the Solomons has completely isolated Australia. Austra ' lian War Minister Francis Forde, who had believed that his country would be safe as long as the United States would support it, frankly admitted the present plight of the country with wOl'ds to the effect that though a\1 Australia is solidly united for the execution of the war, the continent is now facing the most critical moment. Austr'alia now should recall its mistake in trusting the United States. It must realize that it has been relying on what is unreliable. It may be said that the deceptive policy of the Roosevelt Administration is leading to ruin both the United States and Australia. Some people, I am afraid, seem to think that the War of Greater East Asia has already entered a definite period of construction. I want them to know that the war is still going on as vigorously as ever and that it ,vi\1 proceed on and on. The constructive work in the Southern Regions and the productivity e"'Pansion move in the homeland should be ba sed on a thorough_ going extermination of all hostile forces. These constructive moves on the other hand, facilitate the further execution of the war. AU in all the entire nation is strictly warned against harboring any idea of the present war renching n constructive stage.

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The United States is now reported to be busily engaged in the production of as many war vessels and planes as possible so that it can face Japan on the desired numerically superior basis. Such a move needs must be shattered before its realization; and we have full conviction that we can do this. The sphere of the Impel'ial Navy, as you know, now extends all over thil large expanse of waters, measlU'ing more than 4,000 nautical miles on each of its sides. The Japanese Navy is resolute to have all enemies moving in the sphere annihilated. The nation, backing this Navy, is earnestly required to hold themselves firm, without being overjoyed with the successive brilliant victories of the Imperial Forces.

)

[118]


MOUNTING OBSTACLES FACE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT The hostilities which are raging in the Pacific have rudely awakened the United States to make aU necessary preparations to meet the ever-increasing hazards of wal'- While the American people are steadily losing confidence in the Roosevelt administration, due to successive defeats suffered by the armed forces of their country, Washington is finding it exceedingly difficult to check the rise of inflation_ On April 27 President Roosevelt sent a message to Congress outlining his plan of preventing inflation during wartime. He declared that the American nation must lower its standard of living to meet the unprecedented requirements of war. On the following day, in a nation-wide broadcast he made a seven-point announcement directed toward checking inflation. He told the American people that heavy taxes would be levied on profits made by individuals and corporations to countermand profiteering, price ceilings would be adopted to regulate commodity prices, rents and hires, prices of agricultural products would be standardized and the system of credit sale and monthly instalment would be abolished. He also indicated that the coupon system would be enforced to buy the necessities of life. He then urged the people to purchas war bonds and settle their debts and monetary obligations.

'L ife路Planning' This new wartime measure was called by President Roosevelt as the national economic planning, but the newspapers headlined it as wartime "life-planning." Though this kind of planning is urgently needed, it is problematic to what ",,-tent the American people would be able to readjust their mode of living, especially when they are rather inclined to maintain their usual standard of living as far as possible. To Americans, who have become inured to material life, it would not be a plain affair to pl'actise rigorous economy, in spite of the fact that they r ealize the imperativeness to become self-sacrificing to tide over the current emergency. On the other hand, life' planning is nothing new or novel to Ja.p an. 1I1oreover, the Japanese people united as one have already reformed their standard of living to enable the Government to prosecute the war until final victory is attained. Now that President Roosevelt has adopted this life'planning, it is reason 路 able to assume that the American people would endeavor to readjust their mode of living; yet it is a question whether such a measure would induce them to change their attitude toward the Pacific war in order to e>:tend thei r unquestionable support to the Roosevelt Government. It has to be recognized that the Americans are creative and energetic. The "pilgrim fathers" came to the New WOl'ld \vith a burning ambition to found a country of their own. They were puritan in every way. But the subsequent development of America brought about a lust for gold, and this caused the rise of individualistic capitalism. Hence, the creativeness and energetic faculty of the Americans have become more concerned with amassing wealth for themselves. This i the reason why the American spirit is a quaint mixture of puritanism and hankering aft2r wealth.

[119]


When the first set tiel's crossed the Atlantic aboard the Mayflower and landed on the American continent, they were full of energy and hope, with the result that they soon established a new home for themselves. Because of their pioneering activities, America rapidly developed into a land of op' portunities, a nd this called for a full display of creative faculty and energetic endeavors on the part of early Americans. Their untiring efforts to open up vast tracts of virgin land awaiting the hand of man to give up their riches, caused the rapid development of various industries. But with the close of the nineteenth century, the outlook of the Americans underwent a striking change. They became more addicted to wealth-seeking tendencies. In consequence, from the outset of the twentieth century they started becoming the devotees of Mammon, and thus the)' finally ~ecame the worshippers of monisticism.

Policy of Inter/e"ence In order to pursue their policy of capitalist'imperialism, the Americans began to interfere in the movement of the economic life of other nations. Tberefore, it is nO wonder that, they propounded the so·called policy of "open door and equal opportunity" in East Asia to make their capitalist invasion in tbat part of the world a fait accompli. Their desire to enrich themselves by exploiting the resources and wealth of other nations appears to be a fixed policy. Relying on their financial capabilitlies and industrial expansion, they extended the sway of their capitalist-imperialism to Latin America, Europe and East Asia. Because of their self·centered activities, the Pacific war has broken out, while Italy and Germany are trying to exterminate their influence in Europe. Today , La~in America bas be.n forced to become the economic granary of the l.:nited States, but the peoples of East Aisa and the majority of European nations, refusing to submit to the domination of Washington, are acting unitedly to shape a new way of life for themselves. The determination of Axis Powers to overthrow the supremacy of the Anglo-American " democracy" has confronted tbe Roosevelt administration with a grave crisis. It is finding it a hard problem to suppl'ess the indivi· dualistic tendency of the American people who appeal' to think that the exi· gencies of war should not be permitted to disturb their mode of living. This tendency is bound to create additional difficulties for the American Government to maintain national solidarity. Although it will be able to enforce the new life'planning measure on the people, it is not certain whether the results to be obtained wQuld be highly satisfactory. Nevertheless, it can be presumed that the Americans will accept the changed conditions to facilitate the prosecution of hostilities against the Axis nations. Even ill that event national unity accomplished would be a forced unity and not a voluntary one. However, as this question only concerns America, it will not be&ppropriate to pass a hasty judgment, for it is apparent that the fate of tIIat nation is dependent on national solidarity and cUI·tailment of standard of living to maintain wartime economic life.

[120]


Perplexing Questions Generally speaking, life-planning in wartime has two objects: one is to prevent the rise of vicious inflation and the other is to increase the output of war industries. To America, the attainment of these two objects is abso· lutely necessary to carryon its resistance against the A>.';s Powers. But the question is which of the two objects should be realized first. While it seems imperative that a vicious inflation should be checked to safeguard financial potentiality, the question of increasing the production of armaments is equally pressing, particularly when the United States has to continue giving effective aids to Britain, Chungking and Australia. Viewing the life-planning from this angle, it has to be said that the requirements of war industI·ies have to be met as early as possible, tackling the inflation issue as a domestic affair needing the practising of rigjd economy in aU home expenditures. But as inflation has a direct hearing on the production of armaments, it would not be easy to solve either problem in an effective manner. President Roosevelt in his recent message to Congress pointed out that there was no need for any individual American to have a n annual income e..'<ceeding $25,000. Suppose that the engineer s and experts as weU as factory · workers who are i,ndispensable for accelerating the production of war acces· sories demand that amount as their annual income, the J·esul t would not be very good for the Chief Executive. If such a n outcry is raised, he shall have to introduce graduated scale of payme?t to satisfy al1 the parties concerned. The possibility, is that once such a)l exceptional step is taken , the Government shal1 have Iresort to many more such exceptions, with the result that life·planning would ultimately become a skeleton affair. The question of fixing the prices of agricultural products a nd the wages of laborers is indeed a gl·ave pI·oblem for President Roosevelt. It can be easily solved provided the intensity of hostilities against the United States by the Axis Powers is I·educed to a great extent, but as such a hypothetical lull is impossible of conception, President Roosevelt \vil1 have to think out a new workable plan. Furthermore, should the value of the American dol1ar fall pI·ecipitiously, the AmeI·ican national life would be completely upset. In that case, President Roosevelt wiU have to devise ways and means to check inflation at the expense of curtailing the productive capacity of the armament industries. On the other hand, since Japan, Germany and Italy are bent upon demolishing the military potentiality of the United States, President Roose· velt will not have time enough eit her to replenish hi s \var machine Or to initiate the new life·planning on a h armonious scale. Slu'1n bering Am.enCa1t8

It is indeed strange that at this moment of super·emergency confronting the nation, the American ma sses have not yet fully r ealized the advisability of abandoning their materialistic fetishism. They do not seem to ponder that their ancestors founded the counb·y by practising t he ideal of "Jive and let Jive." In fact, the fundamental ideal of America, which envisages the utility of Jiving in peace and harmony with other peoples, ha been relegated to the

[121]


background to nationalize the so路called ideal of monetary materialism. To them, money has become everything, and as a consequence, they have lose their spiritual power and vigor to maintain their traditional way of life. Ie is a fact that the United States has amassed wealth beyond the conception of other nations, and yet it is finding it difficult to meet the exigencies of war. This shows that material potentiality or monetary power cannot stand and give battle to a national power backed up by solid national determination. It needs no argument to assert that America's self路complacency will seriously undermine its national strength. President Roosevelt has plunged the country into an unnecessary war in order to stick to his own set of utopi an principles and unworkable ideologies. Time is bound to come when the American masses will begin to wonder why their country is waging a war in Europe and East Asia, far a~ay from the Western Hemisphere. They may also come to realize that there is no reason for America to hinder the return of normalcy in Europe and East Asia, especially when they are not in any way menaced by the rise of a metamorphosed life in those areas. But when the American masses will come to view the situation in that light is not possible to predict since they are still under the spell of materialistic fetishism.

[122]


----------- -----

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Highlighting the fact that ,路econstruction work i8 prog,路essillg smoothly e1Jerywhere in the Philippines i8 the above pictw路e showing one of the big bridges being constructed that travel and cOlmnunication can be faciNtated .

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[:"lJaralleled in the history of internationcrllOal-Ja>'e is this "",,sual eommelleement exercise, at lOhich 1.400 1'a"killg officers of the Philippine .Army lvil o had beell taken p1'i801ler8 of 100r are graduated by the ' '''1'e>';al Japanese Forces aft.,. a 20路day t>'oining p repara tory to "eversion to the Philippine COllsta bn /al路Y.

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Official Journal of the Japanese Military Administration Vol. No. 6  

Official Journal of the Japanese Military Administration Vol. No. 6