Page 1

THE COMMO NWEALT H OF THE PH[LfPP rNES

589

ing force-w orthy of your country and of the _ "Gentle men of the Commo nwealth : It must efforts that have been put forth. be an inspirat ion to you, as it is to me, to see this fine represe ntative body of men - your "You must be patient in workin g with new own people -all of them trained , enthusi asmen-an d expect to repeat, repeat and retic, well pl'epare d to carry your Army depeat. Remem ber that regardl ess of discour velopm ent program on through the next agement, with those who are inept, or unphase, the trainin g of the groups of instruc developed, success will cro\\'l1 your efforts if tors that will go to each of the 128 camps you wOl'k unceasi ngly for the standar ds set where enrollee s are to be trained . I have by these enlisted instTuc tors of the United great confidence in their success and in the States Army. They' will be the ideal toward success of the plans as they' are unfolde d to whichi the recruit will natUl'al ly strive. Be me for the develop ment of your Nation al pat:ent and ,h elp him to attain his goal! Army."

ADMINI STRATIV E STAFF,

RO.S.S ..

P.A.,

BAGUIO .

MT.

PROVIN CE

FILIPINO RESID ENTS AT HAWA II RAISE D CONTRIBUT ION FOR PHILI PPINE ARMY

As a sign of their loyalty to the cause of independence, the Filipin o residents of Hawaii have raised a 1'32,000.00 defens e fund for the Comm onwea lth of the Philippines. The money was spent for the acquis ition of an airplan e and several machi ne guns which were donate d to and accept ed by the Philip pine Army. Atty. Gonzalo Manibog, who arrive d on Novem ber 12, 1936, on the s.s. Presid ent Lincoln, presen ted the donati on to Presid ent Quezo n and Speak er Gil Montilla and conveyed to these officia ls the greetin gs of the Filipino Hawaii community upon the completion of the first year of the Commonwealth. The campa ign for the raising of the fund was launch ed by the Philip pine National Defense of Hawai i under Marian o Gorospe, a Filipino busine ssman in Hilo.


CORNEJO'S COM.MONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHII.dPPINES

590

PHILIPPINE

ARMY

b

INSTRUCTORS, DEPARTMENT OF TACTICS, RO.S.S.

INS TRUCTORS, ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT, RO.S.S.,


THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES

591

TRAli''lNG PROGRAM AIMS TO PRODUCE USEFUL CITIZENS As Revealed by路 Major-General Paulino Santos, Chief of Staff, P. A., in his Speech at the Opening of the Military Camp at San Fernando, Pampanga, January, 1937 ,',

Maj.-Gen. Paulino Santos

RE combined vocational and milital:Y training envisaged by Major General Paulino Santos is il1tended to . instruct the youth of the country not only in the technique of warfare but also in the science of useful production of crops. It is intended to enable them to ,defend the motherland in the event of a conflict with another nation and to make them productive citizens during times of peace, Their stay in the training camp for five and a half months or more will be taken up completely in soil cultivation, poultry and fish raising and military instruction. Filipino soldiers who will defend the Philippines not only militarily but also economicallr were envisioned by' Major General Paulino Santos, chief of staff of the Philippine Army, as he opened the first of the 95 military training camps completed under the national defense plan in San Fernando, Pampanga, sometime ago. If the Filipino people wish to be treated as equal by other nations, they must develop mentally, physically and economically, General Santos pointed out. In his speech, General Santos envisioned

O

It

The Philippines Herald. January 18, 1937.

training camps that will lead in the physical and mental development of the youth of the land tlu'ough balanced diet. He said that when a Filipino possesses the stature of Eu~ ropeans he does not have to demand respect, but commands it. He believes that prejudice against t he Orientals is not only due to color but to mental and physical development. He deplored the fact that the Filipino peo~ pIe use goods 90 per cent of which are not produced by them. He revealed that the purpose of the national defense is not only to defend the Islands from military invasion, hut economic invasion as well. If his plans are carried out, he declared that by the end of ten y'ears there will be 400,000 trained men who are not only capable of defending the Philippines from a military point of view, but well-developed men wtho have learned to exploit the resources of t heir country. Relating his experience as a lad 8 years of age in 1898, General Santos said that he watched the troops of Gen eral Macabulos in his barrrio in Tarlac opera ting against the Spanish troops and afterwards against the Am ericans. HI saw our soldiers Gen. Francisco ill-supplied," he said. Macabulos "After an engagement of three or four hours, they retreated because of empty stomachs. They were running away from the enemy because they could not stand the rigor of war when pitted against a well organized and well-fed army. "From that time an ambition came to me that if I ever had the opportunity to place myself in a position where this weakness could be corrected, I wou)d look after the proper training of our men not only how to fight, but also' how they should be fed.


592

CORNEJO' S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

Battalion Staff, Cadet Corps, Philippine Army

II I was very! happy when Divine Providence placed in the hands of our Fl'esident the best living soldier America has produced to head the Philippine Army. I broached the program to them as part of the miIital'Y training of our young men and they readily approved the plan. "This is our plan now-what you can see developing here. Lt. A•.mando Pineda, through his resourcefulness, started carrying out the plans here. Soon you can see mangoes, pine~ apples, fruit trees, growing here. There will be poultry farms, piggery, fish ponds and nurseries. In three years time we assure the people of Pampanga that they will find this station self-sufficient in food and the men who come to the training stations will never be without fruit and eggs for breakfast. They will find balanced diet in all training stations, ({This place will be in a position to return to the people the capital they invested. We intend to start nurseries here and will distribute seeds and seedlings to the people of the province free. "This will not be only the place to train men, but will be a place in years to come where it would be possible for the Filipino people to become self-sufficient. The ration of 24 centavos a day is hardly enough to give the trainees sufficient food to develop physically. We have to resort to vocational tl'aining to give them better rations and to teach

them how to exploit every inch of land that we have in our possession. " 'Ve want to develop men who are physically strong, mentally alert." General Santos told the provincial commanders of central Luzon provinces who gathered'" at the opening of the training station to maintain close relations with the people where~ ever they are, He said that unless the provincial commanders can have the cooperation of the local people, they win be unable to organize an army worthy of the names of Andres Bonifacio and General Antonio Luna. He thanked Governor Pablo Angeles David for the cooperation of the provincial officials and local people in giving the land to the army and giving aid wherever possible. He said that as long as th~re are people who wear a soldier's unifonn in the IslandE, the name or Pampanga as the first province to have completed the first training station under the national defense plan win never be forgotten. Governor Angeles David responding to General Santos' speech, said that in a fight for the conservation of national freedom national' defense is the first need, U\Ve know here that without national defense we can't live," Governor Angeles Davia said. "In cooperating with the army we arenot doing any more than our duty as good' citizens. It is our primordial duty and it is for us to work for the stabilization of our national defense."


l'HE COMMONWEALTH OF TIiE PHlL[PPINES

593

ON THE EVE OF THE FIRST ANNIVERSARY OF THE COMMONWEALTH PRESIDENT QUEZON

Says-"We are builcling in the Philippines" not for today, not for tomorrow, but for all times," P,resident Manuel L. Quezon said yesterday on the eve of thE\" first anniversary of his inauguration as first president of the Commonwealth. "In the face of considerable pessimism and distrust, we have set up a government run exclusively by Filipinos, respected by foreign nations, in whose ability and integll."ity the people of this country have every reason to trust. loyally. "As soon as I was installed into office I realized that the first requirement was a national defense force. " If the Assembly had refused to pass the national defense act practically as the administration submitted it I would have resigned then and there. "My next objective was to set this country on the road towards economic self-sufficiency. .. My idea of economic self-sufficiency would be a national eC0nomy that comprehends every aspect of the life of the people and is dedicated to the task of correcting the deficiencies of existing conditions... We must evolve an economic plan geared to the new proposition of gradually redistributing ou]'" trade preferably through commercial agreements with various countries. "There shall be no laissez-faire in this country. I conceive it to be not only the right but the duty of the government to regulate the relation between capital and labor, between producer and consumer. "We are also trying to evolve a scheme under which education will cease to be a luxury. "I have been criticized for concentrating too much power in my hands. But the truth is there is not a single power I am exercising today which is not conferred on me by the constitution. "During the past one year of our stewardship, we have taken ev~y needful step to l"eal" a new state that is safe, stable, financially sound, just and humane. "My conception of life, be it of man or any of his works, precludes death or dissolution. For me there is only Birth and Growth. I leave death and the thoughts of death to the pessimists, the weaklings, and the defeatists." The T1-ibune) Nov . .15, 1980:


.....8'.-11 --. t.c:.,t."

RECALLING THE BIRTH OF THE NEW NATION

~ '~"~'"

t.n9Ji' ' "~"''''-' " .",") ,-,-,'--

A GENERAL VIEW OF THE GRANDSTAND DURING THE COMMONWEALTH INAUGURAL CEREMONIES

~

on

,..,

:0

o

'o'""'

Z

Q

'o"

~ ยงl

'",."

~

'"

;;;

"'.." "'

~

o

."

0:

."

., '" '~"

'Z"

"''"


THE COMMO NWEALT H OF THE PHILlPP INES

Nove mber 15, 1936

595

~

Nation In Fes tiva l Mo od Tod ay The entire nation will be in festive mood today as it celebr anniversary of the establ ishme nt of the Commonwealth, which ates the first hands of the Filipinos virtua lly comple te contro l of the affairs places in the. of their government. Fitting progra ms, featur ed by parade s, will be held in variou country in observance of the memo rabla day. In Manila and in s parts of the some towns of the provin ces hundr eds of thousa nds of people the capita ls and will parade this morning as the opening featur e of the nation al festivi ty. As the climax of the celebr ation, Presid ent Manue l L. Quezo this afterno on after a prelim inary progra m will speak over the n at 5 o'clock memoration of outsta nding person ages who helped the Filipin radio in comos obtain their independence. Preside nt Quezon and the Filipino people are congrat ulated by Preside nt Frankli n Delano Rooseve lt, who has recentl y scored a smashin g victOl'y in the United &tates pl'esidential election , and by Secreta ry of Wal' Harry H. Woodri ng, in messag es receive d from them by the Preside nt yesterd ay. Their messag es to Preside nt Quezon are as follows :

The service rendere d by Preside nt Quezon to his people since the inaugu ration of the Commo nwealth when he assume d the office ' of the Preside nt of his country is recalled by acting High Commi ssioner J. Weldon Jones in a stateme nt he issued "jesterd ay. The stateme nt reads a s follows : liThe Commo nwealth govern ment of the Philipp ines is to be congra tulated on this the first anniver sary of its existen ce for the " "W ashingt on, D. C. success ful manner in which its affairs have Nov. 13, 1936 been adminis tered. To the Preside nt of the Philipp ines Manuel Quezon , first Preside nt of the PhilManila ippines , by his dynami c persona lity, has made My congrat ulations to you and the Filipino his influenc e felt even to the remote st barrIO people <)n this first anJ?ive rsary of the inof the Archipe lago. He has persona lly t.raaugurat ion of the Commo nwealth govern ment. veIled over a large section of the Philipp ines ' May the success which has marked the first and has thus been able to ob-tain first hand year of your admini stration continu e. informa tion of the immedi ate problem s con(Sgd.) FRANK LIN D. ROOS路E VELT路' frontin g each section and of the Commo n- ' wealth as a whole. Based upon such infonna "Washi ngton, D. C. tion and the advice of his able counsel lors, Nov. 13, 1936 he has recomm ended a far-reac hing program of legislat ion to the Assemb ly, wJrich has met 'fo the Preside nt of the Philipp ines with the approva l of that body and h as been Manila enacted into law. Undert akings of great On this first anniver sary of th~ inaugur afuture importa nce to the Philipp ines have tion of the Commo nwealth govern ment I take been comme nced. Law and order have been pleasure in sending my congrat ulation s to maintai ned. you and the Filipino people and wish you As Acting United States High Commi scontinu ed success in your adminis tration . sioner to the Philipp ines, I congrat Ulate Pres(Sgd.) HARRY H. WOOD RI NG ident Quez<ln for the success of the Fh'st SeCl'eta ry of War" Year of the Commo nwealth ."


596

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

PARADE DURING THE INAUGURATION OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PffiLIPPINES

Cadets of Philipp ine Constabulary of Baguio in West Point uniform

The Philippine Constabulary Moro Battalion from Jolo


THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHDLIPPINES

597

FIRST ANNIVI:RSARY OF THE

COM M路 0 N W E A L T H OF THE

PHILIPPINES SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1936'

MORNING

~

JJaraike At 8.30 a. m. the military-civil parade will start from the corner of Taft Avenue and P. Burgos and pass in review in front of the Grandstand at the New Luneta. MILITARY DIVISION

Order of Units: 1. Parade Marshal and his Staff. 2. Cadets, Philippine Military Academy. 3. Students, Reserve Officers Servic02 School. 4. Officers, First 路Reserve Squadron, Cavalry. 5. Regiment, First Regular Division. 6. R.O.T.C. Units. (a) University of the Philippines. (b) Ateneo de Manila. (c) San Juan de Leh路an. (d) Adamson School of Industrial Chemistry. (e) De la Salle College. 7. Nautical School Cadets. 8. High School Cadets. CIVIL DIVISION

Order of Units: 1. Grand Marshal and his Staff and a Company of Patrolmen. 2. Public and Private Schools. 3. City and National Government Employees and Laborers. 4. Labor Organizations. 5. Political Parties and Civic Associations. 6. Commercial and Industrial Firms.

AFTERNOON At 5.00 p. m. the Commemorative Tablet, containing the names of those who contributed in an outstanding way to the achievement of Philippine freedom, will be unveiled at Malacaiian by His Excellency, MANUEL L. QUEZON, President of the PJi"ilippines. COl!Y or

Anniversar'Y Pl'o(uam as Dublished.


598

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

AT THE HEAD OF THE MILITARY UNITS The Commanding Officers of the Various Military and Cadet Regiments represented in the First Commonwealth Ann iversa ry Parade.

La Salle College Color Bearers


THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE) PHIiLIPPLNES

599

lftrogram* I. "Philippines Triumphant," the Win ning Commonwealth Anniversary Hymn . -Chorus of one thousand studen ts from the Centro Escolar Umversl t y, Far Eastern University, National University, Philippine Normal School, Philippine Women's University, University of Manila and University of the Philippines.-Dr. Francisco Santiago, Conductor. II. Awarding of Prizes to the Winners in the Various Contests.Mrs. MANUEL L. QUEZON. 1. The Author of the Best Essay. 2. The Authors of the Best Hymn. 3. The Model Homesteader. 4. The Model Tenant. 5. The Model Industrial Laborer. 6. The Model Employer. 7. The Filipino Who Has Initiated and Developed a New and Important Industry. III. Presentation of the Commemorative Tablet.-The Honorable ELPIDIO QUIRINO, Secretary of the Interior, Chairman, Commonwealth Anniversary Committee. IV. Address and Unveiling of the Tablet. -- His Excellency, MANUEL L. QUEZON, President of the Philippines. V. The Philippine National Anthem. The Star-Spangled Bann.er.

EVENING ~

Clrnncpri anll Yirpwnrks :misplay From 8.30 to 9.30 p. m.-Concert by the Philippine Army Band at the Old Luneta. At 9 :30 p. m.-Fireworks display at the New Luneta.

(!tommomuea1t4 J\nniuernary Qrommittee ~ Hon. ELPIDIO QUIRINO, Chairman MEMBERS

Hon. Claudio Sandoval Mr. Lino J. Castillejo Maj. Gen. Basilio J . Valdes Mr. Arsenio N. Luz Hon. Faustino Aguilar Mr. Vicente Madligal Hon. Juan Posadas Mrs. Pilar Hidalgo-Lim Dr. Jorge Bocobo Mr. Pedro Aunario Dr. Gabriel Mafialac Dr. Carlos P. Romulo Mr. Juan Ruiz Dr. Victor Buencamino Mr. Teodoro Evangelista, Secl'etary â&#x20AC;˘ Copy of Anniversary Program as published.


600

CORNEJO'S CO MMONWEAL'l'H DlRECTORY OF THEPHrLlPPINES

Commonwealth First Anniversary Parade

-

"

Ateneo de


THE COMMONWEALTH OF THI!l PHDLIPPfNES

601

SPEECH OF

HIS EXCELLENCY

MANUEL L. QUEZON President of the Philippines Delivered on November 15, 1936, on the Occasion of the Inauguration of the First Anniversary of the Commonwealth of the Philippines

ltIR. HIGH

COMMISSIONER, My FELLOW CITIZENS:

One year ago today. the government of the Commonwealth was inaugurated. Through the choice of our people it was my privilege to head this new government and to assume the xesponsibilities for a very difiicult task. When on this same day a year ago, I took my oath of office, my heart was 'full of hope, but my mind of doubt, as to nlY ability to fulfill the duties imposed upon mc by the newly born nation. Of one thing 1 was certain-my determination to do everything in my power to measure up to the Expectations of my people. The xest I left in the hands of God. As I look back upon the year just passed, I feel that we have -every right to be thankful to the Almighty for His Divine guidance and to you, my beloved countrymen, for your wholehearted support and cooperation. It is with a deep sen!'".e ()f humility that I turn my eyes to Him at this moment to seek further light and prQtection and to you for continUied help in the remaining years of my administration. I shall not at this juncture undertake to .enumerate the legislation enacted by our N:ltional Assembly in fulfillment of the pledges we have made to our people. nor the administrative measures and executive orders in conformity thereto. It is enough for me to say that in m'y opinion the National Assembly has made a recol'd unequalled by any legislative body in the world in carrying out <lUr pre-election commitments. And as for the record of my administration it is for the future, and not for us, to judge. On this occasion I shall devote myself entirely to one thought, which is my most serious con~ cerp. Ladies and Gentlemen: The task of establishing a new government is indeed a difficult one. But the mere setting up of the

governmental mechanism and making' it function efficiently is after all not beyond the reach of an ordi nary man endowed with real commonsense, some knowledge of constitutional law and honest purpose and strong will. To establish a new government in our day, when a great social revolution is takln~ place and n ew ideas and id eals are gripping the imagination and emotions of the masse~, demanding t he recognition of rights which have been ignored and denied by governments since the dawn of civilization, one must haye slifficient vision to see this world-wide change and wisdom to meet it fearlessly and squarely. We are not building a nation to last during our hours and a few succeeding generations. My task-that which you have confided in me-is not only to set up the government of the Commonwealth that will last but for ten years, but to lay the foundations for the government of an indep~ndent State that will last a s long as the world lasts, and. therefore, it is my du ty to foresee the future and to adopt a course that will meet the problems of the n ew day. The time is past when we can blissfully ignore the lot of the man and woman who toil in the soil or who work in the factories. The time is past when any government can feel secure without the full support and cooperation of the masses of the people,--cooperation coming not from a sense of duty only. much less from fear, but cooperation which is the result of devotion for and loyalty to their government engendered by a sense of satisfaction and happiness which their government has insur路 ed for them. The government of the Phil4 ippines has the rare privilege and opportu~ nity of learning from the experience of much older nations. The problem of our age is how to harmonize property right with the right to live,-and the right to live is para-


60 2

t;ORNEJO'S COMMONWEA:i:TIi DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

Commonwealth First Anniversary Parade


THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHrLrpPINES

603

S a n Ju a n d e Letran Cadets

mount and abo\'e every other right. (Ap路 plause) . In pagan Rome it was proclaimed that the r ight of a man to h is property meant not only the right to use it but the right to abuse it. " J us u ten di et ab u tendi," But that was a proper concept of right before the Son of Man laid down as the supreme la,..' of human relations: Love thy neighbor as thyself. Do unto others what you would that others do unto you. It is here then 'where pagan and Christian civilizations conflict. The former is the philosophy of self路 ishness; the latter of love and justice. No Christian people should adm it, much less prac路 tise, the theory that he who has can abuse or misuse his possession. Vt'hat we have in excess of Our needs and reasonable luxuries should be spent pro bono publi c. The struggle that we see e\'erywhere is between those who have and those wh o have not. The fortner 1rying to keep evel'ything it has mindless of the misery of tho se who have not. The latter trying to take away everyth ing from those who have, forgetting that they have worked for it and are entitled to the fruit of their labor whether manual or mental. The ta~k ()f Our government is not on ly t o protect the rip:ht of those who have to the proper use and enjoyment of their property, but also to deman d th at those who h ave n ot received the fr uits of their labor in its entirety and should

have sufficient for their needs and of their dependents. It is time for us to sound thcl \varning: Let no one believe that he can still continue exploiting his fellowmen without in the end suffering from it. He \.\'ho owns had bettler give a part of what he owns to the community in which he lives if he wants to conserve the rest for himself. (Applause). It is my ambition that this new nation will be able to undertake changes in its national economy, in its industrial and agricultUl'a l organizations looking toward the be tterment of the working class without depriving capital of its rights, without endangering our social and political institutions, and all in the mid st of peace and order, by cooperation between all the elements of the community ann in t.he spirit of the Nazat1ene-Love thy neighbor. Democracy offers the means to 901\'e this problem; a d emocracy properly understood and directed. We are laying th e foundation for a nation that will live not ten years, not a century, but as long as the world lasts; and 1 call upon every man and woman of my co ur..try in this first anmiversal'Y of t he路 inauguration of the Commonwealth to cooperate with us in our efforts to bring about a situation that will insure the existence of this nation forever !


604

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

SPEECH OF THE

HON. ELPIDIO QUIRINO Secretary of the Interior Chairman of the Commonwealth Anniversary Committee Delivered at Malacaiian Palace on Sunday, November 15, 1936

MR. PRESIDENT, MR. HIGH COMMISSIONER, MRS. QUEZON, AND LADIES AND GENTLEMEN:

'Ve commemorate today the initial fulfillment of four centu ries of struggles f r om obSClnity to freedom . In barely a year of its fpundation, t h e Commonw-ealth of the Philippines has established confidence at home and inspired admiration abroad. It ha::; met every task and responsibility lea.ding to the recognitio n of a truly independ ent nation. Its accomplishments justify all our hopes in the future Philippine Republic. But we cannot merely dedicate this solemn occasion to such an achievement however splendid. Much less can 'we, with a proper sense of history. just accredit this achi~ve颅 ment to our epoch. There have been two great eras in our life, and we are living in a third. The first was the era of national awakeening ; the second, the revolutionary era; and this in wh ich we live, t he e ra of construction. The heroes and martyrs who before us gladly gave their lives that this country might live, deserve, therefore, as eloquent a place in this memorial. Vve must not forget to hon or their d eeds and the ir valor, tho se who first saw t h e light of Jibel垄y gave their all fighting for it. They left to us as our sacred hel;tage t heir undying love for freedom . Nor must we forget that we owe a debt of gratitude to the men not of our own race but whom fortune had chosen to guide our destiny as if it ,,'ere their own. Their extraordinary benevolence and so licitude for Our wellbeing enriched the life of the nation that t hey helped to build. So this occasion which is simplicity itself holds a far d eeper and greater s ignificance

than is implied by the mere ceremony of unveiling a memorial tablet. For at last, after centuries of being held in doubt, of being belittled and looked upon at times with pity and contempt, our capacity as a race is v indicated. The intrepidity of Magellan, too, is happily remembered; Spain's early civilizing and Christianizing spirit justly rewarded; and America's noble work in the Orient fr om McKinley to Murphy fittingly g lorified. The joyous outcome of events, unfolded to our ey es by this celebration, has come sooner than even our fond est hopes had ever drea med of largely beca use of the wise, aggressive and intellige,nt leadership of the first Filipino to occupy this historic seat of authority-Malacafian. He a ssumed the reins of th is governm en t in an era of depression and s ufferin g the world over. But while the O'overnment of old er and f ar more stable ~ations floundered, he steadily s teered ourS with a firm and unerring hand, immediately t r ansforming this governm ent from a found~路 ling into one that is solvent, enduring and prosperous.

He has completed in one year a progTam of political and economic development fal" the ten-year period preparatory to the auto~ matic g rant of our ind ependence. He has established the national credit here an abroa d. He has rapidly acquired a renown in wodd affairs tluough the organization of an orderly and fearless government, thereby enhaneing the L national prestige. He has founded a citizen army and a centralized' state police ror our national defense and in路 ternal security. He has reorganized the government to effect economy in exp.e ndit. ures and efficiency in the public service, and,


THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHlL1PPINES

by the high standard of official integrity and morale permeating his decisions, doctrines and appointments he has everywhere gaiDed confidence for the government. He created councils, boards and companies which reinvigorated and revitalized all the other agencies for the proper and adequate material development of the country. He has laid ample provision for the protection and conservation of our high natural resources for the benefit of this and the succeeding generations. He has endeavored to elevate the standard of living of our masses and to provide for their security. He has set up a substantial relief and rehabilitation program ror the distressed and for the arne .. Horation of the poor and the unemployed. He has spurred the country to productive activities, laying special emphasis on the proper orientation of the pe<>ple for their new duties and responsibilities. The task of nation-building has certainly gained a great impetus under him. He has inaugurated a comprehensive program of large-scale development of the erstwhile Vii'gin region of Mindanao. He has created four new cities and several municipalities. He has solidified our political institutions, encouraged trade and commerce, given ne\v life to agriculture, awakened industries, mobilized men and means. and afforded new opportunities for the enhancement of the material welfare of the general populace. In the.se and in various ways, and in a measure far exceeding our expectations, he has endeavored to establish a well-rounded national life, securely able to withstand the ten years' transition period and calculated to outlast any change of administration or government. Mr, President. yours has been the privilege and the great opportunity to advance the cause of your race and to carry into fulfillment the realization of the ideals of your country. We. therefore, call upon you to unveil this tablet bearing the names of OUl~ departed illustrions heroes and leaders-Burgos. Rizal, Marcelo del Pilar, Bonifacio, JaCinto, Mabini and Luna

605

and the name of Presidents of the United States-McKinley, Wilson and Franklin D. Roosevelt j of Amel'ican governors-generalTaft, Harrison and Murphy j and Senators and Congressmen-Cooper, Jones, Hawes, Cutting, Hare, Tydings and McDuffie. In an outstanding way they all helped and labored with unselfish devotion that our dream of independence may become a reality. Y;ours, Mr. President, does not appear on this tablet, because although we are sure that posterity will similarly engrave your name in plates and letters of gold, while you live we can only fittingly write your name in our hearts-in the hearts of fourteen million peo路 pIe who Jive in everlasting gratitude to you as their benefactor and liberator for your noble deeds and unselfish leadership, As a worthy depository! of the ideals, traditions, and the hopes of this vigorous race, allow me to present, therefore. in the name of the Commonwealth Anniversary committee this Gold Memorial Tablet . 'W ith it goes the prayer of your people that t he memory it seeks to hold inviolate, will ever continue to inspire faith and confidence in the guiding spirit of our heroes and martyrs and in the generous assistance of our benefactors. and that we will ever follow their example of selfabnegation and fortitude in the search for the common good. No depth of human suffering, no heigbt of material comfort can ever dissuade our people to deviate from our set course of right and justice. For. never as a people have we wavered to follow the path of national duty. May we all remember that OUi' national freedom is not yet won. and that if we abandon or falter at this hour in its search, Or stop to count the sacrifice to personal comfort and convenience in achieving it. we cannot, we shall never attain it. So in entrusting this tablet to you. Mr. President. we l'enew our faith and trust in that high ideal and in your ability to bl'ing into complete fulfillment the cause that has been richly consecrated by your endeavor and by the lives and sufferings of our martYi's and heroes.


·606

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DLRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I~

J

~

~¥ ~

~ i<lt

~v:

~ ~

XJ ~Y,;Y:

~X? ~1?

~

~ R'P.

~I f.,Y, /

~ -~

mile Qrllmmemllraiiue mabIe! The 24-carat gold Commonwealth first anniversary oommemorative tablet which was unveiled at Malacanan Su nday, November 15, 1936, bears the names of Americans and Filipinos '(who have r.ODtributed to the establishment of the Commonwealth of the Philippines." The tablet, made from gold donated by Judge Haussermann, Jan H. Marsman and Andres Soriano, was executed by Vda. e Hijos de Crispulo Za-

~~

~

I!~

~~ ~u

~~ ~

~~

mora. The complete inscription on the tablet follows:

"(!!l'1ebraiion of tl1e IFirst )\nniuersar!l of tl1e Q:ommonlU!'altl1 of t11!' PI1i1ippines -

"Qilut.tan!>ing Irn!>." IUl)o I)"u. rontribnlP!> to tl1l" cst;;tblishrncut of th.P Q;"ommunw£>alth of the

~

~

zt.. ~ u ~ ~\

@

Philippines:

A~

"Jose Burgos, Jose Rizal, Marcelo H. del Pilar, Andres Bonifacio, Emilio Ja cin to , Apolinario Mabini, Antonio Luna.

A~ ~" ~,~

"Presidents of the United States: William Me-

It~

.bJ

't\\i

?\'l?

'it

~I

~

Kinley, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

~

~"illiam

W

Murphy.

~

X?

~

~

% ~

X?

W ~

~

"Filipino patrio .. and martyr"

'Woodrow

'Wilson,

"Governors Ge n e ral of the Philippine

Island :; :

H. Taft, Francis Burton Harrison, Frank"

"Authors of Congressional Acts: H enry A. Cooper, 'Willi am Atkinson Jon es, Harry B. Hawes, Butler Hare, Bronson Cutting, Millard E. Tydings, .T ohn McDuffie. Manila, Phjljppines, November 15 , 1936."

~~

~

~

~ ).~ ~ fIt~

~ ~ 11~

~

~

~

t&'~.»~~.»~~.»~~~~.»~:!! ~~~~ ~>~~.»~~.»~~


THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES

OFFICE OF THE AMERICAN TRADE COMMISSIONER 410 HEACOCK BUILDING MANILA, P. I.

PHILIPPINE ECONOMIC CONDITIONS ANNUAL REPORT FOR 1936 PREPARED BY

J. BARTLETT RICHARDS AMERICAN TRADE COMMISSIONER

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

607


608

CORNEJO'S COMf,lONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHrtiIPPINES

PHILIPPINE ECONOMIC CONDITIONS ANNUAL REPORT FOR 1936 (Released January 23 , 1937)

GENERAL RESUME

The upward trend in Philippine business which became evident in 1935 was accentuated in 1936 and assumed some of the aspects of a boom. Export crops were generally good and, w ith the exception of tobacco, were in excellent demand in American and foreign markets. Prices reached higher levels than have been seen in recent years and the va lue of exports, in路 cluding gold, was greater than in any year since 1929. Includin g some P42,OOO,OOO f or gold and approximately P6,OOO,OOO for sugar bene fit payments, which may be c-onsidered as equivalent to exports of sugar, the total value of exports was P320,896,000, or only about four percent below the record 1929 figure. Imports also increased but not in the same proportion, due to greater stability of prices on imported goods, and the favorable balance of trade reached a record figure . Prices of some imported goods increased rapidly toward the end of the year, indicating t.hat there will be a considerable increase in the value of imports in ]937. Cred it conditions were excellent.

Payment of P30,000,000 in sugar benefits in the later part of 1935 and early 1936, largely to a class of people who were a heady in good financial condition and who had no incentive to expand their productive capacity, du e to sugar limitation, created a pool of funds available for investment, wh ich found its way mainly into the mining share market. Share quotations advanced steadily and rapidly th roughout most of the year, the opportunity for quick and spectacular profits attracting savings an d even interesting some foreign capital. This activity was reflected in bank figures, with demand deposits nearly doubling in the course of the year, while overdrafts, loans and cash increased substantially. Debits to incli路 vidual accounts, during the height of the speculative movement, averaged 150 percent greater than the previous year. There was a moderate reaction toward the end of the year. Note circulation increased markedly, due to sugar benefit and veterans bonus payments and to general prosperous conditions. In the exchange market, the peso was strong throughout the year, due to the heavy increase in exports, a r eduction in remittances, particularly to Spain, and some imports of capital attracted by invesbnent opportunities. The commonwealth Government benefited from the marked in crea se in pl'osperity in its first full year, revenues in the General Fund increasing to about P76,675 ,OOO, compared with 1'65,000,000 in 1935. The 1936 figure in cludes P4,1)79,000, representing repayment by the Philippine National Bank of old advances. The increase in revenue was sufficient to cover augmented expenditures for national defense and economic measures incident to the establishment of the new Government, and a comfortable sUl'plus was shown for the year. Actual expenditures in 1936 totaled about P71,OOO,OOO, including P9,990,OOO, representing a loan to the Manila Railroad Company to penn it it to l'etil'e bonds. N E"W revenue bills were passed by the National Assembly in its 1936 session to cover increased appropriations for the next year and a balance of revenues and appropriations fo r 1937, in the neighborhood of P80,OOD,000, appears probable. Receipts in the Special Funds for highways and port works in 1936


THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES

609

appear to have been at least 40 percent greater than in 1935, due partly to heavy imports of gasoline and lubricating oil during the end of the year in anticipation of a tax increase, partly to restoration of sugar exports to a normal basis and partLy to general prosperity. Government companies with the exception of the railroads, showed increased profits in 1936 and promise to do even better in 1937. Se.veral new Government companies were formed or authorized, including the National . Rice and Corn. Corporation, which was active in the stabilization of rice prices during the year. A nati-onal Power Corporation, organized at the end of the year, is empowered to issue bonds to finance the development and operation of hydro-electric projects. A national Poroduoe Exchange, to facilitate trading in agricultural products, is in process of oTganization, and a committee has recommended the organization of a National Iron Company to study the possibility of developing iron ore deposits. The National Development Company was reorganized as a public company. The na-4 tional Economic Council, organized at the begiI ~ ning of 1936, was engaged during the year in the study of the industrial needs and possibiiities of the country. A Radio Advisory Board was organized to study the possibility of nationalizing radio broadcasting and a Government Service Insurance system was authorized to replace the pension funds . ..- - Sugar production was on a more nearly normal basis in the 1935-36 season, with a total production of about 952,000 short tons. The crop fell short of expectations due to unfavorable weather and was insufficient to cover an export quota of 952,000 tons and a domestic quota of 70,000 tons, making it necessary to dra·,v on the previous year's reserve. The revenue to the sugar industry was, therefore, considerably greater than the crop figuTe would indicate, even taking into consideration the better prices in 1936. The 1934-35 crop totaled 691,000 tons but that included 100,000 tons of reserve, which brought in no revenue. Alcohol production totaled 59,384,854 proof libel'S, against 54,978,000 proof liters in the same period of 1935.

• I

Production of other export crops was in general not mucth greater in quantity than in 1935 but substantially greater in value. Copra production was only slightly greater than in 1935 and exports were about 10 percent greater in volume but about 31 percent greater in value. Coconut oil exports were slightly reduced in quantity but increased about 13 percent in value. Copra cake and meal and desiccated coconut exports increased moderately in volume and value. Abaca production decreased about 14 percent, while exports decreased 8 percent in volume but increased about 50 percent in value. The small tobacco crop of 1935, together with disturbances in tlhe principal foreign market, and decreased demand in the second best market, led to a 32 percent decrease in ·the volume of leaf tobacco exports, with a more moderate decline in value. The tobacco crop harvested in 1936 was nearly normal, however. Cigar production was greatly reduced due to reduced demand from the United States. Lumber exports were apparently nearly 30 percent greater than in 1935 and with the domestic market also good, miJIs were working to capacity in the later part of the year and some of them double shifts. Production and exportation of embroideries, cordage and pearl buttons was somewhat lower than in 1935, but exports of hats improved. Gold production increased about, 37 percent and iron ore nearly 100 percent. B(lth arB expected to show further increases in 1937 and there may be a moderate production of chromite, manganese and copper. Production for the domestic market improved in most lines, with cement production

showin~ an increase of about 14 percent due to greater building activity. Cigar and cigarette

Prod~ctlOn for the domestic market increased only about 2 percent, doing very little toward makmg up for the decline in exports of cigars. The four manufacturers of canvas rubbersoled shoes increased their production nearly 25 percent and are now supplying practically the e:ire domestic requirements. Leather shoe factories also had a good year, sales increasing bv a ut 20 percent. Manufacturers of soap, vege table lard and margarine were busy throughou't 20


610

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEAL'l'H DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

the year, in spite of losing most of their American market. Three new companies were organized to make soaps, perfumes and vegetable lard, but none of them had started bus~ess by the end of the year. A company was organized at the end of the year to can tuna fIsh . . There was a good market for most imported goods, although cotton textiles moved rather slowly' during most of the year. Total Imports of cotton textiles were substantially Jower than in 1935, but the reduction was parUy made up by heavier imports of rayon from Japan. I.mports of cotton cloth from the United States continued to decline, In spite of the Japanese quota agreement. The demand fol' .otton textiles increased strongly in the latter part of the year but advancing local prices never quite caught up to American mill prices and the inability of American mills to offer prompt or near delivery was an added deter· rent to business being placed. Japanese competition continued keen during most of the period, but was largely withdrawn at the end of the year, promising a much better market for American goods in the first half of 1937 if the mills are able to take advantage of the opportumty. Mine and building activity brought ab)lit a marked increase in the sale of machinery and iron and steel products. Japanese competition in nails, wire and galvanized sheets in· creased durillg the year but was suddenly discontinued in December, when Japanese priees ,,·ere increased as much as 50 Ii~rcent. European pl' ices on these products also rose sharply leaving the field to the United States at the end of the y~ar. GeneTal prosperity created a good market for automobiles and accessories, flour and other foodstuffs, electrical equipment, paints, toiletn es and a variety of other goods. Auto· mobile sales were up 17 percen t , truck sales up 15 percent and radio registrations up nearly 2~ percent. Sales tax receipts indicate an increase of about 23 percent in total sales recorded. Export cargoes were about 30 percent greater than in 1935 due mainly to increased su· gar shipments but partly to logs, lumber, iron ore and other commodities. Inter-island freight and passenger movement was very good tlu-oughout the year. Railroad carloadings did not increase in spite of the larger sugar crop, due to continued competition from other forms of ta:ansportation. Scheduled airplane services to Baguio and Paracale were increasingly popular. Th e Manila-Iloilo-Davao service was suspended, folIowing the loss of a plane in July, the first serious accident to a transport plane since scheduled services were started in 1933. This service, as well as the Manila- Iloilo service~ will be resumed early in 1937 with an amphibian plane of improved model. Exports, not including gold, totaled P272,896,106, an increase of 45 percent over 1935~ The increase was due partly to sugar exports, ,,~hich were nearly twice as great as the previous year, but exports of abaca, coconult products, lumber and timber, hats, cutch and rna· guey were also substantially greater. Cordage, embl'oidedes, pearl buttons, leaf tobacco and cigars were exported in reduced volume and value in 1936. Exports to the United States were 43 percent greater than in 1935 and made up about 79 percent of total exports, against 80 percent the previous year. Exports of sugar to the United States nearly doubled while exports of other products, notabl y coconut products, hemp and lumber, increased about 21 percent. Exports to Japan were 57 percent a1head of 1935, owing chiefly to increased shipments of iron ore, logs and hemp, and made up 6.15 percent of total exports, compared with 5.69 percent the year before. Exports to other Oriental Countr1es were slightly increased and exports to Europe were up 61 percent, due to heavier shipments of copra in the first half of the year and lumber throughout the year and to bet,er prices for abaca and copra cake. Imports totaled P202,252,349, or 18 percent greater than in 1935. They' were slightly under t he 1930 figure but much greater than in any more recent year. They increased in nearly every category', excepting cotton cloth and printed matter.


THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES

611

1m orts from the United States were 13 percent better than in 1935 and made up 61 ~ total imports compared with 64 percent in 1935 and an average of about 63 perpercen t o ' . . S d d cent for the past ten years. Imports of cotton textiles from the Uruted ltares. ~ere ~e uce t but most other products, notably machinery, iron and steel products, e ectnca e~Ulpmen, automobiles and tires, were received in greater volume. Imports from Japan Increased nine percent and made up 13.12 percent of total imports, a slight decrease. from the 14.23 rcent in 1935. Rayon textiles and canned sardines account for a considerable part of the rncrease. There are indications that Japanese competition in this market will be less keen . the first few months of 1937. Imports from all European countries were substantially iu:eased, notably the Netherlands, Germany, Great Britain .and Belgium. Heavy im~orts of flour from Australia and Canada increased the value of Imports from those countries. The visible balance of merchandise trade in 1936 was favorable in the amount of MO,路 643757. If gold exports are included, 1fu.e favorable balance is increased to about f'112,OOO.(lOD: and with sugar benefit payments considered as equivalent to sugar exports, to f'118,000,000, a record figure. The favorable balance was due as usual to a large favorable balance with the United States, which amounted in 1936 to P92,056,129, plus P42.000,000 of gold. Trade with Orientlal Countries showed an unfavorable balance of P28,689,578, of which P9,742,258 was due to trade witlh Japan. With Europe and the rest of the world, there was a favorable balance of f'6,960,924. In 1935, the favorable balance with the United States was P41,138,073 (plus P26,000,000 of gold), the unfavorable balance with Oriental Countries P25,248,500 (of which P13,624,220 was from trade with Japan) and the favorable balance with Europe and the rest of the world onlY' Pl.152,489. The National Assembly in its first regular s'e ssion passed a record number of bills, including several revenue bills increasing existing taxes and creating new ones. Among thp. taxes increased were the inheritance tax, income tax, firearm license fees, tax on mining production, tax on retail leaf tobacco dealers, taxes on gasoline and lubricating oil and motor vehicles license fees. New taxes include an amusement tax and a privilege tax on brokers and market vendors. The duty and excise tax on beer were increased, the former subject to American approval. A bill was passed giving the President of the Philippines the right to increase duties by a maximum of 400 percent and decrease them by a maximum of 75 percent, by executive order. This also awaits American approval. Provisi-on was made for a ",comprehensive census in 1937. A number of labor bills were passed, including a bill providing for a Court of Industt路ial Relations, and one fixing a minimum wage for Government employees. Agriculture was the beneficiary of bills providing for warehouses for copra and tobacco, making appropriations for extermination of pests and diseases, creating a livestock promotion fund and a buntal fiber stabilization fund and creating a National Produce Exchange to facilitate trading in agricultural products. A new comprehensive mining law and a Bureau of Mines were provided to regulate mining and a Securities Conunission to protect investors. Aviation was encouraged by an appropriation for airmail contracts. An export tax was imposed on shells. and an embargo on buntal fiber. The President was authorized to negotiate witlh the President of the United States toward the holding of an economic and trade conference. A bill creating a Government-owned National Merchandising Corporation to improve the competitive position of Filipino retailers failed of approval, as did a bill to impose a 10 percent tax on certain luxuries, induding automobiles. The volume of exports may be expected to increase moderately in 1937. Sugar exports will be the same as in 1936 and copra and abaca production is apparently not likely to increase very notably in the first half of 1937, although some increase may be expected in the last half of the year. Lumber and ore shipments will probably increase in 1937 and cigar p,nd leaf tobacco exports will probably' not go any lower. Prices are high at the end of the year and if they hold at anywhere near the p resent level the value of exports should show


612

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

a substantial increase and, including gold, might even approach the 1929 figure. Prices of some of the principal imports increased rapidly at the end of the year. Imports in 1937 are likely to increase moderately in quantity and more substantially in value and the very heavy favorable balance shown in 1936 will probably be reduced. Government revenues and expen. ditures will pl'obably be balanced at around P80,OOO,OOO. Banks may find increased use for their resources, with the higher prices of both imported and native products. Although the Philippines are dependent to a greater extent than most countries on conditions in foreign markets, making predictions difficult, it seems probable that the Islands will experience anotiber year of prosperity in 1937. The results' of the Trade Conference planned to be held in 'Washington during the year will exert a psychological influence. ".

FOREIGN TRADE With value of imports and exports exceptionally heavy in December, according to the Bureau of Customs, in spite of the shortage of ships, Philippine foreign trade reached the highest total since 1929, with a balance of exports over imports larger than in any previous year. Exports, including gold, totaled about P314,000,OOO, and sugar benefit payments, equivalent to exportation of sugar, brought the figure to about P320,896,000, or only about P12,' 000,000 under tihe r ecord established in 1929. The increase over 1935 exports, including gold and sugar benefit payments, is about 32 percent. Imports totaled P202,252,349, ",Thich is below the figure for 1930, but exceeds that for any subsequent year and exceeds 1935 by 18 percent. Excluding gold and benefit payments, values of imports and exports in the past six years have been as follows:

Imports 1931 ............ ......... P198,357,437 1932 ........... .......... 158,790,170 1933 .. ..... .............. 134,722,926 1934 ................ ..... 167,214,221 1935 ..................... 171,047,699 1936 .......... _ .... _ 202,252,349

.....

Exports P207,944,148 190,676,161 211,542,105 220,807,271 188,491,360 272,896,106

r

Balance 9,586,711 31,885,991 76,819,179 53,593,050 17,443,661 70,643,7;;7

The visible balance of merchandise trade (excluding gold) in 1936 was favorable in the amount of P70,643,757. If gold is included, being exported as a Philippine product rather than as treasure, the balance is about P112,000,OOO (gold exports being estimated at about '42,000,路 000) . The favorable balance has been due every year since 1921 to a large favorable balance with the United States, which more than offsets an unfavorable balance with oriental countries. There is usually a moderate favorable balance with Europe. ThIS was again tlle case in 1936, when trade with the United States showed a favorable balance of P92,056,129, plus about P42,000,000 of gold. Trade with Oriental countries showed an unfavorable balance of P28,689,578, of which P9,742,258 was due to trade with Japan. With Europe, there was a favorable balance of P6,470,986, with Canada an unfavOTable balance of P1,115,986, and with other countries, mainly South American and African, a favorablfl balance of Pl,605,924. In 1935, the favorable balance with the United States was P41,138,073 (plus f:26,OOO,OOO for gold), the unfavorable balance with Oriental countries P25,248,500 (of which PI3,624,220 '\V8& .- President Quezon. witb Secretary of Justice Yulo and a staff of advisers, left for the United States on JafP ual'y) 23. 1937, to prepare tbe grounds for Philippine-American Trade Conference at Washington. D. C.-Ed.


THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES

613

from trade with Japan) and tlhe favorable balance with the rest of the wOl"ld only Pl,152,489. The adverse trade balance with Japan was substantially reduced, exports to that country being '6,067,543 greater than in 1935, while imports from Japan increased only, P2,185,581.

Exports to the United States (not including gold) were about 43 percent greater tlhan in 1935, due largely to increased exports of sugar. Exports. of products other than ~u足 gar to the United States were about 21 percent p'eater tha~ m 193~, howev~r, due ~ mcreased value of shipments of abaca and coconut products (chIefly owmg to hlgher pnces). About 79 percent of total exports went to the United States in 1936, against 80 percent the previous year. Exports to Japan, the second largest mar ket, were 57 percent ahead of 1935, owing chiefly to iron ore, logs and hemp, and made up 6.15 percent of total exports, compared with 5.69 percent the year before. Exports to all other Oriental Countries, excepting Hong Kong, were moderately increased, but the aggregate made up only 2.17 percent of total exports, against three percent in 1935. Exports to Europe were up 61 percent, due to heavier purchases of copra in the first half of the year and lumber throughout the year, and to better prices for abaca and copra cake. All European countries participated in the increase excepting Spain, whel'e political conditions brought about a practical cessation of imports from the PhJlippines in the latter part of the year. Exports to the Netherlands were nearl)!' eight times as great as in 1935, and to Italy nearly t en times as g.l'eat, both, largely ori. account of copra. Exports to Germany doubled and to Fra;nce, Belgium and Great Britain increased 50 00 75 percent. Sweden feU off slightly but Denmark became an important customer for the first time. Sugar exports totaled P123,874,644 in 1936, or nearly double the P65,981,359 for 1935. Exports of abaca were reduced in quantity but up about 50 percent in value. Copra exports were up about 10 percent in quantity and 30 percent in value, while coconut oil shipments were slightly lower in quantity but up about 12 percent in value. Volume and value were greater in the case of copra cake and meal, desiccated coconut, lumber and timber, !hats, cutch and maguey. Cordage, embroideries, buttons, leaf tobacco and cigars were exported in reduced volume and value in 1936. Imports from the United Sta.tes were about 13 percent over those for 1935 and made up 61 percent of total imports, compared with 64 percent in 1935. The average for the past ten years is 63 percent. Imports of cotton textiles from the United States were reduced but most other products, notably machinery, iron and steel products, electrical goods, automobiles and tIres, were received in greater volume. Imports from the United States were heavy in December, in spite of a slhortage of shipping, but the effects of that shortage may be expected to be felt in the first quarter of 1937, offsetting the otherwise improved competitive position of most American products. Imports from Japan increased about ni le percent and made up 13.12 percent of total imports, a decline from the 14.23 percent in 1935. Increased imports of rayon textiles, canned sardines, wire and nails, flour and a variety of other goods from Japan were noted, but imports of cotton textiles were r educed. There were indicat ions that Japanese competition in this market might be less keen in the first part of 1937. Among other Oriental Countries, imports were notably increased from Australia (flour, butter, condensed milk), French IndoChina (rice), Siam (rice), and Hong Kong (cotton textiles) . From British East Indies (sugar 6~ck.ing). the increase was slight and from Netherland India (mainly oil), there was a ~hght reduction. Imports from China fell off slightly, in spite of considerably increased unports of cotton cloth in the first half of 1936. Aggregate imports from Oriental Countries ~ncluding Japan, were 24 percent greater than in 1935 and made up 25.42 percent of totai nnports, against 24.33 percent in 1935.


614

CORNEJO'S COMi\IONWEALTH DIRECTORY

o-r

THE PH ILIPP INES

Imports from Be lg ium (iron and steel products). Germany (fertilizers, iron and steel, machinery, etc.) I Great Britain (cotton goods, machinery, etc.) a nd t he Netherlands (dairy products) increased notably, from France more moderately. From Switzerland (cotton cloth, milk) I there was a slight decline. Aggregate imports from Europe were 36 percent greater than in 1935 and made up 11.69 percent of the rota ., against 10.14 percent in 1935. Imports from Canada (flour, insulated wire, chemicals, paper ) increased about 34 per· cent and made up 1.19 percent of the total, against 1.04 percent the previous year. From Other Countries, mainly South America and Africa, imports increased about 22 percent, due largely to canned beef from Uruguay. Imports of wheat f lour, automob ile tires, electrical machinery and a pparatus , mach inery, iron and steel products, dairy products and paints were 30 to 45 percent greater than in 1935, according to Customs returns. Rice imports were up nearly 1,000 percent. Imports of most other goods were increased from 10 to 30 percent, major exceptions being cotton cloth. mineral oils and tobacco products. Imports of mineral oils were heavy' in December and it is believed that actual imports for the year were at leas't 10 percent greater than in 1935. Sales of cigarettes were up 25 percent in 1936, imports were apparently increased about as much and it is difficult to find any explanation for the red uction indicated by t!he Customs figure. PRINCIPAL PHILlP,P,INE IM P ORT S - 1929, 1935 a nd 1936 (Values in Pesos: Pl.OO equa ls U.S . $0.50) 1929

Wheat flour . ........ •... .. . . . _..... . . . . . .. . Rice . . .. . ... . .............. . .. .. .. . ....... . Other breadstuffs .. . ........... . ..... .. . . . . Automobiles and trucks . . ..... . . . . . ... . ... . Automobile parts .... . ....... . ............. . Other cars, carriages and parts .......... . . Automobile tires .......... . ... . ............ . Other rubber goods ........... . . . ......... . Chemicals, drugs, dyes and medicines ....... . Coal ............... _ ... . ... . ........... _•.. Cocoa and manufactures ............. . .. . . . Coffee ..................... _........ . ... .. .

Cotton clotlh ............. . ........ _.... .. .. . Other cotton ............................ . . Silk and rayon goods ................... .. .. . Electrical machinery and apparatus ....... . Explosives . . ......... . ..... . ........... . .. . Fertilizers . . ... . . . ... . . ... . ............ . .. . Vegetable fibers and manufactures ...... . .. . F ish and fish products .. . .... . .......... . . . Fruits and nuts . ................. . ....... . Glass and g lassware ..... .. ........ . . . .. . . . Agricultural implements ... . .... . ...... . _ . . . Machinery and parts . . ..... .. . . .. ... .. . ... . Iron and steel goods . . . . . . ......... . .. .. ... . Leath er and products ... . . . . . . .. .. . .... . . . . Meat products ... . .... .. . . .. . . .. . ... . ... . .

10,120,155 11,620,026 2,941,539 9,722,830 2,264,846 2,737,890 3,283,785 2,li3,219 5,088,845 5,138,556 1,507,253 2,045,697 37,743,012 16,210,822 9,328,442 7;460,050 608,675 5,763,248 6,468,642 4,673,920 3,404,801 1,927,013 266,956 17,885,276 25,660,099 3.613,946 6,123,238

1935

5,711 ,254 556,208 1,743,273 5,617,055 1,583,392 949,233 2,013,839 1,414,645 5,154,636 1,538,636 1,010,954 1,346,778 20,099,242 10,500,599 4,849,400 4,307,336 1,334,781 3,620,191 3,382,340 2,721,670 2,645,015 1,381,569 124,985 8,097,705 13,954,149 2,127,351 3,153,099

J936

7,900,519 5,874,635 1,266,90fi 6,614,261 1,929,626 1,474,139 2,864,250 1,604,970 5,576,887 2,045,515 882,624 1,302,200 18,609,388 11,925,869 5,764,409 5,830,861 1,776,181 4,271,720 3,881,983 3,058,815 2,834,001 1,506,684 233,099 11,718,381 20,080,128 2,518,656 2,887,070


615

THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES

1929

Dairy products .. . . ..... .................. . Mineral oils ..... . . . .......... . ..... . .. .. . . Other oils ................... . . . . .. .... . .. . Paints, pigments and va.rnishes ..... . .... . . . . Unprinted paper ...... .. ...... ... . . ..... . . . Printed matter .. .. ... .. ... .. .... .. . . . . ... . Perfumery and toilet preparations ... .. .... . Tobacco products .................. . . . ..... . Vegetables ................................ . Wines and liquors .................. . .. . .. . ' \ '001 and manufactures ....... . . ......... . . All others .......... . . . ................... . Total Imports .. ..... â&#x20AC;˘ ......... . . . . ...

7,663,922 19,568,967 1,614,704 1,987,406 5,540,719 2,913,528 1,787,671 6,54 ,455 4,346,640 1,625,251 1,899,564 33,027,941 294,320,549

1936 8,137,284 14,425,501 1,050,657 1,778,860 4,531,659 1,910,988 1,499,133 7,130,860 3,382,919 1,273,554 1,085,112 19,812,046

J935

6,152,723 14,885,027 1,019,296 1,315,183 4,244,156 ~,375,639

1,319,074 7,500,559 3,278,477 870,842 713,653 16,433,735 171,047,699

202,252,349

PRINCIPAL PHILIPPINE EXPORTS 1929, 1935 and 1936 (Values in Besos: Pl.OO equals U.S. $0 .50 )

56,841,100 3,259,125 2,779,530 3,80"8,544 12,023,065 382,377 31,131,641 7,585,573 7,080,247 58,369,883 770,002 4,097,457 106,488,298 621,274 765,795 8,7"84,870 7,649,297 1,145,721 956,898 6,281,020 8,071,968

1935 22,947,933 1,018,397 977,489 2,323,629 9,992,559 534,749 21,974,660 3,278,847 7,924,630 24,509,162 547,860 949,641 65,981,359 497,300 474,793 4,614,920 6,798,760 589,978 1,904,527 3,118,992 7,531,175

1936 34,177,197 2,116,407 1,497,544 2,317,739 8,384,441 646,071 29,999,568 3,659,079 8,794,125 27,577.767 673,599 1,176,578 123,874,644 504,057 437,021 4,532,606 5,489,033 467,927 2,584,291 3,614,949 10,371,463

328,893,685

188,491,360

272,896,106

1929

Abaca . .......... . ....................... . Maguey .......... . ...................... . Other hard fibers ... ...... . . ........... . Cordage

Embroideries Cutch Copra ... . . . ........ ' .. . ... . . . ........ . .. . Copra cake and meal ................ .. ... .

Desiccated coconut . .............. .. ...... . . Coconut oil . . ................ . ............ . Gums and resins ....................... . . . . Hats .......... .. .. ....... . ......... ....... . Sugar .... . .... . ....... . ...... . .... . .... . . Molasses and syrup ....... . . ...... .... . ... . Pearl buttons ..... . ....... .. . . . . .. . .. .... . . Leaf tobacco ..... ... . ..................... . Cigars

......... ..... ............. . .... . .. .

All other tobacco .......... . . ...... .. ... . . . . Timber .... . ..... .. ........ .. . ..... . . .... . Lumber .. .. ............. . ............ . . . . All others ... . ............ .. ............ . â&#x20AC;˘. Total E xports ....... . .......... . . .

The above export statistics do not include gold and silver, which were exported to the United States in 1935 and 1936 as follows:

Bullion, ounces Approx. value, pesos ........... . ....... . Gold ore, kilos ... .... ..... .... ........... Approx~ value, pesos ...... ... ...... . .... .

1935 655,171 24,767,116 841,308 761,239

1986 950,093 34,733,853 4,160,741 3,325,785


CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

616

The bullion averages 52 to 53 percent gold and 43 to 45 percent silver. Gold exports appear to have been under-valued in the Customs statisticS'. they are believed to have amounted to at least f'42,OOO,OOO.

Actually,

PHILIPPINE FOREIGN TRADE, BY COUNTRIE S, 1929 (Value in Pesos: P1.00 equals U.S. $0.50) Exports

Imports

Oriental:

Value

Value

Balanco

4,288,649 7,187,020 14,185,585 11,541,652 365,179 23,879,095 1,841,413 6,342,541 252,634

1.46 2 . 44 4 . 82 3.92 12 8.11 .63 2.15 .09

1,131,009 2,216,337 6,378,951 86,243 2,325,719 14,259,084 26,786 637,774 292,736

.34 .67 1. 94 .03 .71 4.34 .01 .19 .09

- 3,157,640 - 4,970,683 - 7,806,634 - 11,455,409 1,960,540 - 9,620,011 - 1,814,627 - 5,704,767 40,102

69,883,768

23.74

27,354,639

8.32

-42,529,129

2,509,397 3,267,960 9,726,107 11,455,713 650,104 1,160,670 1,828,064 675,656 3,361,621 1,001,164

.86 1. 11 3.30 3.89 .23 .39 .62 .23 1.14 .34

2,066,741 4,509,416 7,111,189 14,078,707 4,229,110 2,976,303 12,444,518 846,254 86,362 1,225,444

. 63 1. 37 2.16 4.28 1. 29 .90 3.78 .26 .03 .37

442,656 1,241,456 - 2,614,918 2,622,994 3,579,006 1,815,633 10,616,454 170,598 - 3,275,259 224,280

35,636,456

12 . 11

49,574,044

15.07

13,937,588

557,808 1,745,787

.19 .59

591,180 1,407,274

.18 . 43

3.3,372 338,513

2,303,595

.78

1,998,454

.61

305,141

Total, Foreign ........... .

107,823,819

36.63

78,927,137

24.00

- 28,896,682

United States ............ . Posses.:ionsb

185,185,917 1,310,813

62.92 . 45

248,930,946 1,035,602

63,745,029 275,211

186,496,730

63.37

249,966,548

75.69 .31 --76. 00

294,320,549

100.00

328,893,685

100.00

34,573,136

Australia ... ....... . . British East Indies ... . China French East Indies .,. Hong Kong ... . .. .. .. . Japan .. . ...... .. ... . Japanese-China Netherland-India Siam

Total European: Belgium France Germany ....... . ... . Great Britain ........ . Italy .... . . . ........ . Netherlands Spain Sweden Switzerland Other European,s ..... .

Total Other A'reas: Canada All other countries ....

Total

Total GRAND TOTAL ....... . . â&#x20AC;˘ b

Includes Ireland, Austria, Denmark and Norway. Includes Hawaii, Guam and Puerto RicO'.

63,469,818


617

THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES

PHILIPPINE FOREIGN TRADE, BY COUNTRIES, 1935

(Values in Pesos:

P1.00 equals U.S. $0.50)

Imports

Oriental:

Australia ..... "" , .. . Bl'itish East Indies ... . China .. , .. . ' .. , , , , .. French East Indies " , Hong Kong " ... , .. " . Japan ., .. ,. ' , .. , , ,. Japanese China Netherland India , .... Siam

Exports

Value

%

Value

%

2,929,766 3,378,527 5,603,237 830,696 353,262 24,342,949 496,353 3,665,263 3,376

1. 72 1.97 3 . 28

745,792 900,132 1,792,106 33,209 1,393,021 10,718,729 14,718 557,108 210,114

.39 .48 .95 .02 .74 5.69 .01 .29 .11

.49 .21 14.23 .29 2.14

Balance _ 2,193,974 _ 2,478,395 - 3,811,131 797,487 1,039,759 -13,624,220 481,635 - 3,108,155 2061738 ~5,248,500

41,613,429

24.33

16,364,929

1,392,079 1,777,632 5,129,756 3,456,024 177,132 2,625,583 497,593 812,092 1,103,815 375,061

.81 1.04 3.00 2.02 .10 1.54 .29 .47 .65 .22

905,031 2,161,672 1,848,972 5,767,726 242,815 595,849 5,449,000 429,955 27,101 1,252,034

.48 1.15 .98 3.06 . 13 .32 2.09 .23 .01 .66

17,346,767

10.14

18,680,155

9.91

1,781,454 900,340

1.04 .53

534,107 1,966,788

.28 1. 05

2,681,794

1.57

2,500,895

1.33

180,899

61,641,990

36.04

37,545,979

19.92

-24,096,011

100,733,000 672,709

63.57 .39

149,871,073 1,074,308

79.51 .57

41,138,073 401,599

..............

109,405,709

63.96

150,945,381

80.08

41,539,672

GRAND TOTAL. . ........

171,047,699

100.00

188,491,360

100.00

17,443,661

Total

8.68

Em'opean:

Belgium France Germany Great Britain ". , .,. , . Italy ....... . ....... . Netherlands Spain Sweden Switzerland Other European- ... , ..

Total

-

-

-

487,048 384,040 3,280,784 2,311,702 65,683 2,029,'734 4,951,407 382,137 1,076,714 876,973 1,333,388

Othfff Areas:

Canada All other countries , ...

Total Total Foreign

United States ....... . ..... Possessionsb . . . . . . • • . . Total

• b

Includes Ireland; Austria, Denmark, and Norway. Includes Hawaii, Guam and Puerto Rico.

-

1,247,347, 1,066,448


CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE

618

PHILIPPINES

PHILIPPINE FOREIGN TRADE, BY COUNTRIES, 1936

(Values in Pesos: rl.OO equals U. S. $0.50) Exports

Imports

Val u e

OtientaJ:

0/0

Val u e

Balance

.31 .44

4,717,144 3,656,915 5,365,564 4,252,460 1,526,311 26,528,530 312,797 3,378,743 1,667,916

2.33 1.81 2.65 2.10 .76 13.12 .15 1.67 .83

854,550 1,200,975 1,974,838 35,009 853,720 16,786,272 21,076 681,431 308,931

.01 .31 6.15 .01 .25 .11

51,406,380

25.42

22.716,802

8.32

-28,689,578

1,991,972 69,344 2,095,968 6,933,933 5,046,729 141,854 4,516,406 501,194 887,024 1,046,308 407,333

.98 .03 1.04 3.43 2.50 .07 2.23 .25 .44 .52 .20

1,500,748 1,205,125 3,226,022 3,791,573 8,317,520 2,357,303 4,620,895 4,191,551 362,457

518,397

.55 . 44 1.18 1.39 3 . 05 .86 1.69 1.54 .13 .01 .19

491,224 1,135,781 1,130,054 3,142,360 3,270,791 2,215,449 104,489 3,690,357 524,567 1,028,848 111,064

23,638,065

11.69

30,109,051

11.0~

2,402,771 1,101,424

1.19 .54

1,286,785 2,707,348

.47 1.00

3,504,195

1.73

3,994, 133

1.47

489,938

Total, Foreign ............. . 78,548,640

38.84

56,819,986

20.82

-2).,728,654

United States ......... .. .. . Possessions b

122,994,525 709,184

60.81 .35

215,050,654 1,025,466

78.80 .38

92,056,129 316,282

Total

123,703,709

61.16

216,076,120

79 . 18

92,372,411

GRAND TOTAL

202,252,349

100.00

272,896,106

100.00

70,643,757

Australia British East Indies ... . China

............... .

French East Ind ies ." Hong Kong ........... . Japan . . .. . .......... . Japanese-China . . , . ... . Netherland India ..... . . Siam Total

.73

-

3,862,594 2,455,940 3,390,726 4,217,451 672,591 9,742,258 291,721 2,697,312 1,358,985

European: Belgium Denmark France ......... .. ... Gennany Great Britain ........ . . Italy ........... . ..â&#x20AC;˘.. Netherlands .. .. ...... . Spain Sweden Switzerland .......... . Other European- ...... . ~

Total

1~,460

-

6,470,986

Other Areas: Canada All otlher countries .. ...

Total

-Includes Ireland, Austria and Norway. b Includes Hawaii, Guam and Puerto Rico.

-

1,115,986 1,605,924


THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES

619

SUGAR

The export quota for 1936 was originally placed tentatively at 965,000 short tons, l:aw value. It was later increased, but not much of the increase was used, due to the short crop and the fact that any excess over 952,000 tons commercial weight, roughly equivalent to about 966,000 tons l'aw value, was dutiable under the Tydings-McDuffie Law. The domestic quota was set at 70,000 tons and the reserve quota at 30,000 tons, corrunercial w~ight. . Actual production iri the 1935-36 season totaled only about 952,000 tons conunerclal weight, due to unfavorable weather conditions in 1935, and the reserve, which amounted to 99,000 tons at the beginning of the season, was reduced to less than 30,000 tons by the end of the crop year, October 31, 1936. Actual production in the 1935-36 season was about 40 percent greater than the 691,000 tons in 1934-35. The monetary return was nearly double. however. The export price was considerably better. the monthly average being P8.35 per picul in 1936, against P7 .30 in 1935 and the avel'age domestic price was also better. MOl'e important was the fact that ali ~f the 1935-36 crop was sold, in addition to which a large part of the previous year's reserve was sold at a good price. The 1934-35 crop included 100,000 tons of reserve which brought no revenue. The total value of exports in 1936 (including about P4,000,000' representing 1937 quota sugar) was rI23.874,644, which compares with P65.981.359 in 1935 and P130.909,161 in 1934. Benefit payments, equivalent to exports, totaled 1'24,931,112 in the full year 1935 and P5,788,198 in 1936. Total volume of export in the calendar year was 508,974 long tons in 1935 and 899,282 long tons in 1936, according to records of the Philippine Sugar Association. This ineluded 56,353 tons of refined in the former year and 46,605 tons in the latter. Export quota sugar prices were firm throughout t he first half of the year, during which most of the crop was sold. Starting the year at P7 . 50 per picul, the price rose to P9.15 at the beginn.ing of May, falling gradually to around P8.00 at the end of the year. Domestic sugar quotations were slightly over export quotations at the beginning of the year. when the centrals were milling only for export, but dUl'ing most of the year they ran a little behind. They were steady throughout the year at f8.00 to P8.20. New crop export quota sugar was first quoted at P8 . 00 in October. For 1937. an export quota of 952,000 short tons, commercial weight. of duty-free sugar has been allocated on the basis of the mill and planter coefficients set for last year. The Jones~Costigali quota is considerably larger. but no arrangement for the allocation of the dutiable quota will be made prior to August, when it may be better determined whether exportation of dutiable sugar will be practicable. The probability of shipment of dutiable sugar to the continental United States depends on tlhe relation between profit on duty-paid sugar and the speculative price for reserve sugar held in the Philippines. The domestic sugar quota for 1937 is set at 90.985 short tons, commercial weight, and the Teserve at 58,523 sht,rt tons. In a,l.dition, 6.000 to 10,000 tons, repres(,llting the difference between the duty-free 8.'{port quota ap..d the Jones-Costigan quota, may be milled as a special reserve for' potential exportation. This. amount is uncertain. due to the varying margin between Corrunercial weight and raw value. The new crop appears sufficient to fill all these quotas. with the exception that the reserve quota may' not be entirely filled in Central Luzon. 'Dhe total amount of sugar milled from the 1936-37 crop will. therefore. be close to 1,100,000 short tons. commercial weight. or nearl y 150,000 tons more than last year. Much of the increase will not produce revenue. however, and the actual revenue from sugar will


CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

620

probably be no greater than in 1936, including sales of reserve and benefit payments in that year. According to Domestic Sugar Administrator Vargas, about 15,000 short tons of t.be 1935-36 crop remained at the end of 1936 to m eel the domestic demand. Since bhe 1936 domestic quota was only 70,000 short tons, the increase of nearly 21,000 tons in the domestic quota for 1937 should be ample to meet any increase in demand. It is hoped, however, that increased prosperity and lower sugar prices may encourage greater domes tic consumption. Molasses and alcohol production were increased in 1936, due to increased grinding of cane. Molasses expolts were about the same as in 1935, when they totaled 45,000 tons. Production (}f distilled spirits in th e first eleven months of 1936 totaled 59,384,854 proof liters, compared with 54,978,331 proof li.ters in the same period of 1935. Part of this was dis~ posed of as distilled spirits, as follows: Proof Liters

193 5

1 9 3 6

54,978,331 425,326 4,307,965 45,305

59,384,854 1,092,115 4,835,391 59,375

3,900,640

3,700,019

47,812,005

51,563,240

I'l'oduced Removed for export ............. ...... ...•........... :R emoved for domestic consumption .... • .... . .. ........ Sold to the U.S. Army and Navy .................... . The balance was sold as denatured alcohol, as follows: Removed locally for industrial purposes .. . ....... . LxpOlted for industrial purposes ................. . I{emoved locally for motive power purposes ............ .

The Agricultural Adjustment Administration in the Philippines was finally liquidated about tl,.'lJ.e middle of 1936, after making benefit payments totaling P30,719,OOO as compensation for the limitation of production from the 1934-35 crop. The contract freight rate for sugar shipments to the Atlantic Coast of the United States was set at $8.00 per ton for the year beginn ng October I, 1936. It became apparent before the end of the year, however, that it was not to the advantage of the ship operators to make space available at that rate, and sugar exporters were foned to charter ships at high~ er rates, $10.50 to $12.00 a ton, to handle a considerable proportion of their shipments. This forced them to reduce their quotations for suga r somewhat in the latter part of December.

COCONUT PRODUCTS Coconut products again made up the second biggest e..-.,:port group, as in every year since 1928. Exports increased moderately in volume and substa ntially in value, the total value of exports of copra, coconut oil, cake and meat and desiccated coconut in 1936 being about 20 percent greater than in 1!.l35. Volume and value in the two years are estimated as follows:

1 9 35 M. Tons

Copra . ................................... 256,683 Coconut oil ...... . ... . ..... . . .. .. .... . .... . . 163,824 Copra cake and meal .....•... . ............. 103,031 Desiccated coconut .. ................... . ... 34,729 Total

1 9 3 6

Pesos

M. Tons

Pesos

22,135,993 24,561,537 3,289,883 7,929,038

281,370 158,802 110,511 26,064

28,981,110 27,598,200 3,735,272 8,958,592

57,916,451

69,273,174


THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES

621

Domestic factories using coconut oil in the manufacture of soap, vegetable lard and margarine for domestic use and exportation were active throughout the year and their production is estimated to have been only about eight percent less than in 1935, in spite of the fact that exportation of vegetable lard to the United Stares was cut down by a revision in the American Excise Tax Law. Prices of copra, coconut oil and cake and meal again fluctuated widely, but the market was very strong in the last half of the year and the average for the year was higher than in recent years. Total copra production for the Islands is estimated at 614,812 metric tons in 1936, or four percent under the 641,507 tons estimated for 1935. Copra production was fairly heavy in the first six months of 1936, arrivals at Manila and Cebu, the two principal manufacturing and exporting centers, amounting to 3,736,000 sacks in the 1936 period, compared with 3,051,000 sacks in the same period of 1935. American demand was only moderate and European buying dominated the market. Only 49 percent of total exports of copra went to the United States in the first half of 1936, compared with 84 percent in the same period of 1935. The trend of prices was easy during the period and the average was about P2.00 lower than in the same period of 1935. The market opened the year strong with resecada ad vancing from P9.25 per hundred kilos at the beginning of January to PI0.75 toward the end of the month. The attractive prices bro,u ght out large supplies of copra, causing a steady drop to P8.50 at the beginning of March. Renewed 'European buying forced the price up to P9.50 at the end of March, but unexpectedly large arrivals, with a weak oil market, brought about a steady declin e to P7.00 at the end of April. Reduced arrivals and good European demand caused a gradual advance to P8.35 at the end of May and the market continued at about that level in June. 4

The situation was markedly different in the last half of the year. Arrivals increased somewhat less than seasonally and for the six months 路period amounted to only 4,279,000 sacks, compared with 4,893,000 sacks in the same period of 1935. Arrivals were particularly- disappointing in November and December. European buying, which had dominated the market in the first half of 1936, fell off in July and was an inconsiderable factor during the remainder of the year, while Ameri~an demand increased strongly, possibly due in part to the new American Revenue Act, which imposed an excise tax on taUow and various oilseeds not covered by t1he previous Act, thus diverting them to Europe to a greater extent and improving the competitive position of Philippine copra in the United States. The drought in the United States was also an important factor. From August on, export went mainly to the United States and in the last quarter almost entirely so. For the full year, exports to the United States made up 175,906 metric tons out of total exports of 281,370 metric tons, or about 63 percent. In 1935, they made up 211,386 metric tons, out of a total of 256,683 metric tons, or about 82 percent. Total exports for the year were thus about ten percent greater than in 1935, while exports to the United States were about 22 percent lower. Value of total exports was up nearly 30 percent. The increased American demand for copra and oil brought about a firmer market and as it became clear that copra arrivals were running considerably below expectations, the price advanced rapidly, particularly in the last quarter of the year. The average price "for the month increased from P7.82 per hundred kilos for resecada in June to P9.04 in July, PI0.21 路 ~n August, '12.50 in September, and P14.25 in October. By the end of November, it had Increased to P16.00 and throughout December it advanced steadily to P20.50 at the end of the year with some transactions going through as high as P21.00. There were at all times more buyers than sellers in the last quarter and with fancy' prices offered in the United States for spot oil, mills were compelled to bid for copra, to the advantage of holders with


622

CORNEJO'S COl\B10NWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

accumulatedl stocks. American mills also increased tl.leir offers but found it difficult to obtain delivery at the en d of the year on account of shortage of shipping space and the difficulty of gett ing ships unloaded on the Pacific Coast. It is not quite clear to what extent the prices of copra and oil at the end of the year were affected by the shipping situa_ tion, but the principal factors seem to be the gener a l increase in consumption of oils, a shortage of oils in the United States, and the disappointing production in the Philippines.

Copra stocks in Manila and Cebu and other provincial ports at the end of the year totalled only 51,962 metric tons, a considerable reduction from the 87,254 metric tons at th, end of .1935. Production is expected to the relatively路 light during the first haIi of 1937, particularly in Southern Luzon, where a typhoon in Novem:ber appears to have done a good deal of damage. It is also believed by some authorit ies tlhat the bearing capacity of the trees has been impaired during the past few months by the practice of harvesting green nuts to take advantage of relatively good prices. Sales at the end of the year were only for immediate delivery', buyers being reluctant to make future commitments at prevailing prices.

Coconut oil exports in 1936 totaled 158,802 metric tons , about three percent under th~ 163,824 metric tons exported in 1935. The value increased nearly 13 percent, however. Ex~ ports went almost entirely to the United States, as usual. Mills were active throughout the year but found some difficulty in buying copra advantageously due to the tendency of oil prices to lag behind copra prices. Stocks declined, amounting to only 9,909 metric tx:ms at the end of the year, compared with 14,963 metric tons at tlle beginning. Manufacturers of coconut oil products were also active throughout the y-ear, producing soap, lard and margarine for the domestic and neighboring markets, extending as far as Java and India. Their Amedcan market was reduced, however, by changes in the American Revenue laws which made the excise tax applicable to a ll products of coconut oil, whether or not tfl.e first processing took place in the United States. It is estimated that abou... 34,534 tons of oil was consumed locally in trne manufacture of these products, against 37,669 tons in 1935. Three new companies were organized to make soap, perfume and possibly lard and margarine, but none of them had started production by the end of the year. The market was dull but fairly steady at 18 to 19 centavos per kilo during the first quarter of the year, fa lling to 15 centavos in April and May. The unwillingness of local mills to sell, in view of the stronger copra market, caused a gradual but steady increase to 19.. 1/ 2 centavos at the end of Jul y. The advance accelerated in August, with increasing American demand, and by the end of the year the price had reached 37 centavos per kilo, Or double the price at the end of 1935. Copra cake and tneal, the former being ta ken by European buyers and the latter pl'efel'l'ed in the United States, were in good demand tlu'oughout the year. Exports totaled 110,511 metric tons, of which the United States took 53,)63 metric tons, or a little less than half. In 1935, exports totaled 103,031 metric tons , of which the United States took 32,689 metric tons, or about 30 percent. European demand domi lated the market during a large part of the year, particularly between March and July, American buyers being unable to compete with rising EUl'opean quotations. A su dden increase in demand from the United States, presumably due to drought conditions, caused a sharp increase in price in July which Europe could not meet, and European purchases were negligible. during the balance of the year. In tlhe last two months, there were a few sales to EUl'ope, even though prices were not competitive, due to the difficulty' of making shipment!; to the United States. Stocks declined from 8,495 tons at the beginning of the year to 4,319 tons at the end. The market was easy during the first two months, the price of cake falling from P30.00 per metric t on at the beginning of the year to P23.00 at the end of February. It was strong the rest of the year, du e to good demand from both Europe and the United States


THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES

623

and to reluctance of mills to make conunitments. Tohe cake price rose to P39.50 by the end of June and increased to P41.00 in July. The latter quotation quickly became nominal, how· ever, as the price of meal increased rapidly' to $28.00 per short ton, c. i. f. Pacific Coast, equivalent to P51.50 per metric ton, f. o. h. Manila, by the end of July. The Pacific Coast market continued its advance to $31.00 by the end of August, eased off to $27.00 but closed the year strong at $30.50. It is not generally believed that the demand is likely to continue at the same rate and some business with Europe is expected during the first quarter of 1937. Desiccated coconut exports increased in ~936, amounting to 36,064 metric tons, compared witih 34,729 metric tons in 1935. Exports were very good during most of the year but fell off somewhat in the last quarter, due to the difficulty of purchasing nuts and the in· crease in freiwht cost caused by the shipping strike, whicll made it necessary to route ship· ments through Canadian ports. Reduced production is expected in the first quarter of 1937, unless the supply of nuts increases. An act passed by the National Assembly in its 1936 session dil'ected the Philippine Na· tional Bank and the N ationsl Development Company to establish, operate and maintain ware.houses for copra. Another act provided for a National Produce Exchange to facilitate trading in agricultural products, including copra. Statistics for 1935 and 1936 are as foUo ws : 1935

Copra arrivals, sacks: Manila ...... . ............ . ........ • . . Cebu .. . ....... . . . ..... . . ...• . . . • . ... Copra exports, metric tons: Total . ................... . .. • ... . .... United States . . ...................... . Copra stocks, metric tons: Manila and provincial ports Coconut oil Total United Coconut oil Manila

exports, metric tons: ... .... . . . ........ . ........... . . States ......... . .... . ...... . . .• stocks, metric tons: and Cebu ........ _... . . . ..... . .

Copra cake Total United Copra cake Manila

exports, metric tons: .... _........ _.... _...... . States .. . . . ... ... ..... . ... . . . . stocksJ metric tons: and Cebu .. . ..... . ... . ......... .

3,969,873 3,973,725

4,037,681 3,978,351

256,683 211,386

281,370 175,906

87,254

51,962

163,824 162,444

158,802 154,442

14,963

9,909

103,031 32,689

110,511 53,163

8,495

4,319

34,729 34,679

36,064 35,952

Desiccated coconut exports, metric tons: Total United States

I

ABACA (MANILA HEMP)

1936

I

Abaca was again the fourth largest export com.modity, in value, being exceeded by Bugar, coconut products and gold. The value of abaca exports increases substantially in 1936, however, amounting to P34,177,197, compared with P22,947,933 in 1935 and P17,323,136 in


CORNEJO' S COMMONWEAL'iiH

624

DIRECTORY OF

THE PHILIPPINES

1934. The val ue of abaca exports has increased steadily since 1932 and the 1936 flgure was the largest since 1930. The 1936 increase was due to better prices rather than to greater volume of exports, volume being about eight percent lowe r in 1936. Exports by markets in the two years were as. follows; in bales: 1935

1936

United States and Canada ....... . . ...... . United Kingdom ..... ......... .. ... . ..... . Continental Europe ...... , ..... . ..... . Japan . ... .. . . . . .... .... .... .. ....... ... . Australia and New Zealand .. ... ..... . .... . Other countries .............. . .. . ........ .

373,168 336,174 165,728 518,015 31,178 24,700

309,747 318,216 177,250 480,205 19,472 28,953

Total ......... ........... . .. ..â&#x20AC;˘...... .

1,448,963

1,333,843

Although the United States is only the third best market in volume taken, it probably led in value, as tfue American market takes the more expensive grades. Domestic mill consumption adds about 60,000 bales a year, mostly unbaled hemp. Production f ell off in 1936, as expected, balings amounting to only 1,295,010 bales, agai nst 1,480,396 in 1935 and 1,441,202 in 1934. Stocks were estimated at 147,662 bales at the end of the year, or considerably under the 191,121 bales at the beginning. Production is ex.. pected to be about the sante in 1937 as in 1936. The strong market of the last half of 1935 did not carryover into 1936. Balings did not fall off to the extent anticipated, in the first quarter. of tJhe year, and all foreign markets were stagnant, with the result t hat prices eased off during the first four months. Holders generally were unwilling to sell at the lower prices offered and the market was inactive, though there were some sales by holders tired of waiting for an upturn. A notable decrease in balings in April a nd May, together with increasing interest on the part of foreign markets, particularly Europe, caused prices to advance sharply toward the end of May'. 'Dhe market continued strong throughout the rest of the year, closing with a notably firm tone as demand from aU export markets increased in December and balings continued moderate. Holders were persistently optimistic and inactivity developed with eve,r y recession in prices during the year. A popular grade, J-2, fell from P12.00 per picul at the beginning of the year to 1'10.25 at tlhe end of April , rose to 1'13.25 at the end of September and closed the year a t P16.00. Manila prices on the principal grades at the beginning and end of the year wereas follows:

G1-ad. CD E F I

J¡1 G H

J-2 K L-1

L¡2

JanuO/ry 1

December 91

P 23.50

I' 28.00

20.50 19.25 18.50 15.75 13.75 10.25 12.00 9.75 8.75 7.50

23.00 21.00 19.00 16.50 16.75 15.50 16.00 15.25 14.75 13.00


62/Y

THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES

Freight rates were increased P1.50 per bale to the United States and PI.OO per bale to Japan, effective May .1. Rates to the United ~ingdom and Continental Europe~n ports were increased 16 shillings per ton of 20 cwt., effeiCtIve October 1. Further rate Increases arebelieved likely, on account of the shortage of ships.

Cordag~ exports declined, due to the fact that the quo~ limit had been reached in 1935 and new shipments to the United States could not be resumed until the new quota year, beginning May 1, 1936. About 65 percent of the 6,000,000-pound quota for the year ending April 30, 1937, had been shipped to the United States by the end of the y·ear. Shipments to' other countries were somewhat increased in 1936. Exports in 1935 and 1936 were as follows: J 985

United States .....•.... . ..... .. Total

J936

Kilos

Pesos

Kilos

Pesos

3,601,221 7,954,407

1,257,918 2,323,629

1,777,203 6,602,454

889,383 2,317,739'

RICE

The market was finn at the beginning of the year, as it became evident that the crop' was far from adequate to fill domestic requirements. At the beginning of the year, luxury grades sold for 1'6.10 to 1'6.30 per cavan of 57-1/ 2 kilos and macans for 1'5.75 to 1'5.95. Luxury grade palay sold at P3.00 and ordinary palay at P2.85. The price moved up to n.10 to 1'7.15 for luxury grades and 1'6.70 to 1'6.90 for macans in AJpril, with palay at 1'3.10 to 1'3.30. The organizat'ion of the National Rice and Corn Corporation in April checked the advance, asthat organization immediately commenced the importation of rice, which was offered. for sale at P6.24 per cavan wholesale and 28 centavos per ganta retail. A brief flurry followed the decision of the Collector of Customs in April that the National Rice and Corn Corporation would have to pay duty since it was selling imported Rice at a profit. That decision was soon reversed, however, on the grounds that the corporation is governrnent·owned, that profit is not it's primary' purpose and that such profits as are made 'will be used to advance its primary aim of stabilizing rice prices. Prices were steady during the rest of the year, at P7.10 to P7.40 for luxury grades and P6.50 to P6.75 for .macans, with palay at P3.05 to P3.40. There was a decline toward the end of the year, when new crop rice began to appear on the market and the National Rice and Corn Corporation, in September, dropped its retail price to 26 centavos a ganta. New crop palay was sold as low as P2.10 per cavan in October, but the Corporation took effective means to forestall efforts to depress prices by offering to purchase palay at producing centel'S at 1'2.25 to P2.50, depending on the grade. The y'ear closed with palay selling for P2.25 tQ P2.40 per cavan, luxury rice at P5.45 to P6.50 and macans at P4.85 to P5.40. The palay crop for the year ended june 30, 1936, was estimated by the Bureau of Com... merce at 43,000,000 cavans of 44 kilos, equivalent to 21,500,000 cavans (of 57-1 / 2 kilos) of cleaned rice. This compares with an estimate of nearly 46,000,000 cavans of palay in 193435. The 1935-36 crop was about 4,000,000 cavans below nonnal domestic requirements and nearly 2,000,000 cavans of rice was imported. Rains in September and October relieved fears that the 1936-37 crop would be another short one, and it appears probable that the new crop ~ll yield as much as 47,000,000 cavans, or approximately sufficient for normal domestic re~ quirements.


626

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH

DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

Om:: of tilie first measures adopted by the New Commonwealth Government was the ap. pointment of a commission, with Honorable Manuel Roxas as Chairman, to study the rice question. This commission recommended, among other things, the formation of a National Rice and Corn Corporation, as a subsidiary of the National Development Company', with an authoriz路 ed capital of :P4,OOO,OOO, of which '2,000,000 should be paid in. This Corporation was formed early in April, the National Development Company s upplying P1,OOO,000 from its own reSOUrces and 1'1,000,000 obtained by' sellin g additional stock to the Government. Its purposes is to stablize rice and pala~t prices by purchasing palay from the growers during the harvest season, when prices are ordinarily low, and selling rice, eitzhel' domestic or imported, during periods of scarcity and high prices. During 1936, its activities were confined largely to importing rice duty free, and distributing it through commercial channels at fixed prices, thus preventing profiteering that might have come as a result of the Short crop. Toward the end of the year, however, it demonstrated its ability to forestall efforts of buyers to depress palay pri路 ces during the harvesting season, by offering to purchase palay at producing centers at P2.25 to P2.50. A comparativel y moderate amount of rice was purchased, but sufficient to prevent private buyers from driving prices down to a point much below the level set. The capital of the National Rice and Corn Corporation was probably at least doubled by t1le sale of dutY'-free imported rice at a price considerably above current Saigon prices. It may be expcc ~ed that this capital will be an im portant factor in stabilizing rice prices in the future, particularly if effective steps are taken to prevent too rapid increases in production. At the present time, the principal problem of the National Rice and Corn Corporation seems to be to lease or otherwise obtain sufficient warehouse space to store all the palay that may be offered to it. Officials report that progress along that line is encouraging. The Roxas Commission also recommended that a tax of three centavos per sack be paid on all rice turned out by power-driven mills. The proceeds would go to increase the funds of the National Rice and Corn Corpool'ation, to be used in stabilizing rice pricE-s. This tax has not yet been imposed but will be considered by the National Assembly in its next session, in October (1937).

TOBACCO

With increased planting due to excellent prices for the small 1935 crop and with favorable weather conditions, the 1936 tobacco crop in the Cagayan Valley amounted to about 380,000 to 400,000 quintals, wJlich was about 50 percent greater than the 1935 crop though slightly below what is considered normal production. Quality was about average. Prices, which had been unsually high in 1935 due to the small crop and the necessity of the largest exporter to fill contracts regardless of cost, fell off rapidly between February and April wlhen it became clear that the 1936 crop would be a fairly good one. It is difficult to make exact price comparisons due to the absence of adequate grading standards, but the price level during the last thalf of 1936 was apparently arq,und 50 percent below that for the same period of 1935. Farmers weTe reluctant to accept these reduced prices, but with the comparatively good supply and the lack of export demand , it became clear that theTe was no likelihood of an increase and most of the crop was in the hands of dealers by the end of November. Floods in the Cagayan Valley at the beginning of December caused serious damage to seedbeds in Isabela. To some extent, it may' be possible to replace destroyed seedlings, but it seems certain that a very considerable replanting of seeds will be necessary. This will make part of the crop much later and more vulnerable to weather conditions. In the province of


THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES

627

here was some destruction of transplanted plants but not much damage to seedCagayan â&#x20AC;˘ t . . h h . h d beds. Transplanting continued shortly after the floods subsIded and WIth t e earl en1'lC e b deposits from the floods, an increased crop in Cagayan is possible. Much depends on .wea~er conditions but it seems almost certain that the 1937 crop in the Cagayan Valley wIll be below normal. Prices of Cagayan Valley tobacco increased about 30 percent, as a result of the flood, but it soon became clear that damage to tobacco in warehouses was not as great.. as at first believed, and with demand continuing moderate much of the gain in prices was lost. The crop in other provinces including La Union, Pangasinan and Panay, is estimated tohave been somewhere in the neighborhood of 400,000 quintals, or about the same as the previous year. Prices were steady to firm throughout the year, willi the lower grades of Pa~gasinan. and La Union tobacco particularly in demand for the manufacture of very cheap CIgars by small independent producers for local consumption. The outlook at present is for an increased crop in La Union and Pangasinan in 1937, although it is too early to make any predictions. Exports of leaf tobacco fell off sharply in 1936, amounting to only 12,545,690 kilos, a. reduction of about 32 percent from the 1935 figure of 18,517,000 kilos. Exports were moderate in the first half of 1936 due to limited supplies and in the latter palt of the year due to lack of foreign demand, with Spain out of the market most of the time. There was a fairly large amount exported in December to France, with other ports optional, and it will doubt-less go to Spain if conditions permit. It is apparent, however, that exports will be at a relatively low level so long as conditions in that principal market continue so uncertain, and. prospects for export trade in 1937 are not promising. The Japanese and Korean monopoliestook a large shipment in February but were out of the market for the rest of the year, aside from a very moderate shipment in December. Exports of scraps to the United States totaled 1,000,000 kilos in 1936, or about 25 percent less than in 1935. The manufactul-e of cigars fell off badly in 1936, due to the sharp decrease in exports to the United States, which fell off to 164,905,000 in 1936, a decrease of over 20 percent from the 1935 figure of 208,676,000. Exports of the better grade cigars increased in 1936, but these are still a negligible quantity. Exports to other foreign countries fell off moderately,. amounting to 14,637,306 units in 1936, against 15,771,427 in 1935. Domestic sales totaled 103,865,826 in the first eleven months of 1936, or about the same as in 1935. Production of cigarettes amounted to ' 2,809,000,000 units in the first eleven months of 1936, a very slight increase over 1935. Domestic sales totaled 2,753,000,000 in the eleven mon1!.hs period, or about two to three percent better than in the same period. of 1935, while' exports amounted to 16,000,000 and deliveries to the United States Army and Navy 33,000,000. Cigal'ette production declined steadily from 5,110,000,000 in 1928 to 2,965,000,000 in 1934, on account of increasing preference for American cigarettes. It has held even or increased very slightly, however, in the past two yeal'S. Production of chewing tobacco totaled 193,619 kilos and production of smoking tobacco 182,547 kilos, all for domestic consumption. Stocks of leaf tobacco in the hands of was to be expected, with the larger crop and totaled 31,766,454 kilos, not including stocks ports have not been received. Total stocks cember 31, 1935, were 28,774,678 kilos.

manufacturers and dealers increased in 1936 as reduced exports. Stocks as of November 30, 1936, in the hands of 40 small dealers from whom rein the hands ot Importers and dealers of De-

New legislation of interest to the tobacco trade includes an Act increasing the licensefee ~or leaf tobacco dealers from P20.00 a yeal' to P30.00, and an Act directing the Philippine' NatIOnal Bank and the National Development Company to invest SUM amounts as may benecessary out of the funds at their disposal in building and maintenance of warehouses for


628

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH IDIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

leaf tobacco. The latter Act is expected to help stabilize tobacco prices by permitting farmers to store and borrow on their tobacco during the harvesting season in case they believe they can get better prices by' holding it. Some autlhorities believe that farmers with good tobacco will be reluctant to store it in warehouses for fear of having it mixed up with tobacco of inferior quality, attempts to introduce standard grading having so far not been very successful. There is also the difficulty that farmers generally have to borrow at the time ' of transplanting and during the growing season, giving to the lenders tihe first opportunity to purchase their tobacco at prevailing market prices.

LUMBER AND TIMBER

The lumber industry had a very good year in 1936, with production and exports both in4 creased substantially. Mill production in the first eleven months totaled 221,097,159 board feet, which compared witlh 207,588,288 board feet in the same period of 1935. Mills were working at capacity during most of the year and many of them were working double shifts in the last few months of the year. Lumber inventory in the hands of mills was reduced by heavy November deliveries and totaled 38,076,674 board feet at the end of November, 1936, or about 1,692,000 board feet less than the inventory a year earlier. With the excellent export and domestic demand, the inventory is believed to have been further reduced by the end of the year. Exports increased to all major markets, excepting China, according to the Bureau of Customs. There was a total of 122,973 cubic meters of lumber, valued at P3,614,949, exported in 1936, compared with 107,854 cubic meters, valued at P3,118,992 in 1935. Nearly 60 percent of the total went to the United States, witih most of the balance divided between Great Britain, British Africa, Australia and China. Exports of logs totaled 329,425 cubic meters, valued at P2,584,291, in 1936, compared with 229,808 cubic meters, valued at Pl,904,527, in 1935. Logs went almost entirely to Japan. China showed an increasing tendency to take logs rather than lumber, but was a rather inactive market for eitlher during most of the year. A considerable shipment of logs was made to Korea in October. Lumber prices were steady to finn, averaging for tJhe year about ten percent higher than in 1935. The average value per thousand board feet of lumber exports appear to have decl ined, however, due to increased shipments of lowel" grades, particularly路 to the United States. At one time, only the best grades were shipped, but with the demand increasing. there has been a tendency to ship the lower grades as well and one of the smaller mills is exporting its entire output. This increase in the proportion of lumber exported has eased the pressure on the domestic market and witih the activity in the building trades and with the mines requiring an increasingly large quantity of lumber and mine timbers, domestic prices for lumber have been firm. The heavy increase in exports of logs to Japan has caused a considerable amount of concern to the Philippine lumber industry. !The Japanese market for lumber, at one time an important one, was completely lost some years ago when the Japanese tariff was adjusted to give a strong degree of preference to imports of logs rather than lumber. In recent years, Japanese lumber made from Philippine logs has been offering increasingly keener competition to Philippine lumber in Shanghai, Singapore and other markets. It has been suggested that an export tax be placed on logs or that a quota be imposed requiring a fixed ratio of lumber to logs shipped to any country. but no bill embodying any such suggestion was introduced in the 1936 session of tlhe National Assembly. An Act passed by' the Assembly and


THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES

629

awaiting action by the American President, put;ing an embargo on the exportation of buntal fiber, is somewhat similar in principle and is being watched. with interest by the lumber people. An Act was passed by the National Assembly relieving forest products of payment of the yvharfage tax.

MINING Gold production continued to increase, witlh a new production record set nearly every month during 1936. The total for the year was P44,394,552, which compares with P32,600,683 in 1935 and P'23,823,365 in 1934. There has been a spectacular increase in production since 1928, when gold production was valued at P3,808,124, or even since 1932, when it was PI0,200,167. Ir. thOSE earlier years, however, production was valued at only P41.34 per ounce, whereas beginning with 1934, it has been valued at P70.00 an ounce. The increase in 1936 was due partly to entrance into the field of five new mines, One of which may be ranked as among the leading producers, and partly to increased production by' the older mines. One group of four mines, under the same management, produced guld with a total value of P23,588,782, or more than half the total production. Production by mines in 1935 and 1936 was as follows: 1 9 3 5

193 6

Antamok Goldfields Mining Co. . . .. . . . . . .... . . ... ... . . Ilaguio Gold Mining Co. . .......................... .. . Balatoc Mining Co. . .. . .. . ........ . .. . ............... . Benguet Consolidated Mining Co. . .... .. .... ..... .. ,"' .. Benguet Exploration, Inc .. . ...... ... ......... . ...... . Big Wedge Mining Co ......... _ . . .......•............ Cal Horr Mine ...................... . .. ... .....•..... Coco Grove, Inc. (Placer) . . ... ............ . .... . .... . Demonstration Gold Mines, Ltd. . ..... . ............... . East Mindanao Mining Co., Inc. . ..... . .•... . ....... Gold Creek Mining Corporation .......... • ..• ... .. . . . . Gold River Mining Co. . ....... . ....... . ..•.......... Jpo Gold Mines, Inc . . ............. .. ...... .. . . . . ..... . Itogon Mining Co ...................... .. . ... • ... .. ... I X L - Argos Syndical", ............. . ........ ... .. J X L Mining Co. . .. . ....... . ..... . .. . ......... . .... . }\fasbate Consolidated Mining Co. . . ... . ....... . . . ..... . Northern Mining & Development Co., Inc. . ......•...• Halacot Mining Co. . ...... . . ... . ......... .. ......•.... San 1\fauricio Mining Co. . ........... . ....... . . . .... . Suyoc Consolidated Mining Co. . .. .. ..... • ........ . ... Tambis Gold Dredging Co. (Placer) .. . . . .......... . . . . . United Paracale Mining Co. . ..... . ...... . . .. .. . .. .. .

P 3,013,177 882,386 12,552,833 8,639,667 283,820

P 5,033,480 1,077,107 12,760,521 9,013,310 274,914 594,450 1,173,736 636,292 1,473,999 225,649 226,861

947,591 99,858 587,219

641,215 2,825,669 211,315 1,279,688 2,022,305 67,571 413,05 3 1,733,888 1,172,547 106,369 1,430,613

......................... .. ......... .....

P32,600,683

P44,394,552

Total

16,027 934,158 494,645 30,800 575,039 2,219,207 448,767 827,952 73,325

With several new mines expected to come into production in 1937, it may be conservatively anticipated tlhat 1937 production will exceed P50,OOO,000, which will permit gold to hold its place as third leading export commodity.


CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

630

The public took an extreme interest in mining shares during the year, which in Some cases exceeded anything that could be justified by actual operations or visible prospects. Many of tJhe producing mines were nevertheless able to show good profits on their invested capital and the number of dividend payers increased from 6 to 15, the 1936 figure including one iron mining company, one management, and one investment company. Dividends paid in tile two years were as follows : 1 9 3 6

1 9 3 5 Antamok Goldfields Mining Co . ...................... . Baguio Gold Mining Co. . .................. ... ... .. .. . :Balatoc Mining Company .. .................. . ....... . Renguet Consolidated Mining Co. . ....... .. .......... . Benguet Exploration, Inc. . .......... ... . . ........ . ... . Demonstration Gold Mines, Ltd ....................... . Gold Creek Mining Corporation ......... • .... ..... ..... Ipo Gold Min es, Inc. . . .............................. . Itogon Mining Company ..... , .................... . i\larsman & Company .. .. ........ . •. . • ... . ... .... .. . . :r.iarsman Investments, Ltd .........•.. .. ....... .... .... rhilippine Iron Mines, Inc. . ....... . . ... . .••........ . . San Mauricio Mining Company ... . . ...•. . .. . ..•......• Tambis Gold Dredging Co . ... ... .................... . United Paracale Mining Co. . .................. . Total

P 1,000,000 5,100,000 5,700,000

38,825 643,864

45,900 1'12,528,589

P

687,500 129,890 5,600,000 7,500,000 50,000 400,000 52,500 116,475 600,000 940,301) 500,000 655,872 320,000 30,951 275,000

P17,858,488

A bill passed in the 1936 session of the National Assembly increased taxes and roy'alties on gold production and established a code of rules for th~ regulation of the mining indu stry. Taxes remain reasonably moderate, however. Another bill established a Bureau of Mines in the Department of Agriculture and Commerce, replacing the Mines Division of the. Bureau of Science. Production and exportation of iron ore continued at an increasing rate, the one producing coma:>any shipping 596,000 Lons to Japan during tlhe year, compared with 305,000 tons in 1935. The ore avera~s 62 to 63 percent iron. The original contract made at the beginning of 1936 called for total shipments of 450,000 tons for the year, but that total was ;:reached early in October and 146,000 tons additional shipped during the balance of the year. The contract for 1937 calls for shipments of 600,000 tons. Interest continued in chromite and a number of properties were staked and some development work done. One company, which has about 100,000 tons of ore blocked out, averag ing a little better than 50 percent chrOmium, started shipping commercially in August and shipped altogether nearly 10,000 tons before the shortage of freight space made further ship. ments impossible. Another company with lar ge deposits of lower grade chromite made a trial shipment to the United States for tests. of its value as a refractory material, but the shipping situation prevented further shipments. Production of other metallic minerals was negligible. Considerable development work was done on a copper deposit in Panay, which appears to be small but of good grade, although 80 far development work has been insufficient to pennit any very definite report on either size or quality of the deposit. Development work was done on a few manganese claims and it is reported that one, in Iloeos, is planning to make conunercial shipments to the United States in 1937, but on the whole, the prospects of manganese production in the Philippines on a large scale are not, so far, impressive. Buyers of mineral ores were attracted to the Phil...


THIil COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILl!"PrNES

631

ines during the year, one Italian metal broker opening an office and a company being or· PP . ts Severa1 new mnung . . . . ganized locally to represent Japanese mteres. companies were regIs· tered during the year, as well as management companies and investment companies.

i

There was a lively interest in petroleum possibilities at the beginning of the year and several exploration companies were formed. The more substantial ones abandoned the field, however, primarily as a result of legal technicalities and the public interest in petroleum pos· sibilities died down as quickly as it had arisen. Many geologists believe that it is' unlikely that petroleum will be found in commercial quantities, due to the faulted etructure of the Islands, which prevents accumulation in pools. Among non-metallic minerals, cement production is estimated at 729,000 barrels in 1936, a considerable increase over the 640,000 barrels in 1935 and 600,000 barrels in 1934. Prospects for 1937 appear favorable and a further increase is likely. Production of coal continued small, only one mine being operated. An engineering company made a survey of a coal property owned by the National Development Company and almost adjacent to tihe plant of £he Cebu Portland Cement Company. Although the quality' of the coal is believed to be inferior to that of imported coal, it is expected that the considerable saving in freight cost will make it desirable to develop the property, though nO' decision has yet been announced. There was a general increase in the production of other minerals, including clay products, lime, salt, sand gravel, crushed rock and rock asphalt. The latter has so far been produced only in a small way! in Leyte. A consi derable increase in production is expected in 1937, as a result of a contract understood to Ib.ave been placed for an airplane landing field. A committee appointed by the Chairman of the National Economic Council has recommended the formation of a National Iron Com,pany as a subsidIary of the National Development Company. It is planned to make a survey of iron ore deposits in the Philippines with a view to determining whether it is desirable to develop deposits owned by the Government.

MOTION PICTURES There we~e two producing companies in the Philippines in 1936, the Filippine Films, Inc. and the Parlatone Hispano-Filipino, Inc. They produced altogether 14 features length pictures, averaging 9,000 feet, five shorts and four new reels. Most of the pictures were pro~ duced in Tagalog but one feature was produced in Spanish, for export, and one completed JUBt at the end of the year was made in English, for tlhe American market. Two of the shorts. were scenic subjects, in color, mainly for the export market. One producing company is planning to make four to six feature length pictures in Tagalog in 1937 and one feature in English, for €'xport. The other producer has under consideration 25 pictures for 1937, including 'tlw"o in Spanish and one in English, for export. It is unlikely that more than ihalf that number win be made, however. The domestic market for pictures conti nued to fall off during the year. There were 148 theaters wired for sound at the beginning "Of the year and 63 not wired for sound. The latter were negligible, only a few silent pictures being available for showing. It is estimated that there were about 140 theaters wired for sound at the end of the year, a reduction of about six percent. First-run theaters in Manila, with air-eonditioning, appear to have done well but neigfuorhood theaters suffered and very few provincial theaters had a satisfactory year.


632

CORNEJ O'S COMMONWEA LTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

A new Board of Censorship was appointed in the middle of 1936. It appears to have continued the liberal policy of the old Board and little occasion was found to make cuts in pictures during the year. A bill enacted! by' the National Assembly during the year provides f or a five percent amusement tax to be paid on a dmissions exceeding 40 centavos. A new ordinance adopted by the Municipal Board of Manil a imposes more stringent regulations regarding storage vaults for motion pict'u re films. So far, no very consider路 able alterations have been required under that ordinance, however. A municipal ordinance prohibiting t he sale of standing room tickets for first-run movie theaters was declared unconstitutional by the Court of First Instance as class legisla..tion.

TEXTILES

Imports of cotton textiles from the United States again decreased in 1936, in spite of the fact that the Japanese quota agreement was in effect throughout tlhe year. In this agreement, the Japanese engaged to limit "Philippine imports of Japanese-made cotton piecegoods" to 45,000,000 square meters in each of the two years beginning August 1, 1935, with a ten percent margin for anticipation or carry-over and a limit of 26,000,000 square meters in any half-year. The wording of the agreement to limit "Philippine imports" was presumably for the purpose of making it clear that imports of Japanese-made goods tran shipped at Hong Kong or other ports were to be included as we ll as direct shipments from Japan. Limitation of transhipments was found more difficult than had been anticipated, however, as these goods are imported into Hong Kong by Chinese merchants, ostensibly for the requirements of t hat market, and reshipped to Chinese merchants in Manila. As a result, imports of Japanese cotton piecegoods in the first quota-year, ended July 31, 1936, amounted to 52,.675,000 square meters, exceeding the quota limit (including the ten perc:ent tolerance) by 3,175,000 square meters. Of the total, 45,148,000 square meters came direct from Japan and 7,527,000 square meters was transhipped at Hong Kong. This apparently lea ves only 37,325,000 square meters, including transhipments, to be received fr om Ja pan in the second quota-year. Arrivals during the first fi ve months of the second quota-year totaled 21,625,000 square meters. Efforts were being made at the end of the year to contl'Ql transhipments, with some promise of success. The quota agreement has nnquestionably limited importation of Japanese-made cotton textiles. Actual 1936 arrivals (for the calendar year) were 48,669,638 square mete r s, which compares with Customs figures showing 72,374,000 square meters imported in 1935 (customs figures represent liquidations of Customs entries, but actual arriva ls of goods were at least as great and probably gJ.路eater.) \\lithout the agreement, it may be assumed that t!here would have been a substantial increase in 1936 instead of t he marked decrease from the 1935 figures. Unfortunately, American textiles do not appear to have been the beneficiaries of the J apanese restraint, imports totaling only 27,583,336 square meters whereas Customs figures for 1935 show liquida tions covering 35,250,000 square meters and actual arrivals were approximately as great. Imports from the United States in 1936 include about 8,250,000 squa re meters of embroidery cloth, compared with 10,989,600 square meters in 1935. The decreased importation of cotton textiles from Japan and the Uni ted States was partly offset by' imports of cotton textiles from China and Hong Kong, which totaled 11,366,505 square meters in 1936, whereas in 1935 such imports were negligible. Imports of rayon from J apan nearly doubled, increasing from 13,692,338 ~quare meters in


THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES

633

1935 to 25,618,558 square meters in 1936, as a result of the success of Japanese rayon manufacturers in making available fabr ics wlhich were brig.ht and attractive, though perhaps not, very substantial, at prices considerably lower than those at which American cotton goods could be offered. The Hong Kong and Chinese Cotton industry and the Japanese rayon industry appear, therefore, to have been the r.hief ganers from the quota agreement. Demand for cotton textiles was rather slow throughout most of the year. Prices were fairly steady in the first half-year, though heavy arrivals of ray'On from Japan and cotton goods transhipped at Hong Kong caused some nervousness in the market. The transhipped goods in particular had an unsettling effect on prices because they were purchased in Japan at the non-quota price, which is lower than the price for Philippine quota goods, and not being subject to the export fee, were in a positon to undersell Japanese goods imported direct.; Easier prices toward the middle of the year reduced the transhipment trade by making it less profitable and importation of Japanese rayon also declined seasonally. Business in all textiles was more than seasonally dull during the rainy season. By August, however, it began to be apparent that stocks were getting low and a number of inquiries were sent to the United States, chiefly for grey dr ms and sheetings, denims, khakis and other staples. These inqu iries continued and increased in volume tfuroughout the rest of the year but resulted in only a moderate volume of orders being placed, for the reason that American prices advanced too rapidly for the local market to keep pace. Prices in the local market advanced steadily' throughout the last five months of the year but were never quite able to catch up with the American prices. The fact that American mills were unable during the latter part of the year to promise any delivery earlier than three or four months, was also a deterrent factor, due to reluctance of importers to make commitments so far ahead at high prices and also to their unwillingness to have goods arrive in volume a t the beginning of the rainy season. Japanese prices advanced more moderately during the latter part of the year, and kept always well under American prices. At the end of the year, however, Japanese as well as American importers found it difficult to get any promise of reasonably prompt tleiiveries, mills being unable to promise any better than four or fi ve months on many types of cloth. Japanese prices at the ~ame time advanced shar pl y, while, demand became unusually urgent. The volu me of inquiries for Am erican goods 'w as better than in some years, but importers of American textiles were unable to take full advantage of the situation on account of the great difficulty in getting their orders filled by American rollls. It appearsl probable tfuat the demand for cotton textiles 'Will continue at least during the first quarter of 1937. A. seasonal reduction in demand may be expected after Easter, but the decline may verY' likely be less than usual as it will doubtless take some time to replenish stocks. Imports from Japan will of necessity be very light during the first seven months of 1937, under the tenns of the quota agreement, and the market for American goods should benefiti accordingly, if goods are available.

Imports of cotton, rayon and silk textiles in 1935 and 1936, according to the Bureau of Customs, were! as f ollows:

1 9 3 6

1 9 3 5

Unble<Lched: Total .... . ... . .....•....... United States .. . . . ......••.. Japan . .. . ... . ........ . ... . China .......... . ...... Hong Kong .... . •.. . .... .. . . t

•••

Sq. meters

Pesos

Sq. meters

Pesos

10,250,426 3,414,857 6,703,325 93,091

1,465,384 717,582 716,534 11,214

9,609,156 3,674,728 3,264,724 1,690,958 713,190

1,454,133 796,526 347,191 186,691 72,052


634

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH 'DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

Sq. meters

Pesos

Sq. meters

Pesos

31,733,678 15,171,218 14,689,294 229,602

6,230,185 3,918,533 1,727,320 26,826

22,499,577 11,206,853 7,823,882 546,879 676,201

4,731,329 3,064,850 868,482 75,731 91,821

48,013,081 13,246,524 31,393,620 1,618,853

8,932,939 3,855,644 4,171,186 215,493

45,554,383 15,498,689 21,580,095 4,454,272 4,586,379

4,581,340 2,883,002 609,470 682,895

23,327,936 3,417,591 19,588,023 29,474

3,470,734 874,941 2,511,228 3,759

22,258,815 2,349,136 14,745,426 859,073 1,761,528

3,369,722 687,751 1,781,728 91,873 212,823

Total 路 .... .............. ... United States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Japan .. ....... ... ......

449,130 179,856 192,225

335,102 223,799 68,585

225,362 39,223 117,792

130,817 47,699 44,464

Rayon : Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . United States ......... . . . .. Japan .................. .. .

14,433,006 432,796 13,692,338

2,688,032 371,123 2,230,926

25,200,064 525,481 24,327,075

3,910,272 472,910 3,388,190

Bleached: Total , ............. . ....... United States . . .. . .......... Japan ... , .. ... - .. . . ....... China . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hong Kong ..... - .... . . . . . . .

.

Dyed: Total

........ . .........

United States .......... Japan .......... .. ... China . . ........ ... Hong Kong ...... - . . .. - .. - . .

.

P,'inted:

.

Total 路 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . United States ..... .. ... - ... .

.

Japan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . China 路 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hong Kong . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ,

~', O54..204

Silk :

.

'

.

It will be observed that nearly 80 percent of< t he bleached goods imported from the United tates was embroidery cloth, which does not enter the Philippine market but is returned to tihe United States in the form of galments.

I

IMPORTED FOODSTUFFS

Flou:r .-Consumption of flour increased .substantiall y in 1936, due to a shortage of rice and the increased purchasing power of the people. Im ports for the year totaled 4,037,182 bags (of 49 pounds) in 1936, an increase of 18 percent over 1935 imports, and stocks were extremely low at the end of the year. Consumption is apparently running at the rate of at least 325,000 bags a month . Imports from the United States, after decl ining througiliout 1935, continued to fall off during the first few months of 1936 , due to the fact that American prices were relatively much higher than Australi an 01' Canadian. Imports from t he United States made up only 19 percent of the total durin g the first quarter of the year and only 22 percent in the first half. American prices were reduced in March as the result of a s ubsidy and order,S increased moderately. There was a further price reduction early in June, which brouglht American prices to a competi tive level and' Amel'ican flour dominated the trade thereafter, un ti l the shipp ing strike made it impossible to load flour at American ports in


635

THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILrPPINES

the last quarter of the year. Imports from the United States made up 37 percent of total im orts in the first eleven months of 1936, compared with 27 percent in the same period of Light arrivals of American flour in December reduced the proportionl for the twelve months of 1936 to 35 percent. There were, however, large stocks of American flour ordered from the United States awaiting shipment at the end of the year. The total of imports from the United States in 1936 is 59 percent greater than that for 1935. Imports from Canada and Australia also increased, while imports from Japan were somewhat reduced.

19is.

Japanese flour is apparently used only by Japanese bakers. I The use of Canadian flour is mainly confined to Manila bakeries, as it requires more kneading than American or Australian flour and on ly the largest bakeries have machines for kneading. Stocks of Cana路 .dian flour appeared ample at the end of the year; but stocks of American and Australian flour were very' low. Imports, according to ships manifests, in 1935 and 1936 (in bags of 49 pounds) were as

follows:

.

American Canadian Australian Japanese Chinese

Total

.""

....... ... ............. , .. ..... ...... .

1 9 3 5

1 9 3 6

894,448 645,984 1,455,582 419,100 10.200

1,419,436 807,720 1,449,116 334,100 26,810 4,037,182

Prices were inclined to be easy during the first half of the year, a veraging about a ten percent decline between the first of the year and the first of Ju ne. American prices naturally decreased more markedly due to the subsidy'. During the last half of the year, prices were firm, being on an average about 55 percent higher at the end of the y"e ar than at the first of June.

Canned Fish.-Japanese competition on canned sardines continued with Japanese prices averaging ten percent below American prices in the first half of the year. American prices increased throughout the second half of the year and were about 20 percent over American prices in October and November. In December, with no a rr ival s of American canned fish, the very small remaining stocks were sold at nearly 25 percent over the Japanese pri路 ces, which remained practically unchanged throughout the year. Imports of sardines from Japan exceeded tfu.ose from the United States for the first time, being estimated (from ships' manifests) at 130,870 cases, compared with 109,000 cases in 1935. Imports of sardines from the United States totaled 99,224 caSes in 1936, against 115,000 cases in 1935. Imports of pil. chards from the United States increased, however, amounting to 76,335 cases in 1936, against 44,000 cases in 1935. Imports of sardines from Europe increased substantially. totaling 15,000 cases in 1936. There wer e 24,000 cases of salmon from the United States and 3,750 cases from Canada. Dried codfish came into favor as an addition to the fish diet, due to its low price, and about 24,000 packages were imported from Japan during the year. Imports of sardines and pilchards from the United States together exceeded imports of sardineg. from Japan by 80 percent in volume in 1936, but it is notable that nearly 70 percent of the year's imports of American sardines and pilchards came in the first half of t he year, whereas imports from Japan were about equally divided between the first halt and the second half of the year. No shipments of canned fish were being made from the United States at the end of the year, due to the considerably increased cost of shipping via Vancouver.


CORNEJO 'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHRdPPINES

636

Canned Milk.-Canned milk imports appear from a study of manifests to have increased moderately in 1936, the totals for 1935 and 1936 being as follows: eaSelS

193 5

Condensed Evaporated Sterilized Total

.......... ..... ........ ................... ..................... ......... .... .......

1 9 3 6

207,109 539,055 22,299

207,764 552,978 24,018

768,463

784,760

Customs returns, showing liquidations of entries rather than actual arrivals of goods , suggest a more substantial increase in value. 'Dhe toLaI value of condensed milk imports is recorded at P2,500,OOO, an eight percent increase over ~935, while evaporated milk is valued at r4,188,000, a 60 percent increase over 1935. The major share came from the Netherlands. Imports of condensed milk from the United States made up nearly 30 percent of the total for the first quarter, but declined during the rest of the year and were negligible in the last quar~ tel', amounting to only nine percent of the total for the year according to the Customs figure, against 27 percent in 1935. Australia was the chief gainer, imports from that country amounting to 28 percent of the total in 1936, whereas there were no imports from Australia in 1935. Imports from Netherlands made up 56 percent in 1936 against 65 percent in .1935. Imports from Japan attracted notice around the middle of t.he year but were negligible in the last half and for the year made up only four percent of the total imports. Imports of evaporated milk from the United States made up only 40 percent of the total in 1936, against 80 percent in 1935, the balance in each year coming from t he Netherlands. Local prices were steady throughout the year, with an increase of 20 centavos a case for evaporated milk in July. Retail prices on some brands of condensed and evaporated milk increased moderately in December. One of the principal importers put out a new brand at & low price during the year, in anticipation of Japanese competition which did not materialize.

Fresh Fruits and Vegetables.-Demand for apples, oranges, grapes and lemons continued good in 1936. Imports of apples appear t oj have increased and oranges to have decreased. Grape imports were below normal, due to frost damage to the American crop and the shipments tiliat were received were not in the best condition. As usual, the United States got most of the business in apples, lemons and grapes and about 80 percent in value of ttle oranges. Japan continued to supply the biggest part of the onions and potatoes. Apples from Japan and China did not prove satisfactory to the Philippine taste. Imports of fresh fruits and vegetables from the United States fell off in November and December, due to the shipping strike, and stocks were very low at the end of the year , with prices increasing 50 percent in the last two months. Othe,路 Foodstuffs.-Imports of fresh beef fen off to P785,OOO in 1936, or 11 percent less than in 1935. The American share totaled 77 percent against 88 percent the previous year, Australia getting the balance. Although Customs figures indicate that the greater part of the beef imported in tilie past two years has been from the United States, it has apparently been chiefly Army imports, as fresh beef is hard to find in the cold stores and sells at prices sufficiently high to discourage most Purchasers. Imports of canned sausage totaled P229,OOO in 1936, an 18 percent increase, and the Amerlcan share continued at around 77 pel'cent. I mports of frozen butter totaled P583,OOO, an increase of about 20 percent. As usual, it came largely from Australia l the American share being 20 percent against 29 percent in 1935.


THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES

631

AUTOMOTIVE

The automotive trade had a very good year in 1936, sales of cars totaling 3,067 for the year, a 17 percent increase over 1935 sales. Sale~ were remarkably consiste~t throughout the year, the high month being October with 337 and! the Jow month, May wIth 208. The usual rainy season slump was not experienced, as rising quotations for mining shares along with general prosperity yielded profits which were reflected in automobile purchases, beginning with June and continuing throughout the balance of the year. Sales reached a peak in October, due partly to fear that a luxury tax on automobHe sales might be passed by the National Assembly, and fell off in November due to a reaction in the stock market and to the fact tihat the National Assembly adjourned without acting on the Luxury Tax Bill. Decem.. ber sales were comparatively moderate due to sJlortage of stocks, but demand was excellent at the end of the year. Truck sales were very good in the first quarter, fell off seasonally during the rainy and were good in the last four months of the year. Sales for the year totaled 2,279, a 15 percent increase over the 1935 figure. Sales to the sugar in dustry fell below expectations, but other sales were very good throughout the year, particularly to mining and transportation companies.

~eason

Imports of new cars by dealers totaled 2,826 in 1930, according to a census' of all the importers. This includes 26 midget cars imported direct by a taxicab company. It is a consi路 derable increase over the 2,594 cars imported in 1935. Imports were as usual almost entirely from the United States, although six cars were received from the German subsidiary of an American manufacturer and 23 were imported from Italy. These foreign cars appear to' have found a ready market, coming at a time when there was a shortage of American cars, but it is not believed that foreign cars will become an important factor in the market. Imports of new trucks by dealers total ed 2,129 in 1936, which compares with 1,744 in 1935. Trucks were a ll from the United States and included 16 diesel trucks, most of which had been sold by the end of the year. Stocks of cars were considered normal at the beginning of the year and extremely low at the end, dealers having very few cars available to meet the demand. A shortage of medium and high-priced cars developed as early as August due to the unexpected demand for that class of car. Prospective purchasers, to some extent, satisfied themselves with low路 priced cars but by the end of the year there were practically no stocks of any class of car. Sales during the year exceeded imports by 241 units. Truck stocks were considered nonna} at t!he beginning of the year, increased to fairly large proportions at about mid-Y'ear but declined steadily in the last four months and were very low at the end of the year. Sales of trucks exceeded. imports by路 150 units. Registrations at the end of 1936 totaled 28,420 cars, 17,355 trucks and buses, and 518 ltlotorcy'Cles. Of these, 14,213 cars, 5,017 trucks and buses and 320 motorcycles were registered in Manila and Rizal. The used car situation was comfortable throughout the year. The demand was particularly good in tfue last quarter, as stocks of neW cars were getting short and used car stocks were low at the end of the year. Prospects for 1937 appear good and it is believed likely that sales of cars and trucks 路Il approximately equal or possibly exceed those for 1936. There is an accumulated demand t the. beginning of 1937 which may be expe~ted to result in record sales for the first quarter, ssummg that adequate stocks of new models become a va ilable during that period. ThE' ex-


CORN1!:JO'S CO MMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHI'LIPP1NES

ceptional demand for high-priced cars as a result of stock market profits may not be repeated to the same extent in 1937, but so long as the present foreign demand for PhilippiJ!p. products .continues, there seems no reason why there should be any abatement in the present general feeling of prosperity.

Auto1nobile Accesso'rics, Pa'1'ts and Ti1路es.-Business in automobile J.arts was good throughout 193(i, ::;howillg a consistent :ncl'ease over the preceding year, although the improvement was less striking than in the case of cars and trrucks. Imports of parts, accessories and garage equipment totaled P'1,929,626, a 22 percent increase over 1935. The in.crease in sales appears to have been more moderate, however, being estimated at 10 to 12 'Percent. Stocks were apparently increased, although they were considered normal at the end of the year. A notable feature was the increa::-e in indenting, transp0rtation companie~ and .dealers showing a greater willingness to carry stocks themselves instead of relying on importers to carry stocks for them. There appeal'S to be a' greater proportion of new cars and trucks on the road, which will presumably not need parts to the same extent as old cars. -'Vith the greater number of cars, however, and with generally prosperous conditions, an i!11provement in sales of parts, accessories and garage equipment is expected in 1937. Imports of automobile and truck tires, according to. the Bureau of Customs, totaled 123,160, valued at P2,595,613 in 1936, compared \vith 93,529, valued at P1,829,074, in 1935. It is probable, however, that somp. biycle tires were included. A careful ex::aminati'tm I')f manifests indicates total imports of about 102,000 tires in the whole of 1936, an increase of about 18 percent over 1935. Sales were good through out the year, apparently exceeding those for 1935 by at least 20 percent, as stocks were lower at the end of the year than at the beginning. Collections improved and were very good at the end of the year. Prospp.cts for 1937 appear good, with an increased number of cars and trucks in use. Prices were increased ten percent on January 1, 1936, although five percent of this went to dealers in an extra discount. There was another increase of five percent on July 2 on all tires. The tax on gasoline was increased to five centavos a liter (formerly four centavos) and that on lubricating oil to four centavos (fol'merly tfuree centavos) a liter as of January 1, 1937. Registration fees were increased by 25 to 50 percent. These increases will probably not greatly affect the sale or use of automobiles and trucks although there may be a tendency among transportation companies to reduce rolling stock by scrapping or storing old units and failir.g to replace them, in preference to paying the enhanced fees. Business of transportation companies was good at the end of the Y'ear and if it continues at the present rate, there will probably be no considerable reduction in the number of trucks' and buses in use. A bill which might have had a more serious effect would have imposed a ten percent tax on the first sale in the Commonwealth of certain articles designated as lu.x~ uries, including automobiles. accessories and tires. This bill was considered by the 'Vays and Means Conunittee but no action was taken on it. It may come up in future sessions of the National Assembly,

An Act passed by the National Assembly in 1936 removes the limitation on the power of the Manila Municipal Government to fix license fees for, dealers in automobiles and acceSsories, merely requiring that the fee be reasonltble. Heretofore, the fee has been limited by the Revised Administrative Code to P500 a year. The Manila Municipal Council was considering, at the beginning of 1937, a proposal to increase license fees for dealers in a number of goods, including automobiles.


639

THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES

JRON AND STEEL PRODUCTS Imports of iron and steel products, not ' including machinery, totaled P20,080,128 in 1936, according to Bureau of Customs returns. This exceeds the P13,954,149 for 1935 by 44 percent. The increase seems to have been genera l. Imports of some of the principal items for the two years were as follows: 1 9 3 5

U.S.A. Bars and rods .... .. ......... .. . . ..... Corrugated roofing . - . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . Plain galvanized sheets ......... . . ... . Barbed wire . . . . . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nails .. .. ....... _ ..... . ..... . ......... Tin plate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - . - .. ... Cast iron pipe ..... . . . ... \I'rought iron pipe ..... ... ............ Steel pipe ............... . ..... - ...

.

_

.

_

... ..

P 317,402 2,584,647 557,322 33,088 345,570 1,279,106 348,801 702,888 275,146

1 9 3 6

Total P 954,767 2,650,200 634,016 172,143 607,483 1,284,541 384,303 755,383 294,867

U.S . A.

Total

P 472,092

P1,346,571 3,242,493 653,567 258,463 514,971 1,914,036 470,828 868,591 289,698

3,114,608 529,832 25,266 199,041 1,906,745 388,935 561,246 262,244

The increase in imports of bars and rods was due to the considerably greater construction activity. Prospects for continued activity in reinforced concrete building construction appear very good and a further incl'ease in imports of bars and rods is likely; in 1937. Imports of bars and rods from the United States were about 50 percent greater than in 1935 and made up about 35 percent of total import-s, 01' slightly better than the 33 percent in 1935. American bars were consistently' quoted about 20 percent higher than Belgian and other European bars during most of the year and were imported only for Government work, where they had the advantage of the Flag Law. In Decembel', however, European price~ increased so rapidly as to pass the prices of American bars, leaving the market to the latter. Imports of corrugated roofing increased about 22 percent and as usual, came almost entirely from the United States, in spite of the fact that Japan ese roofing was at one time offered at a price nearly 20 percent lower. The increase in imports reflects the spread of prosperity, one of the first signs of indivdual prosperity among Philippine peasants being the replacement of a nipa roof with a corrugated iron root . Imports of plain galvanized sheets increased only slightly and t he American proportion decreased from 88 percent of bhe total in 1935 to 81 percent in 1936, due to increased Japanese competition on the lig'ht gauges, 31 to 34. Some fault was found with the galvaniz.. ing of Japanese sheets, however, and importations Were largely discontinued in th e last quarter. Imports of barbed wire increased about 50 percent, but the American share was re" duced to ten percent of the total, against 20 percent in 1935. American barbed wil'e was competitive in price during most of the year, but there was a prejudice against it, arising from the fact that it is tightly rolled. The ordinary purchaser in the Philippines sees more value in the loosely rolled Japanese and European wire, in spite of the greater convenience of the small roll and the fact that the length and weight of the wire al'e plainly indicated on each roll. It will be observed that imports of nails from the United States made up nearly 60 percent of the total in 1935, whereas in 1936 the American share was only 39 percent. Imports from Europe, particularly Czechoslovakia, incr ased somewhat but the principal increase was in imports from Japan, which more than doubled. Actual imports of nails from Japan appear to have exceeded imports from the United States but with' the considerably lower price


1340

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF rHE PHILIPPINES

prevailing f or Japanese nails, they made up only; 35 percent of the total in value. Japan also dominated the market for plain wire, imports from Japan apparently exceeding those from the United States in value and being about twice as great in volume. Japanese prices on nails and plain wire were 20 to 23 percent under AmericaTlr prices during most of the year, American and European steel companies being unable to compete in price on these products in spite of the fact that it wa s from these same steel companies that Japanese rna路 nufactures bought most of their steel rods. 4..t the end of the year, both European and Japanese prices increased to such an extent that they were not competitive with American prices, however. The increase of about 50 percent in imports of tin plate is due mainly to the chance that large consignments happened to arrive at the beginning of one year rather than at the end of another. The consumption of tin plate is estimated to have increased some 15 to 20 percent, however. About 75 percent of the volume and 80 percent of the value of cast iron pipes im~ ported in 1936 came from the United States, the balance coming from Japan. 'Dhe pipe from Japan is for the most part soil pipe, water pipe coming almost entirely from the United States. Of 'Wl'ought iron pipe, 52 percent in quantity and 67 percent in value came from the United States, the balance coming mainly from Germany. Imports of steel pipe were 90 percent from the United States in volume and value. Some importers believe that the Customs fig~ ure must include a certain amount of steel pipe in the wrouglht iron pipe figures, as it is be-lieved that steel pipe is impoded in a larger way than wrought iron pipe, the former being preferred by tfue mines. With excellent prospects for continued activity in building and mining and with a general feeling of prosperity in the I slands, there seems no reas'on why imports of iron and steel products in 1937 should not at least equal those for 1936. American mills at the begin~ ning of 1937 have an excellent chance of getting a considerably better proportion of the total, as Japanese and European prices on all iron and steel products were increased up to 50 percent, or even more, during December and prices on manYj items were higher than American prices at the end of the year. Demand was excellent and stocks very low.

MACHINERY Imports of machinery were valued at P11,718,381 in 1936, according to Customs re~ turns, an increase of 45 percent over the P8,097,705 in 1935. Imports from the United States are believed to have made up about 80 percent of the total, against 74 percent in 1935. This item includes office machines, sewing machines and tractors, as well as industrial machinery and parts. Imports of some of the principal items in 1935 and 1936 were as follows: 1 9 3 5

Mining machinery ...... .... ........ .. . Pumps and pumping machinery ... . .... . Stationary and marine engines ........ . Refrigerating machinery ............. . Sawmill machinery .. . . .... . ... . .. .. ... .

P1,558,034 247,052 296,997 142,303 83,862

Pl,698,347 292,881 814,092 147,060 85,018

1 9 3 6

U.S.A.

Total

P1,767,114 396,259 320,049 84,681 145,025

1,982,179 419,153 977,052 84,773 145.466

It will be observed that mining machinery\ impo-rts increased about 17 percent and that 90 percent of the 1936 total came from the United States, against 92 percent in 1935. In each year, most of the balance was from Germany. Mining development promises to con.


THEl COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHlLI'PPlNES

641

tinue and a number of properties are expected to install mills in 1937. It may, therefore, be anticipated that imports of mining machinery as wen as o1lher types of machinery used by the mines such as pumps, stationary engines, hoisting machinery, etc .. will not be l'educed. The United States should continue to get most of the bUSiness, in view of the preference of mining engineers for American equipment. Imports of pumps and pumping machinery increased 44 percent, due largely to mine purchases, and American companies again got about 95 percent of the business. Imports of stationary and marine engines increased about 20 percent, also due mainly to mining activity, although in the case of bot1h. pumps and diesel engines there was a substantial demand for irrigation purposes. Imports of stationary and marine engines from the United States de~ clined from 37 percent of the total in 1935 to 33 percent in 1936, while imports from Swe~ den fell from 33 percent to 20 percent. There was a notable increase in imports from Great Britain, which made up 25 percent of the rotal in 1936, against eight percent in 1935. This increase was due partly to the fact that an important mining development company did some financing in London in 1935 on terms which required a substantial amount of money to be spent in Great Britain. Imports of refrigerating machinery were surprisingly smaI~, being 43 percent below the 1935 figure, in spite of the large installation of air-conditioning machinery at the Ma~ nila Hotel and a number of small installations in offices and residences. It is possible that air-conditioning madhinery is included in the Customs returns under some other heading. Imports of sawmill machinery increased about 73 percent in 1936, as was to be expect. ed in view of the considerable increase in the production of lumber. With lumber mills working to capacity at the end of the year, and with demand good in both export and domestic markets, a further increase in imports of sawmill machinery may be expected in 1937. Im~ ports of logging machinery, notably' tractors, were also greatly improved. Both sawmill and Jogging machinery came almost entirely from the United States.

Agricultural Implements.-The demand for tractors improved considerably, imports totaling 123 in 1936 compared with 110 in 1935 and 68 in 1934. The value of tractor imports approximately doubled in 1936, amounting ttl P531,717 compared with P269,518 in 1935, due to the fact that 1936 imports were mainly of large tractors for use in logging and in the mines. Imports of tractors were particularly heavy in December and prospects appear good for even better business in 1937. Imports of other agricultural implements appear to have increased moderately in 1936, although details are not available.

ELECTRICAL MACHINERY AND APPARATUS

Customs returns show imports under this heading to have totaled P5,830,861 in 1936, an increase of 35 percent over the P4,307,336 in 1935. The increase seems to have been preto ty well distributed among the several items of elecfrical machinery and appliances, and the proportion from the United States is not believed to have fallen below the 86 percent achieved in 1935. Imports of some of the principal items were as follows: 2J


642

CORNEJO 'S COMMONWEALTH DlRECTORY OF THE PHIL1PPINES

1 9 3 6

1 935 U . S.A. Incandescent bulbs and tubes ......... â&#x20AC;˘. Electrical machinery and motors ...... . .Batteries .... . ... . ................... . Electric refrigerators .. ... . .... . ....... . Insulated wire ...... . ..... .... .. . . . .. . .

199,322 675,169 241,837 201,406 428,152

Total p 371,774

753,662 243,815 201,469 481,479

U.;> . A.

P 289,955 798,804 254,047 419,731 550,732

Total

r

497,237 939,297 257,509 420,505 654,066

Imports of incandescent bulbs increased about 33 percent and imports from the United States increased a little mOTe than that, the American proportion of the total being 58 percent in ] 936 and 53 percent in 1935. Most of the balance came from Germany, the Osram lamp being well represented in the Philippines. The Phillips lamp also seems! fairly popular but imports from the Netherlands were surprisingly small, according to records in the Bureau of Customs, amounting to only four percent of the total. There were no changes in prices during the year, American, Gennan and Dutch lamps a ll selling at about the same price. Imports of cheap Japanese lamps continued t.o decline, amounting to ten percent of the total in 1936 against 15 percent in 1935 and about 20 percent in 1934. Imports of electrical machinery and motors increased about 25 percent but imports from the United States increased only' 18 percent due to increased competition from Sweden. The American proportion of the tota l was only 85 percent, against 90 percent in 1935. Swedish electrical machinery is very ably represented and has been sold at a price 10 to 15 percent under the American price, but Swedish manufacturers were unable to promise prompt delivery at the end of t91e year, being' booked to capacity for several months ahead, and prices increased. Imports of batteries, not including flashligiht batteries, increased only slightly, in spite of the increase in the use of automobiles and in installations of electrical equipment. The United States continued to get practically all of the business. Imports of electric r efrigerators increased more th2.11 100 percent, with sales incrca~ ing in about the same proportion, due mainly to stock market profits and improve revenue from agricultural products. Demand for electric refrigerators was good at the end of the year and prospects for 1937 appear encouraging. Imports of insulated wires increased about 35 percent, the American share being about 89 percent of tfue total in 1936, compared with 85 percent the previous year. The chief competition came from Canada, imports of cheap insulated wires from Japan amounting to only about three percent of the t otal. Sales of radio receiving sets apparently improved, new. registrations totaling 5,74fi sets in 1936, compared with 4,504 sets in 1935. Cancellations totaled 1,283 in 1936, against 1,202 in 1935. Sales might perhaps have been greater had it not been for the uncertainty of radio broadcastin g. An act passed by the National Assembly provided for a Radio Adv isory Board to censor ~adio programs and to study the possibility of nationalizing radio broadcasting. Meanwhile, the three privately-owned broadcasting companies, KZRM, KZEG, and! KZIB, are continuing to broadca.st regular programs consisting of local talent, newS items, stock market quotations, electric transcriptions and phonograph records. The volume of radio advertising appeared to be somewhat increased in 1936. E lectric power production increased in 1936, the principal company producing 128,039,606 KWH in 1936, against 114,179,000 KWH in 1935, an increase of 12 percent. It did not add s ubstantially to its transmission 01' generating facilities during the year. Smaller plants operating throughout the Islands and for the most part using diesel power are estimated to have produced in the neighborhood of 12,000,000 KVlH in 1936, or probably a slight increase


THE COMMONWEALTH OF' THE PHILfPPlNES

643

over 1935. The National Assembly passed an Act appropriating P250,OOO for organization expenses and capital of a National Power Corporation, which is authorized to make surveys of power sites in the Philippines and to borrow up to P20,000,000 for tfue p'urpose of developing and operating hydro-electric power plants. Preliminary surveys have indicated that considerable amounts of power could be developed at sites in Lanao, Tayabas and Central Luzon, but so 1':11' no study' has been given to the problem of marketing. Prospects appear good for 1937. Mines should continue to be large buyers of electrical machinery and equipment and construction activities should offer a good market for 'wiring fixtures, etc. The formation of a number of new mining and brokerage companies and the installation of ticker systems greatly increasecL the demand for telephone apparatus in 1936 and it is expected to continue in 1937. The market for flashlights, flashlight batterries and incandescent bulbs should be very good in 1937, if present prices for Philippine products continue.

PETROLEUM PRODUCTS Imports of petroleum products, according to the Bureau of Customs, were valued at P14,425,493 in 1936, or about three percent less than in 1935. Imports of gasoline, of which about 98 percent comes from the United States, totaled only 145,078,000 liters in the whole of 1936, compared with 158,731.000 liters in 1935, an eight percent decrease. Imports of kerosene, imported entirely from t!he United States, totaled 78,304,000 litel's in 1936, against 87440,000 liters in 1935, a ten percent decrease, though value increased two percent, apparently due to higher invoice valuation. Imports of lubricating oil totaled 11,669,000 liters, 85 percent American, compared with 11,221,000 liters, 83 percent American, in 1935. Crude oil imports totaled 3'41,299,000 liters, 39 percent American, in 1936, against 358,084,000 liters, 42 percent American, in 1935. Customs returns represent liquidation of entries rather than actual imports and these figures do not appear to include exceptionally heavy imports of gasoline and lubricating oil in December, 1936, in anticipation of an increase in the tax on those products. Actually, imports of all classes of petroleum products appear to have been substantia lly higher in 1936 than in 1935, gasoline imports totaling 42,913,00a gallons, according to an examination of manifests, against 40,576,494 gallons in 1935; kerosene imports 20,778,000 gallons against 20,623,000; lubricating oil 3,489,000 gallons against 3,457,000; diesel oil 29,942,000 gallons against 26,094,000; fuel oil 54,102,000 gallons against 49,821,000. Imports will probably not decrease in 1937, though stocks of gasoline and lubricating oil were rather large at the beginning of the year. , Sales of gasoline are estimated at 41,000,000 gallons in 1936, an 18 percent increase Over 1935. Sales of alcohol for motive power purposes totaled 51,563,000 proof liters in the first eleven months of 1936, an eight percent increase over the 1935 figure. The retail price of gasoline was reduced by two centavos a liter in March. It was increased by one centavo in November, anticipating an increase in the gasoline tax from four centavos a liter to five centavos, effective January I, 1937. The tax increase is not e..xpected to affect sales of gasoline, since production of alcohol, a competing product, is limited by the limitation on sugar. Alcohol production will probably increase 10 to 15 percent! in 1937, due to the larger sugar croP. but sales of gasoline may also be expected to increase, unless a reduction in business shOUld combine with the increase in gasoline and oil taxes and in registration fees to discourage bus and truck operators. 21


644

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

A bill in,t'l"oduced in the National Assembly, which would have required an admixture of 25 percent a lcohol in all gasoline sold, was not favorably considered, legislators realizing that t here is not enough alcohol produced in the country to meet such a requirement.

Kerosene sales are estimated at 22,500,000 gallons for 1936, an 18 percent increase over 1935. The increase was much greater than hadl been expected, th e trend of kerosene sales being genera lly downward, due to the gradual spread of electricity. Electric power production increased substantially in 1936 in the Manila district, but there was no expansion in nhe provinces and the improved purchasing power encouraged larger sales of kerosene ill areas not served by the electric power companies. It seems probable that sales will be at least as good in 1937. Sales of bunker fuel oil are estimat ed at 213,000 long tons, compared with 221,945 long tons in 1935. The decrease is due to lower purchases by the Navy. Omitting Navy purchases, sales are estimated at 165,000 long tons in 19 36, a 17 percent increase over 1935 sales. Sales of diesel oil increased from 85,794 long tons in 1935 to 94,500 long tons in 1936. Omitting Navy purchases, sales totaled 90,000 long tons in 1936, an increase of about 13 percent over 1935 sales. The increase was mainly in sales to the rn.ines. Sales for marine use were somewhat better than in 1935, while sales to electric light and power companies were about the same. Lubricating oil sales are estimated at 3,650,000 gallons in 1936, an increase of about 14路 percent. A slightly better average grade of oil wa s imported in 1936, due to the large purchases by the mines, wh ich generall y require oil of good qualitYt and to the fact that independent importers, while offering about as much competition as in 1935, brought in a greater proportion of standard brands of oil. Sales of grease are estimated at 1,750,000 pounds, a 14 percent increase over 1935. The demand for lubricating oil and grease should be at least equally good in 1937. Lubricating oil prices were generally increased one centavo a liter at the end of the year, due to the increase in the tax from three centavos a liter to four centavos.

PAPER AND MANUFACTURES Imports of unprinted paper increased about eight percent in 1936, wrapping paper and a variety of other types of paper being imported in greater volume and value. The total value of unprinted paper imports in 1936 was P4,531,659. Imports of printing paper, the largest single item, were apparently greater in volume in 1936 than in 1935, but were about eight percent lower in value , amounting only tD P1,381,286, against P1,502,172 in 1935. Imports of printing paper from the United States were valued at P'133,000 less than in 1935 and made up about 60 percent of total impo ts, against 66 percent in 1935. The lower va~ lue of printing paper imports in 1936 is due to the very low prices which ruled throughout most of the year. Prices on Canadian and Eu ropean newsprint increased nearly 30 percent in t he last two months of the yeal', h owever. American prices increased about 15 percent and were competitive with European prices at the end of the year. Not a great deal of busi~ ness was being placed, however, possibly due to the shortage of ships and to the fact that Amer~ ican mills, bus)ll on domestic ordel:s, were unable to promise early deliveries. Stocks were :airly large at the end of the year but will probably be reduced in the first' half of 1937. Imports in 1937 are expected to b ~ lower in volume but as great or greater in value. Imports of wrapping paper increased about 23 percent in value in 1936, amounting to P855,515 against P692,863 in 1935. The United States was again the leading source of sup~


THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES

64G

ply with 73 percent of the total in 1936. Imports of wl:apping paper should increase in 1937, with a greater volume of trade expected. Imports of paper bags increased about 15 percent in 1936, in spite of the fact that a local company started making paper bags during the year. Imports are expected to be somewhat reduced in 1937 and will be made up mainly of cement bags. The increase in 1936 was entirely in imports of cement bags, from Japan. The American share in 1936 was about 75 percent of total bag imports. Imports of writing paper fell off in 1936, amounting to P101,200, or about ten percent less than in 1935. Imports from the United States fell off about 16 percent and made up 80 percent of the total in 1936, against nearhr 90 percent in 1935. Competition was from Germany and China. Imports of printed matter were reduced about 20 percent in 1936, amounting to Pl,910,988. The decline was due principally' to lower imports of textbooks, which were imported to the value of only 1'726,841 in 1936, against 1'1,309,103 in 1935. The 1936 figure is a normalone, imports having been unusually large in 1935 due to the purchase by the Government of text books to the value of P700,000 for l'ental to students in the more advanced grades aad high schools. An Act passed by the National Assembly appropriates P570,000 for the purchase of necessal'Y equipment for the use of the Bureau of Printing to use in printing elementary textbooks. The Act also provides that textbooks for use in the elementary grades of public schools must be printed either by] the Bureau of Printing or by private printers in the Philippines from manuscripts and materials which shall be furnished and prepared by the Bureau of Education. There will doubtless be some delay in putting this law into effect, as it will take some time to purchase and install the necessary presses and other equipment and probably even more time to prepare the textbooks, but it 'appears probable that it will ultimately result in a reduction in imports of American textbooks.

CHEMICAL PRODUCTS Fertilizers.-Imports of fertilizers increased moderately, amounting to 1"4,271,720, or 18 percent better than the 1935 figure. Imports increased from both Germany and the United States, with the former showing a more marked improvement. The United States supplied 61 percent of the 1936 total against 64 percent in 1935. With sugar produclion more or less fixed, fertilizer imports will probably continue at about the same rate. The American share Ihas been exceptionally good in the past two years as a result of a campaign of sugar centrals and the Federation of Sugar Planters to increase purchases of American supplies in return for the advantage given by the United States to Philippine sugar. Wi1ili. German prices consistently about five percent lower than American prices, however, the German share of the total is likely to gain at the expense of the American. Imports from Japan have been 6mall and appear unlikely to increase.

Chemicals, Drugs, Dyes and Medicines.- Imports under this heading were about six percent greater than in 1935. due largely to mining activity. A further moderate increase may be expected in 1937. The American share continues in the neighborhood of 70 percent, with competition chiefly in chemicals from Canada, Germany and Japan. Paints, Pigments and Varnishes.-Imports amounted to 1"1,778,860 in 1936, a 35 percent increase over 1935, in spite of the increase in domestic manuiacture. Imports apparently' came about 75 percent from tbe United States, the balance being mainly zinc oxide from Great Bri~ain and cheap paints from China and Japan . Building activity is expected to continue to Increase, offering a good market for paints in 1937.


G4G

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH nLRECTORY OF THE: PHILIPPINES

PeTfU'lne'1'lh COI:>'1netics and Toilet Preparations.-These were imported to the value of P1,499,133 in 1936, a 14 percent increase over the same period of 1935. Imports were apparently about 80 percent from the United States, the balance being made up mainly of per路 fumes from France and Spain.

Three companies have been organized to manufacture perfumes, lotions and scented soap in the Philippines, from French essences, and they are all expecting to start production in 1937. It is believed that this domestic competition will affect imports from France and Spain rather than from the United States.

TOBACCO AND PRODUCTS

Customs figures indicate total value of cigarette imports in 1936 at only P5,342,460, a 13 percent decrease from the P6,153,235 in 1935. Customs figures are based on liquidation of entries rather than on actual arrival of goods and appear in this instance to be misleading. Excise tax returns indicate that sales of imported cigarettes increased about 25 percent over 1935 and t he principal importers believe that imports increased in about the same proportion. The preference for American cigarettes has been growing steadily in recent years, 1935 sales having shown a 16.97 percent increase over the previous year. Sales of domestic cigarettes, on the hand, have declined or at best held even. Some local companies started during the year to manufacture American-type cigarettes from tobacco imported from the United States, but the preference con tinues for the brands widely advertised in Arnel'jcan and local magazines and papers, Imports of other tobacco products amounted to Pl,788,400 in 1936, a 25 percent increase over the P1,347,324 imported in 1935. TJ1e increase ~as chiefly in chewing and smoking tobacco.

LEATHER Business was fair in the first eight months of 1936, with no particular features. Prices were unusually steady. In the last four months of the year, business was excellent with tihe demand increasing morl'" than seasonally. Rising prices in the United States, particularly on the lower grades of upper leather, the grades chiefly demanded in the Philippines, were reflected in rapidly rising prices in the local market during 'the last four months of the year. These price increases were accepted by the factories and by the hand-shoemakers of Marikina, who are responsible for more than half the shoe production of the Islands, and the market became definitely a seller's market toward ihe end of the year, when stocks were re~ duced and replacement became difficult. Moderate imports of low' grades bellies and shoulders from Australia continued, entirely for the use of the Marikina shoemakers. Occasional imports of black upper leather from Japan, though small, caused some disquiet in the market during the first three quarters of the year, due to the low prices at which this leather was sold. It does not appear to have been vel'y satisfactory, due mainly to the fact that it will not take a high polish. Imports from the United States constituted well over 90 percent of total leather imports in 1936. It appears probable that demand will continue good and prices firm during the first quarter of 1937. The usual quiet season may then be expected to ensue, with a likelihood of some\\~hat easie)' prices if the shipping' strike has been settled by that time.


THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHJi.LlPPINES

647

Production of leather in the Philippines, by two fairly modern tanneries and a number of small tanners doing only local business, was apparently about the same as the previous year. despite Army contracts. The principal trouble of the two domestic tanneries is in getting a regular supply of suitable hides, not too badly cut, from the slaughterhouses. There ",.-as, nevertheless, a moderate exportation of carabao hides to Japan and other Asiatic markets in 1936. Imports of leather and leather products in 1936 totaled '2,518,656 in value, according to the Bureau of Customs, an 18 percent increase over last year. This is chiefly upper and sole leather and cut soles for the use of shoemakers, although a few ready-made shoes and other leather products are imported. The increase is due mainly to greater volume, althouwh avea'age price was a, little better, particularly in the last half of the year. Factory production of shoes increased markedly in 1936, particularly in the last half of the year which some factories consider tihe best six months period for several years. The increasing cost of leather necessitated a general increase of 10 to 20 percent jn shoe pri.ces on January 1, 1937, but with most native products bringing good prices and with a feeling of optimism througihout the Islands, the price increase is not expected to meet with great resistance from buyers. The volume of orders at the beginning of January indicates, in fact, that the coming year will be an exceptionally good one.

TRANSPORTATION

AND

COMMUNICATIONS

Railways.-Railroad carloadings did not show the expected imp rovement in 1936. in spite of a consid:erably heavier sugar crop. Freight carloadings on the Manila Railroad Company totaled only 1,267,180 tons in \he 52 weeks ended December 26, 1936, a very slight decline from the 1,278,306 to!1S loaded in the same period of 1935. There was only a moderate increase in the amouni of sugar carried and sugar cane actually showed a decrease, due pre-sumably to the increasing tendency to USe trucks. Rice and palay movement was reduced due to the short crop and there was also a considerable reduction in copra and coconuts. Lumber and timber movement was also substantially reduced, in spite of the considerable increase in production and exports. This appears to be due to a greater tendency to ship by water. Movement of mineral products, manufactured goods and L.C.L. shipments was considerably better in 1936 than in 1935. No figures are available to show the mo vement of freight on the Philippine Railway Company, but it would appear from preliminary financial returns that there was nO! iroprover.nent over 1935. Railroad carloadings are not a particularly good index of freight movement, as the railroads serve relatively limited areas, by far th~ greater part being served by boats and trucks. Prospects for 1937 appear fairly' good. Movement of most conunodities may be expected to be a little better than in 1936 and the increase in the tax on gasoline and lubricating oil and in motor vehicle registration fees may improve the competitive position of the railways' by forcing an increase in truck transPQrtation rates. The railroads built no considerable extensions during the year and purchases were confined to essential replacements. The Manila Railroad is authorized by an Act passed bv the National Assembly to abandon some little-used lines in Southern Luzon and extend i~ Southern line to Legaspi, wlhich should improve the earnings of its Southern lines. The Assembly appropriated P300,OOO for the purcha.se of Manila Railroad Company stock, the proceeds to be used toward this extension.


648

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF 'CRE PHILIPPINES

Another Act passed by, the National A ssem bly authorizes the Manila Railroad Company to cons truct and operate toll bridges, toll viaducts and toll tunnels. The fate of t he Philippine Railway Company remains in doubt. Bonds totaling about P17,000,000 become due in 1937 and no prov ision has been made for meeting them. The Philippine Government has been paying interest on the bonds but does not guarantee l'epay_ men t of the principal and shows no present inclination to purchase the bonds and operate the lines. There seems little prospect that the railway wi ll ever be a paying proposition but some compromise may be worked out whereby it will be permitted to con tinue in operation.

Shipping.-Export cargoes totaled 2,692,095 tons in 1936, according to the Associated Steamsnip Lines. This compares with 1,917,398 tons in 1935. The increase is due mainly to sugar, but there was a lso a s ubstantial increase in most other export products, notably logs and lumber, coconut products and minerals. Of the 1936 exports, 872,728 tons went to Oriental ports, 431,028 tons to the American Pacific Coast, 1,107,827 tons to the Atlantic Coast and 252,383 tons to Europe. American boats carried 545,653 tons, or 20 percent of the total, compared with 28 percent in 1935. Import tonnage was apparently much better than in 1935 and interisland traffic was ver y good. Passenger traffic was excellent t h roughout the year and hotel facilities in Manila were strained at all times, excepting during the rainy season. An exceptionally heavy ingress of visitors is expected in the' first qualter of 1937, due to the Eucharistic Congress and difficulty is anticipated in accommodati ng them. The Manila Hotel is building a n annex with 68 air-cond itioned bed'r ooms and a banquet room, which should be ready by about t he end of the first quarter. German and Italian steamship lines offered a ver:4 popula r rapid service to Europe during the year, which provided some competition to American and Canadian lines operating on the Pacific Ocean. Prospects for shippin g in 1937 a re difficult to forecast due to the exceptional situation at the end of the year, arising from t he tie-up of American ships. A sudden increase in the demand for tonnage a ll over the world is believed an even more important factor in producing an extreme shortage of space available! to Philippine shippers at t he end of the year. I t became definitely a buyers' market, w ith s~ip operators finding no difficulty in filling all the ships they could get Ihold of and folowing a natural tendency to prefer the classes of cargo carrying the best! rates. Shipments of mineral ores to the United States have been suspended for that reason and sugar shippers are experiencing difficulty in gett!ng adequate space. Assuming the settlement of complicating factors, it appears probable that cargo movements from t he P hilippines in 1937 will show a fairly good increase over 1936.

Moto?' T1路ansportation.-Although no figures are available, bus and truck transporta~ tion companies appear to have had a successful year in 1936. Transportation companies have been active purchasers of trucks throughout most of the year. Increased difficulties are anticipated for 1937, when registration fees are increased nearly 50 percent and there is an increase as of January I, 1937, from four to five centavos a liter in the tax on gasoline and from three to four centavos a liter in the tax on lubricating oil. Some of the weaker operators may find it impossible to pay t he increased taxes, but it is believed that the larger companies w ill conti nue to operate at a profit. A viation.-Regular airmail service between San Francisco and Manila was provided during 1936. Beginning w ith October 27, passengers were also carried. This methocL of traveling has proved very popular, particulaTly since the shipping strike reduced the number of boats available, 'and the Clippers have for the most palt been filled close to capacity.


THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHLLIPPIlNES

649

It rem.ains to be seen whether trans· Pacific ai~ travel will pl'ove as popular when the novelty has worn off and when adequate accorrunodation is available on ships, but it will always be a great convenience to business men to whom tim} is of paramount importance. The company established a temporary base at Cavite early in the year and is planning a permanent base in

Manila Harbor. , The Philippine Aerial Taxi Company continued to operate on a schedule of seven trips a week between Manila and Baguio and increased its schedule to Pal'aeale from one plane a week to five. Several extra flights were required to accommodate passengers. The company again operated without accident. The 1l0ilo·Negros Air Express Company continued its semi-weekly service between Manila and Davao until the end of May when it had its first accident, a tri-motored plane being forced to land in the water near Panay. It was impossible to recover the plane and the mystery why all three motors stopped at almost the same time was not solved. There were no serious injuries to passengers or crew. The Manila-Davao and Manila-Iloil~ services were suspended early in September but will be resumed about the end of February, 1937, with a new 16·passenger amphibian plane of American make. Due to the suspension of the Manila-Iloilo and Manila-Davao services, the number of passengers carried on scheduled flights was somewhat reduced, amounting to 17,548, compared with 19,075 in 1935. The number of hours flown and miles covered on scheduled flights, nevertheless, increased to 4,243.45 and 489,481, respectively, in 1936, compared with 2,969 and 344,686 in 1935. In addition, there were 1,295 passengers carried, 180,219 miles covered and 2,014 hours flown on non-scheduled flights. The two operating companies carried 3,860 kilos of mail, compared with 2,431 kilos in 1935. The number of privately-owned planes in operation in the Philippines at lhe end of 1936 was 19. There were 20 licensed commercial pilots, 25 licensed pilots and 73 licensed • student pilots. A bill passed by the National Assembly authorizes the Director of Posts to enter into contracts for the transportation of mail by air between points within the Philippines and between the Bhilippines and foreign countries. The base rate may not exceed 75 centavos per airplane mile for transporting a mail load not exceeding 200 pounds. Another bill provides for the creation of a Bureau of Civil Aviation, under the Department of Public Works and Communications. Another requires airplane transportation companies to install two-way radios for all scheduled flights and for all fl ights lasting over one hour. 'Dhe 1937 Public 'Works Bill contains an appropriation of P300,000 for the development of a national airport. There is a plan under consideration to fill in ground for a landing field in the neighborhood of Fort San Antonio Abad in Manila Harbor, with a seaplane basin adjacent to it. Pan American Airways would be prepared .t o construct their own base in connection with the project. There seems to be some difficulty in connection with the plan, however, and no decision has yet been made. A sum of PZOO,OOO available from the 1936 Public W:orks Appropriation might have been available for an airport but had not been released by the end of the year and was, therefore, automatically turned back to the General Fund.

EXCHANGE Opening the year with seners at 200.50 and buyers at 200, the market for dollars was easy during the first quarter due to sugar shipments and to the shortage of cash in Manila. This cash situation was alleviated in April and dollars were firm during the Sec.


650

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEAL'I'H DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

ond quarter, falling off a little toward the end of June due to demand for pesos for mid-year cash requirements. A steady market was expected dUTing the last half of the year, as most of the sugar had been sold by mid-year. Renewed weakness developed in August, however, and continued throughout the balance of the year. At Uhe end of the year, sellers of T.T . . .vere satisfied with 198.75 and buyers were offering no better than 198.25, the treasury's buying price. The dollar reached its high point in May when sellerS were asking 201 and buyers offering 200.50 but the average of both selling and buying quotations for tlhe year was below par. The relative weakness in the dollar dUTing the last half of 1936, a period in which sugar exports were moderate, was apparently due mainly to the fact that banks were am路 ply supplied with dollars as a result of the very' remunerative export trade in sugar and other Philippine products in the first half of the year and ~id not wish to increase their balances in the United States, where they could obtain only very low interest rates. Exports of products other, t han sugar, including gold bullion, continued excellent and increasing throughout the last half of the year and the favorable balance of trade for the year reached l'ecord proportions. The supply of dollars apparently exceeded demand at all times during the last half of the year, in spite of the fact that imports were also good during most of the period. Toward the end of the year, however, imports fell off due to the shipping strike and the weakness in exchange rates was accentuated. Another> factor was the heavy increase in bank deposits, Philippine law requiring that foreign banks normally keep in the Philippines assets equal to 90 percent of their total deposits. The Tetent~on in the Philippines of fairly large remittances that would normally have been made to Spain and other countries and the rather considerable imports of capital, chiefly from Hong Kong and China, for investment in Philippine mining shares, were also factors in the! strength of the peso. ,"Vith a large supply of dollars becoming available from sugar shipments during the Ilext few months, it appears almost certain that the buying quotation for dollars will remain considerably below par and probably' not much above the treasury's buying point of 198.25.

BANKING AND CREDIT

The consolidated statement of Manila banks as of December 26, 1936, showed an increase for the year of P75,000,OOO in total resources. Investments increased P17,OOO,000, but the increase was apparently due mainly to contracts for foreign exchange. Cash declined moderately in the first quarter of the y'ear , during the sugar milling season, and increased substantially in the second quarter, as returns from exports were received. There was little change during the balance of the year, until December, when there was an increase of about P3,OOO,OOO, due partly to cashing of war veterans bonus bonds. The nee cash increase for the year was about P12,OOO,OOO. Loans and discounts increased from P39,OOO,OOO at the beginning of the year to P51,OOO,OOO at the end of the first quarter, the sugar harvesting season. They remained in the neighborhood of P52,OOO,OOO during the balance of the year, increasing to 'P54,500,OOO with the start of the ,new sugar season in December, a net gain of P15,000,000 for the year. Overdrafts were steady at P55,000,000 during the first quarter and declined to P48,000,OOO at mid-year proceeds of sugar sales apparently being reflected in reduced overdrafts rather than loans and discounts. Overdrafts increased steadily during the last half of the year due to stock market activities, reaching a high of P68,000,OOO in November and declining slightly in December. The net increase for the year was Pl1,OOO,OOO.


651

THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE) PHlLIPP1NES

The most striking increase was in demand deposits, which went from P55,OOO,OOO at the beginning of the y-ear and P52,OOO,OOO at the end of January to PI04,000,OOO at the end of October, falling off slightly during the balance of the year for a net gain of P47,OOO,OOO. The increase in demand deposits during! the first haff-year appears to have been due partI to pJ,YlCeeds of sugar sales and during the last half-year, largely to the spectacular in:rease in mining share quotations. General prosperity was a factor, however, throughout the year. The net working capital of foreign banks fell from PIO,OOO,OOO at the beginning of the year to a minus quantity of r4,000,000 at mid-year, when credit balances from sugar sales had been built up at head offices, but increased in the last quarter to P12,000,OOO as funds were required for the new sugar seasoI'l:' Consolidated figures for Manila banks as of December 28. 1935, and December 26, 1936, are as follows: Thousands of Pesos Dec. 28

Total resources ..................•.... . ........ Investments . ....... . . . ......•......... . .. . . . . . Cash on hand ........... . ...... . ..... . ...•...• Loans and discounts .. . . •.. . •...... . .......... . Overdrafts ..... . ..... . ............. . ........ . Demand deposits .. . ... . . . ... . .............. . .. . Savings deposits . . .................. . ... . . . . . . . Time deposits ........ . ........ . ............... . Net amount due from banks, agencies and branches in the Philippines ...... .. ................. . Net amount due from other (foreign) banks ..... . Net amount due from Philippi1}e branches to foreign banks ............ ... ... .. ............ . Average weekly debits to individual accounts .. ' Total net circulation . . : ... .. .... . ........ . .... . Total Government reserves

Dec. 26

1935

1936

251,959 59,950 24,721 39,265 55,029 55,18li 40,420 46,811

325,786 77,483 36,580 54,511 66,117 102,015 35,614 58,226

8,773 29,051

17.149 33,910

10,349 23,712 117,274 154,826

11,960 39,628 138.990 176,544

Debits to individual accounts were consistently ahead of 1935 and during some months, when stock market activity was at its height, were considerably more than double the figure for the corresponding month of the previous year. The weekly' average for the year was about P39,600,OOO in 1936, against f23,700,OOO in 1935. The weekly average was a little under '30,000,000 for the first half-year, but increased suddenly between early July and the end of October, falling off during the last two months of the year. The weekly average for the last six months was P46,500,000. The very striking increase was due mainly to stock market activity. but partly to general prosperity. Bank clearings, available for domestic banks only, ran about 25 percent ahead of the previous yea}' during the first half oti 1936 but were considerably more than double tlhe previous year's figures for the last half, the total for the year amounting to P377,000,000 or 77 percent more than in 1935. Branches of for eign banks, which do the largest part of the banking bUSiness, in the Philippines, are not members of the Clearing Bouse Association. Circulation increased from P117,274,OOO at the beginning o~ the year to P124,500,OOO at the end of March, due largely to sugar benefit payments in March. The figure remained in the neighborhood of P125,000,000 during the second and' third quarters and increased to


652

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

r138,990,OOO at the end of the year, a seasonal increase accentuated by the cashing of war veterans bonus bonds and by the general prosperity. The net increase in circulation for the year was nearly' 1'22,000,000, which followed an increase of '15,000,000 in 1935. 'Dhere was no general decrease in interest rates on deposits or loans, despite the COntinued excess of cash and the comparative lack of demand for loans and Qvel'dl'afts. Demand deposits were not particularly welcomed, since banks ha ve to pay a three-quarter percent tax on deposits, and no interest was paid on demand deposits. There was some switch from savings to time deposits during the year as a result of the lower interest rate on the former. Interest rates on loans remained at seven to nine percent on domestic loans and five to six percent on ]etter~of-credit and trust l'eceipt loans, with export bills discounted at one-quarter percent per month. Despite the shortage of revenue producing assets, most of the banks appear to have operated at a profit in 1936. The Philippine Nationa l Bank made a profit of P2,700,OOO, of which about P2,OOO,OOO represented profits from operations, the balance being payment or principal and interest on debts which had been written off. The profits from operations was about P100,OOO better than the previous year. Loans to sugar centrals, which were written off several years ago but which have since proved to be good, were written up to their face value, increasing the bank's assets by about P6,685,OOO. That amount was turned over to the Government along witH P2,023,OO, representing three-fourths of the year's profit, and ap~ proximately Pl,250,000 in taxes on income, capital deposits and circulation. Judge Corpus resigned as President of the Bank early in the year and was replaced by Vicente Carmona, formerly Under-Secretary of Finance. The Board of Directors, appointed at the same time, is made up entirely of Government representatives, neither American nor Fi~ Jipino business men being included. President Quezon, in his message to the Directors, pointed out that the Bank should play an important part in the execution of plans designed to build up the national economy in preparation for independence. This would involve aid in the promotion and financing of new enterprises and advice to clients contemplating new ventures. A careful study should, he indicated, be made of the feasibility of improving credit facilities to small merchants and farmers and thus improving social conditions and alleviating the evils of usury. The Directors should, in short, consider loans and investments from the broader viewpoint of social and economic advantage, as well as from the strictly banking viewpoint, but w ithout departing from sound banking practices. The Philippine National Bank opened a new department during the y-ear for the purchase and sale of Philippine Government bonds, hoping to create a market for those bonds in the Philippines. The new department did a moderate business which might have been greater had it not been for the diversion afforded by the exceptional activity in the stock market.

POSTAL SAVINGS BANK There were 650 first~class postal savings bank offices and 345 second-class offices in operation at the end of 1936, an increase of eight first-class offices and one second-class of~ fice during the year. Plans are being made at the end of the year to have a ~ost office alld a postal savings bank in every municipality in the Islands, or a total of 1,003. There were 35,838 new accounts opened in 1936 and 21,314 accounts closed, increasing ' the total number of outstanding accounts to 335,451. Deposits totaled P11,806,891, or an average of '35.19 per depositor at the end of 1936, against PI0,619,340, an average of P32.09 at the end of 1935. This increase in deposits is considered a very good shOwing, particularly in view of the fact that there were several withdrawals of deposits, apparently for stock market speculation.


THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHI!LIPPINES

653

The income of the bank is given as P428,970 for 1936 and expenditures at P552,514, an apparent loss of P23,544 from operation. Expe~dit~res include accr~ed interest cre~ited to savings accounts in the amount of '329,627, whIle mcome does not mclude accrued mterest receivable, which is estimated conservatively 路 at P290,000. It is believed therefore that the final figur~ will show a net profit of at least P166,455, increasing the net surplus of the Postal Savings Bank to P1,659,981.

GOVERNMENT COMPANIES The Government investment in railway"S again proved unprofitable. The Manila Railroad Company, entirely government-owned, will apparently show a net loss in bhe neighborhood of Pl,500,000, against '1,840,000 in 1935. The moderate improvement is due mainly to reduced interest charges, as a result of retirement of '16,340,000 of bonds carrying interest charges of ovel 6-1/2 percent, including exchange, through f'13,500,000 at loans, bearing a low interest rate, from the Government and the Philippine National Bank. Railway operating revenues did not increase, despite increased sugar movement and efforts to meet motor competition by decreasing rates. A better showing is hoped tor in 1937. It is possible that the increase in gasoline tax and motor vehicle registration tees may improve the competitive position of the railways. The Philippine Railway Company was again unable to meet bond interest charges and the government, which guarantees interest on the bonds, had to contribute about P500,000 on that aecount. The bonds, due July 1, 1937, and totaling about f'17,000,OOO, are not guaranteed as to principal and no indication has been given as to what action will be taken on them. The Philippine National Bank showed a net profit, after taxes, of P2,697,OOO, of which about P2,000,000 was operating profit, the balance recoveries from debts written off. In 1935, the net profit was P3,966,000, but about half of that was recoveries from debts written off. The reason for the lower amount of recoveries in 1936 was the fact that the balance outstanding of loans to sugar centrals, \vlhich were written off some years ago, was reinstated at full lace value, the amount of the write-up being paid to the Government. Hidden assets of the Bank still include shares of sugar centrals carried at P53,000 and worth nearly '4,000,000 at present values, and a few debts carried at .P1.00, from which some recoveries may be made. In the main, however, the Bank will have to rely on operating revenue in the future and may be expected to show somewhat smaller profits for that reason. The Bank paid a total of about f'9,950,OOO to the Government in 1936, including P6,685,OOO from the write-up of sugar central loans, f'2,023,000 representing 75 percent of the net profit for the year and about '1,250,000 in taxes on income, capital, deposits and circulation. The Cebu Portland Cement Company showed a profit of P450,OOO for the first ten months of 1936, compared with P345,OOO in the same period of 1935. The Manila Hotel had an excellent year and made a profit of P200,000, the best in its history. With its facilities considerably increased by an annex, which will be ready by March or April, 1937 ~ it should show an increased profit in the coming year. The National Rice and Corn Corporation is es. timated to have made a profit of better than 100 percent from its sale of imported!' rice. 1'his is not available for dividends, but will be added to the company's capital and used to further its aim of stabilizing rice prices. Several new Government companies or other organizations were formed during the year. Conunonwealth Act No.2, passed by the National Assembly at its first session, provided for a National Economic Council, evidencing a consciousness of the necessity for an organized study of the industrial needs and possibilities of the count"l'y, in preparation for ul-


654

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH ,DffiECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

timate independence. The National Development Compan y' was reorganized as a public company and it is anticipated that its capital will be increased from time to time by Government purchases of its stock, as the desirability of expansion becomes evident and money becomes available. Its capital 'was thus inneased by P1, OOO,OOO duri ng t he year, the company adding another million pesos from its own surplus t o form a su bsidiary under the name of the National Rice and Corn Corporation. Plans call for further expansion from time to time to finance the organization of additional subsidiaries to take the lead in the development of new industries, such as cotton yarn and cloth manufacture, preservation of foodstuffs, iron and steel manufactures, etc. A National Power Corporation was organized at the end of the year, with a capi.al of P250,000 appropriated by the National Assembly, t o be used for expenses of organization. The COU1:pany has the right to borrow up to P20,OOO,000 to finance the development and operation of hych'o-electric power plants. Favorable pr.eliminary reports have been made as to the possibility of developing water power sites in Tayabas, Lanao and Central Luzon, ,but so far less attention has apparently' been given to the problems of marketing or using the power that may be produced. ,Organization of a National Iron Company has been recommended by a committee appointed to study the subject. Attention to h ydro-electric power and iron production is considered important from tihe standpoint of national defense, as well as economic preparation for independence. Other Government organ izations formed during the year include a National Produce Exchange, to faci litate trading in agricultural products; a Radio Advisory Board, to censor radio programs and study ways .anc1 means for the nationalization of radio broadcasting; a Goverrunent Service路 Insurance System, to replace .pension funds ; a National Loan and Investment Board, to centralize management of various funds. The Philippine National Bank and the National Development Company were authorized to build and maintain warehouses fOll storage of tobacco and copl'a, the Bureau of Printing was given an appropriation of P570,000 to enable it to print elementarY textbooks and the National Development Company was ~iven an appropriation of P500,000 to stabilize the price of buntal fibel:.

GOVERNMENT FINANCES The Commonwealth Government started off under favorable financial auspices, its revenues in its first full year of existence showing a marked increase as a result of exceptionally prosperous business conditions. General Fund revenues totaled about P76,678,000 for the year (December estimat ed) , compared with P6 5,000,000 in 1935. The 1936 figure includes repayment by the Philippine National Bank of old advances in t he amount of P'4,679,000 made possible by wl:iting up assets previously written off and now clearly good, but does not include transfers of '7,579,000 from the Special and BoneL Funds (specifically, from the Exchange Standard Fund.) These accretions to the General Fund are reflected in large part in the item of P9,990,000, among the expenditures, representing a loan to the Manila RailToad Company to permit it to retire bonds. In 1935, repayments by the Philippine National Bank. and tl'ansfers from the Special and Bond Funds were at the more nearly normal figures of 1'2,051,000 and Pl,616,OOO. Expenditures totaled about P71,OOO,000 in 1936, compared with P60,375,OOO in 1935. The 1936 figure, however, includes P15,148,OOO for investments and outlays, of whiCh 1"9,990,000 'Was a loan to the Manila Raihoad Company (mentioned above); P300,OOO an investment in Manila Railroad Company stock to permit it to close up a gap in its Southern lines; P1,000,-


THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PH[LIPPINES

655

000 an investment in National Development Compapny stock for use in financing the Nat~o­ nal Rice and Corn Corporation; and Pl,017,000 used for the pur~hase of government office buildings. Of the 1935 expenditures, only P3,360,000 represented Investments and outlays. On the basis of these preliminary figures, it appears that ordinary (recurrent) re~ewas sufficient to balance total expenditures in 1936, including over PI2,000,000 for m~~etmen~. Adding nonrecurrent revenues and transfers, there is a margin of around PI2,044,000. The principal items of revenues and expenditures in 1935 and 1936 are as follows (December estimated for 1936) : Revenues (in Pl,OOO) 1935

Import duties .................... . ..... . ...... . ... . ..... Excise taxes ................. . ....................... . .. License and business taxes .............. . ............ , .. Income tax . . ' .. , .. , . .. , , , .. ,. , , . . . , . .. '.' .. ,. , .......

. 19,393 . 12,017 . 14,001 . 4,727

Net from taxes (after P3,164,00 contribution to local governments) Incidental revenue , ................... . ....... , ......... . Earnings and Cl'edits ................... . .......... .. ... .

1936 22,226 13,427 17,240 4,472

49,689 4,455 10,874

57,237 5,590 8,966

65,018

71,793

Repayment of loans and advances .' .... .. . " . . ,., . , ...... . Transfers from Special and Bond Funds . ....... . ...... . ... .

2,128 1,616

4,885 7,579

Total ............ ........... . ............. . . . . ... .. .

68,762

84,257

Incidental l'evenue is mainly from public forests and from United States internal revenue' on cigars and liquors. Ear,nings and Credits is made up in 1936 entirely of earnings of Government companies and functional activities of government, both of which &how moderate increases over 1935. The 1935 figure also includes aboutj 'P2,000,OOO of pl'ior year credits. Expenditures

(in

Pl.OOO)

19 35

1936

Administrative: .. , ..... " ..... , ....... , .... . ........ ... . Contribution to local Governments . , ..... . ...... . ... . . . . . Pensions and gratuities ,., ...................... , .. , ... . Outlays and investments ..... . .... . .. . . ...... ....... , .. . Public debt ................... . ................ . ... ... . Public works .... . . . . ,.,., .. .. . .... . ..... " ...... , .. ,., Other charges .. . ........ . .... , ....... , . . . . . .. ,.,

30,967 12,662 1,717 3,360 8,499 2,991 179

29,593 11,994 1,715 15,148 8,257 4,290 50

Total ... . ........ . .... ... ••.. .• ....•........ . .. ..

60,375

71,047

5,725

1,166

'

Transferred to Special Fund ...... , ... , .. , ..

,

..

,."

....

,

The 1936 increase in outlays and investments has already been expl::J.ined, The increase in public works expenditures is largely in roads and bridges, for whioh Pl,975,OOO was spent from the General Fund in 1936, against '902,.000 in 1935. Of the public Debt allotment in 1936, P2,402,000 went to the sinking fund, against P2,515,OOO in 1935. Encouraged by increasing revenues, the National Assembly, in its 1936 session, passed appropriation bills totaling about P78,000,000. Pal't of these provided for the funds to become


656

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH !DLRECTORY OF THE PHILJPPINES

available inunediately, increasing the expenditures authorized for 1936, including fixed expenditures, to '73,928,000, part of which will be actually spent in 1937. Expenditures authorized for 1937 total P74,620,OOO, plus conditional appropriations of P6,260,000 (from the General J.. . und) for public works and P2,000,OOO for a Waterworks Revolving Fund. Revenues are expected to reach at least r80,0aO,ooo, as new taxes and increased rates are expected to bring in P7 ,312,000, while increased efficiency in collection of present taxes is promised as a result of personnel increases in the Bureaus of Customs and Internal Revenue. This should permit most of the conditional public works appropriations to be released. The money for the water works fund may come from a bond issue. The accumulated net surplus in the General Fund at the beginning of 1936 was P39,565,496. An estimated '12,045,511 excess of income over expenditures in 1936, including t ransfers to and from other Funds, increased the surplus to P51,611,007 at the end of 1936, Of that amount, P21,672,000 was encumbered, leaving an unencumbered surplus of P29,939,066 at the end of 1936, Encumbrances include appropriations made in previous years which did not revert to the General Fund. and appropriations in acts passed by the National Assembly in 1936 to become available immediately upon signature by the President. Not included, however, are special appropriations for 1937, passed by the National Assembly in its 19a6 session. These amounted \.0 P14.820,000 which, by accountinw practice, became encumbrances immediately after December 31. automatically reducing the unencumbered surplus to P15.119,路 456. Actually, of course. the special appropriations for 1937 are expected to be covered from current revenues. The Special Fund, made up of various I'evolving and P32,364,000 at the beginning of 1936. Income during the year more than in 1935. Expenditures, including transfers, totaled P464,000 over 1935. The balance at the end of the year was,

continuing funds, amounted to totaled P19,051,000, or P2,967,000 P17,121,000, or an increase of therefore, P34,295.000.

Provincial and municipal revenues are understood to have shown a gratifying in~ erease over 1935, but complete figures are not a vailable. The Collector of Internal Revenue re路 ports collections of P13,652,268 for provincial governments. compared with P10,041,174 in 1935, an increase of 35.96 percent. Internal Revenue collections for municipal governments are reo ported at P3,888,781, a 7.19 percent increase over 1935, while collections for the City of Manila totaled P549.273, a 2.19 percent decrease.

PUBLIC WORKS ACTIVITIES Public \Vorks activities include the following:

Roads a.n d B'ridges.-A total of P15,550, 000 was made available for road and bridge construction beiween November 15, 1935, and December 31. 1936. This made possible the construction of 375 kilometers of first class roads, 579 kilome.ters of second-class roads and 640 kilometers of third-class roads. A part of it was used for the maintenance of 9,544 kilo~ meters of f irst-class roads, 5,402 kilometers of second-class roads, and 2,409 kilometers of third-class roads. There were 25 permanent bridges with an aggregate span of 2,629 meters completed during the period at a total cost of P1,773,000, chiefly from the Revolving Bridge Fund. The bridges were chiefly made with reinforced concrete spans or steel truss spans. The new bridges were nearly completed in Manila. One, the Ayala bridge, has one through riveted steel span 242 feet long and one steel span 200 feet long, with 30 feet roadway. The other, the Santa Ana bridge has one 240-foot through riveted steel span and one 12-meter concrete girder approach span.


THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILJ;F'PINES

65'(

Particular attention was given to road construction in Mindanao, where P990,000 wa5mBde available for road work in Lanao, Cotabato and Davao. A second-class road from Iligan on the north coast of Mindanao, passing through Cotabato and going west along the south~ coast to Davao, with a total length of 412 kilometers, was practically completed by the end of the year. It is expected that emphasis on road construction in Mindanao will continue' during 1937. Buildings.-There were 46 permanen'Q buildings completed during the year at a total cost of P725,000. Tlhese were principally markets and schools. In addition, 128 barracks路 for the Army were constructed at a cost of about P2,000,000.

,

PQrt Works.-Work was done at 90 ports in the Philippines during 1936 ,and approximately f2,200,000 spent on construction maintenance and improvement. The wharf at Le-gaspi has been completed to a length of 194 meters and the harbor is being dredged to a.. depth of 30 feet. A modern reinforced concrete wharf with steel frame cargo shed was路 completed at Iloilo.

Dredging was continued in Manila Harbor.

WaterwQ'r ks.-WlOrk was completed on seven projects serving a population of 22,200,. at a total cost of P227,612. Work was newly started on 13 projects serving a popUlation of' 31,630, at an estimated cost of P415,000. There were at the end of the year 45 projects under construtcion estimated to cost P3,840,000 and to serve a population of 232,730. A bill passed by the National Assembly during the year provides for an appropriation of P2,000,000, either from the General Fund or from the sale of bonds, to constitute a , Revolving Fund for the construction of provincial and municipal waterworks systems. The Zamboanga sewerage system was completed at a total cost of P186,512 and plans were completed for construction of the Iloilo sewerage system, which will be financed with the' proceeds of a P350,000 bond issue. Plans are being made for a stonn drain system costing a!'?uncl P110,000 at SHay, Occidental Negros. The Public Works Act for 1937 appropriates P1,500,000 for river and sea protection projects, of which P550,OOO is for two river control projects in Pampanga and Pangasinan, in Central Luzon. Floods from those two ri vers have caused serious damage in the past, two rainy seasons.

Artesian Wells.-Between November 15, 1935, and December 31, 1936, 71 successful wells were drilled capable of supplying 2,111 gallons per minute ofi potable water to a. population of 105,588. Their cost was P99,000. The number of drilling machines was increased from 10 to 17 due to the necessity of providing sources of water! supply for anny training camps.

REAL ESTATE AND CONSTRUCTION

Real estate sales reported in Manila totaled ?18,557,530, the largest since 1919. The 1936 figure does not include three important transactions consummated during the year including tihe sale of the National City Bank Building for over P2,000,000 and reported t~ involve altogether over P5,000,000, If they had been recorded the total would have been over P23,000,000, Or far ahead of any previous year. Prices improved considerably, though they are still below predepression prices ... Modern office buildings were filled to capacity by the Unusual number of new companies formed, and rents were increased, The acute shortage of modem residential buildings COn-


658

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH iHRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

tinued. Some indication of the improvement in real estate in the past two years may be seen in t he fact that the largest building and loan association, EI Hogar Filipino, which had' a deficit at the end of 1934, was able to declare a dividend on September 30, 1936. New building permits totaled P6,140,330 for the year, or more than double the P2,773,950 for 1935. One large new office building was erected but for the most part the new building was residential, including an addition to the Ma nila Hotel, a smaller hotel and some apartment houses. There is sti1l an acute shortage of better class residence and office space, particularly the former, and since real estate and building construction offer a convenient form of investment for idle funds, it is probable that real estate and construction activities will continue at the same or an increased rate in 1937.

INVESTMENTS

There were 460 companies. incorporated in the Philippines in 1936, with P172,622,000 of authorized capital, of which P52,017,000 was subscribed and P18,989,000 paid up in cash and P3,092,000 in property. The controlling interest in 375 of the companies was Filipino and in 57, American. The companies organized by Filipinos had P43,896,000 of subscribed capital and P18,006,000 paid up, while companies incorporated by' Americans had P7,148,000 of subscribed capital and P3,209,000 paid up. In 1935, there were 295 companies registered, of which 201 were Filipinos and 61 Americans. The authorized capital was P58,552,000, of which P22,227,OOO was subscribed, P4,448,OOO paid up in cash and P13,802,OOO paid up in property. The Filipinos had P10,409,OOO of the subscribed capital and P8,067,OOO paid up, and the American companies had P6,220,000 subscribed and P5,051,000 paid up. Mining companies, investment companies, management and engineering companies and others allied with the mining industry made up the majority of the companies and about 90 percent of the subscribed capital. A number of investment companies were organized by wealthy sugar planters and ovmers of sugar centrals to manage their investments in mines and other enterprises. There were 143 partnerships registered in 1936 with '6,462,000 of capital, all paid up. These include 36 Filipino partne1:ships with P1,111,000 capital, six American partnerships with P617,OOO capital and 84 Chinese companies with P2,649,OOO. Several large brokerage firms were included. In 1935, there were 108 partnerships registered with P8,387,000 capital, including 24 Filipino partnerships with f'329,000, eight American partnerships ,vith P6,223,000 and 55 Chinese partnerships with P1,289,000. Dealings on the Manila Stock Exchange were far more- active in 1931) than in any previous year and a new exchange, the International StocK: Exchange, was organized! and started business in October, 1936. A third exchange, the Central Exchange of the Philippines, was organized but did not start trading until after the end of tihe year. There was a total of 1,074,868,290 shares traded in on the two exchanges, of which 978,879,647 shares was on the Manila Stock Exchange and 95,988,643 shares on the International Stock Exchange compared with 183,524,353 shares in 1935 and 71,742,319 shares in 1934. The total value of the 1936 transactions was P445,122,866, aga inst '45,539,316 in 1935 and P28,253,820 in '1934. The greatest monthly turn over was in December wp.en 180,537,079 shares were sold, but the value was only P47,343,719, or less than in any of the preceding five months. The greatest monthly value was in October when the value of shares traded in reached a total of P69,339,424, but the total number of shues sold was only' 158,189,780. The greates~ daily volume was in December 29, when the turn-over was 15,123,835 shares.


THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES

659

The Swan, Culbertson and Fritz index, based on average value of stocks of 10 producing mines compared with averagp, value in March, 1935, opened the year at 52, reached 125 by July 1 and attained a high point of 256 on October 22, averaging. 245 in October. It declined to 163 on November 11, shortly recovered to 218, again declined to 138 on December 2 and had recovered to 207 by December 31.

T'Y'adem,an路ks. - Applications for registration of trademarks totaled 398 in 1936, of which 245 were approved. In la35, 321 applications were received and 170 approved. Registrations in 1936 included 93 for American applicants and 26 for Filipinos. In 1935, the respective figures were 69 and 19.

.r

POLITICAL

The National Assembly in its) first regular session passed a record number of bills, including several revenue bills increasing existing taxes and creating new ones. Among the taxes increased were the inheritance tax, income tax, firearm license fees, tax on mining production;tax on :l'etail leaf tobacco dealers, taxes on gasoline and lubricating oil and motor vehicle license fees. New taxes include an amusement tax and a privilege tax on brokers and market vendors. The duty and excise tax on beer were increased, the former 5uoject to American approval. A bill was passed giving the President of the Philippines t!he right to increase duties by a maximun of 400 percent and decrease them by a miximum of 75 percent, by executive order. This also awaits American approval. The Flag Law was amended by increasing the margin to 15 percent, in favor of Philippine-and American-made goods, and by further providing for a 15 percent margin of prefe.l'ence to Philippine and American distributing entities. Provision was made for a comprehensive census in 1937. A number of labor bills were passed, including a bill providing for a Court of Industrial Relations and one fixing a minimum wClge for Government employees. Agriculture was the beneficiary of bills providing for warehouses for copra and tobacco, making appropriations for extermination of pests and diseases, creating a livestock promotion fund and a buntal fiber stabilization fund and creating a National Produce Exchange to facilitate trading in agricultural products. A new comprehensive mining law and a Bureau of Mines were provided to regulate mining and a Securities Cominission to protect investors. Aviation was encouraged by an appropriation for airmail contracts. An export tax was imposed on shells and an embargo on buntal fiber. The President was authorized to negotiate with the President of the United States toward the holding of an economic and trade conference. A bill creating a Government-owned National Merchandising Corporation to improve the competitive position of Filipino retailers failed of approval, as did a bill to impose a ten percent tax on certain luxuries, i~c1uding automobiles. . Among the bills passed by the National Assembly were the following: Bill No. 11*.-Prohibits the exportation of buntal fibers, seeds or seedlings. Bill No. 67*.-Amending the Bookkeeping Law by requiring that entries in both journals and ledgers must be kept in or translated into English, Spanish or a native Filipino language. Bill No. 177*.-An Act to fix a minimum daily wage of P1.00 for laborers employed in public works. Bill No. 301*.-\Vaterworks Fund.-Appropriates P2,OOO,OOO to constitute a revolving fund for the construction of provincial and municipal waterworks systems. The P2,OOO,OOO appropriation will be released only on certification by the Auditor Gen-


660

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHrLIPPlNES

eTal and the Secretary' of Finance that such funds are available from current revenues, If such certification cannot be given, the President of the Philippines is authorized to issue Corrunonwealth Government bonds in the amount of P2,000,000 for the purposes of the Act. Bill No. 572* .-Authorizes the Secretary of Labor to promulgate and enforce rules and regulations to promote the safety of laborers and employees in mines, quar· ries and metallurgical operations. Bill No. 700*.-An Act providing for compulsory arbitration by creating a Court of Industrial Relations. Bill No. 727*.- Preventing the Use of Registered Containers.-Provides that eon· tainers Ina)t be registered with the Bureau of Commerce (similar to trademark registration) . Bill No. 734*.-Directing the Philippine National Bank and the National Devel· opment Company to establish, operate and maintain warehouses for copra. Bill No. 922* .-Provides for registration of labor unions with the Department of Labor. Bill No. 929*.-Appropriating P1,100,000, of which, P600,000 is for the pur· chase of the Ayuntamiento office building acquired by the Commonwealth Government from the City, and P500,000 as a gift to the City to aid it in building a new City Hall. Bill No. 1183* .-Amends Article 2444 of the Revised Administrative Code by removing the limitation on the power of the Manila Municipal Government to fix license fees for dealers in automobiles and accessories and in some other goods. Bill No. 1337* .-Increasing the inheritance tax rates. Bill No. 1465*.-Amending Law 4142 by returning to Municipal Governments the power to fix their own slaughterhouse fees. Bill No. 1489*.-Increasing the specific tax on beer and other fermented liquors to 12-1/ 2 centavos per liter. Bill No. 1490* .-Increasing the tariff on malt beverages and ciders. Bill No. 1535*.--Amending Section 14 of the Philippine Tariff Act by exempting forest products from the payment of wharfage charges. Bill No. 1874* .- Airmail Contracts. -Authorizes the Director of Posts to enter into contracts for thP. transportation of mails by air between any points witlhin the PKilippines and between the Philippines and foreign countries. BilI No. 1875*.-Incl'easing income tax rates. Bill No. 1912*.- Incl'easing firearm license fees and reducing the bond or depos it required. Bill No. 1926*.-Authorizing the Pihilippine National Bank and the National Development Company to establish and maintain warehouses for tobacco. Bill No. 1960*.-Provides that the possession of misbranded articles in quantities in excess of the reasonable needs of the possessor shall constitute prima facie evidence of possession with intent to sell. Bill No. 1991* .-Creating a Philippine Livestock Promotion Fund for the intra· duction, preparation and distribution of purebred and improved breeding animals. Bill No. 2120*.-Creates a Bureau of Civil Aviation under the Department of Public Works and Communications.


THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES

661

Bill No. 2126*.-Amends Section 1 of Act 3592 (the Port Works Fund Act) by providing that the fund may be used for the construction, improvement and maintenance of lighthouses and other aids to navigation and for airports and landing fields. Bill No. 2149* .-Appropriates P250,000 to be spent for reforestation and afforestation of watersheds, denuded areas and cogan or open lands within forests reserves, national parks, etc. Bill No. 2163*.-Fixes October 17 of every year as the date for opening the re路 gular session of the National Assembly. Bill No. 2187*.-Budget Act. Bill No. 2219* .-Imposes a percentage tax of one-fourth of one percent on the total selling price of stocks, bonds or other securities. Bill No. 2245*.-Appropriates P1,500,000 for the taking of a census. Bill No. 2262*.-Authorizes the invesbnent of funds under the control of the N~颅 tional Loan and Investment Board, including the Postal savings Bank Fund, as advances to the Insular Government for the construction of toll bridges. Bill No. 2281* .-Increases Flag Law margin Bill No. 2290*.-Mining Law. Bill No. 2297*.-Increasing .the tax on gasoline to five centavos a liter and on lubricating oil to four centavos a liter. Bill No. 2311*.-Increasing license fees for motor vehicles. Bill No. 2312*, Cedula Tax.- Provides that in provinces where the cedula tax is fixed at . P1.00, the proceeds shall go equally to the province and municipality wherein collected. In provinces where the tax is fixed at P2.00, the extra peso shall accrue to the school fund of the municipality wiherein collected. Bill No. 2313*.-Provides that textbooks needed for use in the elementary grades of the public schools shall be printed either by the Bureau of Printing or by private printers in the Philippines. Bill No. 2326*.-Creates a National Power Corporation. Bill No. 2329* .-Securities Act. Bill No. 2335*, Amusement Tax.-Imposing a tax equivalent to five percent of the gross receipts of theaters, cinemas, concert halls and other places of! amusement whose admission prices exceed 40 centavos. Bill No. 2336*.-Flexible Tariff Act. Bill No. 2339*.-Creates a Bureau of Mines under tihe Department of Agriculture and Commerce. Bill No. 2343,路 Radio Broadcasting.-Creates an Advisory Board of three members to be appointed by the President, which will study ways and means for the nationalization or acquisition by the Government of radio broadcasting. The Board will also censor all programs, whether sustaining or sponsored. Bill No. 2344*.-Appropriates 1'500,000 to. be used by the National Development Company in stabilizing the price of buntal fibers. Bill No. 2356*.-Increases the merchants' privilege tax to P4.00 a year. Bill No. 2359*.-Imposes a penalty on any路 person found in possession of untaxpaid articles subject to specific tax, or unlicensed apparatus for the manufacture of distilled spirits or apparatus which may be used in the manufacture of articles subject to specific tax.


G62

CORNEJO' S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILlPPINES

Bill No. 2366*.-Makes Appal'i and Jose Panganiban (fonnerly known as bulao) Customs ports of entry.

Mam~

Bill No. 2370*,--Provides for the Jiquidation of th e Teachers' Retirement and Disability Fund. Bill No. 2371 *,-Pro\'ides for the liquidation of the Constabulary Pension and

Retirement Fund. Bill No. 2372*.-Pro'vides fol' the liquidation of the Bureau of Health Pension and Retirement Fund. Bill No. 2373*.-Creates a Government Service Insurance System to which the employees and the Government will contribute equally', This will replace the three pension funds mentioned above.

Bill No. 2378.-Exempts from the sales tax trading in agricultural products and salt on trading centers or produce exchanges organized or supervised by the Government, when s uch trading does not result in actual physical delivery of produc ts. Bill No. 2383* .--Authorizes the Manila Railroad Company to construct toll viaducts, toll bridges and toll tunnels.

Bill No. 2386*.-ReOl路ganizes the National Development Company as a public corporation. Bill No. 2392*.-Creates a National Produce Exchange. Bill No. 2395* J Trade Conference.-Authorizes the President of the PhilippiJles to negotiate \vith the President of the United States towards the holding of an economic trade conference.

Bill No. 2398*.-Increases the fixed tax on retail leaf tobacco dealers from 'P20.0G to P30.00 per an num. (Sgd.) J. BARTLETT RICHARDS American Trade Commissioner

( "' )

Bills s igned by President.


THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHlLTPPTh""ES

u. s.

663

NAVY DAY CELEBRATION

American Fleets Work for Stability in World Relations, Says Admiral Marquardt BY REAR-ADMIRAL E. J. MARQUARDT, U. S . NAVY (Former Commandant, Sixteenth Naval District) Commander, Yangtze Patrol (China)

"We celebrate I.t oday (October 26, 1936) America's fifteenth annual Navy Day. It was in 1922 just after our gover nrnent had let the world in a renunciation of comparative naval building and had sacrificed definite naval superiority on the altar of international concord, that the Navy League of the United States had the happy inspiration of sponsoring our first Navy Day and advocating an Amelican Navy of Treaty Strength. It was altogether fitting balance wheel today seems and appropriate that the wobbly on its pivots. The birthday of that guoeat world is full of unrest, it American, Theodore Rooseis uneasy and unsettled. velt, should be selected as Now, more than before, d()es the date for the annual obour Navy work for stability servance of Navy Day, bein world relations; now, cause so much of his public more than before, is the life was devoted to AmerNavy the surest guaranty ican sea power and the needs and safeguard of peace for of national defense. our country. More and On the occasion of the more, a s the world m()vE.:-; first observance ()f Navy on, do the lessons of sea Day the great maritime power stand out clearly a s powers of the world had th ey have been written s o met a short time before at pla inly in history's pag es Washington and agreed upon from the days of th e ancient the relative sizes of their g all eys t o the wond erful respective naval establishships devised by modern ments. That was the first man to cruise the ocean time in the history of hwman and fly the air. EDWARD J. MARQUARDT relations that independent And as part of the Navy Rear-Admiral, U. S. Navy states had undertaken to is the U. S. Marine Corps, limit and restrict their sea defenses in acwhose motto "Semper Fidelis" has been their cordance with an international formula creed and inspiration for glm'ious pages in amicably arrived at and acceptable to alL history of their own making. The balance wheel of common sense, on its The Navy's activities in the Manila area pedestal of security for all without fear or from a strictly commercial standpoint are favor, had been started spinning. But that probably known -or conceived by so very


664

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH

f ew citizens that it is safe to say that the;..' are practically unknown. Even those civilians in the field of commerce, who deal directly with the Navy, represent so many different types of business that, wh ile the few mterested in each type may Ihave a knowl edge of the Navy 's dealings in their particular type, they do not r ealize t he extent of t he Navy's dealings in other types or the co ns iderable extent of the Navy's commercial deali ngs as a whole. For instance, only the butter dealers know that the Navy buys locally each year 125,000 Ibs. ()ÂŁ butter; a nd on ly the poultry dealers know of the yearly 25,000 Ibs. of chicken and 150,00 0 dozen eggs; and only the vegetable dealer knows of the 250,000 lbs. of onions a nd the 1,500,000 Ibs. of potatoes; and the ice dealers of the 2,000,000 lbs. of ice ; the rice a nd sugar and rope dealers of

DIRECTORY

OF 'rHE PHILIPPINES

t he 200,000 lbs. of rice and the 900,000 lb â&#x20AC;˘. of s ugar and the 800,000 lbs. of rope and ha wsers. And so on, there being so many more items that the list in its entirety would be very ti resome readh~g. But it is believed that a general idea may be formed of the Navy's commercial dealings with Manila from a brief sumrnary of t hes e dea lings in wholesale figur.es. Each year, st ores and material of varied descript ions are received over the docks at Manila to the quantity of 20,000 long tons, valued at ap proximately P 10,000,000.00; and shipments are made of 10,000 long tons, valued at P2,500,000.00. Yearly payments are made to local dealers for stores and material to the amour..~ of P2,100,OOO.OO, and the total loca l di s~ ursements, or payments, including stores, material and; wages amount 1;0 P12,000,000.00."

San Juan de Letran Cadets marching passed the Revlewing stand.


THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PffiLIiPPJ.N'ES

665

PRESIDENT QUEZON'S RADIO SPEECH Delivered by PI'esident lVIanuel L. QuelLon at Washington, D. C., April 5, 1937, at 7 :30 A. lVI., !\lauila Time.

MY FELLOW CITIZENS:

I am very happy to have this opporturtity of addressing you today. It is a long way from Washington to the Phil!ippines and I am beginning to feel homesick, but I am here in the performance of a most important duty that I hope will bring happiness to OUT people. I wish to speak to you on this occasion on two subjects: the woman suffrage and the immediate Philippine independence. 1 wish to reiterate my hope that the worlli!n of our country may at last use their right to vote. I hope all the women whd possess the qualifications required by law will not only register but vote favorably on the plebiscite upon this question. Filipino women are not as yet in full possession of all their right s and unless they make by voice its object in the National Administration it will take a long time before all their rights are secured. The Filipinos will be willing to seek the advice and collaboration of their mothers, wives and daughters in public affairs just as they seek them in their private business. The Filipino woman is the equal of the best in the world and the-re is no reason why she should not enjoy all the rights and privileges of women in more prog1ressive countries. I think that all I can tell you is that I am for woman suffrage. Don't let the world be disappOinted when the day for the decision of this momentous question comes. Let the world see that our women will have all the political rights that women in other advanced countries have.

Purpose of Tydings-McDuffie Law Now I want to speak to you on these questions of Philippine independence M-hich have struck me at this time. Yuu are a lready informed that I have re,:ommended that the period for the granting of independence be shortened so that the Philippines may establish itR republic on the 31st of December, 1938 or on the 4th of July, 1939. I understand some people have been surprised that I should make such a proposal at this time, yet anyone who has followed closely my public career will have expec~ed me to do so. Moreover, it is well known that the majority of our people in accepting the Tydings-McDuffie Lav.\ have accepted it in the hope and expectation that if after it had been in opera:lOn lt had been demonstrated that certain modifications are necessary the Filipmos will have the right to present to the government of the United States their point of vfew on this modification, and my conviction is that it is


666

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY

OF THE PHILIPPINES

in the interest of the Philippines and perhaps no less than in the interest of the United States that the period for the granting of independence be shortened, as I have stated before. Why have we been granted these ten years from the establishment of tho Commonwealth before independence is recognized? The main reason was because in the experience of the government the Philippines needed these ten years to readjust her national economy to the cQnditions that will prevail when independ. ence shall have been granted. The Independence Law provided a certain machinery whereby it was the hope that the Philippines within ten years will be able to readj ust their national economy to th .. independence regime. We accepted the independence law upon the assumption that none of its provisions will be amend路 ed except with the consent of the Filipino people. Under the provisions of this law the frade relations between the United States and the Philippines were to be on certain basis and we took for granted that this basis would not be altered during the ten years of the transition period. Congress Amends Law Unilaterally As a matter of fact, however, even after the independence law was accepted by our people the Congress of the United: States started to an1end those provisions of the law regulating our trade relations with America. It would appear, therefQre, that Congress thinks that it has the right at any time and at its will to change the trade relations between America and the Philippines reo gardless of the provisions of the Independence Act. Under these circumstances, to continue in this present status is simply to cause economic ruin for the Philippines. It is absolutely neces,sary that we may be able to place ow: trade relations with America on a mOre stable basis and there is but one way to accomplish this pmpose, namel\\', a treaty between the government of the United States and the independent Philippine republic. So long as the Philip路 pines remains under the American flag, Congress will always feel at liberty to amend any of these laws affecting the Philippines. But OlYce we aTe independent, if we could secure a treaty from the Government of the United States similar in terms to the provisions of the Independence Act regulating our trade relations, Congress will have to respect that treaty during the time of its existence. And so I have proposed that the Philippines be granted independence and I hope within as short a period of time as possible with the idea that there may be entered a treaty between Am~rica and the Philippines whereby the trade relations between the United States and the Philippines as provided in tha Independence Act may be agreed upon in the form of a treaty between our two countries, and I am hopeful that such :1, proposal will not meet any serious objection on the part of the govermnent of the United States. Moreover, I think it will not be imposRil)le to secure special trade relations between America and the PhilippineR after the third year period shall have elapsed.


THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES

667

Answers Stand Taken by Sugar Industry I heard that many of our business i116n in the Philippines, especially those I'ngaged in the sugaJ; industry, are against my proposal to shorten the period for the granting of independence. Moreover, I have been told that some of these men are in fact thinking that the proposition which I have submitted to the government of the United States is going to ruin them. I want to say to thesCi gentlemen that the present situation of the Philippines affords them no guaranty that they' will during the period provided in the Independence Act be allowed to send to the United States the amount of sugar free of duty that is allowed under the terms of that Act. Even now there is pending before Congress a bill taxing the sugar coming from the Philippine Islands, a tax which is greater than the tax which has been levied heretofore and which under the previous Act was to return to the Filipino farmer and sugar producer while independently the tax has not only been raised but there was no Wovision in that bill for this tax to be returned to the Philippines. Who can assure you, sugalj barons of the Philippines, who are now protesting ag'ains,t what I am .doing which is for their own protection-who can assure you that next year the Con路 gress of the United 8tates is not going' to increase further the tax on your sugar? Who can assure that next year the Congress of the United States is not going to reduce the amount of sugar that you can send free of duty to this country? The suggestion that we should remain under the present status is tantamount to an economic suicide on your part. It is only under my proposal that you can find safety and security of your investments. But do not forget that I am prepared, if necessary, to get independence for the Philippines even if I would fail to secure for ou" products the benefit of the market of the United States. The time has come when the Filipino people must decide whether they shall be the masters of their own destiny 01' not. If we are not willing td assume all the responsibilities of a free, people then let us quit talking about freedom and independence and let us sell om bil'tluigh t for one million tons of sugar. Fortunately for you and fortunately for the whole country the authorities in Washington are concerned about the fu ture of our people, and they are trying to do everything they can to find a fOl,mula whereby we' may be independent without very serious in.iury to our country from all possible unwise legislation that may bling harm to our people. Independence with Trade Preference I want you to have faith in me and I hope you will not emb3(lTass my work here by sending protests before you know what you are protesting about. If I ~ucceed in getting the President to recommend to Congress that the period f011 .he grantmg of mdependence be sho;rtemed and at the same time that the PresIdent be authorized to enter into negotiations with the Republic of the Philip-


668

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH

DIRECTORY

OF THE PHILIPPINES

pines whereby the trade relations between America and the Philippine Islands will be a t least 15 years as pro路vided in the Independence Act, nothing better co uld happen to our country and to our people. I have agreed to the creation of a committee of experts that at the same time that it is studying the different aspects of our trade relations it may also consider how the question of granting independence will affect our national economy. I have appointed to this committee as our representatives Secretary Yulo, of Justice; Commissioner Paredes; Assemblyman Romero, the majority floor leader; Assemblyman Roxas, the minority floor leader; Mr. Elizalde, a member of the National Economic Council; Dean Conrado Benitez, of the College of Commerce of the University of the Philippines; and Mr. Benito ,Razon, as tecilnical adviser. This is a very strong committee which, jointly with other members and other American members, will study the whole and every phase of the Philippine question. They will hold hearings in America as well as in the Philippines so that everyone who has something to suggest may be heard. After t hey have finished their labor-and I expect that their labor will be finished next autumn,-a report will be submitted by them with their recommemiation. This committee is not the same as the committee IconteITlJllatediby the provisions of the Independence Act. This is a committee of experts. The other committee will be a committee which on behalf of the government of the United States and on behalf of t he government of the Philippines will proceed to make recommendations as to our future trad~ relations after independence shall have been granted. Now, my fellow citizens, my time is about up. Don't be panicky, don't be scared with anything that you hear or see printed by the papers as to what might happen to the Philippines. None of you is mw-e interested than I am" not even the man, who owns the sugar factory, or the man who owns the coconut oil factory, or the tobacco factory, not one of you is more, interested than' I am in securing for the Philippines the economic stability and the consequent prosperity for oilr people. Even though I have not a cent in any of those industries, I am at least as interested, as everY' one of you are, for it is my duty to look after the welfare of our people. Now, I say good-bye to you and I hope yOU will sleep well after what I told you.


PART TWO

I'I

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA (See also pp. A-1 71-A-176 and Appendixes, pp. 2563-2609.)

PAGES

INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT THE PRESIDENTS

669.672

THE PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES . ........... .

670·671

PICTURES AND BRIEF BIOGRAPHIES OF THE PRESIDENTS

673·705

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

707.717

The Cabinet

707,

Treasury Department . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . , ....

708

Department of State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... , . . . . . . . • . •

707

Deparbnent of

708

Justice

.... . • . . • . . . . . . , ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . ...•

War Department •.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

709

Post Office Department ... . ... .. . . . . . . . ... ~ . . . . . . . . . , . . ... . . .

709

Navy Department . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .•.• . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . • . •

709

Department Df t he Interior . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • ... ... ... , . ..•

710

Department

.,f Agriculture

Department .of Commerce

. . ... .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

.... .... , . . . . ... . .. , .... .

..... .

710 711

Department of Labor

711

Supreme Court of the United States

711

Court of Claims

I

711

The 75th Congress: The Senate

. . . , .• , . . . .. . ... , . .

The House olf Representatives

. .

0000

0.

Governors of the States and Territories Federal Offices in the Philippines

..

0

,

••

,'

••••

0.'

••••

••

•••••

0.'

••••

0

'

,

••••

0

••••

••

718 •

Bureau of Coast and Geodetic Survey Bureau of Quaran tine Service .,.,

0

,

U . S. Agricultural Adjustment Administration U. S. Treas u ry Department ...

0

U. S. Veterans Administration . ' , '

,

0

.

' ,

.......

•••••••••

•••••••

0

••••

U. S. Army, Philippi ne Department (As of 1937 )

I

0

0.0.0

••••

•••

Office of the U. S. High Commissioner . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

U. S . Navy, Asiatic F l eet (As of 1937)

721 721 '721

••

Office of the American Trade Commissioner

I I

712 713

0

0

,

••••••

,

•••

0

0

••••••

••••

••••

••••••••••••

.00

••••••••••••

721 721 723 723 723 730.740 769

I


CORNE.lO 'S COMMONWEAL'rH DIRECTORY OF 'fHE PHlWPPINES

NOTICE FOR THE CONVENIENCE of OUl' subscribers in the Continental United States and the Territory of Hawaii, we have made al'rangements with the following named persons to represent us. They are, therefore, authorized to receive orders as well as to r eceive payments from any pel'son or firm desiring to adver tise in or to subscribe fOl' copies of this publication. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Mrs. EDNA BILLER 5640 Woodlawn Ave. Chicago, Illinois Mr. NICOLAS BUENAVENTURA 1633 San tee St. Los Angeles, California MI'. JACK CABEZA 533 N. Garfield Ave. P asadena, California \1

I

Mr s. JOSEPHINE R. SOLDEVILLA 643 So. 29th Street Lincoln, Nebraska Mr. RODOLFO R. CORNEJO C/ o Eastman School of Music Uni versity of Rochester Rochest er, New York Mr. A VELINO R. VILLANUEVA 1522 Russell St. Berkeley, California

Mr. P ONCIANO L. CRUZATA P . O. Box 771 San P edro, Califo rnia

Ml'. ALFREDO SUNIO P. O. Box 73 Oakland, California

Mr. MARCELO G. GONZALES P. O. Box 4564 San Francisco, California

Mr. SIMON R. RAP ANUT P. O. Box 422 Hollister, California

TERRITORY OF HAWAII

Mr. PERPETUO D. RICALDE iMaunaloa, Molaki, Hawaii

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES MIGUEL R. CORNEJO Editor and Proprietor 221 Barbosa, Quia po Manila, Philippines P. O. Box 1545

Tel. 2-50-85 Cable Address : Co'rne jo , Ma,ni la


PART TWO

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA The Presidents of the United States: Interesting Facts - Statistics - Por路 traits and Biogxaphical Data - Government of the United States: The Pres路 ident and Members of the Cabinet. - U. S. Supreme Count - The 75th Congress: The Senate and House of Representatives. State Governors. - Federal Offices in the Philippines. - U. S. High Commissioner. - U. S. Army, Phil. Dept. - U S. Navy, Asiatic Fleet and Station, Etc.

By reason of war between the United States of America and Spain, the latter, after her vain effort to defend her.self against the combined forces of the American and Filipino troops in the islands, had relinquished her sovereignty over the Philippines in favor of the for'mer by virtue of a treaty of peace concluded at Paris on December 10, 1898; and, from August 13 of that year up to the establishment of the Commonwealth of the Philipipnes on November 15, 1935, the Government of the United States had exercised complete control of the :Archipelago. The political tie that Jil1jked the Philippines with the United States as a result of her conquest has not, however, been totally dissolved by the Tydings路McDuffie Law, although by its. provisions complete and absolute independence of the Filipinos is assured after a transition period of ten yea~ from the establishment of the Commonwealth. It is, therefore, proper and fitting that in recognition of the good work the United States has done and is still doing for this country, we, Filipinos, should not only be thankful to her pre,sent government and people but also grateful to all those American presidents and other statesmen and heroes who conceived, fou2"ht and died for Freedom and Democracy. Hence, this dedication to the Presidents and Government of the United States of America.

INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT THE PRESIDENTS

*

Thirty-one men have served as President of the United States, but Mr. Roosevelt is called the thirty-second President because Grover Cleveland served two separate, disconnected terms as twenty-second and twenty-fourth President. The story of our Presidents is an outline of American hist.ory. Here are all the great political battles, the decisive issues which shaped our national destiny. all the momen. tous events abroad which gave direction to American politics and policies, -From a PUblication entitled "Prf:Sidents and Their Wives"

by Frederic J. H askin, Wa.shington, D. C.

GG9


670

CORNEJO'S COM].lONWEALTH DIRECTORY

OF THE PHILIPPINES

S T ,\

PRESIDENT FRANKLIN DELANO ROOSEVELT f FULL NAME

1.

George \Va shin gton

2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

John Adams . . . ... Thomas Jefferson ....... . James Madison .. . ....... . James Monroe . .. ...... John Quincy Adams . . . . ..

7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24.

Andrew Jackson ...... . Martin Van Buren \Villiam Henry Harrison .. J ohn Tyler ..... . ..... . James Knox Polk .. ..... Zachary Taylor ........... Millard Fillmore . . . • . . . . Franklin Pierce ..... James Buchan an . . . . . . .. Abraham Lincoln ......... AndTew Johnson.. . . . .... Ulysses Simpson Grant . . .. Rutherford Birchard Hayes James Abram Garfield... Chester Alan Arthur .. .... Grovel' Cleveland Benjamin Harrison . . . Grover Cleveland . ... . .

25. 26.

\Villiam McKinley . '... . .. Theodore Roosevelt . ..... William Howard Taft . . . W()OdTOW Wilson . .... . Wanen G. Hardi ng .. Calvin Coolid ge ...... . Herbert Hoover ......... . Franklin D. Roosevelt ... .

27.

28. 29. 30. 31. 32.

English English Welsh .... . English Scotch . ... . English ... . Scotch-Irish Dutch ... .. English ... .

English ... . Scotch· Irish English English . ... English .... Scotch-hish English English ... . Scotch . ... . Scotch . . . . . English ... . Scotch-Irish English English .. . . English Scotch-Irish Dutch .... . English .... Scotch-Irish Scotch-Dutch Puritan .. ..

Swiss-Dutch Dutch .....

voq

BIRTH

PATERNAL ANCESTRY

WII

PL.ACE

DATE

Westmoreland Co., Va .. , Feb. Oct.

EL

22, 1732 PI

Quincy, Mass. . ...... .

La Shadwell , Va. .. . . . .. . Apr. Port Conway, Va. . ... . Mal'. 16, 1751 La Westmoreland Co., Va . . . Apr. 28, l758 Sta Quincy, Mass. . ...... . July 11, 1767 La, Union Co., N . C. Mar. 15, 1767 La, Kinderhook, N. Y. . . . . .. Dec. 5, 1782 La, Berkeley, Va. . . . . .. Feb. 9, 1773 Fa Greenway, Va . .. ...... Mar. 29, 1790 La Near Pineville, N. C..... Nov. 2, 1795 La Orange Co., Va. Sept. 24, 1784 Sold Summerhill, N. Y . . . . . . Jan. 7, 1800 La HillsboTough, N. H. • . .. Nov. 23, 1804 La Near Mercersburg, Pa. . Apr. 23, 1791 La Neal' Hodgensville, Ky.. Feb. 12, 1809 La Raleigh, N. C. .. . . . . .. Dec. 29, 1808 Pub. Point Pleasant, O. . ... Apr. 27, 1822 Sold Delaware, O. . .. '. . . . .. Orange Township, O. .., Fairfield, Vt. . . .. . . . .. Caldwell, N. J. North Bend, O. .. • .. Caldwell, N. J. Niles, O. ...... '.. .. . .. 28 E. 20th St., N.Y.C ity

Oct. Nov. Oot. Mal" Aug. Mar. Jan . Oct.

5, 18, 20, 18. 29, 27,

1830 Lal 1837 1833 1837 1843 1858

Sept. Dec. Nov. Plymouth , Vt. . . . . .. July " rest Branch, Iowa ... .. Aug. H yd. Park, N . Y. Jan.

15, 28, 2, 4, 10, 30,

1857 1856 1865 1872 1874 1882

Cincinnati, O.

Staunton , Va. .... . . . .. Corsica, O. ...........

Compiled by the Editor from difi(!rent SOIiTCes o f information.

4, 1822 La" 19, 1831 L3'\

L3I Sta Pub

Lal En La


671

THE PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES

ICS

~MER

PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES *

SERVED DEATH IN AUGU. TIME ~ ~ ~_ _ _ _ _ ._ _ _~_ _ _ RATED~. Mo. Da. ' DATE

.. .. .. ..

.. .. ..

.. .. ..

..

.. ..

..

.. .. .. ..

1789 1797 1801 1809 1817 1825 1829 1837 1841 1841 1845 1849 1850 1853 1857 1861 1865 1869 1877 1881 1881 1885 1889 1893 1897 1901 1909 1913 1921 1923 1929 1933

,..

7 - 10 - 4 4- 0-0 8- 0-0 8- 0-0 8- 0-0 4- 0-0 8- 0-0 4- 0-0 0- 1 - 0 3-11-0 4- 0-0 1- 4 - 5 2 - 7 -26 4- 0-0 4- 0-0 4 - 1 -11 3 - 10 -19 8- 0-0 4- 0-0 0 - 6 -15 3 - 5 -15 4- 0-0 4- 0-0 4- 0-0 4 - 6 -10 7 - 5 -18 4- 0-0 (8 0-0 2 - 4 -28 5- 8 - 2 4- 0-0

Dec. 14, 1799 .... July 4, 1826 July 4, 1826 .... June 28, 1836 ... July 4, 1831 ..... Feb. 23, 1848 ... June 8, 1845 .... . July 24, 1862 '" Apr. 4, 1841 .. -., Jan. 17, 1862 June 15, 1849 .... July 9, 1850 Mar. 8, 1874 . _.Oct. 8, 1869 ...... June I, 1868 ....• Apr. 15, 1865 ... July 31, 1875 ... July 23, 1885 ... . Jan. 17, 1893 ." . Sept. 19, 1881 Nov. 18, 1886 June 24, 1908 Mar. 13, 1901 .... June 24, 1908 ••.• Sept. 14, 1901 ... Jan. 6, 1919 -- ... Mar. 8, 1930 ..... Feb. 3, 1924 Aug. 2, 1923 Jan. 5, 1933 . ....

....

.

...... ............ ..................

_ _ _ _ _~ CAUSE

AGE YRS.

Pneumonia ......... 67 Debility 90 Ohronic Diarrhea .... . . . ...... 83 Debility 85 73 Debility . . .... . . ... . 80 Paralysis Consumption .... . ..• . .... 78 Asthmatic Catarrh ... 79 Bilious Pleurisy..... 68 Bilious Attack . . . . . . . 71 Chronic Diarrhea .. . . . ... 53 Bilious Fever ........ ........ 65 Debility ..... • .. . . . •........ . 74 Inflammation of Stomach ..... 64 Rheumatic Gout ..... 77 Assassination " . . . .. .. 56 Paralysis .... .. .. .. • . . . . . . . .. 66 Cancer ...................... 63 Paralysis of the Heart ... . ... 70 Assassination ............... 49 Bright's Disease .. ...... . . . . .. 56 Debility .. . .. .. . .... .. . .. .... 71 Pneumonia 67 Debility 71 Assassination .... .. . . • . . . . .. 58 Rheumatism .. . . . . .. . . .... ... 61 Arteriosclerosis . ....... 72 Heart Disease ....... ... . . 67 Pneumonia and Heart Trouble 58 Heart Attack ... .. ..... 61

. ..... .. ......... . ... ... ... . .


672

CORN'EJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILlPPINES

All of these men were American born. Seventeen came largely of English ancestry, six of Scotch-Irish i two were mostly ScotClh, and four were of Dutch descent. One was chiefly Welsh, and one Scotch and Dutch. Sixteen were sons of farmers and plan ters. Four were sons of lawyers, three of merchants, three of clergymen, and one each of a doctor. a constable, a tanner, a blacksmitlh, and an iron maker.

Nine were bor n to ver y poor families . . The others were born in varied circumstances, mostly middle-class f ol ks. ·W ashington became one of the great land 'owners of his day. Abraham Lincoln entered t he White House almost penniless, but since the Civil War most .of our Presidents have been men of moderate means. The ancestral estate of President Franklin D. Roosevelt' bverlook'ing the Hudson River at Hyde Park, N. Y., is one of the most .extensive in that: sect ion of ·t:he United States. v

own

efforts, Fifteen Twenty-tw o of our Presidents went to college, several by their were sold iers in one or more ' of our national wars, twenty-one were laWyers, fourteen served in the House of Representatives and twelve in the Senate. Nine were Vice Presidents. Nine wer e members of ~h e ~?-,bi!l ~t, and thirteen were governors of their States . .Seven were minist er s abroad. Four were in the Continent~ Congress. Adams and J~tferson signed the Declarat ion of Incie'pendence. \Vashing'ton a~d ' 'Ma:-diso~ si~ed ' the. _Cons~itution. Wilson .signed t he League bf' Nations covenant. All except · Buchanan w~re ~'arried. Ty'l er , Fillmore, Benjamin- Harrison, Theodore Roosevelt, a nd \¥ ilson 'Were married ·~twice. T yler had the largest family, seven children by each marr iage, Washington, Madison, Jackson, Polk, ,Buchanan, and H-arding' were childless. J ohn Adams was tl].e ,:(atp.e;r of a PresHlent, and, William .Henry Harrison was the grandfather of one. Theodore Roosevelt was .. tlhe youngest man tp assume the office, 42, and 'W illiam Henry Harrison the oldest, at 68. Grant, Cleveland, Pierce, Polk, and Garfield were inaugurated before t hey were 50. Garfield, ,die,d younges~: '49',' from an assassin'; b~llet. John Adams r ' . lived longest, 90. Lincoln, Garfield, and ' McKinley were a's·s3.s~i'natea. The ' assassin at: Lincoln was killed by pursuing soldiers. Those of G'a rfield and 'McKinley were legally executed. Jackson was shot at while in office. Theodore Roosevelt was ' wounded when he was- the third-party candidate in 1912. J ~ck sol) . was wounded in a duel in which his opponent was killed, before he became President, ,Franklin D, Roosevelt narrowly escaped the fire of the mad Zangara at Miami, Florida, on F ebruary 15, 1933, onlYi three weeks before his inauguration. N ine Presidents belonged . to the Episcopal Church, seven to the Pr.esbyterian, four MethOdist, four Unitarian, t wo Dutch Reform ed, one each Baptists, Disciples, Congregational, and Quaker. . Ten were elected twice and two refused third tenns. Seven served eight years. Wil· liam Henry Harrison served but one month. Four were never elected President, but merely served out unexpired terms. Five were named James, three William, three John, and two Andrew. Three fought in the Revolution, five in the War of 1812, th ree against Mexico, six in the Civil War, and two against Spain. Eight were born in Virginia and seven in Ohio. Six were residents of Ohio when elected, five of Virginia, six of New York, and three each of Massachusetts and Tennessee. Herbert Hoover, the Republican nomin ee in 1928, was the first President to be elected from a State west of the Mississippi River.


673

THE PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES

GEORGE WASHINGTON 1 s t Presiden t

Born Febnul,ry 22, 1732

(I 789-J 7.97)

Died December 1.4, 179-)

GEORGE WASH I NGTON, the fiTst Pres ident of the United States, was born February 22,1732, at Pope's Creek (Now Wakefield), Virginia, of English ancestry; son of Augustine Washington, a planter, and Mary Ball. He was a surveyor, a soldier and a farmer by occupation.

He married Martha (Dandridge) Custis, a widow.

They had no chi ldren.

He was

an Episcopalian. Died of laryn gitis at Mt. Vernon,- December 14, 1799, at the age of 67, and Was buried at Mt. Vernon. He is called "The Father of His Country"


674

CORNEJO 'S COMMONW EALTH DIRECTORY

OF THE PHILIPPLNES

JOHN ADAMS 2nd President

Bm'n October 90, 1735

(1797-1801 )

Died July 4. 1826

JOHN ADAMS. the second President of th e United States was born October 30. 173;. at Quincy, Mass., of English descent; son of J ohn Adams, a farmer, and Susanna Boylston. He was educated at Harvard. He was a teacher and a lawyer. A Unitarian. Married in 1764 the former Miss Abigail Smith of Weymouth, Mass. They had three sons and two daughters, the eldest being John Quincy Adams. the Sixth President. Died July 4, 1826, of old age, at Quincy; age 90.

Buried in t he First Congregational Church, Quincy,

He was one of the s igners of the Declaration of Independence.


675

THE PRESIDENTS OF THE UN ITED STATES

THOMAS JEFFERSON 3rd President

Born April 19, 1749

(1801-1809)

Died July 4, 1826

THOMAS JEFFERSON, the third President of the United States, was born April 13, 1743. at Shadwell. Virginia, of 'Welsh descent. Son of Peter Je fferson. a farmer, and Jane Randolph. He was educated at William and Mary College. He was a lawyer. Married in 1772 to Martha (Wayles) Skelton, a widow. llhey had one son and five daughters. Died JUly 4, 1826, of chronic diarrhea, at Monticello, his estate near Charlottesville, at the age of 83. Buried at Monticello. He was one of those who drafted and signed the Declaration of Independence.


UORNEJU S

676

CO:Mi\10NWEALTI-J

DIRECTORY

OF TIiC

PHILIPPINES

JAMES MADISON 4th President

B01'n March

J(i, 1751

(1809-1817)

Died J /lne 28. 1836

JAMES MADISON, the fourth President of the United States, was born March 16, 1751, at Port Conway, Virginia; son of James Madison, a planter, and Nellie Conway. He was the first of twelve children. Ancestry, English. Educated at Princeton as a lawyer. An Episcopa lian. Married at Philadelphia in 1794 to Dolly (Payne) Todd, a widow. They had no children. Died June 28, 1836, of debility at Montpelier, Orange County, Virgina, at the age of 85, and was buried on his estate there.

He earned the title, "Fathe r of the Constitution."


677

THE PRESIDENTS OF THE UN I TED S'I'A TES

JAMES MONROE 5th Pre sid e nt

Born AP1'il 28, 1758

(1 817-1 825)

Died July 4, 1831

JAM ES MO NROE, the fifth Pi'es ident of the United States, wa s born April 28, 1758', i:1 'Westmoreland Cou nty, Virg inia; son of Spence Monroe, a planter, and Eliza J ones, a sister of Judge J oseph J ones, who sat in the Continental Congress. Of Scotch ancestry. Educated at William and Mary College but left to fig ht in the Revolutionary Army and was wounded in action. A lawyer. An Episcopalian. Married in 1786 to the former Miss Elizabeth Kortwright. They had two daughters. He died Jul y 4, 1831, of deb ility at New York, at t he age of 72, and was buried in Holl ywood Cemetery at Richmond. He was noted f or hi s policy, known as the " Monroe Doctrine."


678

CO RNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

JOHN QUINCY ADAMS 6th President

Born July 11, 1767

(1825-1829)

Died Februa7'y 28, 184S

JOHN QUINCY ADAMS, the sixth President of the United States, was born July 11, 1767, at Braintree, Quincy, Mass.; son of John Adams, second President of the United States, and Abigail Smith. Graduated at Harvard. A lawyer. A Unitarian. Married in, 1797 the former Miss Louisa Catherine Johnson, of England. They had three sons and one daughter. He died February 23, 1848, of a paralytic stroke in the Capitol at Washington, at the age of 80, and was buried at the First CongregatIonal Church, Quincy, Massachusetts. Pres. Adams was for high tariff, opposed to slavery, and for government highways and internal improvements. He favored the United States Bank.


679

THE PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES

ANDREW JACKSON 7th Preaident

Born March 15, .1767

(1829-1837)

Died June 8, 18.5

ANDREW JACKSON, the seventh Presicent of t he United States, was born March 15. 1767, in the Waxhaw settlement of the North ~nd South Carolina border. Both States have claimed him. Son of Andrew Jackson, a fann er, and Elizabeth Hutchinson. Of Scotchllish stock. Largely self-educated, he became ". lawyer at Nashville. A Pres byterian. Married, in 1791, Rachel (Donelson) Robards, a \vid ow. They had no childl路en. He died June 8, 1845, of tuberculosis, at The Hermitage, hi s home nea l' Nashvi1le, at the age of 78, and was buried at the The Hermitage. He was a hero in the War of 1812, prior to hi s election to office as President, and. in 1829, he introduced the "Spoils System."


680

CO R NEJO'S COMMONWEA LTH

nrRECTQRY

OF THE

PHILIPPINES

MARTIN VAN BUREN 8th President

Born December 5, 1782

(1837-1841)

Died July 114, 1862

MARTIN VAN BUREN, the eighth President of the United States, was bOTn December J782, at Kinderhook, N. Y.; son of Abraham Van Ruren, a farmer; and Mary Hoes. Of Dutch ancestry. Studied law in New York City. Member of Dutch Reformed Church. MarTied, in 1807, to the former Miss Hannah Hoes, a distant cousin. They had four sons. He (lied July 24, 1862, of asthma, at Lindenwald, N. Y., at the age of 79, and was buried in the <:emetery at Kinderhook. Eo

He established an independent Treasury System.


681

TH E PRESIDENTS OF THE UN IT ED STATES

WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON 9th President

Born February 9, 1773

(1841 )

Died April 4. 1841

WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON, the ninth President of the United States, was born February 9, 1773, at Berkeley, Virginia; son of Benjamin Harrison, a s ig ner of the Declaration of Independence, and Elizabeth Bassett. Grad uated at Hampden-Sidney College. Studied medicine, but stopped to g o west and fight the Indi a ns. A soldier and a farmer. An Episcopalian. Married, in 1795, the former Miss Anna Symmes, of New J ersey. They had s b:: Sons and four daughters. He died April 4, 1R41, of pn eumonia and bilious pleurisy, at the White House, at the age of 68, and was buried at North Bend, Hamilton County, Ohio. He died a month after he wa s inaugurated.


682

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

JOHN TYLER 10th PresideDt

Born Mwrch 29, 1790

(1841-1845)

Died January 17, 1862

JOHN TYLER, the tenth President of the lhl ited States, was born March 29, 1790, at Greenway, Virginia. Of English descent. The son of Judge John Tyler and Mary Armistead. Educated at Wi1liam and Mary Col1ege. A lawyer. An Episcopalian. Married, in 1813, the former Miss Letitia Christian. They had three sons and four daughters. After hi s nrst wife's death in 1842, he married Julia Gardin er in 1844. They had five sons and two daughters. He died January 17, 1862, of a biBalls attack, at Richmond, at the age of 71, and was buried in Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond. Strict construction of the Constitution was one of Tyler's principles.


683

THE PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES

JAMES KNOX POLK 11 th Pre. iden t

Born November 2, 1795

(1845-1849)

Died June 15, 1849

JAMES KNOX POLK, the eleventh President of the United States, was born November 2, 1795, in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina; son of Samuel Polk, a farmer and surveyor, and Jane Knox. Of Scotch-Irish descent. Educated at the University of North Carolina. A lawyer. A Presbyterian. Married, in 1824, the former Miss Sarah Childress. They had no children. He died on June 15, 1849, of chronic diarrhea, at Nashvi1le, at the age of 53, and was buried in Polk Place, Nashville. It was during his term of office when the annexation of 522,000 square miles of Mexican territory to the United States was completed at the close of war with Mexico, to which $15,000,000 was paid by the United States.


684

('I) R NE./O 路S

COMMON\\' EA LT H

DIR ECTO R Y OF TH E

PHILI P PIN E S

ZACHARY TAYLOR 12th President

B orn September 2.4, 1 78.4

(1 849-J 850 )

D ied J uly 9, 185u

ZAC HARY TAY L OR, t he twelfth Pres ident of t he United States, was born November 24, 1784, in Oran ge Co unty, V irg inia. Of En glis h stock , Son of Col. Richard Taylor, a Reyolutional'y offi cer, and Sa rah Strother. En te red t he army a s a youth and r ema ined a soldi el'. An Episco pa li a n. Married, in 1810, t he former Miss Margaret Smith , of Maryland. ']' hey had one son and fi ve daughters. H e died Jul y 9, 1850, of a bilious fever, at the \ Vhite H ouse, at the age of 65. a nd was buried on his estate , neal' Louis ville, Kentucky. H e served wit h d istinction in t he war of 1812. He won a deci sive victory in the war w ith Mexico.


THE PRESIDENTS OF THE UN I1'ED STATES

685

MILLARD FILLMORE 13th President B01"n

January 7, 1800

(1850-1853)

MILLARD FILLMORE, the thirteenth P r esident of the United States, 路w as born January 7, 1800, on a farm in Cayuga County, New York. Of English ancestry. The son of Na~ t haniel Fillm')re, a log cabin settler, and Phebe Millard, a pioneer teacher. Of limited education, he was apprenticed to a tailor, but later studi ed law and became a lawy-er. A Unitarian. Marri ed, in 1826, the former Miss Abigail Powers. She died in 1853. They had one son and one daughter. Married, 1858, Caroline (Carmichael) McIntosh, widow of a prominent Albany Merchant. They had no children. He died March 8, 1874, of debility, at Buffalo, at the age of 74, and was buried in Forest Lawn Cemetery, Buffalo. He signed the Clay Compromise, object of the heated debates in the United States Senate between the most gifted group of orators-Daniel \Vebster, Henry Clay', John C. Calhoun, and others.


GSG

CO RNEJO'S COMM ONWEALTH

DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

FRANKLIN PIERCE 14th President

Born Novem ber 23, 1804

(1853-1857)

Died Octob.". 8, 1869

FRANKLIN PIERCE, the fourteenth Preoident of the United States, was born November 23, 1804, at Hil1sborough, New Hampshire. Of 1:!;nglish ancestry. The son of Gen. Benjamin Pierce, former governor and officer of the Revolutionary army, and Anna Kendrick. Educated at Bowdoin College. A Lawyer. An Episcopahan. Married, in 1834, the former Miss Jane Means Appleton, of New Hamp 3hire. They had three sons, none of whom li ved to manhood. He died October 8, 1869, of stomach trouble, at Concord, New Hampshire, at the age of 64, and was buried in the Minot Lot, Old Cemetery, Concord. During his presidency the United States purchased from Mexico forty-five t housand square m iles of land along the southwestern border, Japanese ports were opened to American commerce, and plans were laid for the first railroad across the continent to the Pacific.


687

THE PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITEO STATES

JAMES BUCHANAN 15tb President

Born April 23, 1 791

(185 7-1 861)

Died June 1, 1868

JAMES BUCHANAN, the fifteenth President of the United States, was born April 23, 1791, near Mercersburg, Pennsylvania. Of Scertch-Irish ancestry. Son of James Buchanan, a mercihant. and Elizabeth Speer. Educated at Dickinson College. A lawyer. A Presby~ terian. Died June 1, 1868. of rheumatic gout, at Wheatland, Pennsylvania, at the age of 77. Buried at Lancaster, Pennsylvania. A bachelor. Before Buchanan left the presidency South Carolina seceded hom the Union, the Con~ federate States were organized, and the nation was preparing for w&r--<cm slavery question!.


688

t.:ORN EJ O·S COMM ONWEALTH

DIRECTORY

OF THE

PHILIPPINES'

- - - - --

I Gell)'shllrg Address In Pl'csitlcnl Lincoln"s Own Handw,"iting (!5xcculint Htansion. ~J~7{(JII,

r

J.,:w~ ~ ~~

(q>C£, ~

t;{:... ~,

__

_

I

fN

".....~~ ~~ ~

N

",,~, ~ ~,t:D~~d'= ''2bJ~~~~'

.AIw

W<>

a-.o

~

#.., '"

r

~........,~

~~~-"/~,-~ ~,4b ~ <:. z::?; cl..-/ ~ p.. 0" Cl. IJh., ~ /'A.tXJ J

~"" r~~ -Id=-~, 1Jr~~_ ~ ~ ~u= ~ /~

'1" X;

""" ""r:--~~

/I~r~~~~~~~ ~ J.:v.... .JL, "" ~, i.., e-W 04, n..z;..;., ..

H4

~ ~I w.v ~ ~.

(9I,..J"Co

C

~ ~

/,......c;>

~ ~ t::t::... r--'J:.t..,.&.-, ~ ~ ~~ ~ ~

~ •• c"Xl

W<J

""--

4-. .t:..- ~ ~

10 ~

qy

,pL.tz<;.

r

~

"'"""~I-

.Rf'.... ~~;= ~ fh<Nf.;;

~ .. L.. ~~ ~ ~i ~ .::r;~~

.p.r ,...,

~~~ "L,

U{J ' "

fu, bi

__ -r-P

~

:....~, L--P ?1W

#.:. ~~ ,:~., ~ .•~ ~ .. "'--.

t#..- ~-m.4e- ~ ~ ~_

~F~~~w-v~"':'> ~·~fr~,.g··"r~

~ -4..." ~. ~ ~~ ~.7'0"--~ ~-~~4...,~~~

~ ~~~ ~ ~ nr.w-:.,UCm

f:t.;~, ~~ ~~~"'~ ~

. .-.

~ ~~

,,#::;

/I.#o/~ "S

e;6~r,d.j~· ~('~/"'" ...;A ~

.t::I!.

,c,c?, ~ •

I


689

THE PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES

A'BRAHAM LINCOLN 16th President Horn February 12, 1809

U861-]8 65 )

Died April 15, 1865

ABRAHAM LINCOLN, the sixteenth President of the United States, was born Febru~~ 12, 1809, in a log cabin in Hardin County, Kentucky . Of English stock. The son of Thomas Lincoln, a pioneer settJer, and N&ncy Hanks. Self路educated. Farmer, ferryman, storekeeper, lawyer. A Presbyterian. Man;ed, in 1842, the former Miss Mary Todd, of Kentucky. They had four sons. He died April 15, 1865, the victim of an assassin's bullet. Age 56. Buried at Oak Ridge Cemetery, Springfield, Illinois. Pres. Lincoln was noted for his Gettysburg address, for his debates with his opponent Stephen A. Douglas, for the preservation of the Union, and for the emancipation of Negro slaves in the United States.


690

CORNE.JO路S

COMMONWEALl H

DIRECTORY

OF THE

P HI LIPPI NES

ANDREW JOHNSON 17th Pres ide nt

Born Decembe'l' 29. 1808

(.1865-186.9)

Died July 31, 1875

ANDREW JOHN SON, the seventeenth Pres ident of the United States, was born December 29, 1808, at Raleigh, North Carolina. Of English ancestry, Son of J acob J oh nson, a sexton and constable, and Mary McDonough. Self-educated. A tai lor and labor leader. A Methodist. Married, in 1827, the former Miss Eliza McCard le, a school teacher. They had three sons and two daughters. H e di ed July 31, 1875, of paralys is, near Carters Station, Tennessee, aged 66. Buried at Greenville, Tennessee. Lfncoln's sudden deat h t hrust Johnson into presidential l'espons ib ilities that woul(l have challenged the wisdom of Lincoln himself. COl1!l'ess hied unsuccessfull y to impeach h im.


691

T H E PRESIDENTS OF' THE UN ITED STATE':;

ULYSSES SIMPSON GRANT 18th Pres ident

Born A.pril 27, 1822

(1869-1877)

Vied July 28, 1885

ULYSSES S IM PSON GRANT, the eight )enth P r e3idcnt of the United States, was born April 27, 1822, at Po in t Pleasant, Ohio. Of Scotch and EnglisJl descent. Son of Jesse R. Grant , a t ann er, and Hann ah Si mpson. Educated at West Point. A military officer. A Methodist. Married, in 1848, t he for mel" Miss Julia Dent, of Missouri. They had three sons a nd one daughter. He d ied Jul y 23, 1885, of cancer, at Mt. McGregor, New York, at the age of 63. Bu r ied in a magn ificent tomb on R iverside Drive, New York City. To his coul"age and wise m ilitary tactics the Union was indebted for Lee',> surrender of t he Conf ederate Army on A pril 9, 1865. He lost h is fortune after he retired from the presidency and wr ote h is M emoi'rs a ~hort time befol'e his death.


692

CORNEJO'S COl\Ii\IONWEALTH

DlRECTORY OF THE

PH I LIPPINES

RUTHERFORD BIRCHARD HAYES 19th P r es iden t

Born Octo be,路 4, 1822

(J 877-1881)

Died Janua'ry 17, 1893

RUTHERFORD B. HAYES, the nineteenth President of the United States, was born October 4, 1822, at Delaware, Ohio. Of Scotch ancestry. Son of Rutherford B. Hayes, a merChant, and Sophia Birchard. Educated at Kenyon College. A lawyer. A Methodist. Married, in 1852, the former Miss Lucy 'Va re ,,,. ebb. They had seven sons and one daughter. He died January 17. 1893, of heart disease, at Fremont, Ohio, at the age of 70, and was buried at Fremont. He supported Lincoln, answered his caU for volunteers, and served vaTiantIy as a eotn-" mander in the Civil War. He did not comprom ise his vie\vs for political. advantage. I n hi.s political appointments Hayes tried to be fair and honest.


THE PRESIDENTS OF T HE UNIT ED ST ATES

693

JAMES ABRAM GARFIELD 20th President

Born November 19, 1 831

(.1 881)

Died Septemb.,路 19, 1881

JAMES A. GARFIELD, the twentieth President of the United States, was born November 19, 1831, at Orange, Ohio. Of English descent. Son of Abraham Garfield, a pioneer of the west, and Eliza Ballou. Educated at Williams College. A teacher and lawyer. Member of the Disciples Church. Married, in 1858, the former Miss Lucretia Rudolph, of Ohio. They had four sons and one daughter. He died Sepi~mber 19, 1881, at Elberon, New Jersey, where he had been sent to recover from the wounds of an assassin, Oharles J. Guiteau, who shot him in the railroad station at Washington on July 2; aged 49. Buried in Lake View Cemetery, Cleveland, Ohio.


694

COR NEJO'S

COMMONWEALTH

DlRECTORY OF TH E

PHILIPPINES

CHESTER ALAN ARTHUR 21st President

Born Ociobe1' 5. 1830

(188J-1885)

Died Nove'mber J8, 1886

CHESTER A. ARTHUR, the twenty路first President of the United States, was born on October 5, 1830, at Fairfield, Vermont. Of Scotch-Irish descent. Son of Rev. \tVilliam Arthur and Malvina Stone. , Educated at Union College. A teach er ,md lawyer. An Episcopalian . Married, in 1859, t he former Mi ss Ellen Lewis Herndon, of Virginia. They had two sons and one daugh ter. He died l':ovembel' 18, 1886, of Bright's disease, a t New York City, at the age of 56. Buried in Rural Cemetery. Alba ny, N. Y. During Arthur's administration three tran scontinental railroads were completed, new' plan s were under discuss ion for thp. building of the Panama Canal, and the country was in a state of unparalleled growth and prosperity.


695

THE PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES

GROVER CLEVELAND 22d & 24th President

Born March 18, J837

(1885-1889, 1893-18.97)

Died June 24, 1908

GROVER CLEVELAND, the twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States, was born March 18, 1837, at Caldwell, New J ersey. Of English descent. Son of Rev. Richard F. Cleveland and Anna Nea1. Educated in common schools. B~came a teacher and then a lawyer. A Presbyterian. Married, in 1886, at the White House, t he former Miss Frances Folsom. They had two sons and three daughtE"rs. He died June 24, 1908, of debility and old age, at Princeton, New Jersey, at the age of 71. Buried at Pri_nceton. Cleveland was busy giving thought to monetary standards and to questions of immigration. During his second term, he persuaded Great Britain to arbitrate the matter of boundaries in Venezuela under the Monroe Doctrine, settled controvel'sies over Canadian fisheries, and kept Peace with Spain over Cuban independence.


696

CORNEJO'S

CQilDIQNWEA LTH

DLRECTO R Y OF TilE

P HILIPPINE S

BENJAMIN HARRISON 23rd Pres ident Born At/,gnst 20, 18.'J.'/

( 1889-18.9.1)

Died Ma'1'Coh 13, 1901

BENJAMIN HARRISON, th e twenty-third Pres ident of the United States, was b OlT. August 20, 1833, at North Bend, Ohio. Of Englis h ancestry. Son of John Scott Harrison, farmer and Congressman, a nd Elizabeth Irwin. Grand son of President William Henry Harrison. Ed ucated at Miami University. A lawyer. A Presbyterian. Married, in 1853, the former Mi ss Caroline Lavinia Scott. Th ey had a son and a daughter. The first Mrs. Harr ison died at t he White H ouse in 1892, and he marr ied, 1896, her niece, Mary Scott (Lord) Dimmick, a widow. They ihad one daughter. H e died March 13 , 1901, of pneumonia, at India路 napoli s, Ind., at the age of 67. Buried in Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Indiana. Important legislation was enacted in the McKinley law for a high tariff, the silver purchase law, and the Sh erman anti-trust law. Harrison successfully settled vexing qu estions with Great Britain, Germany, a nd Italy.


THE PRES IDENTS O F TH E UN IT E D ST ATES

697

WILLIAM McKINLEY 25th Pres.;den t

B orn Janua'ry 29, .1843

(1897-1901)

Died Septe1nb." 14. 1 901

WILLIAM McKINLEY. the twenty-fifth President of the United States. was born January 29, 1843, at Niles, Ohio. Of Scotch-Irish descent. Son of William McKinley, an iron manufacturer, and Nancy Allison. Educated in the common schools. A lawyer. A Methodist. Married, in 1871, the former Miss Ida Saxton . They had two daug hters. He died at the age of 58 on September 14, 1901, at Buffalo, from wounds inflicted by an anarchist named Czolgosz. Buried at Canton, Ohio. It was President McKinley who, in his Message of December 5, 1899, to the Congress of the United States, and in h1s Instructions of April 7, 1900, to the Second Philippine Commi!. sion headed by Judge Taft, established the Philippine policy of administration which has been adhered to by his successors in office.


".

698

CORNEJO 'S COMMONWEAL'I'H

DIRECTORY

OF THE

PHILIPPINES

THEODORE ROOSEVELT 26th President

Born October 27, 1858

(1901-1909)

D ied January G. 1919

THEODORE ROOSEVELT, the twenty-sixth President of the United States, was born October 27, 1858, at New York City; of Dutch ancestry; son of Theodore Roosevelt, a merchant, an d Martha Bulloch. Educated at Ha rvard . A lawyer , l'ancher, author. Member of t he Dutch Reformed Chm'ch. Married, in 18 33, thf' former Miss Alice Hatha way Lee. They Ihad one daughter. The f irst Mrs. Roosvelt died in 1884 and in 1886 he married Edith Kermit Carow. They had four SOns and one dau g hter. Co1. Theodore Roosevelt , Jr., the tenth governor-general of t he Philippines (1932-1933 ) is one of his sons. Pres. Roosevelt died January 6, 1919, of rheumatism, at Oyster Bay, New York, at the age of 61. Buried at Oys ~ tel' Bay. Pl'esident Roosevelt, follo wing the policy establis hed by hi s predecessor, Pres. McKinley, gave the Filipinos the Philippine Bill of 1902 and a lower leg islative chambe r, the First Philippine Assembly in augurated in 1907. He started the building' of the Panama Canal.


699

THE PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES

WILLIAM HOWARD TAFT 27th President

Born September 15, 1857

(1.909-19.13)

Died Ma1路ch 8, 1930

WILLIAM H. TAFT, the twenty-seventh Fresident of t he United States was born September 15, 1857, in Cincinnati, Ohio; the son of Alphonso Taft, who was Attorney-General under Hayes, and of Louisa M. Torrey. Educated at Yale University. A lawyer. A Unitarian. Married, in 1886, tihe fanner Miss Helen Herron. They had twOl sons and one daughter. He died March 8, 1930, of arteriosclerosis, at Washington, D. C., at the age of 72. Buried in Arlington National Cemetery, 'Washington, the only President interred there. President Taft was the first American ci vii governor of the Philippine Islands, who, prior to his appointm~nt as Secretary of 'Val', announced that "the Philippines are for the Filipinos."


';00

CO RNE.JO路S COMMONWEALTH

DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINE S

WOODROW WILSON 28th Pres ident

Born December 28, 1856

(1.9.13-1.921)

Died February 9, 1924

WOODROW WILSON, the twenty-eigh th President of the United States, was born De-cember 28, 1856, at Staunton, Virg inia i of Scotch-Irish ancestry; son of Rev. Joseph R. Wilson and Janet Woodrow. Educated at Princeton. A lawyer and teacher. A Presbyterian. Married, in 1885, t he former Miss Ellen Louise Axson. They had three daughters. She died in 1914, and he married in 1915 Edith (Bolling) Galt, a widow. He died February 3, 1924, of heart disease, in Washington, D. C., at the age of 67. Buried in the National Cathedral, Washington. President \OVilson approved the Jon es Law in 1916, and recommended the early grant of 'Philippine Independence in 1926, certifying that a stable government had already been estabHshed in the I slands.


THE PRESIDENTS OF TH E UN ITED STATES

701

WARREN GAMALIEL HARDING 29th Presiden t

Born Novembiw 2, 1865

(1921-192.9 )

Died .rluguRt 2, 1923

WARREN G. H ARDI NG, the twenty-ninth President of the United States, was born November 2, 1865, at Corsica, Ohio ; of Scotch and Dutch ancestry; son of Dr. George T. Harding and Phoebe El izabeth Dickerson. Educated at Ohio Central College. A newspaper publisher. A Baptist. Married, in 1891, F lorence Kling (DeWolfe), a divorcee. They had ncr children. He died August 2, 1923, at San Francisco, California, of pneumonia and heart trouble, at the age of 58. Buried at Marion , Ohio. It was President Harding who sent the Wood-Forbes Mission to the Philippines in 1921 to investigate condi tions in t he Islands prior to considering the question of Philippine independence.


702

CO R NEJO'S

COMMON\\' E A LTH

DIRECTORY

OF '1'HE

PHILIPPINE S

CALVIN COOLIDGE 30th Presiden t

B01-n J u ly 4. 1872

(1923-1929)

Died Ja.nua1-y 5, 1933

CALVI N COO LIDGE, the thirtieth Pres ident of the United States, was born July 4, 1872, at Plymouth, Vermont; of an old Puritan fami ly; SOil of Col. John Coolidge, fanner, G.nd Victoria Moor. Educated at Amherst College. A la wyer. A Congregationalist. Married, in 1905 the former Miss Grace A. Goodhue. They had two sons, the younger of whom, Calvin , di ed at 'Vashington, Jul y 7, 1924, aged 16. Pres. Coolidge died J anuary 5, 1933, at his hom e, aThe Beeches" in Northampton, Mass. , of a sudden heart attack. Buried in the country cemetery. beside his father a nd so n, at Plymouth, Vt.


THE PRESIDENTS OF 'PHE UN I TED STATES

703

HERBERT CLARK HOOVER Born August 10, .1874 31 s t Pres ide nt (1929-1983)

HERBERT HOOVER, t he th irty-first President of the United States, was born August 10, 1874, at West Branch, Iowa. Of Swiss a nd Dutch descent. Son of Jesse Clark Hoover, a blacksmith, and Hulda Randall. Educated at Stanford University. A mining engineer. A Quaker. Married, in 1899, Lou Henry, of Caiifornia. They had two sons, Herbert Jr., and Allan. It was President Hoover who vetoed the Hare-Hawes-Cutting Bill in 1933, saying: Iithis legislation puts both our people and the Phi lip pine people not on t he road to liberty and safety, wh ich we desire, but on the path leading to new and enlarged dangers to liherty and free dom itself."


704

CORNEJO'S

CQMl\ION\\' EAL'lH

DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

FRANKLIN DELANO ROOSEVELT Bont JOJnnfl'I'Y 30, 1882 32nd Preside nt

(Elected, 1933. (lInd ?'e-eLected. 1936.)

FRANKLIN DELANO ROOSEVELT, t he thirty-secon d President of the United States, was born January 30, 1882, at H yde Park, N. Y.; of early American and Dutch lineage; son of James Roosevelt, capita1ist and landholder, and Sara Delano. Educated at Harvard University and Columbia University Law School. .A lawyer. An Episcopalian. Married, in 1905, the former Miss Anna Eleanor Roosevelt, a distant cousin. They have five children, James, Anna (Mrs. Dall), Elliott, Franklin D., and John A. Pres. Roosevelt's "New Deal" policy in the United Stares was supported by the American people in the last presidential election (1936). He approved the Tydings-McDuffie Law and signed the Constitution of the Philippines dUTing his first t erm of office, and called the first P<hilippine-American trad e conference in the early part of 1937.


THE PRESIDENTS OF THE UNITED STATES

705

lJ1ranltlin ildann litnnseuelt The second member of a distinguished Colonial Dutch family to attaln the Presidency, Franklin Delano Roqsevelt carries on a tradition of public life some,. what akin to that of the Adams and Harrison presidential families. A fifth cousin to Theodore Roosevelt, 26th PrE1sident, ' his service has been in the opposing major political party. In the Wilson Democratic Administration, h~ was appointed Assistant Secretary of the Navy, as Theodore Roosevelt was in thE1 McKinley Republican Adminlstration. As Theodore Roosevelt was elected Republican Gov!1rnor of New York, so Ft;anklin Roosevelt was elected Democratic Governor. The son of James Roosevelt, a Illlm of wealth, Franklin Roosevelt, although by profession a lawyer, was free to fol [ow a political career without economic embarrassment. }His service in the New York State Senate acqualnted him with legislative procedure while, as Assistant Secretary of the Navy and Governor, he acquU'ed experienc'e as .an executive in both federal and state governments. Nominee of the Democratic Party in 1920 for the Vice-Presidency with James M. Cox of Ohio, he was schooled in major political strategy. His political careeI'l has been so continuous that only interm: ittently has he engaged in the practice of law. . Mr. Roosevelt came to the White House on the highest tide of both popular and electOral votes ever cast, having drawn the support of members of every political faith._ Champion of the Forgotten Man; the interests of President Roosevelt have !leen humanitarian, and his ' aim to improve the economi~ condition of every citizen. Attaining the Presidency amid world-wide depression, his inauguration was followed' by the historic bank·holiday proclamation of March 6, 1933. As President Monroe's Aaministration was called the "Era of Good ' Feeling", so President Roosevelt's Legan as the "New Deal." " The Philippine Ill-depeiidence Law, known as the Tydings-McDuffie Act, was signed by President Roosevelt on , March 24, 1934. It was among the first important acts enacted by the Congress of the United States since he stepped into the White House. The Constitution' of the Philippines was also signed by him on March 23, 1935. On the strength of his accomplishments under the New Deal, President Roosevelt was reelected in 1936. He was first elected in 1932. jEl~a:nnr iRonfi~tI~lt Mrs. Anna Eleanor Roosevelt, the wife of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, in her own person. adds to the Roosevelt tradition in the White House, for, as daughter of Elliott and Anna (Hall) · Roosevelt, she is: a distant cousin of her husband, the President. She was born in New York City, October 11, 1884. She was educated at private schools and has taken a continuing interest in educational work. . Always keenly interested in political affairs, her equipment fits her adirrirably for the exacting position of Mistress of the White House. Mrs. Roosevelt was Vice-Principal of the Todhunter School, New York, and also established the Val Kill Shop, a species of vocational enterprise engaged in the making by hand of fine furniture. From 19~4 to Hi28 she was finance chainnan of the Women's Division, New York State Democratic ~ommittee. In 1928 she was a member of the advisory com.m,:ittee in dharge of women's activities of the Democratic National Committee. She is a member of the New York State League of Women Voters. Mrs. Roosevelt also edited 3! magazine dev.oted to infant care and welfare. Even after assuming the 9uties o1! First Lady she contmuetl her manifold educational and humanitarian interests. She is an Episcopalian.*

Anna:

• From. a

booklet· entitt'ed

"Presidents and

their Wives" by Frederic J. Haskin.

23


706

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

EXCERPTS FROM PRESIDENT FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT'S INAUGURAL ADDRESS DELIVERED JANUARY 20, 1937 [Reule)' Sel'vice said: "President Franklin Delano Roosevelt began his second four-year term to-day (January 20, 1937) emphatically promising the government will continue to m ake life better for more than 40,000,000

under-privileged Americans.

In the worst inaugural weather in years, he delivered bis speeeb bareheaded to the

lusty cheers of thousands."]

Il"Ve of the Republic pledge ourselves to drive from the temple of our ancient faith those who had profaned it.

• • •

II Autocratic powers '" have been challenged and beaten. unbeatable has been shattered.

• •

The legend that they are

""Ve a\'e beginning to abandon our tolerance of the abuse of power by those who betray for profit.

• • • "\Ve are fashioning an instrument of power for the establishment of a morally better world.

• • •

liTo hold our progress today, however, is more diff Icult. Dulled consci;e.nce:s, Irresponsibility and ruthlessness have not entirely disappeared. Such symptoms of prosperity' may be· come portents of disaster.

• • • III see millions whose daily lives in city and on farm continue under conditions labeled indecent by so called polite society.

• • • "I see millions denied ... recreations and opportunity, and millions lacking the means to buy products of farm a nd factory millions.

and by their poverty denying work .... to many other

• •

f'l see one-third of the nation ill-housed and ill-cared for.

• • • "We are moving toward an era of good feeling, but we realize there can be no era of good feeling until we have men of good will.

• • • hThe test of our progress is not whether we can add more to those who have too much. It is whether \ve can add enough for. those having too little. If I know aught of the spirit and purpose of our nation, we will carry on.

• • • "Nearly all of u s realize that as the intricacies of human relationships increase, so the power to govern them also must increase-the power to halt evil is the power to do good.

• • • "Out of the confusion, many voices rise in unders tanding of the dominant public need .. . in taking again the oath of office as President of the United States, I assume the solemn obligation of leading the American people forward along the road over which they have cho.sen to advanc~!'


U. S. GOVERNMENT

Cabillet

State Dept.

707

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Hon. FRANKLIN DELANO ROOSEVELT, of New York, .................... President Hon. JOHN NANCE GARNER. of Texas, ...................................... Vice President (Annual salary of the President. $75.000: Vice President, $15,000)

MEMBERS OF THE CABINET (Salary. $16,000 each)

Hon. Hon. Hon. Hon. Hon. Hon. Hon. Hon. Hon. Hon.

Cordell Hull, ........................................................................ Secretary of State Henry Morgantheau, Jr., ...................................... Secretary of the Treasury Harry H. Woodring•............................................................ Secretary of War Homer S. Cummings. ............................................................ Attorney-General James A. Farley, ................................................................ Postmaster-General Claude A. Swanson. ..................................................... Secretary of the Navy Harold L. Ickes, ............................. _ .......................... Secretary of the Interior Henry A. Wallac.e, .................................................... Secretary of Agriculture Daniel C. Roper, ........................................................ Secretary of Commerce Frances Perkins, ................................................................ Secretary of Labor DEPARTMENT OF STATE

(Vacant), Under SeCtretary. Wilbur J . Carr, Assistant Sec?·etal'Y.

Stanley K. Hornbeck, Chief, Div. of Far Easwrn. Affairs.

R. Walton Moore, Assistant Secretary.

Laurence Duggan, Chief. Div. of Latin A-m.erican Affairs.

Francis B. Sayre, Assistant Secretary. Summer Welles, Assistant Secretary.

Green H. Hack-worth, Legal Adviser. Harry A. McBride. Asst. to the SecretOffY of State. J ames Clement Dunn, Special A.ssistant.

Leo Pasvolsky, Special Assistant. Clinton E. MacEachran, Chief Clerk. Herbert C. Hengstler, Chief, Div. of Foreign Service Administration.

Thomas M. Wilson. Chief. Div. of Foreign Se'MJice. Personnel.

James Clement Dunn, Chief, Div. of Western EU'1'opean Affairs. 'Vallace MUl'ray, Chief, Div. of Near Eastern Affairs. Edward L. Reed, Chief, Div. of Mexican Af· fairs. Robert F. Kelly, Chief. Div. of Eastern E",·ol>ean AffaiTs. Michael J. McDermott, Chief, Div. of Current Information. Herbert Feis, Ecorunnic Adviser. Ruth B. Shipley. Chief. Passports Division. Charles M. Barnes, Chief, T1'eaty Divisio.n .


708

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

David A. Salmon, Chief, Div. of Comnnunications and Records. John Farr Simmons, Chief, Visas Division. Richard Southgate, Chief, Div. of Protocol and Conferences. Hunter Miller, Historical Adviser. Cyril Wynne, Chief, Div:· of ReseQR"ch and Pu.blication.

Harry C. Hawkins, Chief. Div. of Trade Agreements~

Joseph C. Green,. Chief, Div. of Arms and Munitions Control. James J. Murphy, Jr., Chief, Consular Commercial Office.

TREASURY DEPARTMENT (Vacant), Under Se<>retOJrY. Wayne C. Taylor, Assistant Ser;retwry. Stephen B. Gibbons, Assistant Secretary. Miss Josephine A. Roche, Assistant SerectOlr1f. Herman Oliphant, General Counsel. Archie Lochhead, Technical Assistant. Edwin R . Ballinger, Technical Assistant. Beriah M. Thompson, Special Assistant. Herbert E. Gaston, Assistant to the SeCtTetary. Daniel W. B€;ll, Assistant to the Secretarry. LeRoy Barton, Assistant to the SecretM'1/. Harold N. Graves, Assistant to the SeClf'etwry. Cyril B. Upham, Assistant to the Se<>retary. Henrietta S. Klotz, Assistant to the SeClf'etwry. John Kieley, Assistant to the SecretOlYY. William H. McReynolds, Admn. Asst. to the Secretan-y. W. N. Thompson, Asst. Admn. Asst. to the Sec'retary. Eugene W. Sloan, Chief. Savings Bond Divisio-n. James \¥i1liam Bryan, Chief, Information Section.

Herbert J. Wollner, Consulting Chemist. George C. Haas, Research and Statistics. Frank A. Birgfeld, Chief Clerk. W. H. Moran, Chief, Sewet Service. James E . Harper, Chief. Appointments. Guy F. Allon, Chief Disbursing Officer, Div. 0/ Disbursement. L. C. Spangler, Chief. Div. of Printing. J. F. T. O'Connor, Comptroller of the Currency. W. A. Julian, Tr-easurer of the United States. Marion Banister, Assistant Treasurer. William S. Broughton, Commissioner, Public Debt. Edward F. Bartelt, Commissioner, Accts. & Deposits. Guy T. Helvering, Commissioner, Internal Revenue . H. J. Anslinger, Commissione?", Narcotics . James H. Moyle, Commissioner, C~tom.s. Wilford S. Alexander, Federal Alcohol Administrator. Nellie Tayloe Ross, Director of the Mint. Alvin W. Hall, Director, Bur. Of Engraving and Printing. Wm. W. Durbin, Regist ... of the Treasury.

DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Stanley F. Reed, Solicitor General. Joseph B. Keenan, Asst. to the Atty. General. John Dickinson, Asst. Atty. Gen. (Antitrust). Robert H ..Jackson, Asst. Atty. Gen. (T"",). James \V. Morris, Asst. Atty. Gen. (Claims). Harry W. Blair, Asst. Atty. Gen. (Lands). Brien McMahon, Asst. Atty. Gen. (Criminal). Joseph R. Jackson, Div. of Customs.

J. Edgar Hoover, Director, Federal Bur. of Investigation. Sanford Bates, Di'rector, Bur. of Prisons. Julius C. Martin, Director, Bur. of War Risk Litigation. Joseph Lawl'ence, Administrator, Taxes and Penalties Unit. Urey Woodson, Director, Alien Property Bureau. Harvey C. Donaldson, Chief Clerk.


War Dept.

NatVy Dept.

U. S. GOVERNMENT

709

WAR DEPARTMENT General Malin Craig, Chief of Staff. Major General E. T. Conley', The Adjutant General. Major General Walter L. Reed, Inspector General. Major General Arthur W. Brown, Judge Advocate General. Major General Henry Gibbins, Quartermaster General. Major General Charles R. Reynolds, Surgeon Genera!. Major General Frederick W . Boschen, Chief of Finance. Major General Edward M. Markham, Chief of Engineers. Major General William H. Tschappat, Chief of Ordnance. Major General Claude E. Brigham, Chief of of Chem.ical Warfare Service.

Major General James B. Allison, Chief Signal Officer. Major General Albert H. Blanding, Chief of National Gua!rd Bwreau. Brigadier General Charles Burnett, Chief. Bureau of InsulGir Affairs. Colonel Alva J . Brasted, Chief of Chaplains. Major General Oscar Westover, Chief of the Air Corps. Major General Archibald H. Chief of Coast Artillery. Major General Infanflry.

Edward

Croft,

Sunderland,

Chief

of

Major General Leon B. Kromer, Chief of Cavabry. Major General Upton Birnie, Jr., Chief of Field Artillery.

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT William W. Howes, First Asst. Postmaster Gene-ral.

J. Austin Latimer, Special Assistant. 'W illiam J. Bray, SecretGlr1J.

BarlIee Branch, Second Asst. Postmaster General. Clinton B. Eilenberger, Third Asst. Postmaster General. Smith W. Purdum, Fourth Asst. Postmaste-r General. Ambrose O'Connell, Executive Assistant.

,\Villiam C. Lyons, Administrativ e Assistant. Karl A. Crowley, Sollicitor. Kildroy P . Aldrich, Chief Inspector. Harrison Parlonan, Purchasing Agent. William L. Slattery, Comptroller. Owen A. Keen, Chief Clerk.

NAVY DEPARTMENT Charles Edison, Asst. SefYY'etary of the Navy. William D. Bergman, Admn. Asst. and Chief Clerk. Ailmiral William D. Leahy, Chief, Naval Ope'rations. Rear Admiral T. C. Hart, Senior Member General Board. Captain W. P . Robert, Senior Member Compensation Boarrd. Captain H. E. Kimmel, Budget Officer. Rear Admiral A. Andrews, Chief, Bur. of Navigation. Capt. L. R. Leahy, Hydrographer.

Rear Admiral H. R. Stark, Chief, Bur. or Ordnance. Rear Adm.iral H. G. Bowen, Enginee'r in Chief of the Navy and Chief, Bureau of Engineering. Rear Admiral A. B. Cook, Chief, Bur. of Ae'ronautics. Rear Admiral E. S. Land, Chief Constructc-r of the Navy and Chief. Bur. of Construction and Repair. Rear Admiral N. M. Smith, Chief, Bur. of Yarrds and Docks.

I


CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILTI'PINES'

710

Rear Admiral C. Conard, Paymaster General of the Navy and Chief Bur. of Supplies and Accounts. Rear Admiral P. S. Rossiter, Surgeon General and Chief, Bur. of Medicinel and Surgery. Rear Admiral G. J. Rowc1iff, Judge Advocate General. Rear Admiral J. B. Dennis, President, Naval Retiring Bowrd.

Rear Admiral C. R. Train, Prresident, Naval Examining Board. Captain J. F. Hellweg (ret.), Superintendent, Naval Observatory. Captain W. D. Puleston, Director, Naval InteUigenc~.

Rear Admiral C. E . Courtney', Director, Naval Com.munications.

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Charles West, Under Secreta;ry. Theodore A. \Valters, First Asst. Sec'retQlr1.j. Oscar L. Chapman, Second Asst. Secretary. Ebert K. Burlew, Administrative Assistant and Budget Olficer. Harry Slattery, Personal Assistant to the Secretary. Nathan R. Margold, Solicitor.

Floyd E. Dotson, Chief Clierk. Fred W. Land

Johnson,

aIfice.

Commissioner,

General

John W. Studebaker, Commissioner, Education.

John Collier, Commissione'1', Indian Affairs. John C. Page, Corwmissioner, Reclamation. W. C. Mendenhall, Director, Geological Survey. John W. Finch" Director, Bureau of Mines. Ernest Gruening, Director, Territories and Island Possessions. Arno B. Cammerer, Direotor, National Pevrk Service. F. R. Carpenter, Director, Grazing. G. "\V. Holland, Director, Petroleum Conservation. Fanning Hearon, Director, Motion Piotures.

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (Vacant), Under Sec'retary. M. L. \Vilson, Assistant Secretary. Paul H. Appleby, Assistant to Secretary. Milo Perkins, .4.ssistant to SecretCIJrY. J. D. LeCrpn, Assistant to Secretary. F. P. Bartlett, Asst. to Under Secretary. D. C. Blaisdell, Asst. to Asst. SeCff'etary.

M. G. White, Solicitor. C. W. Warburton, Director, Extension Work. W. W. Stockberger, Director, Personnel. W . A. Jump, Direotor, Finarnce. M. S. Eisenhower, Director, Information. Howard R. Toney, Administrator, AAA. A. G. Black, Chief, Bur. of AgriculturaL Economics. S. H. McCrory, Chief, Bur. of Agri. Engineering. J. R. Mohler, Chief, Bur. of Animal Industry. I. N. Gabrielson, Chief, Biological Survey.

H. G. Knight, Chief, Chemistry and Soils. J. W. T. Dubel, Chief, Commodity Exchange Admi:nistration. O. E. Reed, Chief, Dairy Industry. Lee A. Strong, Chief, Entomology and Plant Quarantine. W. G. Campbell, Chief, Food and Drug AdministJration. }4'. A. Silcox, Chief, Forest Service . Miss Louise Stanley, Chief, Home Economics. F. D. Richey, Chief, Plant Industry. T. H. MacDonald, Chief, Public Roads. n. H . Bennett, Chief, Soil Conservation Ser路 vice. W. R. Gregg, Chief, Weather Bureau. J. T. Jardine, Chief~ Office of Experiment Stations and Director of Researoh. C. B. Smith, Chief, Office Of Cooperative Extension Work. 'Miss C. R. Barnett, Libranian.


711

U. S. GOVERNMENT

Dept . Comm.

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Ernest G. Draper, A ssistant S ecretary.

Frank T . Bell, Director, Bureau of F isheries.

John M. Johnson, A ssistant S ecretary. Malcolm Kerlin, Administrative A sst. to the

Harold D. King, Director of L ighthouses.

SelY1"eta/ry.

South Trimble, Jr., Solicit or. Eugene L. Vidal, Dilrector, Bureau of Air

Commerce. William L. Austin, Director, Bureau of Cen-

S. P a tton, Direct01', Bureau Coast and Geodetic Survey.

Raymond

Jos. B. Weav~r , Director, Bureau of Naviga,tion and Stea;mboat Inspection . Conway P. Coe, Director, Patent Office.

V. Dye, Di'J1ector , Bwreau Foreigrv, and Domestic Commerce.

Alexander

sus. Lyman J. Briggs, Director, Bureau dwrds.

0/ Stan-

of

of

E. W. Libby', Chief CllWk.

DEPART,MENT OF LABOR Edward F. McGra dy, A ssistant Secretatry. Turner W. Battle, Assistant to the Secretwry. Richardson Saunders, A ssistant to the Seer

retary. Samuel J . Gompers, Chief Clerk . Laura A. Thompson, Librarian. Daniel W. MacConnack, Commissioner of Immigrati!Jn .and Naturalization. !sador Lubin, Commissioner of Labor Statistics.

Ma r y Ander son, Director, Women's Bureau. Katherine F . Lenroot, Chief, Children's BUr

reau. Hugh L . Kerwin, Director, Bu,1'eau of Con-

ciliation. V,l . F . Per sons, Di1'ector, U. S . Employment Service. V. A. Zimmer , Director, Bureau of Labor S tanda,rds.

SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES (Sala ries : Chief Justice, $20,500 ; Associate

Hon. Hon. Hon. Hon. Hon. Hon. Hon. Hon. Hon.

Justices, each , $20,000)

Charles Evans Hughes, .................. .............................................. Chief Willis Van Devanter,' ............................................................ Associate James Clark McReynolds, ...................................................... Associate Louis D. Brandeis, ........................ ......................................... Associate George Sutherland, ................................................................ Associate Pierce Butler, .......................................................................... Associate Harlan Fiske Stone, ................................................................ Associate Owen J. Roberts, .................................................................... Associate Benjamin Nathan Cardozo, .................................................... Associate

HON. â&#x20AC;˘ Resigned May, 1987.

COURT OF CLAIMS TENTON W. BOOTH, Chief Justic e

Justice Justice Justice Justice Justice Justice Justice Justice Justice


CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PIDLIPPINES

712

THE CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES [SEVENTY FIFTH C ONGRESS]

THE SENATE Hon. John N. Garner, Presiding Officer. Hon. Key Pittman, President Pro-Tempore. Mr. Edwin A. Halsey, Secretat路y. Mr. Chesley W. Jurney, Sergeant-at-At路ms. ALABAMA Hugo L. Black, D. John H. Bankhead, D. ARIZONA Henry F . Ashurst, D. Carl Hayden, D. ARKANSAS Joseph T. Robinson, D. Mrs. Hattie W. Caraway, D. CALIFORNIA Hiram W. Johnson, R . William Gibbs McAddo, D.

ILLINOIS

J. Hamilton Lewis, D. William H. Dieterich, D. INDIANA Frederick Van Nuys, D. Sherman Minton, D.

IOWA

Clyde La V. Herring, D. Guy M. Gillette, D . KANSAS

Arthur Capper, R. George McGill, D.

COLORADO

Alva B. Adams, D. Edwin C. J路ohnson, D.

Alben W. Barkley, D. Marvel M. Logan, D. LOUISIANA John H. Overton, D. Allen J . Ellender, D.

DELAWARE

John G. Townsend, Jr., R. James H. Hughes, D. FLORIDA Claude Pepper, D. C. O. Andrews, D.

GEORGIA

Walter F. George, D. Richard B. Russell, Jr., D. IDAHO

William E. Borah, R. James P. Pope, D.

MISSISSIPPI Pat Harrison, D. Theodore G. BIlbo, D. MISSOURI Bennett Ohamp Clark, D. Harry S. Truman, D. MONTANA Burton K. Wheeler, D. James E. Murray, D. NEBRASKA

KENTUCKY

CONNEcnCUT Augustine Lonergan, D. Francis T. Maloney, D.

MINNESOTA Henrik Shipstead, F. L .. Ernest Lundeen, F. L .

George W. Norris, Ind. Edward R. Burke, D. NEVADA

Key Pittman, D. Patrick A. McCarran, D. NEW HAMPSHIRE

MAINE Frederick Hale, R. Wallace H . White, Jr., R . MARYLAND Millard E. Tydings, D. George L. Radcliffe, D. MASSACHUSETTS David 1. Walsh, D. Henry C. Lodge, Jr., R. MICHIGAN Arthur H. Vandenberg, R. Prentiss M. Brown, D.

Fred H. Brown, D. Henry S. Bridges, R. NEW JERSEY

A. Harry Moore, D. William H. Smathers, D. NEW MEXICO

Carl A. Hatch, D. Dennis Chaves, D. NEW YORK

Royal . S. Copeland, D. Robert F . Wagner, D.


H0'U8e of Reps.

U. S. GOVERNMENT

SetuJte

713

MEMBERS OF THE U. S. SENATE -Continued NORTH CAROLINA Josiah W. Bailey, D.

Robert R. Reynolds, D.

RHODE ISLAND

Peter Goelet Gerry, D. Theodore F. Green, D.

Ellison D. Smith, D. James F. Byrnes, D.

VIRGINIA Carter Glass, D . Harry F. Byrd, D.

Robert J. Bulkley, D. A. Vie Donahey, D.

SOUTH DAKOTA Peter Norbeck, R. W. J. Bulow, D.

WASHINGTON Homer T. Bone, D. Lewis B. Sehwellenbach, D.

OKLAHOMA Ebner Thomas, D. Josh. Lee, D.

Kenneth D. McKellar, D. Nathan L. Bachman, D.

Matthew M. 路 Neely, D. Rush Dew Holt, D.

TEXAS Morris Sheppard, D. Tom Connally, D.

Robert M. La Follete, Jr., P. F. Ryan Duffy, D.

NORTH DAKOTA

Lynn J. Frazier, R. Gerald P. Nye, R. OHIO

SOUTH CAROLINA

VERMONT Warren R . Austin, R. Ernest W . Gibson, R.

WEST VIRGINIA

TENNESSEE

OREGON

CharIes 1... McNary, R. Frederick Steiwer, R.

UTAH

PENNSYLVANIA

William H. King, D. Elbert D. Thomas, D.

James J. Davis, R.

Joseph F. Guffey, D.

WISCONSIN

WYOMING Joseph C. Q' Mahoney, D. Harry H. Schwa.rtz, D.

Number of Senators, 96; Democrats, 70; Republicans, 17; Farm Labor, 2; Proi"ressive, 1; Independent, 1. Annual salary, $10,000.00 each.

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Hon. William B. Bankhead, of Alabama, Speaker. Mr. South Trimble, of Kentucky, Clerk of the House.

MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES ALABAMA

Frank. W. Boykin, D. Lister Hill, D.

Henry B. Steagall, D. Sam Hobbs, D. Joe Starnes, D. Pete Jarman, D. William B. Bankhea.d, D. John J. Sparkman, D. Luther Patrick, D. ARIZONA

.1ohn R. Murdock, D.

ARKANSAS William J. Driver, D. John E . Miller, D . Claude A. F uller, D. Ben Cravens, D. David D. Terry, D. Jdhn L. McCellan, D. Wade H. Kitchens, D. CALIFORNIA Clarence F. Lea, D. Harry L. Englebright, R . Frank H. Buck, D .

Frank R. Havenner, D. Richard J . Welch, R. Albert E. Carter, R. J. H. Tolan, D. John J. McGrath, D. B. W. Gearhart, R . Henry E . Stubbs, D. John S. McGroarty, D. H. J erry Voorhis, D. Oharles Krammer, D. Thomas F. Ford, D. John M. Costello, D. John F. Doekweiler, D.


CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PIDLIPPlNES

714

MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Charles J . Colden, D. Byron N. Scott, D. H.arry Sheppard, D. Ed. V. Izac, D. COLORADO

Lawrence Lewis, D. Fred Cummings, D. John A. Martin, D. Edward T. Taylor, D. CONNECTICUT Herman P. Kopplemann, D. William J. Fitzgerald, D. James A. Shanley, D. Alfred N. Phillips, Jr. , D. J . Joseph Smith, D. At La.rge W. M. Citron, D. DELAWARE William F. Allen, D.

Edward A. Kelly, D. Harry P. Beam, D. Adolph J. Sabath, D. Thomas J. O'Brien, D. Leonard W. Schuetz, D. Leo Kocialkowski, D. James McAndrews, D. Ralph E . Church, R. ChaunceYi \V. Reed, R. Noah M. Mason, R. Leo E. Allen, R . Chester Thompson. D . Lewis L. Boyer, D. Everett M. Dirksen, R. L. C. Arends, R. James A. Meeks, D. Hugh M. Rigney, D. Scott W . Lucas, D. Frank ""V. Fries, D. Edwin M. Schaefer, D. Laurence F . Arnold, D. Claude V. Parsc]1s, D. Kent E. Keller, D .

FLORIDA

J. Hardin Peterson, D. R. A. Green, D . Millard F. Caldwell, D. James Mark \\'ilcox, D. Joe Hendricks, D. GEORGIA Hugh Peterson, Jr., D. E . E. Cox, D. Stephen Pace, D. Emmett M. Owen, D.

Robert Ramspeck, D. Carl Vinson, D. Malcolm C. Tarver, D. Braswell B . Deen, D . R. Frank Whelchel, D. Paul Brown, D. IDAHO Compton I. White, D. D. Worth Clark, D. ILLINOIS

Arthur H. Mitchell, D. R. S. McKeough, D.

At La.rge Lewis M. Long, D. E. V. Champion, D. INDIANA William T. Sc1\<Jlt.e, D. Charles A. Halleck, R. Samuel B. Pettengill, D. James I. Farley, D. Glenn Griswold, D . Virginia Jenckes, D. Arthur H. Greenwood, D. John Vi. Boehne, Jr., D. Eugene B. Crowe, D. Finly H. Gray, D. William H. Larrabee, D. Louis Ludlow, D. IOWA Edward C. Eicher, D. Wm. S. Jacobsen.. D. John W. Gwynne, R. Fred Biermann, D. Lloyd Thurston, R. Cassius C. Dowell, R.

Continued.

Ohta D. Wearin, D. Fred C. Gilchrist, R. Vincent Harrington, D. KANSAS W. P . Lambertson, R. U . S. Guyer, R. Edward "Y.. Patterson, D. Edward H. Rees, R. John M. Houston, D. Frank Carlson, R . Clifford R. Hope, R. KENTUCKY Noble Gregory, D. Glover H. Cary, D. Emmet O'Neal, D. E. W. Creal, D. Brent Spence, D. Virgil Chapman, D . Andrew J . May, D. Fred M. Vinson, D. John M. Robsion, R. LOUISIANA Joachim O. Fernandez, D. Paul H . Maloney, D. Robert L. Mouton, D. Overton Brooks, D. Newt V. Mills, D. John K. Griffith, D. Rene L. De Rauen, D. A. Leonard Allen, D. MAINE James C. Oliver, R. Clyde H. Smith. R. Ralph O. Brewster, R. MARYLAND T. Alan Goldsborough, D. William P . Cole, Jr., D. Vincent L. Palmisano, D . Ambrose J. Kennedy, D. Stephen V",r. Gambrill, D. David J . Lewis, D. MASSACHUSETTS Allen T . Treadway, R . Charles R. Clason, R.


H OUS6 of Reps.

House of Rep8.

U. S. GOVERNMENT

MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Joseph E. Casey, D. Pehr G. Holmes, R. Edith N. Rogers, R. George J. Bates, R. William P.Connery, Jr., D.

Arthur D. Healey, D. Robert Luce, R. Geo. H. Tinkham, R. John P. Higgins, D. John W. McCormack, D.

Rich. B. Wigglesworth, R. Joseph W. Martin, Jr., R. Charles L. Gifford, R. MICHIGAN George G. Sadowski, D. Earl C. Michener, R. Paul W. Shafer, R. Clare E. Hoffman, R. Carl E. Mapes, R . Andrew J. Transue, D. Jesse P. Wolcott, R. Fred 路 L. Crawford, R. Albert J. Engel, R. Roy O. Woodruff, R. John Luecke, D. Frank E . Hook, D. George D. O'Brien, D. Louis Rabaut, D. John D. DingeU, D. John Lesinski, D. George A. Dondero, R. MINNESOTA August H. Andresen, R. EImer J. Ryan, D. Henry G. Teigan, F . L. Melvin J. Maas, R. Dewey W. Johnson, F . L . Harold Knutson, R. Paul J. Kvale, F . L. John T.I Bernard, F . L. R. T. Buckler, F.L. MISSISSIIIPI John Elliot E. Rankin, D. Wall Doxey, D. W. M. Whittington, D. A. L. Ford, D.

Ross A. Collins, D. William M .. Colmer, D. Dan R. McGehee, D.

715

Continued.

Edward L. O'Neill, D. Frank W. Towey, Jr., D. Mary T. NortoD, D. Edward J. Hart, D.

MISSOURI Milton A . Romjue, D. William I. Nelson, D. R. M. Duncan, D. C. Jasper Bell, D. Joseph B. Shannon, D. Reuben T. Wood, D. Dewey Short, R. Clyde Williams, D. Clarence Cannon, D. Orville Zimmerman, D.

Thomas C. Heenings, Jr., D. C. Arthur Anderson, D. John J. Cochran, D.

MONTANA Jerry J. O'Connell, D. James F. O'Connor, D.

NEBRASKA Henry C. Luckey, D.

Charles F. McLaughlin, D. Karl Stefan, R. C. G. Binderup, D. Harry B. Coffee, D. NEVADA James G. SCl'ugham, D. NEW HAMPSHIRE Arthur B. Jenks, R. Charles W. Tobey, R. NEW JERSEY Charles A. "Volverton, R. Ehner H. Wene, D. William H. Sutphin, D. D. Lane Powers, R. Oharles A. Eaton, R. Donald H. McLean, R. J. Parnell -Thomas, R. George N . Seger, R. Edward A. Kenney, D. Fred A. Hartley, Jr., R.

NEW MEXICO

John J. Dempsey, D. NEW YORK Robert L. Bacon, R.

William B. Barry, D. Joseph L. Pfeifer, D. Thomas H. Cullen, D. Marcellus H . Evans, D. Andrew L. Somers, D. John J. Delaney, D. Donald L. O'Toole, D. Eugene J. Keogh, D. Emanuel Celler, D. James A. O'Leary, D. Samuel Dickstein, D. Chris. D. Sullivan, D. William I. Sirovioh, D. John J. Boylan, D. John J. O'Connor, D. Theodore A. Peyser, D. Martin J. Kennedy, D. Sol Bloom, D. James J. Lanzetta, D. Joseph A. Ga vagan, D. Edward W. Curley, D. Charles A. Buckley, D. James M. Fitzpatrick, D.

Charles D. Millard, R. Hamilton Fish, Jr., R. Philip A~ Goodwin, R. William T. Byrne, D.

E. Harold Cluett, R. Frank Crowther, R. Bertrand H . Snell, R. Francis D. Culkin, R. Fred J. DougI<!s, R. Bert Lord, R. Clarence E. Hancock, R. John Taber, R.

W. Sterling Cole, R. George B. Kelly, D. James ''V. Wadsworth, R.

Walter G. Andrews, R.


CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

716

MEMBERS OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESE N TATIVES Alfred F. Beiter, D. James M. Mead, D. Daniel A. Reed, R . At Lwrge Matthew J. Merritt, D. Mrs. Caroline O'Day, D.

NORTH CAROLINA Lindsay C. Warren, D. John H. Kerr, D. Graham A. Barden, D. Harold D. Cooley, D. F. W. Hancock, Jr., D. William B. Umstead, D. J. Bayard Clark, D . J. Walter Lambeth, D. Robert L. Doughton, D. Alfred L. Bulwinkle, D. Zebulon Weaver, D.

NORTH DAKOTA

.4.t LOirge Usher L. Burdick, R. William Lemke, R. OHIO Joseph A. Dixon, D. Herbert S. Bigelow, D. Byron B. Harlan, D. Frank L. Kloeb, D. Frank C. Kniffin, D. James G. Polk, D. Arthur W. Aleshire, D. Brooks Fletcher, D. John F. Hunter, D. Thomas A. J enkins, R. H. K. Claypool, D. Arthur P. Lamneck, D. Dudley A. White, R. Dow W. Harter, D. Robert T. Secrest, D. William R. Thorn, D. William A . Ashbr ook, D. Lawrence E. Imhoff, D. Michael J. Kirwan, D. Martin L. Sweeney, D. Robert Crosser, D. Anthony A. Fleger, D.

At Large John McSweeney, D. Harold G. Mosier, D.

OKLAHOMA Wesley' E. Disney, D. Jack Nichols, D. Wilburn Cartwright, D. Lyle H. Boren, D. R. P. Hill, D. J ed Johnson, D. Sam Massingale, D. Phil Ferguson, D.

Continued.

Joseph Gray, D. Robert G. Allen, D. Charles N. Crosby, D. Peter J . DeMuth, D. James L. Quinn, D. Hennan P. Eberharter, D. Henry Ellenbogen, D. Matthew A. Dunn, D. RHODE ISLAND Aime J . Forand, D. John M. O'Connell, D. SOUTH CAROLINA

At LOirge

Will Rogers, D. OREGON J ames W. M'1tt, R. Walter M. Pierce, D. Nanny' W. Honeyman, D.

Thomas S. McMillan, D. Hampton P. Fulmer, D. John C. Taylor, D. G. Hey'ard Mahon, Jr., D. James P. Richards, D. Allard H. Gasque, D. SOUTH DAKOTA

PENNSYLVANIA Leon Sacks, D. James McGranery, D. Michael J. Bradley, D. J. Burrwood Daly, D. Frank J. G. Dorsey, D. Michael J. Stack, D. Ira W. Drew, D. James Wolfenden, R . Oliver W. Frey, D. J. Roland Kinzer, R. Patrick J. Boland, D. J. Harold Flannery, D. James H. Gildea, D. Guy L. Moser, D. Albert G. Rutherford, R. Robert F. Rich, R. J. William Ditter, R. Benjamin K. Focht, R. Guy J. Swope, D. Benjamin J arrett, R. Francis E . Walter, D. Harry L. Haines, .D. Don Gingery, D. J. Buell Snyder, D. Chal'les 1. Faddis, D. Charles R. Eckert, D.

Fred Hildebrandt, D. Francis Case, R. TENNESSEE

B. CarrolL Reece, R. J. W. Taylor, R. S. D. McReynolds, D. J. R. Mitchell, D. Richard M. Atkinson, D. Clarence W. Turner, D. Herron Pearson, D. Jere Cooper, D. Walter Chandler, D. TEXAS Wright Patman, D. Martin Dies, D. Morgan G. Sanders, D. Sarq Rayburn, D. Hatton W. Summers, D. Nat Patton, D. Albert Thomas, D. J oseph J. Mansfield, D. James P. Buchanan, D. Wllliam R. Poage, D. Fritz G. Lanham, D.


MEMBERS

House of Reps.

U. S. GOVERNMENT

House of Reps.

O~'

W. D. McFarlane, D. Richard M. KJeherg, D. Milton H. West, D. R. EwiJ;1g Thomason, D. Clyde L. Garrett, D. Marvin Jones, Do, George H. Mahon, D. Maury Maverick, D. Charles L. South, D. UTAH Abe Murdock, D. Norman R. Hamilton, D. VERMONT Charles A. Plumley, R. VIRGINIA Schuyler Otis Bland, D. Colgate W. Daroen, Jr., D. Andrew J. Montague, D. Patrick .Henry Drewry, D. Thomas G. Burch, D. Clifton A. Woodrum, D. A. Willis Robertson, D.

THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Howard W. Smith, D. John W. Flanagan, J r' J D. WASHINGTON Warren G. Magnuson, D. Momad C. Wallgren, D. Martin F. Smith, D. Knute Hill, D. Charles H. Leavy, D. John M. Coffee, D. WEST VIRGINIA Robert L. Ramsay, D. Jennings Randolph, D. Andrew Edmiston, D. George W. Johnson, D. John Kee, D. Joe L. Smith, D. WISCONSIN Thomas R. Amile, P. Harry Sauthoff, P. Gardner R. Withrow, P . Raymond J. Cannon, D. Thomas O'Malley, D.

717

Continued.

Michael K. Reilly, D. Gerald J. Boileau, P. George J. Schneider, P. Merlin Hull, P. Bernard J. Gehnnann, P. WYOMING Paul R. Greever, D. AL.ASKA A. J . Dimond, D. HAWAII (Delegate) Samuel WHder King, R. PHILIPPINE 路ISL.ANDS (R esident Commissioner) Quint in Paredes (Appointed Dec. 21, 1935, to serve indefinitely).

PUERTO RICO (Residen t Commissioner) Santiago Iglesias, Coal't.

The Bouse ot Repr~s~ntatlv~s of the 76th Congr~SII consists of 435 memb~rs. The composition as elected Nov. ember 3. 1936, was: Democrats, 334; Republicans. 89: Farm Labor, 5; Pro&,ressive, 7. Annual salary. $10,000,00 ~ach.


CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

718

GOVERNORS OF THE STATES AND TERRITORIES State

Governor

Years

Ter m Expires

ALABAMA

Bibb Graves, D.

4

January,

1939

ARIZONA

R. C. Stanford, D.

2

January,

1939 1939

ARKANSAS

Carl E. Bailey, D.

2

January,

CALIFORNIA

Frank F. Merriam, R.

4

January,

1939

COLORADO

Teller Ammons, D.

2

January,

1939

CoNNECTICUT

\Vilbur L. Cross, D.

2

January,

1939

DELAWARE

n.

4

January,

1941

FLORIDA

F'red P. Cone, D.

4

January,

1941

2

January,

1939 1939

GEORGIA

C. McMullen, D .

E. D. Rivers, D.

loAHO

};, Worth Clark, D.

2

January,

ILLINOIS

Henry Horner, D.

4

January,

1941

INDIANA

M. C. Townsend, D.

4

January,

1941

IOWA

N . G. Kraschel, D.

2

January,

1939

KANSAS

\ Valter A. Huxman, D.

2

January,

1939

KENTUCKY

Albert B. Chandler, D.

4

December,

1939 1940

LoUISIA~A

Richard W. Leche, D.

4

January,

MAINE

L-ewis O. Barrows, R.

2

January,

1939

MARYLAND

Harry W. Nice, R.

4

January,

1939

MASSACHUSETTS

C. F. Hurley, D.

2

January,

1939

MICHIGAN

Frank Murphy, D.

2

January,

1939

MINNESOTA

Elmer Benson, F. L .

2

January,

1939

MISSISSIPPI

Hugh L . White, D.

4

January,

1940

MISSOURI

Lloyd C. Stark, D.

4

January,

1941

MONTANA

Hoy E. A yres, D.

4

January,

1941

NEBRASKA

R. L. Cochran, D.

2

January,

1939

NEVADA

Richard Kirman, D.

4

January,

1939

NEW HAMPSIDRE

F. P. Murphy,

2

January,

1939

NEW JERSEY

Harold G. Hoffman,

3

January,

1938

NEW MEXICO

Clyde Tingley, D.

2

January,

1939

NEW YORK

Herbert H . Lehman, D.

2

January,

1939

NORTH CAROLlNA

elY'de R. Hoey, D.

4

January,

1941

NORTH DAKOTA

路WilIiam A. Langer, Ind.

2

January,

1939

R. R.


\

Governors

U. S. GOVERNMENT

Governors

719

SOME OF THE STATE GOVERNORS WHO WERE ELECTED IN 1936

C. Stanford Arizona Democrat

Carl E . Bailey Arkansas

Teller Ammons Colorado

Richard McMullen Delaware

Fred Cone F10rida

E. D. Rivers Georgia

Democrat

Democrat

Democrat

Democrat

Democrat

Frank Murphy Michigan

M. C. Townsend

B. G. Kraschel Iowa Democrat

Walter Buxman Kansas

Democrat

C. F. Burley Mass. Democrat

Lloyd Stark Missouri

Roy E. Ayres Montana

Francis Murphy New Hampshire

Clyde R . Hoey North Cal'Oiina

Democ rat

Republican

William Langer North Dakota

Democrat

Democrat

/miep611dent

India na

Democrat

E. A. ,Benson Minnesotar FaMl~

Labor

Democrat


CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF TH E PHILIPPINES

720

SOME OF THE STATE GOVERNORS WHO WERE ELECTED IN 1936 (Cont'd)

Robert E. Quinn

Leslie Jensen

GOl'don B rown ing

Rhode Island Democrat

South Dakota R epulllican

Tennessee Democrat

George D . A iken Vermont Republican

Homer Holt West Virginia Democrat

GOVERNORS OF THE S'I'ATES AND TERRITORIES--(Con tinued )

State

Governor

Yea",

Term EXpires

OHIO

Martin L. Davey, D.

2

January,

1939

OKLAHOMA

E . W. Marland, D .

4

January,

1941

OREGON

Charles H. ,Martin. D.

4

January,

1939

PENNSYLVANIA

Ceorge H. Earle, D.

4

January,

1939

RHODE ISLAND

Robert E. Quinn, D.

2

January,

1939

SOUTH CAROLINA

Olin D. Johnston, D.

4

January,

1939

SOUTH DAKOTA

I .eslie Jensen, R .

2

January,

1939

TENl>.'ESSEE

Gordon Browning, D.

2

January,

1939

TEXAS

James V. Allred, D.

2

January,

1939

UTAH

Henry H. Blood, D.

4

January,

1941

VERMONT

George D. Aiken, R.

2

January,

1939

VIRGINIA

George C. Peery, D.

4

January,

1941

WASHINGTON

Clarence D. Martin, D.

4

January,

1941

W'EST VIRGINIA

Homer A. Holt, D.

4

January,

1941

WISCONSIN

P. F. LaFollette, Prog.

2

January,

1939 1941

\VYOl\UNG

Leslie A. MiHer, D .

4

January,

ALASKA

;ohn W. Troy. D .

4

January,

1941

HAWAII

Joseph P. Poindexter, D.

4

January,

1941

PuERTO RICO

Maj. Gen. Blanton Winship, U.S.A. (retired)

Indef.


Fed. Offi.c(!3

U. S. GOVERNMENT

Fed. Offic68

721

FEDERAL OFFICES IN THE PHILIPP INES BUREAU OF COAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY INTENDENCIA BLDG., INTRAMUROS TELEPHONE 2·26·11)

Captain 'Dhomas J. Maher, Director. Antonio G. Perez, Administrative Officer. C. F. Maynard, Chief, Computing, Division.

John Bach, Chief, Drafting Division. V. V. Kovalevsky, Assistant Chief, Drafting Division.

BUREAU OF QUARANTINE SERVICE (U. S. PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE) CUSTOM HOUSE, PORT AREA TELEPHONE 2·11·28

Howard F. Smith, Senior Surgeon, U.S.P.B.S., Chief, Quarantine Officer for the Philip~ pines. J. L. Wilson, P.A. Surgeon, U.S.P.H.S. A. B. Geyer, P.A. Surgeon, U .S.P.H.S. L. C. Watkins, P. A. Surgeon, U.S.P.H.S. (Cebu).

U. •

~.

R. Acriol, Acting Assistant Surgeon, U.S.P.H.S. No C. Comfort, Phannacist, U.S.P.H.S. T. J. B. Stevens, Chief and: Cashier. Gervasio Borja, Stenographer. Ceferina M. Tarcela, Nurse.

BUREAU OF FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC COMMERCE (OFFICE OF THE AMERICAN TRADE COMMISSIONER) 410 HEACOCK BLDG.. ESCOLTA. MANILA TELEPHONE 2·35·95

J. Bartlett Richards, American Trade Commissioner. Ricardo M. Sabella, Clerk to the American Trade Commissioner.

Alejandro Van, Principal Clerk. Bonifacio Lintag, Clerk-Stenographer. Francisco Schulthess, Clerk. FI01'entino Liwanag, Clerk.

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGRICULTURAL ADJUSTMENT ADMINISTRATION 312 NATIONAL ClTY BANK BLDG., MANILA TELEPHONE 2· 30·04

Charles P. Englesby, Senior Administrative Assistant.

Mrs. Elizabeth Rogers, Second Administrative Assistant.


722

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

HON. FRANK MURPHY First U. S. High Commissioner to the Philippines (1935-1936)


Fed. Offices

U. S. GOVERNMENT

Fed. Offices

723

U. S.TREASURY DEPARTMENT 420 NA"TIONAL CITY BANK BLDG., BINONDO. MANILA TELEPHONE 2-30-03

Virginial Clerk.

C. H. Hurst, Disbursing Clerk.

T.

Rowe,

Assistant

Disbursing

U. S. VETERANS ADMINISTRATION 911 MUELLE DE LA INDUSTRIA P . O. BOX 43B-TEL. 2-12-27

Col. Harry T. Herring Manager. A. H. Roche, Field Examiner. Dr. Juan Cabl'eza, Junior Medical Officer Expert. Jesus Sarmiento, Field Examiner. Pascual Trinidad, Accountant.

Pelagio Mopas, Clerk. Genaro Almodovar, Clerk. Buenaventura Soriano, Clerk. Frederick Seman, Clerk. Dominador Ricarte, Jr., Stenographer.

OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES HIGH COMMISSIONER SOUTH BOULEVARD, MANlLA TELEPHONE 2-13-63

Hon. PAUL V. McNUTT U. S. High Commissioner to the Philippines

Wayn(l' COY', AdministI'ative Assistant. J. Weldon Jones, Financial Adviser. Evett D. Hester, Assistant Financial Adviser. Leo M. Gardner, Legal Adviser. . George A. Malcolm, Assistant Legal Adviser. Lt. Col. '짜i1liam C. Rose, Military Aide. ' Capt, Leander Larson, Construction Q. M. L. T. Clark, Construction Superintendent. Mrs. Margaret B. Headdy, Private Secretary. Richard R. Ely. Chief Clerk and Passport Officer. Mrs. Edith M. Keyes, Assistant Chief Clerk and Secretary-Stenographer. Miss Mary Jo Keene, Confidential Stenographer. P. W. Reeves, Confidential Stenographer. Charles W. Franks, Chief Statistician. Floyd Dubas, Accountant Statistician.

Mrs. Janet White, Confidential Stenographer. Lt. Hunter Wood, Jr., U.S.N., Naval Aide. Capt. Melvile F. Grant, U.S.A., Liaison Officer. Ora E. Lautzenheiser, Cable Clerk. Constantino Tirona, Record Clerk. Ricardo J. Dimalanta, Statistician. Victor Baltazar, Stenographer. Macario Guevara, Stenographer. Fabian de Guzman, Stenographer. A velino de Guzman, Clerk. Pedro de Guzman, Clerk. Vicente Manuel, Clerk. Andres Marinas, Clerk. Pablo Marquez, Clerk. Gerardo Bernardino, Clerk-Messenger. Ricardo Cancio, Clerk-Messenger.


724

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

HON. J . WELDON JONES Acting U. S. High Commissioner to the Philippines (1936·1937 )


U. S. GOVERNMENT

725

THE NEW U.S. mCR COMMISSIONER TO THE PHILIPPINES Paul V. McNutt, appointed American High Commissioner to the Philippines, was met in Shanghai, China, April 21, 1937, by a delegation of American and Chinese officials. He said: "My first job is in the Philippines. I will be there as long as President Roosevelt desires. "I enter upon the performance of my duties in the Philippines as high commissioner with great enthusiasm and deep interest, conscious of the opportunity to render public service of the highest order to the peoples of the Philippines and the United States. liThe independence program for the Islands has passed the initial stages but there remain problems awaiting solution and question regarding which decisions are imperative. "A large measure of autonomy in administration of domestic affairs has been entrusted by the independence act to Filipinos through the Commonwealth government inaugurated under that act. This was a wise Congressiononal provision because the people of the Islands thereby were enabled through the medium of their own officials and in t1heir own way to w.ork out a program of adjustment preparatory to independence in 1946. "Although the United States continues to exercise sovereignty over the I-slands it is our policy not only to avoid unnecessary interference with this autonomous authority so long as it is exercised in accordance with the purposes and provisions of the independence act and of the constitution of the Commonwealth government, but also to give helpful encouragement to the new government in a sincere spirit of cooperation. UThere has been formed a joint committee "Among important matters to be considered in the immediate future are first, pro- of American and Philippine experts appointed for the purpose of preparing specifvisions regarding neutralization) of the Isic recommendation regarding these matters lands; second, the status of our future trade after careful study. This is not a joint comrelations with the Islands j and third, economittee of which one side will seek to obtain mic adjustments which must take place in concessions or favors from the other", All the Islands before economic as well as politefforts will be directed toward the formulaical independence is achieved. tion of a constructive program which will "Interested departments of the United then be referred to the two governments. State's government are giving earnest consid"In view of the 路 capacity for self-governeration to the problems involved in future ment and adherence to democratic constitutrade relations between the Philippinesi and tional principles heretofore demonstrated by the United States as well as various econothe people of 1Ihe Philippines, all of us hope mic and related adjustments which may be and expect that they will continue to justify necessitated in connection with the independ- their faith in the principles of liberty and ence program. self-government."

Amidst simple but impressive ceremonies, Paul V. McNutt, second American High Commissioner to the Philippines, arrived in Manila at exactly 8:1~ o'clock A.M.! Monday, April 26,1937, with Mrs. McNutt, his wife; Miss LOUise . McNutt, hIS daughter; and an entourage of 15 other men and women that WIll form his staff. Manila's high official and social circles composed ~he cosmopohtan crowd that welcomed him . A nineteen-gun salute was fired III his honor. . . . Those who met the new High Commissioner were Acting High CommISSIOner J . Weldon Jones, Rear-Admiral George J. Meyers, Jorge B. Vargas, Secretary to PreSIdent Quezon, Judge and Mrs. Francisco Delgado, President


726

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

Jorge Bocobo of the University of the Philippines, AssemblyrDian and Mrs. Manuel Alzate, former Associate Justice George C. Malcolm, Leopoldo R. Aguinaldo, J. P. Heilbronn, Mayor Juan Posadas, and a number of other prominent men .and women. Accompanying the High Commissioner, outside of his family, were Wayne Coy, administrative assistant to the High Commissioner, with Mrs. Coy and their son, Steven; Lt.-Colonel William C. Rose, military aide to the Commissioner, and Mrs. Rose; Leo M. Gardner, legjal adviser to the C:ommissioner and Mrs. Gardner and their son, Leo Kellie; Mrs. P. B. Headdy, confidential secretary; Mrs. Edith Keyes, assistant clerk; Miss Mary Jo Keene, one of the secretaries; P. W. Reeves, another secretary; and Floyd Dubas, statistician, and Mrs. Dubas. After placing a wreath on the foot of the Rizal Monument in honor of the Filipino hero and martyr, High Commissioner McNutt proceeded directly to the "El Nido," his temporary residence, where he held a press conference. Following are the highlights of Commissioner McNutt's press statements: His p1'ogram in the Philippines: III shall proceed on the assumption that independence is set for 1945, until the independence law is altered. Earlier independence: IIThel'e is no proposal in Congress to this effect. It is my impression that a sentiment to this effect does not exist in Congress." Tir ade t'l'eaty with U. S.: teA treaty is, of course, something which the signatories must respect until repealed. And I believe that there is no impediment to the Philippines, as a Commonwealth, concluding a commercial tl1caty with America." His conception of economic indepe.ndence of the Philippines: HI mean by this a government that can support itself :financial1~t and can count with fiscal stability'." f)

~aul

N. :!WlrNutf

Born in Franklin, Indiana, on July 19, 1891. He is the son of John C. and Ruth (Neely) McNntt. Married the former Miss Kathleen Timolat of San Antonio, Texas, on April 20, 1918, and has one daughter, Louise. He took his bachelor's degree at Indiana University in 1913. He was a member of Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Delta Chi, Order of the Coif, Beta Theta Pi, mid Phi Delta Phi. He graduated from the Harvard Law School in 1916. R'eturning to Indiana, he was appointed assistant professor of law, Indiana University. When America joined the World War, he entered as Captain of volunteers, field artillery. He successively rose in rank until at the end of the war he was a Lieutenant Colonel in the reserve force. He was later active in American Legion work and was president of the American Legion Publishing Corporation from 1928 to 1931. He has been decorated by France with the Legion d'Honneur, and as commander of the "Polonia Restituta" by Poland. A Rotarian, Kiwanis Club member, a 32nd degree Mason, and a Methodist, he plays a fair game of golf. In 1933 he was conferred an LL.D. degree of Notre Dame and Indiana universities. He was elected governor of Indiana on the democratic ticket a year after the 1932 Roosevelt landslide. His term as governor terminated last January 15, 1937. As a former law professor, having served as Dean of the Indiana University School of Law from 1925 to 1933, he had a rich background of theoretical politics 'before actually entering the political arena. At present, he is High Commissioner to the Philippine Commonwealth.


U. S. GOVERNMENT

U. S. HIGH CO MMISSION E R

HON. P.AUL V . McNUTT

727


728

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

~udu1'l

1R.

~olhrook

MAJOR-GENERAL LUCIUS R. HO LBROOK, Commanding General of the Philippine Department, U. S. Army, was born at Arkansaw, Wis., on April 30, 1875; the son of Willard Francis and Mary (Ames) Holbrook. He graduated in 1896 from the U. S. Militar y Academy, and in 1905 he graduated with dis'tinction from Infantry and Cavaky School. He also graduated from the Staff College in 1906. He was commissioned as 2nd Lieutenant of 4th CavaJlry on June 12, 1896; promoted through grades to Lieutenant-Colonel May 15, 1917. During the Wo路r ld War he was promoted to the rank of Brigadier-General (temp.), August 16, 1918, and Brigadier-General, Regular Army, October 20, 1925. In March, 1934, he was promoted to the rank of Major-General. His services were: Duty at Boise Barracks, Ida., 1896-98; in the Philippines, 1899-1900, 1901, and 1903; organized the training school for Bakers and Cooks, Ft. Riley, Kan., 1907 and 1911; developed the army field bakery and ;cooking equipment; attended the French School of Supply at Paris, 1911-13; went to France in May, 1919; Senior In structor of Artillery, Command and Staff College, 1919-20; Member of the General Staff, 1920-24, Inspector GeneraPs .Department, 1925; Commanding General, Ft. Douglas, Utah, 1925-26; Commanding, Camp Stotsenburg Philippines, 1926-29, Ft. Bragg, N. C., 1929-30; Commander, 1st Division, Hdqrs., Ft. Ham ilton, N. Y., since 1930. He was specially; cited for bravery in the Philippines, 1900; also "for skillfully handling a,rtillery" in Cantigny operations and during the second Battle of Marne; decorated D.S.M.; Legion of Honor, and Croix de Guerre (French); silver medal for bravery and ClI'OSS of Prince Danilo (Montenegrin). He married on June 7, 1899, the former Miss Henrietta Coffin, ()f Boise, Ida., by whom he has three children: Frank Coffin, John Ames, and Lucius Roy. An army officer by profesSlion, and a Baptist by religion. Home: Boise, Ida. Official Addresl>: War Dept., Washington, D. C. Manila address: 1 Military Plaza.


U. S. ARM Y P HI L. D EPT.

COMMANDER, PHILIPPINE DEPARTMENT

MAJOR-GENERAL LUCIUS R. HOLBROOK, U.S.A.

729


730

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

U. S. ARMY, PHIL. DEPARTMENT DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTERS PERSONNEL, AND STATIONS AND TROOPS (As of March 20, 1937) THE PHILIPPINE DEPARTMENT INCLUDES ALL THE ISLANDS OF THE PHILIPPINE ARCHIPELAGO AND THE U. S. ARMY TROOPS IN CHINA: HEADQUARTERS, MANILA, P. 1.

Commamder-Major General Lucius R. Holbrook, U. S. A. Aides-de-Camp-Major William Clarke, Capts. Landon J. Lockett, and Frank C. Holbrook Chief of Staff-Col. Raymond W. Briggs. Assistant Chief of Staff for Personnel-Major David S. Rumbough Capts. Landon J. Lockett, Morton McD. Jones and Bonner F . Fellers. Intelligence -Capt. Franklin L. Rash (Acting) 1st Lt. George H. Bishop, Jr., Press Officer. Opemtions and Training-Col. Donald A. Robinson -Capt. John B. Sherman Supply -Maj. Norman Randolph -Maj. William Clarke - Capt. Leland H. Hewitt War Plans Officer-Col. Donald A. Robinson. Defense Reserves Officer-Major Norman Randolph. Adjutant General-Major Ralph B. Lovett (Acting) Assistant Adjutant General-Capt. John G. Brackinridge Inspector Geneml-Col. Cassius M. Dowell. Assistant-Lt. Col. Troy H. Middleton


Dept., Hqn.

U. S. ARMY PHIL. DEP'r.

Dept.

HqT8 .

731

Judge Advocate-Lt. Col. Myron C. Cramer . . Assistant-Lt. Col. Russell H. Brennan. Quartermaster-Col. Charles A. Clark. Assistants-Lt. Col. John F. Daye, Major William E. Goe, Capts. Robert S. Beard and Carroll R. Hutchins. Finance Officer-Col. Emmet R. Harris Assistants-Majors Horatio G. Coykendall, Capt. John P. Tillman SurgeO'l'lr-Col. Mathew A. Reasoner Assistant-Major Francis M. Fitts. Engineer-Lt. Col. Gilbert van Wilkes Assistant-Capt. Roscoe Bonham Ordnance Officer-Lt. Col. Harry R. Kutz. Assistants-Major Fred A. McMahon and 1st Lt. John H. Weber. Signal Officer-Col. Goodwin Compton. Assistants-Capts. Charles M. Simpson, Arthur E. Mickelsen and James E. McGraw. Air Officer-Col. Albert L. Sneed. Chemical OffiCer-Lt. Col. Paul X. English.

TROOPSClark Field-see Ft. Stotsenburg. Hay, Camp John: Comdg-Lt. Col. Herbert E. Taylor. Cos A & B 45th Inf. (PS) Dets-Co B 12th QM Regt. (Div) (PS), lOth Sig Serv Co, QMC, MD (PS) , and FD. Manil~Hq P Dept (Ft Santiago), Cos A & B 12th QM Regt (Div) (PS), 34th Sep QM Co (Lt Maint) (PS), Vet Gen Hosp, Dets-QMC, FD, MD, CE, Hq P Dept & CIP. Depots-PQM, P Med, P Ord (75th Ord Co and Det OD), P Sig, P Engr, PCW (Ft Mills), PAir (NF). [nac Orgns-J,2d Sep QM Co (HM) (PS); 35th Sep QM Co (Lt Maint) (PS) , Serv Co 12th QM Regt (div ) (PS) , 53d & 5.t,th Sep QM Cos (Wagon) (PS). Post of Manila: Comdg-Col. Charles S. Hamilton. 31st Inf; lOth Sig Serv Co (Less dets) ; Dets-MP Co P. Div, OD, QMC, and MD. McKinley, Ft Wm: Comdg-Maj. Gen. John L. DeWitt P Div (see following page) 4th Sep Cml Co Sch for Bakers & Cooks, 74th Sep KM Co (Bakery) (PS), 65th Sep QM Troop (Pack) (PS). Dets-10th Sig Serv Co, QMC, MD, FD, and OD. Nichols Field: Comdg-Lt. Col. Thomas S. Voss Air Corps-Hq 4th Comp Gp, 6th Photo Sec, 2d Obsn Sq, 28th Bomb Sq and 66th Serv Sq. Dets-10th Sig Serv Co, QMC, MD, and OD, P Air Depot


732

OORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

Pettit Bks: Comdg-Maj. Henry R. Anderson 1st Bn 45th Inf (PS) (less Cos A & B). Dets-Hq and Serv Cos 45th Inf (PS), QMC, MD, FD, 10th Sig Serv Co and 12th Sig Co (PS). Sternbe"g Gen H osp: Comdg-Col. William H. Allen Dets-QMC, MD; Patients. Stotsenbu"g, Ft: Cmclg-Brig. Gen. Evan H. Humphrey Post Hq 26th Cay (PS) Btry A & 1st Sec CT 1st Bn 23d FA (PS), 24th FA (PS), Co D 12th QM Regt (Div) (PS) 2d P lat Co E 12th QM Regt (Div) (PS), 66th Sep QM Troop (Pack) (PS) and 12th Ord Co (PS). Clark Field-3d Pur Sq AC Dets-10th Sig Serv Co, 12th Sig Co (PS), 12th Med Regt (PS), P Div Hq (PS), QMC, MP Co P Div, (PS), MD (PS), FD, and OD Manila & Subic Bays, H Def of: Comdg-Brig Gen Percy P. Bishop Drum, Ft-Btry E , 59th CA Frank, Ft-Btry F, 91st CA . (PS) Hughes, Ft-Btry G 59th CA Mills, Ft-H Def Hq, 59th CA (less Btrys E & G), 60th CA, 91st CA (PS) (less, Btry F) , and 92d CA (PS) USAMP-"Col George F. E. Harrison" Dets-QMC, MD, FD, OD, 10th Sig Serv Co, and Engrs Wint, Ft-Dets-91st & 92d CA (PS) China, USA Tn in; Tientsin: Comdg-Col George A. Lynch Post Hq 15th Inf (1st Bn and Cos G & L Inactive) Dets-10th Sig Serv Co, QMC, MD, FD, and OD

PHILIPPINE DIVISION HEADQUARTERS PERSONNEL, COMPONENTS AND STATIONS Contmander-Maj. Gen. John L. DeWitt ftide-de 路Camp-Capt. Julian E. Raymond and 1st Lt. Thomas L. Sherburne, Jr. Chief of Staff-Col Edwin Butcher. Asst. Chief of Staff for Personnel--Major Arthur S. Nevins. Asst. Chief of Staff for Military lntelligence-Lt Col Courtney H. Hodges. Asst. Chief of Staff for Operations and Tmining-Lt Col Courtney H. Hodges Asst. Chief of Staff for Supp~y-Maj . Arthur S. Nevins. Adjutant General--Lt. Col. Carl H. Seals. Assistant Adjutant General--Major Jess G. Boykin l nspecto,' General--Maj. Gabriel T. Mackenzie. Judge Advocate-Maj Desmond O'Keefe Quarte,路master-Lt. Col. James R. Hill. Assistants-Maj. Ray E. Quigley Maj Albert E. McIntosh Maj Floyd D Jon es Capt Charlie Q. Lifsey Capt. Charles Richardson Smith


Dept. H(JTS.

U. S. ARMY. PHIL. DEPT.

Dept. H(ITS.

Finance Officer-Maj Arthur O. Walsh. Surgeon-Lt Col Charles W. Riley. Enginee"-Maj William M. Hoge. Ordnance Officer-Maj John Huling Jr. Si.qnal Officer-Lt. Col. Seth H. Frear Air Officer-1st Lt. George F. McGuire Chemical Officer-Capt. Frank B. Lindley (Acting) Chaplain-Lt Col Aristeo V. Simoni. Assistant-Maj. Willis T. Howard. Troops- (All PS units unless otherwise indicated.) Hq. & Hq. Det-Ft. William McKinley. Spec TrsHq-Ft William McKinley Hq & MP Co-Ft William McKinley (Amer Dets at Post of Manila and Ft Stotsenburg) 12 Sig Co-Ft William McKinley Tank Co 12th Ord Co-Ft Stotsenburg (Det at Ft Wm McKinley) 23d BrigHq & Hq Co-Ft Wm McKinley 45th lnf (less 1st En) -Ft Wm McKinley Hq 1st En and Cos C and D-Pettit Bks Cos A and E-Camp John Hay 57th lnf-Ft William McKinley 24th BrigHq 48d Infantry 44th Infantry 12th FA BrigHq & Hq Btry 12th Am Tn 23d FA Btry A & 1st Sec CT 1st En-Ft Stotsenburg 28d FA less Btry A & 1st Sec CT 1st Bn 24th FA-Ft Stotsenburg 14th Engrs (Combat) Ft William McKinley 12th Med Regt-Ft William McKinley 12th QM Regt (Div) (PS) Hq & Hq Co-Ft William McKinley Co. "A"-Manila " "B"-Manila " "C"-Ft William McKinley " "D"-Ft Stotsenburg " "F"-Ft William McKinley " "E"-(less 2d Plat)-Ft William McKinley " "E"-(2d Plat)-Ft Stotsenburg Sm'v Co-(Inactive) Hq 1st Bn-(Inactive) " 2d "-(Inactive) " 3d "-(Inactive)

733


734

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

ANY ERRORS OR OMISSIONS DISCOVERED IN THIS ARMY DIRECTORY SHOULD BE REPORTED PROMPTLY TO THE DEPARTMENT ADJUTANT GENERAL.

ABBREVIATIONS USED WITH TELEPHONE NUMBERS IN THIS DffiECTORY CY FS McKNF SB -

Manila City Exchange. Fort Santiago Exchange. Fort William McKinley Exchange. Nichols Field Exchange. Sternberg Exchange.

CALLS FROM CITY TELEPHONES To call an Army telephone from a city telephone, dial the number of the appropriate exchange as indicated below, then ask for the local number desired. Fort Santiago Exchange .... . ...... .. ......... dial 2-38-41 Fort William McKinley Exchange . .. ........... dial 5-69-11 Nichols Field Exchange ...... . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. dial 5-17-01 Sternberg Exchange ... .. ..... . . .. .. ...... .. ... dial 2-39-55 Fort Mills Exchange路 ............ . . dial Fort Santiago number given above, then ask for Fort Mills.

DffiECT ARMY TRUNK liNES The Army Exchanges have direct trunk lines to other Exchanges as follows. Fort Wm. McKinley Exchange. Nichols Field Exchange. Fort Santiago Exchange Sternberg Exchange. Fort Mills Exchange. Manila City Exchange.

Il

Fort Santiago Exchange. Fort William McKinley Exchange { Nichols Field Exchange. Manila City Exchange. Fort Santiago Exchange. Nichols Field Exchange Fort Wm. McKinley Exchange. Manila City Exchange.

{

Fort Santiago Exchange. { Manila City Exchange. USE THE DIRECT LINES WHEN POSSIBLE IN PREFERENCE TO LINES THROUGH THE MANILA CITY EXCHANGE.

Sternberg Exchange


Tel . Service

U. S. ARMY PHIL. DEPT.

Tel.. Scrviec

IMPROVE YOUR OWN TELEPHONE SERVICE Complaints that you cannot hear, or that others do not hear you, are possibly due to an improper method of speaking into the transmitter. Telephone engineers, after exhaustive tests, have found that speaking with the lips one inch from the transmitter has the same effect as adding 75 miles of open wire to the line. Two inches, 128 miles. Three inches, 179 miles. Four inches, 218 miles. When you use your telephone have your lips so close to the transmitter that they almost touch it. Talk in a normal voice and enunciate distinctly. Due to extremely severe circuit conditions, telephone conversation between the mainland and the Harbor Defenses is very difficult. Conversation should be slow, distinct and loud. To call one Army post from another, ask the operator for the post desired by name, not by city telephone number. In calling an Army telephone, after getting the proper exchange give the telephone number desired, rather than the name of the individual, unless the number cannot be found in the directory.

USE OF FORT SANTUGo-FORT MILLS TRUNK LINE The Fort Santiago-Fort Mills telephone circuit will be reserved for official business between 7 :00 a. m. and 1 :00 p.m., daily, except Sundays and holidays. This trunk line may be used by Army and Navy personnel at other times for personal calls when such use does not retard official business. Personal calls over this trunk line are limited to three . minutes each.

735


736

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

U. S. ARMY TELEPHONE DIRECTORY CLASSIFIED SECTION

PART I HQ. PHILIPPINE DEPT.-PHIL. ORDNANCE DEPOT-PORT AREA (All numbers given are on Fort Santiago Exchange unless otherwise indicated)

A

ADJUTANT GENERAL'S DEPART. Adjutant General, Phil. Dept 83 Assistant .. . ........... 83,.2R Assistant .. ............ 83-3R Chief Clerk . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 71 Enlisted Division ......... 96 Extension School . . . . . . . . .. 111 Library .... . . . . .. ....... 11 Mail & Records Div ....... 107 Miscellaneous Div .... .. ... 45 Officers Di v .............. 94 Orderly, Entrance Hall ., 105 Publications Div Blank Forms & Publications ................ 82 Orders .......... " ..... 174 Radio & Cable Div ....... . 117 Reserve Division ..... .. .. . 174 Returns Div ....... . ..... . 245 Aides-de-Camp . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Air Officer, Phil. Dept . ...... 56 Athletic Officer, Phil. Dept . . ' 127 C

Chemical Officer, Phil. Dept 35 Chief of Staff, Phil. Dept ... . 26 Commanding General, Phil. Dept .................. 155 Orderly, Entrance Hall ... . 105 Secretary CG P Dept ..... . 155, E

ENGINEERS, CORPS OF Engineer, Phil. Dept . .. ... Assistant , . . . . . . . . . . . . Chief Clerk .. . . . . .. .â&#x20AC;˘. ...

8 8 8

C. O. Engineer Detachment 8 Engineer Depot .'...... . ... 151 Fiscal Branch ...... .... .. 106 106 Purch. & Contr. Section

F FINANCE DEPARTiVIENT Finance Officer, Phil. Dept. Executive Officer . . . .... Chief Clerk ........ . ... Property AJlditcr Section . Disbursing Offi.:er ........ Officers Pay and allowances ., . ' . ' . . . .. . .. . Cashier .. ... .. ... . .. . . Commercial Accounts .... Enlisted Pay .. ... .. .... FIRE STATION ............

27 27 27 119 37 15 25 24 24 42

G

GENERAL STAFF CORPS Chief of Staff,Phil. Dept Assistant, G-1 . . . . . . . . . . .. Assistant, G-2 ............ Assistant, G-3 . ' . . . . . . . . . . Assistant, G-4 , . . . . . . . . . .. Orderly, Entrance Hall

26 127 145 75 131 105

H

Hq. Detachment, Phil. Dept

12

I

INSPECTOR GENERAL'S DEPART. Inspector General, ~hil. Dept. .. 84 Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . 9 Chief Clerk ............... 30 145 Intelligence Officer, Phil. Dept


U. S. ARMY, PHIL. DEPT.

Tel . Directo ry

J Janitor, Fort S antiago ...... . .. . 93 Judge Advocate, Phil. Dept 144 L Library, Fort Santiago

11

M MEDICAL DEPARTMENT Surgeon, iPhil. Dept ........ . . 16 Assistant (MC) .... . . . . . . . 16 Assistant (VC) ....... . .. , 13 Chief Clerk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Phil. Medical Depot (CO) . . ... 61 Phil. Medical Dept (Warehouse) 108 Depot Veterinarian (QM Depot) 123 Sternbel'g General Hospital (Call Sternberg Hospital) Veterinary General Hospital .. .... . ......... .. U~ (CO) Mortuary, Army ..... . ..... . ... 122

N NCO Quarters, Ft Santiago ..... 140

o ORDNANCE DEPARTMENT Ordnance Officer, Phil. Dept Assistant ................ Mlministrative Assistant ... Philippine Ordnance bepot (CO) Assistan t .. ... .... . ....... Administrative Assistant .... Ammunition Forenian .. . ... Finance Divi sion ..... . ..... Foreman (General) ........ Guard Room .... . ....... . .. Post Exchange ............ Propel'ty Division .......... Purchase Division .. .. ... . .. Storekeeper .. . . . .......... 75th Ordnance Oompany (D).

33 23 103 313 23 103 23 147 49 90 81 10

147 49 21

P Publicity Office ............

125

Q

QUAR1'ERMASTER CORPS: Administrative Division: QM, P Dept ... . .. . .......... Executive Officer ..........

70 70

Clas$lijif'd Sf'c.

Chief Clerk .. .... ..... " ... Fiscal Branch . .. . "......... Mail & Records Branch ....... Pel'sonnel Branch ..... . . . .... Pay Roll Section ......... . . Port' Area Mess Exchange QiVI Detachment, Port Area . . . . Watchman's Force : Chief Watchman .. ... . ..... Post 1 Bonifacio Gate ........ Post 2 Muelle de San Francisco

737

173

In

55 91 78 223 12 6 19路1 193

Construction Division: Officer in Charge ............ Principal Clerk ..... . ...... Engineer Section .. . ........ . Utilities Branch: Officer in Charge .. . ....... Principal Clerk ........... . General Shops ........ . .... Shops Superintendent ...... Ice and Refrigeration Plant . . . Fire Marshal and Police Officer. Fire Department ... . ....... .. Foreman Janitor , Ft Santiago. Gardener, Military Plaza .

120 120 120 38 154 130 42 93 168

Supply Division: Of.Yicer in Charge ..... Ilequirements Bra nch ......... Planning Branch ........

72 72 72

95 95 10

Transportation Division: Animal & Motor Branch : Officer in Charge .......... Principal Clerk ........... . Water Branch (A.T.S.) A So sis t ant Supelintendent, ATS ...... . .... . ....... Superintending Engineer .. .. Chief Stevedore (Pier 1) ... . Customs Branch ... .. ...... Manifest Section ........... Pier No. 1 (Baggage Room). A & N Transports (When at Pier No.1) ......... ..... . Pay Station (Pial' No.1) .... . Launches & Scows ..... . ...

59 259 36

Depot Division: Administrative Branch: Officer in Charge ......... .

69

92 92 165 165 34 165 16" 85


738

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIREC'l'ORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

Principal Clerk 69 Survey Section 139 Army Mortuary 122 Laundry Branch 64 Procurement Branch 102 Heceiving Hoom Section 133 Storage & l ssue Branch: Officer in Charge 8tl Principal Clerk 86 ti Chief Storekeeper City Delivery 9H Forage Shed (Office) 150 General Supply Section 141 Lumber Yard 129 Memorandum Heceipt Section 13\! Packing Hoom Section 66 Subsistence Section o' 41 Service Section 14 Warehouses: "B" Clothing 97 124 "C" Subsistence IfDJI Hardware .... ..... . .. 15~ HE" Stoves, Ranges, Furniture 28 "F" Harness, etc .. ... . .... 17 "II" Motor Transport . ..... 50 "X" Paints & Oils (McKinley) McK 121 Pasig River Quay 150 Cold Storage SB-18 Forage, Coal, Cement 150 Sales Branch: Officer in Charge . 101 136 Butcher Shop 0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

000000000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

00.00.0

00000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

•••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

.

.

0

0

0

0000...

••

0

•••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

00.

o'

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

00000

.

0

0

o

o

0

0

0000000000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

000

0

0

0

••

0

o.

0

0

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Office Order Clerk Gasoline Station Salvage Branch Transportation Branch: Officer in Charge Principal Clerk Hail Tmnsportation Motor Hepair Shops Motor Transport Pool Issue Gasoline Station 000000

0

0000000000000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

101 135 123 130 113 113 113 128 121 226

S SIGNAL CORPS Signal Officer, Phil Dept AS'sistant Chief Clerk Supply & Finance Section Telephone & Telegmph Section Department IIq. Signal Systems Officer in Charg~ Chief Operator, Telegraph Chief Operator, Telephone . Message Center Hadio Transmitter Station Pvepair, Shqp Wire Chief Philippine Signal Depot Commanding Officer Hepair Shop . . ...... . .. . . . Storekeeper Photographic Laboratlory . . ... Signal Property Officer 10th Signal Service Company 0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

••

o.

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

•••

••••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

••

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

•••

0

0

•••

0

••

0

0

0

114 76 76 5 oj

68 98 110 138 7 241 196 46 22 40 100 132 240


U. S. ARMY. PHIL. DEPT.

Ttl. Diredory

u.

Cla88ified Sec.

739

S. ARMY TELEPHONE DIRECTORY CLASSIFIED SECTION PART II

POST OF MANILA (All numbers given are on Fort Santiag路o Exchange unless otherwise indicated) A Adjutant, 31st Inf. and Post .. . 210 Assistant (Personnel) ........ 211 B Band, 31st lnilantry .... ... . ... 224

Plans & Training Officer .. ..... ;Post Exchange Officer .. ... .... Pl"ison & Police Officer ......... Provost Marshal ...... . .. . ... ..

Q

208 172 227 227

QM Detachment . . ........ . 242-R 1 QM Office ........ . . ... ... .... 212 Chaplain .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... 207 Commanding Officer, Special Uuits 228 QM Utili ties Shops ........ ..... 230 QM Warehouse ........... 242-R 2 Commanding Officer, 31st Inf. & Post . .. . ..... .... .... . ..... 209 Regimental Gas & Machine Gun Officer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 228 D Dispatcher, Service Co., 31st Inf. 255, S Dispensary, Cuartel de Espana .. 217 Ser~ant Major ....... .. ...... 214 Dispensary, Estado Mayor ... . SB 13 Supply Office, 31st Infantry .... 235 Dispensary, Navy, Cuartel de Es.Siupply Office, Storeroom, 3 1 s t pana .................. .. . 202 Inf. . ............ . ..... 188-R-2 Summary Court Office ..... . ... . 222 E Electrician, Post ........ . ...... 230 Surgeon, Post ............... . . 217 Executive Officer, 31st Inf. & Post 210 T lOt h Signal Service Company '" 240 G ,Guard Hou*, Cuailitel de Espana 21G 31st Infantry: Headqua~路tei路S! Company . ..... 22::; Guard House, Estado Mayor .. SB-12 Service Company .. .......... , 206 Guard House, Fort Santiago .... 134 Hq., 1st Battalion ...... . .... 204 Guard House, Port .Ajrea ..... . . 47Company A ... ... .......... 238 I Company B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237 Investigation Officer . ..... ..... 222 Company C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 229 M Company D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221 Medical Detachment .. .. ...... . 217 Hq., 2nd Battalion ..... . . . SB1 Military Police Detachment ... . . 227 Company E . . ..... .... .. SB- .. 3 N Company F .. . .......... SB4 Navy Dispensary, Cuartel de EsCompany G ............. SB5 pana ..................... 202 6 Company H ........ .. ... SBo 2 Hq., 3d Battalion ........ . SBOfficers Staff School ....... . ... 137 Company I ..... ...... ... SB7 Ordnance Officer . .. ........ ... 231' Company K .... . ...... .. SB8 9 Company L ............. SBP Pay telephone, Cuartel de Espana . 257 Company M . ............ SB- 10 Personnel Adjutant ........... 211 U ,\'ersonnel Sergeant Major ...... 211 Utilities, Post ... ...... ........ 230 C


AKE

740

AVE

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DlREC1'ORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

U. S. ARMY TELEPHONE DIRECTORY ALPHABETICAL SECTION AND ADDRESS LIST OF OFFICERS OF THE ARMY IN THE PHILIPPINE DEPARTMENT AND OTHER AUTHORIZED TELEPHONES OFFICE TEL NO

NAME, RANK AND ARM OR SERVICE

RESIDENCE ADDRESS

RES TEL NO

DATE ARVD IN DEPT

A McK Cy

SB

FS

SB

FS

FS

4:J

56921

30

2

7

16

82

Akers Russ311 F J1' 1st Lt Illf Mrs Akers Alba Bienvenido MIst Lt PS CAC Mrs Alba Alderman Craig Capt Inf Mrs Alderman Allan Charles C WIst Lt Cav Mrs Allan Allen William H Col MC Mrs Allen Alley Edward C Maj DC Mrs Alley Allman Morris St Sg, DEML Mrs Allman Alspaugh Ralph 1st Lt Inf Mrs Alspaugh Anderson Ethel M 2d Lt AN C Anderson Henry R Maj Inf Mrs Anderson Anderson Joseph C 2d Lt Inf Mrs Anderson Anderson Ralph W St Sgt Sig C Anderson Robert L. 1st Lt. CAC Mrs Anderson Andersson Kingsley S Capt CE Mrs Andersson Andrews Charles L 2d Lt CAC Ansbro Francis Tech Sgt MD Mrs Ansbro Archer Herman N ,"VO USA Mrs Archer Ashcraft James H Maj MC Mrs Ashcraft Ashman Alfred 2d Lt CAC Mrs Ashman Austin James J WO USA Mrs Austin A vera Claude B Capt QMC Mrs Avera Avery Dorcas C 2d Lt ANC

80-A Fort McKinley

McK

291

July 15, 193

187 M Roxas Sta Ana Manila Tientsin China

JUly 26, 1936

Fort Stotsenburg

Oct

31, 1935

43 Feb.

25, 1937

Mar

8, 1937

1143 Gral Luna

PS

FS

Tientsin China Oriente Hotel Manila Cy

23653

Oct

Camp John Hay

Oct

30, 1936

Fort Stotsenburg Pettit Barracks

Feb. Feb.

25 1 193~ 25, 1937

3-E Fort Santiago

FS

Sta Lucia BalTacks Fort Mills

FS 220-R2

80 Feb. 25, 1937 June 28, 1936 May 2, 1936

Fort Mills

May

Fort Mills 15-B Old Med Supply Depot Manila Apt. H Garden Court Bac1aran Rizal Fort Stotsenburg

Mal' 19, 1935 Oct 30, 1936 Feb.

2, 1936

25, 1937

Oct 30, 1936

Fort Mills

Feb.

320 V Gotamco Pasay

Aug 29, 1916

Fort Mills

Mar 19, 1935

Sternberg Gen Hosp Cy

23338

25, 1937

Mar 19, 193-


U. S. ARMY, PHIL. DEPT.

BAC

NAME, RANK AND ARM OR SERVICE

OFF TEL NO

R.ESIDENCE ADDRESS

BLE

RElS TEL NO

741

DATE ARVD IN DEPT

B

SB ~n

Bache William H be Lt In! Mrs Bache Baclig Eustaquio S Cap't PS (Cav) Mrs Baclig Bailey Donald J Capt CAC Mrs Bailey Baldwin Norman L Maj Sig C Mrs Baldwin 5 Barbour Thomas E P Capt Inf Mrs Barbour 3 Bare Walter E Jr 2d Lt In! Mrs Bare Barnes Harold A Maj QMC

Pettit Barracks

Oct 3 1, 1935

Camp H T Allen Baguio M P Fort Mills

PS Oct 31,

Fort Mills

Oct

28

FS 95&120

FS

41 145

FS

237

Barnett Lloyd Maj (Capt) AC Mrs Barnett Barrett Henry L Maj Inf Mrs Barrett Miss Marion F Barros Vicente R. Maj Ret Mrs Barl"os Miss Mercedes Barrows Ernest R Maj CAC Mrs Barrows Bates Russell E Capt CAC Baylo r Estella 2d Lt ANC Baynes William H 2d Lt CAC Bayot Jesus M WO Ret Mrs Bayot Miss Jo sephine M Miss Carmen M Board Robert S Capt QMC Mrs Beard Mr Bruce B Beers William H Maj Inf Mrs Beers Bender Arthur H Capt CAC Mrs Bend~ Bernard Samuel St Sge QMC Bevans Stuart M Capt AGD Mrs Bevans Bishop George H路 Jr 1st Lt In! Bishop Percy P Brig Gen USA Mrs Bishop Miss Peggy Bizzell Lee 0 Capt Inf Mrs BizZ'ell

394x

MeK

144

Black Ira W Cant Inf Mrs Black Black Minnie M 2d Lt ANC Blair Jerome E II 2d Lt (Cav) AC Mrs Blair Blanchard Robert M J1' 1st Lt In! Mrs Blanchard Blesse Frederick A Maj Me Mrs Blesse

2, 1934

1134 Dakota Manila

Cy

54386 Oct 31, 1935

5-C F()rt Sanl\iago

FE'

54 Oct 30, 1936

Fort Mills

Feb

Mrs Ban:nes

NF

193~

90 F B Harrison Baclaran Tientsin China

Cy

25, 1937

51320 Oct 30, 1936 Nov 23, 1935

22 Sta Mesa Manila

Retired Oct

Fort Mills Fort Mills Sternberg Gen H osp Cy Fort Mills 811 Vermont Malate Cy

FS

31, 1935

June 17 , 1934 23338 Feb 13, 1936 Feb 25, 1937 55252 Re,tired ,-

L71 Dec

1, 1934

Tientsin China

July

7, 193,

Fort Mills

July 15, 19 ;36

1134 Gral Luna Manila

Bldg 3 Sta Lucia Brks FS 220-R2 July 15, 1936 Fort Stotsenburg July 15, 1936 A & N Club Manila Fort Mills

Cy

22095 Oct 30, 1936 Oct 30, 1936

1152 Dakota Manila

Cy

55316 Oct 31, 1935

Camp John Hay

Jan 26, 19路35

Sternberg Gen Hasp Cy Fort Stotsenburg

23338 Oct 31, 1935 Oct 30, 1936

76-1 Fort McKinley

McK

176 Oct 31, 1935

82 Fort McKinley

McK

288 Oct

30, 1936


BON

742

OFF TEL NO

BUR

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

NAME, RANK AND ARM OR SERVICE

RESIDENCE ADDRESS

RES TEL NO

DATE ARVD IN DEPT

----------------------------------------

FS McK

Mel(

151&8 &106 48

351

FS

83-R3

FS

207

McK 134-A SB

33

FS McK

144 238

FS

206

FS

26

FS

128

SB McK

8 66

Miss Norma June Miss Eleanor Mr Frederick C Bonham Roscoe Capt PS (CE) Mrs Bonham Miss Lina Peterson Bowen Claude L Jr 1.t Lt Inf Mrs Bowen Bowman Maude 1st Lt ANC Bowman Raymond S Maj Ret Mrs Bowman Boyer Gouverneur H Maj Me Mrs Boyer Boykin Jess G Maj AGD Mrs Boykin Miss Charlotte Mrs Z T White Rrabson Sam M Capt In! Mrs Brabson Brackinridge John G Capt AGD Mrs El'ackinridge Mi ss Evelyn Trost Braham Edward L. CHAP (Lt Col) Mrs Braham Bratton Daniel Maj DC Mrs Bratton Miss Judy Breaux N uma P st Sgt MD Mrs Breaux Brennan Russell H Lt Col JAGD Brian Adrian R Maj Inf Mrs Brian Miss Elizabeth Brier William W Jr Capt Inf Mrs Brier Mr. William W IV Mr John K Briggs Raymond W Col GSC Mrs Briggs Brooks Bruno W Capt QMC Mrs Brooks Miss Evelyn F Broom Thad A 1st Lt Inf Mrs Broom Brown Arthur Edmon Maj DC Mrs Brown Brown Perry W Capt FA Brawson Jessie 2d Lt. ANC Brumby Sewell MIst Lt Inf Mrs Brumby Buck J ames B 2nd Lt Inf Mrs Buck Buckley Willia.m R Maj QMC Mrs Buckley

619 Dakota Manila

Cy

24-A Fort McKinley

McK

56542

PS

32 July 15, 193.

Fort Stotsenbw'g PO Bx 540 Cebu

Feb

FOl路t Mills

Ja n 26, 1935

61 Fort McKin ley

McK

Tientsin China

25, 19 ~7 Retire d

225 July 15,

193~

May 11, 1936

11 36-C Dakota Manila Cy

56749 Dec

1, 1931 25, 1937

USA 341 Gral Luna

FS

172 Feb

8 1 FOl"

McK

290 July 15, 1936

McKinley

18-G Cumiel de Espana FS

24-R Oct

30, 1936

A & N Club Manila 38 Fort McKinley

Cy 22095 June 17, 1934 MeK 10 Oct 31, 1935

1438 F B HalTison Pasay

Cy

51068 Feb 13 , 1936

3 Mil Plaza Manila

FS

143 July 15, 193.

710 Pennsylvania Manila

Cy

57336 F eb 13, 1936

Tientsin China

Oct 11, 1934

Fort Stotsenburg

F eb

Fort Stotsenburg Sternberg Hos piatl 1123 Dakota Manila

Cy Cy

86-A Fort McKinley

MeK

26, 1935

i'!ept 22, 1934 23338 Feb 25, 1937 55811 Oct 31, 1935 282 Feb 13, 1936

Tientsin China

Oct

2, 1934

F ort Mills

Feb

25, 1937

Fort, Mills

Feb 13, 1936

Mr. 'W illiam Jr .

Bullard Fred H WO AMPS Mrs Bullard Miss Vida Tillerv Burford Hazel D 2nd Lt ANC


BUR

OFF TEL NO

McK

rucK

183

2

CHE

U. S. ARMY, PI-IlL. DEPT.

Burgess Henry C Capt Inf Mrs Burgess Burgess Lloyd S WO USA Mrs Burgess Ml' '楼ilIiam E Butcher Edwin Col GSC Ml's Butcher Mr Edwin C Byrd Eunice B 2d Lt ANC

RES TEL INO

RESIDENCE ADDRESS

NAME, RANK AND ARM OR SERVICE

26 Fort McKinley

McK

DATE ARVD IN DEPT

29 June 28, 1935 Feb

515 Dakota Manila 39 Fort McKinley

743

McK

25, 1937

9 Oct 30, 1936

Fort Mills

May

2, 1936

c Caldwell Albin N Capt QMC Mrs Caldwell McK 110 Callahan James W Jr Maj PO路(Inf) Mrs Callahan McK 133 Callard Charles B Maj MC Mrs CaliaI'd Miss Barbara E Caluya Pio Q Capt PS (CAC) Mrs Caluya McK 82-R2 Camp Pierce H Capt Inf Mrs Camp Campbell William P Capt FD M.rs Campbell 36 Canby Clarence P Capt DC SB Mrs Canby Mrs J J Dillts Cantpl'bury William M 2d Lt AC Mrs Canterbury Cy 68481 r.apinpin Mateo M Maj USA Ret Mrs Capinpin Caraway Paul W 1st Lt Inf Mrs Caraway Carlton Rebecca 2d Lt ANC I'S 121 & Carpenter Joseph WO USA 128 Mrs Ca rpen tel' Carroll Pe.rcy J Maj MC Mr~ Carroll McK 77 Carter James D Maj PS (Inf) Mrs Carter Case Robert A Capt Inf Mrs Case Cepeda Emmanuel S 1st Lt PS In! Mrs Cepeda Miss Lom'des Quinto FS 229 Charles Grovener C Capt Inf Mrs Charles Cheesman Burt ';VO USA Mrs Cheesman FS 1 Cheski William A M Sgt DEML Mrs Cheski Cheyney Sam W 1st Lt AC Mi.路s Cheyney FS

86

1146 Dakota Manila

Cy

2 Fort McKinley

McK

254

PS

78-A Fort McKinley

Mcl{

296 Mal'

1~ ,

5665 8 Oct

McK

231 Oct 31 , 1935

Fort Mills 78 Fort McKinley

McK

Oct

31, 1935

295 Oct

30, 1nG

Fort Stotsenburg 3614-A Taft Ex:t Pasay Tientsin China

1935

rs

Fort Mills 63 Fort McKinley

30, 1936

Feb 13 , 193 6 Cy

52268

Retired Nov 23. 1935

Fort Mills 2693 Taft Ext Pasay

F eb 13 , 1936 F eb 13, 1936

Tientsin China

July

25 FQrt McKinley

Mcl<

Tien.tsin China

31

PS Nov 11, 1936

Phil Mil Academy Baguio M P

PS

100-A P Burgos FE' Manila 36 Cual'tel de Espana FS 1020 Florida Manila

7, 1935

Cy

187 Oct 31. 1935 184-R1 Feb

25, 1937

54528 Oct 31, 1935

Fort Stotsen burg

Oct.

31, 1935


CHR

744

O'F F

TE L

NO

MeK

114

MeK FS

189 155

SB

27

FS

70

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE F HILIPPINES

NAME, RANK AND ARM OR SERVICE Christian Frank Capt PS (lnf) M.rs Christian Churchill James M Jr 1st Lt In1 Churchill Thomas P WO U~A Mrs Churchill Churney Otto L Capt MC Mrs Churney Clark Charles A Col QMC

RESID ENCE A DD RESS, 56 Fort McKinley

CRA

R拢S TEL NO MeK

DA TE ARVD IN DE P T

219

PS

58-A Fort McKinley MoK 230 Oct 31, 1935 40 Cuartel de Espana FS 184-R2 Ju ly 15, 1936 1140 Gral Luna Manila 7 l)1il P laza Manila

FS

159 J an 26, 1935

FS

178 Mar 19, 1935

7 Mil Plaza Manila Camp John Hay

FS

178 June 28, 1935 Feb 25, 1937

1144 Gral Luna Manila

FS

166 July 1 5, 1936

Mrs ClarK

Nl'

FS

FS

SB SB

MeK

30

13 1

214 48

Miss Marian Mi,s Ethel Clark Charles A Jr 1st Lt AC Clarl.;: Ha lTV' A Maj !\'Il'S Clark Mis'> Barbara U

Me

Clarke Vlilliam Maj FA ADC Mrs Clarke Miss Genedick Cleary William D Chap Maj USA Cleaves l-rathan H Mr Sgot Inf Coates Edward A Jr Lt Col MC

Mrs Coates ML<)s Edna COlrhlan Anne 2<1 Lt ANC 5

326

FS

114

~IeK

1-11

Coleman Wilson D 2d Lt Inf Mrs Martha D ,V Coleman Collins Thomas K Lt Col PS (I nf) Mrs Co1Iin s Collison Cora E 2rl Tt ANC Colwell Jav K Maj Cay Mrs Colwel1 Compton Goodwin Col Sig C Mrs Compton Miss Edith Conway Mv'ron J Maj Inf Mrs Conway Mrs Louise Da.ughel'ty Cook Brainard S 1st Lt Cay Mrs Cook Cook Frederick W Maj CAC Mrs Cook Mrs Cornelia M Tennev Cook John D Maj PS (QMc") Mrs Cook Cooper Avery J Jr Lt CAC Mrs Cooper Cooper Eug'ene G 2d Lt MAC Mrs Cooner Corderman W Preston Capt Sig C Mrs Cordel,nan Coverda Ie Garrison B 1st T,t FA Cowan Gerard C 1st Lt Cay Mrs Ella M 'Watson Coykendall Horatio G Maj FD Cozart Clarence A 21 Lt CAe Mrs Cozart Cnlbill Edwin B Maj lnf :Mrs Crahill

I.,

Mel{

I'S

340

27

ADC Maj Gen Holbrook

Fort Mills Sta. Lucia Barracks 1115-A Gral Lun a Manila

J uly 15, 1936 FS: 220-R2 Oet 30, 1936 FS 162 July 15, 193.

FOTt Mills 3路B Fort Santiago

FS

78 Fort MeKinley

McK

Sternberg Gen Hosp Fort Stotsenbul'g

Cy

1114 Gral Luna Manila

FS

36 Fort McKinley

MeK

Oct 30, 1 936 52 Feb 13, 1936 246

PS

23338 June 28, 19:15 July 15, 1936 232 Oet 12 Feb 13,

Feb 13, 1936

Fort Stotsenburg

Jan

May

Fort Mills 718路A Georgia Man ila

Cy

50 Fort McKin ley

MeK

2, 1936

57543 Feb

g5, 1937

2 12 May

2, 1936

Feb 25, 1 9~7 Oet 30, 1936

FOTt Stotsenburg ForL Stotsenburg

Camp John Hay

26, 193\ PS

Fort Stotsenburg

A & N Club Manila Fort Mills

19~6

Cy

22095 Mal' 19, 19:!; Feb 25, 1937 Oct

31,

1 9'~:;


QFF TEL NO. Cy

67520

F'~

144

5B

McK

DEN

U. S. ARMY. PHIL. DEPT.

eRA

Craig John W Col Ret Mrs Craig

Cramer Myron C Lt Col JAGD Mrs Cramer Miss Emily D Crim Charles H Capt CAC Mrs Crim Crockett Clement W 2d Lt FA Mrs Crockett Croswell Henry B 1st Lt Cay ADC (ADC Brig Gen Humpl,rey) ,18 Cudlipp Ralph L Maj MC Mrs Cudlipp Miss Shirley Mr Ralph L Jr Culleton John R Capt FA Mrs Culleton Cunningham James H Col CAG Mrs Cunningham 170 Curren Edward J J1' Capt In! Ml'S

Curren

RES TEL NO.

RESIDENCE ADDRESS

NAME, RANK AND ARM QR SERVICE

15 San Luis Pasay

Cy

1121 Gral Luna Manila FS

745

DATE ARVD IN DEPT

51502

Retired

29 Jan

26, 1935

Fort Mills

Feb

25, 1937

Fort Stotsenburg

Feb

25, 1937

Fort Stotsenburg

May

2, 1936

157 May

2, 1936

1120

Gl~l

Luna M.anila FS

Fort Stotsenburg

Qct 31, 19R;;

For" Mills

Qct

30, 1936

11 Oct

31, 1935

Mar

19, 1935

37 F01't McKinley

McK

D

SB

NF

Daine Henry W Capt Ma. Mrs Daine Dalao Esteban B Lt Col PSCAC Mrs Dalao Dalao Nkholas B 1st Lt Ret Mrs Dalao Ml' Diomedes Daly John B 1st Lt FA Ml's Daly 42 Dansereau Joseph H T Sgt QMC Mrs Dansereau Davidson James R Capt Inf Mrs Davidson 3 Davies Isaiah Maj (Capt) AC Mrs Davies Miss Zella

FS

70

FS

208

FS

106

FS 64 &12

Davis Ada 2d Lt ANC Davis Thomas J Capt AGD ADC (ADC Maj Gen MacArthur) Daye John F L t Col PS (QMC) Mrs Daye Mr John F Jr Mr Arthur N, Hill Dedicke Alfred E Maj Inf Mrs Dedicke Deichelmann Mal~the\V K lstLtCAC Mrs Deichelmann Dekker Lorentus C Tech Sgt CE Mrs Dekker Dencker Walter L Capt PS (QMC) Mrs Deneker Denicoly' Lou is A \\'0 USA Mrs Denicoly

FS

71

Dennis Edward W \VO USA Mrs Denni s

Pelttit Barracks

Fort Mills

PS

Binalbagan Oc N'cgl'os

Retired

Fort Stotsenburg

Oct '31, 1935

18-R Cuartel de Espaiia FS

48-R1 Qct

31, 1935

Tientsin China

July 26, 1936

7 Bayside Court Parafiaque Rizal

Qct

2, 1934

Sternberg Gen Hosp Temp duty in US

Cy

23338 Feb 13 , 1936 Oct 26, 1935

337 Perez Paco

Cy

54511

522 Mabini

Cy

57418 Qct 31, 1935

Fort Mills

PS

June 28, 1935

18-S Cuartel de Espaiia FS 201-R1 Qct

30, 1936

18 Fresno Rd P.asay

PS

Cy

Tients in Ch ina 41 Cuartel de Espa na FS

51987

March 8, 1937 189 June 17 , 1934


746

DEN

OFF TEL NO

McK

1

MeK

4

EAS

CORNEJO'S COr.1lwlONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

NAME, RANK AND ARM OR SERVICE

RES TEL NO

RESIDENCE ADDRESS

DATE ARV IN DEPT

Denson Maude 2d lit ANC Fort Mills Oc;t 30, 1936 23338 Mar 19, 1935 Deveney Elizabeth M 2d Lt ANC Stern berg Gen Hosp Cy De Vine Charles N \VO USA 372 Feb 25, 1937 143-13 FOl路t McKinley McK Dewey Lawrence R Capt Cay ADC Fort StotsenbuTg May 2, 1936 (ADO Brig Gen Humphrey) Mrs Dewey DeWitt John L Maj Gen USA 42 Fort McKinley McK 6 June 28, 1935 Mrs DeWitt Dildi ne Seth C Maj VC Tientsin China March 8, 1!)37 Mrs Dildine

Doddridge Philip Capt Inf Mrs Doddridge

55 F<>rt McKinl ey

McK

218 July 15 , 1936

Miss Winfl'erl

9B

NF

FS FS

SB

FS

FS

Miss Phy]1i. Drdson Richard S Lt CuI CA C ~f)'s Dodson Doherty John H. Capt FD Mrs Doherty 8 Dombrowsky Albert J Capt Inf Mrs Drombrowsky Donnellv Harold C 1st Lt CAC Mrs Donn elly 20 DOllovan Stanley J 2d Lt AC Doran Arthur F Maj FA Doty Ralph E 1st Lt Inf Mrs Doty Dougherty Jo seph R Capt In! Mrs Dougherty 84 Dowell Cassius M Col IGD Mrs Dowell 212 Doyle James D St Sgt QMC Mrs Doyle Dreisbach Albert R Capt MC Mrs Dreisbach 53 Driscoll Charles L 1st Lt MAC Mrs Driscoll Due William F 1st Lt In! Mrs Due Miss Sarita N Rodriguez Duffy John E Chap (Capt) USA Mi ss Doroth y H Vogel Dulay Pedro D Lt Col Ret Mrs Dulay Mr Pedro Jr Dunn Charles G 1st Lt CAC Mrs Dunn Mrs Ruth G Dunn Dunn Wayne J 1st Lt Cav Mrs Dunn Dusenbury Carlisle S Cap In! Mrs Dusenbury 172 Dyer Charles W Lt Col Inf Mrs Dyer Miss Ruth C

Fort S'botsellburg

11 36 Gral Luna Manil. FS Fort Mills

Cy

F ort Stotsenburg Camp John Ha y

Camp John Hay 5 Mil Plaza Manila

25, 1937

May

2, 193.

177 July 15, 1936 Oct 30, 1936

(ADO Brig Gen Bisshop) .117 ParnflRClue Rd. Bacial'an

Feb

51465 Oct 30 , 1936 Oct 31, 1935 Oct 31, 1935 Oct

31, 1935

FS

161 Feb 13 , 1936

18-1 Cuartel de Espana F S

239-Rl July 15, 1936

Fort St<>路t sen burg 1136-D Dakota Manila Cy

Oct

31, 1935

56646 Jan

26 , 1935

Camp John Hay

July 15, 193r,

Fort Stotsenburg

June 17 , 1934

Poro, San Fernando La Union

Retired

Fort Mills

June 28, 1935

Fort (ltotsen burg

Feb 13, 1936

TieTlltsin China

Mar 28, 1935

5 Corlabitarte Manila Cy

57166 Oct

30, 193r.

E 94

Easterling Albel"t H WO USA Mrs Easterling Miss Kathleen Miss Virginia

2699 Taft E xt Pasa),

Oct 30, 1936


U. S. ARMY, PHIL. DEPT.

EDE OFF TEL No

ADDRESS RESIDENCE

NAME, RANK AND ARM OR SERVICE

747

FIR

RES TEL NO

DATE ARVD

M'iss Jeanne

McK

71

FS FS

229 231

FS

2

McK

53

FS

35

NF

12

McK

FS

43x

229

Edens Jean Capt In£ Mrs Edens Edmands Howard J Capt PS (In£) Mrs Edmands Edward David L 2d Lt Inf Edwards William McK Tech SgtOD Mrs Edwards Eisenhower Dwight D Lt Col Inf Mrs Eisenhower Elliott Walter A Capt Inf Mrs Elliott Miss Mary K Elmore John A Capt Inf Mrs Elmore E lsner Bertha 2d Lt ANC Embery Mabel 2d Lt ANC English Pa.u l X Lt Col CWS Mrs English Ensrud Joseph 0 Chap(Capt)US·A Mrs Ensrud Miss Marie R Evans Sylvia M 2d Lt ANC Evans Thomas B 1st Lt Inf Mrs Evans Everett Warren S 2d Lt lnf Mrs Everett Ew ing Charles B 1st Lt Inf Mrs Ew ing

84 Fort McKinley

McK

286 Jan 26, 1935

Pettit Barracks

PS

A & N Club Manila Cy 22095 Feb 25, 1937 18-'£ Cuartel de Espaiia FS 201-R2 Oct 12, 1932 Manila Hotel Manila

Cy

13 FOl1t McKinley

McK

22022 Oct

267 July 15, 1936

Tien'tsin China

Feb 26, 1936

Camp John Hay Fort Stotsenburg 1116 Gral Luna Manila FS 90 F B Harris<>n Baclaran

26, 1935

Cy

Fort Mills 85-A Fort McKinley McK

Mar 19, 1905 Feb 13, 1936 160 Feb 13, 1936 51674 July 15, 1936 Feb 25, 1037 28 4 July 15, 1936

Tientsin China

Feb 26, 1936

100 P Burgos Manila FS

191 June 28, 193.,

F McK

McK

SB McK NF

79

144

!i3

301)

11

Faine Syril E Capt Inf Mrs Faine Fairless John K WO USA Mrs Fairless Falisi J Vincent Maj Me Mrs Falisi Miss Francetta Miss Laurita M Farley Wirt P St Sgt MD Mrs Farley Farner Harry J Maj Inf Mrs Farner Miss .June Fatol" Lilburn D 1st Lt AC Mrs Fatal' Mrs Gl'ace A Beebe Featherstone Fred D \VA Ret Mrs Featherstone Mr David F Febiger Paul C Capt Cay Fellers Bonner F Capt CAC Mrs Fellers Finn Russell T Capt FA Mrs Finn Firehock RaYllnond B 2d Ut FA Mrs Firehock

34 Fort McKinley

McK

14 Oct 30, 1936

Camp John Hay

Dec

66-Dn Fort McKinley McK

18-H Cuartel de Espana 18 Fort McKinley

FS McK

235 Oct 31, 1935

48-R2 June 28, 1935 274 June 28, 1935

6 Robinson Court Baclaran 65 7th St Pasay Rizal

1, 1934

June 17, 1934 Cy

51290

Retired

Fort Stotsen burg Temp duty· in US

May 2, 1936 Oct 31, 193.';

Fo,t Stotsenburg

Oct 31, 1935

Fort Sto.tsenbul'g

Feb 13, 1936


748

FI R

OF F T EL NO

FS

NF

16

28

McK

73

SB

38

McK

369

~1cK

172

McK

58

NF

32

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIREC'!'ORY OF THE P HI LIPP INES

CHO

NAME, RANK AN D A RM OR SERVICE

DATE AR IN DEPl

Fi restone James J Maj QMC Mrs F irestone Mrs Sarah McDermott Fisher Hanison H Maj Me Mrs Fisher Fitch Bu rdette M Ca.pt FA Mrs }l'itch Fitts Francis M Maj Me Mrs Fibts Fletcher Joseph F WO Ret Mrs Fletcher Flock Juliu s T 1st Lt AC M,-s Flock Foltz Christian G Maj CAG Mrs Foltz Foreman Allen H 2d Lt Inf Mrs Foremar. Franklin Danie l Maj Me MJ's Franklin Frear Seth H Lt Col PS (Sig C) Mrs Frear Mr Seth Mrs N B Rathgeber F"-edendall Lloyd R Col Ini Mrs Fredendall Fredendall Lloyd R Jr 1st Lt I nI Mrs Fredendall Freeman Nora G 2d Lt ANC French Edwin R 1st Lt AC Mrs French Fren ch FatTest J Cap, CAC Mrs French Fl'ink James L Jl' 2d Lt FA

RE SIDENCE ADDRE SS

RES TEL NO

For't Mills

Oct 30, 19

Fo r t !!I ills

Jun e 17 , 1

Fort Sbotsenbu rg

Oct 31, 19

8 Mill Plaza Ma nil a

FS

10 H Lozada Manila

Cy

142 Oct 684 76

30, 19 Retired

M ar 19, 19

6 De Los Reyes Coud; Baclaran Fort Mills

Oct

31, 1

26-A Fort McKinley

McK

1140 Dakota Manila

Cy

87 Fort McKinley

McK

281

20 Fort McKinley

McK

277 May

7-A F ort McKin ley

McK

260 Oct 30, 1

Sternberg Gen H asp Cy 2 Robinson Court Baclaran Fort Mills

28 F eb 13, 19 5770 9 May

2, 1 PS

2, 1

23338 Jun e 28 , 1 ~ Jun e 28, 19 May

Fort Stotsenb ul'g

F eb

2, 19 25 , 1

G FS

225

Gaillard Fred E Capt I ni Mes Gaillard Gaither Ridgely Jr Capt Ini Mrs Gaither Miss Louise Bassford Gantt Henry P Maj FA Mrs Gantt FS 224 Garbett Joseph E Tech Sgt Ini Mrs Garbett Cy 49160 Garcia Raiael L ~1aj PS (QMC) Mrs Garc ia Garfinkel Abraham Lt Col PS (I ni) McK ~ Mrs Garfinkel Miss Nina McK 82-R-2 Gavin James M 1st Lt In 拢 Mrs Gav in Gerfen Roye P Maj Cav Mrs Gerfen Getz Austin Capt VC Ml路S Getz FS 121, 128 Ghormley Wil liam Kist Lt QMC & 130 Mrs Ghormley

Robinson Co urt Real St., Parafiaque Tientsin Chin a

Cy

51977 May

2, 19

July

7, 19

F o:rt &totsen burg

F eb 13, 1

18-D Cuartel de Espana Wilso n & Arras Sts., San Ju an H eights 59 F ort McKin ley

FS 24 6-R2 Mar 68 644 Cy 51211 Cy 228 McK

76-3 F ort McKinl ey

McK

4, 1 PS PS

17 8 Oct

30, 19

F o'r t Stotsen bu rg

May

2, 1

Fort Stotsenburg

F eb

25, 1

125 -E Dakota Court Manila

F eb

25, 19.


OFF

TEL

NO

McK

77

FS

225

FS

72

FS

217

FS

102

HAN

tr. S. ARMY, PHIL. DEPT.

GIB-

NAME,RANK AND ARM OR SERVICE Gibbons Lloyd H Capt Inf Mrs Gibbons Gibson Richmond T Lt CAe Mrs Gibson G iifin Sidney Fist Lt CAC Mrs Giffin Gillette Chauncey A Capt CAC Mrs Gillette Gilman S'eymour I 2d Lt CAC Gilmer Dan 1st Lt Inf Mrs Gilm er Glori od John A 2'd Lt FA Goe William E Maj QMC Mrs GDe

Goodiel Ca.rltcm D Capt MC Mrs Goodiel Goodrich John D Maj QMC

RESIDENCE ADDRESS 48 Fort McKinley

RES TEL NO McK

McK

23

70

Goodrum Jack T WO USA Gooier Max H Capt Inf Mrs Gooier Graban Benjamin H Capt Cay Mrs Graban Grant Melville F Capt Inf

McK

189

McK

49

McK

56

McK

47

Mrs Green Gretser George R 1st Lt Inf Mrs Gre:tser

Griffin William E Capt CAC Griffith Jack H 1st Lt Inf Ml's Griffith Grimes Alston 1st Lt 1nf Mrs Grimes Grunert George Brig Gen USA Mrs Grune~t Miss Mary C Guevara Santiago G Capt PS (1nf) Mrs Guevara

210 Oct

30, 1936

July 15, 1936

Fort Mills

P eb 13, 193 6

Fort Mills

Dec

Fort Mills 337-B Gral Luna

1, 19 34

Mar 19, 19 35 FS 183-R2 Oct 31, 1935

Manila

Fort Stotsenburg 2 Pal m Court Pa say Rizal Robinson Court R3a1 Paranaqu e 550 Taft Manila

Feb 13, 1936 Feb 25, 1937 Cy

51069 May

Cy

56112 Feb

25, 1937

12 Nebraska ETmita Pettit Barracks

Cy

56271 Dec

1, 1934

Fort Stotsenburg

35 Fort McKinley

2, In G

June路 28, 1935 Mal' 19, 19 35

McK

Ml"s Grant

Grayeb George A Capt FA Mrs Grayeb Green Ray H Capt QMC

DATE ARVD IN DEPT

Fort Mills

Mrs Goodrich

FS

74~

13 Oct 30, 1936

Fort Stotsenbul'g

Feb 13, 1936

Fort Stotsenburg

J.une 28, 19 35

21-A Fort McK in ley Fo r ~

McK

37 Oat 30, 19 36

McK

Jun e 28. 1935 256 July 15, 19 36

Mills

4 Fort McKinl ey

July 15, 1936

Pettit Barracks

28 Fort McK inley

McK

20

Oct 30, 1936

9 Fort McKinl ey

McK

262

PS

H

FS lIcK !lcK

McK

Hackett Robert 1st Lt FA Mrs Hackett Hale HarrY' R 2d Lt CAC Mrs Hale 209 Hamilton Charles S Col Inf Mrs HamH ~ on 69 Hamilton Paul Capt Inf Mrs Hamilton 143 Hamilton Walter F Maj Me Mrs Ha.milton Hampson John C 1st Lt DC 72

Mrs Hampson Haneke William C 2d Lt Inf Mrs Haneke

Fort Stotsenbu rg

Oct

3 1, 1935

Fort Mills

Feb

25, 1937

1146 Gral Luna! Manila PS

163 F e b 13, 1936

51 Fort McKinley'

McK

213 Feb

40 F01,t McKinley

McK

2, 1936

July 15, 19 36

FOlrt Mill s

25- A F ort Mckinley

8 May

25, 1937

McK

30 F eb

25, 1937


1S()

HAN OF~

TEL

NO

lIfcK

91

SB

7

SB

31

FS

225

FS

27

FS

235

NF

30

FS

174

FS

4x

FS

86

SB

10

McK

172

McK

69

FS

61

FS

131

FS

69

FS

46

MeR

101

CORNEJO' S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

NAME, RANK AND ARM OR SERVICE Hanmer Stephen R 1st Lt CE Mrs Hanm er Hanna Charles W Capt Inf Mrs Hann a Hardy Robert M 2d Lt CAC Mrs Hardy Harlow Guy W 2d Lt MAC Mrs Harlow Harper Lester W T Sgt Inf Mrs Harper Harries Herbert L Lt Col Ret Mrs Hanies Harris Emmet R Col FD Mrs Harris Miss Kay Harris Herbert H Capt Inf Mrs Harris Rarris Hunter Jr 1st Lt AC

RESIDENCE ADDRESS 162-A-2 ",ort McKinley 390 Taft Ave Pasay

HIL

- RES TEL NO McK Cy

DATE ARV IN DEPT

98 Oct 30, 193 51284 Oct

30, 193

Fort Mills

Oct 30, 193

714-B Georgia Manila

Oct

18-D CUaltel de FS Espana 300 Dewey Blvd Cy Manila 10 Mil Plaza Manila FS

31, 193

24G-R2 July 15, 193 57419

Retired

65 July 15, 193

1133 Gral Luna FS 161 Manila 117 Paraiiaque Rd Ba- Cy 51465 clal'an Harris Willie P 2nd Lt ANC Tientsin China Harrison Robert G Mr Sg.t DEML 19-B Cuartel de FS 247-R2 Mrs Harrison Espana Harrison &aanuel C Maj Inf 1312 Gral Luna Cy 56576 Mrs Harrison Havey Sylvester F WO USA 123-G Fort McKinley McR 392 Mrs Havey Mr Sylvester F J1' H awes Benj amin W 2d Lt Inf A & N Club Manila Cy 22095 Head Hal C Chap (M aj) USA Fort Stotsenberg Mr Robert M Head Harold Maj Inf 23 Fort McKinley McK 35 Mrs Head Mr Harold S Heintges John A 2d Lt Inf 15-A Fort Mckinley McK 270 Mrs Heintges Hemenway Frederic V Lt Col AGD Fort Mills Mrs Hemenway Herbert William D Lt Col MC Fort Mills Mrs Herbert Herlong Henry WIst Lt FA Fort Stotsenburg Mrs Herlong Her()n Gordon J F Maj Cay Fort Stotsenburg Mrs Heron Mrs Carrie J Heron Hershberger Frank C Maj VC Fort Mills Hester Thomas G Capt MAC 1125-B Dakota Manila Cy 56486 Mrs H ester Hewitt Leland H Capt CE 3-F Fort Santiago FS 20 Mrs Hewitt Heyne Daniel H 2d Lt FA Fort Stotsenburg Mrs Heyne H eywood Frank A Maj QMC 552 Taft Ave Manila Cy 57724 Mrs Heywoo d Hi'dreth Rayinond C Capt Sig CApt 40 309 Isaac Pera] Cy 56883 Mrs Hildreth Manila Hill Charl es W 2d Lt CAC Fort Mills Mra Hill Hill James R Lt Col QMC 44 Fort McKinley McK 206 Mrs Hill Miss Aileen C

June 17, 193 Feb

25, 1937

Mal' 8, 1937 June 28, 193 Oct 31, 193

July 15, 193 Feb 13, 1936 F eb 25, 1937 Oct

31, 1935

F eb

25, 1937

July 15, 1936 Jun e 28, 1935 July 15, 1936 Oct

2, 1984

Mal' 19, 1935 July 15, 1936 Feb

25, 1937

Feb

25, 1937

June 28, 1935 June 28, 1935 Oct 30, 1936 June 28, 1936


U. S. ARMY. PHIL. DEPT.

HIL

NAME, RANK AND ARM OR SERVICE

OFF TEL NO

9

SB McK

160

1rlcK

85 36

Miss Barbara Ml' James Hillyard Hany L 2d Lt Inf Mrs Hillyard Hodges Courtney H Lt Col GSC Mrs Hodges Hoehl Francis R 1st Lt CE Hoff Ezra S Sgt AC

RESIDENCE ADDRESS

JEN

RElS TEL NO

31 Fort Santiago

FS

46 Fort McKinley

McK

751

DATE ARVD IN DEPT

53 Feb

25, 1937

208 May

2, 1936

27-A-5 Fort Mckinley McK Ran 1 Bldg 3 Ft FS Santiago 41 Fort McKinley McK

382 Feb 25, 1937 223 Mar 19, 1935

FS 104

118 Feb 13, 1936

FS

& Holbrook hank C Capt FA ADC 2 Mil Plaza Manila FS (ADC Maj Gen Holbrook) 155 Mrs Holbrook 104 & Holbrook Lucius R Maj Gen USA 1 Mil Plaza Manila FS 155 Mrs Holbro'ok Fort Stotsenburg Holden Anna S 2d Lt ANC 394X Hollister Paul A Capt PS (Inf) 49 Fort McKinley McK Mrs Hollister Fort Stotsenburg H<>lmes Claude D Maj MC Mrs Holmes Mr Claude Jr. 228 Holmes Don N Maj Inf 1357-A Gral Luna Cy Mrs Holmes Manila 22 Holmes EImer C M Sgt Sig C 24 Cuartel de Espana FS Mrs Holmes Hood John H Lt Col CAC Fo路r t Mills Mrs Hood 53 Hopkins Richard C 2d Lt Inf 58-A Fort McKinley McK Horsfall George .Capt MC Fort Stotsenbul'g Mrs Horsfall 320 Howard Willis T Chap (Maj) USA 24 Fort McKinley McK Mrs Howard 44 Howze Charles N 1st Lt Inf I-Up Fort McKinley MeK Mrs Howze Hubbell Richard L Maj OD Fort Mills Mrs Hubbell 3 Huff Sidney L Lt USN-Ret Dewey Arms Apt Cy Dewey Blvd Manila 31 Huglin Harold Q 1st Lt AC 5 De Los Reyes Mrs Huglin Court Baclaran 3 Huitt Evert L Sgt Inf 15-A . Old Med Supply SB Mrs Huitt Depo!t Manila Humphrey Evan H Brig Gen USA Forte Stotsenburg Mrs Humphrey Miss Jane 111 Hunsbe.r ger Ray S 1st Lt VC 27-A-4 Fort McKinley McK 165 Hutchins Canol! R Capt QMC Apt S Patio de Pasay Cy Mrs Hutchins P~ay Miss Dorothy Davis 3 Hutter Howard J Maj MC Manila Hotel Manila Cy Mrs Hutter

168 Feb 13, 1936

FS M,K

158

Hoge 路William M Maj CE Mrs Rage

McK

FS FS McK McK McK

FS NF SB

McK

FS FS

7 June 28, 1935

211

Oct 31, 1935 PS Oct 30, 1936

54907 June 28, 1935 213

Mar 19, 1935 Oct 30, 1936

230 May Dec

2, 1936 1, 1934

33 Feb 13, 1936 253

Oct 31, 1935 Oct 31, 1935 Ret拢Ted

56397

June 28, 1935 63 Oct

1, 1931

May

2, 1936

381 Feb 13, 1936 51325 June 28, 1935 22022 Oct 26, 1935

I Ingram Louis L 2d Lt CAC Mrs Ingram FS

75

Jacks George R Si Sgt QEML Jensen Naomi J 2d Lt ANC

Fort Mills

Feb

25, 1937

190-R1 Feb

25, 1937

J 18-Q Cuartel de FS Espana Ste.rnberg Gen Hosp Cy

23338 Feb 13, 1936


752

JOH

OFF TEL NO

KEY

CORNEJO'S CO?lIMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF TilE PHTLLPPINES

NAME, RANK AND ARM OR SERVICE

Johnson Howard R Capt In!

RESIDENCE ADDRESS

RES TEL NO

Tien tsin China

DATE ARVD IN DEPT

Oct

11, 1934

Mrs Jo()hnson

McK

164 Johnson Lee WO USA

123-H Fort McKinley McK

393 Oct 15, 1932

Mrs J<>hnson

SB

3

Miss Lela M Johnson Robal A Capt Inf

Joiner Talley D Maj Inf Mrs Joiner 317 Jones Floyd D Maj QMC McK Mrs Jones 78 Jones Henry C Capt Inf MeR Mrs Jones Jones Marcus E Capt Cay Mrs Jones NF 17&73 Jones Morton MeD Capt Cay Mrs Jones Ml' Morton MeD Jr Mr Thomas W 221 Jones Samuel E 1st Lt In f FS Mrs Jones Jones Thomas R 2d Lt MAC Mrs Jones SB

1357-B Gral Luna

Mrs J.ohnson

2

Cy

5485B June 28, 193"

Manila Cy

54635 Jan 26, 1935

Manila

1136-A

Dak,,~

65 Fort McKinley

McK

233 Feb .13, 1936

33 Fort McKinley McK ADC Brig Gen Grune 27 Fort Mckin ley McK

15 June路 28, 1935

62 Fort McKinley

McK

4-D Fort Santiago

FS

Fort Mills

25 June 17, 1934

226 Oct

2, 1e3

55 Dec

1, 1934

Oct 30, 1936

K 35 SB

9

FS

108

MeK

141

McK

4

MeK

45

NF

28

FS

238

Kaiser John MI' Sgt CWS Mrs Kaiser

18-E Cuartel de Espana

FS

39-Rl July 15, 1936

Kane John H Capt Inf 1\11'5 Kane

337-A Gral Luna Manila

FS

183-R] June 28, 1935

Katafiasz Louis J S Sir' MD

Rm 5 Bldg 3 Pt Santiago Sternberg Gen Hosp Fort Mills

FS

Kawalle Ottilie 2d Lt ANC Keeler George E Jr 1st Lt CAC Mrs Keeler Keelty Frank J Maj FD Mrs Keelty Kelley Reginald H Col Inf Kemble Franklin Lt Col CAC Kemble Franklin Jr 2d Lt CAC Mrs Kemble Kendall Paul W Capt Inf Mrs Kendall Kengla Leo F Jr Capt Inf Mrs Kengla Kenny Eugene A 1st Lk Tn! - Mrs Kenny Kenny John P 1st Lt AC Kernan Harold Maj (FA) QMC Key Robert 1st Sgt Inf

140 June 15,

Cy

23338 Oct 3 1, 193: Feb 25, 1937

Tientsin China 73 F01路t McKinley Fort Mills

July 26, 193 Mcl(

Fort Mi11s

Tientsin China 19 Fort McKinley

193 ~

242 Oct 31, 193路 June 28, HJ3 June 28, 1935 Nov 11, 193

McK

275 June 28, 1935

149-Up Fort McKinley McK

348 MOl' 13, 1935

117 Paranaque Road Baclaran Fort Mills 18-F Cuartel de Espana

Cy

51465 Mar 19, 193 Feb

FS

25, 1937

248-RJ Oct 30, 19:1


U. S. ARMY, PHIL. DE!P1',

KIM OFF TEL NO SB

26

FS

45

NF

47

FS

224

SB

60

McK NF

66 40

McK

FS

158

33

SB FS FS

6

La Bonte Michael JIst Sgt Inf Mrs La Bonte Lake John P Maj Inf Mrs Lake Land Rutush L Capt Cav Mrs Land 20 Landy Rae D 1st Lt ANC 10 Lang Walter P Tech Sgt FD 227

FS95 &120 Cy 57704 FS 1

753

RES DATE ARVD TEL NO IN DEPT

himbrough James C Maj MC 1161 M, H, del Pilar Cy 56246 Ml'S Kimbrough Manila Kimmett Pie.rce ,F WO USA 509 Dakota Manila Cy 56281 Mrs Kimmett Fort Mills Kinberger Albert G Maj MC Mrs Kinberger 7 De Los Reyes COUl~t Kirby John WIst Lt AC Baclaran Mrs Kirby 21 Cuartel d'e Espana FS 186-R2 Kislow Edward E WO USA Kleinman Edward A CaPlt CAC Fort Mills Mrs Kleinman 1388 Leveriza Manila Knowlton ' Arthur H WO Ret Miss Emma Mr Sidney Koch Joseph R Chap (Capt) USA 406 Pe.rdigon Manila Cy 55023 Koch Theodore H Lt Col Ret 22 Salazar S J del Mrs K()ch Monte Kohls Carl WIst Lt Inf 27-A-2 Fort McKinley McK 379 Kozlowski Karol B Maj PS QMC 8 Nichols Field NF 50 Mrs Kozlowski Kramer Floyd Col MC Fort Stotsenburg Mrs Kramer Miss Charlotte Miss Elizabeth Krueger Orrin C. 1st Lt Inf Tientsin China Mrs Krueger Krueger Robert H Capt CAC Fort Mills Mrs Krueger Kumpe Ge'o rge 1st Lt CE 27-A-6 Fort McKinley Mc K 383 Kunz Bradford W Capt QMC Fort Mills Mrs Kunz Kushner Gersen L 2d Lt CAC Fort Mills Mrs Sarah Kushner Kutz HatTy R Lt Col OD 3 P Ord Depot, FS 87

â&#x20AC;˘ SB

RESIDENCE ADDRESS

NAME, RANK AND ARM OR SERVICE

LEE

Feb

25, 1937

July 15, 1936 Feb

25, 1937

Mar 19, 1935 Oct 4, 1921 Oct 30, 1936 Retired Jan 26, 1935 Retired Mar 19, 1935 PS Oct 31, 1935

Nov 11, 1936 July 15, 1936 Oct 31, 1935 Feb 25, 1937 Feb 13, 1936 Oct 31, 1935

L 15-C Old Med Sup Depot Man ila Tientsin China

July 26, 1936

Fort Stotsenburg

Feb

Stenberg Gen Hosp Rm 6 Bldg 3 Ft Santiago Lantz Charles H Lt Col PS (Inf) 924 Wright Manila Mrs Lantz Larson Leander Capt QMC Apt-A-20 Blvd Apts Mrs Larson Dewey Blvd Manila Lauderdale Alfred F Tech Sgt 1020 Florida Manila DEML Mrs Lauderdale Layman Walter G Maj Inf Tientsin China Mrs Layman Lee William F Maj lnf Tientsin China Mrs Lee

Feb 13, 1936

Cy FS

25, 1937

23338 Oct 30, 1936 140 June 15, 1932

Cy

54234

PS

Cy

56108 May

2, 1936

Cy

54528 Oct 31, 1935 Nov 23, 1935 Nov 23, 1935


754

LEE

OFF TEL NO Cy

49572

FS

]07

SB

24

SR

36

McK 110 48943 Cy 61

RESIDENCE ADDRESS

NAME, RANK AND ARM OR SERVICE Lee William LIst Lt AC Mrs Lee Legg Richard A 2d Lt AC Mrs Legg Lermo nd George W 1st Lt Ini Mi's Lenuond Letherm oll Robel t H WO USA Mrs Lethel'lTIon Miss Ruth Miss Haze l Le uschn er AlUl1in W Ca.pt Me Mrs Leuschner Lewis Oharles W Lt Col DC Mrs Lewis Lifsey Charlie Q Capt (Inf) QMC Lim Vicente Lt Col Ret Mrs Lim

MeK

MAC

CORN EJO'S COMMONWEAL'l' H DIRECTORY O li' THE PH ILI PPJNES

Lindley Fra nk B Capt Inf Mrs Lindley

4 Reyes Court Baclaran Fort Stotsenburg

RES TEL NO Cy

DATE ARVD IN DEPT

51192 Mar 19, 1935 Feb 13, 1936

Tientsin China

Nov 11, 1936

124-Dn FOlt McKinley McK

330 Feb 13, 1936

1125 -A Dakoloa Manila Cy

54 108 ' JUIce 28, 1935

Apt-E Patio de Pasay Pasay' 27-A-1 Fort McKin ley 168 Vito C"UZ Manila 1-D Fort McK inley

51660 Feb

Cy

25, 1937

McK 378 Jun e 28, 1935 Cy 56522 Retired MeK

252 June 28, 1935

Miss Mary M

FS

SR

SB

Lindsey Julian B 1st Lt Inf 1\11'S Lindsey Livesay Harvey R Maj Me Mrs Livesay 127 Lockett Landon J Capt lnf ADC Mrs Lockett Miss Virginia 6 Long William D Capt Inf Mrs Long Loome Jame s T Capt FA Mrs Loarne 49 Loosley H orace S St Sgt MD 50

Louden Russell R CaPio Inf Mrs Louden FS 83-R2 Lovett Ralph B Maj AGD Mrs Lovett 44 Lovless Jay B Capt Inf McK M.rs Lovless M.rs Aura Orr Lowe Robert G 1st Lt Cay Mrs Lowe MeK 43X Lowery William B Maj Ini M.rs Lowery 37 Lowry Robert H Jr Maj MC SB Mrs Lowry Ly nch George A Col Inf .Mrs Lynch Lynch George E 1st U: FA Mrs Lynch 23382 Lynch Thomas A Maj Ret Cy Mrs Lynch Miss Helen M 61 Lyo ns James T M S'gt MD FS Mrs Lyons

Mar 28, 1935

Tientsin China

A & N Club Manila

Cy

22095 Feb 13, 1936

4 Mil Plaza Manila

FS

126 F eb 13, 1936

(ADO

Maj

Gem

Holbrook)

5-B Fcnt Santiago

FS

79 Feb

Fort Stotsenburg

July 15, 1936

1G-B Old M,e d Supply SB Depot Manila 7 Fort McKinley McK 1122 Gra l Luna Manila 14 Fort McK inley

25, 1937

FS McK

17 May

2, 1936

259 J a n 26, 1935 57 July 15, 1936 268 Oct

31, 1935

â&#x20AC;˘ Fort Sto tsenburg

June 28, 1935

G Fort McKinl ey

MeK

Apt 1 690 Taft Manila Tientsin China

Cy

272 Jun e 28, 1935 57304 Mar 19, 1935

Fort Stotsenbul'g 919 Wright Manila i

18-C Cuartel de Espana

Cy

July

7, 1935

Oct

2, 1934

56375

Retired

F SI 192-R2 June 15, 193Z

M MacArthur Douglas Maj Gen USA Tempt duty in US (Mil Advise,r To Common- wealth of P I) Mrs McArthur

Oct

26, 1935


U. S. ARMY, PHIL. DEPT.

MAC

OFF TEL NO

NAME, RANK AND ARM OR SERVICE

MCK

RESIDENCE ADDRESS

RES TEL NO

l\Iacatee Edward V Capt inf 88 Fort McKinley Mrs Macatee 17 Nichols Field 41 Mace Harold LIst I<t AC NF Mrs Mace 60 Mackenzie Gabriel T Maj IGD 64 Foit McKinley McK Mrs Mackenzie 210 Magill W Fulton Jr Maj Inf 903-C Dimasalang FS Mrs Magill Parafiaque Manthey Erwin A Capt USA Ret A & N Club Manila Cy 21712 Manzano Narciso L Capt PS (CE) 3606-A Taft Ext Pasay Mrs Manzano 78 Maroun Autrey J 2d Lt Inf 143-2 Fort McKinley McK 54 Marshall Alfred C Jr 1st Lt Inf 27-A-3 Fort McKinley ~kK Marte lino Pa-,tor Capt PS (CAC) Phil Mil Academy Mrs Martelino Baguio MP Martin Emmor G Capt CAC Fort Mills

McK

66

Mrs Madin Martin Paul L Capt FA

McK NF

FS

FS NF

FS FS

&B

FS

Mrs

McCr~ry

McDonald Robert C Jr 2d Lt FA McDowall John Maj FA Mrs McDowall

FS NF

McK

FS

68 McGraw James E Capt (CAC) Sig C 20 McGuire George FIst Lt AC 175

237

DATE ARVD IN DEPT

280 Oct

31, 1935

56 JUly 15, 1936

Mcl(

232 Mar 19, 1935

Cy

51026 Oct 31, 1935

Cy Cy

22095 51106

McK M'c K

Retired PS

362 Feb 13, 1V36 380 J une 28, 1935 PS Oct

30, 1936

Fort Stotsenburg

May

Camp John Hay

Jan

26, 1935

185-R1 Oct

30, 1936

Mrs Martin

Martin Robert R Capt Inf Mrs Martin 211 Marvill Howard A Ml' Sgt Inf Mrs Marvill Masterson Edward M 1S1~ Lt Ret Matteson Richard LIst Lt CAC Mrs Matteson 221 Maxey John C 1st Sgt Inf Ml'S Max.ey 22 Maxwell Alfred R 1st Lt AC Mrs Maxwell Maxwell Charl"ll L Maj MC 211 McCaI1thy Thomas F Capt Inf Mrs McCarthy Miss Nathalie Kennedy 204 McClune Harold H Maj Inf Mrs McClune 1 McClure Richard A Maj Inf 144 McCormack Robert H WO USA Mrs McCormack McCrary Arthur A 1st Lt CAC

755

18-K Cuartel de Espana FS 932 A Mabini Manila Cy Fort Mills 19-A Cuartel de Espana FS

56150

2, 19:56

Retir"d Feb 13, 1936

247-R1 Feb 13, 1936

8 De Los Reyes Court Cy Baclaran

51865 Jan

Fort Stotsenbul'g 912 Wright Manila

Cy

JUly 15 19 36 54712 Oct 30, 1936

ll4 5 Gral Luna Manila FS

73 Mar 19, 1935

26, 1935

A & N Club Manila Cy 22095 Jun e 28, 19.30 123-D Fort Mckinley McK 389 Oct 30, 1936 FOllt Mills

June 28, 1935

Fort Stotsenburg Fort Stotsenburg

Feb 13, 1936 June 24, 19 35

816 Remedios Manila Cy

57796 Oc;t 30, 19 36

117 Paraiiaqque Rd

51465 Oct

Baclaran McIntosh Albert E Maj QMC 62-A F'ort McKinl ey McKay Neal H Capt QMC Fort Stotsenburg Mrs McKay McKee William FIst Lt CAC Foo"b Mills Mrs McKee MeKinney Marvin J Capt CAC Fort Mills Mrs McKinney Miss Mary F Tierney McKinney Ralph D 2d Lt Inf A & N Club Manila

Cy MoK

31, 1935

227 Mal' 19, 1935 Mal' 19, 1935 Oct 30, InS July 15, 1936

Cy

22095 Feb 13, 1936


'756

Mer.{

O:FF TEL NO FS

McK

FS FS FS

CORNEJO'S CoMMONWEALTH D1RECTO/!Y 01" THE PHILIPPINES

NAME, RANK AND ARM OR SERVICE

4-Phil Ord Depot McMahon Fred A Maj OD Mrs McMahon Miss Mary Jane McMahon McManus Howa rd F 2d Lt l11f 14-3 F ort McKinley 74 McMaster Willia.m R Capt Inf 76-4 Fort McKinley Mrs McMaster McRey nolds Samuel McF J1" 1st F ort Mills Lt CAC Mrs McReynolds Melberg Reinold Lt Col CAC Fort Mills Mrs Melberg Merkle Ernest A Capt CAC Fort Mills Mrs Merkle Messinger Edwin J ls~ Lt Inf Tien tsin China Mrs Messinger 76 Mickelsen Arthur E Capt Sig C 264 Fort McKinley Mrs Mickelsen 9 Middleton Troy H Lt Col (Inf) 1135 Gral Luna Manila IGD Mrs Middleton 222 Miller Eacott B Lt Col PS (Inf) 520 Figueroa Paco 23

Mrs Miller

Miller Irene L 2d Lt ANC Miller Lillian P 2d Lt ANC Milne Louis A Maj MC M.r s Milne

SB

FS FS

FS SB

RESIDENCE ADDRESS

36

Miss Margaret E Iv. iner Russel M 2d Lt CAe Mrs Miner Mitchell Edwin F WO USA Mrs Mitchell Mixon Elizabeth G 2d Lt ANC Mockbee James B Maj DC

Fort Mills Sternberg Gen Hosp F-ort Srtotsenburg

MOR

RES TEL NO FS M.K McK

DATE ARVD IN DEPT

89 Feb 13, 1930 363 Feb 25, 1937 179 Aug 26, 193 3 May

2, 193U

Oct

2,

19~ 4

Oct 30, 1930 Nov 11 , 1936 MeR

324 Oct

30, 1936

FS

146 Oct

30, 1936

Cy

55030

Cy

Mal' 19, 1936 23338 Feb 13, 1936 June 28, 1935

PS

FOl't Mills

Feb

25, 1937

N ichols Field

Dec

1, 1934

Stern berg Gen Ho sp Cy Apt M Patio de Pasay Cy

23338 Mar 19, 1936 51672 Feb 25, 1937

Mrs Mockbee Miss Patricia A Mollohan Cecil S Capt MC Tientsin China Mar< 8, 1937 Mrs Mollohan 2 Monette Maurice M S Sgt DEML 729-G-F B Harrison Oct 31, 1936 Pasay 131 Moody Lafayette WO USA 30 P Ol'd Depot FS 44 Jun e \17, 1934 Mrs Moody Moore Edward W 2d Lt CAC Fort Mills May 2, 1936 Mrs Moore Moores Zachery W Capt Cay Feb 13, 193 6 Fort Stotsenburg Mrs Moo~'es Moose Frank MeA Maj MC Tientsin China July 26, 1936 Mrs Moo se Morgan Maurice Maj CAC ~ort Mills Oct 2, 193j Mrs Morgan 245 Morgan Raymond WO USA 123-C FOl't McKinley McK 388 Feb 25, 1937 Mrs Morgan 49 Moriarty William J Sgt MD 19-B Old Med Supply SB 62-RI Mal' 2, 1933 Mrs Moriarty Depot Manila Marrow George L Maj Inf Tien tsin China Mal' 28, 1936 Mrs Morrow Morrow Moose D WO Ret 306 Calle Burgos Pasay Retired Morrow Samuel H Capt CAC Fort Mills May 2, 1936 Mrs Morrow M iss Ethel M Sullivan


MOS

OFF TEL NO

McR

48

U. S. ARMY, PHIL, DEPT.

NAME, RANK AND ARM OR SERVICE

RES TEL NO

RESIDENCE ADDRESS

Moseley Geol"ge V H J1' 1st Lt Inf Tiensin China Mrs Moseley Murphy John J Capt Inf 15 Fort McKinley Mrs Murphy Musselman Minerva 2d Lt ANC Sternberg Gen Hasp

757

OSW

DATE ARVD IN DEPT Nov 11, 1936

McK Cy

269 Oct 30, 1936 23338 Feb

25, 1937

N

FS 13&123 MoK

168

McK

133

SB

10

Negltotio Sidney H Maj lni Mrs Negrotw MTS Dorothy Nelson Charles 0 WO Ret Miss Gertrude M Miss Anna B Nevi1le Francis N Maj QMC Mrs Neville Miss Dorothy Nevin Stanley M Capt VC Mrs Neyin Nevins Arthur S Maj GSC Mrs Nevins Newgard Julius G Maj Me Mrs Newgord Mr Jul es G Newton George D Capt Me Mrs Newton Nicholson Arthur B Capt CAC Mrs Nicholson Nolen George Mist Sgt Inf Mrs Nolen Northrop Mary E 1st Lt ANC

Tientsin China 924 Indi ana Manila

Nov 23, 1935 Cy

55558

5 Palm Court Pasay Hizal

4-B F01-t Santiago

Rem-ed Feb

FS

25, 1937

180 Oct 31 , 19 35

78-B FlOl-t McKinley McK

297 Oct

52 Fort McKinley

214 June 28, 19 35

McK

30, 1936

Fort Stotsenbul'g

May

2, 1936

Fort Mills

May

2, 1936

8-D Cuartel de Espana S.B

15-Itl Feb 13, 1936

F01-t Mills

Feb

25, 1937

o FS

69

SB

10

McK FS

3 & 144

Cy

48404

FS

117

FS Cy

2 & 49164 143

Oakham Melville B WO USA Mrs Oakham O'Connor Richard E Capt FA O'Connor William W Capt Inf Mrs O'Oonnor O'Keefe Gorneliu,s F Maj Cay Mrs O'Keefe O'Keefe Desmond Maj JAGD Mrs O'Keefe Miss Jean Sullivan Olivares Jose E Capt PS (CAC) Mrs Olivares Oliver James B WO USA Mr Jam es W Mr Eugene E Olson Hard in L 1st Lt Inf Mrs Olson Ord James B Lt Col Inf Mrs Ord Mr James Jr Mi ss Letitia H Oswalt John R Maj MC Mrs Oswalt

620 M H del Pilar Manila Fort Stotsenburg 7 Robin son Court Baclaran Fort Stotsen burg

Cy

55056 June 28, 1935

Cy

Oct 31, 1935 61934 Jun e 27, 1935 June 28, 1935

85 Fort McKinley

McK

1164 p akota Manila

Cy

39 Cuartel de Espana FS Tientsin China

1335 Oregon Manila

Cy

74 F01-t McKinley

McK

285 Oct 30, 19 36 56061

PS

192-Rl Oct 31, 1935 Mar

8, 1937

57514 Oct

26, 1935

243 Jun e 17 , 1934


758

PAC

OFF TEL NO

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALT H DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPP INES

NAME, RANX AND ARM OR SERVICE

RESIDENCE ADDRESS

PRA

RES TEL NO

DATE ARVD IN DEPIl'

P

Cy

FS

49572

1& 2

FS 13 & 123

NF 20 & 6 NF

2

SB

53

MeK

SB Cy

307

25 56921

NF

]3

FS

228

NF

J\leK

28

64

Packard Gooding Lt Col CAC Fort Mills Mrs Packard Tientsin China Page Thomas N Capt Me Mrs Page Fort Mills Pamplin Douglass G Capt CAO Mrs Pampliu Sternberg Gen Hosp Cy Parham Charlotte P 2d Lt ANC 1] 9 Paraiiaque Rd Cy Parker Hugh A 1st Lt AC Baclaran Rizal Mrs Parker Fort Mills Parsons Marvel H Maj CAO Mrs Parsons Sternberg Gen Hosp Cy Patton Helen H 2d Lt ANC Fort Mills Pazdral Nuel Capt MC Mrs Pazdral Pease Roosevelt R M Sgt DEML Victoria Manila Fort Mills Peca Peter S 2d Lt CAC Fort Mills Perkins Clell B 2d Lt CAC Mrs Perkins Fort Mills Patry Dora A 2d Lt ANC 9 De los Reyes Court Phillips Jam es F Capt AC Baclaran Mrs Phillips 17 Nichols Field Pillet Frederick A 1st Lt AC NF Mrs Pillet P;nckney Frank A Mr Sgt MD 18-L Cuartel de Espana FS Mrs Pinckney 72 FOlt McKinley Pit路tle James J Maj Inf MeK Mrs Putle Fort S~tsenbul'g Pitts Frederick R Capt Cay Mrs Pitts Fort Mills Pit z Otto G Lt Col CAC Mrs Pitz Mrs Ruth Pitz Warren Plew Ralph V Capt MC 525-B Pennsylvan ia Cy Manila 2841 Taft Manila Cy P obl ete Ricardo Capt PS (Inf) Mrs Poblete Mi ss Trinidad Papa Pohl Marion GIst Lt CAC Fort Mills Ml's Pohl Porter Edward H 1st Lt AC 1 Rey路es Court Mrs P orter Baclaran Po,r ter Ercil D Maj Inf 1119 Gral Luna Manila FS Mrs Porter Miss Mary L Posa~' Odando J Maj MC F01路t S'A>tsenburg Mrs Po sey Power Thomas S 1st Lt AC 8 N ichoh.j Field NF Mrs Power Powers Henry C \Va USA Ret 31 7th Street Pasay Mrs Powers Mr Henry F Miss Dolores Lopez Powers John J Capt QMC 60 FOli~ McKinley MeK Mrs Powers P ratt Wanda M 2d Lt ANC Fort Milss

Jan

26, 1935

Mar 28, 1935 May

2, 193 6

23338 Mar 19, 1935 51465 Dec 1, 1934 Oct 31, 1935 23338 May 2, 1936 Feb 25, 1937 Ocb 3 1, 1935 Jul y 15, 1936 July 15, 1936 Feb 25, 1937 Feb 13, 1936

51 Oct 30, 1936 39-R2 Oct

30,1936

241 Jan

26, 1935

June 28, 1935

Oct 31, 1935 56 174 Dec 51495

1, 1934 PS

Oct

30, 1936

Oct 3 1, 1935 250 Mar 17, 1935 July ,15, 1936 54 Feb 13, 193& Retired

224 Oct

30, 1936

Fcb

25, 1937


u.

PRI

' OFF TEL NO McK

101

Cy

22391

NF

34

McK

131

S. ARMY, YHIL. DEPT.

RESIDENCE ADDRESS

NAME, RANK AND ARM OR SERVICE Price Edward W WO USA Mrs Pl'ice Mi ss Edna Prosser Harvey W Maj (Capt) AC Mrs Prosser Prudh<>mme Shelton E Capt AC Mrs Prudhomme Pruitt Francis W Capt Me

RES TEL NO

123-E FOlt McKinley McK 1335 FB Harrison Bacial'an 90 FB Harrison Baclaran 80 Fort McKinl ey

759

RIC

Cy

DATE ARVD IN DEPT

390 June 28, 1935 51877 Dec

1, 19 35

O"b 15, 1935 McK

292 Jun e 28, 1935

M rs Pruitt Mrs Nellie 'Viley

Q McK

109

FS

214

Quigley Ray E Maj PS (QMC) Mrs Quigley Quinn \Villiam V\' 1st LJ~ Inf

28-A8 Fort McKinley Mcl( A & N Club Manila

Cy

385

' PO;

22095 Oct

30, 1936

R McK

394

FS

131

1'8

145

lB

53

FS McK

16 41

MeK FS

41 217

Raffensperger Elida E 1st Lt ANC R~unee Per Lt Col Inf Mrs Ramee Miss Ruth Mr Paul W Randolph Norman Lt Col GSC Mrs Randolph Rash Frankl in L Capt Inf Mr. Franklin L, J1' Rathjen Herman F Maj Cay Mrs Rathjen Ray John E Maj FA Mrs Ray Ray William A Maj FA Reach Alon"o 0; Sgt MD Mrs Reach Reasoner Mathew A Col MC Read H.oward H 1st Lt Inf Mrs Reed Reeves Raymond J 2d Lt AC Mrs Reeves Regnier Augu stus J Cap/t I nf Mrs Regnier Reinhardt William R L Maj MC

Tientsin China 21 Fort 'McKinley

McR

6 Mil Plaza Manil a

FS.

1319 FB HUl'Tison Pasay Rizal F01't Slotsenburg

Cy

Mal'

8, 1937

38 Fcb

25, 1937

156 Feb 13, 1936 51142 Oct

30, 1936

Oct 30, 1936

Fort Stotsenbul'g

Oct

Fort Stotsenhul'g 15 D Old Med Sup Depo t Man ila 8 Mil Plaza Manila FS 16 Fort McKinley MeK

Oct 31 I 1935 May 2, 1936 142 Cct 2, 1934 271 Oet 30, 1936

Fort Stotsenburg 67 Fort McKinl ey'

1161 M H del Pilar Manila Remington Woodbel'n E Capt Inf Pettit, Barracks Mrs Remington Mr Edward W MeK 189 Renth Edward J Maj Inf 31 Fo>'t McKinl ey Mrs Renth Ml' Edward J Reybold Franklin 2nd Lt CAC Fort Mills Mrs Reybold Cy 56921 Reyes Salvador F Maj PS (FA) 1169 Dakota Manila Mrs Reyes Reynold s Oscar W Chap (Maj) USA Fort Mills FS 221 Richardson John B Jr 2d Lt Tnf 10 Mil Plaza Manila Richardson Will iam L Capt CAe Fort Mills Mrs Richardso n

3 t , 1935

F eb 13, 1936

McT< Cy

236 Oct 30, 19 36 ·56246 July 15, 1936 May

McK

2, 1936

17 June 28, 1935

.•

Oct 30, 1936 Cy FS

56115

PS

Oct 30, 1936 65 F eb 13. 1936 9 1936 May -,


760

RIC

OFF TEL NO McK McK McK

McK

Rickard Roy V Maj Inf Mrs Rickard Ricker Gladys D 2d Lt ANC 130 Riley Charles W Lt Col MC Mrs Riley Miss Katherine R 136 Riordan Bernard N Tech Sgt MD Mrs Riordan Rixey George F Chap (Maj) USA Mrs Rixey Roberson Gerald L 1st Lt FA

Cy

57249

FS

75

FS

225

McK

158

FS

FS McK

NAME, RANK AND ARM 0]1 SERVICE

151

III

94

141 95

RYD

CO RNEJO 'S COM MONWEALT H DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

M1'5 Roberson Robertson Daniel So Lt Col VC Mrs Rob ertson Mr Milton

Robertson Mabel E 2d Lt ANC Robertson Harry S Maj Inf Mrs Rob ertson Ml' Harry H Robinson Donald A Col GSC Mrs Robinson Mr, Donald A Jr Robins-on Thomas Capt Cav Mrs Robinson Rogers Stanley H St Sgt Inf Rogers William L 2d Lt CE Mrs Rogel's Rohrbach Richard R WO USA Mrs Rohrbach Rohrbough Ralph H WO AMPS Mrs Rohrbough Roloff Robert P WO USA Mrs Roloff Miss M Theo RomeI'o Ru fo C 1sb ut PS ( CE) Mrs Romero Ross Frank K Lt Col FA Ml'S Ross Roth Irvin~ D 1st Lt CAC Mrs Roth Rounds William A Maj JAGD Mrs Rounds

RESIDENCE ADD'R ESS

RES> TEL NO

DATE ARVD IN DEPT

22 Fort McKinley

McK

Stern berg Gen Hasp 86 FOIt McKinley

Cy 23338 June 28, 1935 283 Oct 30, 1930 McK

Fort McKinley

McK

36 Oct 31, 193 5

14 8 Feb 13, 1936

Tientsin China

July

Fort Stotsenburg

F eb, 25, 1937

68 Fort McKinley

McK

Fort Stotsenburg 47 Gilmore San Juan Cy 12 Mi! Plaza Manila

FS

237 May

16Q Mar 19, 1935 F eb 13, 1936

FS 220-R2 Jul y 15, 1936 McK

38 Guartel de E spana FS

247 Oct 31, 193 5 186-R1 JunE 28, 1936

F ort 路Mills

90-K Gard en COUlt Pa raiiaqu'e Riml

2, 1936

Oct 30, 193G 68587 Mar 19, 1935

Fort .Stotsenburg

Bldg 3 Sta Lu cia Barracks 78-C Fort McKinl ey

7, 1935

Feb 13, 1936 Cy

149 Dn Fort McKinley McK

62187 Oct 31, 1935 349

PS

Fort Stotaenburg

Oct

Fort Mills

Jun e 17, 1934

Tientsin China

Nov 11, 193 6

Fort Mills

Oct

31, 193 5

Mr Williams C

M'cK SB FS FS NF McK

Routh David B 2d Lt CAC Mrs Routh 86 Rowland Chester A Capt CE Mrs Rowland 50 Rudy Randall P S Sgt MD Mrs Rudy Ruhan Kathryn L 2d Lt ANC 127 Rumbough David S Maj GSC Mrs Rum bough 3 1 Ruth Beverly P M Sgt MD Mrs Ru:th 66 Ryan John Paul 1st Lt AC Mrs Ryan 82 R yder William T 2d Lt I nf Mrs Ryder

76-2 FOIt McKinley 18-P Cualtel de Espana Sternberg Gen Ho sp 11 Mil Plaza Manila

McK

30, 1936

177 Oct 30, 1936 Oc(t 31, 1935

Cy FS

23338 Oc t 31, 1935 167 Oct 30 , 1936

18-M Cuartel de FS 249-R1 O'ct Espana 3 Reyes Court Feb Baclaran 162-B1 Fort McKinley McK 97 F eb

2, 1934 25, 1937 25,

193~


SAC

U. S. A RMY, PHIL. DEPT.

NAME, RANK AND ARM OR SERVICE

OFF TEL NO

RE SIDENCE ADDRESS

761

SIM

RES TEL NO

DATE ARVD IN DEPT

s SB

46

McK

75

McK

54

FS

71

FS

238

McK

171

McK

350

NF

31

Cy

48977

FS

128

McK

137

FS SB

75 10

FS

225

FS

10

McK

346

FS

68

NF

9

Sackville Mary K 2d Lt ANC Sale Charles W Maj MC Mrs Sale Mr Charles W J r Salzmann Rafael L Capt Inf Mrs Salzmann Sapia-Bosch Timothy Capt Ini Mrs Sapia-Bosch Sapp DeWitt T WO USA Mrs Sapp Sargent Charles R Capt Ini Mrs Sargent S'chanze Augu st E Capt In! Mrs Schanze Schneider Elsie E 2d Lt ANC ~chwaeble Elsie 2d Lt ANC Scott John P Maj Cav Mrs Scott SCQville John N 1st Lt Inf Mrs Scovil1e Seals Carl H Lt Col AGD Mrs Seals Mrs M P Seals Mrs Florence ' W Byroade Seal'S William P WO USA Mrs Sears Miss Marion Seaton David S Maj AC Mrs Seaton Segundo Fidel V Maj PS (FA) Mrs Segundo Shanks Johnny N M Sgt QMC Mrs Shanks Shea Patl;ck 1st Lt R et Mrs Shea Sheldon Charles A Capt Cav Mrs Sheldon Mrs James B Sheldon Sherburne Thomas L Jr 1st Lt FA ADC (ADC Ma j Gen DeWitt) Sherman John B Capt Tnf Shinberger John B 1st Lt Inf Shingle Edward Gist Lt FA Shufelt James Van V Maj Cay Mrs ShuJielt Miss Jean E Simcic Philip S Sg t Ini Mrs Simcic Simon Andy J T Sgt OD

Tientsin China 1125 Gral Lun a Man ila F S

July 60 May

7, 19 35 2, 1 936

89 Fort McKinley

McK

279 0 "," 31, 1935

83 Fort McKinley

McK

287 Oct

123-B Fort McKin ley McK 519 Col orado Man ila

Cy

10 Fm"t McKinley

McK

&ten lberg Cen Hosp Cy Tientsi n, China Fort Stotsenburg

387 J uly 15, 1936 56506 F eb 13, 1936 264 J uly 1 5, 1936 23338 J un e 28, 19 35 Mar 8, 1937 J un e 28, 19 35

Petitt Barracks

47 F or t McKinley

Oct M cK

16-A Old Med Su p Depot Man il a 34 T rinidad Ayala Ermita Fort Stotsenbul'g

SB Cy

Feb

25, 1037

52204 Feb

25, 1937

51688

PS

A & N Club Man ila Cy 728 A Mabini Man il a Cy Fort St o路tsenbu rg Fort Stotsenburg

Simoni Ari. ~ e o USA Simpson Charles M Jr Ca pt S ig C 162-1 F ort McKinl ey Mrs Simpson Miss Elizabeth J Simpson Robert K Maj Me 9 Nichols Field Mrs Simpson

19 June 28, 19 35 2649 5

Ret ired Mar 19, 1935

27-A 7 F ort McKinley McK

18-B Cuartel de E spana Rm 1 Bldg 3 F1t Santiago V Chap (Lt Col) 66-U p Fort Santiago

30, 1936

209 OCt 31, 1935

F or t Mills Cy 10 Reyes Court Bacla ran 3263 Taft Ext Pasay Cy

Z, 1934

384 Oct 22095 Oct 51934 Oct Mar Oct

2, 1931 30 , 31, 19, 31,

1936 1935 19 35 1935

F S 239-R 2 June 28, 19 15 FS

140 Oct 3 1, 1935

McK

234 May

2, 1936

McK

99 Feb

25, 1937

NF

53 May

2, 19313


762

S IN

OFF TEL NO

FS McK

Mcl(

FS

FS

NA ME, RANK AND ARM OR SERVICE

RESIDEN CE ADDRESS

108

Siniscalchi 8'i1'io T Sgt MD (V S ) Rm 2 Bldg 3 Ft San tiag o 52 Sink Robert FIst Lt Inf 58 F o rt McKinley Mr s Si nk Skinrood Norman A 2d Lt CA C Fort Mil1s Mrs Skinrood Skladal Conrad Lt Col P S (In f ) Temp Du ty in U S Mrs Skladal ~mith Carleton Capt lnf T ientsin China Mrs Smith 175 Smith Charles Richru'dson Capt 12 F ort McKin ley (Inf) QMC Mrs Smith Smith Harrv J WO Ret 201 1\fal'iquina Manila 106 Smith Harry J T Sgt CE 23 Cuartel de E spana Mrs Smith Smith James W Capt F ort Mill s Mrs Smith Smith John W Capt PS ( QMC) P ettit Ba rracks Mrs Smith 107 Smith Richard W O US A 2695 T aft Manil a l\fl-s Smith Paraiiaque Ri zal ~mith Ridgeway P Jl' 2d Lt Inf 81-A Fort McKin ley' Mrs Smith

FS

56

30

FS

206

FS

86

MeK

SD

340

36

SUL

CORNEJO 'S CO MMONWEA LTH DIRECTORY OF 'l'HE PH I LIPPINES

Sneed Albert L Col AC Soule Robert H Capt rni MI'S Soule Mrs Elizabeth L Hoffman Speth E mil l\1aj Re't f'taples Marp.-aret F 2d Lt ANC Staus Alv in A St Sgt DEML Mrs Staus SteadIer Fred 1st Sp.-t rnf Mrs Steadier Steele Irving E W O U S A Mrs Steele Mr J ohn P Steele Preston lot Lt CAC Mrs Steele Stephenson Andrew D 1st Lt Inf Sig C Mrs Stephenson Steward W ilfred H Capt CAC Mrs Steward Mr Wi lfre d H J r Stil well J oseph W Jr 1st Lt In i M1'5 Stilwell Stout Roy A Maj D C Straughn Hugh Lt Col Ret Stuart Archiba ld W Ist Lt rnf Mrs Stuart Mrs Ruth S Fu ll er Stuart Nell ie B 2nd Lt ANC Sulit Mariano S Capt P S (FA) Mrs Sulit

RES TE L NO

FS

140 May

McK

229 Oct 31, 1935 Feb

2, 1936

25, 1937 PS

Jul y 26, 1936 Mc K Cy FS

263 July 15 , 193 6 22 7 01 Retired 203-R1 J uly 15, 1936

PS P5 Jul y 15, J\'lcK

A & N Club Ma nil a Cy Tients in China 1 Gibraltar Road B aguio Iv! P Tients in China 91-A For':; McKinl ey

DATE ARVD IN DEPT

19~,

289 F eb

25, 1931

22095 Dec Mar

I , 1934 8, 1931

Rclired MeK

Jul y 26, 1936 59 F eb 13, 1936

20-A Cua r tel de F S 249- R2 Ma r 19 , 1935 E span a 45 Sta Monica Court F eb 25, 19 ~7 Manila

F ort Mills 62-B F ort McKinley

Mat' 19, 1935 McK

223 F eb

2G, 1937

Fort Mills

J un e 28, 1935

T ientsin China

Nov 23, 19R6

B ay V iew Hotel Cy Manila 1191 A Mabini Manil a Cy Tientsin China

2438 4 31me 28, 1925

Stenbery Cen Hos p F ort Stotsenburg

23338 F eb 13, 19 3"

Cy

54497

Retire d Oct 11, 193路1

PS


U. S. ARMY, PHIL. DEPT.

SUL

OFF TEL NO

MeK

251

Mel{,

41

NAME, RANK AND ARM OR SERVICE

RESIDENCE ADDRESS

763

TUR

RES TEL ~O

Sullivan Mortimer F Capt Cay Camp John Hay Mrs Sullivan Summers Duran H Capt Me 29 Fort McKinley McK M1'S Sununers Sutherland Edwin Van V 2d Lt Inf 162-B2 FOl't McKinley McK Mrs Sutherland

DATE ARVD IN DEPT

F eb 13, 1936 19 Feb

25, 1937

96 Feb

25, 1937

T FS SB

FS

McK

FS FS McK

210

Tack Willis J Lt Col In! Mrs Tack 6 Talbot Ralph 3d 1st L t Inf Mrs Talbot T",tton Albert E WO USA Ret Mrs Tatton Miss Alice K Taulbee Edgar W Lt Col Cay Mrs Taulbee Taylor Herbert E Lt Col Cav Mrs Taylor Taylor John S Capt Inf Mrs Taylor Terry Thomas A Lt Col CAC Mrs Terry 5 Teska Han" S Sgt Sig C

Theimer John E 1st Lt FA Mrs Theimer Thomas Arthur R 1st L t CAC Mrs Thomas 16!lx Thomas Evert S WO USA Mrs Thomas Miss Elizabeth M Thomas &ances E 2d Lt ANC Thomas Richard G Jr Capt Inf Mrs 'Thomas 238 Thompson William V ls~, Lt Inf Tilley Maidie E 2d Lt ANC 27 Tillman John P Maj FD Mrs Tillman Mr Robert L 70 Tipton Norman E 1st Lt Inf Mrs Tipton Toufanoff Anatoly I WO AMPS Mrs Touf anoff Towler Harry H Maj MG Mrs Towler 'l.'ra:egel' Edna 2d Lt ANC Tredennick Donald C Capt CAC Mrs Tredennick Triplet William S Capt Inf Mrs Triplet Tucker George A Capt CAC Ml's Tucker

Turner Edward W Lt Col CAC Mrs Turner

14 Pasaje del Carmen Cy Manila 3路C Fort Santiago FS

54393 Mar 19, 1935 77 J uly 15, 1936

280 Reposo Sta Mesa

Retired

F-ort Stotsenburg

Oct 30, 193t,

Camp John Hay

O~t

P ettit Barracks

July 15, 1936

Fort Mills

Oct 30, 1936

Rm 7 Bldg 3 Sta Lucia FS

31, 1935

220-R2 Feb 13, 193 6

BI<s F'ort Stotsen burg

Oct

For t Mills

Oct 31, 19 35

124-Up Fort McKinl ey Mek

31, 1935

329 Oct 30, 1936

Ste.rnberg Gen Hosp Cy Tientsin China

23338 Jun e 28, 1935 July 26, 19 36

A & N Club Manila Cy Camp John Hay 1115-B Gral Luna FS Manila

22095 Oct 30, 1936 Feb 13, 1930 158 May 2, 19 36

57-A Fort McKinl ey

McK

221 June 28, 19 35

F Ol't Mills

Jun e 28, 19 35

Fo,t Mills

Mar 19, 1935

Stern beJ.路g Gen Hasp Fort Mills

Cy

23338 Ma r 19, 193 5 Feb 25, 1937

Tientsii1 China

July 26, 1936

Fort Mills

Feb

FOllt Mills

July 15, 1936

25, 1937


TYN

764

OFF TEL NO

SB

'VEL

CORNEJO 'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PH]LIPPINES

REsmENCE ADDRESS'

NAME, RANK AND ARM OR SERVI CE

Tyndall J olln G Col FA 31 Tyng Francis C Maj MC Mr Charles

RES TEL NO

DATE ARVD IN DEPT 25, 1937 25, 193'/

FS

Feb 142 Feb

4-C Fort Santiago

FS

115 July 15, 1936

Sternbe.rg Gen Ha sp 18-N Cua rtel de E spana

Cy FS

23338 May 2, 1936 190-R2 J an 26, 1935

Sternb erg Gen Hasp P ettit B arracks

Cy

23338 Oct 31, 19:;5 Oct 30, 193 6

26-B Fort McKinley

McK

Fort Stotsenburg 8 Mil Plaza Manila

U FS FS

172 Uhrbrock Harold W Capt Lnf Mrs Uhrbrock Ullom Cathern M 2d Lt ANC 229 Urban Robert E 1st Sgt Inf Mrs Urban

:v McI{

72

Cy

21756

NF

10

Cy

25258

McK

NF

FS SB McK

SB FS SB

395

1

Valle Louise M 2d Lt ANC Van Duzee Fred P Capt Inf Mrs Van Duzee Van Hou ten John G CaJ>t Inf Mrs Van Houten Van Meter Samu.el W Capt AC Mrs Van Meter Van Schaick Louis J Col Ret Mrs Van Schaick Velo Minnie 0 2d Lt ANC Venn Frank C Maj MC Mrs Venn Ver Anastacio Q Maj Ret Mrs Vel' Vermette Raymond E Capt Inf Mrs Vermettre V iIJaret Gu stave J1' Maj Inf Mrs Villaret Voss Thomas S Lt Col Mrs Voss Miss Margaret S

212 Waldron Norman E Maj QMC 7 Wall Thomas F 1st Lt Inf 102 Walsh Arthur 0 Maj FD Mrs Walsh Ward Frederick A Maj P S QM C Mrs Ward Warner Oscar C Lt Col CAG Mrs Warner Warren Albert H Lt Col CAC Mrs Warren '楼ashington Clara G 2d Lt ANC Viiaterman Bernal'd s2d Lt CAC Mrs Waterman

34 Watfield John A M Sgt MD Mrs Watfield 23 Weber John H 1st Lt OD Mrs Weber

51 Weidn e r Edwa.rd Lt Col Me Weitzel George J 2d Lt CAC Mrs Weitzel

Welch John P Maj QMC Mrs Welch

27 Oct

F路ort Stotsenburg

30, 1936

July 15, 1936

16 Outlook Drive Baguio M P Sternbe.rg Gen Has p 90 F B Harris on B aclaran 1023 Dakota Manila

Cy Cy

23338 May 2, 1936 52226 Oct 31, 1935

Cy

56766

71 Fort McKinley

McK

Retired

240 Jun e 28, 1935 Oct 11,

Tients in China

18 Nichols Field

Retired

NF

193~

52 July 15 , 1936

w 5-A Fort Santiago A 8> N Club Manila 30 FOlt McKinley

67 Oct 30, 1936 FS 22095 Jun e 17, 1'IT34 Cv McK 18 Feb 13, 1936 PS

Camp John Hay

June 28, 19 35

Fort Mill s

Tientsin. China F01't Mill s

Tientsin China

25, 1937

Mar

8, 1937 25, 1937

Feb

FS 20-B Cuartel de E spana Phil Ord Depot Manila FS A & N Club Manila Fort Mills

F eb

Cy

248-RZ Oct 31, 1935

88 Oct 30, 1936 22095 Feb 13, 1936 July 15, 1936 Nov 11, 1936


WEL OFF TEL NO SB NF

4 66

McK

164

McK

54x

McK

49x

FS

FS

McK

8

102

55

SB

9

FS

151

CORNEJO'S co~n.tO:NWF1ALTH 1l1RECTotty or THt: PH1LIPPINES

NAME, RANK AND ARM OR SERVICE

RESIDENCE ADDRESS

liM

RES TEL NO

A & N Club Manila Cy Wells Ge<>rge F 2d Lt Inf 22095 Wells Harold R Maj (Capt) AC 2 De Los Reyes Court Cy 51197 Mrs Wells Baclaran Wendt William F F WO USA 123-A Fort McKinley McK 386 Mrs Wendt Whatley Vachel D Jr 1st Lt Inf 3 Fort McKinley McK 255 Mrs Whatley: Wheatley Edwin T Maj Inf 8 FOIt McKinley Mcl( 261 Mrs Wheatley White Samuel Maj FA Camp John Hay Mrs White Wilkes Gilbert Van B Lt Col CE 9 Mil Plaza Manila FS 18 Mrs 路W ilkes Williamson Howard M Maj Me Fort Mills Mrs Williamson Willkie Robert T Maj QMC 558 Taft Manila CY 54969 Mrs WiIlkie Wilson Daniel MIst Lt CAC Fort Mills Mrs Wilson Wilson Francis M Capt PS (CAC) Fort Mills Mrs Wilson Wilson Henry F WO R路t 237 Kasarinlan Mrs Wilson Sta Ana Manila Miss Hellen Wilson MUl"l'ay C Cap;t FA Fort Stotsenbu rg Mrs Wilson Winters Ll,oyd N Capt Inf 57 Fort McKinley Mcl{ 220 MTs Winters Miss Phyllis A Wood Stua,r t 1st Lt FA Fort Sttotsenburg Mrs Wood Woodbury Kenneth JI st Lt CAC Fort Mills Mrs Woodbury Woods Fred J Capt CAC Fort Mills Mrs Woods Woodyard Thomas W Jr 2d Lt Inf 335-B Gral Luna F& 175-R1 Mrs Woodyard Manila Wright Alfred T Maj QMC Fort &totsenburg Mrs Wright Wuest Charles E WO USA 90-C Garden Court Mrs W,u est Paranaque Rizal Wurtsmith Paul B 1st Lt AC Fort Srtotsenbul'g Mrs Wurtsmith

765

DATE ARVD IN DEPT Feb 13, 1936 June 17, 1934 June 28, 1935 June 28, 1935 June 28, 1935 Jan 26, 1935 Feb

25, 1937

Oct 30, 193G Jan 26, 1935 Jan 26, 1935 PS Retired

June 17, 1934 Oct 30, 1936 Oct

30, 1936

Oct 30, 1936 May

2, 1936

Feb 13, 1936 Mal' 19, 1935 Feb

25. 1937

Dec

I, 1934

y McK FS

50 144

Yanga Eleuterio S Capt Ret Pulupandan Oc Negl'os Mrs Yanga Yarborough William P 2d Lt Inf 23-A Fort McKinley Mrs Yarborough Yarbray James A WO USA 37 Cuattel de Espana FS MI.'s Yarbray

Young George E Capt CAC Mrs Young

Fort Mills

Retired

F eb

25, 1937

188-R1 Feb 13, 1936 Feb

25, 1937

Z NF 14

74 &

Zeigler Francis MIst Lt AC

8 Nichols Field

Zeller Frank JIst Lt CAC Mrs Zeller Zimmerman Wilson H WO Ret Mrs Zimmerman Mi .. C M

Fort Mills

Mrs Ze~gler

POBox 88 Legaspi Albay

NF

55 Feb 13, 193G Dec

I, 1934

Retu'ed


766

CORNEJO 'S COMMQNWUlA J..: l'H DrRECTORY OF THE PH1LIPPINES

~arry

1ÂŁ. larnrll

ADMIRAL HARRY E . YARNELL, U.S. Navy, t he Commander in Chief of the United Stat.es Asiatic Fleet, was born in Ind ependence, Iowa, on October 18, 1875. In 1893 he was appoi nted to the United S..ates Naval Academy, from which he graduated in 1897 with the "al1k of Passed Midshipman. He then served in the U.S.S. OREGON from 1897 to 1899, being on board that ship during the Spanish-American War. From 1899 to 1902 on the Asiatic Station he ser ved in the U.S.S. ALBANY, the U .&.S. YORKTOWN, and t hen served on the staff of Admil'al George Remey in the BROOKLYN. During the period from 1903 to 1 905 he serv ed in the torpedo boats BIDDLE, STOCKTON, BARRY, and DALE, coming to China on the BARRY in 1904 and taking Qver the command of the DALE during 190 5. Admiral Yarnell then spent a tour of shore duty at the Naval Proving Ground, Indian Head, Maryland. From there he went to the U.S.S. CONNECTICUT for the period from 1908 to 1909, during which time the Fleet made the cruise aroun d the world. During his next. shore duty he was Executive Officer at t he Naval Torpedo Sttation, Newport, R.l. Again in 1911 he served in t he U.S.S. CONNECTICUT, this time being on the staff of Admiral Hugo Osterhaus. In 1913 he report-ed to the U.S.S. NF.W JERS,E Y a, Navigato\". After one year he went to the Nava l War College, whel'e he remained dUlin g 1914 and 1915 . During was sent to on the staff Department

1916 and 1917 he was in command of the U.S.S. NAS'EVILLE, which vessel Gibraltar after the United States entered thej World War. In 1918 he was of Admiral Sims in London. For the nex t two years he served in the Navy in 'Washington.

Retu rning to sea duty he was with the D estroyer Flot illa at Charleston, S.C., from 1920 to 192 2. For the next. two years he was in command of the Naval Ail' Sta tion at r-Iamp ~ on Roads, and from 1924 to 1926 wns Commander, A ircraft Squadrons, Scouting Fleet. In 1926 and 1927 he was attache d to the staff of the Naval War College. During 1927 and 1928 he was in command of the aircraft carrier SARATOGA. After his pl'>omotion to the rank of Rear Admiral in 1928 be was appoinbed Chief of the Bureau of Eng ineer ing. Tn 1930 he was a technical adviser at the Disarmament Conference in London . In 1931 he became Commander, Aircraft Battle Force, leaving this post ;n 1933 to assume duties as Commandant of the Fourteenth Naval District at Pearl Harbor, T.H. On October 30, 1936, Admiral Yarnell assu med command of the United States Asiatic Fleet.


tJ. S. NAVY, ASIA'rrc fo'LEE'r

COMMANDER IN CHIEF, U. S. ASIATIC FLEET

. ,. , '"

Admiral HARRY E. YARNELL, U. S. Navy

767


768

CORl.fEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

REAR-ADMIRAL GEORGE JULIAN MEYERS was born in Iowa, April 10, 1881. He entered the U.S. Naval Academy on May 23, 1898.

He has been

awarded the Navy Cross.

He is a

graduate of the Naval War Coliege, Senior Class, and of the A!lmy War College. Early in Admiral Meyers' career, he completed a post graduate course in; Mechanical Engineering and is considered one of the Navy's leaiLing authorities on turbines, having written the text book now in use for the Service. He is the

auth(~r

of other books

and articles, including a book on Strategy.

Admiral Meyer's last command,

prior to duty in the Sixteenth Naval District,

was

Commander

of

th(j

EIGHTH Cruiser Division of the United States Fleet. He has also been in Command of the Special Service Squadron. Admiral Meyers first served on the Asiatic Station from 1902路 to 1904, being attached to the U.S.S. KENTUCKY and U.S.S. RAINBOW.

Admiral Me-

yers was again on the Asiatic Station Rear路Adm;,.! GEORGE J . MEYERS, U. S. N. Commandant, 16th Naval District

during 1906 and 1907 on ooard the U.S.S. CHATTANOOGA.


U. 路 S. NAVY, ASIATIC FLEET

U.J.~AV'" UNITED STATES ASIATIC FLEET AND STATION U. S. S. AUGUSTA, (Flagship)

NOTE The tour of duty on the Asiatic S'tat~o:n for all Navy Officers is:Line officers with the rank of Commander and above. Staff COl'PS officers and Staff Corps warrant officers is Itwo years-all other officers two and one-half years, Duty on the Asiatic Station is computed from the time of departure until time of return to the Continental United States. The date appearing under "Tour Expires," repre sents month and year the officer will have comple ted h is nor mal tour of duty on the Asiatic Station. The tour of duty on the Asiatic Station for Marine officers above the rank of major is two years, and two and one-half years for officers of the rank of major and below, computed from the time of depa r/.ture until time of return to the Continental United States. Commanding Officers will check the accuracy of the "Assigned Present Duty" and "Tour Expires" dates as shown herein for all officers under their command and report errors to the Commander-in-Chief. Other errors or omissions should also be reported. Make report of changes in officers promptly in accordance with Fleet Regulations .

1 DECEMBER, 1936

DISTRmUTION ID.

"

769


CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

770

ASIATIC FLEET ORGANIZATION Commander in Chief, Asiatic Fleet Ship

AUGUSTA-Flagship Uni~ VS--AUGUSTA

SACRAMENTO ASHEVILLE ISABEL TULSA

Operating directly

under Corrunander in Chief

DESTROYER SQUADRON FIVE Commander Destroyer Squadron FIVE BLACK HAWK-Tender 230 Paul Jones-(SL)

Division 13 211 213 216 217

Alden Barker John D. Edwards Whipple (F)

Division 14 218 219 222 224

Parrott Edsall Bulmer Stewart (F)

SUBMARINE SQUADRON FIVE Commander Submarine Squadron FIVE and Commander Submarine Division TEN

CANOPUS-Flagship and Tender PIGEON-Rescue Vessel Submarine Division TEN 8-36, 8-37(F), 8-38, 8-39, S- 40, 8 - -41

YANGTZE PATROL Commander Yangtze Patrol

LUZON-Flagship Tutuila Panay Oahu Guam Monocacy Palos

SOUTH CHINA PATROL Commander South China Patrol

MINDANAO-Flagship

TRAIN, ASIATIC FLEET Commander Train, Asiatic Fleet

AUXILIARY Pecos--Oiler

MINE DIVISION THREE Bittern Finch

AIRCRAFT DETACHMENT Heron-Tender Utility Unit-2-VJ

Senior Officer of Group

Division 15 225 226 227 228

Pope Peary (F) Pillsbury' Joom D. Ford


U. S. NAVY, ASIATIC FLEET

771

ROSTER UNITED STATES ASIATIC FLEET AND STATION 17

Admiral H. E .

U. S. Navy, Commander-in-Ch1'ef

Captain R. F. McConnell, U. S. Navy, Aide; Chief of Sta ff

315

Captain A. M. Charlton, U. S. NaV)l', Fleet Maintenance Officer

974 1028 -1214

'2971 :3163

"3480

3450 5155 5211

TO~T

D~ty

Expirea

YARNELL,

294

628

Auigned

Commander M. L. Deyo, U. S. Navy, Fleet Operations Office?'

10-36

10-38

10-36

10-38

3-35

3-37

10-36

10-38

Lieutenant-Conunander J. A. Terhune, U. S. Navy, Fleet Communica,tion Officer

7-35

2-37

Lieutenant-Commander F. G. Fahrion, tT. S. Navy, Fleet Gunn..-y O/ficO>'

5-34

3-37

Lieutenant-Commander L. P. Lovette, U . S. Navy, Fleet Int elligence Officer

3-36

4-37

Lieutenant A. H. Oswald, U. S. Navy, Aide; Flag Secr~tary

10-36

6-37

Lieutenant E. S. L. Goodwin, U. S. Navy, Asswtant Fleet Com1nunieat'ion Officer

11-35

11-36

Lieutenant J. Sylvester, U. S. Navy, A ide .. Flag Lieutenant

10-36

3-39

Lieutenant (jg) G. R. Phelan, U. S. Navy, Assistant to Fleet Int elligence Office/r

6-36

4-37

Lieutenant (jg) W. R. Franklin, U. S. Navy, Communication Watch Officer

6-35

4-37

Lieutenant (jg) R. H. Blair, U. S. Navy, Communication rVatch Officer

5-36

4-37

6776

Captain W. A. Angwin, (MC), U. S. Navy, Fleet Medical Oificer

10-36

10-38

7946

Captain E. D. Stanley, (SC), U. S. Navy, Fleet Supply Officer

5-36

4-38

11078

Colonel H. L. Parsons, (USMC), Fleet Ma?-ine Of/ieer

4-36

4-38

10394

Chief Pay Clerk G. P. Hardy, U. S. Navy, A ssistant to Fleet Supply Officer

4-36

3-38


772

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

U. S. S. AUGUSTA (FJagship of the Commander-in-Chief, Asiatic Fleet) Assigned Duty

248 788 928

Captain Commander Commander

1389 Lieut-Comdr. 1561 . Lieut-Comdr. 1609 Lieut-Comdr. 2438 Lieut. 2789 Lieut. 2876 Lieut. 2890 Lieut. 3017 Lieut. 3075 Lieut. 3333 Lieut. 3428 Lieut. 3716 Lieut. (jg) 3824 Lieut. (jg) 4016 Lieut. (jg) 4095 Lieut. (jg) 4116 Lieut. (jg) 41R9 Lieut. (jg) 4427 Lieut. (jg) 5141 Lieut. (jg) 5143 Lieut. (jg) 5307 Lieut. (jg) 5349 Lieut. (jg) 5399 Lieut. (jg) 5617 Lieut. (jg) 5787 Ensign 5801 Ensign 5835 Ensign 5868 Ensign 5914 Ensign 7037 Lt-Comdr. (MC) 7499 Lieut. (MC) 7875 Lieut. (jg) (DC) 8302 Lt-Comdr. (SC) 8385 Lieut. (jg) (SC) 8462 Comdr. (ChC) 9038 9232 9563 9685

Ch. Boatswain ClUef Gunner Electrician Ch. Radio Elec. Ch. Mach.

F. X. Gygax (Commanding) O. O. Kessing (Executive Officer) C. E. Braine (1st Lieut.) (Damage Control Officer) R. M. Ihrig (Navigator) C. B. Momsen (Engineer Officer) H. C. Fitz (Gunnery Officer) H. H. Smith-Hutton (Comm. Officer) R. A. MacKerracher (Sen. Asst. Eng. Off.) B. R. Harrison, Jr. (Asst. Fire Control Off..) O. F. Gregor (Electrical Off.) (W&D-E) R. G. Lockhart (Senior Aviator) I. H. Nun~ (Asst. 1st Lt. Damage Cant. Off.) F. R. Stickney (W &D-4) J. F. Delaney (W&D-B) A. W. Lentz (Aerologist) (W&D-2) H. C. Allan, Jr. (Radio Officer) (C-Div. Off.) C. Shands (Naval Aviator) (W&D-V) W . A. Sutherland, Jr. (Naval Aviator) (W&JD-V) P . Henry, Jr. (Naval Aviator) (W&JD-V) J. P. Walker (Naval Aviator) (W&JD-V) L. C. Sill1iPler (Naval Aviator) (W&JD-V) W. D. Coleman (W&JD-2) W. J. Dimitrijevic (W &D-R) M. E. Dennett (\v&D-F) H. W. Seely (Signal Officer) (W &JD·C) C. A . Johnson (W&JD-1) A. T. Wright (W&D-3) J. T. Bullen, Jr. (W&JD-3) E. S. Powell, Jr. (Wi&JD-F) J. R. Bromley' (W &JD·4) D. P. Dixon, Jr. (W&JD-4) F. G. Pegelow (CWO) (JD-C) T. O. Summers (Senior Medical Officer) E . L. Caveny (Asst. Medical Officer) (H-Div.) R. H. Barrett (Dental Officer) J . E. Wood (Supply Officer) O. P. Lattu (Asst. for Disbursing) (S-Div.) R. L. Le\vis (Chaplain) (Add. duty Fleet Chaplain) K. C. Ingraham (Boatswain) (R-Div.) D. L. Young (Ordnance Gunner) (V-Div.) A. C. Manlove (Asst. Engineer) (E-Div.) A. T. Hodges (Asst. Comm. Off.) A. F. Blake (Asst. Engineer) (M-Div.)

Tour Expires

4-35 11·35

3·37 4-37

9-36 4-36 2-36 4-36 7-36 11-35 10-36 7-36 8-36 5-36 12-35 4-36 10-35 7-36 6-34

2-39 9-38 7-37 7-37 1-39 2-37 4-37 12-38 1-39 2-37 5-38 7-37 3-38 12-38 4-37

4-36 9-38 9-35 3-38 6-36 11-38 2-36 7-38 8-35 7-37 12-34 4-37 5-36 10-38 5-36 10-38 5-36 4-37 9-~7 4-35 8-36 1-39 5-36 10-38 5-36 10-38 5-36 10-38 4-36 9-38 3-36 8-37 3-36 4-37 8-36 6-37 10·35 9-37 9-36 11-37 8-36 2-35 8·36 11-35 8-36 5-36

7-38 7-37 12-38 4·38 1-39 4-38


773

U. S. NAVY, ASIATIC FLEET r'

Assigned DI~ty

9840 9939 10089 10433 11648

Ch. Mach. Machinist Carpenter Ch. Pay Clerk Captain (USMC)

11936 1st Lieut. (USMC)

C. T. J. R. S.

S. Seidle (Asst. Engineer) (A-Div.) A. Stone (Asst'l Engineer) (B-Div. ) A. Austin (Carpenter) (R-D iv.) W. Underwood (Asst. to Supply Officer) K . Bird (Marine Officer) ( Comdg. Detachment) P. E. Wallace (Marine Officer)

~-34

TOUT Expires

12-35 8-35 4-36

2-37 5-37 7-37 3"38

4-36 5-36

9-37 11-37

3-35 12-36 10-34 11-34 6"35

3-37 1-39 3-37 4-37 3-37

U. S. S. ISABEL 1519 2340 3055 4615 5285

Lieult Comdr. Lieut路 Lieut. Lieut路 (jg) Lieut. (jg)

B. T路 R. S. E.

E. Rokes (Commanding) L. McCann (Commanding) W. Lajeunesse (Executive-Na vigator) Adams ( Engineer Officer) B. Bilingsley (Gunnery) (First Lieu tenant)

DESTROYER SQUADRON FIVE 304 712

2425 2703 3216 3632

H. A. McClure (ComDesRon 5) J . R Palmer (Senior Aide ) M. E . Miles (Squadron Material Officer) E . L. Fryberger (Squad- Corum. Off) (Flag Sec) F. D. Karns, Jr. (Sqd. Gunnery & Torp. Off.) E . K. Olsen (Sqd路 Asst. Material Officer)

Captain Commander Lieut. Lieut. Lieut. Lieut-

2--36 1-38 1-35 3-37 7-36 1-39 4-35 9-37 2-36 12-37 2--36 3-37

U. S. S. BLACK HAWK (Tender) 611 1103 1891 2042 2136 2567 3059 3184 3733 7039

7458 7775

Commander Lt.-Comdr. Lieut. Lieut. Lieut. Lieut. Lieut. Lieut. Lieut. - Lt.Comdr. (MC)

8042

Lieut. (jg) Lt.-Comdr. Lieut. (jg) Lt.-Comdr.

(MC) (DC) (DC) (SC)

8225 5026 8496

Lt.-Comdr. (SC) Lieut. (jg) (SC) Lt.-Comdr. (ChC)

8522 Lieut. (jg) (ChC) 9] 30 Boatswain Boatswain 9191 Chief Gunner

J . K. Esler (Commanding) C. M. Holton (Executive Officer) R. A. McClellan (Engineer Officer) G. E. Ernest (1st Lieut.) (Gunnery Officer) E . J . Milner (Navigator) G. R. Cooper (Repair Officer) W:. R. McCaleb (Ta rget Repair Officer) W. P. McGirr (Comm. Officer) J . D. Sweeney (Asst. Repair Officer) C. E. Morse (Senior Medical Officer) (Add. duty Squadron Medical Officer) E. V. Jobe (Junior Medical Officer ) J. W. Grassl (Dental Officer) A. R. Frechette (Junior Dental Off.) A. B. Clark ( Supply) (Add. duty Squadron Supply) K. S. Farnum (Disbursing Officer) (Ord. US) J. F. Just (Asst. for Disbursing) A. E. Stone (Chapla in) (Add. duty Sqd. Chaplain) E. B. Harp, Jr. (Chaplain) F. L. Van Camp (Bosn ) (Deck Watch Officer) G. E. Perry C. M. Maloney- (Asst. Repair Officer)

3-36 10-36 9-34 2--36 6-36 2-35 8-36 9-35 9-36

2-38 4-38 2-37 1-37 8-37 1-37 3-37 3-38 1-39

4-35 10-36 11-35 7-36

3-37 1-37 4-37 7-38

7-36 11-34 12-36

11-37 11-36 6-38

6-35 12-36 8-34 12-36 9-34

5-37 10-38 2-37 5-39 2-37


CO RNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTO RY OF THE PHILIPPINES

774

A S8igned

Dutil

9316 9442 9461

9847 9916 9935 10087 10464 10481

Gunner Gunner E lectrician Electrician

Radio Elec. Chief Machinist Machinist Machinist Carpenter Pay Clerk Acting Pay Clerk

D. B. Shepherd (Asst.. Gunnery Officer) O. D. Drain (Asst. Repair Officer) F. L. Smith (Asst. Repair Officer) L. V. Starkey) (Asst. Repair Officer) A. B. Ward (Asst. to Repair Officer) R. G. Sly (Asst. Repair Officer) P. A. Duffy (Asst. Repair Officer ) C. F. Lee (Asst. Engineer Officer) F. J. May (Asst. to Repair Officer) M. R. Bishop (Asst. for Supply) E. J. Hagen (Asst. for Supply)

TOUT

Expires

2-36 8-36 7-35 11-35 8-36 4-36 12-34 1-35 5-35 1-36 4-35

6-37 2-39 12-37 4-38 2-39 9-38 5-37 5-37 4-37 12-37 4-37

6-35 10-36 3-35 11-34 4-36 6-35

12-37 5-37 4-37 4-37 9-38 11-37

3-36

2-38

7-36 9-36 7-36 10-36 7-36

1-39 9-38 1-39 12-37 1-39

U. S. S. PAUL JONES (230) (Squadron Leader) 2277 3282 5050 5247 5493 5538

Lieut. Lieut. Lieut. Lieut. Lieut. Lieut.

G. D. Lyon (Commanding) D. C. Varian (Executive) (Navigator) A. A. Jones (Engineer) (Stores ) W . Outerson (Comm.) (Torpedo Officer) G. Wendelburg (First Lieutenant) (S.S.) D. Mayberry (Gunnery') (Coms.)

(jg)1 (jg) (j g) (jg)

DESTROYER DIVISION THIRTEEN 631

Commander

H. H. Good (ComDesDiv 13)

1192 2332 5322 5503 6062

Lieut.-Comdr. Lieut. Lieut. (jg) Lieut. (jg) E nsign

S. M. H aight (Comm anding) F. S. Steinbauer (Executive) (Navigator) J. B. Smith (Engineer ) (Stores) W. A. Schmid (Gunnery) (Corns.) D. H. Biwerse (Torpedo) (Comm.)

952 2357 5061 5460 5633 6013 7372

Lieut.-Comdr. Lieut. Lieut. (jg) E nsign E ns ign Ensig n Lieut. ( MC)

W . D. Thomas (Commanding) W . S. Keller (Executive) (Navigator) J. L. Wickens (Torp.) (Comm.) (Corns.) R. W . Curtis (Engineer) (Stores) E. M. Davenport (Gupnery) (1st Lieut.) D. E . Pugh (Asst. Engineer) (S. S.) G. B. Ridout (DesDiv-13 Medical Officer)

U. S. S. ALDEN (211)

U. S. S. BARKER (213) 3-36 7-37 7-35 12-37 5-36 4-37 4-35 9-37 7-36 7-38 4-36 9-38 10-36 10-37

U. S. S. JOHN D. EDWARDS (216) 992 3336 3953 4787 5623 5666 8378

Lieut.-Comdr. Lieut. Lieut. (jg) Lieut. (jg) Lieu t. (j g) Ensign Lieut. (jg) (SC)

T. D. Warner (Commanding) W. S. Mayer, Jr. (Executive) (Navigator) J. W. Boulware (Gunnery) (First Lieutenant ) F. B. Merkle (Engineer) (Stores) J. J. McCormack (Asst. Gun.) (Torpedo) (S.S.) P. W. Winston (Asst. Engineer) (Corns.) A. J. Bourgeois (Division Disbursing Officer)

4-35 2-36 . 7-36 11-36 I 7-35 9-36 4-35

3-37 5-37 12-38 11-37 12-37 12-38 3-37


775

U. S. NAVY, ASIATIC FLEET

U. S. S. WHIPPLE (217) (Division Flag) Assigned Out"

1369 3452

4596 5085 5279 5613 5856 6006

T. G. W. Settle (Commanding) N. W. Sears (Executive Officer) (Navigator) G. M. Chambers (Engin eer Officer) (Stores) E. S. Cooke (First Lieutenant-Torpedo) R. P. Walker (Gunnery) (S.S.) G. D. Roullard (Asst. 1st Lieut.) (Asst. Torp.) K. E. Taylor J . H. Parker

Lieut.-Comdr. Lieutenant Lieut. (jg) Lieut. (j g) Lieut. (jg) Lieut. (jg) Ensign Ensign

Tour Expire8

6-35 6-36 10-35 11-34 2-36 11-36 10-36 10-36

3-38 5-37 4-37 4-37 7-38 11-37 3-39 9-38

7-36

6-38

3-35 10-34 6-34 11-34 9-36 6-36 10-36

4-37 3-37 5-37 4-37 1-39 12-38 3-37

6-35 7-35 11-34 6-34 9-34 6-35 12-36 7-35

5-37 12-37 4-37 5-37 10-37 11-37 4-39 6-37

7-35 12-36 1-36 6-34 6-34 11-34 11-36

1-38 1-38 2-37 5-37 7-37 4-37 1-38

5-36 6-35 2-36 5-36 6-36

1-38 4-37 11-36 4-37 10-38

DESTROYER DIVISION FOURTEEN 645

Commander

A. B. Anderson (ComDesDiv - 14)

U. S. S. PARROTT (218 ) R. McDowell (Commanding) A. Farrell, Jr. (Executive-Navigator) R. Ross (First Lieu ~ . ) (Gunnery) B. COX" Jr. (Engineer) ( Stores) C. Edrington, 3rd ( Torpedo) (Corns.) M. Price (Comm.) (S.S.) G. W. Dickinson (DesDiv-14 Medical Officer)

4589 5402 5873 5963 7111

Lieut.-Comdr. Lieut. Lieut. (jg) Lieut. (jg) Ensign Ensign Lieut. (MC)

L. J. R. A. T. F.

!l3! M10 4G34 4636 4898 5483 5981 4764

Commander Lieutenant Lieut. (jg) Lieut. (jg) Lieut. (jg) Lieut. (jg) Ensign Lieut. (jg) (SC)

C. A. Baker (Commanding ) W. S. Veeder (Execut.ive) (Navigator ) J. K. Bisson (Engineer Officer) (Stores) E. B. Grantham (First J 'eut. ) (Gunnery) G. B. Madden ,(Torpedo ) (Ship's Service) E. S. Miller (Comm.) (Corns.) L. H . Birthisel, Jr. J. S. McAfee (Division Disbursing Officer)

1009 3723 4448 4713 4992 5201 5390

Lieut.-Comdr. Lieut. (jg) Lie.ut. (jg) Lieut. (jg) Lieut. (jg) Lieut. (jg) Lieut. (jg)

T . V. Cooper (Commanding) R. de C. Baker (Executi ve ) (Navigator) A. F. White (Gunnery) (SS) ,,,, . 'Yo Wilbourne (Torpedo-First Lieut.) W. J. Giles, Jr. (Comm.) (Corns.) R. M. Pitts (Engineer) (Stores) R. C. Scott

1647 3206 4561 4665 5393

Lieut.-Comdr. Lieut. Lieut. (jg) Lieut. (jg) Lieut. (jg)

1542 ~132

U. S. S. EDSALL (219)

U. S. S. BULMER (222)

U. S. S. STEWART (224) (Division Ffug) J. B. Mallard (Commandin g) T. C. Thomas (Executive) (Navigator) J. B. Gragg (Gun. Off.) (Corns.) (Ord. US) J . M. Whitaker (Engineer ) ( Stores ) E. G. Chase (First Lieut. ) (Torp.) (Asst. Eng)


CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

776

.4ssigned Duty

5700 5a05

M. De Maria (Comm.) (SS) S. L. Erwin (Asst. Gunnery)

Ensign Ensign

TOUT Expires

5-36 8-36

10-38 1-39

4-36

4-37

2-36 2-36

5-37 1-37

10-36

1-38

10-34 1-35 10-36 7-35

4-37 7-37

11-35 11-35 11-35 3-35 7路35 2-36

1-37 1-37 5-37 7-37 1-38 7-38

4-36 7-36 5-36 11-35 7-35 9-36

6-37 1-39 9-37 4-38 1-38 12-38

DESTROYER DIVISION FIFTEEN 714

Commander

J. L. Hall, Jr. (Commanding DesDiv. 15)

u. S: S. POPE (225) 1572

Lieut.-Comdr.

3303 5052 530]

Lieut. Lieut. (jg) Lieut. (jg)

A. J . Couble (Commanding) W. L. Benson (Executive) (Navigator) F. J . Becton (Engineer) (Stores) C. E . Phillips (Torpedo) (Gunnery) (First Lieut.)

~034t11<

5332

Lieut. (jg)

5739 4370

Ensign Lieut. (jg)

(SC)

R. L. Baker (Gun Control) (Coms.) S. H. Pattie (Comm.) (SS) G. Vl. Foott, Jr. (Division Disbursing Officer)

1-39 6-37

U. S. S. PEARY (226) (Division Flag) 1090 Lieut.-Comdr. 2977 Lieut. 4536 Lieut. (jg) 4959 Lieut. (jg) 5317 Lieut. (jg) 5632 Lieut. (jg)

E. T. H. N. M. G.

H. A. G. E. B. M.

Jones (Comman<ling) Huckins (Execntive) (Navigator) Corey (Engineer) (Stores) Warman (Gunnery) (First Lieutenant) O'Connor (Torpedo) (Coms.). (S.S.) Price (Asst. Eng.) (Asst. Gun.) (Comm.)

U. S. S, PILLSBURY (227) 1486 2565 3748 1915 4~]6

5652

Lieut.-Comdr. Lieutenant Lieut. (jg) Lieut. (jg) Lieut. (jg) Ensign

F. T. B. B. J. L.

E. Vensel, Jr. (Conunanding) T. Beattie (Executive ) (Navigator) F. Tompkins (Torredo) (First Lieutenant) P. Field, Jr. (Gunnery) T. Smith (Engineer) (Stores) L. Snider (Asst. Engineer) (Comm.) (S.S.)

U. S. S. JOHN D. FORD (228) 923 3323 4486 5331 5466 5872 6047 7496 7562

Commander Lieut. Lieut. (jg) Lieuf. (jg) Lieut. (jg) Ensign Ensign Lieut. (jg) (MC) Lieu t. (jg) (MC)

D. P. Moon (Commanding) W. H. Truesdell (Executive) (Navigator) W. C. Butler (Gunnery) (Corns.) R. D. Harwood (Engineer) (Stores) H. C. Yost (First Lieut.) (Torpedo) C. C. Butterworth (Asst. Gun.) (Comm.) A. L. Ingling (Asst. Engineer) E. L. Nefflen (DD 15 Medical Officer) J. D. Butler (DesDiv-15 Medical Officer)

9-34 4-37 10-36 4-37 6-34 5-37 6-35 11-37 5-35 10-37 7-36 1-39 10-36 1-39 7-35 6-37 12-36 10-38


u.

777

S. NAVY, ASlATIC FLEET 路

SUBMARINE SQUADRON FIVE AND SUBMARINE DIVISION TEN A ssigned DItty

639 22~2

4033 8761

Commander

Lieut. Lieut. (jg) Lieut. (jg) (CC)

A. C. Bennett (Com Sub Ron-5-Com Sub Div-10) C. W. Gray (Senior A', de) (Operations) W. R. Caruthers (Squadron Comm. Officer) R. O. Burzynski (Squadron Material Officer)

TouT Expires

7-36 4-36 10-36 8-36

6-38 5-38 12-38 6-38

8-36 12-36

7-38 3-37

2-36 3-36 4-36 6-36 7-35 11-35 7-36 1-35 4-36 8-36 8-36 2-36 12-35 7-35 1-35 8-36 7-35 4-36 4-36 7-35 4-36 9-34 7-35 4-36 8-36 9-35 10-36

12-3 1' 8-38 4-37 11-38 1-38 7-37 12-38 6-37 12-36 6-38 7-38 5-37 10-37 7-37 5-37 12-38 8-37 9-38 9-38 12-37 1-38 2-38 12-37 9-38 8-38 8-37 9-38

U. '8. S. CANOPUS (Flagship) and (Tender) B. S. Killmaster (Conunanding) B. E . Rokes (Executive Officer) W. H. Roberts (Executive Officer) (Ord. US) R. P. Erdman (First Lieutenant) (S. S.) Lieu t. J. W. Long (Repair Officer) Lieut. C. V. Conlan (Gunnery) Lieut. J. C. Hubbard (Navigator) Lieut. W. F. Broun (Torpedo Officer) Lieut. G. 'W. Snyder~ 3rd (Asst. F'irst Lieutenant) Lieut. F. J. IIsemann (Engineer Officer) Lieut. N. F. X . Banvard (Senior Medical Officer) Lt-Comdr. (MC) Lieut. (jg) (MC) B. G. Feen (Junior Medical' Officer) E. J. Holubek (Dental Officer) Lieut. (jg) (DC) Lt-Comdr. (SC) D. M. Miller (Supply Officer) Lieut .. (jg) (SC) W. E. Moring (Asst. for Disbursing) Lieut. (jg) (ChC) L . C. Pritchett (Chaplain Ord. US) Boatswain C. A . Parsons (Boatswain) Chief Gunner J. J. Jesso (Ordnance Gunner) Gunner O. G. Urquhart (Diving Officer) Obief Electrician E. W. Hermanson (Electrical Officer) Electrician L. G. Giard (Asst. Repair Officer) Chief Radio Elec B. F . Schmidt (Radio Officer) Radio Electrician C. Shumaker (Asst. Radio Officer) Chief Machinist H. Z. Throop (Asst. Repair Officer) Chief Machinist F. R. Good (Asst. Engineer Officer) Machinist C. F. Vance (Asst. Engineer Officer) Carpenter C. W. Bennett (Asst. First Lieutenant) Chief Pay Clerk E. G. Oelkers (Asst. to Supply Officer) Pay Clerk J . A. Hagan (Asst. to Supply Officer)

769 Co,mmander 1519 Lt.-Comdr. 1581 Lieut.-Comdr. 1936 2069 2129 2243 2249 2564 3109 7234 7547 8082 8397 8525 9138 9235 9321 9428 9441 9490 9601 9692 9779

)0393 10473

SUBMARINE DIVISION TEN U. S. S. S.-36 3304 3931 4585 4667 4964

Lieut. Lieut. Lieut. (jg) Lieut. (jg) Lieut. (jg)

W. C. R. R. A.

N. Christensen (Commanding) C. Burlingame (Exec.) (Nav.) L. Rutter (Gunnery) (Torpedo) (Corns.) L. Gross (First Lieut.) (Com.) H. Holtz (Engineer) (Elec.)

10-35路 5-37 6-3& 11-38 3-34 4-37 10-35 7-37 2-34 1-37


CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

778

u.

S. S. S.-37 (Flag) Assigned Duty

6~9

3535 2859 4482 4517 4607 4884

Corrunander

Lieut. Lieut. Lieut. Lieut. Lieut. Lieut.

(jg) (jg) (jg) (jg) (jg)

A. C. Bennett (ComSubDiv-l0) R. W. Cavenagh (Engineer SubDiv-.10) J . H. Brady' (Commanding) J. A . Adkins (Exec.) (Nav.) (Torpedo) D. W. Morton (First Lieut.) (Commissary) F. W. Laing (Gun.) (Comm.) (Asst. Torpedo) W. B. Sieglaff (Engineer) (Electrical)

u. Lieut. Lieut. (jg) Lieut. (jg) Lieut. (jg)

5448

Lieut. (jg)

F . B. Warder (Commanding) C. E. Duke (Exec.) c-'av.) B. L. Carr (Eng ineer) (E lectrical) W. B. Perkins (Gunnery) (Torpedo) (1st Lieut.) R. M. Raymond (Comm.) (Coms.)

3492 3783 4481

Lieut. Lieut. Lieut. Lieut . Lieut.

H. E. D. P. M.

u. S.

~981

5300

3424 4031 0196 5294 5463

Lieut. Lieut. (jg) Lieut. (jg) Lieut. (jg) Ensign

E. O. E. C. G.

3766 4524 4957 5447 5517

Lieut. Lieut. (jg) Lieut. (jg) Lieut. (jg) Ensign

6-36 6-36 9-34

5-37 11-38 2-37

6-35 3-36

10-37 7-38

7-36 7-36 3-34 9-34 2-36

8-38 1-39 3-37 2-37 7-38

6-36 3-34 6-35 5-35 7-36

6-37 2-37 10-37 7-37 1-39

6-36 2-35 9-34 2-36 7-36

1-38 7-37 4-37 7-38 1-39

S. S. S.-40

R. Swinburne (Commanding) (Nav.) (1st Lieut.) C. W" odwa rd (Gunnery) (Torpedo)1 F. Brindupke (Engineer) (Elec.) H. Laird. J1'. (Com.) (Corns.)

J. Earle (Exec.)

u.

6-38 1-39 4-37 3-37 3-37 4-37 1-37

S. S.-39

C. Bruton (Commanding) Olsen (Exec.) (Nav.)1 L. Whelchel (Gun.) (Torr.) (Coms.) L. Wirtz (First Lieut.) (Comm.) E. Garrison (Engineer) (Electrical)

u.

7-36 7-36 4-36 9-34 3-34 10-35 2-34

S. S. S.-38

3202 4055 4860 52 10

(jg) (jg) (jg) (jg)

Tour Expires

S. S. S.-41

L. Shane (Commanding) , E. Lee (Exec.) (Nav.) (Torp.) D. Grant (Engineer) (Electrical) H. Bourland (Comm.) J . C. Titus (Gun.) (Asst. Torp.) (Corns.) G. J. J. J.

u. S. S. PIGEON (Salvagl! Vessel) 2326 Lieut. 3645 Lieut. 9135 Boatswain 9296 Gunner 9826 Chief Machinist

E. D. J. T. G.

B. J. C. D. L.

Oli ver (Commanding) Sweeney (Exec.) (Nav.).., (SS) Oster (First Lieut.) (Comm.) Fickes (Diving Officer) (Corns.) Prible (Engineer)

10-34 3-37 2-36 10-37 7-35 5-37 3-36 4-37 12-34 5-37


779

U. S. NAVY. ASIATIC FLEET

TRAIN, ASIATIC FLEET AUXILIARY U. S. S. PECOS Auioned Dut y

505

Commander

1297 1802 2068 2353 2728

Lieut.-Comdr. Lieut. Lieut. Lieut. Lieut.

5840 7261 7554 8207 8394 9119

Ensign Lieut. (MC) Lieut. (jg)1 (MC) Lieut.-Comdr. (SC) Lieut. (jg) (SC) Boatswain Boatswain Ch. Mach. Pay Clerk

9734 10455

J. M. Ashley' (Commanding) (Add. duty Commander Train, Asiatic Fleet) F. A. Ruf (Executive) (Navigator) R. P. Bielka (Gunnery) (W&D) W. N. Crofford, JrJ (1st Lieut.) W. B. Pendleton (W&D) (SS) R. M. Scruggs (Eng. Off.) (Add. duty, Maintenance Off., Train, Asiatic Fleet) E. K. Solenberger (Comm.) (Asst. Nav.) H. Seal (Medical Officer) R. M. McComas (Medical Officer) N . A. Brown (Supply Officer) (Ord. US) F . A. Kinzie (Supply Officer) C. B. Lee (Asst. 1st Lieut.) C. A. Waddle J. W. Cunningham (Asst. Engineer) R. F. Slach (Assistant to Supply Officer)

3-36 3-35 4-36 5-34 4-36

1'our

E.tpires

4-37 7-37 6-37 4-37 3-37

11-35 8-37 4-36 9-38 4-36 . 8-36 12-36 10-38 12-34 11-36 11-36 9-38 9-34 2-37 12-36 5-39 4-36 9-38 2-35 6-37

MINE DIVISION THREE U. S. S_ BITTERN (36) 2281 5276

9938

Lieut. Lieut. (jg) Boatswain Boatswain Machinist

C. O. Glisson (Comdg.) (Add. duty Comindiv. 3) T. D. F. Langen, (Exec.) (Nav.) (Comm) C. J . Wichmann (Gunnery) (Comm.) (Stores) J . R. Fluette (1st Lieut.) (SS) C. C. Jones (Engineer) ,

u. 2316 4941 9144 9146 9947

Lieut. Lieu t. (j g) Boatswain Boatswain Machinist

2-36 5-36 11-35 2-36 1-35

9-37 10-38 4-38 7-38 5-37

S. S. FINCH (9)

W. G. Schindler (Commanding) F . S, Steinke (Exec.) (Nav.) (Comm.) C. S. Horner (1st Lieut.) (W&D) (SS) J. N. Norwood (Gunnery) (Corns.) J . LeR. Johnson (Engineer Officer)

6-36 11-37 10-36 12-37 4-36 9-38 6-36 12-37 1-35 5-37

AmCRAFT DETACHMENT, ASIATIC FLEET U. S. S. HERON (Tender) 2852

Lieut.

3723 4665

Lieut. (jg) Lieut. (jg)

4192 9004 9142 9941

Lieut. (jg) Ch. Boatswain Boatswain Machinist

P . C. Treadwell (Comdg.) (Add. duty Comairdet AF) R. deC. Baker (Exec.) (Nav.) (Gun.) (Comm.) J. B. Bowen, Jr. (Exec.) (Nav.) (Gun.) (Comm.) N. F. Garton (Commanding Utility Unit) J. L. Freese (1st Lieut.) (Corns.) A. T. Terrio (Radio & Signal Off.) (Stores) W. Brinton (Engineer)

7-36 â&#x20AC;˘ 3-35

1-39 1-38

12-36 4-36 2-36 1-35 12-35

6-37 9-38 10-37 7-37 5-37


CORNEJO 'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORy' OF THE PHILIPPINES

780

SIXTEENTH NAVAL DISTRICT :r-;A VY YARD, CAVITE COMMANDANT'S OFFICE REAR ADMIRAL

GEORGE L. MEYERS, (Commandant 16th ~aval Dist) (Add, duty Commandant, Navy Yard, Cavite)

2134 2008

Captain , Lieut.- Comdr. Lieut. Comdr. Lt.-Comdr. Lieut.

3744 3782

Lieut . Lieut.

6813

Captain (MC)

316 1299 141)2

J. J. E. A. H.

W. Rankin (Aide: Chief of Staff) F. Wanis (War Plans Officer) H. Kincaid (District Intelligence Officer) P. Lawton (Aide to Commandant) Coldwell (Issuing Officer) (Yard Comm. Officer) (Assistant DCO) R. S. Lamb J. S. Holtwick, Jr. W. Chambers (Medical Officer) (Add. duty C. O. USNH, Canacao and Supply Depot, Cafiacao) C. W. Stelle (Attend Navy Families, Manila) N. B. Farwell (Dist. Supply Officer) R. Coyle (D istrict Marine Officer)

7362 Lieut. (MC) 7933 Captain (SC) 11069 Lt.-Col. USMC

Assign.ed Duty

Tour E 'J;piT(~8

7-35 8-36 7-35 5-36 7-35

6-37 6-38 7-37 5-37 12-37

2路36 10-35 11-36

3-37 4-38 4-39

4-36 11-35 6-36 6-36

2-38 11-36 5-37 6-38

4-36

2-37

4-36 9-36 7-36 12-35 4-36

3-38 5-37 12-38 7-37 5-37

11-34 12-36

10-36 5-37

OFFICE OF HIGH COMMISSIONER TO P. I. 3306

Lieut.

1256 1478 235 2 8979 9070

Lieut.-Comdr. Lt.-Comdr. Lieut. Ch. Boatswain Ch. Boatswain

H. WOOD, Jr. (Naval A!ide)

OFFICE OF CAPTAIN OF THE YARD A. R. L. W. G.

M. G. F. P. W.

Hinman (Captain of Yard) Rhoton (Asst. Captain Yard) Connolly (Asst. Captain Yard) Arrowsmith (T ugmaster) (Yard Pilot) Graves (Asst. Capt. Yard)

OFFICE OF DISTRICT CHAPLAIN 8463 8496

Comdr. (ChC) Lt.-Comdr. (ChC)

W. W. Elder (Chaplain) A. E. Stone (Chaplain)

(Ord. US)

ASSIGNMENT 8982 10080

Chief Boatswain Carpenter

Vl. "VI". Dyer H. "V. Fisher

12-36 12-36

4-39 5-39

5-35 5-35 9-36

4-37 4-37 10-37

11-34

4-37 5-37 4-37

INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT 8563 286 1250 1260

Captain (CC) Captain Lt .-Comdr. Lieut Comdr.

1803 1893

Lieut. Lieut.

J. B. C. H.

W. Woodruff (Manager) (Ord. US) H. Bruce (Engineer and Planning Officer) Antrobus (Asst. Plan Off., Eng.) J. Meneratti (Asst. Plan Of.) (Rad.) (Ad. duty) W. J. Ru ssell (Safety Engineer) (Survey Off.) G. T. House (Asst. Plan Officer-Mach.)

~路~4

4-36


u.

781

S. NAVY, ASlAT1C FLEET .

Assigtled Tour Duty Expire8

2084

Lieut.

8120 Lt.-Comdr. 8593 Comdr. (CC) 8688 Lt.-Comdr. (CC) 8742 Lieut. (CC), 8747 Lieut. (CC) 8830 Comdr. (CEC) 8853 Lt.-Comdr. (CEC) 8884 Lieut. (CEC) 8904 Lieut. (CEC) 9415 Ch. Elec. 9426 Ch. Elec. 9572 Chief Radio Elec. 9667 Ch. Machinist 9737 Ch. Machin ist 9844 Ch. Machinist 10041 Ch. Carpenter Carpenter

S. W. Hanns (Ass istant Nav.-Avia . an;,d Shore Title Eng.) W. H. Abbey (Accounting Officer) (Add. duty) F . G. Crisp (Production Officer) R. B. Daggett (Shop Supt.) J. L. Bird (Ast. Plan. Off.) P. W. Snyder (Hull Supt.) L. B. Combs (Dist. PWO) C. W. Coryell (Asst. Dist. PWO) J . R. Perry (Assistant) A. J. Fay (Assistant) 1'. W . Hardisty (Asst. Shop Supt.) (Mfg.) E; S. Pelling (Asst. Mach. Supt.) (Elec.) T . C. Thrasher (Asst. D. R. M. 0 .) W. E . Magee (Asst. Mach. Supt.) (Eng.) F. Carter (Asst. Shop Supt.-Optical Repair) D. R. Cheek (Asst. Mach. Supt.) (Eng.) W. E. Redfern (Asst. Hull Supt.) T. C. Stewart (Asst. Dry Dock Off.) (OIon gapo)

8-34 10-36 8-36 5-35 10-36 10-35 5-35 8-36 8-36 8-36 5-35 4-36 10-36 12-35 7-35 12-35 5-35

3-37 8-37 7-38 4-37 9-38 9-37 4-37 7-38 7-38 7-38 10-37 9-38 4-38 2-37 12-37 5-37 4-37

11-36

10-37

5-35 8-36 8-36 8-36

4-37 7-38 7-38 7-38

6-35 2-35 7-36 12-36 11-36 7-36 7-36

5-37 1-37 6-38 10-38 10-38 6-38 6-38

10-36 10-36

8-37 7-38

10-36 4-36

3-37 7-37

10-36 10-36

8-3'7

DISTRICT PUBLIC WORKS DEP ARTME N'l1 8830 8853 8884 8904

Comdr. (CEC) Lt.-Comdr. (CEC) Lieut. (CEC) Lieut. (CEC)

L. G. J. A.

B. Combs (Dist. P WO ) W. Coryell (Asst. Dist . PWO) R. Perry (Assistant) J. Fay (Assistant)

SUPPLY DEPARTMENT 7933 8133 8383 8395 4611 5026 5305

Captain ( SC ) Lt.-Comdr. (SC) Lt. (jg) SC) Lieut. (jg) (SC) Lt. (jg) (SC) Lt. (jg) (SC) Lt. (jg ) (SC)

N. S. J. S. L. J. T.

B. E. W. A. D. F. J.

Farwell (Supply Officer) Smith (Assistant) Boundy (Assistant ) Freeberg (A ssistant) Boyle (Assistant) Just (Assistant) Montgomery (Ass istant)

DISBURSING OFFICE 8120 10437

Lt.-Comdr. (SC) Chief Pay Clerk

W. H. Abbey (Officer in Charge) (Add. duty) A . C. Larsen (Assistant)

COMMISSARY STORES 8411 10462

Lt. (jg) (SC) Pay Clerk

8120 10437

Lt.-Comdr. (SC) Chief Pay Clerk

R. G. Linson (Officer in Charge) C. A. Batchelder (Assi stant)

DESTROYER STORES OFFICE W. H. Abbey (Officer in Charge) (Add . duty') A. C. Larsen (Assistant)

7-~g


CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

782

Assigned

Tour

Duty

ExpireS'

10-35

4-37

10-35

4-31

11-34

4-37

8-36

6-38

2-36 6-35

3-37 10-37

MOTION PICTURE EXCHANGE 1980

T. S. Thorne (Offken in Charge) (Add. duty)

Lieut.

SHIP SERVICE STORE 1980

T. S. Thorne (Officer in charge) (Add. duty) (Motion Picture Exchange)

Lieut.

COMMUNICATION OFFICE 1260 1831

Lieut.-Comdr. Lieut.

2008

Lieut.

2579 2701

Lieu t. Lieut.

9547 9572 9594 9599

Ch. Radio Elec. Chief Radio Elec. Radio Elec. Radio Elec.

H. J. Meneratti (Dist. Radio Mat. Officer) F . J. Barden (ACO, DCO. CO Rad Sta. 16th ND) H. Coldwell (Asst. DCO) (Yard Comm.) (Add. duty) P. J. Neimo (Asst. D. R. M. 0.) C. A. Chappell (Assistant A. C. 0.) (Officer in Charge Radio Station, LoS! Banos) J. E. Desrosiel's (Oine Rad. Station, Canacao) T. C. Thrasher (Radio Lab.) S. H. Foster (Oinq FIt. Rad. School) D. L. Dickson (Asst. OinC Rad. Station, Los Banos)

6-35 11-37 6路35 6-37 9-36 4-38 11-34 ' 4-37 4-36

10-37

2-36 2-36 3-36 11-36 2-36

3-3S 7-37 5-37 4-3S 4-38

5-36 9-36 10-36 5-36 10-36

12-36 3-37 4-37 4-38 9-38

4-36 11-35

2-3S 10-31

4-36 11-35 8-36 1-35

2-38 10-31 7-38 12-36

NAVAL AMMUNITION DEPOT 2097 9268 9274 9323 93 24

Lt.-Comdr. Ch. Gunner Ch. Gunner Gunner Gunnel'

M. R. G. VV . G. A. M. D. C. E.

7241 7474

Lieut. Lieut. Lieut. Lieut. Lieut.

E . B. Erskine (Yard Medical Officer) J . G. Schnebly' J. L. Holland J . L. Parker (Yard Dental Officer) G. L. Parke (Asst. Yard Dental Officer)

6813

Captain (MC)

Kelley (Insp. Ord. in Charge) Woolwine (Assistant) Ney (Assistant) Olavsen (Assistant) Conboy (Assistant)

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT '7353

(MC) (MC) (MC) (jg) (DC) (jg) (DC)

MEDICAL SUPPLY, DEPOT, CA'NACAO, P. I. 10207

Ollief Pharm.

6813

Captain (MC)

:W. Chambers 芦(ommanding) (Add. duty Med. Off. 16th ND & CO USNH, Canacao) E. Fernquist (Executive Officer)

NAVAL HOSPITAL, CA'NACAO, P. L 6880 Comdr. (MC) 6931 Comdr. (MC) 7015 Lt-Comdr. (MC)

W. Chambers (Commanding) (Add. duty Med. Off. 16th ND & CO S. D. Canacao) W. W. Hargrave (Executive Officer) T. L. Morrow W. H. W,hitmore (Ord. US)


783

U. S. NAVY, ASIATIC FLEET

A83ioned Duty

7181 7188 7301 7382 7396 7481 7496 7561 7806 10187 10198 10204

Lt-Cmdr. (MC) Lt-Cmdr. (MC) Lieut. (MC) Lieut. (MC) Lieut. (MC) Lieut. (MC) Lieut (jg) (MC) Lieut. (jg) (MC) Lieut. (DC) Lieut. (jg) (DC) Chief Pharmacist Chief Pharmacist Chief Pharmacist

F. M. Harrison R. W. Hughes J. P. Brady F . W. Farrar L. E. Gilje J . V. Land E. L. N effIen F. K. Smith R. R. Crees R. D. Koepke F. O. Huntsinger W. Grimes A. D. Spaulding

TOUT Ex pire8

3-37 4-35 7-38 8-36 12-36 10-38 3-38 4-36 3-37 3-36 3-37 3-36 6-37 12-36 6-38 7-36 5-~7 11-35 9-38 10-36 1-35 12-36 5-35 4-37 11-34 5-37

TREATMENT 31;09 10467

Lieut. (jg) Pay Clerk

H. D. Rozendal C. E. Rose

11-36 6-37 11-36 12-37

RECEIVING STATION, CAVITE 1840 Lieut. 8186 Lt-Comdr. (SC) 9034 Chief Boatswain 10474 Pay Clerk

R. L. Lovejoy (Commanding) S. L. Bates (Sup.-Add. duty Sup. Off. Sub Base) R. C. West (Executive Officer) R. C. Thurrott (Assistant Disburs ing)

9-36

2-39

4-35 2-36 10-36

3-37 5-37 9-38

SUBMARINE BASE, CAVITE, (Deoornrnissioned Status)! 1840 8186

Lieut. Lt-Comdr. (SC)

10474 Pay Clerk

R. L. Lovejoy (Officer in Charge ) S. L. Bates (Sup.-Add. duty Sup. Off. Sub Base) R. C. Thurrott (Assistant Supply Officer)

9-36

2-39

4-35 10-36

3-37 9-38

1-35

9-36

12-34

2-38

U. S. S. GENESEE 9031

Chief Boatswain

H. L. Arnold (Commanding) (Ord. US)

U. S. S. VAGA 9015

Chief Boatswain .

F. Harder (Commanding)

MARINE BARRACKS 11069 11447 11644 12013 12051 12073 12159

Lieut-Colonel Captain Captain Chief Mar. Gun. Marine Gunner Chief QM Clerk Pay Clerk

R. Coyle (Commanding) F. W . Bennett (Post QM) (Commanding) T. H. Saunders W. O. Corbin T. Woody W. R. Affleck L. B. Andrus

6-36 4-35 9-36 4-36 2-36 8-36 2-36

6-38 9-37 10-37 10-38 6-38 12-38 6-38


CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH D1R EC~ORY OF THE PHTLIPPINES

784

Assigned Duty

T~, E~piTes

NAVAL STATION, OLONGAPO, P. L 1187 Lt-Comdr. 2082 Lieut. 8755 Lieut. (CC) 9109 Boatswain Carpenter

H. A. A. E. T.

G. Eberhart (Captain of Yard Commanding) S. Johnson (Asst. Captain of Yard) M. Zo!lars (Dr路ydock Office,') T. Sanders (Asst. Captain of Yard) C. Stewart (Asst. Drydock Officer)

5-36 8-35 7-36 1-35 11-36

10-37 1-37 6-38 8-37 10-37

SUPPLY, DISBURSING OFFICES and COMMISSARY STORE 8269 10471

Lt-Comdr. (SC)

J. M. Liebel' (Supply Officer) (Disbursing)

Pay Clerk

(Commissary and Accounts Officer) G. E. Manuel (Assistant)

4-36 10-36

3-38 9-38

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT 7377

Lieut. (MC)

W. R. Whiteford (Med. Off.) (Port Quarantine Of. )

6-36

3-37

4-36 11-36 5-35 2-36 9-36

11-37 4-38 11-36 11-37 11-37

MARINF) BARRACKS 11356 11426 11566 11767 11806

Major Major Captain 1st Lieut. 1st Lieut.

B. G. G. R. J. W. M. A. O. C.

Jones ( Commanding) Rowan Lakso (Ord. US) Cramer Ledbetter

U. S. S. GOLD STAR Reported on Station

770 1335 1740 1851 25M 3756 4734 7556 8191 9778 10458

Corrunander Lt.-Comdr路 Lieut. Lieut. LieutLieut. (jg) Lieut. (jg) Lieut. (jg) (MC) Lt-Comdr路 (SC) Chief Machinist Pay Clerk'

R. A. Dyer (Commanding) A. H. Cu.rnrn.b1gs (Executive Officer) G. B. Evans (1st Lieut.) (Gunnery) J. B. Bliss (Eng ineer) S. R. Clark (Navigator) (Comm.) C. L. Carpenter (W&D-2) (S.S.) N. A. Lidstone (W&D-1) M. W. Arnold (Medical Officer) H. C. McGinnis (Supply) (Disbursing) C. J . P. Buckey (Asst. Engineer Officer) E. J. Beasley (Asst. to Supply Officer)

May A,ug. Aug. July July Nov. April Aug. Nov. Nov. Nov,

1935 1936 1936 1935 19~5

1935 1936 1936 1935 1935 1934


PART THREE

GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH (Su pplem ented by Dir'ectory on Payee A-l - A-170.)

PAGES

GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONIWEAL TH

785- 720

DIRECTORY OF INSULAR GOVERNMENT FOR 1935-1938 ........

791- 982

LEGISLATIVE National Assembly

791- 801 EXECUTIVE

Office of the President of the Philippines .. . . . . .. .

803- 864

Department of Public 'Instruction

865- 890

. .. .. .. . . . . . . . . . .

Department of the Interior . . . . . . . . . . ... .

I

•••• ••

891- 893

•••

Department of Justice

894- 900

Departm~nt of Finance

901- 912

Department of Agriculture and Commerce . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . .. .

913- 920

Department of Public Works and Communication s

. . . . . . . . . , .. .

921- 929

... .. .

930- 937

Department of Labor

. .... .... .. .. ... ...............

,

JUDICIAL Supreme Court of the Philippines .. .. _ ... . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

938 - 942

Court of Appeals

. ... . .... . .. .. . ... . .... . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ..

943- 944

Court's of First Instance, Judges of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . .. . ..

897

Justices of the Peace

......... . .... . . . . ................ .

DIRECTORY OF THE: CITY OF MANILA .. . ..... . .......... _ . . ..

945- 982

984-1008

DIRECTORY OF PROVINCIAL AND MUNICIPAL OFFICIALS, ETC. 1009-1082


CORNEJO'S COM MONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PH ILIPPINES

~O\JR

~~ ~lZ£Wr-rU crU£

eC

e

. N\l\ T he only kind in t h e fi eld r ecognized Its t h e or gan fo r publicizing th e activities and achievements of the Government and the pilople of the P hilippines - It is t he reading and a dver tising medium of all select ed a dvert isers in t he P hilippines and abroad.

Make Mine A Space For ~our Advertisement In The Recorder Magazine For Excellent Results./ "ONCE ACQUIRED AL WAYS REQUIRED"

RECORDER PUBLISHING COMPANY P. O. BOX 2124

MANILA

TEL. 2·79·93


PART Tt--1REE

GOV~RNM~NT

OF

TH~ COMMONW~AL TH

Government of the Commonwealth.-Directory of Officers and Principal Employees of the Insular Government: The Legislative Department.The Executive Department.-The Judicial Department.Provincial and Municipal Officials, Etc. The Constitution of the Philjppines (PP. 329-341),* adopted by the Consti tutionl!1 Convention at the City of Manila on the eighth day of February, nineteen hundred and thirty-five (pp. 315-S21 and 343-345), and signed by the President of the United States on the ~wenty-third day of March, t he same year, (pp . 347-348), in accordance with the provisions of the T ydings-McDuffie Law or A.ct of Congress of the United States of March 24, 1934 (pp. 302-310), and ratified by the people of the Philippines in a national plebiscite held May ] 4. ]935 (pp. 349-352), provides among other things that the Government of the Commonwealth of the Philippines shall be composed of three distinct and separate powers or departments, namely, (1) the L egislative D epa?"tment, (2) the Executive Department, and (3) the Jud icial Department. THE LEGISLAT.IVE DEPARTMENT The National AS,ae mbly.-Section 1 of Article VI of said Constitution provides: "The Legislative power shall be vested in a National Assembly." The National Assembly is a unicameral legislative body that replaced on November 15, 1935, the Philippine Legislature which was composed of two chambers known as the Philippine Senate and the House of Representatives, created by the Jones Law or Act of Congress of August 29, 1916 (pp. 120·132) . Membership in the National Assembly .-

The Members of the National Assembly shall not exceed one hundred and twenty, who shall be chosen every three years, and shall be apportioned among the several provinces (Manila included) as nearly as may be according to. the number of thei'l" respective inhabitants; but, regardless of the size of· population, each province shall have · at least one Member. The National Assembly shall by law make an • Reference is made to the pages of this .book.

apportionment within three years after the return of every enumeration, and not otherwise. Until such apportionment shall have been made, the National Assembly shall consist of ninety-eight Members, of whom eightyseven shall be elected by the representative districts as provided by the old Election Law; three by the Mountain Province; and one by each of the other eight existing special provinces,-Nueva Vizcaya (in Luzon), Agusan, Bukidnon, Cotahato, Davao, Lanao and Zamhoanga (in Mindanao), and Sulu (archipelago) . The Members of the National Assembly in the Provinces of Lanao, Cotabato and S'u lu shall be chosen in accordance with the provisions of Section 8 of Act No. 4203 of the tenth Philippine L.e gislature, approved July 23. 1935 (page 377), which in part read as follows: "Sec. 8. Election of Members of the National Assembly for Cotabato, Lanao, and Sulu.- The Members of the National Assembly for the Provinces of Cotabato, Lanao, and Sulu shall in each case be

785


CORNEJO 'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORÂĽ OF THE PHILIPPINES

786

elected by the presidents, vice presidents and present municipal councilors of the municipalities and districts making up the pr ovince, by the persons who occupied similar positions in said municipalities and munic ipal districts in the past, and by the present senators, representatives, delegates t o th e Constitutional Convention, prov incial governors and members of provincial boards, and by any persons who occupied an y of said offices in the past and r eside in the province concerned. * * * " AssemhlY Dis tricts.-The pr esent districts of the National Assembl y are as follows: Abra. 1 ; Agusan, 11 ; Albay, 4; Antique, 1; Ba taan, 1 j Batanes, 1; Batangas, 3; Bohol, 3 ; Bukidnon, 1; Bulacan, 2; Cagayan , 2; Camar ines Norte, 1; Camarines Sur, 2; Capiz, 3 ; Cav ite, 1; Cebu, 7; Cotabato, 1; Ilocos N orte, 2; Ilocos Su,r, 2; Iloilo, 5 ; Isabela, 1; Lag una, 2; Lanao, 1; La Union, 2; Leyte, 5; Ma ni la , 2; Marinduque, 1; Masbate, 1; Mindor o, 1; Misamis Occiden t al, 1; Misamis Orien tal, 1; Mounta in Province, 3 ; Negros Occidenta l, 3 ; Negros Oriental, 2; Nueva E cija, 2; N ueva Vizcaya, 1; Pala wan, 1; Pampanga, 2; Pangasin an, 5 ; Rizal, 2; Romblon, 1; Sa mar, 3 ; Sorsogon, 2; S ulu, 1; Surigao, 1; Tarlac, 2 j Tayabas, 2; Zambales, 1; and Zamboanga, 1. ( See pictur es of the Members of the N ational A ssembly at the time of the Commonwealth In au gur ation, on pages 446-453, and that of the S peaker, A ssembl:yman Montilla, on page 445. also p. 474, after the inauguration).

Qualifications for Me.mbership.-In order t hat a per son may be elected Member of the National Assembly, he* must possess, according t o section 2 of Article VI of the Constitu t ion, t he f ollowing qualificati ons:

(a) Citizenship : Must be a citizen of the P h ilipp ines or naturalized as such f or at least fi ve years bef ore his election; (b) age;

Age :

N ot less than thirty years of

â&#x20AC;˘ Accord ing' to t he f a vorable r esult of the plebis cite on wom a n su f frage held o n April 30, 1937, the s ame quaIifi cat~o n s mus t be- r eq u ire d of f e male candidates for mem be rs h ip in t he N ational A ssembly.

(c) Qualified Voter: At the time of his election, he must be a qualified elector; and, (d) Residence: A resident of the province (not necessarily in 'tihe district, if the province has more than one district L in which he is chosen, for at least one year immediately prior to his election to said office. Tl!rm of Of6ee.-M.embers of the National Assembly shall hold office for a term of three years from the date of their election. In case of vacancy in the National Assembly, a special election may be called in the corresponding district, in the manner prescribed by law, but the Member thus elected shall serve only for the unex pired term. Elections for the National Assembly shall be held on the dates fixed by law. Sec. 2 of Act No. 4203, passed by the tenth Philippine Legislature, and approved July 23, 1935, fixed the date of the first commonwealth election on september 17, 1935.

Compensation.-The Members of the Nat ional Assembly shall, unless otherwise provide by law, receive an annual compensation of five thousand pesos each, including per diems and other emoluments or allowances and exclusive only of travelling expenses to and from their respective districts when attending sessions of the National Assembly. No increase in said compensation shall take effect until after the expiration of the full term of the Members of the National Assembly elected subsequent to the approval of such increase. The Speaker of the National Assembly shall receive an annual compensation of sixteen thousand pesos until otherwise provided by law. (Sec. 5 of Art. VI of the Constitution.) Commonwealth Act No. 14, approved December 31, 1935, fixes the salary of the Speaker of the National Assembly at twelve thousand pesos per annum. Privileges.-The Members of the Nati()nal Assembly shal1, in all cases except treason, felony. and breach of the peace, be privileged from arrest during their attendance at the sessions of the National Assembly. and in going to and returning from the same j and for any speech or debate therein, they


GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH

shall not be questioned in any other place. (Sec. 6, same Article.) Of6cer. of the National Auembly.-The National Assembly shall choose its Speaker, a secretary, a sergeant·at·arms, and such other officers as may be required. (Sec. a, par. (4) of Art. VI, of the Constitution.) The Speaker of the National Assembly enjoys less powers than heretofore enjoyed by the Speaker of the defunct House of Representatives. Commonwealth Resolution No. 10, adopted December 12, 1935, empowers the Secretary of the Assembly to authorize the payment of the expenses of National Assembly. Quorum.-A majority of all t he Members shall constitute a quorum to do businesl), .oUt a smaller number may adjourn fl'om day to day, and may compel the attendance of ab· sent Members, in such manner and under such penalties as the National Assembly may provide. (Sec. 3, par (4), of same Article.) Rules.-The National Assembly may deter· mine the rules of its own proceedings, punish its Members for disorderly behavior, and, with the concurrence of two·thirds, expel a Member. It shall keep a Journal of its proceedings, and from time to time publish the same, excepting such parts as may in its judgment require secrecy j and the yeas and nays on any question shall, at the request of one·fifth of its Members present, be entered in the Journal. (Sec. 3, par. (5). of same Article.) Electoral Commiasion.-There shall be an Electoral Commission composed of three Justices of the Supreme Court designated by the Chief Justice, and of si.x Members chosen by the National Assembly, three of whom shall be nominated by the party having the largest llUmber of votes, and three by the party having the second largest number of votes therein. The senior Justice in the Commission shall ' be its chairman. The Electoral Commission shall be the sole judge of all contests relating to the election, returns, and qualifications of the Members of the National A.ssembly. (Sec. 4, of same Article VI.) Cornmiuion& On Appointmenb and 1m. peac:brnent.-The National Assembly shall

787

elect from among its Members, on the basis of proportional representation of the political parties therein, a Commission on Appointments and a Commission on Impeachment, each to consist of twenty·one members. These Commissions shall be con.stituted within thirty days after the National Assembly shall have been organized with the election of its Speaker, and sha ll meet only while the National Assembly is in session at the call of their respective Chairmen or a majority of their members, to discharge such powers and functions as are conferred upon them by the Constitution. (Sec. 7 of same Article.) Restrictions and Pro'hibitions .-Section 8 of same Article prohibits the Members of ~he National Assembly from holding any other office or emp loyment in the Government without forfeiting their seats; from entering into any contract with the Government or any subdivision or instrumentality thereof, or in any franchise or special privi lege granted by the National Assembly during his term of office; from appearing as counsel before the Electoral Commission or any court in any civil case wherein the Government or any subdivision or instrumentality thereof is the adverse party, or from collecting any f ee for his appearance in any administrative proceedings or in any criminal case wherei n an officer or employee of the Government is accused of an offense committed in relation to his office. And no Member of the Commission on Appointments shall appear as counsel before any court inferior to the Supreme Court. Duties and Powers.-The National Assembly may pass any act or resolution , not in conflict with any provision of the Constitu· tion, subject to the limitations therein established respecting the Bill of Rights (Article III of the Constitution), and in accordance with the provisions of Sections 9, II, 12, 13 and 14, of Article VI, of said Constitution. The National Assembly has the sole power to declare war, and, in times of war or other national emergency, may by law authorize the President, for a limited period and subject to such restrictions as it may prescribe, to promulgate rules and regulations to carry


788

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF 'rHE PHILIPPINES

out a declared national policy. (Seetions 15 and 16 of same Article.) Acts affecting currency, eoinage, imports, exports, and immigration shall not become law until approved by the President of the United States. (Sec. 1, par. (9), of the Ordinance Appended to the Constitution:) All acts passed by~ the National Assembly of t he Commonwealth of the Philippines shall be r eported to the Congress of the United States. (Sec. 1, par. (11) of same Ordinance Appended to the Constitution.) Amendments.-The National Assembly, by a vote of three-fou rt hs of all its Members, may pTopose amendments to the Constitution or ca ll a convention for that purpose. (Sec. 1, Art. XIV, of the Constitution.) But every duly approved amendment to the Constitution of the Philippines shall be submitted to the P resident of the United States for approval. (Sec. 1, par. (18), of the Ordinance Appended to the Constitution.) THE EXECUTIVE DEPARTM£NT

The President and Vice President.-The Executive power shall be vested in a President of the Philippines. (Sec. 1, Art. VII, of the Constitution.) In the event of the l'cmoval of the President from office or of his death, resignation, or inability to discharge the powers and duties of the said office, the same shall devolve on the Vice President, and the National Assembly shall by law provide for the caSe of l'emoval, death, resignation, or inability, both of the President and Vice President, declar ing what officer shaH then act as President, and such officer shan act accordingly, until t he di sability be removed, or a President shall be elected. (Sec. 9, same Article. ) The mere absence of the incumbent President from the Philippines does not entitle thf> V ice President to a ssume office as Acting President of the Philippines. Elections and Te?ms of Of6ce.-Tbe President and the Vice President shall be elected by the direct vote of the people and such elections shall be held once every six years on a datE' to be fix ed by the National Assembly (Sec. 5), and their terms of office shall

end at noon on the thirtieth day of December following the expiration of six years after theiI: election, and the- terms of their successors shall begin from such time (Sec. 6.) No ·person elected President ma'Y be reelected' for the following term, . nor shall the Vice President or any other person who may have succeeded to the office of President as prov .... ided in said Article VII of the Constitution . at least one year before the election, be eligib le to the office of President at such election. Qualifications.-No person may be elected to the office of President or to that of Vice President, unless he be a natural-born citizen of the Philippines, a · qualified voter, forty years of age or over, and has been a resident of the Philippines for at least ten years im· mediately prior to his election. (Sec. 3, same Article.) Compensations.-Until the National As· sembly sha11 provide otherwise the President sh all receive an annual salary of thirty thous· and pesos and shall have an official residence -the Malacanan Palace. The Vice Pres· ident, when not acting as President, shall receive an annual salary of fifteen thousand pesos until otherwise provided by law. (Sec. 10, same Article.) Duties and Powers of the President.-The President shall have control of all the exe· cntive departments, bureaus, or offices, exer· cise general s upervision over all local govern· ments as may be provided by law, and take care that th e law~ are faithfully executed. (Sec. 11, Par. (1). of Article VII, of the Constitution.) Consequently, the President of the Philip' pines, as Chief Executive of the Country. e.<e:rClses control and supervision over all the ~xecutive departments. namely: (1) The De· partment of the Interior, (2) the Department of Justice, (3) the Department of Finance, (4) the Department of Agriculture and Commerce, (5) the Department of Public Instruction, (6) the Department of Public Works and Communications, and (7) the Department of Labor. Tn addition, he has direct control of certain bureaus and offices such as, (a) the Philippine Army, (b) the Domestic


GOVERNMENT OF THE C0MMONWEALTH

Sugar Administration, (c) the General Auditing Office, (d) the Budget Commission, (e) the Census Commission, (f) the Civil Service Commission, and (g) the Government Survey Board. He has also control of the governmentowned corporations, such as, the Manila Railroad Company, the Philippine National Bank, the National Development Company, etc. (Commonwealth Act No. II, approved December 31, 1935.) The President of the Philippines also exercises general supervision over all local governments-provincial and municipal, including chartered cities. The President is the Commander-in-Chief of all armed forces of the Philippines, and, whenever it becomes necessary, he may call out such armed forces to prevent or suppress lawless violence, invasion, insurrection, or rebellion. In case of invasion, insurrection, or rebellion, or imminent danger thereof, when the public safety requires it, he may suspend the privileges of the writ of habeas corpus, or place the Philippines or any part thereof u.nder martial law. (Sec. 11, par. (2), of Art. VII, of the Constitution.) The President shall nominate and, with the consent of the Commission on Appointments of the National Assembly, shall appoint the heads of the executive departments and bureaus, officers of the Army from the rank of colonel, of the Navy and air forces from the rank of captain or commander, and all other officers of the Government whose appointments are not otherwise provided for in the constitution, and those whom he may be authorized by law to appoint; but the National Assembly may by law vest the appointment of inferipr officers, in the President alone, in the courts, or in the heads of departments. (Sec. 11, par: (3), of same Article.) The President shall have the power to make appointments during the recess of the National Assembly, but such appointments shall be effective only until disaproval by the Commission on Appointments or until the next adjournment of the National Assembly. (Sec. 11, par. (4), of same Article.) The President shall from time to time give to the National Assembly information of the

789

state of the Nation, and recommend -to -its consideration such measures as he . shall judge necessary and expedient. (Sec. 11, par. (5), of said Article.) The President shall have the power to grant reprieves, commutations, and pardons, and re- _ mit fines and forfeitures, after conviction,_ for all offenses, except in cases of impeachment, upon such conditions and with such restrictions and limitations as he may deem proper to impose. He shall have the power to grant amnesty with the concurrence of the National Assembly. (Sec. 11, par. (6), of same Article.) The President shall have the power, with the concurrence of a majority of all the Members of .t he Natiollal Assembly, to make treaties,_and with the consent of the Commission on Appointments of the National Assembly, he shall appoint ambassadors, other public ministers, and consuls. He shall receive ambassadors and other ministers duly accredited to the Government of the Philip.pine,s. (Sec. 11, par. (7), of same Article.) The President may appoint the Vice President as a member of his cabulet and also as head of an executive department. (Sec. 12, par. (3) of Art. VII, of the Constitution.) Annual Report.-The President of the Commonwealth of the Philippines shall make an allnual report to the President and Congress of the United States of the proceedings and operations of the Government of the Commonwealth of the Philippines and shall make s!lch other reports as the President or Congress may request. (Sec. 1, paragraph (20), of the Ordinance Appended to the Constitution. ) THE JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT

The SuprelIle Court.-Section 1 of Article VIII of the Constitut:on provides: "The Judicial power shall be vested in one Suprem~ Court and in such inferior courts as may be established by law." Commonwealth Act No. ' 3, approved December 31, 1935, amends certain provisions of the Revised Administrative Code on tlle Jud iciary, by reducing the number of Justices of the Supreme Court and creating the Court of Apr:eals and defining their respective jurisdictions.


790

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DlRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

Jurisdiction .-Section 2 of same Al ticle of t he Constitution empowers the National Assembly to' enact laws defining, prescrib ing, and apportioning the jurisdiction of the various courts, but no la w may de.prive the S up 路 reme Court of its original jurisdiction over cases affecting ambassadors, other public ministers, and consuls, nor of its jurisdiction to re-view, levise, reverse, modify, Or affirm on appeal, certiorari, or writ of error, as the law or the r ul es of court may provide, final judgments and decrees of inferior courts in(1) All cases in which the constitutionality or validity of any treaty, law, ordinance, or executive order or regulation is in question. (2) All cases involving the legality of any tax, impost, assessment, or toll, or any penalty imposed in r elation thereto. (3) All cases in which the jurisdiction of any trial court is in issue. 1S

(4) All criminal cases in which the penalty deat h or life imprisonment.

(5) All cases in which an error or question of law is involved. Section 3 of t he same Article recognizes sucih ongll1al and appellate jurisdiction of the Suprem e L.oul"t as was possessed an~ exelcised by it at t ne t une of the adoption of the ConstItution. ::iuch original jurisdictlOn of said \....ourt includes all cases affecting amoassadors, other public mini sters, and consuls. Appointment.-The members of t he SupI'eme Court and all judges of inferior courts are appointed by the President with the conse nt of the Commission on Appointments of the Nationa l Assembly. (;:,ec. 5, Art. VIlI.) Qualification$.- In order t hat a person may be appointed a member of the S upreme Court he or she must possess the following qualifications, viz.: (a) A citizen of the Philippines for at least five years, (b) forty years of age 01' over, (c) for ten years or more has been a judge of a court of record, or (d) engaged in the practice of law in the Philippines for such a length of time. (Sec. 6, id.)

The qualifications r equired of judges of inferior courts shall be prescribed by the' National Assembly (Commonwealth Act No. 3), but no person may be appointed judge of any' such courts unless (a) he or she is a citizen. of the Philippines, and (b) has been admitted to the practice of law in the Islands. (Sec. 8, id.) Term of Office and Compensation.-The members of the Supreme Court and all judges of inferior courts shall hold office during good behavior, until they reach the age of seventy years, or becomer incapacitated to discharge the duties of their office. They shall receive such compensation as may' be fixed by law,. which shan not be diminished during t heir continuance in office. Until the National Assembly shall provide otherwise, the Chief Justice of t he Supreme Court shall receive an annual compensation of sixteen thousand peSOSr and each Associate Justice, fifteen thousand pesos. (Sec. 9, id.) Transfer and Residence of Judges.-NoJudge appointed for a particular district shall be designated or transferred to another district without the approval of the Supreme. Court. The National Assembly shall by law detennine the residence of judges. (Sec. 7 r id.) Rules of Court.-The Supreme Court shall have the power to promulgate rules concerning pleading, practice, and procedure in all courts, and the admission of candidates to the practice of law in the Philippines. Said rules shall be uniform for all courts of the same grade and sha l ~ not diminish, increase, or modify substantive rights. .section 13 of Article VII I of t h e Constitution also provides that the existing laws on pleading, practice, and procedure al'e thereby repealed as statutes, and are declared Rules of Courts, subject to the power of the Supreme Court to alter and modify the same. It furth er provides that the National Assembly shall have the power to repeal, alter, or supplement the rules concerning pleading, practice, and procedure, and the admission of candidates to the practice of law in the Philippines.


791

THE NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

DIRECTORY OF THE

<irturrnmrnf of fqr <!tommonwraUq of fqr ~qi1ippinrs INSULAR GOVERNMENT Hon.

MANUEL L. QUEZON, of Tayabasâ&#x20AC;˘........ President of the Philippines

Hon. SERGIO OSMEJ'iA, of Cebu ... ...... . Vice President of the Philippines

LEGISLATIVE

DEPARTMENT

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY Speaker: Residence:

HON. GIL MONTILLA Taft Ave. Extens1on, P3.5ay, Rizal

~645

Secreta1'Y: Res.:

MR. NARCISO PIMENTEL 440 M. Ii. del Pilar, Manila; Tel. 5-73-57

MEMBERS OF THE NATIONAL ASSEiVIBLY, Residence

Telephone Number

Mani la or Suburb

369

2-36-15

. . . . . . . . .. . ..

ADDURU, Han. Mal'celo* 1st Dist., Cagayan

236

2-32-12

385 Libertad, say', Rizal

AGAN, Hon. Vicente Batanes

221

2-19-46

8 Nebraska, Manila; Ivana, Tel. 5-57-42 Batanes

ALANO, Hon. Juan S. * Zamboanga

362

2-17-05

1162 Dakota, Mani- Zamboanga, Zamboanga Ia; Tel. 5-59-65

Surname and First Name (Arranged Alphabetically)

Office Room

ABELLANA, Hon. Hilario '" 2nd Dist., Cebu

-Married

Province

Cebu, Cebu

Pa- Tuguegal'ao, Cagayan


792

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

MEMBERS OF THE NATIONAL ASSEMBLY-Continued Surname nnd First Name (Arranged Alphabetically)

~

Of{ice - tUoom -,

Residence

Telephone Number

Manila or Suburb

Province

ALZATE, Hon. Manuel A. * 1st Dist., Nva. EcHa

227

2-33-79

2001 Felix Huertasj Nampicuan, Tel. 2-19-06 Nva. Ecija

AMILBANGSA, (Datu) Ombra* Sulu (Sultan of Sulu)

285

2-18-90

Hotel Palma Tel. 2-33-50

Joio, Sulu

ANGARA, Han. Jose A.* 1st Dist., Tayabas

203

2-21-39

718 Pennsylvania Manila

Casiguran, Tayabas

AQ UINO, Han. Benigno S.路 2nd Dist., Twrlac

328

2-10-65

56

ARZADON, Han. Ulpiano R.*

261

2-39-94

220

2-36-97

BALAPARAN, (Datu) Sinsuat Cotabato

381

2-36-58

Cotabato, Cotabato

BOCAR, Hon. Juan L. * 31'd Dist., Samar

229

2-13-78

Borongan, Samar

BONIFACIO, Han. Arsenio* 2nd Dist., Laguna

456

2-42-27

2111 Felix Huertas Sta . .Cruz, Tel. 2-56-81 Laguna

BONTO, Han. Jose 1st Dist., Albay

217

2-33-04

City Y.M.C.A. Tel. 2-28-58

BORROMEO, Han. Leon Oriental Misamis

234

2-37-65

433 Tambakan, Sta. Mambajao, Or. Misamis Cruz, Manila

BRILLANTES, Hon. Sixto* 2nd Dist., llocos Sur

267

2-36-23

1001-A Georgia Tel. 5-64-19

BUENAFE, Hon. Bernardo L. Nueva Vizcaya

237

2-29-06

1208-C Misericordia, Solano, Manila N. Vizcaya

BUENAFLOR, Hon. Tomas' 4th Dis t ., Iloilo

364

2-18-56

285 Labores, Panda- Dumangas, can, Manila Iloilo

BUENCAMINO, Han. Felipe Jr.*

376

2-41-55

408 Aviles Tel. 2-22-26

Cabiao, Nva. Ecija

BUENDIA, Hon. Nicolas路 1st Dist., Bulacan

223

2-37-26

626 Dayao, Tondo Tel. 4-74-33

Malolos, Bulacan

CABILI, Han. Tomas L.* Lanao

278

2-37-67

309 Padre Faura Tel. 5-74-04

Dansalan~

CAMACHO, Hon. Teodoro* Bataan

325

2-38-84

501 Dakota, Mani la Balanga, Tel. 5-48-95 Bataan

CELEBRADO, Hon. Francisco* 1s t Dist., CaanuTines S.

210

2-30-33

Broadway, S. Concepcion, Juan, Tel. 6-85-21 Tarlac Badoc, Ilocos Norte.

2nd Dist., llocos NO'rte

AZANZA. Hon. Pascual B. *

10 Suerte, Pasay

2nd Dist., Samar

2nd D is t., Nvu. Ecija

Villareal, Samar

Tabaco, Albay

Santa, Ilocos Sur

Lanao

Naga, Cam. Sur


THE NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

793

MEMBERS OF THE NATIONAL ASSEMBLY-Contiftued Surname and First Name (Arraneed Alphabetically)

Office Room

Telephone Number

I"_,-:---,-:-_-::--:-,R:::.:::,;:.:d::.n:::,=-,_-:-:-' -,--_ _ ltlanila or Suburb

Province

232

路2-39-17

312 Plaza Miranda Loay, reI. 2-66-58 Bohol

CLEMENTE, Hon_ Tomas S.' 2nd Dist., Sorsogon

211

2-37-63

5 Basa, San Juan Tel. 6-83-16

COJUANGCO, Hon. Jose' 1st Dist., Tarlac

378

2-42-56

1259 Agno, Malate Paniqui Tel. 5-43-24 Tarlac

CONFESOR, Hon. Tomas' 3'rd Dist., Iloilo

461

2-36-63

47 Gen. Haig, Man- Cabatuan, daluyon; Iloilo Tel. 6-78-97

CORPUS, Hon. Pio V.' Masbate

283

2-15-92

48 Panadero, Sta. Masbate, Ana; Tel. 5-62-58 Masbate

CUENCO, Hon. Miguel 5th Dist., Cebu

281

2-37-40

Hotel Cantabria Tel. 2-27-67

Cebu, Cebu

CURATO, Hon. Apolonio D.' Agusan

275

2-19-38

509 Catalufia Tel. 2-84-67

Butuan, Agusan

DE LA PAZ, Hon. Emilio* 2nd Dist., Rizal.

216

2-37-08

211 Regina Bldg. Tel. 2-84-41

Marikina, Rizal

DIZON, Hon. Tomas' 1st Dist., Laguna

252

2-39-78

819 Anak Ng Bayan San Pablo, Paco Laguna

DORADO, Hon. Jose A.' 2nd Dist., Capiz

374

2-42-68

FABELLA, Hon. Gabriel F.' Romblon

259

2-36-67

FAUSTO, Hon. Jose P.路 2M Dist., Pampanga

218

2-20-49

FORTICH, Hon. Manuel' Bukidnon

233

2-37-13

Malueo, Bukidnon

FUENTEBELLA, Hon. Jose' 2nd Dist., Cam. SU'r.

230

2-14-73

161 Arquiza, Ermita Sagnay, Cam. Sur Tel. 5-41-30

GARDUQUE, Hon. Agapito Abra

323

2-36-89

GIL, Hon. Pedro' 2nd Dist., Manila

408

2-37-60

1906 Herran, Paeo Manila Manila Tel. 5-58-33

HERN AEZ, Hon. P edro C., 2nd Dist., Occ. N egros

380

2-33-05

471 L. Guerrero

Bacolod. Dce. Negros

JOSE, Hon. Felipe E.' 2nd Dist., Mt. Provo

370

2-31-64

745 Sto. Cristo Tel. 4-74-19

Baguio Mt. Provo

CLARIN, Han. Olegario E.*

2nd Dist., Bolwl

Danso}, Sorsogon

Capiz, Capiz 713 Honradez, Sam- Jones,

paloe

Romblon

Hotel Mapalad Tel. 4-90-95

. . . . . . ... . . .

Sta. Ana Pampanga

.

Bangued Abra


CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

~94

MEMBERS OF THE NATIONAL ASSEMBLY-Continued SUfnllme and First Name (Arran Ired Alphabetical ly)

Office Room

Residence

Telephone

Number

Provinee

489 Peiiafrancia Paeo, Manila

Lipa.

2-36-79

1686 Washington Tel. 6-71-14

Tacloban Ley-te

253

2-36-69

1411 Henan Int. 8 Argao, Tel. 5-63-70 Cebu

LAGMAN, H on. E ligio G. ' 1 st Dis t., P ampanga

371

2-3'7-15

453 Gelinos, Sampa- Guagua, loc Pampanga

LA VIDEZ, H on. Francisco路 2nd Dis t., Tayabas

254

2-36-62

468 Burgos, Pasay Gumaea Tel. 5-11-48 Tayabas

LAZO, H on. Vicente T . * Jst Dist., !locos N01'te

230

2-36-65

Bacarra, n. Norte

LES ACA, Hon. Potenciano* Zambales

257

2-18-05

39 Broadway, 10th Iba, St., New Manila Zambales

LUNA, Hon . Juan L.* Mindoro

333

2-10-15

32 Hollywood Drive, Calapan, S. Juan; Mindoro Tel. 6-86-13

MAGALONA, H on . Enliqque B. * 1st. Dist., Oce. Negro s

354

2-'16-71

MAGSALIN, Hon. Pedro' 1 st Dist., Rizal

382

2-21-24

521 Martin Ocampo Tagig, Tel. 2-86-34 Rizal

MANEJ A, Hon. Cecilia 1..." Marinduque

375

2-28-93

82

MARAMBA, Hon. Daniel* 8rd Dist., Pangasinan

226

2-11-48

48 Lourdes, Pasay Sta. Barbara, Tel. 5-11-37 Pangasinan

MOLDERO, Hon. Saturnino 1st Dist., Mt. Pr ovince

256

2-37-64

Hotel Palma Tel. 2-33-50

MONTANO, Hon . Justin iano S.*

215

2-18-53

MONTINOLA, Hon. Ruperto' 2nd Dist., Iloilo

332

2-32-70

3614-B Taft Ave. Tel. 5-14-72

NAVARRO, Hon. Ricardo' Surigao

251

2-36-27

City Y. M. C. A. SUFigao, Tel. 2-28-58 Surigao

NUYDA, Hon. Just ina 2nd Dist., Albay

363

2-36-64

1000 San Andres Malate

Camalig, Albay

OPPUS, Hon. Tomas路 9rd Dis t., L eyte

228

2-29-42

1456 Abreu S. Miguel

Maasin, Leyte

KALA W, Hon. Maximo M." 8rd Dis t., Batangas

330

KAPUNAN, Hon. Ruperto' 5th Dist., Leyte

309

KINTANAR, H on. Agustin Y. " 8rd Dist' Cebu

2-37-44

Manila or Suburb

J

Saravia, Occ. Negros

Rebe1!in, Sta. Boac, Ana. Tel. 2-55-53 Mdque.

Lubuagan, l)H. Provo

Tanza, Cavite

CaVl.te

- Married

Batangas

Iloilo, Iloilo


1'HE NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

------------~~~~~------------

795

MEMBERS OF THE NATIONAL ASSEMBLY-Continued Reaidenee

Office Room

Telephone N umber

ORENSE, Hon. Eusebio* 2nd Dis t., Batanga:;

303

2-39-84

932 P. Faura, Ermi- Bauan, ta; Tel. 5-72-87 Batangas

OSIAS, Hon. Camilo' 1st Dist. , La Union.

351

2-39-10

c/ o Nat. U niversity Balaoan, Manila La Union

OZAMIS, Hon. Jose ' Occ. Misamis

279

2-36-17

1510 Taft Ave. Tel. 5-63-81

PEREZ, Hon. Eugenio 2nd Dist., Pangasinan

273

2-36-60

899 Sta. Mesa, Sam - San Carlos, paloc Pangasinan

PERFECTO, Hon. Gregorio* 1st Dist., Manila

477

2-43-58

389 S. Rafael Tel. 2-43-42

QUIMPO, Hon. Romu a ldo C.' DavM

455

2-43-20

708 Colorado, ta

RAFOLS, H on. Nicolas 6th Dist., Cebu

334

2-28-91

Bay Vi ew Hotel Tel. 2-43-84

Toledo, Cebu

RAMA, Han. Vicente* 4th Dist., Cebu

321

2-36-70

Hotel Cantabria Tel. 2-27-67

Talisay, Cebu

RAMOS, H on. Anacleto B.' 1st Dist., Pangasinan

222

2-31-29

1748 Oroqu ieta, Sta. Cru z

Lingayen, Pan g asinan

RAMOS, Han. Narciso* 5th Dist., Pangasinan

224

2-15-95

City Y. M. C. A. Tel. 2-28-58

Lingayen, Pangasinan

REV ILLES, Hon. Margarito E. ' 3rd Dist., Bohol

271

2-36-66

RODRIGUEZ, Han . Buenaventura* 7th Dist., Cebu

315

2-41-69

1164 Carolina Tel. 5-71-65

RODRIGU EZ, HOIl. Celestino 1st Dist., Cebu

260

2-36-11

I)

ROMERO, Hon. Jose E. ' 2nd Dist., Or. Negro s

258

2-37-12

1140 Celestino Ara- Dumaguete, gOIl ; T el. 5-41-75 Or. N egros

ROMUALDEZ, Hon. Norberto' 4th Dis t., Le yte

286

2-37-11

2918 Herran , Sta. Tolosa , An a; Tel. 5-4 6-5:1 Leyte

ROQUE, H on. Norberto A. 1s t Dist., SO?'sogon

335

2-16-50

280 Dominga, Pa say Bulan, Tel. 5-1 9-49 Sorsog on,

ROXAS, H on. Manuel' 1st Dist., Capiz

458

2-31-69

911 Taft Ave.

Capiz, Capiz

RUPISAN, Hon. N. T.' 4th Dist., Pangasinan

212

2-16-94

Hotel Palma Tel. 2-33-50

Urdaneta, Pangasinan

SUTname and Fiut Name (.AuBnl'ed Alphabetically )

Manila or Suburb

Province

Jimenez, Occ. Misamis

Manila, Manila

Enru-

Da vao, Davao

Talibon, Bohol Medellin , Cebu

n imas- Al ang, San Bogo, Juan , Riza l Cebu


796

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PH ILIPPINES

MEMBERS OF' THE NATIONAL ASSEMBLY-Continued Residence

OHiee Room

Telephone Nu mber

SABIDO, Han. Pedro' S,.d Dist., Albay

453

2-36-16

1572 Calixto Dyeo Tel. 5-43-83

SALCEDO, Hon. Victorino M. 5th Dist., Iloilo

372

2-37-66

60 Nagtahan, Samp. Sara, Tel. 6-72-32 Iloilo

SAN DOV AL, Hon. Claudio* Pala.wPtn

204

2-36-61

86 Lourdes, Pasay

SO LIVEN, H an. Benito ' 1st Dist., l locos SU1'

284

2-36-68

TAIT, Hon. George K. * 8"d Dist., M i . Provo

208

2-37-62

TAN, Hon. Antolin D. * 1 s t Dist., Samatr

277

2-34-52

117 Martin Ocampo, Catarman, Quiapo Samar

TAN, Hon. Dominador M.* 2nd Dist., Leyte

319

2-38-07

307-D Nebraska Tel. 5-53-06

TOLENTINO , H an. Miguel 1 st Dist., Batangas

269

2- 36-1 3

318 Laguna, Sta. Balayan, Cruz, Tel. 2-27-55 Batangas

TORRALBA, Han. Juan S. 1st Dist., Bohol

365

2-29-69

803 Raon, Sta. Cruz Tel. 2-32-01

TUMBOKON, H an. Rafael S.' 3?'d Dist., Capiz

313

2-36-45

1155 Singalong, Int. Kalibo, Malate Capiz

VELOSO, Han. Jose Ma. ' l stJ D ist., Leyte

384

2-30-37

33 J . M. Paterno, S. San Isidro, . Juan del Monte Leyte

VERA, Hon. Pedro* 4th Dist., Albay

263

2-31-40

140 Solana, W. C. Tel. 2-35-10

Pandan, Cat. Albay

VERIDIANO , Han. Regina 2nd Dist., Cagayan

255

2-36-14

45 Teresa, Ermita Tel. 2-62-55 -

Ballesteros, Cagayan

VERZOSA, Hon., Mauro* Isabela

359

2-41-48

1689 Donada, Pasay !lagan, Tel. 5-16-43 Isabela

VILLANUEVA, Han. Guillermo' 1st Dist., Or . Neg.

205

2-37-06

521 Ongpin ( Ledda) Bais, Tel. 2-13-66 Or. Negros

VILLARAMA, Han. Antonio' 2nd Dis t., Bulacan

202

2-37-05

1481 Gral. Luna Tel. 5-52-55

YARANON, Han. Agaton R. 2nd Dist., La Union ZALD I VAR, Han. Ca]jxto 0.' Antique ZULUETA, Han . J ose C.' 1 st Dist., lloilo

368

2-35-84

12&1 Sisa, Sampaloc Aringay, Manila La Union

331

2-37-69

10 Loreto. Sampaloc Pandan, Manila Antique

209

2-37-94

112 Arquiza, Ermita Oton, Tel. 5-77-77 Iloilo

S urn ame and First Name (Arran ged Alphabetically)

Manila or Suburb

Tel. 5-13-04 328 A viles, S. Miguel Tel. 2-93-68

Province

Polangui, Albay'

Coron, Palawan . S to~

DomUlgo 11. Sur

Bauko, Mt. Provo

Ormoc,

Leyte

T~gbilaran,

Bohol

Angat, Bulacan


797

THE NAT路toNAI; ASSEMBLY

COMMISSIONS AND COMMITTEES OF THE NATIONAL ASSEMBLY (As of October 80, 1986) ELECTORAL COMMISSION (Dec. 5, 1986)

COJllJlli ss ion on AppointJllents

Han. Vicente Rama, " Manu el Forlich, VictOl;ano M. Salcedo, " Olegal;o B. Clarin

Hon. Antonio Villa-Real, Associate Justice Carlos A. Imperial, "

" " " " " Claudio Sandoval, Assemblyman " Ruperto Kapunan u " Anacleto B. Ramos Nicolas Rafols,

" Gregorio Perfecto, " Agaton R. Ya<ranon.

"

COMMISSION ON IMPEACHMENT (D ec. 17, 1985)

" " "

COMMISSION ON APPOINTMENTS (Dec. 17, 1985)

Hon. Benigno S. Aquino, OJ Nicolas Buendia. " Juan Torralba Benito Soliven, " Vicente T. Lazo, " Narciso Ramos. " Teodoro Camacho. " Pedro Vera, " Francisco Lavidez " Norberta A. Roque, " Tomas Confesor, " Eugenio Perez, " Ruperta Montinola, " Dominador M. Tan, Camilo Osias,

COMMITTEE ON ACCOUNTS (Dec . 18. 1935) Hon. Daniel Maramba, Eugenio Perez, Enrique B. Mag-alona. Jose A. Dorad o. Teodoro Camacho, Arsenio Bonifacio. Regino Veridiano.

COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE (Dee. 18, 1935) Hon. Felipe BUencamino, Jr., Buenaventura Rodriguez. Pedro C. Hern acz, Guillermo Z. Villanueva, Juan S. Alano, Benigno S. AqUino, .. Jose Cojuangco, Norbe rto A. Roque, Dominado r M. Tun.

-Cont'd.

Hon. Eusebio Orense, Celestino Rodriguez, " Sixto Brillantes, " Jose Ozamis, " Mauro Verzosa, " Eligio G. Lagman, N. T. Rupisan, " Manu el A. Alzate, " Tomas Dizon, Francisco Celebrado, " Pedro C. H ernaez, " Ombra AmHbangsa, " J ose A. Dorado, " Regino Veridiano, " Leon BOl"l"omeo, " Potenciano Lesaca, " Arsenio BonifaCio, " Tomas Buenaflor, " Enrique B. Magaiona, " Norberto Romualdez.

"

Comm. on Agriculture--Cont'd. Hon . Manuel Fortieh. Ruperto Montinola, Victorino M. Salcedo, Vicente T. Law, Leon Borromeo, Olegario B. Clarin, Tomas Dizon, Daniel Maramba. Eligio G. Lagm:m , Jose Ma. Veloso, Tomas Buenailor, .. Tomas L. Cabili. COlIUtflTTEE ON APPROPRlATONS (Dec. 13, 1935) Hon. Tomas Qppus, " Eugenio Perez, Jose E. Romero, .. Claudio Sandoval, " Pedro Magsalin, .. Justino Nuyda,

Comm. on Approp .---Cont'd. Hon. Vicente Agan, " Felipe Buencamino, Jr., " Nicolas Buendia. " Tomas Dizon. " Regino Veridiano. .. Narciso Ramos. " J ose A. Angara, J ose C. Zulueta. Tomas Clemente, Juan T orralba, Vicente Rama, " J ose Ozamiz, ,. Romualdo C. Quimpo, " Felipe E. Jose, " J ose P. Fausto. Jose A. Dorado, .. T om as L. Cabili, ,. Camilo Os ias, .. Apolonio D. Curato, .. Mru.:imo M. KaJaw. .. Benito SOli"en,


798

CO RNEJO 'S C01olMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PIULIPPINES

Comm. on Approp.-Cont'd.

Comm. on Civ. Serv.--Cont'd.

Comm. on Com.-Co-nt路d.

H on. Pedro Gil, Gregorio Perfecto, CaliJ:to C. Za ldi va r.

H on. Cecilio L. Maneja, P edro Vera, Anacleto 8 . Ramos. Gregorio Pe rfecto.

Hon. Eligio G. Lagman, Bernardo L . Bucnafe, Vicente Ag'an, Agaton R. Ya r a non, Jus tino Nuyda, Antolin D . Tan, Anadeto B. Ramos, Romualdo C. Quimpo,

Agapito Gardu Que.

COMMITTEE ON CODES (Dec. 19 . 1935)

COM MITTEE ON AVIATION ( Dec:. 19, 19j5) lion. Juan L . Luna, E nrique D. Magalona, .. Tomas BucnaC]or, Miguel Cuen co, " R egina V eridiano, Jose Ozamiz, Sinsuat Dalabsrsn, Felipe E. J ose, Tomas Confesor, Agaton R. Yaranon. Pascual B. A:z.an1;>t. COMMITTEE ON BANKS AND CORPO RATIONS. (Dec. 19, 1935) H on. Pedro C. H e rnae z. J O:$C Cojuangco, Celestino Rodriguez, " Tomas O1'1'U5, Ruperto Montinola, Pio V. Cor pus, Enrique B. Magalona, Benito Soliven, Jus tino Nuyda , Vicente Ra ma, Guillermo Z. Villanueva, P edro Vera, Pedro Gil, .. Manuel A. Alzute A gap ito GardUQue,

COMM rTTEE ON BILLS ON THIRD R EA DING <Dec. 17. 1935)

H on. Celestin o Rodrig uez, J ose P . Faustjno R omualdo C. Quimpo, Gabriel F. Fabell a, Mauro VenO:!:R, J ose A. Dorado. Tomas L . Cabili, J ose Bonto, Manuel A. Alzate Sixto Brillanles. Juan L. Luna, J ose A. A ngara. Ca lixto O. Zaldivar, Jus tiniano S. Montano.

It

COMMITTI F. ON FISH 1NG INDUSTRY (Dec. 19, 1935)

- 'j:

COMMITTEE ON COINS ( Dec. 19, 1935) Hon. Antolin D. Tan, Manuel Ro xas, N. T. Rupisan. Eugenio P e rez, J ose Ma. Veloso. Regina Veridiano. Bernardo L. Bue nnfe , Agaton R. Ya ranon , Francisco Celebl'ado, Ulpiano R. Anadon , COMMITTEE ON COMMERCE AND IND USTRY ( Dec. 19, 1935)

H an. Pia V. Corpus , Dom inador M . T a n, Eligio G. Lag-man. lion. Duenaven t ura Rodrigue:!:, Margarito E. Revilles. Gregorio Perfecto, " Norberto A. Roque, Jose E. Rom ero. Pedro Vera, Maximo M, Kalaw J ose Cojuangco, Jose C. Zulueta, Dlpinno R. Anadon, Pedro Sabido, Hilario Abelln na, .. J ose Q:!:amh, Eugenio Perez, Apolinio D. eurato. COMMITTEE ON CIVIL SERVl CE Marcelo Adduru, ( Dec. 19, 1935) Buenaventu ra R odriguez, lIon. Tomas S. Clemente, Arsenio Bonifacio, J us tino Nuyda. Dominador M, Tan. COMMITTEE ON T omas Confesor, COMM UN ICATIONS Cnlix to O. Zaldivar, (Dec. 19, 193 5) Gabriel F. Fabella, H on. UHIael Tumbokon, Margarito E. Revilles, " Francisco Cclebrado, .. Tomas L. Cab iii, Hi lario Abellana, Geo rge K. Tait, J ose A. Angara, .. Marcelo Adduru , JOse A. Dorado. AgaOOn It. Yaranon. Bue na ventura Rodriguez.

H a n . Emilio de la Paz, Victorino M . Salcedo, Pedro Magsa lin , Claudio Sandoval, Vicente T. Lnzo, Eugenio Perez, P edro Vera, J ose Ma. V eloso. Antolin D. Tan , Ombra Amilbangsa, T omas Oppu:; , Apolon io D . Curato, Jose P. Fausto, Justiniano Garduque, COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN RELATJONS (Dec. 17, 1935) H on. Manuel A. Aizate, Guillermo Z. Vllanueva, Ca milo Osias, Margarito E. Rev illes. Miguel Cuenco, Manuel Roxas, Vicente T. Lazo. George K. Tait, Ben ito Soliven, Juan L. Luna , Maxim o M. Kalaw, Fran cisco Celebrado, Ruperta Montinola, Rafael Tumbokon, Ombra Amilbangsa. COMMITTEE ON FOREST3 (Dec. 19, 1935) H on. Cecilio L. Maneja. J uan Bocar , Mar~elo Add uru, Anacleto B. Ramos , Norberto A. Roque, " Tomas L. Cabili, " Saturnino Moldero, Leon Borromeo. Romualdo C. Quimpo, Agu:;tin Y. Kintanar. COMMITTEE ON FRAN CHISES (Dec. 19. 1935) H on. Vicente Agan, J ose O zamiz,


799

THE NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

Comra.

on

Franchiu.s-Cont'd.

Hon. Juan Bocar, .. Pedro Sabi\io, Pedro C. Hernaez, " Miguel Cuenco, Benito Soliven, Bernardo L. Buenafe, Tomas L. Bue naflor, .. Francisco ' Lavidez, Tomas L. Cabili, " Pio V. Corpus, Emilio de la Paz, J os'c P. Fausto,

COMMITTEE ON FRIAR LANDS (Dec, 19, 1935,) Han. Justiniano S. Montano, Vicente Rama, " Teodoro Camacho, " Ruperto Montinola, Antonio Villarama, Pedro Magsalin, .. Jose Ma. Veloso, .. Apolonio D. Curato, Ruperto Kapunan.

COMMITTEE ON HEALTH (Dec. 19, 1935) Hon. Antonio Villarama, " Rafael Tumbokon, Pedro Gil, Antolin D. Tan, Tomas S. Clemente .. Bernardo L. Buenafe, Eligio G. Lagman, Miguel Cuenco, Regino Verldlano, " Juan B. Alano, Saturnino Moldero, Hilario Abellana, Olegario B. Clarin.

COMMITTEE ON INTERNAL GOVERNMENT (Dec, 17, 1935) H on. Marcelo Adduru, .. Gabriel F. Fabella, Benito So liven, Juan L. Luna, .. Juan Bocar, .. Justiniano S. Montano, Ulpiano R. Arzadon. COMMITTEE ON JUDICIARY (Dec. 17, 1935) Hon. Pedro Magsalin, .. Eusebio Drense, Claudio Sandoval, " Benito Soliven, .. Agustin Y. Kintanar, J ose A. Dorado, .. Francisco Lavidez,

Comm, on Judiciary-Cont'd.

Comm. on Mines-Cont'd

Hon. Calixto O. Zaldivar Ruperto Kapunan, Eligio G. Lagman, Anacleto B. Ramos , Juan S. Alano, Margarito E. Revilles, Regino Veridiano,

COMMITTEE ON LABOR AND IMMIGRATION (Dec. 19, 1935)

COMM ITTEE ON NATIONAL COMPANIES

Hon. Enrique B. Magalona, Felipe E. Jose, .. Migue l Cuenco, " Hilario Abellana, Margarita E. Revilles , Vicente Rama, Agaton R. Yaranon . Marcelo Adduru, Jose Cojuangco, Jose A. Dorado, Nicolas Buendia, Juan S. Alano, Jose P. Fausto, Rafael Tumbokon, Felipe Buencamino, Jr.

( Dec, 17, 1935 )

COMMITTEE ON MANILA AND CHARTERED CITIES (Dec. 19, 1935) Hon. Pedro Gil, Felipe E. Jose, Nicolas Buendia, Enrique B. Magalona, Emilio de Ill. Paz, Gregorio Perfecto, Francisco Lavidez. â&#x20AC;˘

I

I

COltfMITTEE ON MINDANAO AND SPECIAL PROVINCES (Dec. 19, 1935) Hon. Apolonio D. Curato, Ombra Amilbangsa, Sinsuat Balabaran, Manuel Fortich, Romualdo C. Quimpo, Leon Borromeo, Juan S. Alano, Bernardo L. Buenale, Marcelo Adduru, George K. Tait, .. Saturnino Moldero, " Tomas Buenaftor, Vicente Rama, Felipe E. Jose. COMMITTEE ON MINES (Dec. 19, 1936) H on. Pedro Sabido, Jose A. Angara, Emilio de la Paz, Nicolas Rafols , Narciso Ramos,

Hon. Cecilio L. Maneja, Eligio G. Lagrnan, Enrique B. Magalona, Tomas Oppus, Benito Soliven, Tomas Confesor, Felipe E. Jose, Camilo Osias, Buenaventura Rodriguez, Saturnino Moldero.

'1),

Hon. Jose Cojuangco, Ruperto Montinola, Olegario B. Clarin, Eligio G. Lagman, N. T. Rupisan, Pedro Sabido, Tomas Coniesor , Tomas Dizon, Apelonio D. Curato, Manuel A. Aizate, Regino Veridiano, Agus tin Y. Kintanar, Pio V. Corpus, Benito Soliven, Pascual 8. Azanza.

COMMITTEE ON NATIONAL DEFENSE (Dec. 5. 1935) Hon. Claudio Sandoval, Daniel Maramba, .. Felipe Huencamino, Jr. Benigno S. Aquino, Pedro Magsalin, Benito Soliven, Potenciano Lesaca, Dominado r M. Tan , Jose A. Dorado, Maximo M. Kalaw, Leon Borromeo, Vicente Rama, Tomas Conresor, Gregorio Perfecto, Sinsuat Balabaran, Camilo Osias, Guillermo Z. Villanueva, Tomas S. Clemente, Marcelo Adduru, Pascual B. Azanza.

COMMITTEE ON NATIONAL LANGUAGE (Sept. 22. 1936) Ho n. Norberto Romualdez, F e lipe E. Jose,


CORNEJO'S OOMMONWEAI;TH DIRE0TOItY' b'F THE PHILIPPINES

800'

Comm. on Nat. Lnngullge-.Cont'd .

Hon. OliganQ B. Glarin. Vicente Teodoro Be nito Ul p iano

"

Rama, Camac ho, Soliven. R. Arzadon. Pllscual B. Azanzn. Ped ro Gil, Pedro Sabido. CamBa Os ins, T o m as L. Cabili, AnacJeto B. Ramos, J ose Bonto.

COMMITTEB ON NAVIGATION (Dec. 19, 1935 ) Hon. Agus tin Y. Kin t anar, N OThe-rOO A. Ro qu e, Vicen te Rama, Nicolas Rafo ls, Gabriel F. Fabe lla, Juan Boear, .. Maximo M . Kala w, T om as Qppus, J ose B on OO, .. R om ualdo C. Quimpo, J ose A. Dorado, G uille rmo Z. V illanueva, Domi n ador M. Tan , .. Vicente Agan, .. T eodor o Ca macho.

COJ\.IMITTEE ON PATENTS (Dec. 19, 1!l35) H on . T o mas Dizon. An toli n D. Tan, Ombra Amilbangsa. Agato n R . Ya ra n on , Geor ge K. Tait, J ose P . F austo, Marga ri to E . R ev illes, Arse nio Bonifacio, Regino Ve ridiano J uan BocaI'. COMMITTEE ON PENSIONS ( Dec. 13, 1935) H on. J ustino N uyda, Euseb io Ore n s e, Agus tin Y. Kin tanar, Teodo r o Camcho, Ma rgarito E. R ev il!es, " Narciso Ramos, J ose Cojuangco, " R egi no Veridia no, " Eugen io P e rez, " M ax imo M. Kalaw, Benigno S. A qu ino, No r ber to Rom ualde z, .. Manuel Roxas, Ulpia no R . Arzadon,

COMMITTEE ON PRINTING (Dec. 19, 1935) H o n. Margarito E. Revilles, Pedro Vera, Jose Bonto, P o te nciano Lesaca, " Franc isco Celebrado, Bernardo L. Buenafe, Mauro Verzosa, Agaton R. Yaranon, " D o minador M . Tan.

Conim. on Pub. Instruction-Cont'd. Hon. Francisco Celebrado, Maximo M. Kalaw, Camilo Osias, Leon Borromeo, Sixto Brillantes, Jose P. Fausto, Tomas L. CabBi, Arsenio Bonifacio, Calixto O. Zaldivar, Jose A. Dorado. Justino 'Nuyda,

COMMITTEE ON PRIVILEGES (Dec. 19, 1935) H o n. Romualdo C. Quimpo, Ombra Amilbangsa, Eligio G. Lagman, Gregorio Perfecto, Gabriel F. Fabella, Sixto Brillantes, Bernardo L . Buenafe. COMMITTEE ON PROVINCIAL AND MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENTS (Dec. 19, 1935) R on. Potenciano Les a ca , Tomas Dizon, Rupe rto Montinola, Francisco Celebrado, Enriq ue B. Magalona, Nicolas Rafols, Be rnardo L. Buenafe, " Marcelo Adduru, To mas L. CabilL Victorino M. Salcedo, Elig io G. Lagman, Daniel Maramba, Buenave ntura Rodriguez, Agustin Y. Kintanar. COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC INSTRUCTION (Dec. 13, 1935) H on. Guillermo Z. Villanueva, " Euge nio Perez, P edro Magsalin, R a fael Tumbokon, Vicente Rama. .. Mauro Verzosa, An to nio Villarama, Eusebio Orense. J ose Bonto, A g us tin Y. Kintanar, Gabriel F. Fabella, Na rciso Ramos, George K. Tait, Romualdo C. Quimpo, Ma rgari to E. Revilles, Vicente T. Lazo, J uan L. Luna, .. Jose Ma. Veloso,

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC LANDS (Dec. 19, 1935) Hon. Ruperto Kapunan. Mauro Verzosa, Pedro Vera, Antolin D. Tan, Manuel Fortich, Apolonio D . .. Curato, Juan L. Luna, Tomas Dizon, Calixto O. Zaldivar. Tomas Buenaflor, Francisco Celebrado, " Tomas L. Cabili, Romualdo C. Quimpo, Pedro Sabido, N. T. Rupisan. COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC SERVICES (Dec. 19,

1935)

H o n. Arsenio Bonifacio, Manuel Fortich, Pedro Sabido. Antonio Villarama, Jose Ma. Veloso, Olegario B. Clarin, Agustin Y. Kintanar, Eugenio Perez, Gabriel F. Fabella, Regino Veridiano, Jose P. Fausto, Juan S. A lano, Norberta Romualdez.

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC WORKS (Dec. 19, 1935) Hon. M iguel Cuenco, Guille rmo Z. Villanueva. Pedro Vera, Enrique n. Magalona, Nicolas Rafols, Vice nte T. Law, Pedro Sabido, Rafael Tumbokon,


801

THE NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

Comm. on P ub. Works-Cont'd.

Co mm. on Re vis io n uf Laws-Cont'd. Hon. Benito Soliven. Pedro Sabido, Ulpiano R. Arzadon,

Han. Dominador M. Tan. " Eligio G. Lagman. N. T. Rupisan. Teodoro Camacho, Apolonio D. Curato, Manuel A. Alznte, Tomas Bue naflor. Justiniano S. Montano, Ruperta Kapunan, ,. Norberto A. Roque. " Agaton R. Yaranon. J uan Bocar, .. Arsenio Bonifacio. Celestino R odriguez, Olegario B. Clarin, Juan S. Alano, Sixto Brillantes, Pio V. Corpus, Emilio de In Paz, Saturnino Moldero, Victorino M. Salcedo, Mauro Verzosa, Potenciano Lesaca.

COMMITTEE ON RULES (Dec. 17, 1935) Hon . Jose E. Romero, Jose Ozamis, Daniel Maramba, P e dro Sabido, Nicolas Buendia, Gregorio Perfecto,

COMMITTEE ON RAILROADS ( Dec. 11. 1935) Hon. J ose Bonto, J ustiniano S. Montano, Jose A. Angara, Emilio de la Paz, Manue l Roxas, Vicente Rama, Daniel Maramba, Antonio Villarama, Maximo M. Kalaw, Tomas Confesor, ON REVISION OF LAWS (Dec. 13. 1935) Han. Jose Ozamis, Pedro Vera, Eusebio Orense, Miguel Cuenca, Guillermo Z. Villanueva, Pedro Magsalin, Tomas Oppus, Claudio Sandoval, Mauro Venosa, N. T. Rupisan , J ose P. Faus to,

COl'tIMITTEE

COMMITTEE ON WATER AND IRRIGATION (Dec. 19,1935) Hon. Calix-to O. Zaldivar, Vicente T. Lazo, Felipe Buencamino, Jr. .. Tomas S. Clemente, " Antonio Villarama. Camilo Osias, N. T. Rupisan , Bernardo L. Buenafe, " Tomas Buenaflor, COMMITTEE ON WAYS AND MEANS (Dec. 19, 1935) Hon. Max imo M. Kalaw, Celestino Rodriguez, Felipe Buencamino, Jr., Euge nio P e rez, " Manuel Roxas, Guillermo Z. Villanueva, Justino Nuyda, Nicolas Rafols , Claudio Sandoval, " Tomas Oppus, Tomas Confesor, Camilo Osias, Jose Ma. Veloso, Regino Veridiano, Tomas Dizon, " Teodoro Camacho, Be nigno S. Aquino, Francisco L avides,

Comm. on \Vays and Means- Cont'd. H on. Juan L. Luna, Grego rio Perfecto, Jose Ozamiz, 'Dominador M. Tan, Pedro Gil. " Pedro C. Hernaez, Justiniano S. Montano. Pio V. Corpus, Romualdo C. Quimpo, Mauro Verzosa, Pedro Vera, Calixto Zaldivar, Cecilia L. Maneja.

COMMITTEE ON RATES REDUC~ TION FOR PUBLIC SERVICES (Res. No. 37.) Hon. Gregorio Perfecto, Arsenio Bonifacio, Pedro Magsalin, " Pedro Gil, Ruperto Kapunan , .. Juan.s. Alano, .. Nicolas Bue ndia, .. Norbe rta Romualdez. Pas cual B. Azanza, Vicente Rama, Agapi to Gar duque , Eligio G. Lagman, Jose A. Dorado, Regino Veridiano. Francisco Lavidez TOBACCO SURVEY COMMITTEE ( Res. No. 34) H on. Mauro Verzosa, Vicente Rama, Agaten R. Yaranon, " E ugenio Perez, P e dro Gil, .. !da nuel A. Alzate. Sixto Brillantes. Vicente T. Lazo, Bernardo L. Buenafe, " R egino Veridiano, Marcelo Adduru, N. T. R upisan, Tomas S. Cleme nte, " Agapito Garduque, Ulpiano R. Arzadon.

OFFICERS OF THEl NATIONAL ASSEMBLY Pos ition

Name

Julian La 0 . ... . ........ .

Asst. Sec. & 'Chief-Clerk

Antonio A. Zacarias ..... . Laurente J . Lopez ........ . Narciso Diokno ... ... .. . . . . Ignacid Reyes ........ ..' Julio Villareal Jose del Rosario ..... . ... . Joaquin Celis . ... .. .. .... . J ase V. Marino .. ...•..•.. J ase R. Teotico ....... . ... . Jose Salud ......... . .. .. . . Jose Ramirez Rojo ... . ... . Vicente Diokno .. .. ... . .. .

Sec. to the Speaker Private Sec. to the Speaker Sergeant-at-Arms ....... . Chief Disbursing Officer .. Chief, Journal Division . .. , Chief, Bill.s Division Chief, Translating Division Ch ief, Records Division ... . Chief, Press Clipping Div.. . Chief, PToperty Division Chief, Com. Stenog. Div. . . Chief, Mailing Section ... . .

..

26

Address

60 M. H. del Pilar. Tel. 2-31-70. 121 L. Guerrero. Tel. 2-53-69. c/o Legislative Bldg. 106 Loreto. Pasay-McKinley Rd. , Makati. 1427 Enriquez. 112 San Marcelino Int. 551 Regidor, Quiapo. 1220 Carolina. 345 San Andres. 1310 Wa"hingion Rizal Pk. 622 Regidor. Tel. 2-81-21. 106 Loreto.


802

CO RNEJ O'S c m,lMO NWEALTH DIRECTORY OF T H E PHILI PPINES

THE COMMONWEALTH CHIEF EXECUTIVE

HON .

MA NUE L

Pre s iden t o f

the

L.

QUEZON

Philippines


OFFICE OF THE PRES'IDENT OF THE PHILIPPINES

803

DEPARTMENT

EXECUTIVE

THE PRESIDENT'S CABINET HON. HON. HON. HON. HON. HON. HON. HON.

MANUEL L. QUEZON ...... . ... . ... ............... President of the Philippines. SERGIO OSMENA ............ Vice President anJ Secretary of Public Instruction. ELPIDIO QUIRINO .................................... . . Secretary of Interior JOSE YULO . . ... Secretary of Justice. ANTONIO DE LAS ALAS ................................... Sem'etar)" of Finance EULOGIO RODRIGUEZ ....... . .......... Secretary of Agriculture and Commerce. MARIANO JESUS CUENCO ........ Secretary of Pub. Works and Communications. RAMON TORRES . ................. . ....... . . . ....... . ..... Secretary' of Labor. d

••••••••••••••••••

•••

•••••

••

••••••••••••••

OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE PHILIPPINES EXECUTIVE BUILDING

162 Aviles, San Migwel, Manila

Tel. 2· 24·91 (Private exchange connecting all oHices )

His Excellency MANUEL L. QUEZON President of the Philippines Res., Malacafian Palace, 162 Aviles J 0 RG E

B.

V A R GAS

JOS.E GIL Acting Assistan t Secretary to the President Res ., 147 N. Domingo, Sa n Ju an , Rizal.

Secretary to the President (with rank of Head of Department) Res., Kawilihan, Mandaluyong, Rizal.

ADVISORY AND I.EGAL STAFF Name

Position

Resid.ence Address

Francisco Enage . . . . . . . . . .

.Technical . Assistant .. . . .. .

118 Buendia, Taft Ave. Ext., Pasay, Rizal. 1 Valenzuela, Sta. Mesa, Manila. 611 San Marcelino, Manila.

...

.

Technical Assistant ... . ...

Luis P. Tones . .... .... .. . Manuel L. Roxas ....... ..

Legal Assistant . . .. . . . .... .Technical A.,ssis~ant in Charg~ of Sugar Office .. Army Assistant .... .. ... . Technical Assistant in charge of pub. wks & communication ..........

Benito Razon .... . .. ....

James B. Ord . . . . . . . . . . . . A. D. Williams ..... . .. . ...

.

1007 Georgia, Manila. 1335 Oregon, Manila.

-

Manila Hotel, Manila.


8'04

CORNli'HTO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECT ORY O F T H E PHILIP PINES

EXECUTIVE N a lIle

Evaristo de Lara ......•.• Apolinal'io S. de Leon .... . Pascual R. P imentel . . ... .

Guillermo Cabrera ....... . Fermin Ton'alba . . ....... .

Jose Ingles . . . . . . ........ . Angel Pulido ......... . . . . Eduardo Quintero .. ..... . Luis Serrano

Primitivo San Agustin Nick Kaminski ...... .

STA FF

P os ition

Address

Administrative Assistant Financial Assistan t Lgislative Assistant Tech nical Ass istant in charge of cabinet matters Technical Assistant in charge of spec. invest. .. Technical Assistant fo r special investigations . . .. Assistant in charge of local governments . .. ...... . A ssistant in charge of agricult ure, commeTce & labor Assistan t in cha r ge of educational matters, p ress releases a nd p ublications .. Assistant in charge of Malacanan household . . .. . . . . Caretaker of Malacafian Palace

839 Don Quijote, Sampaloc. 631 Merced, Paco. 2663 Antipolo Ext., Sampaloc. 1618 WJash ington Ave. 1 533 Sayson, Paco. 31 C. Reyes, San J uan, Rizal. 3 P ara iso, San Ju an , Rizal. 87 Mayon, St a . Ana .

1027

Ca stillejos, Sam paloc.

803 Taft Ave. Mal acafian Palace.

SECRETARIAL STAFF Major Manuel Nieto ..... .

Private Secreta.yy

600 Vermon t .

Mrs. Sofia R. de VeYTa • .

Asst. Private Secretary ... .

10 Lou r des, Pasay, Ri zal.

PROVOST OFFICE Major Ar senio Natividad (P.A.) Capt. Bonner F. Fellers . . • (U .S.A.) Lt. Dominador Mascardo .. (P.A.)

A ide-de-Camp

1118 Celestino Aragon.

Aide-de-Camp

27 Sta. Monica Apts.

Aide-de-Cam p

.460 S ta. Mesa, Ma ni la .

CLE RICAL STAFF Godofredo Dancel . .... . .. . I rineo Morelos ........ . .. . Bernabe Malvar .. '.. . ... . . Feliciano Tayag ..... . .... . Miguel A . Pajarill o ...... . Gabriel Atienza .......... .

Pardon Cler k • . ••••••• • • • Cable Clerk .... . . . . . . . .. . Proper ty Officer .. . . . . ..• . Action Clerk .... . ... .. .. . Clerk-Stenographer Clerk-Stenographer

907 Ma ria F ayo, Tondo. 525 Economia, Sampa loc. 221 Bambang, Manila . 79 E ndaya , Tondo, Manila. 2236 I nt. 4, Jua n Luna. 421 Aviles, San Miguel.


805

OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE PHILIPP1NES

CLERICAL STAFF-Continued. Position

Name

Benedicto R. de la Paz .. . . Pacifico Yanga .. .. ...... . Dionisio Rellosa .... .... . . Vicente Supleo .... . ..... . Miss Pilar Vidal .. . ..... . Mateo D. Cipriano ...... . . Graciano Camacho . ...... . Inocente.s Villegas ....... . Serapio Canceran . ......• . Silvestre Laveria ........ . Vicente Sal'miento ..... ',' . Miss Corazon N . Ohanco ." Mabini Laquindanurn ..... . Juan Ricacho ..... . ...... . Felino Neri ............ . Apoionio Navata ........ . Manuel G. Zamora ....... . Deogracias Geronimo . . ... . Eugenio Ma'rcelo ........ . Mauricio de la Cruz . .... . Crisanto Sta. Ana .. ..... .

Francisco Zarate . ....... . Procopio Maniquis

...... .

Eusebio S. Rozon ........ . Gaudencio Eustaquio .. .. . . Teodoro de los Santos . .. . Jose A. Balquiedra ... .... . Tomas M. U aje .. ........ . Miss Evelyn Rogers ... .• . Patricio Osmeiia .. ......• Vicente Alvarez, Jr .. . ... . . Ignacio Pefia ...........• . Emmanuel Arriola .. Faustino Borja . ......... . Salustiano Peiiaflor . .. ... . Pedro Landicho ...... ' ... . Ohristopher C. Trance .... . Calixto Silva .. .. ........ . Gavino Lopez . . .......... . Benjamin Tanega .. ...... . Nicasiq Santos Estrella ... . Vicente Mosquera ........ . Emilio Glinoga ...... . ... . Alejo Lopez .. .. .. .. ..... . Jose M. Evangelista ..... . Dominador Bisbal ....... . 1••••••

Records Clerk Records Clerk Stenographer .... . ...... . Stenographer ....•...•... Stenographer ... ..... .. . . Stenographer Stenographer ..... . .. • ... Stenographer ., .. . , ..... . Stenographer ....•.. . .•.. Stenographer . .. . .. .• .. .. Stenographer ........... . 'Stenographer .... ' .... . . . Stenographer . ...•....... Clerk ........... ... .. . . . Clerk . .... ............. . Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk

Address

128 Aguado, San Miguel. 1640 La Lorna, Caloocan. 526 Tayuman, Mani la. 15 Gen. San Luis, San Juan. 1215 Magdalena, Manila. 1065 Sa ntol, Manila. 1312 Gov. Forbes, Manila. 2250 Int. Juan Luna. 149-H Ayala Blvd. 109 Int. Aguado, San Miguel. 16 Santiago, Paco. 10 Churruca, Ermita. Parafiaque, Rizal. 60 Legaspi, Manila. 14 Taal, San Andres Ext. c/ o Malacanan Palace. 115 Foch Ave., San Juan. 616 Adelina, Sampaloc. 419 P. Leonci o, Sampaloc. 314 Lipa, Sampaioc. Pasig, Rizal. 155 Int. 22 Loreto, Samp. 551 Tayuman, Manila. 339 San Juan, Pasay, Rizal. 200 Aguado, San Miguel. 435 Decena, Pasay, Rizal. 109 Sta. Potenciana, Manila. 820 Aguilar, Azcarraga. 323 Padre Faura, Ermita. 145 Sanchez, San Miguel. 312 P . Campa, Sampaloc. 230 Pampanga, Gagalaiigin. 846 Tayuman, Manila. 497 Int. Batangas, Manila. ~47 Legarda, Sampaloc. 934 Anak fig Bayan, Paco. 1017 San Andres, Malate. Bocaue. Bulacan. 339 P. Leoncio, Sampaloc 220 NovaIiches, San Miguel. 902 Antonio Rivera, Tondo. 120 Reten, Sampaloc. 430 Pavia, Tondo. 939 Lealtad, Sampaloc. 52 Guidote, Sampaloc. 465 Tenejeros, Manila.


806

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

CLERICAL STAFF-Continued. Position

Name

Cecilia I. Cruz . .. . . ...... . David Valenzuela .

Vicente Torres ... ........ . Estanislao S. Ramos ..... .

J esus Cleofas ........... . Benigno Calaycay . . ...... . Marcelo Viray ........... . Ramon Llobrera Mariano Oducado . . . . .. .. . L ucio Ca rrasco . ......... . . Fidel Santiago .......... . H ennes Dizon ... . .... . . . . Guillermo Ramirez ....... . Eufemio Caparros .. ..... . . MaUl'o Garcia .. ......... . Fausto Yeso .. .... ... â&#x20AC;˘ .. . .

Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Messenger Messenger Messenger Messenger Messenger Messenger Messenger Messenger Messenger Messenger Junior Librar ia n

Laborer

Address

18 Biak-na-bato, Tando. 140 Tortuosa, Sampaloc. 140 Sanchez, Sa n Miguel. 1019 Georgia, Manila. 45 Tenejeros, Malabon, Rizal. 1066 Kansas Av~., Manila. 448 Antipolo, Manila. 113 Reten, Sampaloc. 502 Legarda, Sampaloc. 168-B Lardizabal, Samp. 159 Sta. Mesa, Mani la. Tenejeros, Malabon, Rizal. 878 Don Quijote, Sampaloc 1046 Soler, Sta. Cruz. 450 Dart, Paco. 1618 Dominga, Pasay, Rizal.

HON. JORGE B. VARGAS Secr-etar-y to the Pr-esident of the Philippines


807

PHILIPPIN E ARMY

COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES

ARMY

PHILIPPINl:

ARMY HEADQUARTmS MANILA (As of April I , 1937)

CHIEF OF STAFF

Major General PA ULlNO SANTO S -

Chief of Staff.

A路IDES-DE-CAMP Capt. ANTONIO N. VILLALOBOS - Senior Aide-de-Camp, Chief of Staff_ 1st Lt. JAIME C. VELASQUEZ - Junior Aide-de-Camp, Ohief of Staff_ DEPUTY CHIEF OF STAFF

Major General BASILlO J. VALDES -

Deputy Chief of Staff.


."0-\ .. ,, ..

I .u n .. , (".l,\ " r S "" I1< ...,n. "",,,,.Il,,, .. '

S", .. "leo.

GENEUAL S'IWFF, PHlLU"PINE ARMY

FROM LEFT TO RLGR,1': ColOll e l Rafnel Garcia. 3rd A ssistant Chief of S taff arid Chief, Div. of Supply nn,d Personnel : Co l. Charles £ . Liv ingston, Chief or Staff, Provost Marshal Division; Brigndier-General VIcente Lim, First Assistant Chief of Staff and Chief, WOE: Plans Division; Major-General Basilio J. Vn l de8~ Deputy Chief D,f Staff; Mnjor -Genernl p 'n ulino Snntos. Chief of Staff. P .A.; Major-General Jos e de los Reyes. Provost Marshal Genei nl. €c)1'lstabuiary Division: Colonel W. E. Dosser, Assistant Ch~ef o f Staff anet Ins pcetnr.Gcne rnl: Colon e1 FideJ V . Selrundo, 2nd ~si stnnt G hi e f of. Staff and, Chief, Inte llilrence, Ope:(Btio n s nna Tro.;n;nlr Division; and Lieutenant_Colonel Vic:-

CO

co o

a

~

cr.

~

"'o

z

i

"",.

S3 :.

"

"

~

o

~

."

~

OJ

~

e:"

"Z

'"'"


PHILIPPINE ARMY

AIDE-DE-CAMP

1st Lt. AGUSTIN G. GABRIEL -

Aide-de-Camp, Deputy Chief of Staff.

SECRETARY, GENERAL STAFF

Capt. ANTONIO N. VILLALOBOS -

Secretary of the General Staff.

Capt. RAFAEL JALANDONI - On duty. 1st Lt. ALE.JANDRO B. AC-AC (Res) - On duty.

INTELLIGENCE, OPERATIONS & TRAINING DIVISION

Colonel FIDEL V. SEGUNDO, (Maj., PS, U SA l-Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2. Capt. ELIAS DIOQUINO - Actg. Ohief, Org. & Tng. Section. Capt. JUAN P . VILLASANTA (Res) - On duty. 1st Lt. RAMON ENRIQUEZ - On duty, Training Section . 1st Lt. JAIME C. VELASQUEZ - On duty', Training Section. 1st Lt. ANTONro QUIRINO (Res) - On duty. 1st Lt. FORTUNATO P . 'CATALON (Res) - On duty. 2nd Lt. ADRIANO VALDEZ' - On duty, Training Section. 3rd Lt. FRED R. CASTRO' (Res) - On duty. 3rd Lt. ALEJANDRO D. REGALA (Res) - On duty.

809


810

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHfLIPPINES

DEFENSE PLANS DIVISION

Brigadier General VI CENTE LIM -

Assistant Ohief of Staff, G-l.

Ma jor EMMANUEL A. BAJA, - Chi ef, Executive Section. Capt . JOSE E . OLIVARES, P S, U SA. - Chief, Projects Section. Capt. CALIXTO DUQUE - Chi ef, Planning SectiOJ1. 1st Lt. MANUEL L. VERZO SA - On duty. 1st Lt. HUMBERTO! PICCIO - Aide-de-Camp, Asst. Chief of Staff, G-l. 1st Lt . ALFONSO DABU - On dut y, Projects Section. PHILIPPINE MILITARY ACADEMY

Capt. PASTOR MARTELINO, P S, USA - Superintendent. Capt. VICENTE J . PUN SALANG, MC - Post Surgeon & Asst. Prof of Military Hy路giene. Capt. ALEJANDRO MELCHOR (Res ) - Head of Dept. of Eng. & of Math. & Natural Philosophy; Const. Officer. 1st Lt. EMMANUEL S. CEPEDA, PS, USA-Actg. Comd't. of Cadets; Head, Dept of Tactics. 1st Lt. JOSE GONZALES - Cadet Mess Officer & Instructor. 1st Lt . SIMON GARCIA - Asst. Comd't of Cadets; Treas., C. C. A. P. & Instructor. 1st Lt. FILOMENO VILLALUZ - Instructor (T. D., ROSS) 1st Lt. TIBURCIO BALLESTRO S - Sup & Fin. Off.; Mess Off. and Instructor. 1st Lt. PATRICIO BORROMEO - Actg. Adj., Post Ex. Off. & Instr. 1st Lt. APOLINAR G. FAJARDO - Post Provo Marshal; Consolidated Mess Off. & Ins路 tructor. 1st Lt. JO SE F . REYES (Res ) - Actg. Head, Dept. of Lang. & Social Arts. 1st Lt. ALFREDO M. SANTO S (Res ) - Tactical Off. & Instructor. 1st Lt . FRANCISCO T. ROQUE (MC Res) - Asst. Post Surgeon. 2nd Lt. ENRIQUE L. JURADO - Instructor; Master of the Sword. 2nd Lt. TIRSO G. FAJARDO - Plans & Training Officer; Tactical Officer & Instructor. 2nd Lt. ALFREDO D. PECRSON - Instructor. 2nd Lt. RAFAEL PARGAS - Asst. Master of the Sword i Asst. Tactical Officer & InstructoT. 2nd Lt. VIVENCIO D. DAYOT (Res) - Instructor, Asst. QM., Finance and Construction Officer 2nd Lt. ANANIA S DIOKNO, Jr. (Res)' - Instructor.


PHILIPPINE ARMY

811

Srd Lt. MARIANO T. HIDALGO (Res) - Asst. Taciical Officer and Instructor. 3rd Lt. JOSE G. MONTELIBANO (Res) - Instructor. 3rd Lt. BLAS ALEJANDRE (Res) - Asst. Tactical Off. & Instructor. 3rd' Lt. SALVADOR ABCEDE (Res) - Asst. Master of the Sword; Asst. Tact. Off. & Instructor. 3rd Lt. SALVADOR T. VILLA (Res) - Asst. Tactical Off. & Instructor. Srd. Lt. RODOLFO C. MENDOZA (Res) - In structor. 3rd Lt. FRANCIS R. JUAN (Res) - Asst. to the Sec. of the Academic Board & Instructor. Prob. 3" Lt. ABELARDO B. CARRILLO (Res) - Dept. of Engineering & Asst. Construction Officer. Prob. 3" Lt. CIRILO C. DAZA (Res) - Asst. Post Adjutant. Prob. 3" Lt. ELPIDIO P. DUQUE (Res) - On duty, Dept. of Math. & Nat. Philosopny. R.O.T.C., MANILA

Major SALVADOR F. REYES, PS, USA - Superintendent, ROTC Units, P. 1.; Commandant, ROTC, U. P., Manila; Detailect at HPA. Capt. RICARDO POBLETE, PS, USA. - Adj ., ROTC, U. P.; Plans & Tng. Off. Capt. ALFREDO RAMIREZ - Commandant, RDTC, U.S.T. 1st Lt. BIENVENIDO M. ALBA, PS, USA - Istl'. in FA, U. P. 1st Lt. ANGELES R. BARRIOS - Instr., ROTC, San Bed~ College. 1st Lt. CEFERINO F . GARCIA - Instr., ROTC, U.S.T. lst Lt. FRANCISCO SANDICO - Instr., ROTC, Adamson Sch. of I.C. 1st Lt. ADOLFO EUFEMIO - On Duty, ROTC, U.P. 1st Lt. E. BAI'lES (Res.) - On duty, ROTC, U. P. 2nd Lt. NICOLAS GABUTINA - Instr., ROTC, P.N. S. 2nd Lt. EULOGIO BALAO - Instr., ROTC, U. P. 2nd Lt. ANTONIO C. ALANDY - Comd't., ROTC, De La Salle Col. 2nd Lt. MARCOS G. SOLIMAN - Actg. Comd't., ROTC, P.S .A.T. 2nd Lt. PEDRO DEANG - On duty, ROTC, U. P. 2nd Lt. LEOPOLDO L. NIEVERA (Res) - On duty, ROTC, U. P. 2nd Lt. SEVERINO M. OBAI'lA (Res) - On duty, ROTC, U.P. 3rd Lt. JOSE V. H. BANZON (Res) - On duty, ROTC, U. P. 3rd Lt. TOMAS C. BENITEZ (Res) - On duty, ROTC, U.P. 3rd Lt. NICANOR T. JIMENEZ (Res) - On duty, ROTC, U. P. 3rd Lt. FELIX S. MANIEGO (Res) - On duty, ROTC, U. P. 3rd Lt. SIXTO S. DE SANTOS (Res) - On duty, ROTC, Adamson Sch. of 1. C. 3rd Lt. JORGE BARRENENGOA (Res) - On duty, ROTC, U.S.T. 3rd Lt. IGNACIO CAPILI, Jr. (Res) - On Duty, ROTC, P.N.S. 3rd Lt. CONRADO B. UICHANCO (Res) - On duty, ROTC, U. P . On duty, ROTC, U. S. T. 3rd Lt. FLAVIANO P. OLIVARES (Res) 3rd Lt. ALBERTO O. FENIX (Res) - On duty, ROTC, U. S. T. 3rd Lt. JACINTO T. GAVINO (Res) - On duty, ROTC, U. P. 3rd Lt. MACARIO PERALTA, Jr. (Res) - On duty, ROTC, P. S. A. T. 3rd Lt. ROQUE PEREDO, Jr. (Res) - On duty, ROTC , P . N. S. 3rd Lt. SALVADOR J. CAMPOS (Res) - On duty, ROTC, P. S. A. T. R.O.T.C., U.P., LOS BANOS, LAGUNA

Capt. PABLO R. SUA REZ - Assistant Commandant. 1st Lt. RICARDO BUHA Y (Res) - On duty.


8l~

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE P HILIPPINES

R.O.T.C., CEBU

Instructor, Junior College. 2nd Lt. BENIGNO A. ALEJANDRE 3rd Lt. SEBASTIAN JA VELOSA (Res) - Comd't., Southern Institute.

R.O .T .C., SILLIMAN UNIVERSITY, DUMAGUETE, NEGROS OR.

1st Lt. JU LIA N C. ASPILLA -

Instructol'. Autlwrized 1937 31

ROTC DETACHMEWf; Enlisted men

Act11(tl

April J

13

RESERVE OFFICERS' SERVICE SCHOOL, BAGUIO

Capt. EUS TAQUIO S. BACLIG, PS USA - Commandant. Capt. GABRIEL R. GADOR - Executive Adjutant. Capt. DONATO M. HALILI (Res) - Inst. & P X Officer. Capt. AMADO B. MAGTOTO (Res) - Instructor. Capt. J UAN SALCEDO, Jr. (MC Res) ~ Surgeon & Mess Officer. 1st Lt. F ILOMENO B. VILLALuz - Temp. Instructor. 1st Lt. JU AN C. DEVEZA, Jr. (Res) - Instructor. 1st Lt. MARIANO S. GONZALES (Res) - Instr. & Poso Athletic Off. 1st Lt. LEOPOLDO C. MARTELINO (Res) - Actg. Sup., Prop. & Fin. Off. 2nd Lt. GUILLERMO NAKAR - Tactical Officer. 2nd Lt. DIONISIO S. OJEDA - Tact. Off. & Post Range Officer. 2nd Lt. JESUS L. GONZALES (Res) - Instr. &i Post Utilities Officer. 3l'd Lt. V. N. AYAAY - On duty. 3rd Lt. J. A. SANCHEZ - On duty. 3rd Lt. P. Q. MOLINA - On duty. 3rd Lt. C. M. de CASTRO - On duty. 3rd Lt . G.M. MANIKAN - On Duty. Brd Lt. J. Q. ARCE - On duty. 3rd Lt. E. B. VILr;ALUZ - On duty. 3rd Lt. JONAS VICTORIA - On duty. THE ADJUTANT GENERAL'S SERVICE

Major FEDERI CO G. OBOZA - The Adjutant General. Capt. FELICISIMO I. TORRES - Asst. The Adjutant Gen. & Chief, C. R. S. PHILIPPINE ARMY BAND

1st Lt. ALFONSO J . FRESNIDO -

Comma nding OfficeIj & Conductor. A II-thonzed 1937

PA BAND: Musicians ...

81

MEDICAL SERVICE

Lieut. Col. VICTORIANO LUNA - Chief. Major EM ILIANOi M. PANIS - Assistant Chief.

Actual April 1

81


PHILIPPINE ARMY

813

DIVISION OF SUPPLY AND PERSONNEL

Colonel RAFAEL L. GARCIA, (Maj., PS, USA) -

Asst. Chief of Staff, G-3.

Maj. HIPOLITO GARMA - Executive Officer & Director of Supply. 1st Lt. LAURO D. DIZON - Director of Personnel. 1st Lt. GREGORIO P. BU&O - Asst. Director of Supply. 3rd Lt. LEONIDAS DE LA LLANA (Res) - Asst. Dir. of Personnel. QUARTERMASTER SERVICE

Lieut. Colonel MIGUEL AGUILAR - Ohief. Major D. O. VICTORIA (Res) - On duty. Capt. R. GARCIA, (Res) - On duty. 1st Lt. BENEDICTO GALINATO - Chief, Storage'& Issue Section. 1st Lt! BERNARDINO JARDELEZA - Executive Officer. 1st Lt. FRANCISCO NAVARRETE - On duty. 1st Lt. CORNELIO T. LOPEZ - On duty. 1st Lt. ROSALIO C. SALUDARES - Post Exchange Officer. 1st Lt. JUAN MARQUETA (Res) - On du:ty. 2nd Lt. FLORENTINO V. CARDENAS - Paymaster. 2nd Lt. BRICCIO S. HENSON (Res) - On duty. HEADQUARTERS CORPS OF ENGINEERS

1st Lt. 1st Lt. 1st Lt. 2nd Lt.

VICENTE L. TORRES - Executive Officer. JOSE H. PANGANIBAN (Res) - Chief, Operations Division. B. E. DESIDERIO (Res) _ Asst. Chief, Operations Division. PRIMITIVO 1. DE GUZMAN _ Chief, Administrative Division.


814

CORNEJ O'S COMMONWEALTH DlRECTORY OF THE P H ILIPPINES

2nd 2nd 2nd 3rd 3rd 3rd

Lt. Lt. Lt. Lt. Lt. Lt.

J OSE A. BERNALES (Res ) - Chief , Plans Division. PABLO V. AREVALO (Res) - Chief, Supply Division. EMILIO S. ALMA RIO (Res) - On duty. CARLOS G. CRUZ (Res) - Asst. Chief, Plans Division. RIGOBERTO ATIENZA (Res) - On duty. L. R. RELUNIA (Res) - On. duty , Operations Division. ORDNANC E S ERV ICE

1st Lt. H UG O V. CUNANAN - Actg. Chief.. " 1st Lt. A GUST IN B. DOMONDON (Res) - On duty.

PROVOST MARSHAL GENERAL'S OFFICE

Major Ceneral JOS E DE LO S REYE S -

Provost Marshal General J G-4.

AIDES ·D E· CAMP

Capt. JU AN A. H ERNAN DE Z (Res ) - Senior Aide.de·Camp, Provo Mar. Gen. 2nd Lt. F LO RE N TIN O V. CARDE N AS - Junior Aide· de·Camp, Provo Mar. Gen . INTELLIGENCE SECTION

Colonel J U A N DOMI NG U E Z - Chief. Capt. JOSE P . GU IDO - Assist a nt Chief. Capt. JOSE A GAWI N ( Res) - On duty'. 1st Lt. JUAN BRI LLAN T ES - On duty. 1st Lt. FLOREN CIO SELGA - On du ty. 1st Lt. A. G. GABRIEL - On du ty. 1st Lt. E DWI N D. ANDREWS - On duty. 1st Lt. J UAN CRAME - Recor der , Opium Corrun. & Opium C. Comm. 1st Lt. A MAD E O M. CABE (Res) - On duty. 2nd L t. THOMA S M. GONZALES (Res ) - Press Officer.


815

PHILIPPINE ARMY

RECRUITING DIVISION Major IRINEO BUENCONSEJO - Chief. Capt. JUAN A. HERNANDEZ (Res) - On duty. Capt ISAAC CAPAYAS (Res) - On duty. 1st Lt. MANUEL L. VERZOSA - On duty; Member & Recorder, Army' Pension Board.

CONSTABULARY DIVISION

Colonel CHARLES E . LIVINGSTON Capt. PEDRO F. 1st Lt. JOSE G. Cap!. PEDRO N. 1st Lt. FERMIN

Ohief of St aff.

TABUENA _. Executive Officer. POLOTAN ~ Asst. to Executive Officer. JAMINOLA (Res) - Chief, Fireanns & Expl. Section. F. PERALTA (Res.) - On Duty.

INSPECTOR GENERAL'S DIVISION Col. JUAN C. QUIMBO - Actg. Insptr. Gen. (T. D., Dept. of Int.) Lt. Col. ALEJO VALDES - On duty. Major JOSE V. AGDAMAG - Inspector. Major CELESTINO NAVARRO - Inspector.

SIGNAL CORPS Major PACIANO TANG CO - Actg. Chief, Signal Officer. Capt. JUAN BAUTISTA (Res) - Asst. to Actg. Chief Signal Officer & Executive Officer, 1st Radio Company. A uth orized

FIRST RADIO COMPANY: Enlisted men

AIR CORPS 1st Lt. WILLIAM L. LEE, AC, USA _ Chief. Major MANUEL G. OLYMPIA, MC - Flight Surgeon.

193 7

Actual A p ril J

65

51


816

CORNEJO'S COM1.lONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PillLIPPINES

Capt. P. G. POTENCIANO (MC Res) - Asst. Flight Surgeon. 1st Lt. BASILIO FERNANDO - Asst. Ohief (Student Flying Off.) 1st Lt. HUGH A. PARKER, AC, USA - Operations, & Training Officer. OFFICERS DETAILED FROM THE P . A.

Major ARSENIO NATIVIDAD - Aide-de-Camp to His Excellency, the President of the Philippines. Major EMMANUEL A. BAJA - Aide-de-Camp to His Excellency, the Vice-President of the Philippines. 1st Lt. DOMIN AD OR T. MASCARDO - Aide-de-CamPl to His Excellency, the President of the Philippines. OFFICERS PERFORMING OTHER DUTIES IN ADDITION TO THEIR OWN AS OFFICERS OF THE ARMY

Col. W1ll. E. DOSSER - On duty, B. P. W., Baguio, Benguet. Col. L. R. STEVENS - Special Agent, Bu. of Non-Christian Tribes. Col. J . C. QUIMBO - On duty', Department of the Interior. Major D. GUTIERREZ - Provincial Gcvernor of Cotabato. Major ALBERTO RAMOS - On duty', Department of the Interior. Major S. DE JESUS - T. D., Dept. of the Interior with station in Davao, Davao. Major TIRSO CORONADO - T.D., Dept. of the Interior. Capt. P. GUERRERO - On duty, B.P.W., Naga, Camarines Sur. Capt. E. LASAM - On duty, B . P.W., Cebu, Cebu. Capt. F. P . DONESA - On duty, B.P.W., Iloilo, Iloilo. Maj. LEON ANGELES - Provincial Governor, Sulu. Capt. R. F. FERNANDEZ - On duty, B . P . W., Legaspi, Albay. Capt. M. S. TORRALBA - On duty, B.P. W., Lingayen, Pangasinan. Capt. M. OPPUS - On duty, B.P.W., Ste. Cruz, Laguna. Capt. C. MORTERA - Dep. Provo Gov. & Spl. Tax Coli., Cotabato. Capt. B. R. SISON - On duty; Dept. of the Interior will" station in Tarlac, Tarlac. 1st Lt. V. NUNAG - Ad Interim, Ex-officio Justice of the Peace, Bongao, Tawi-Tawi Dist. 1st Lt. A. B. PINEDA - On duty, B.P.W., San Fernando, Pampanga. 1st Lt. S. N A VARRO - Dep. Gov. Spl. Tax Coli. Butuan, Cotabato & Postmaster of the Bu. of Posts. 1st Lt. L. T. JAVALERA - In charge, Mun. Police Force, Cavite, Cavite. 1st Lt. J. N. ESQUEJO - Dep. Provo Gov. of Glan & Buayan, Cotabato. 1st Lt. S. G. VERGARA - On duty with Cebu City Police. 1st Lt. D. A. ALVARADO - Dep. Provo Gov. & Spl. Tax Coll. C. Ward, Bual, Cotabato. 1st Lt. A. V. BARTOLOME - On duty, B.P.W., Malolos, Bulacan. 1st Lt. L . C. TORRES - Actg. Chief of Police, City of Zamhoanga. 1st Lt. OSCAR SALES - On duty, B. P. W., Cabanatuan, Nueva Ecija. 1st Lt. 1. CARLOS - Dep. Provo Gov. for Mpl. Dist., Lebak & Salaman, Cotabato. 1st Lt. E. C. VICENTE - Dep. Provo Gov. for Kiamba & Kling, Cotabato. 2nd Lt. A. S. ONG (Res, Ex-PC) - Actg. Chief of Police, City of Davao. OTHER OFFICERS

Major MANUEL ROXAS (Res) - On duty, IIPA. Major M. ADDURU (Res) - On duty, IIPA. Capt. TOMAS CABILI (Res) On duty, II PA.


PH ILIPPINE ARMY

817

2nd Lt. LEON PUNZALAN - Detailed at Ord. Field Servo School at Metuchen, U. S. A. 2nd Lt. J. FRANCISCO - Detailed at Rantoul, Illinois, U . S .A . Flying Cadet J . A. VILLAMOR - Detailed at San Antonio, Texas, U.S.A.

FmST DIVISION, REGULAR ARMY DIVISION HEADQUARTERS CAMP MURPHY, RIZAL

COMMANDER

Brigadier General GUILLERMO B. FRANCISCO AIDE-DE-CAMP

First Lieutenant ANGEL OPPUS CHIEF OF STAFF

Colonel MATEO M. CAPINPIN ASSISTANT CHIEF OF STAFF FOR PERSONNEL, G-I

Captain LAURO HERNANDEZ


818

CO RNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PH ILIP PINES

ASSISTANT CHIEF OF STAFF FOR MILITARY I NTELLIGENCE, G-2

First Lieutenant FIDEL N_ CRUZ 2nd Lt. P. MONZON (Res)-Asst. ASSISTANT CHIEF OF STAFF FOR OPERATIONS AND TRAINING, G-3

First Lieutenant FIDEL N. CRUZ 1st Lt. R. O. TIRONA (Resl-Asst. ASSISTANT CHIEF OF STAFF FOR SUPPLY, G-4

First Lieut. ANGEL OPPUS ADJUTANT GENERAL

Captain LAURO HERNANDEZ 1st Lt. M. ROMUALDEZ, Jr. (Res )- Asst. JUDGE ADVOCATE

Maj. EMILIA NO M. PANIS Actg. Chief QUARTERMASTER

1st Lt. MANUEL T. PAZ SURGEON

Major MANUEL G. OLYMPIA, MC FINANCE

F irst Lieutenant VIVENCIO ORAlS 2nd Lt. A. A. JIMENEZ (Res) - Asst . SIGNAL OFFICER

Captain JUAN BAUTISTA (Res )- Actg. POST PROVOST MARSHAL

First Li eutenant HONORATO TENERIFE ENGINEER O F FICER

1st Lt. AGUSTIN L. MATHA Y (Res)-On duty. 2nd Lt. SILVINO Z. MACARANAS (Res)-Camp Engr.


PHILIPPINE ARMY

POLICE; AND PRISON OFFICER

1st Lt. GREGORIO MANALO- (On S.D .. Hq. Co.) POST VETERINARIAN

First Lieutenant MANUEL VALDES (VC Res) UNASSIGNED

Captain GREGORIO L. FAJARDO (Res)

CONSTABULARY

DIVISION

DISTRICT OF NORTHERN LUZON Camp Hem,), T . Allen , Bagu:o, Benguet

Colonel WILLIAM E. DOSSER- District Commander. DISTRICT STAFF

Major L. E

QUINTERO

Major L. C. B~EZ,

Me ..... . . . . .

Asst. Dist Oomr., Bantay, I I. Sur. Dist. Sm'geon, Vigan, Ilocos Sur.

1st Lt. JULIAN OLIVAS ... . .. . ...

District Adjutant.

1st Lt. A. M. BAUTISTA (Res) .... .

District Elngineer, Bagu io.

2nd L t. F. P. JAVIER (Res ) .. ... ..

Asst. Dist. Engineer, Baguio.

819


CORNEJO'S CO'M MONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

820

DISTRICT OF NORTHERN LUZON (Cont'd.) Stations

Pro"inees

Abra

Bangued

Cagayan

Tuguegarao

Batanes IIocos N.

Basco Laoag

IloeDS S.

Ban tay

Vigan llagan

Isabe la

San Fernando

La Union

P rovincial Commanders

Capt. M. Fernandini, Acting (2"Lt. L_ de la Cruz)-PQM Capt. V. S. Bilbao Capt. R. L. Madamba, MC (l"Lt. C. Venzon)-PQM 2"[;t. T. T. Paredes, DC (2"Lt. M. Alviar) Capt. P. P . Rosas Capt. J. Sumabat (Res)-PQM (Maj . L. E . Quintero) Ca pt. F. O. Bugrurin (Res) (l"Lt. N. F. Dario)-PQM l"Lt. J. D. Rodriguez (DC Res) Capt. A . D. Damian (l"Lt. S. Laurente)-PQM Capt. V. Noel (I"Lt. C. Garcia) -PQM

MT. PROVI NCE

Lubuagan

K alinga

Kabugao Banaue Kiangan Bontoc

Apayao Ifugao

Bontoc

Benguet

Trinidad Baguio Trinidad

N. Vizcaya

Bayombong

Companies

S tations

ABRA: 1st Co. Bangued CAGAYAN and BATANES Tuguegarao 12th Co. 13th Co. 13t h Co. tLOCOS N. 21st Co. ILOCOS S. 22nd Co.

l"Lt. R. S. Nagtalon, Actg. ("Lt. G. Balbuena)-PQM (l"Lt. A. L. Gonzalo), Actg. ; PQM Capt. P. Bulan, Actg. (3'Lt. C. Banal (Res) )-PQM Capt. T. Naidas (2"Lt. M. Capistrano)-PQM l"Lt. J . N. Concepcion (DC Res) Capt. E. Montill,; Maj. F. Soliven, DC l"Lt. S. F . Balagot (Res) (l"Lt. A. P. Carandang)-PQM Capt. E. Rellosa (2"Lt. O. C. Ramos (Res) )-PQM

Company Commanders

Jun ior

Officers

2"Lt. L. de la Cruz

l"Lt. C. Venzon

Aparri

I/lLt. L. Tayag

Det. Basco

2"Lt. M. Alviar, Det. Cmdr.

Laoag

( Capt. J. Sumabat (Res) )

C. Manning

I"Lt. N. F. Dario

3"Lt. P. B. Cabreros (Res)

2/1Lt. P. N Raralio (Res)


821

PHILIPPINE ARMY

DISTRICT OF NORTHERN LUZON (Cont'd.) Station.

Companies

ISABELA : 26th Co. 27th Co.

Echague Ilagan

LA UNION: 30th Co. MT. PROVINCE Kalinga: 37th Co. Apayao: 42nd Co. Hugao: 39th Co. 39th Co. 40th Co. Bontoc: 38th Co. Benguet: 41st Co. NVA. VIZCAYA: 51st Co.

Company Commanders

l"Lt. G. Balbuena l"Lt. M. B. Baccay

San Fernando 1"Lt. C. Garcia

Lubuagan

1"Lt. P. Dionisio

Kabugao

1"Lt. A. L. Gonzalo

Junior

Officers

~"Lt.

R. G. Nartatez (Res)

l"Lt. P. L. Bitanga (Res)

Kiangan 3"Lt. C. Banal (Res-Ex-PO TCO) 3"Lt. R. Peledo, J r. (Res) Det. : Banaue Mayoyao 2"Lt. V. Nazal.'eth (Res), Actg. & SQM_ 2"Lt. A. J. Enriquez (Res ) 2"Lt. A. R. Reyes (Res)

Bontoe

2"Lt. M. Capistrano, Actg.

Trinidad

1"Lt. A. P . Carandang

Bayombong

2"Lt. O. C. Ramos (Res) (Ex-PC) 3"Lt. V. A. Garcia (Res) -PQM. l"Lt. A. Navarrete (MCR)

DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN LUZON 758 Legarda, Sampaloc, Manila

Colonel BENITO D. V ALElRIANO-District Comrnancle1' DISTRICT STAFF

Lt. Col. SILVINO GALLARDO Major LUIS RAMOS Major CA YO MARFORI, MC Major ADRIANO T. CRUZ, MC Major LUCIANO FERAREN, DC Captain JOSE P . CAEDO, MC 1st Lt. JOSE A. ARAMBULO 1st Lt. AMADO CRUZ (Res) 1st Lt. WALTER T. SHORT (Res) 2nd Lt. PERFECTO M. VASQUEZ (Res)

Asst. District Commander. Asst. District Commander. Dist. Surgeon, Tarlac, Tarlac. Dist Surgeon, Legaspi, Albay. Dental Surgeon. Dist. Su'rgeon, Batangas, Bat. District Adjutant. Temporary Duty. District Engineer. Asst. Dist. Engineer.


CORN EJO 'S COMMONWEALTH DlRECTORY OF THE PH I LIPPINES

822

DISTRI CT OF SOUTHERN LUZON (Cont'd.) Stations

PrO\'jnc:e6

Albay

Bataan Batanga~

Legasp i

Balanga Batangas

Bulacan

Malolos

Camal'ines Node

Dae t

Camarines Sur

Naga

P ro\'inc:: ia l Com manders

Capt. R. F . Fernandez

( I " Lt. J. Deloso)-PQM. 2" Lt . A. L. Zarate, DC l"Lt. G. F. Fen'eol, Actg. (I"Lt. H. C. Cancio (Res) )-PQM. Capt. F. Borbon (I"Lt. G. R. Monsod) -PQM I"Lt. E . S. Pugeda, DC (Res) Capt. Z. R. Imperial I"Lt. A. V. Bartolome--PQM Capt. C. Legaspi (I "Lt. L. Villanueva) -PQM. Capt. P. Guerrero (I" Lt. J. Conrad a (Res)-PQM. Capt B. Nicolas I"Lt. L. T. Javalera , T .D.

Cavite

Imu s

Laguna

T . Cruces Sta. Cruz

Marinduque

Boac

( I "Lt. A. R. Deveras )-PQM. 1st Lt. C. Bondad, Actg. & PQM I"Lt. B. R. Salazar, Actg. & PQM.

Masbate

Ma sbate

Capt. M. Turingan

Mindoro

Calapan

(I"Lt. A . T . Torrillo)-PQM . Capt. R. Alejandre, Actg. ( I" Lt. S. Panganiban )-PQM.

Nva. Ec ija

Cabanatuan

Palawan Pampanga

Pto. Frincesa

Cavite

Sa n Fernando

Panga sinan

Lingayen

Rizal

Pasig

Capt. S. C. Cl11Z I"Lt. A. C. Diana, Asst. & PQM. I"Lt. V. P. Santos, DC (Res) (I"Lt. A. E . Fawcett) Actg. & PQM. l "Lt. A. B. Pineda, Actg.

l"Lt. I"Lt. I"Lt. Capt. I " Lt. I "Lt. Capt. I"Lt. I"Lt. I"Lt. I "Lt.

P. Diva l Asst., PQM. S. Carino, DC (Res) P. G. Navarro, DC (Res ) M. S. Ton-alba J. R. Mendoza-PQM F. G. Galvan, DC (Res) S. F. Cacdac D. Almagro M. T. J imenez, Asst. & PQM. C. V. Bustillo L. T. Ayson ( Res)


PHILlPPINE ARMY

823

---------------------

DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN LUZON (Cont'd.) Stations

Provinces

Romblon

Romblon

Sorsogon

Sorsogon

Tarlac

Tarlac

'J'ayabas

Lucena

Zambales

Iba

Companies

ALBAY: 2nd Co. 2nd Co. Det. BATAAN: 7th Co. BATANGAS 8th Co. 9th Co. 9th Co. Det. BULACAN 11th Co. CAMARINES NORTE 5th Co. CAMARINES SUR 4th Co. CAVITE 16th Co. 17th Co. LAGUNA 28th Co. 29th Co. MARIN DUQUE 9th Co. Det. MASBATE 34th Co. 34th Co. Det.

Stntions

Provincial Commanders

Capt. R. B. Alcala (I"Lt. A. M. Palumino (Res, Ex) Capt. V. A. Mata (I"Lt. E. A. Abay,) - PQM. Capt. B. R. Sison Capt. L. E. Littaua, Asst. & PQM Major M . M. Velasco (I"Lt. R. S. Banez)-PQM I"Lt. S. R. Encinas, DC (Res.) Capt. S. Molina. (2"Lt. V. H. Aquino (Res) )-PQM (DISTRICT HEADQUARTERS )

Com pany Co mmand eu

Junior

OHicers

Legaspi Virac

l"Lt. J. Deloso l"Lt. T. T. Asuncion, Det Cmdr.

Balanga

I"Lt. H. C. Cancio (Res) Actg.

Lipa

I"Lt. G. R. Monsod

Paliko (Boac, Marinduque)

l"Lt. L. Balolong

14a10105

2"Lt. J. Maramba (Res, Ex-PC)

Daet

I"Lt. L. Villanu eva

Naga

I"Lt. J. Conrado (Res, Ex-PC)

!mus Indang

l"Lt. J. P. Rueda l"Lt. S. V. Babista

l"Lt. P. G. Alcantara 3"Lt. N. D. Garcia

Sta. Cruz Los Banos

1"Lt. C. Bondad I"Lt. M. de Leon (Res, Ex-PC)

2"Lt. M. Bautista

Boac

(I"Lt. B. R. Salazar)

Masbate I"Lt. A. T. Torrillo Rio Guinobatan路

21'Lt. E. F. Mesias ( ResEx-PC) 3"Lt. A. E . Gallardo


CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PH ILIPPINE S

824

DISTRICT. OF SOUTHERN LUZON (Cont'd.) Companies

MINDORO 35th Co. 124th Co. NVA ECIJA 49th Co. PALAWAN 55th Co. 55th Co. PAMPANGA 61st Co. PANGASI NAN 58th Co. 59th Co. RIZAL. 50th Co. Attached 62nd Co. ROMBLON: 63rd Co. 63rd Co. Det. SORSOGON: 67th Co. TARLAC: 69th Co. TAYABAS 70th Co. 70th Co.

Co mpany Commllnders

Stations

Junior

OUicers

l"Lt. S . Panganiban

Calapan San Jose

I"Lt. G. Viduya-SQM

Cabanatuan

I"Lt. L. A. Chavez

l'to. Pl'incesa Det. Balabac

I"Lt. A. Arce-SQM.

l"Lt. A. E . Fawcett

San Fernando 2"Lt. J. B. Ezpeleta (Res, Ex-PC) ' ............ I"Lt. M. Guballa Lingayen l"Lt. G. P. Tomas Tayug Pasig

Pasig Calaocan

I"Lt. S. Juban (From disbanded 56th Co.) 111Lt. F. Asis

Odiongan

I"Lt. A. M. Palumino (Res, Ex-PC) I"Lt. A. Ramas, Det. Cmdr & SQM

SOTsogon

l"Lt. E. A . Abay

San Miguel

l"Lt. F. C. Mejja

Romblon'

Lucena

l"Lt. R. S. Banez

Det. Infanta

l"Lt. F. Magsakay, Det. Cmdr. &

Gumaca

l"Lt. L. S . Tan

Det .. Calabgan

I"Lt. B. M. Santillan Det. Cmdr. & SQM

Det. Iba

2"Lt. V. H . Aquino (Res, Ex-PC)

Det. Villar

2"Lt. S. R. Jimenea, Det. Cmdr

2"Lt. A. G. Velasco (Res)

SQM 7lst Co. 7lst Co. Det. ZAMBALES: 73rd Co. 75th Co.

DISTRICT OF VISA Y AS Cebu, Cebu

Colonel GUY O. FORT-District Commander. DISTRICT STAFF

Lt. Col. T . MARTINEZ Major E. TAIrEDO Major J . P. ROSALES, MC Capt. R. K. KANGLEON 1st Lt. A. A. MARTINEZ 1st Lt. C. R. SABALO (Res)

-

Asst. Dist. Commander. Asst. Dist. Commander. District Surgeon. Insptr., Tng, Cadres, Dist. E. V. District Adjutant. On T. D.


825

PHILIPPINE ARMY

DISTRICT OF VISAYAS (Cont'd.) , -

2nd Lt. E. VIARDO 2nd Lt. L. L. REGIS (Res) 2nd Lt. N. O. BRETA~A (Res)

Provinces

San Jose

Bohol

Tagbilaran

Capiz

Capiz

Cebu

Panitan Cebu

Iloilo

Iloilo

Leyte

Tacloban

Neg. Dcc.

Bacolod

Neg. Or.

Isabela Dumaguete

Samar

Catbalogan --< ,

ANTIQUE: 6th Co. BOHOL: 10th Co.

CAPIZ: 14th Co,

Provincial Commanders

Stations

Antique

Companies

District Engineer. Asst. Dist. Engineer. On duty'.

Stations

Capt. A. Mansueto l"Lt, C. P. Vidamo - PQM Capt. F. Roska l"Lt. A. M. Gonzales (DC Res) 2"Lt. S. Urbina (Res)-PQM Capt. E. V. David 1"Lt. F. Villasenol' - PQ M l"Lt. E . S. Castillo (DC Res) Capt. E. Lasam (x) Capt. M. S. Ballori (Res) l"Lt. J. M. Ruffy-PQM, PE, MO & DO 2HL.t. C. F. Hawkins, DC Capt. F . P. Donesa Maj. J. Gonzales Roxas, Me l"Lt. R. Ruffy, PQM, PE & DO (l"Lt. J . Causing)-MO. ~"Lt. M. R. Fernandez, DC l"Lt. N. B. Menina, DC (Res ) Capt. M.I V. Atanacio Capt. A. S. Hernandez, MC Capt. M. Reyes, DC (Res) Capt. A. P. Capadocia l"Lt. V. Bautista -(x) - PQM l"Lt. D. M. Dimayuga, DC (Res) Capt. L. S. Reyes (l"Lt. M. E. Nolasco (Res) - PQM Capt. H. C. Cambaliza l"Lt. D. A. Villacin (Res, Ex-PC) l"Lt. S. Nolasco, DC (Res) (DISTRICT HEADQUARTERS)

Company Commanders

San Jose

Capt. A. Mansueto -

Tagbilaran

2/JLt. S. Nuique (Res), Actg. (2"Lt. S. Urbina (Res, Ex-PC)On duty

Calivo

l"Lt. S. P. Garcia-SQM

TCO

Junior

Officet8


CORNEJO'S COMMONWEA LTH DIRECTORY OF THE PH ILIPPINES

826

DISTRICT OF VISAYAS Companies

Company Commande rs

Stations

15th Co,

CEBU: 18th Co. ILOILO: 23rd Co, 25th Co, LEYTE 31st Co, 32nd Co, 33rd Co. NEG.OCC, 44th Co, 44th Co. 45th Co, 46th Co. NEG. OR. 47th Co,

SAMAR: 64th Co, 65th Co.

Junior

Capiz

l"Lt. A . D. Rivera (Res, Ex-PC) Actg

Cebu

l"Lt. G. N. Calicdan

Iloilo Callnog

l"Lt., J. Causing l"Lt. A. Ton'es

Tacloban Ormoe

Malitbog

l"Lt. A. E . Tejero (Res, Ex-PC) l"Lt, E. L, de Leon-SQM. 3"Lt. J, Ares (Res) Actg,--SQM.

Cadiz Det : S. Carlos TaJisay Isabela

l"Lt. 3"Lt, l"Lt. l"Lt.

Tanjay

l"LtJ L. U. Echival'l'e 2"Lt M. E. Nolasco (Res, Ex-PC -On duty

Catal'man

l"Lt. F. V. Canu to-S QM, 2"Lt. P. Nera (Res, Ex-PC)SQM 2"Lt. S . B. Inovej as

BOl'ongan

66th Co.

(Cont'd)

Catbalogan

Officers

3"Lt. M. L. Gallard o

D. N . Nava rrete R. Marquez (Res, Ex-PC) p, Castillo J. D. Cl'isologo

DISTRICT OF NORTHERN MINDANAO Camp Keithley, Lanao

Lieut. Colonel MIGUEL NICDAO-Dist?ict C01n1nandeT DISTRICT STAFF

Ma jor J . A. GREEN Major E. Q. BRINGAS , MC 1st Lt. D. U . TENAZAS 1st Lt, M. E. RIVERA 2nd Lt, B. R. ESPEJO (Res) 3rd Lt. A. V. SAMSON (Res) Provinces

Stations

Agusan

Butuan

Bukidnon

Mala y'balay

Lanao

Dansalan

-

Asst. Dist. Commander.

-

Dist. Surgeon & Athletic Officer.

-

District Adjutant. District Quartennaster. District Engineer. Asst. Dist. Engineer. Provincia l Co mmanders

Capt. C. B. Lizardo l"Lt. P. Alviola-PQM l"Lt, D, G. Santos, DC (Res) Capt, A. Dumlao (TDO, 102" Co,) (l"Lt. E, Nave) - PQM. Capt, R. Ramos l"Lt. T. Domaoal,\ Asst.

"'


PHILIPPINE ARMY

827

DISTRICT OF .NOal,THERN MINDANAO Stations

Provinces

Misamis Occidental

Misamis

Misamis Oriental

Cagayan

Surigao

Surigao

Companies

Stations

AGUSAN: 74th Co.

Butuan

75th Co.

Waloe

87t1h Co.

C. Kalaw,

lOlst Co. lOlst Co. BUKIDNON: 76th Co. 89th Co. 89th Co. l02nd Co. LANAO: Arty. Co. 77th Co. 88th Co. 90th Co. 9lst Co. 92nd Co. 95th Co. 96th Co. 96th Co. lO5th Co. 96th Co. MIS. OCC. 96th Co. Det.

DAVAO Bunauan (Attached to

(Cont'd)

Provincial Commanders

(l"Lt. M. E. Rivera)-PQM, PEO (l"Lt. T. Apil)-MO l"Lt. J . A. Sanchez, Me l"Lt. G. Gutierrez, DC l"Lt. R. R. Teves (Res, Ex-PC) Capt. G. Baylon l"Lt. L. P. Lapus-PQM l"Lt. M. L de Santos, MC (Res) I "Lt. A. C. Villanueva, Actg. l"Lt. R. Bargas - PQM. I"Lt. E. N. Concepcion, DC (Res) I"Lt. J. Tando, Actg. (2"Lt~ E. Adle (Res)-TPQM. (DISTRICT HEADQUARTERS) Company Commanders

Junior

Officers

l"Lt. R. C. Rodriguez

3"Lt. E. Brillantes (Res, Ex-PC) l"Lt. A. Labayen (Res Ex-PC)- 2"Lt. J. L. Bayan (Res) SQM. I"Lt. J. B~ Delarmente-SQM. 2"Lt. N. Denosta-SQM. 96th Co. Det., Misamis Occ.

Malaybala)" l"Lt. E. Nave 2"Lt. B. Reyes Maramag I"Lt. D. Santiano-SQM. (Attached tc 96th Co. Det., Misamis Occ. C. Suarez Talacag 2"Lt. B. F. Villasis, Actg,-SQM. C. Keithley C. Keith ley C. Keithley Tamparan Ganasi C. Keihtley Tugaya Kolambugan

l"Lt. T. Apil l"Lt. M. Negrosa 2"Lt. I"Lt. A . C. Alcantara 2"Lt. l"Lt. F. D . Lelis I"Lt. A. D. Ylagan 2"Lt. l"Lt. B. Capayas 2"Lt. 2"Lt. l"Lt. L. R. Marohombsar 2"Lt. E. F. Magallanes;' TCOSQM.

Det. Misamis Mis. Occ. Malabang 2"Lt. O. Rialp-TCO Det. Lumbatan 2"Lt. D. J. Camua, Det. Cmdr. Det. Misamis

2"Lt. L. M. Franco, Det. Cmdr.

R. E. Laconico P. T. Brown (Res) M. T. Aquino (Res) H. R. Franco (Res) A. A. Prudenciado

2"Lt. N. R. Carlos (Res)


CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

828

DISTRICT OF NORTHERN MINDANAO Companies

89th Co. Att. 10lst Co. Att. MIS OR. l08th Co. SURIGAO: 117th Co.

(Cont'd.)

Compllny Com manders

Station.

J unior Officers

Misamis Misamis Cagayan

I"Lt. F. Jongko (Res)

SUl'igao

2"Lt. E. Adle (Res, Ex-PC)

3"Lt. F . E . Bel'nales (Res)

DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN MINDANAO Zamboanga, Zamboanga

Colonel L. R. STEVENS-District

Coml1~ande1'

DISTRICT STAFF

Asst. Dist. Commander. Distlict Surgeon. Dist. QM & Disb. Officer District Adjutant. District Engineer.

Major H. C. PAGE Major G. G. CKSTILLO, MC 1st Lt. A. C, LANZAR 1st Lt. A. A. REYES (2nd Lt. B. R. ESPEJO (Res)) Provinces

Cotabato

Stations

Cotabato

Provincial Com mande rs

Major D. Gutierrez Capt. C. Martera, Asst.

Capt. M. R. de Luna, MC Capt. P. F. Sanchez, DC l"Lt. B. Ante - PQM l"Lt. E. O. Bautista (Res, Ex-PC) l"Lt. J. N. Esquejo, Actg. Major S. de Jesus Capt. J . Teano, Asst. PQM, DO, PEO & MO l"Lt. R. T. Altura, MC l"Lt. C. A. Mercado, DC (Res) Major L. Angeles Capt. E. Lomuntad - PQM, DO & Prop. l"Lt. H'I Caguiat, MC (Res) l"Lt. J. C. Aniceto, Me (Res) Asst. l "Lt. D. Rodriguez, PE~. l"Lt. G. R. Masakayan. l"Lt. M. F. Feraren, DC

Sarangani Davao

Glan Davao

Sulu

Jolo

Tawi -Tawi Zamboanga

Bongao

I"Lt. V. Nunag, Actg.

Zamboanga

Capt. A. C. Campo Capt. R. Zagala, DC (l"Lt. A. C. Lanzar) - PQM (DISTRICT HEADQUARTERS)


829

THE NATIONAL ASS EMBLY

DISTRICT OF SOUTHERN MINDANAO Company Commanders

Companies

COTABATO 78th Co. 79th Co. 8lst Co. 82nd Co. 93rd Co. 94th Co. 98th Co. l03rd Co. SARANGANI DISTRICT 80th Co. 80th Co. DAVAO : 83rd Co. 83rd Co. 84th Co. 85th Co. 86th Co. SULU: 99th Co. lOOth Co. lOOth Co. HOth Co. H1th Co. 112th Co. l1Sth Co. H4th Co. 116th Co. TAWI-TAWI 115th Co. ZAMBOANGA 97th Co. 107th Co. 119th Co. 120th 路Co.

(Cont'd.) Junio r Officers

Buluan Ft. Pikit Cotabato Parang Maganoy Upi Lebak C. Ward

l"Lt. 1"Lt. l"Lt. 2"Lt. 2"Lt. l"Lt. l"Lt. l"Lt.

Glan Det. Kiamba

l"Lt. S. P. Mendoza-SQM. S"Lt. A. V. Javier (Res) I"Lt. E. C. Vicente, Det. Comdr. & SQM .

S. S. L. T. L. D.

Navarr" - SQM. A. Abrera-SQM. Quial S. Cabrera-TCO Acot, TCO-SQM. Cuyugan - SQM. L Carlos-SQM. D. A. Alvarado-SQM.

Davao I"Lt. Pedro Manigque Det. C. Ventura l"Lt. B. H. Morada-Det. Comdr. & SQM. 2"Lt. P. V. Merritt--SQM. C. Victa l"Lt. J. Umadhay-SQM. Malalag I"Lt. A. de Guzman- SQM. Mati F'arang Jolo Det. Parang Taglibi Seit Lake C. Romandiel' C. Andres

I"Lt. I"Lt. l"Lt. l"Lt. I"Lt. I"Lt. I"Lt.

C. Gantuangco J. P. Cortes H. Garcia, Det. Cmdr.

2"Lt. A. Al-Raschid

Siasi Jolo

L. M. Delgado 2"Lt. M. Cawed Marciano Barcena 2"Lt. C. L. Laureta V. T. Garcia, (Res, Ex-PC) 2"Lt. R. Policarpi o B. Devera 2"Lt. M. Villares, (Res, Ex-PC) 1"Lt. A. Suare1r-SQM I"Lt. N. Y. Sarmiento I"Lt. S. J. Alr'cefio (Res)

Bongao

I"Lt. S. Q. Sanglap-SQM

Lamitan Sindangan Labangan Zamboanga

2"Lt. I"Lt. I"Lt. I"Lt.

M. E. F. R.

Gozun-SQM Villase, TCO-SQM Padayhag-SQM Angeles

3"Lt. G. Mariano (Res)


830

ABA

CORNEJO'S CQb1MONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHl.LIPPlNES

ASU

ALPHABETICAL ROSTER OF PHILIPPINE ARMY OFFICERS On Regular Active Service A Abay, Eustaquio A ., 1st Lt., C.O ., 67th Co., Sorsogon, Sorsagan. Abellana, Ananias F ' J 1st L t., 13th Co" Aparri, Cag., (T.D., DTC, Baguio, Benguet.) Abia, Luciano, 1st Lt., C. O., 75th Co., Waloe, Agusan. Abrera, Saturnino, 1st Lt., District Southern Mindanao (Unassigned.) Acab, Eugenio D., 2nd Lt., 74th Co., Butuan, Agusan, (T.D., D'l'C, Iloilo, Iloilo.) Ac-ac, Alejandro B., 1st Lt. (Res), On duty, SecretalJ."Y, General Staff, Manila. Acot, Leopolda, 2nd Lt., TeO., 93rd Co., Maganoy. Cotabato. Agdamag, Jose V., Major, Inspector, loG.D., Manila. Agudo, Isidoro G., 1st Lt., Asst., Provo Comdr. & D.O ., Iloilo, Iloilo. Aguila, Jacinto P., 1st Lt., On duty, DTC, Zamboanga, Zamboanga. Aguilar, Miguel, Lt.-Col., Chief, QMS, 244 Libertad, Pasay. Riza1. Alajar, Panfilo, 2nd Lt., 26th Co., Echague, I s abela, (T.n., DTC, Iloilo, Iloilo.) Alandy, Antonio C., 2nd Lt., Comd't., ROTC, De La Salle College, Manila. Alcala, Rafa el B., Capt., Provo Comdr., Romblon, Romblon. Alcantara, Aniano C., 1st Lt., C.O ., 88th Co., Camp Keithley, Lanao. Alejandre, Benigno A., 2nd Lt., I nstr uctor, ROTC, Junior College, Cebu, Cebu, (T.D., DTC, Cebu, Cebu.) Alejandre, Roman, Capt. Provo Comdr., Calapan, MindoTO. Almagro, Dorotea, 1st Lt., C.O., GIst Co., San Fernando, Pampanga. Almendras, T eofilo R ., 2nd Lt., GI st Co., San Fernando, Pampanga. Alona, Gregorio, Capt., Dental Surgeon fol' t he First Regular Divis ion, Camp Murphy, Rizal and Dental Ass istant to the Ch ief , MS. , Manila.

AI-Raschid, Al i, 2nd Lt., 99th Co., Jolo, Sulu. Altura, Ramon T., 1st Lt. & Med. Inspector for Davao with station in Davao, Davao. Alvarado, Daniel A ., 1st Lt., C.O., 103rd Co., Camp Ward, Bual, Cotahato. Alviar, Marci ano, 2nd Lt., 18th Co., Cebu, Cebu, (T.D., DTC, Baguio, Benguet.) Alviola, Gabriel P., 1st Lt., Going on leave, Camp Ventura, Davao. Alviola, Pedro, 1st Lt., C.O., 74th Co., Bu~ tuan, Agusan. Ancheta, Lino G., 1st Lt., J. 0., 30th Co., San Fernando, La Union, (T.n. , DTC, Zamboanga, Zamboanga.) Ancheta, Vicente P., 2nd Lt., suspended effective Nov. I, 1936, C. Murphy, Rizal. Andrews, Edwin D., 1st Lt., On duty, I ntel~ ligence Section, C. D., Man il a. Angeles, Leon, Major, Provo Comdr. and Provo Governor of Sulu, Jol o, Sul u. Angeles, Ramon , 1st Lt., C. 0., 120th Co., Zamboanga, Zamboanga. Ante, Bibiano, 1st Lt., TD., AGS, Manila. Apil, Teod or ico, 1st Lt., C.O., Art. Co., Camp Keithley, Lanao. Arambulo, Jose A. , 1st Lt., District Adjutant, Dist. Southern Luzon, Manila. Arce, Ambros io, 1st Lt., Det. Comdr., Bala~ bac, Palawan. Arceno, Santiago J. , 1st Lt., C.O., 116th Co., Jolo, Sulu. Arellano, Alfonso, 1st Lt., 62nd Co., Calooean, Rizal, (T.D., DTC, Camp Murphy, Rizal.) Arpa, Pullong, 1st Lt., Co. "G", 1 "Reg. Div., Camp Murphy, Rizal. Asis, Florentino, 1st Lt., C.O., 62nd Co., Ca ~ loocan, Rizal. As istio, Macario B., 2nd Lt., C.O., UD" Co., 1 "RD., Camp Murphy, Rizal and Student Flying Officer, Air Corps. Aspilla, Julian C., 1st Lt., Comd't., ROTC, Silliman University, Dumaguete, Neg. Or. Asuncion, Tomas T ., 1st Lt., Det. Comdr., Vi~ rae, Albay.


ATA

Reglilar

CAN

PHILIPPINE ARMY

Atanacio, Manuel V., Capt., Provo Comdr., Tacloban, Leyte. Ausejo, Placido A., 1st Lt., C.O., 73rd Co., Iba, Zambales. Azurin, Mariano, 2nd Lt., uF", 1 uRD, Camp Murphy, Rizal.

B Babista, Salvador B., 1st Lt., C.O., 17th Co., Indang, Cavite. Baccay, Mariano E., 1st Lt., C.O., 40th Co., Mayoyao, Ifugao, (T.n., DTC, Baguio, Benguet.) Baja, Emmanuel A" Major, Chief, Executive Section, Defense Plans Division. On Temp. duty, ROSS, Bagulo, Benguet. Balao, Eulogio, 2nd Lt., Instructor, ROTC, U . P ., Manila. Balbuena. Gregorio, 1st Lt., C.O., 37th Co., Lubuagan, Kalinga. Ballestros, Tiburcio, 1st Lt., Sup. & Fin. Officer, Mess Officer & Instructor, PMA, Baguio. Balolong, Licerio, 1st Lt., C.O., 9th Co., Paliko, N asugbu, Batangas. Banez, Leon C., Major & Surgeon, Dist. Surgeon for Dist. Northern Luzon and Med. Insptr. for Bontoc, !fugao & Kalinga with Station in Sontoc, Bontoe, (T.D., DTC, Baguio, Benguet.) Banez, Ramon S., 1st Lt., C.O., 70th Co., Lucena, Tayabas. Barcena, Marciano, 1st Lt., C. 0., lllth Co., Seit Lake, Sulu.

Bargas, Reynaldo, 1st Lt., TCO., 108th Co .. . Cagayan, Oriental Misamis. Barrios, Angeles R., 1st Lt., Comd't., ROTC, San Beda College, Manila. Bartolome, Andres V., 1st Lt., C.O., 11th Co., Malolos, Bulacan Batongmalaque, Erasto, 2nd Lt., J .O., 96th Co., Kolambugan, Lanao, (T.D., DTC, Camp Keithley, Lanao.) Bautista, Mamerto, 2nd Lt., l07th Co., Sindang an, Zamboanga. Baylon, Gaspar, Capt., Provo Comdr., Occ. Misamis, Misamis. Bilbao, Victor S., Capt., Provo Comdr., Cagayan, Tuguegarao (TCO, 12"Co.) Cruz, Laguna. Borbon, Fortunato, Capt., Provo Comdr., BaBandad, Cornelio, 1st Lt. , C.O., 28th Co., Sta. tangas, Batangas.

831

Borromeo, Patricio, 1st Lt., Actg. Adjutant Post Ex. Off. & Instructor, PMA, Baguio. Botin, Roberto 0" 1 1st Lt., DTC, San Fernando, Pampanga. Bravo, Antonio, 1st Lt., C.O., 39th Co., Kiangan, Ifugao (T.D., DTC, Baguio.) Brillantes, Juan, 1st Lt., On duty, Int. Sec., Canst. Div., Manila. Bringas, Eliseo Q., Major & Surgeon, Dist. Surgeon for 5th Inf., DNM & Med. Insptr. for Bukidnon, Lanao. (Kolambugan only) Mis. Occ. & Mis. Or., with station in Camp Keithley, Lanao. Buenconsejo, Irineo, Major, Ohief, Recruiting Section, Provost-Marshal General's Division, Manila. Bulan, Pedro, Capt. Provo Cmdr., Ifugao, Banaue, (TCO, 39th Co.) Buno, Gregorio P., 1st Lt., On duty', Supply & Per. Div. (G-3) HPA, Manila. Bustillo, CorneliQ. V ., 1st Lt., C.O., 51st Co., Bayombong, Nva. Vizcaya, (T.D., DTC, San Fernando, Pampanga.)

C Cabal, Manuel F., 2nd Lt., J.O., 7th Co., Balanga, Bataan (T.D., DTC, San Fernando, Pampanga.) Cabrera, Tranquilino, 2nd Lt., TCO, 82nd Co., Parang, Cotabato. Cacdac, Sotero. F., Capt., Provo Comdr., Rizal, Pasig. Caedo, Jos e P ., Capt. & Med. Insptr. for Ba路 tangas, Laguna, Marinduque, Mindoro & Tayabas with station at Lucena, Tayabas. Calicdan, Graciano N., 1st Lt., C.O., 18th Co., Cebu, Cebu (TD, DTC, Cebu.) Cambaliza, Hugo C., Capt., Provo Comdr. Samar, Catbalogan. Campo, Anastacio C., Capt., Provo Comdr., Zamboanga, Zamboanga. Campo, Isagani V., 2nd Lt., J.O., 83rd Co., Davao, Davao (TD, DTC, Zamboanga.) Campos, Federico D., D., 1st Lt. & Med. Insptr. for Leyte and Samar with! station in Tac1oban, Leyte. Camua, Demetrio J. , 2nd Lt., Det. Comdr., Lumbatan, Lanao. Cantero, Diego V., 1st Lt., G.O., 38th Co., Bontoc, Bontoc (TD, DTC, Bagnio.) Canuto, Francisco V., 1st Lt., DTC, Catarma~, Samar.


832

CAP

CORNEJO'S COM..MONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

Capadocia, Angel P ., Capt., Provo Comdr., Dcc. N egros, Bacolod. Capayas, Benito, 1st Lt., C.O., 92nd Co" Camp Keithley, Lanao. Capinpin, Mateo MOl Colonel., C.O., l"Infantry, I"RD., Camp Murphy. Capistrano, Miguel, 2nd Lt., Actg. C.O., 1st Co., Bangued, Abra. Carandang, Arcadia P., 1st Lt., Supply' & Finance Off., Asst. Cadet Mess Off., PM A, Baguio. Cardenas, Florentino V., 2nd Lt., Dish. Officer, H楼A, Manila and Junior Aide-deCamp, Provost; Marshal General, CD. Carlos, Isabelo, 1st Lt., C.O., 98th Co., Lebak, Cotabato. Castaneda, Gregorio, 1st Lt., On duty Office p .e., Sta. Cruz, Laguna, (T.n., DTC, Lingayen, Pangasinan.) Castaneda, Mariano N ., Major, Ex. Officer & C.O., I "Batt., IHInf., l"RD, Camp Murphy, Rizal. Castillo, Gabriel G., Major & S urgeon, Dist. Surgeon f or Southern Mind. & Surgeon for Zamboanga, Zamboanga ( T.D., DTC, Zamboanga.) Castillo, Primitiv~, 1st Lt., Actg., C.O., 45th Co., Talisay, Neg. Occ. (T.D., DTC, Iloilo, Iloilo. ) Castro, Manuel G., 1st Lt., C.O., 6th Co., San Jose, Antique (T.D., DTC, Iloilo, Iloilo.) Castro, Simeon B., 2nd' Lt., J .O., l08th Co., Cagayan, Mis. Or. Causing, J uan, 1st Lt., C.O., 23rd Co., Iloilo, Iloi lo (T.D., DTC, Iloilo.) Cawed, Maximo, 2nd Lt., J.O., 110th Co., Taglibi, Sulu. Celis, Jr., J oaq uin, 2nd Lt., J.O., 16th Co., !mus, Cavite (T.D., DTC, Iloilo.) Chavez, Lu is A., 1st Lt., J.O., 49th Co., Cabanatuan, Nva. Ecija (T.D., DTC, Cebu, Cebu .) Cornelio, H ostillo, 2nd Lt., 70th Co., Lucena, Tayabas (T.D., DTC, Daraga.) Cortes, Jose P., 1st Lt., C.O ., 100th Co., Jolo, Sulu. Crame, Ju an, 1st Lt., Recorder, Opium Custodian Committee and Opium Committee, H P A, Manila. Crisologo, Juan D., 1s t Lt., C.O., 46th Co., l sabela , Occ., Negros, (T.D., DTC, Iloilo, Iloilo.

DIA

Cruz, Adriano T ., Major & Med. Insptr, for Albay, Cam. Norte, Cam. Sur, Masbate and Sorsogon & Dist. Surgeon for S. L. with station at Legaspi, Albay (T.D., DTC, Daraga, Albay.) Cruz, Amado C., 2nd Lt., Actg. Adjutant, 1st Rifle Batt. & C.O., Co. "H u , l"Rifle Batt., 1"RD., Camp Murphy, Rizal. Cruz, Anatolio B., 1st Lt., C: O., CoIl. Batt., M ~d. Reg., I"RD., C. Murphy. Cruz, Fidel N., 1st Lt., Gs 2 & 3, I"RD, Camp Murphy, Rizal. Cruz, Pelagio A ., 2nd Lt., Detailed as Flying Student Officer, Air Corps, Camp Murphy, Rizal. Cruz, Severo C., Capt., Provo Comdr., Nueva Ecija, Cabanatuan. Cuaresma, Francisco H., 1st Lt.,: C.O., <IE" Co., l"RD, Camp Murphy, Rizal. Cunanan, Hugo V., 1st Lt., Asst. to Actg. Chief, Ord. & Eng. Sec., Manila, Cuyugan, Delfin G., 1st Lt., TCO., 94th Co., Upi, Cotabato.

D Dabu, Alfonso, 1st Lt., Projects Section, HPA, Manila. Damian, Andres D ., Capt., Provo Comdr., Isabela, Ilagan (TCO, 27th Co.) Dario, Nepomueeno F ., 1st Lt., C.O., 22nd Co., Vigan, Iloeos Sur, (T.D., DTC, Baguio, Bengoet.) Dator, Luis T. , 1st Lt., C.O., 47th Co., Bais, . Negros Oriental (T.D., DTC, Cebu, Cebu.) David, Emigdio V., Capt., Provo Comdr., Capiz, Capiz. Deang, Pedro, 2nd Lt., T.C.a., 112th Co., Ro路 mandier, Sulu. Delal'mente, Jorge B., 1st Lt., C.O., l05th Co. Malabang, Lanao. Delgado, Luis M., 1st Lt., C.O., 110th Co., Sulu, Taglibi. Deloso, Juan, 1st Lt., C.O., 2nd Co., Legaspi, Albay (T.D., DTC, Daraga.) Devera, Bonifacio, 1st Lt., C.O., 113th Co., C. Andres, Sulu. Deveras, Antero R., 1st Lt., C.O., 16th Co., ImilS, Cavite. Diano, Antonio C., 1st Lt., C.O., 122nd Co., Sn. Isidro, Nva. Ecija.


DIO

( R egula r )

PHILIPPINE ARMY

Dionisio, Pedro, 1st Lt., C.O., 26th Co., Echague, Isabela. Dioquino, Elias, Capt.. Actg. Chief, Org. & Training Sec., BPA, Manila. Diva, Pacifico, 1st Lt., C.O ., 52nd Co. San Fernando, Pampanga. Divino, Miguel D., 2nd Lt., J.O., 29th Co., Cabuyao, Laguna, (T.n., DTC, Lingayen, Pangasinan. ) Dizon, Jose, 1st Lt., C.O., 56th Co., Pasig, Rizal.

( R eo/dar )

FRE

833

F

Fajardo. Apolinar G. , 1st Lt., Post Provost Marshal, Consolidated Mess Officer and Instructor, PMA, Baguio, Benguet. Fajardo, Tirso G., 2nd Lt., Tactical OffIce" & Instructor, PMA, Baguio. Fawcett, Alfred E., 1st Lt., Actg. P.C., Palawan & C.O., 55th Co., Pro. Princesa, Palawan. Feraren, Luciano, Major & Dental Surgeon for Bataan, Bulacan, Nueva Ecija, Pampanga, Pangasinan, Tarlac & Zambales with Dizon, Lauro D., 1st Lt., On duty, G-3, HPA, temporary s tation at 758 Legarda, Manila. Manila. Feral'en, Mauro F., 1st Lt. & Dental Surgeon Domaoal, Tomas, 1st Lt., Asst. Provo Comdr., for Sulu & Tawi-Taw i Dist. with station at Lanao. Dans alan. Jolo, Sulu. Donato, Venusto, 1st Lt., J.O., 67th Co. & D. Fernandez, Miguel R., 1st Lt. & Dental SurC., Bulan Det., Bulan, SorsogoD, (T.n., geon f or Antique, Capiz, Iloilo, Occ. NeDTC, Daraga, Albay.) gros & Or. N egros with station at Iloilo, Donesa, Francisco P ., Capt., Prov. Comdr., Iloilo, Instructor, Field Service School, Iloilo, Iloilo & Traffic Off., BPW., Comd't., Camp Murphy, Rizal. DTC, Iloilo, Iloilo. Fernandez, Rafael F ., Capt., Provo Comdr., Dasser, William E., Colonel, Dist. Comdr., Albay & Traffic Officer, BPW and Comd't., DNL., Trinidad, BenguetJ DTC, Daraga, Albay. Dumlao, Amando, Capt., Provo Comdr., BukidFernandine, Man uel, Capt., Provo Comdr ., non, Malaybalay. Abra, Bangued. Duque, Calixto, Capt., Chief, Planning SecFernando, Basilio, 1st Lt., Asst. Chief, AC. , tion, HP A, Manila. C.O., Tactical Co., C. Murphy. Ferreol, Gregorio F ., 1st Lt., Asst. Provo E Comdr., Batangas, Batangas. Ecarma, Natalio, 1st Lt., J.O., uC" Co., l"Ri- Ferrer, Damaso S., 1st Lt., C.O., Service Co. , fle Batt., l"RD, C. Murphy. AC, C. Murphy, Rizal. Echivarre, Leopoldo V., 1st Lt'J\ T.D., DTC, Florentin. Luis, 1st Lt., Chief, Reg. Div., Cebu, Cebu. CRS, AGS, HP A, Manila. Enriquez, Manuel P., 2nd Lt., J.O., 9th Co., Flores, Manuel T., 2nd Lt.â&#x20AC;˘ J .O., 19th Co., Paliko, Batangas (T.D., DTC, Baguio, Cebu, Cebu (T.D., DTC, Cebu.) Benguet.) Fort, Guy 0., Col., District Commander, DV, Cebu, Cebu. Enriquez, Ramon, 1st Lt., Training Section, HP A, Manila. Fran, Alfonso, 1st Lt., T.D., DTC, Cebu, Cebu. Esquejo, Julian N., 1st Lt., Actg. Provo Francisco, Guillermo B., Brig.-Gen., Comd'g. Comdr., Sarangani Dist., Glan. Gen., l"RD, Camp Murphy, Rizal, (wife) 859 Oroquieta, Manila, Tel. 2-22-23. Espiritu, Joaquin, 1s~ Lt., "AJJ Co., l"Rifle Batt., l"RD, C. Murphy'. Francisco, Jose, 2nd L t ., Detailed at Rantoul, [llinois, U. S. A. Estacio, Marcos, 1st Lt., C.O., "B" Co., l"RifIe Batt., l"RD, C. Murphy. Franco, Luis M., 2nd Lt., (J.O., 101st Co., Camp Mendez, Agusan) D.S., P .C., SuriEstaniel, Delfin, 1st Lt., C.O., 63rd Co., Romgao. blon, Romblon, (T.D., DTC, C. Keithley, Lanao.) Fresnido, Alfonso J ., 1st Lt., Conductor PA Eufemio, Adolfo, 1st Lt., On duty, ROTC, Band- Tel. 5-75-08, (wife) 958 Dakota, U.P., Manila. Manila, Tel. 5-67-64. 27


834

GAB

CO RNEJO' S COM MONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINEl:

G Gabriel, Agustin G., 1st Lt., On duty. Int. Sec., ConstJ Div., & Aide-de-Camp to Deputy Chief of Staff, HPA, Manila. Cabutina, Nicolas, 2nd Lt., Instructor, ROTC, PNS & PSAT, Manila. Gador, Gabriel R., Capt., Executive Adjutant, ROSS, Baguio, Benguet. Galinato, Benedicto, 1st Lt., Chief, Storage and Issue Section, QMS, HPA, Manila. Gallardo, S ilvino, Lt.-CoLj Asst. D.C., DSM, Sulu, Jolo & P. C., Sulu. Gantuangko, Constancio, 1st Lt., J.O., 113th Co., Camp Andres, Sulu. Garcia, Arturo S., 2nd Lt., J.D., Co. li E", 2"Rifle Batt., 1"RD., C. Murphy, (T.D., DTC, Camp Keithley, Lanao.) Garcia, Calixto, 1st Lt., C.O., 13th Co., AparTi, Cagayan. Garcia, Ceferino F., 1st Lt., Instructor, ROTC, U. S.T., Manila. Garcia, Ci rilo B., 2nd Lt., TeO., l04th Co., Jolo, Sulu. Garcia, bominador F., 2nd Lt., J.O., 2nd Co., Legaspi, Albay, T.D., DTC, Iloilo, Iloilo. Garcia, Honorio, 1st Lt., Det. Comdr., Parang, Sulu. Garcia, Silvino P., 1st Lt., C.O., 14th Co., Calivo, Capiz ( T.D., DTC, Iloilo.) Garcia, Simon, 1st Lt., Asst. Com't. of Cadet s, and Instru ctor, PMA, Baguio. Garcia, Teodoro, 2nd Lt., 71st Co., Gumaca, Tayabas ( T.D., DTC, Iloilo.) Garma, Hipolito, Lt. Col., Chief of ExecutIVE: & Administrative Div. of Suppl y, QMS, 1558 Gra!. Luna, Manila.-Te!. 5-67-27. GavioIa, Ramon D., Capt., Provo Comdr., Cehu, & Traffic Off., BPW., and Commandant, DTC, Cebu, Cebu. Gojo, Tomas G., 2nd Lt., 73rd Co., lba, Zambales (T. D., DTC, Sn. Fdo., Pamp.) Gonzales, Domingo B., 2nd Lt., 78th Co., Buluan, Cotahato (T.D., DTC, Camp Murphy. RizaL) Gonzales, Jose, 1st Lt., Cadet Miess Officer, Post Exchange Officer and Instructor, PMA, Baguio. Gonza lo, Ange~ L., 1st Lt., C.O., 42nd Co., Kabugao, Apayao. Gozun, Modesto, 2nd Lt., J .0., 80th Co., Glan, Sarangani District.

JA L

Green, James A., Maj or, Asst. Dist. Comdr., DNM, Camp. Keithley, Lanao. Guballa, Macario, 1st Lt., C.O., 58th Co., Lingayen, Pangas inan. Guerrero, Patricio, Capt., Prov o Comdr., Camarines Sur, Naga. Guido, Jose P.,. Capt., Asst. Chief, Int. Sec., Canst. Div., HPA, Manila . Gutierrez, Dionisio, Major, Provo Comdr. & Provo Gov., Cotabato. Gutierrez, Gil, 1st Lt. & Dent. Surgeon for Lanao & Mis. Occ. with station at Camp Keithley, Lanao. Guzman, Anastacio de, 1st Lt., C.O., 86th Co., Mati, Davao. Guzman, Primitivo I. de, 2nd Lt., On duty, Ord. & Eng. Section, Manila.

H Hawkins, Clifford F., 2nd Lt. & Dent. Surgeon for Bohol, Cehu, Leyte & Samar with station in Cebu, Cebu. H ernandez, Lauro, Capt., Post & Div. Adjutant, l"RD., Camp Murphy, Rizal. Hernandez, Antonio S., Capt. & Med. Insptr. f or Sulu, Tawi-Tawi Dist., with station at Jol0, Sulu . Herrera, Carlos, J ., 2nd Lt., 52nd Co., San Fdo., Pampanga (T.D., DTC, San Fernando, Pampanga.)

I Ibanez, Roman S., 1st Lt., Batt. Comdr. & C.O., " G" Co., 2" Rifle Batt., 1"RD, C. Murphy. llano, Tomas R., 1st Lt. & Med. Insptr., On temp. duty, Office, Chief, M.S., HPA, Manila. Imperial , Zacarias R., Capt., Provo Comdr., Bulacan, Malolos. Inocencio, Leovino, 2nd Lt.) 82nd Co.) Parang, Cotabato (T.D., DTC, Zamboanga, Zamboang a.) Inovejas, Segundino B., 2nd Lt., C.O., 33rd Co., Malitbog, Leyte (T.D., DTC, Cebu, Cebu.)

J Jacaria, Abubaker, 1st Lt' r J.O., "B" Co., C. Murphy, Rizal. J alan doni , Rafael, Capt., On Duty, Secretary General Staff, Manila.


JAR

( R egular)

PHILIPPINE ARMY

<R egula r)

MAG

835

Jardeleza, Bernardino, 1st Lt., Acting Chief, Laurente, Sergio, 1st Lt., C.O., 27th Co., !lagan, Isabela, (T.D., DTC, Baguio, Benguet.) Finance Sec., Budget and Legislative Section & Senior Aide-de-Camp, Provost Mar- Laureta, Claro L., 2nd Lt., l11th Co., Seit Lake, Sulu. shal General. Javalera, Lamberto T., 1st Lt., T.n. Office Lazaro, Tomas, 1st Lt., T.D., DTC, Cebu, Cebu. Provo Comdr. & In charge, Municipal Police Legaspi, Cirilo, Capt., Provo Comdr., CamariForce, Cavite, Cavite. nes Norte, Daet. Javier, Isidro, 2nd Lt., J.O., 15th Co" Capiz, Lelis, Francisco D., 1st Lt., C.O., 90th Co., Capiz (T.n., DTC, Iloilo, Iloilo.) Tamparan, Lanao. Jayme, A1fonso A" 2nd Lt., J.O., 41st Co., Trinidad, Benguet, (T.D., DTC, Cebu, Leon, Eleuterio L. de, 1st Lt., C.O., 32nd Co., Ormoc, Leyte, (T.O., TDC, Cebu, Cebu.) Cebu.) Jere7.a, Jose J ., 2nd Lt., TCO., 79th Co., Pikit, Leon, Jose S. de, 2nd Lt., J.O., 50th Co., Pasig, Rizal, (T.D., DTC, Camp Murphy, Cotabato. Rizal.) Jesena, Jose C., 1st Lt., On duty, Office P. Lim, Vicente, Brig.-Gen., Asst. Chief of Staff, C., Iloilo (T.D., DTC, Iloilo, Iloilo.) and Chief, Defense Plans Di v. (G-1), BPA, Jesus, Simeon de, Major, Provo Comdr., DaManila. vao, Davao. JimelJea, 80f1'onio R., 2nd Lt., Det. Comdr., Linsangan, Matias, 1st Lt., C.O., 10th Co., Tagbilaran, Bohol, (T.D., DTC, Cebu, Cebu. ) Villar, Batolan, Zambales. Jimenez, Manuel T., 1st Lt., Asst. Provo Lit taua, Liberato E., Capt., C.O., 69th Co., San Miguel~ Tarlac. Comdr., Rizal, Pasig. Johnson, William A., 1st Lt., C.O., Special Unit Livingston, Charles E., Colonel, Chief of Staff CD, Appt. uI" Patio de Pasay, Ortigas AveBatt., 1uRD., Camp Murphy, Rizal. nue, Pasay, Rizal. Juhan, Bernardo, 2nd Lt., J.O., 34th Co. & Det. Comdr., Aroroy, Masbate, (T.D., DTC, Lizardo, Claro B., Capt., Provo Comdr" Agusan, Butuan. Lingayen.) Juhau, Simplicio, 1st Lt., C.O., 50th Co., Pa- Lomuntad, Eustaquio, Capt., Provo ComdT., Suiu, J olo. sig, Rizal. Lopez, Cornelio T., 1st Lt., C.O ., 30th Co., Jurado, Enrique 2nd L., Instructor, Master of Sn. Fda., La Union, (T.D., DTC, Baguio, Sword, PMA, Baguio, Benguet. Benguet.) Luna, Francisco, 1st Lt., Actg. S-1, S路2, S路3 K & Actg. Reg. Adj ., l"Inf., l"RD., C. MurKangleon, Ruperto K., Capt., Prov. Comdr., phy, Rizal. Bohol, Tagbilaran, & TCO, 10th Co. Luna, Manuel R. de, Capt. & Med. Insptr. for Cotabato and Sarangani Dist. with station L in Cotabato, Cotabato. Laconico, Ramon E., 2nd Lt., Art Co., Camp Luna, Vicente B., 2nd Lt., 91st Co., Ganassi, Keithley. Lanao. Lanao, (T.D., C. Keithley, DTC.) Lanzar, Antonio C., 1st Lt., Disb. Officer, Luna, Victoriano, Lt-Col., Chief, Medical ServDSM, Zamboanga. ice, HP A, Manila. Lao, Pablo G., 2nd Lt., J.O., 5th Co., Daet, Camarines Norte (T.O., DTC, Daraga, AIM bay.) Madamba, Ricardo LI., Capt. &, Med. Insptr. Lapus, Licerio P., 1st Lt., On duty, Office P. for Apayao, Batanes, Cagayan, Isabela and C., Mis., Mis. Occ . . Nva. Vizcaya with station in Tuguegarao, Larrabaster, Jesus M., 2nd Lt., J.O., Co. flH", Cagayan. 2"Rifle Batt., l"RD Camp Murphy, Rizal. Magallanes, Angel C., 1st Lt., 50th Co., Pasig, Lasala, Nicolas P., 1st Lt., C.O., 21st Co., Rizal, (T.D., DTC, Camp Murphy, Rizal.) Laoag Ii. Norte (TD., DTC, Baguio BenMagalianes, Eugenio F ., 2nd Lt., TCO., 96th guet.) Co., KoIambugan, Lanao.


836

MAG

CORN EJO ' S COMMONWEA LTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

Magsakay, F eliciano, 1st Lt., Det. Comdr., In-

fanta, Tayabas. Pia, 1st Lt., e.O., 117th Co., Suri-

Magsino~

gao, Surigao. Manalo, Gregorio, 1st Lt., Unassigned, lURD, Camp Murphy, Hizal. Manapui, A. G., 2nd Lt., 22nd Co., Vigan, I1ocos Sur, (T.D., DTC, Bagnio, Bengnet.) Manigque, Pedro, 1st Lt., C.O., 83rd Co., Davan, Davao. Manriquez, R. A' 2nd Lt., lOOth Co., JoIo, Sulu (T.n., DTC, Zamboanga, Zamboanga.) Mansueto, Aquilino, Capt., Prov. Comdr. , Antique, San J ase. Maramba, Guillermo, 1st Lt., Suspended, effective Nov. 14, 1936. M.arohombsar, Louis R., 1st Lt., C.O ., 95th Co., C. Keithley, Lanao. Manari, Cayo, Maj or & Med. Insptr. for Abra, Benguet, lIoeDs Norte, noees Sur and La Union with stat ion in Vigan, Ilocos Sur. Martinez, Antonio A., 1st Lt., District Adjutant, D. V., Cebu, Cebu. Martinez, Telesforo, Lt.-Col., Commandant, General Service School, Philippine Army j now visiting General Service School, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas j I nfantry School, Fort Benning, Georgia; Cavalry School, Fort Riley, Kansas and t he Field Artillery School, Fort Sill, Oklahoma, all in the United States of America. Masakayan, Gregorio R., 1st Lt., 115th Co., Bongao, Tawi-Tawi District. Mascardo, Dominador T., 1st Lt., Aide-deCamp to HIs E xcellency, President of the Philippines. Mata , Vicente A., Captain, Provincial Command er , Sorsogon, Sor sogon. Mejia, F abian C., 1st Lt ., C.O. 68th Co., P a niqui, Tarlac. Mendoza , Julio R., 1st Lt ., On duty Office, P rovo Comdr. , Lingayen, Pan ga sinan. Mendoza, Sofio P. 1st Lt., C.O., 80th Co., Glan, Sar a ngani District. Mercado, J esus, 1st Lt., J.O., 11th Co., Malolos, Bula can (T.D., DTC, Cebu, Cebu.) Merritt, P edro V., 2nd Lt., J.O., 112th. Co., C. Romandier, Sulu. Molina, Benjamin G., 2nd Lt., 27th Co., Ilagan, Isabela (T.D. , DTC, Bagnio, Bengnet.) I

NOC

Molina, Severino, Capt. Provo Comdr., Iha, Zambales. Mondragon, Fortunato, 2nd Lt., T.C.O., 47th Co., Bais, Negros Or. (T.D., DTC, Iloilo.) Monsod, Godofredo R., 1st Lt., C.O., 8th Co., Lipa, Batangas. Montilla, Eduardo R., Capt., (Comd't., DTC, Baguio), Provo Comdr., Benguet, Trinidad. Mora, Jose S., 2nd Lt., J .O., 117th Co., Surigao, Surigao (T. D., DTC, Camp Murphy, Riza l). Moreno, Roberto Jr., 1st Lt., Temporary duty, (DTC, Cebu, Cebu.) Morgan, Luis, 2nd Lt., 2nd Lt., 23rd. Co. Iloilo (T.D., D.T.C., Iloilo, Iloilo.) Mortera, Ciriaco, Capt., Asst. Provo Comdr., Cotabato, Cotabato. Muego, Rustico P., 2nd Lt., T.C.O . 99th Co., J ol0, Sulu (T.D., DTC, Zamboanga, Zamboanga.)

N Nagtalon, Roque S., 1st Lt., Actg. Prov, Comdr., Kalinga, Lubuagan. Naidas, Tiburcio N., Capt., Provo Comdr., Bontoc, Bontoc (T.C.O., 38th Co.) Nakar, Guillermo, 2nd Lt., Tactical Officer, ROSS, Bagu io, Benguet. Natividad, Arsenio, Major, A ide-de-Camp to His Excellency, President of the Philippines. Navarrete, Alberto, 2nd Lt., J.O., "D" Co., 1 "Rifle Batt ., 1" RD.~ Camp Murphy, Ri7.al. Navarrete, Dominador N., 1st Lt., C.O., 44th Co. , Cadiz, Neg. Occ. (T.D., DTC, Iloilo.) Navarrete, Francisco B ., 1st Lt., Dist. Adj., DNL, Trinidad, Benguet. Navarro, Celestino, Major, Inspector, I.G.D., HPA, Manila. Navarro, Santiago, 1st Lt., C.O., 78th Co., Buluan, Cotabato. Nave, Eleuterio, 1st Lt., C.O .,. 76th Co., Malaybalay, Bukidnon. Negrosa, Macario, 1st Lt., C.O., 87th Co., C. Kalaw, Davao, Nicdao, Miguel, Lt.-Col. Dist. Comdr. DNM, Camp "Keithley, Lanao. Nocete, Maximo, 1st Lt., C.O., 49th Co., Cabanatuan, Nueva Ecija.


(Regular)

NOE

PHILIPPINE ARMY

Noel, Vicente, Capt., Provo Comdr., La Union, San Fernando (T.C.O., 30th Co.) Nunag, Vicente, 1st Lt., Actg. Provo Comdr., Bongao, Tawi-Tawi District.

o Obieta, Antonio, 1st Lt. & Merl. lnsptr" for Bataan, Nva. Ecija, Pampanga, Pangasinan, Tarlac & Zambales with temporary station in Lingayen, Pangasinan, (T.D., DTC, Lingayen, Pangasrnan.) Oboza, Federico G., Major, The Adjutant General, Actg. Chief of Personnel Section, 137 Herran, Malate, Manila, Tel. 5-65-25. Ocampo, Salvador B., 2nd Lt., & Dental Surgeon for Agusan, Bukidnon, Davao (C. Kalaw only), Misamis Or. & Surigao, with station at Butuan, Agusan. Ojeda, Dionisio S., 2nd Lt., Tactical Officer, ROSS, Baguio, Benguet. Olano, Manuel R., 1st Lt., C.O., 12th Co., Tuguegarao, Cagayan, (T.D., DTC, llaguio.) Olivas, Julian, 1st Lt., Actg. Provo Comdr., Kabugao, Apayao. Olympia, Manuel G., Major & Flight Surgeon, Air Corps & C.O., Med. Regt., I"RD. , Camp Murphy, Rizal. Oppus, Angel, 1st Lt., Actg. Quartermaster & Aide-de-Camp to Comd'g Gen., l"RD., Camp Murphy, Rizal. Oppus, Manuel, Capt., Provo Codr. Bataan, Balanga. Orais, Vivencio, 1st Lt., Disb. & Post Exchange Off., l"RD., Camp Murphy. Orobia, Eustacio E., 2nd Lt., Student Flying Officer, AC, PA., Camp Murphy, Rizal.

p Padayhag, Federico, 1st Lt., C.O., 119th Co., Labangan, Zamboanga. 路 Page, Herbert C., Major, Asst., D.C., DSMj with Hq. at Zamboanga, Zamboanga (Going on leave.) Palacios, Zoilo P., 1st Lt., Dept. Comdr. Misamis, Misamis Occ., (T.n., DTC, Camp Keithley) Paiiganiban, Saturnino, 1st Lt., C.O. 35th Co., Calapan, Mindoro. Panis, Emiliano M., Major, Asst. Chief, MS, and Actg. Chief, Judge Advocate; (wife) 788 San Sebastian, Corner Azcarraga, Manila.

<Regula.r)

QUI

837

Panopio, Agaton B., 1st Lt., C.O.HC" Co., l"Rifle Batt., l"RD, Camp Murphy, Rizal. Papa, Ricardo G., 2nd Lt., T.J.O., 87th Co., C. Kalaw, Davao (T.D., DTC, Camp Keithley.) Paredes, Isidro J., 2nd Lt. e.c., l"Communication Co., l"RD, Camp Murphy, Rizal. Paredes, Tomas T ., 2nd Lt. & Dental Surgeon for Apayao, Batanes, Cagayan, !fugao, Isa-bela & N. Vizcaya with station in Tuguegarao, Cagayan. Pargas, Rafael, 2nd Lt., Instructor, Phil. Military Academy, Baguio. Pasco, Alfredo S., 2nd Lt., 65th Co., Borongan, Samar (T.D., DTC, Cebu, Cebu.) Pastrana, Jesus F., 1st Lt., On duty, G-3, HP A, Manila. Paz, Manuel T., 1st Lt., C.O., Co. liE", 2"Rifle Batt., l"RD, Camp Murphy, Rizal (T.D., G-3) Peckson, Alfredo D., 2nd Lt., Instructor, Phil. Mil. Academy, Baguio. Perez, Ricardo F ., 1st Lt., 7th Co., Balanga, Bataan, (T.D., DTC, Lingayen, Pangasinan). Piccio, Humberlo, 1st Lt., Aide-de-Camp to Chief, Defense Plans Division (G-1). Pineda, Amanda B., 1st Lt. Actg. Prov, Comdr, & Traffic Officer, Pampanga, Sn. Fda., (Commandant, DTC, San Fernando, Pampanga.) Pintoy, Climaco, 2nd Lt., 12th Co., Tuguegarao, Cagayan (T.D., DTC, C. Keithley, Lanao.) Policarpio, Rufino, 2nd Lt., 120th Co., Zamboanga, Zamboanga. Polotan, Jose G., 1st Lt., On duty Office Provo Comdr. Rizal. Prudenciado, Agustin A., 2nd Lt., 90th Co., Tamparan, Lanao. Puns alan, Leon, 2nd Lt., Detailed in U. S. A. Punsalang, Vicente J., Capt. & Surgeon, Post Medical Officer and Instructor Philippine Military Academy, Baguio.

Q Quejada, Felipe P., 2nd Lt., J . ~., 64th Co., Catarman, Samar (T.D., DTC, Cebu, Cebu.) Quial, Lope, 1st Lt., C.O, 81st Co., Cotabato, Cotabato. Quimbo, Juan C., Colonel, Acting Inspector


838

QUI

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINE!:

General, I.G.D., (On duty, Dept. of the Int.) Quintero, Luis E., Major, Asst. D.C., DNL & P.C., 11. Sur, with station at Bantay.

R Ramas, Aurelio, 1st Lt., Det. Comdr. Odiongan, Ramblon. Ramirez, Alfredo, Capt., Comd't., ROTC, U. S. T 'J Manila. Ramos, Alberto, Major, Chief, Int. Sec., Constabulary Division, Manila. Ramos, Luis. Major, Asst. D.C., S.L., Manila. Ramos, Rafael, Capt., Provo Comdr., Lanao, Camp K'eithley, (Comd't., DTC, Camp Keit hley.) Reinoso, Nestor, 2nd Lt., 31st Co., Tacloban, Leyte (T.D., DTC, Cebu, Cebu.) Rellosa, Emeterio, Capt., Provo Comdr., ~"'va . Vizcaya & T.C.O., 51st Co. Relosa, Juan C., 2nd Lt., 75th Co., Waloe, Agusan (T.D., DTC, Baguio, Benguet.) Reyes, Arturo A" 1st Lt., D.A., 8M, Zamboanga, Zamboanga. Reyes, Bernardino, 2nd Lt., A.C.O., 77th Co., C. Keithley, Lanao. Reyes, Fidel V., 2nd Lt., J.~., 69th Co., San Miguel, Tarlac (T.D., DTC, Lingayen, Pang.) Reyes, Jose de los, Maj.-Gen., Provost Marshal General, 811 A. Mabini, Manila. Reyes, Leon S., Capt., Provo ComdT., N'e gros Oriental, Dumaguete. Reyes, Mariano C., 1st Lt., On duty, AGS, HP A, Manila. Rialp, Oscar, 2nd Lt., J.~., 88th Co., Camp Keithley, Lanao. Rivera, Mariano E ., 1st Lt., Disb. Officer & Post Exchange Officer, C. Keithley, Lanao. Rodriguez, Diosdado, 1st Lt., Disb. & Prop. Officer, J olo, Sulu & T.C.O., 99th Co., Jolo. Rodriguez, Rafael C., 1st Lt., C.O. 101st Co., C. Mendez, Agusan. Rosales, Jose P., Major & Dist. Surgeon for the Visayas and Med. Insptr. for Bohol. Cebu & Neg. Or., with station in Cebu, Cebu (T.D., DTC, Cebu, Cebu.) Rosario, Andres del, 1st Lt., On duty Office Provo Comdr., Albay, Legaspi (T.n., DTC, Daraga, Albay.) Rosario, Narciso del, 2nd Lt., Instructor, ROTC, UP., Manila.

SAN

Rosas, Pio P., Capt., Provo Comdr. llocos Norte, Laoag, (T.C.O., 21st Co.) Raska, Francisco, Capt., Provo Comdr., Surigao, Surigao. Roxas, Jo se Gonzales, Major & Med. Insptr. for Antique, Capiz, Iloilo and Negors Dcc. with station at Ft. San Pedro, Iloilo, (T.D., DTC, Iloilo, Iloilo.) Rueda, Jose P ., 1st Lt., J . ~., 16th Co., Imus, Cavite. Ruffy, Jose M., 1st Lt., D.O., Prop. & Po<t Exchange, & Mess Officer, Cebu, Cebu. Rufiy, Ramon, 1st Lt., Asst. to P.C. Neg. Occidental, Bacolod (T.D., DTC, Iloilo.)

S Sabarre, Antonio C., 2nd Lt., J .O., 21st Co., Laoag, I1ocos N'o rte (T.D., DTC, Baguio.) Salacup, Roman T., Capt. & Med. Insptr. for Bulacan, Cavite and Rizal with station at Camp Murphy, Rizal. Salazar, Bernardo R ., 1st Lt., Actg. Prov, Comdr., Marinduque & DC, 9th Co., Det. , Boa<:. Sales, Oscar, 1st Lt., Student Flying Officer, Air Corps, C. Murphy, Rizal Salgado, Valentin E., 2nd Lt., 8th Co., Lipa, Batangas (T.D., DTC, Sn. Fdo., Pam路 panga.) Saludares, Rosalia C., 1st Lt., Post Exchange Officer, HP A, ManiJa. Sanchez, Joaquin A., 1st Lt., & Med. Insptr. for Lanao (except Kolambugan) with temp. station at C. Keithley, Lanao & in charge Post Hospital in Camp Keithley, Lanao, (T.D., DTC, Camp Keithley, Lanao.) Sanchez, Pedro F., Capt & Dental Surgeon for Cotabato and Sarangani District with station at Cotabato, Cotabato. Sandico, Francisco, 1st Lt., ROTC duty, Adamson School of Ind. Chern., Manila. San Diego, Pedro, 1st Lt., on duty, Planning Section, HP A, Manila. Sanglap, Severo Q., 1st Lt., C.O., 115th Co., Bongao, Tawi-Tawi District. Santiano, Dominador, 1st Lt., C.O. 89th Co., Maramag, Bukidnon. Santillan, Benjamin M., 1st Lt., Vet. Comdr., Calabgan, Tayabas.


SAN

(Regular)

PHILIPPINE ARMY

Santos, Antonio F., 2nd Lt. 4i Dental Surgeon for Cavite, Laguna, Mindoro (San Jose onlyL Palawan, Rizal & Romblon with station in Camp Murphy, Rizal (Post Dental Surgeon, 1 "RD) Santos, Leopoldo F ., 1st Lt., J. 0 . , 70th Co., Tayabas, Lucena (T. D., DTC, Camp Murphy.) Santos, Paulino. Maj .-Gen., Chief of Staff, P.A., Manila Sayson, Antonio V., 1st :Lt., Reg. Div., CRS, & Pro!'. Officer, AGS, HPA, Manila. Selga, Florencio, 1st Lt., On duty, Int. Section, Const. Div., Manila. Selim, Emilio M., 1st Lt., C. 0., 841;h Co., Camp Victa, Davao. Sese, Alfredo C., 1st Lt., On temp. duty, Office Provo Comdr., San Fernando, Pampanga (Going on leave.) Sevilla, Severino M., 1st Lt., C.O., Co. "F", 2"Rifle Batt., 1tI RD, Camp Murphy, RizaL SHeno, Porfirio R., 1st Lt., 56th Co., Pasig, Rizal (T.D., DTC, San Fdo., Pampanga. i Sison, Bonifacio R., Capt., Provo Comdr., Tarlac, Tarlac. ~ison, Valeriano E., 1st Lt., Chief, -Res. Div. , CRS, AGS, HPA, Manila. Solidum, Hospicio L., 1st Lt. & Med. Insptr. for Agusan and Surigao with station at Butuan, Agusan. Soliman, Marcos G., 2nd Lt., On duty, ROTC, P.S.A.T, Manila. Soliven, FIdel, Major & Dental Surgeon for Abra, Academy, Benguet, Bontoc, Ilocos 1\"'orte, Ilocos Sur, Kalinga and La Union with station at Camp Henry T. Allen Baguio. Songali., Jesus C., 2nd Lt., 66th Co., Catbalogan, Samar (T. D., DTC, Cebu, Cebu.) Soriano, Antonio E., 2nd Lt. & Phannacist & Chemist of the Opium Custodian Committee, Manila. Soriano, Artemio, 2nd Lt., 4Th Co., Naga, Cam. Sur, (T.D. DTC, Daraga, Albay.) Stevens, Luther R., Colonel, Dist. Comdr., SM., Zamboanga, Zamboanga. ' Suarez, Alejandro, 1st Lt., C.O., 114th Co., Siasi, Sulu. Suarez, Pablo R., Capt., Asst. Comd't., ROTC, Los Banos, Laguna. Sumulong, Pedro, 2nd Lt., 45th Co., Talisay, Neg. Oec., (T . D., DTC, Iloilo, Iloilo.)

VAL

(Regul(LJ")

839

'1' Tabuena, Pedro F., Capt., l!!xecutive Officer, Canst. Div., (wife) 531 Merced, Paco. Tan, Leoncio S., 1st Lt., C . O. 71st Co., Gumaca, Tayabas. Tando, Jose, 1st Lt., On duty, QMS, Manila. Tangco, Paciano, Major, Actg. Chief Signal Officer, HPA, Manila. Tafiedo, Eulalio, Major, Asst. D. C., DV., with Hq. at Cebu, Cebu. Tayag, Leon, 1st Lt., A. C. O. 41st Co., Trinidad, Benguet & Traffic Officer, Mountain Province. Teaiio, Justino, Capt., Asst. Provo Comdr., Davao, Davao, D.O. Prop. & Mess Officer, Davao, Davao. Tenazas, DeograciaS U., 1st Lt., Dist. Actj., DNM., C. Keithley, Lanao. Tenerife, Honorato, 1st Lt., Asst. police & Prison officer, C. Murphy, Rizal. Tomas, Gabrie l P., 1st Lt., C.O., 59th Co., Tayug, Pangasinan. Torralba, Margarito S., Capt., Provo Comdr., (Comd't., DTC) Pangasinan, Lingayen and Traffic Officer, BPW. Torres, An1tonio, 1st Lt., C. 0 . , 25th Co., Calinog, Iloilo (T.D., DTC, Iloilo, Iloilo.) Torres, Felicisimo I., Capt., Asst. The Adjutant General & Chief, Central Records Section, HP A, Manila. Torres, Leonardo C., 1st Lt., C. 0., 97th Co., Lamitan, Zamboanga. Torres, Vicente L. , 1st Lt., Actg. Chief, Ord nance & Eng. Sec., HPA. Torillo, Alfonso T ., 1st Lt., C.O . , 34th Co., Masbate, Masbate. Turingan, Manuel, Capt., Provo Comdr., Masbate, Masbate.

U Umadhay, Julio, 1st Lt., C . 0., 85th Co., Malaiag, Davao.

V Valdes, Basilio J., Maj.-Gen., Deputy Chief of Staff, (wife) 163 San Rafael, Manila, T el. 2-18-8l. Valdez, Adriano, 2nd Lt., On duty, Org. & Training Sec., HP A, Manila. Valeriano, Benito D., Colonel, Dist. Comdr., S.L., Manila, (wife) 311 Burgos, Pasay, Tel. 5-19-74.


840

VAR

CORNEJO 'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE

Vargas, Jesus, 2nd Lt., 58th Co., Lingayen" Pangasinan (T. D., DTC, Lingayen, Pangs.sinan.) Velarde, Nicanor S., 1st Lt., J. 0., 59th Co., Tayug, Pangasinan (T.n., DTC, Lingayen.) Velasco, Dionisio, 1st Lt., T. D " DTC, Lingayen, Pangasinan. Velasco, Melania M., Major, Provo Comdr., Tayabas, Lucena. Velasquez, Jaime C., 1st Lt., Junior Aide-deCamp, Chief of Staff, and On duty, Org. & Training Section, G-2, HPA, Manila. Velasquez, Pia, 2nd Lt., T. C. 0., 46th Co., lsabela, Neg. Oce. (T.D., DTC, Iloilo, Iloilo. ) Venzon, Ciriio, 1st Lt., J. O. 13th Co. & Det. Comdr., Basco, Batanes. Vergara, Segundo G., 1st Lt., C.O., 31st Co., Tacloban, Leyte (T.D . , DTC, Cebu, Cebu.) Verzosa, Manuel L., 1st Lt., On duty, Rect. Div., HPA, Manila. Veyra, Antonio V., de, 2nd Lt., J.O., 76th Co., Malaybalay, Bukidnon (T.D., DTC, C. Keithley.) Viardo, Emilio, 2nd Lt., J. 0., Tactical Co., AC., C. Murphy, Rizal. Vicente Ernesto C., 1st Lt., J . 0., 80th Co. & Det. Comdr., Kiamba, Sarangani District. Viaamo, Crisanto P., 1st Lt., (T . D., DTC, Cebu, Cebu.) Viduya, Gabriel, 1st Lt., C.O., 124th Co., San Jose, Mindoro. Villacastin, Francisco, 1st Lt., C . 0., 19th Co., Cebu, (T.D., DTC, Cebu.) Villalobos, Antonio N., Capt., Senior Aide-de~ Camp, Chief of Staff and Secretary to the General Staff, HP A, Manila. VilJaluz, Filomeno B., 1st Lt., Temp. Instructor & Post Adjutant, ROSS, Camp Henry T. Allen, Baguio.

u.

PHILIPPINE~

ZAR

-

Villanueva, Arsenio C., 1st Lt., Actg. Provo Comdr., Misamis Or., Cagayan. Villanueva, Jose C., 1st Lt. & Med. Insptr. on duty Office, Chief Medical Service and in charge Office of Pharmacistj No. 551 Legarda, Sampaloc, Manila. Villanueva, Luis, 1st Lt., C. 0., 5th Co., Daet, Camarines Norte. Villanueva, Pacifico, 1st Lt., C . 0., 102nd Co., Camp Suarez, Talacag, Bukidnon via Cagayan, Misamis Oriental. Villase, Esteban, 1st Lt., T. C. 0 ., 107th Co., Sindangan, Zamboanga. Villasenor, Felix, 1st Lt., C.O., 15th Co., CapiZ, Capiz (T.D., DTC, Iloilo, Iloilo.) Villasenor, Jesus, 1st Lt., J . O., 122nd Co., San Isidro, N . Ecija (T. D., DTC, Daraga, Albay.) Villasis, Braulio F ., 2nd Lt., J .0., 76th Co., Malaybalay, Bukidnon.

w Weinbrenner, Carlos, 1st Lt., On duty, AGS, En!. Reg. Div., CRS, HP A, Manila.

y Ylagan, Amando D., 1st Lt., C. 0 ., 91st Co., Ganassi, Lanao.

z

Zagala, Ramon, Capt., Dental Surgeon for Da.. vao (except Camp Kalaw) and Zamboanga with station at Zamboanga, Zamboanga. Zarate, Agustin L., 2nd Lt. & Dental Surgeon for Albay, Batangas, Camarines Norte, Camarines Sur, Marinduque, Masbate, Mindoro (except San Jose) Sorsogon and Tayabas with station in Legaspi, Albay.

S. A. Officers Detailed With The Philippine Army

Alba, Bienvenido, 1st Lt., (PS), USA, Instructor in F ield Artillery, ROTC, UP., Manila. Baclig, Eustaquio S., Capt., Cav., (PS), USA, On duty with the Intel. Operations & Training Div., (G-2) HPA, Manila. Cepeda, Emmanuel S., 1st Lt., (PS), USA, Asst. Comd't. of Cadets, Plans and Training Officer, Dept. of Tactics; Master of Sword, Tactical Officer and Instructor.

Garcia, Rafael, Major, (PS), USA, Third Asst. Chief of Staff, EPA, Manila. Fellers, Bonner F ., Capt., USA, Manila. Lee, William L., 1st Lt., USA, Chief, Air Corps, C. Murphy, Rizal. Martelino, Pastor, Capt., (PS), USA, Supt., Philippine Military Academy, Baguio. Olivares, Jose E., Capt., (PS), U SA, Chief, Projects Sec., G-1, HPA, Manila.


PAR

(U. S. A,.my D l1 t.)

PHILIPPINE ARMY'

Parker, Hugh A., 1st Lt., AC, USA, Opera路 tions and Training Officer, Air Corps, C. Murphy. Poblete, Ricardo, Capt., Inf., (PS), USA, Plans & Training Officer, and Adj ., ROTC, UP., Manila. Reyes, Salvador F., Capt., FA, (PS), USA, Commandant, ROTC, UP., Manila, & Superintendent, Reserve Officers' Training

(Reti red)

NAY

841

Corps Units and High Schools for the City of Manila; detailed at BPA, Mani!a. Romero, Rnfo C., 1st Lt., (PS), USA., Commandant of Cadets; Head, Dept. of Tactics, Philippine Military Academy, Bagujo. Segundo, Fidel V., Colonel, (Maj., PS, USA), Asst. Chief of Staff and Chief, Intelligence, Operations & Training Div., HPA, Manila.

Relired Officers Argaiiosa, G., 1st Lt., (retired Sept. 16, 1927) San Dionisio, Iloilo. Babiera, L. G., Major (retired Mar. 7, 1924) 238 Plaza Sta. Cruz, Manila. Bactat, C., Col., (retired June 30, 1934) c/ o Philippine Army, Sorsogon, Sorsogon. Banez, Urbano, Major, (retired Feb. 15, 1923) Bangued, Abra. Barros, Candido, 3rd Lt., (retired Feb. 8, 1922) Bangued, Abra. Bautista, V., 1st Lt., (retired Jan 4, 1928) Calapan, Mindoro. Bersola, Pablo A., 1st Lt., (retired May 20, 1925) Caba, La Union. Bowers, C. H., Brig.-Gen., (retired April 30, 1934) Calle F'och, San Juan, Rizal, Tel. &-88路50. Cerquel1a, Cristobal, Lt.-Col., (retired Sept. 1, 1933) c/ o Don Salvador Pasquan, Galileo No.9, Madrid, Spain. Coleto, P., Capt., (retired Nov. 20, 1921) Surigao, Surigao. Cruz, Liberato de la~ 2nd Lt., (retired Dec. 7, 1921) San Fda., La Union. Coronado, T., Major, (retired Feb. 11, 1925) 3191 Taft Ave. Ext., Pasay, Rizal. Denosta, N ., 2nd Lt., (retired Feb. 1, 1924) C. Suarez, Talaeag, Bukidnon. Dominguez, Juan, Col., (retired June 24, 1927) 1504 Washington St., Sampaloc, Manila. Duckworth-Ford, R.A., Col., (retired Jan. 1, 1933) N路o. 5 Kenilworth, Apartments 131 Manhattan Place, Los Angeles, California, USA. Espiritu, P., 1st Lt., (retired Jan. 1, 1933) Santolan, Pasig, Rizal. Evangelista, .. J. N., Major, (retired Mar. 16, 1930) Baguio, Benguet.

Flores, V., Capt., (retired Dec. 22, 1935) Silay, Negros Occidental Ferrandiz, Guillermo, Capt., (retired Sept. 26, 1921) Bangued, Abra. Fertus, V., 1st Lt., (retired Jan. 1, 1933) Rosario, Batangas. Gatuslao, Alonso, Major, (retired Jan. 1, 1936) Hda. Lilia, Cadiz, N egl'os Occidental. Gayoso, J ., Capt., (retired Jan. I, 1922) Fa路 brica, Negros Occidental. Hipe, Fernando, 1st Lt., (retired June 19, 1936) Alang-Alang, Leyte. Javier, C . I.M., Capt., (retired Jan. 31, 1936) 90 Mabini, Cebu, Cebu. Kadano, M.A . , 1st Lt., (retired May I, 1926) Tuguegarao, Cagayan. Lasam, E ., Capt., (retired Jan. 15, 1936) Leonor, D., Capt., (retired Mar, 31, 1931) Gibong, Agusan or 25 Sandejas, Pasay, Rizal. Llorente, F., Col., (retired Sept. 24, 1924) Concepcion, Tarlac. Llorente, R. M.., Major (retired Mar. 1, 1924) 1971 Oroquieta, Sta. Cruz Manila. Malone, Dorr H., Major, (retired June 24, 1929) c/o Middletown Military Academy, Lake County, California, USA. Manuel, Jose, 2nd Lt., (retired Sept. 29, 1926) Basilan, Zamboanga. Martinez, Benjamin J' t 1st Lt., (retired Dec. 15, 193-0) c/ o Surigao Express Co., Surigao. Morada, B. H., 1st Lt., (retired June 9, 192"7) Davao, Davao. Natanawan, S., 1st Lt., (retired May 15, 1934) Talisay, Batangas. Nathorst, Charles E., Brig-Gen., (retired Apr il 14, 1932) Apartment N, Patio de Pasay, Pasay, RizaI, Tel. 5-12-30. N'a varro, P. B., Capt., (retired Jan. 6, 1924) 26 Manapa, Malabon, Ri'Za1.


842

ABC

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PtfI LIPPlNE!:

1'oiicoias, Bernabe, Capt., (retired Dee. 1923) 230 Grey St., Ermita, Manila.

25,

Ochoa, Ramon, Lt.-Col., (retired Jan. I, 1933) 1163 Dakota St., Manila. Palma, M. S., Capt., (retired Dec. 1, 1923 ) 2633 Lico St., Sta. Cruz, Manila. Ramos, Aurelio, Col., (retired Nov. 21, 1927) Taverga, Asturias, Spain. Rea l, Victor, 1st Lt., (retired Oct. 20, 1925)

Batangas, Batangas. Ruid era, Q., 1st Lt. , (retiTed Jan. 1, 1926)

Malicboy Railroad Sta., Tayabas. Sanchez, D., Capt., (retired Dec. 21, 1926) Tuao, Cagaya n. Soledad, B., Maj or, (retired Jan. 22, 1926) Dumaguete, Negros Oriental. Tharp, J. L. F ., Col., (r etired April 7, 1923) Gen . Del., Long Beach, Cal. , U . S. A.

BAR

Torres, Santiago, 2nd Lt., (retired Oct. 16, 1926) Balanga, Bataan. Valdes, Alejo, Lt.-Col., (retired Apri l 1, 1935) 28 Escolastica St., Pasay. Rizal. Valmores, D., 3rd Lt., (retired July 30, 1922) 24 Blumentritt St., Pasig, Rizal. Velasquez, J. t Major, (retired Dec. 10, 1927) Sta. Maria, Laguna or 76 Gen. L. Geronimo, Sampaloc, Manila. ViTIafuerte, Cipriano, 1st Lt., (retired June 18, 1930) Davao, Davao. Waloe, 0., Col., (retired Mar. 7, 1924) 225 Westgate Ave., Brentwood Hights., Los Angeles, California, U. S . A. Yance, A., Major, (retired Mar. 7, 1925) 1650 F. Huertas, Sta. Cruz, Manila. Zapanta, L., 2nd Lt., (retired Mal'. 1, 1925) Tanjay, Negros Orienta1.

Reserve Officers Of The Philippine Army On Active Duty A Ahced e, Salv ador, 3"Lt., On duty, Philippin e Military Academy, Baguio. Abrenica, Jose, 3"Lt ., On duty, DTC, Zamb oan ga, Zamboanga. Adi a r te, Isidro G. , 2" Lt ., On duty, DTC, Cebu Cebu. Adl e, Enrique, 2"Lt., On duty, District 01 Nor th ern Minda nao. Agawin , J ose, Capt., On duty, Office of Asst. E xc. Off., C.D., HPA., Man ila . Agui la r , Francisco S., 3"Lt ., On du ty, DTC, Ce bu, Ce bu. Albari110, Vicente Q. , 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Baguio, Bengu et . Alcala, Proceso, 2"Lt., On duty , DTC, San F ern a ndo, Pampang a. Al can ta ra , Manu el F ., 3 " Lt ., On duty , DTC: Cebu, Cebu. Alcazar, Estaban A" l " Lt., On duty, DTC., Il oil u, Il oilo. AJd ea, Ramon B., 3 "Lt ., On duty, DTC, Cebn . Ceb u. Alejandre, BIas, A ., 3"Lt ., On duty, PhPippi n e Mi lit ary Acad e my , Baguio. Al ej andrino, P edro C., I"Lt. , On duty , DTC, Cebu, Cebu. Ale jandro, F lo r encio G. , l"Lt. , On duty, DTC, Bagu io, B engu et . An cheta, Celedonio A., lIlLt., On duty, DTC, Il oil o, Iloilo.

Antenor, Constantio S., 3"Lt., Temp. Comdr., Troop "A",ls t Squadron, lURD, C. Murphy. Aquino, Restituto T ., 3"Lt., On duty. DTC, Camp Keithley. Lanao. Aquino, Venancio H., 2"Lt., On duty, District Southern Luzon. Aranas, Agapito F ., 3"Lt., On duty, DTG, Daraga, Albay. Ares, Julian, 3"Lt., Acting C. C., 33rd Co., Malitbog, Leyte. Arevalo, Pablo V., 2"Lt., On duty, Quartermaster S ervice, HPA, Manila Arroyo , Juan E., 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, Camp Murphy, Rizal. Atienza, R iga-berto J., 3"Lt., On duty, ROSS, Baguio, Benguet. Ayson, Laureano F., l"Lt., On duty, Office of Provo Comdr., Rizal, Pasig.

B Balagot , Santiago F., l"Lt., On duty, Me, Baguio, Benguet. Ballori, Manuel S., Capt., On duty, Office of Provo Comdr., Cebu, Cebu. Banzon, Jose V., 3"Lt., On duty , ROTC, U. P., Manila. Barbero, Carmela Z., 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, Baguio, Benguet. Barrenengoa, Jorge, 3"Lt., On duty, ROTC, La Salle College, Manila.


( Reserve)

BAU

PHIl...lPPINE ARMY

Bautista, Amado N ., l"Lt., On duty, l"RD., Camp Murphy, Rizal. Bautista, Juan, Capt., Actg. Div. Signal Off., l"RD., III Asst. to Actg. Chief Signal Off., PA. Bejasa, Gregorio D., 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, Cebu, Cebu. Benitez, Tomas C., 3"Lt., On duty, ROTC, U. P ., Manila. Bemales, Jose S., 2"Lt., On duty, Quartermaster S'ervice, HP A, Manila. Bernardo, Trajano V., l"Lt., (M. C.), On duo ty, Office of Chief, Med. Serv., HPA., Manila. Borja, Valeriano A., 2 H Lt., On duty, DTC, Baguio. Benguet. lirillantes, Emilio, 3"Lt., On duty, District of Northern Mindanao. Bueno, Aurelio S., 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Baguio, Benguet. • Bueno, Fermin G., l"Lt., On duty, DTC, Iloilo, Iloilo. Bugarin, Fabian 0., Capt., On duty, Office of Provo Comdr., and TCO, 22nd Co., Bantay, Ilocos Sur. Buhain, Teodoro R , 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Cebu, Cebu.

C Cabal, Amado F., l"Lt., On duty, DTC, Camp Murphy, Rizal. Gamins, Lorenzo B., 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, Cebu, Ceb·u. Cancio, Eulogio J ., l "Lt., On duty, DTC, San Fernando, Pampanga. Cancio, Hugo C., l"Lt., C. 0 ., 7th Co., Balanga, Bataan. Capayas, Isaac M., Capt., On duty, Office of the Provo Comdr., Imus, Cavite. Cap iii Jr. , Ignacio, 3"Lt., On duty, ROTC, P.N. S. III P .S.A. T., Manila. Carandang, Porfirio R, 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Cebu, Cebu. Cardenas, Priscilo V., 3"Lt., On duty, DrTC, Baguio, Benguet. Carlos, Sixto S. J., 2"Lt. , On duty, DTC, San Fernando, Pampanga. Castillo, Jose S., 3"L., On duty, DTC, Baguio, Benguet. ~astro, Com'ado D. de, 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Camp Keithley, Lanao.

(Reserve)

FER

843

Castro, Fred R, 3"Lt., On duty, Int., Oper. & Training Div., HPA, Manila. Casu pang, Onofre M., 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Lingayen, Pangasinan. Chanco, Restituto L., 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, Iloilo, Iloilo. Conrado, Jorge, l"Lt., C.O., 4th Co., N"aga, Camarines Sur. Crisostomo, Vicente D., 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, Camp Murphy, Rizal. Cruz, Amado, l"Lt., In charge, Powder Magazine, Tapao Pt., Binangonan, Rizal. Cruz, Irineo, M., I"Lt., On duty, DTC, San Fernando, Pampanga. Cruz, Mariano E., 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Iloilo, Iloilo. Cruz, Ponciano E. D., 2"Lt., on duty, DTC, Lingayen, Pangasinan .

D Dayot, Noe, 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, Iloilo, Iloilo. Dayot, Vivencio D., 2"Lt ., On duty, Philippine Military Academy, Baguio. Delfin, Ramon V., 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Zamboanga, Zamboanga. Deveza, Jr., Juan C., I "Lt., Supply, Prop., & Fin. Off., ROSS, Baguio. Dinglasan, Mariano A., 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, C. Keith ley, L anao. Diokno Jr., Ananias R., 2"Lt., On duty, Phnippine Military Academy, Baguio. Domingo, Jacinto H., 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, Daraga, Albay. Duran, Melecio S., 3"Lt., On duty, San Fernando, Pampanga.

E Espejo, Braulio R., On duty, l"RD., Camp Murphy, Rizal. Estrera, Luis B., 3"Lt., Acting C.C . , 64th Co., Catarman, Samar.

F Fajardo, Gregorio L ., Capt., On duty, Quartermaster Service, HPA, Manila. Felix, Leon F., 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Iloilo, Iloilo. Fenix, Alberto 0 ., 3 t1 Lt., On duty, ROTC, U. P., Manila. Fernandez, Hugo B., 3 t1 Lt., On duty, DTe, Lingayen, Pangasinan.


844

FLO

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE

Flores, Gabriel S., gULt., On duty, DTC, Iloilo, Iloilo. Francisco, Manuel C., 2"Lt., On duty. DTC, Cebu, Cebu.

G Gahol, Felipe A" 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Daraga, Albay. Garcia, Marcelino B., l"Lt., On duty, DTC, Lingayen, Pangasinan. Garcia, Pastor V., 2"Lt., On duty, Lingayen, Pangasinan. Garcia, Ricardo, Capt., On duty, Div. of Pers. & Supp., (G-3), BPA, Manila. Garcia, Valentin T., lULt., On duty, District Southern Mindanao. Garcia, Vitaliano 0 ., 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Lingayen, Pangasinan. Garduno, Dorninador, l"Lt., M . e.R. - On duty, Camp Murphy, Rizal.

Gavino, Roman, 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, Iloilo, Iloilo. Gazmin, Segundo L., On duty, DTC, San Fernando, Pampanga. Genic, Artemio A" 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, Da-raga, Albay. Giron, J ose P., l "Lt., On duty, DTC, Cebu, Cebu. Goma, Silvino R. de, 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Camp Murphy, Rizal. Gonzales, J esus L., 2"Lt., On duty, ROS S, Baguio, Benguet. Gonzales, Mariano S., lIlLt., Supply Off. & Instructor, ROSS, Baguio, Benguet. Gonzales, Nicolas L., 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Daraga, Albay. Gonzales, Thomas M., 2"Lt., Press Officer, HP A, Manila. Guerrero, Clemente G., 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, Baguio, Benguet.

H Halili, Donato M., Capt., Instructor, ROSS, Baguio, Benguet. Henson, Fermin A ., l"Lt., On duty, DTC, San Fernando, Pampanga. Hernandez, Juan A., Capt., On duty, Quartermaster Service, HP A, Manila. Hernandez, Magtangol N., 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, San Fernando" Pampaga.

PHIL1PPlNE~

LOZ

Hicaro, Felipe A., lIlLt., On duty, DTC, Cebu, Cebu. Hidalgo, Mariano F., 3"Lt., On duty, Philippine Military Academy, Baguio, Benguet. Hocson, Victoriano P., 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Cebu, Cebu.

I Icasas, Iluminado M., 211Lt. On Iloilo, Iloilo. Ignacio, Benjamin P ., 2"Lt., On Iloilo, Iloilo. Inciong, Lino J ., 3"Lt., On duty, Kei thley, Lanao. Isidoro, Francisco R., 2"Lt., On Camp Murphy, Rizal.

duty, DTC, duty, DTC, DTC, Camp duty, DTC,

J Jaminola, Pedro N., Capt., On duty, Firearms & Explosives Sectioll., PMG, HPA, Manila. Janairo, Antiqui o X., 3H Lt., On duty, DTC, Bagnio, Benguet. Javelosa, Sebastian D., 3"Lt., On duty, ROTC. U. P., Los Ba nos, Laguna. Jayrne, Gregorio A., 2"Lt.â&#x20AC;˘ On duty, DTC, Zamboanga, Zamboanga. Jesus, Serafin D. de, 3"Lt., On duty, DTC. Iloilo, Iloilo. Jimenez, Nicanor T., 3"Lt., On duty, ROTC, U. P., Manila. Juan, Francis R., 3"Lt., On duty, Philippine Military Academy, Baguio.

L Labayen, Angel, l"Lt., On duty, District of Northern Mindanao. Lasam, Rafael R., 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, Baguio. Benguet. Lazaro, Esmeraldo R., l"Lt., On duty, DTC, Cebu, Cebu. Legaspi, Angel M., 311 Lt., District of Visayas, Cebu, Cebu. Leon, Modesto de, l"Lt., C. 0 ., 29th Co., Cabuyao, Laguna. Lintag, Cesar, 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, San Fer-. nando, Pampanga. Lorenzo, Cesar M., 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Cebu, Cebu. Lozada, Pastor A., 3"Lt., On duy, DTC, lIe>ilo, Iloilo.


(Reserve )

MAC

PHlILII"PINE ARMY

M 1facaranas, Silvino Z., 2"Lt., On duty, 1st Reg. Div., Camp Murphy, Rizal. Magtoto, Amado B., Capt., On duty, ROSS, Baguio, Benguet. Mamaiigun, Paulo S., 3"Lt. On duty, DTC, Iloilo, Iloilo . .Mancao, Mariano B., 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, Cebu, Cebu. Mandac, Manuel D., 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Baguio, Benguet. Maniego, Felix S., 3"Lt., On duty, RO TC, U. P., Manila. Manuel, Primo C., 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Cebu, Cebu. Maramba, Ju an, 2"Lt., C. 0., 53rd Co., Malolos, Bulacan. .r.-Iarin, Pacifico C., l"Lt., On duty, DTC, San Fernando, Pampanga. Mariano Cornelio 0., l"Lt., On duty, DTC, Cebu, Cebu. Marquez, Remigio, 3"Lt., On duty, District of Visayas, Cebu, Cebu. Martelino, Leopolda C., l"Lt., On duty, ROSS, Baguio, Benguet. Mendoza, Bartolome M., 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, Camp Keithley, Lanao. Mendoza Rodolfo C., 3"Lt., On duty, Philippine Military Academy, Baguio. Mercado, Ernesto C., 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, Iloilo, Iloilo. Montelibano, Jose G., 3"Lt., On duty, Philippine Military Academy, Bagnio. Montemayor, Pedro R ., 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Lingayen.

N Narvaez, Jaime R., 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, Iloilo, Iloilo. Narvaez, Julio R, 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, Cebu, Cebu. Natividad, Amado J. , 1"Lt. , On duty, DTC., Camp Keithley, Lanao. Navarro, Bernardino G., 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Zamboanga, Zamboanga. Nazareth, Victoriano C., 2"Lt., TCO., 40th Co., Mayoyao, !fugao. Nera, Paulino, 2"Lt., Acting C.C., 65th Co., Borongan, Samar. Nuique, Sergio G., 2"Lt., On duty, District of Viayas, Cebu, Cebu.

(Reserve)

REY

845

o

Obieta, Juan R, 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, TIoilo, Iloilo. Olivares, Flaviano P ., 3"Lt., On duty, ROTC, U. P ., Manila. Ortega, Juan B., l"Lt., On duty, DTC, Cebu, Cebu.

p Paguia, Felix, l"Lt., On duty. DTC, San Fernando, Pampanga. Panganiban, Jose H., l"Lt., On duty, 1st Reg. Div., Camp Murphy, Rizal. Pascual, Leonardo C., 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Iloilo, Iloilo. Paulmino, Angel M., l"Lt., C. 0 ., 63rd Co., Romblon, Romblon. Pedro, Felix B., l"Lt., On duty, DTC, Lingayen, Pangasinan. Pe-rez, Zoilo M., 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, San Fernando, Pampanga. Perlas, Jesus C., 2"Lt., On duty, Philippine Military Academy, Baguio. Pilapi! J r., Felipe, l"Lt., On duty, DTC, San Fernando, Pampanga. Planes, Maximo J., 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Daraga, Albay. Pollard, Charles R ., 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Daraga, Albay. Potenciano, Pelagio C., Capt., (M.C.) Asst. Flight Surgeon, Air Corps, C. Murphy.

R Rabang, Julian E., l "Lt., On duty, DTC, Camp Keithley, Lanao. Ramos, Oscar D., 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, Baguio, Benguet. Ramos, Osmundo C., 2"Lt., On duty, District of Northern Luzon, Camp Haimes, Trinidad, Benguet. Regis Leopolda L., 2"Lt., On duty. Office of Dist. Comdr., Visayas, Cebu, Cebu. Rementilla, Pacifico P., 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, Iloilo, Iloilo. Reyes, Arturo L. de los, 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Iloilo, Iloilo. Reyes, Augusto W. de los, l"Lt. (M. C.) On duty Med. Regt., Camp Murphy, Rizal. Reyes, Francisco N., l"Lt., On duty, DTC, Zamboanga, Zamboanga. Reyes, Jose F., l"Lt., Actg. Head, Dept. of Lang. & Social Arts, PMA, Baguio.


846

REY

CORNEJO'S COMI'.. IONWEALl'H DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

Reymundo, Elpidio L., l"Lt., On duty, DTC, Cebu, Cebu. Roque, Fl'ancisco T., 1st Lt., (MC Res), Asst. Post Surgeon, P'MA, Baguio. Rosales, Justo A" 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Iloilo, Iloilo. Ruiz, Petronilo L., 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Zamboanga, Zamboanga.

S Sacay, Guadencio P ., 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, Cebu, Cebu. Salazar, Jose G., 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, eehu, eebu. Salcedo Jr., Juan, Capt. (M . C.) Post Surgeon, ROSS, Baguio, Benguet. Samson, Bernardo, Capt. (M.C.) On duty, DTC, San Fernando, Pampanga. Santamaria, Lorenzo, 3"Lt., On du ty. DTC, Daraga, Albay. Santos, Alfredo M., 1"Lt., On duty, Philippine Military Academy, Baguio. Santos, Sixto S. de, 3"Lt., On duty, ROTC, Adamson School of Ind. Chern., Manila. Sauco, Avelino E., 1"Lt., On duty, DTC, Lingayen, Pangasinan. Short, 'Valter T., 1"Lt., On duty, 1st Reg. Div., Camp Murphy, Rizal. Solis, Alfredo J., 1"Lt., On duty, DTC, Iloilo, Iloilo. Solis, Basilio P., 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Camp Keithley, Lanao.

l' Tallow, Adamin. A., 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Li ngayen, Pagasinan. Tecson, Juan P ., 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, Zamboanga, Zamboanga. Teves, Ricardo R., 1"Lt., On duty, District Northern Mindanao, C. Keithley, Lanao. Tinio, Jose M., 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, San Fernando, Parnpanga. Tiongson, Cirilo R., 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Cebu, Cebu. Tiongson, Vicente 0., 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, Lingayen, Pangasinan. Tirona, Rodolfo 0 ., 1"Lt., On du ty, DTC, Camp Murphy, Rizal. Tolentino, Eulogio V., 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Zamboanga, Zamboanga.

U Uichangco, Conrado B., 3"Lt., On duty. ROTC, U. P., Manila.

ZUL

Ungson, Trinidad Jose C., 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, Baguio, Benguet. Urbina, Santos, 2"Lt., On duty, District of Visayas, Cebu, Cebu.

V Valdes, Manuel L., 1"Lt., (V.C.Res) On duty, 1st Reg. Div., Camp Murphy, Riza!. Valdez, Pio B., 11/Lt., On duty, DTC, Linga~ yen, Pangasinan. Valdez, Simeon M., 3"Lt., On duty, ROTC, U. P., Manila. Valentin, Ignacio J., 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Camp Murphy, Rizal. Vasquez. Perfecto M., 2"Lt., On duty, nTC, Daraga, Albay. Vasquez, Serafin B., 3"Lt., On duty. DTC, Iloilo, Iloilo. Velasco, Agapito G., 2"Lt., On temp. duly, Office C.C., Caloocan, Rizal. Velasco, Constancio R. , 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, Lingayen, Pangasinan. Velasco Migu el D., 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Camp Murphy, Rizal. Victoria, Daniel 0., Maj,o r Detailed with the Fin. Dept., Phil. Dept., USA, Ft. Area, Manila. Villa, Salvador T., 3"Lt., On duty, Philippine Military Academy, Baguio. Villacin, Dioscoro A. , 1"Lt., Acting C.C., 66th Co., Catbalogan, Samar. Villaflor, Romulo C., 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, Daraga, Albay. Villanueva, Wenceslao, l"Lt., Acting C. 0 ., 23rd Co., Calinog, Iloi lo. Villa-real, Luis A., 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, Camp Murphy, Rizal. Villares, Modesto, 2"Lt., . J . 0., lOOth Co., Jolo, Sulu. Villarino, Marcial B., 2"Lt., On duty, DTC, Cebu, Cebu. Villasanta, Juan P., Capt., On duty, Int., Oper. & Trng. Div. H PA, Manila. Vinluan, Pedro S., 2" Lt., On duty, DTC, Da路 raga, Albay.

Z Zamora, Jr., Marcial, 3"Lt., On duty, DTC, Zamboanga, Zamboanga. Zosa, Constancio M. de, 1"Lt., On duty, DTC, San Fernando, Pampanga. Zulueta, Jose R. , 3"Lt., On duty, DTC. Cebu.


PHI'LIPPINE ARMY

(O n Ina ctive S tatus )

On Annnal Dnty Training (No v. 23. 1936)

Alejandrino, Gil M., l"Lt. (D.C.) Altavas, Rizal L., l"Lt., (M.C.) Aniceto, Jose R., I"Lt., (M.C.) Angangco, Marcelo C., I"Lt., (M.C.) Angeles, Jose, Capt., (D.C.) Arevalo, Jose S., I"Lt., (M.C.) Arnaldo, Vicente A., l"Lt., (M.C.) Balao, Manuel P., l"Lt., (M.C.) Bahia, Rodolfo, l"Lt., (M.C.) Barrera, Benjamin D., I"Lt., (M.C.) Bautista, Jose L., l "Lt., (D.C.) Bengzon, Luis C., I"Lt., (M.C.) Bernardo, Eduardo A., l"Lt., (M.C.) Caguiat, Herminio, I"Lt., (M.C.) Cangco, Alfredo N ., l"Lt., (D.C.) Carino, Sinforoso M., I"Lt., (D.C.) Casquejo, Antonio M., l"Lt., (D.C.) Cid, Corazon A., I"Lt., (M.C.) Clemente, Tomas S., l"Lt., (M.C.) Concepcion, Eduardo N., l"Lt., (D.C.) Concepcion, Jesus N., I"Lt., (D.C.) Cruz, Inocencio de la, l"Lt., (M.C.) Cruz, Pedro M., l"Lt., (M.C.) Delfin, Domingo R, I"Lt., (D.C.) Dizon, Gregorio, l"Lt., (M.C.) Domingue'z, Andres V., I"Lt., (D.C.) Fajardo, Braulio C., l"Lt., (M.C.) Fidelino, Valentin A., I"Lt., (M.C.) Fuente, Antonio de la, I"Lt., (M.C.) Gatmaitan, Clemente S., l"Lt., (M.C.) Gatpayat, Raymundo L., l"Lt. , (D.C.) Gonzales, An!;el M., l"Lt., (D.C.) Guerrero, Fortunato S., I"Lt., (M.C.) Gutierrez, Alvaro I., I"Lt., (M.C.) Icasiano, Conrado B., I"Lt., (M.C.) llano, Guillermo M., I"Lt.. (M.e.) llano, Lazaro R., I"Lt., (M.C.) Ingco, Manuel, I"Lt., (M.C.) Javier, Vicente C., I " Lt., (M.C.) Katighak, Francisco J., l"Lt., (M.C.)

Maloles, Maximino, IULt., (D.C.) Martinez, Luis D., l ULt., (M.C.) Matoto, Honorio A., I"Lt., (D.C.) Melendres, Narciso, I"Lt., (M.C.) Mercado, Carlos A., I I1 Lt., (D.C.) Mesina, Simeon P., I " Lt., (M.C.) Navarrete, Agripino P., I"Lt., (M.C.) Niehres, Bienvenido D., II/Lt., (M.e.) Nolasco, Saturnino M., I"Lt., (D.C.) Ong, Genaro M., I /t Lt., ( M.C. ) Ordonez, Delfin 0., l " Lt., (M.C.) Pacheco, Mariano M., I t/ Lt., ( D.C.) Pascual, Florencio, I " Lt. , (D.C.) Peralta, Rizal G. de, l " Lt., (M.C.) Perez, Francisco B., I"Lt. , ( D.C. ) Perez Francisco B., I"Lt., (D.C.) Perez, Guillelmo B., l"Lt. , (D.C.) Perio, Jorge R. de, l"Lt., (D.C.) Pia, Ruperto I., l"Lt ., (D.C.) Posadas, Antonio V., I"Lt., (D.C.) Pugeda, Emilio S., I"Lt., (D.C.) Quilala, Francisco V., I " Lt., ( M.C.) Rabago Ramon R., l"Lt., ( M.C.) Ramos, Segundo, l"Lt., ( D.C.) Reyes, Eliseo T., l"Lt., (D. C.) Reyes, Marcial, Capt., (D.C.) Reyes, Rosalino V., l"Lt ., ( M.C.) Rivera, Teodocio, I"Lt., (D. C.) Rodriguez, Jose D., l " Lt., (D.C.) Rosete, Juan P., I"Lt. , (M.C.) Ruelos, Valentin C., I"Lt., ( M.C.) Saez, Eusebio, A., I I/ Lt., (D.C.) Santos, Marcelino 1. de, l"Lt. , (M.C. ) Santos, Vivencio P., I"Lt., (D.C.) Sotto, Protacio R., l"Lt., (M.C. ) Tandoc, Jose S., l"Lt., (M .C.) Tangco, Jose F., l"Lt., (M.C.) Taiiada, Mariano M., I/1Lt., ( M.C.) Verano, Epifanio Q., I"Lt., ( M.C.) Zialcita, Jose C., 1"Lt., (M.C.)

On Inactive Status ( N o v. 23. 1936)

A Abaya, Rafael G., l"Lt., (MC) Abaya, Ricardo C., I"Lt. , (MC) Abella, Domingo, l"Lt., (MC) Ablaza, Eulalio E., l"Lt. (DC) Acosta, Luis R., l"Lt., (MC) Agatep, Martin, l"Lt., (MC)

Aguila, Bernardo A., 1" Lt., (DC) Almeda, Lorenzo G., l"Lt., (DC) Alonzo, Alfredo 0 ., I " Lt., (MC) Altarejos, Francisco C., l"Lt., (MC) Ampil, FeJ;'nando G., l " Lt., (DC) Andrada, Benjamin B., Capt., (lnf.) Andrada, Jose V. l"Lt., (lnf.)

847


84&

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALT H DIRECTORY OF THE

Andrade, Manuel M., l"Lt., ( DC) Angeles, Jaime N., l"Lt., (MC) Arca, Pacifico, lULt., (MC) Arca, Teofilo, l"Lt., (DC) Arnaiz, Antonio, Lt.-Col., (AC) Arnaldo, Cresente S., I"Lt., (DC) Arzaga, Artemio Z., l "Lt., (DC) Arvisu, Jose S., I"Lt., (Inf.) Asis, Abelardo de, I"Lt., (DC) Austria, Arsenio S., lULt.. (DC) Ayuyao, Claro D . l"Lt., (DC) Azaola. Federico G., I"Lt., (MO)

B Baioin, Avelino R., I"Lt., (MC) Baltazar, Gonzalo L., It/Lt., (MU) Bantug, Isidro P., I"Lt., (MC) Banez, Pedro A. , l"Lt., (DO) Baradi, Isidoro P., I"Lt., (Me) Barangan, Roman A., l"Lt., (DC) Baraiigan, Victor, l"Lt., (Me) Barba, Amador, l"Lt., (DC) Bascon, Felix, IULt., (DC) Bie, E milio S., l"Lt ., ( DC) Borromeo, Jes us R., l"Lt.. (DC) Bravo. Alberto E .. 1 "Lt., (DC) Bravo, Dianisio E., l"Lt., (MC) B r ias, Leopol do, 3"Lt., ( Cav. ) Eringas, Trineo B., l"Lt., (MO) Buenaventura, Florentino C., Capt., (Inf.) Buencamino Jr., Felipe, Major (Inf.) Buencamino, Pablo, l"Lt., (VC) Buencamino, Victor, Major, (VC) Buenvia ie, F ernando L., l"Lt., (MC)

c Cabrera, Florent ino P ., l"Lt., (Inf.) Cadeli na, Alejandro N., l"Lt., (MC) Ca jucom, J ose M., Capt ., (Cav.) Oalil ong, Victoriano P., I"Lt., (MO) Calvo, Juan , Lt.-Col., ( AC) Caparas, F eliciano B., I"Lt., (MC) Cardenas, Maxim o B.. l"Lt., (MC) Carino, Hel'men egildo, l"Lt., (MC) Carlos, Octavio, l"Lt., (DC) Carretero, Antonio C., I"Lt., (MC) Ca stillo, Eligio S., l"Lt., (DC) Castillo, Juan S., I"Lt., (MC) Castro, Maximo de, I"Lt., (PC) Catin dig, Cesar, l"Lt., '( MC) Cif ra, Benjamin R., I"Lt., (MC) Clemente Jr., Mariano A., I"Lt., (MC)

PHILIPPINE~

Con sing, Pedro L., 1"Lt., (DC) Consing, Timoteo, 1"Lt., (MC) Corpuz, Paciano P ., IIlLt., (DC) Coronado, Oliver B., l " Lt., (MC) Coronel, Anselmo M., I"Lt., (MC) Crisantc. Avelino G., l " Lt., (DC) Cruz, Anatalio C. de la, 3"Lt., (Inf.) Cruz, Eusebio C., l"Lt., (MC) Cruz, Federico S .. l"Lt .. (DC) Cruz, IIumillatlo J. I"Lt .• (Me' Cruz, Pedro C., I"Lt., (Me) Cruz. Sixto M., l"Lt., (DC) Cuajungco, Daniel A ., 1st. Lt., (Me) Cuesta, J esus V., l"Lt .. (MC) CUl'a meng, Amado, l"Lt., (Inf.) t

D Dagnalan, Federico, l"Lt., (MC) Dansico, Alfredo ., l"Lt., (MC) Delfin, Jesus, l"Lt., (DC) Delgado, Luis B ., l"Lt., (MC ) Diaz, Manuel, I"Lt., (DC) Diego, Alfredo D., l"Lt., (MC) Dimayuga. Delfin M., I"Lt., (DC~ Dionisio, Donato R., I"Lt .• (DC~ Dios, Sergio J. de, l"Lt., (MC) Duran, Eduardo J ., I"Lt., (MC)

E Eleazar, Jose F., I"Lt., (DC) Elizalde, Angel, 2"Lt., (AC) Elizalde, Manuel. I"Lt., (Cav.) Elizalde, Joaquin M., Major, (Cav.) Elizalde, Juan C<Lpt., (Cav.) Encinas, Salvador R ., l"Lt., (DC) Endrinal, Domingo M., 3"Lt., (Inf.) E spinas, Gregorio L., 3"Lt., (Inf.) Espinueva, Graciano D., 2"Lt., (Cnf. )

F Fausto, Daniel S., I"Lt., ( DC) Feliciano, Fausto R., I"Lt., (D C) Fenol, Honesto L., l"Lt., (DC) Feraren, J esus F., I"Lt., (DC) Fernandez, J ose C .. l " Lt., (MC) Fernandez, Victor S., l"Lt., (DC) Filart, Rafael P., I"Lt ., ( DC) Figueras, Ricardo B.. I"Lt., (MC) Francisco, Jose P ., l"Lt., (DC) Francisco, Sixto, l"Lt., (MC)


(On i11a.ctive Status)

G Gaffud, Pablo H ., l"Lt., (MC) Galang, Mariano B., I"Lt., (DC) Galang, Pedro G. L., l"Lt., (MC) Galvan, Faustino F., I"Lt., (DC) Galvez, Jose M., l"Lt., (Me) Gamboa, Julio D., l"Lt., (MC) Gapuz, Domingo B., l"Lt., (Ve) Gapuz, Fausto B., I"Lt., (VC) Garcia, Benjamin, l"Lt. (DC) Garcia, Eusebio D., l"Lt., (MC) Garcia Jr., Miguel, I"Lt., (DC) Garcia, Vicente S., l"Lt., (DC) Garduno, Dominador, I"Lt., (MC) Garrido, Jose, Capt., (EC) Gestuvo, Arsenio S., l"Lt., (MC) Goco, Eliseo D., Capt., (MC) Gomez, Jr., Aurelio Q., I"Lt., (MC) Gonzales, Abelardo P . l"Lt., (DC) Gonzales, Teofilo V., I"Lt., (MC) Guerrero, Francisco G., I"Lt., (MC) Guzman, Jose 0., I"Lt., (DC) Guzman, Lauro D., I"Lt., (DC)

H Henson, Vicente, l"Lt., (MC) Heredia, Raymundo J., 2/1Lt., (Inf.) Huerto, Gregorio B., I"Lt., (MC)

I Ignacio, Artemio M., l"Lt., (MC)

J Jamilano, Felix A., r'Lt., (MC) Japson, Vicente, l/1Lt., (MC) Javellana, Vicente J., I"Lt., (MC) Javier, Dominador C., I"Lt., (MC) Javier, Melchor M., I"Lt., (MC) Jazmines, Vicente H. L., l"Lt., (MC) Jsus, Jose K. de, I"Lt., (MC) Jimenez, Alejandro L., 3"Lt., (lnf.) Jose, Angel M., San l"Lt., (MC) Jose, Marcial A., l"Lt., (lnf.) Jose, Pedro Sera, Capt., (lnf.)

PHILIPPINE ARMY

(On Inactive Status )

Leon, Casiano R. de, l"Lt., (Me) Leon, Jose P. de, I"Lt., (MC) Leon, Juan G. de, I"Lt., (MC) Leon, Ponciano M. de, I"Lt., (MC) Leon, Severino S. de, 3"Lt., (Inf.) Leon, Walfrido de, Major, (MC) Leonida, Gaudencio M., l"Lt., (DC) Lim, Gregorio S., l"Lt., (MC) Liwanag, Manuel, Capt., (Inf.) Lla-mas, Rizalino F., 2lJ Lt., (Inf.) Lomotan, Angel J., l"Lt., (MC) Lopez, Antonio, l"Lt., (MC) Lopez, Ceferino, l"Lt., (MC) Lopez, Gemiliano C., l"Lt., (DC) Lotuaco, Galicano Y., I"Lt., (MC) Luarca, Lucio 0., l"Lt., (DC) Lucas, Emilio R., l"Lt., (MC) Luczon, Manuel, l"Lt., (MC) Lugod, Remedio V., l"Lt., (MC) Lumanlan, Amado Y., I"Lt., (MC)

M Magbag, Pastor G., l"Lt., (MC) Majam, Miguel S., II/Lt., (DC) Manankil, Conrado M., l"Lt., (MC) Mandanas, Aniceto, Capt., (MC) Mal'telino, Apolonio C., l"Lt., (MC) Miranda, Aurelio D., l"Lt., (MC) Martinez, Ladislao B., l"Lt., (DC) Martinez, Jose F., l"Lt., (MC) McMicking, Joseph R., 2"Lt., (AC) Medina, Norberta B., 1 "Lt., (DC) Medina, Ramon J., l"Lt., (MC) Melchor, Alejandro, Capt., (Inf.); p. 810. Mendoza, Rufino, l"Lt., (DC) Miranda, Com'ado L., I"Lt., (MC) Misa, Eriberto B., Major, (Inf.) Montalvan, Jose M., l"Lt., (Inf.) Monzon, Jose M., I"Lt., (DC) Monzon, Patricio R., 2"Lt., (Inf.) Monzon, Solomon, I"Lt., (DC) Morga, Daniel V., I"Lt., (MC) Mortera, Rafael M., Capt., (MC)

N L Lachica, Cesar R., l"Lt., (DC) Laico, Jaime, II/Lt., (MC) Lambujon, Restituto C., l"Lt., (DC) Lara, Crispin G., 11/Lt., (MC) Lara, Hilario, Major, (Me)

849

Nakpil, Juan F ., Major, (Inf.) Navarro, Andres, Capt., (Me) Navarro, Paterno G., l"Lt., (DC) Nieto, Manuel, Major, (Inf.) Noble, Gaudencio R., I1/Lt., (DC) Nolasco, Manuel 0., l"Lt., (DC)


850

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE

o Ochosa, Jose E., l"Lt., (DC) Olivas, Claudio C., l"Lt., (DC) Ongiengco, Rosendo V " l"Lt., (DC) Ort iz, Jesus, A., l"Lt., (Me) Ozamis, Jose, Ma j or , (Inf.)

p P a doli na , Onofre B., l " Lt., (Me) Pangiiinan, Jose, l"Lt., ( Me) Papa, Perfecto R., l"Lt., (MC) Paras, Armando, l"Lt., ( Me) Pin zon, Fidel S., l " Lt., ( MC) Principe, Lorenzo, l " Lt ., (Me)

Q Quis umbing, Ernesto A. , l"Lt., (Me) R Rabadilla, J or ge S., l " Lt., (MC) Rafael, Aurelio S., l " Lt., (DC) Rama, AngelO. de, l " Lt., (Me) Ramos, Aurelio C., Capt. , (lnf.) Ramos, Deog racias P ., l"Lt., (nC) Ra mos, F elix M., lllLt., ( DC) Ramos, Leon S., 1 " Lt., (DC) Ra mos, Manuel C., I"Lt., (DC) Ramos, Manuel M. , l"Lt., (Me) Ramoso, Jose B., I"Lt., (Me) Reyes, Eligio G., I " Lt ., (DC) Reyes, Gualbert o de los, 1 "Lt., (D C ) Reyes, Gustavo U ., l " Lt., ( Me) Reyes, P edro V., 1" Lt., (DC) Ri co, Eusebi o A., 3" Lt., (Inf.) Rodelas, N orberto, l " Lt., (Me) Rodil, F ernando, l"Lt., (Me) Rodri go, Jose B., l"Lt., (Me) Rodriguez, Antonio, l " Lt., (Me) Rodriguez, Jose P., l " Lt., (DC) Rojas, Teofil o R., l " Lt. , ( DC) Rojo, J ose, 2"Lt ., (Inf.) Roman , Gonzalo, T., l"Lt., (DC) Romano, Alejandro, 3"Lt., (Inf.) Roque, Felipe C., l " Lt., (MC) Roque, Francisco F., l"Lt., (MC) Ros a, Jose Y. de la, l"Lt., (MC) Rosario, Venan cio del, l " Lt., (M C ) Roxa s. Benjamin M .• l"Lt., (MC) Roxa s, Manuel, Major, (Inf.) Ruadap, And res N . l " L t., (DC) Rubio, Leon A., l"Lt. , (DC) Ruiz , Elias L., l"Lt., (Ee)

PHILIPPINE~

S Sal a, Severino P ., l"Lt., (MC) Salcedo, Alfonso C., l"Lt., (DC) Sales, Jose M., l"Lt., (MC) Salud, Jose V., l"Lt., (MC) Samala, Raymundo V .• 2"Lt., (In!.) Samson, Gregorio B., l"Lt., (DC) Santiago, Pedro L., 1 "Lt., (DC) Santos, Dominador, l"Lt., (DC) Santos, Jes us N., I"Lt., (Me) SauIer, Marcelino M., I"Lt., (DC) Sayoc, Burgos T., l"Lt., (Me) Sazon, Rodolfo M., l"Lt., (DC) Sebastian, Jose, l"Lt., (DC) Sison, Agerico B. M., Major, (Me) Sison, Fernando E. V., Capt., (EC) Soliman, Pedro F., l"Lt., (Me) Soto, Dionisio J., l"Lt., (DC)

T Talens, Luis, l"Lt., (MC) Teano, Abelardo C., l"Lt., (MC) Tempongco. Oscar L., l"Lt., (DC) Tiongson, Luis R., l"Lt .• (Me) Tirona, Arsenio Tria, l"Lt., (MC) Tiu, Basilio V., l"Lt., (DC) Tolentino, Domingo T., l"Lt., (DC) Torres, Maximo B., l"Lt., (MC) Torres, Petronilo L., lIlLt., (MC)

U Un son, Fidel G., l"Lt., (MC) Uyengco, Augusto A ., l"Lt., (MC) Uyguangco, Leandro V., l"Lt., (MC)

V Valera, Eligio V., I "Lt.. (DC) Valeriano, Antonio P .• l"Lt., (DC) Valeriano, Luis P., I"Lt., (MC) Valero, Carlos G. , l"Lt., (DC) Valle, Bienvenido G., I"Lt., (DC) Ventilacion, Benjamin S., 3"Lt., (lnf.) Vera, Loren zo G. de, l"Lt., (DC) Vera, Pedro, Major, (Inf.) Vicuna, Francisco L., l"Lt., (MC) Villafuerte, Pedro P ., I" Lt., (MC) Villanueva, Amando S., l"Lt., (DC) Villarama, Dios dado S., l"Lt., (DC)

Z Zalamea, Roberto U., l"Lt., (MC) Zaguirre, Jaime C., l"Lt., (Me) Zobel, Jocobo, Capt., (Cav.)


PHlLIPPINE ARMY

851

Probationary Reserve (3rd Lieutenants) ON DUTY, R. O . T . C., UNITS, P . A.: Brown, Preston T., On duty, U. S. T., Manila. Campos, Salvador J ., On duty, P. S. A. T ., Manila. Gavino, Jacinto T., On duty, U. P., Manila. Nievera, Leopoldo L ., On duty, U . P., Manila.

Ohana, Severino M., On duty, U. P., Manila. Peralta, Jr., Macario, On duty, P. S. A. T., Manila. Peredo Jr., Roque, On duty, P. N. S., Manila. Regaia, Alejandro D., On duty, P. S. A. T., Manil a ; p. ( 809). Rigor, Conrado B., On duty. U. P., Manila.

On Duty, T"aining, Reserve Officers' Service School, Bagnio (1936) Abeleda, Alberto Abrenica, Aurelio M. Ac-ac, Alejandro B. Adduru, Marcelo Aguinaldo, Felicisimo R. Alberto, Antonio C. Alcantara, Pedro G. Alejandre Jr., Antonio A. Alfonso, Augusto F. Almario, Emilio S. Ancheta, Fruto S. Aquino, Manuel T. Aquino, Roman R. Aragon, Estanislao Arevalo, Emilio D. Arzaga, Julio F. Atayde, Leandro R. Banaag, Leonardo V. Barretto, Guillermo S. Barroqui1lo, Amado B. Bayan, Jose L . Bernabe, Filoteo E. Bitanga, Pedro J. Bolido, Vivencio B. Bonifacio, Arsenio L. Bretana, Nicolas O. Brugada, Fortunato B. Buenaventura, Alfredo S. Bugarin, Pacifico G. Buhay, Ricardo Cabe, Amadeo M. Cabili, Tomas L. Cabreros, Pedro B. Calavera, Luciano Carlos, Nicanor Carlos, Primitivo R. Carreon, Numeriano D. Carungay, Antonio A. â&#x20AC;˘ Already graduated an d commissioned. See G.O. No . 9. J an. 13, 1937. I>ages 853-855.

Catalon, Fortunato Chioco, Juan O. Cruz, Carlos G. Cruz, Juan A. Cuevas. Dominador R. Desiderio. Benedicta Enriquez, Alberto J. Enriquez, Demetrio C. Espiridion, Oirilo S. Factora. Marcelo L. Faustino, Jose Fermin, Fausto H. Fernandez, Arturo C. Figueroa, Wen ceslao S. Francisco, Urbano C. Franco, Hector R. Fusilero, Hilario G. Gabaldon. Senen J. Galang, Osmundo L. Garcia, Vicente A. Gestoso, Francisco L . Gomez. Francisco Gon zales, Francisco D. Guevarra, Benito {;uevara, Jose F. Guirnela, Luzcielo J. Guzman, Rafael de Henson, Briccio S. Hernando, Pedro S. Hidalgo, Simeon A. I mperial, Santiago F. Intengan, Romeo A. Javier, Alfredo V. Javier, Fernando P . Jongko, Fermin C.

*


852

CORNEJO 'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE

-----

r{atlmoang, Gregorio C.

Quirante, Jacob F. Quirino, Antonio

Lapus, Ismael D. Lareza, Luis J. Lasam, Damian Licuanan Jr., Francisco H. Llana, Leonidas de la Llanes, Alberto M. Lozano, Jose A. Lucero, Aurelio L. Lumang, Alfredo E. Luzon, Ruperto B.

Racela, Remedios .E. RaceIis, Fortunato Ramos, Edilberto M. .llaralio, Pedro N . Regalado, Nelson L. Relunia, Leopoldo R. Rey, Baltazar S. Reyes, Abelardo R. Reyes, Carlos C, Reyes, Recaredo H. Rico, Primitivo Rivera, Catalino D. Roa, Augusto R. Rodriguez, Jesus L. Romualdez Jr., Migup~ Rosal, Ananias Y. Rosen, Martiniano E.

Macatangay, Vicente C. Mallari, Alfredo I. Manalo, Bonifacio M. Marcelo, Alfonso S. Mariano, Gabriel Marqueta, Juan Martin, Manuel C, Mata, Benjamin T. Mathay, Agu stin L, Maulawin, Sergio M. Medina, Florencio A, Melegrito, Serafin J. Miguel, Teofilo S. Miraso!, Ciriaco V. Monroy, Celestino S, Montano, Ju stinan o S. Montemayor, Modesto R.

Sabalo, Celestino R. Salud, Ambrosio Samson, Amadeo V. Samson Jr" Eladio G. Santiago, Vicente L. Sarmiento, N emesio Y. Sipriaso, Catalino B. Sison, Isauro M. Sumabat, Jose

Nartatez, Rufino G. Navarro, Simplicio Noble, Vicente N .

Tabije, Demetrio P. Tait, George K. Talag, Mariano A. Tan, Dominador H. Tanwangco, Mariano

Olazo, EulalifJ Oreta, Wulfrano M,

Velasco, Valentin D. Villafria, Avelino D, Villanueva, Ignacio B. Villegas, Inocentes

Palma, Rufino J . Pagcaliwagan, Santiago Paz, Emilio de la Peralta, Fermin F . Peralta, Telesforo M. Perez, Isidro A. Perez, Sisenando F. Portacio, Esteban M,

Yadao, Leo S. Yap-Diangco, Vicente Zaldivar, Calixto 0,

On Inactive Status (1936) Abanes, Eleuterio Aguirre, Jose F . Bato, Justo Y. Benitez, Eulogio (Major, Res.) â&#x20AC;˘ Already commission e d.

PHILIPPINE~

*

Biascan, Florencio C, Buencamino Jr., Felipe Buenviaje, Santiago M. Calub, Regino


(Reserve J

( Resc Mlc)

p.miJPf"INE AltMT

Carbonell, Pedro B. Castillo, Justiniano G. Columna, Iluminado N.

Leancio, JacInto B. Marcelino, Federico G. Marcelo, David

Fajardo, Balbina Frondaso, J anuaria P.

Orara, Juan D.

Ganacias, Alvaro V. Gomez, Mariano

Salazar, Eusebio N . Santillan, Felipe Ll. Santos, J ase B. Suva, Geronimo T.

Hernandez, Basilio Kalaw, Teodoro V. Lao. Fernando Laureola, Jesus Lazo, Vicente

853

Pongos, Dominador S.

Tal1seco, Generoso F. Tantoco, Francisco R. Uranza, Luis A.

COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES ARMY HEADQUARTERS MANILA January 13, 1937 GENERAL ORDERS No.9 3. The following appointment by the President of officers in the Reserve Force, Army of the Philippines, is ann ounced effective as of December 28, 1936: To be Maj o r s, Infantry:

Frob. 3d Lt. Emilio de la Paz

Prob. 3d Lt. Marcelo Adduru To be Captaina. Infantry:

Prob. 3d Lt. Tomas Cabili Ju stiniano Montano " " Jose Sumabat " Juan O. Chioeo

"

"

P rob. 3d Lt. Calixto O. Zald ivar George K. Tait " Numcriano Carreon Arsenio Bonifacio

"

To he Firat Lieutenants, Infantry: Prob. 3d Lt. Antonio Quirino Prob. 3d Lt. Arturo C. Fernandez " 1/ Ricardo Buhay " "Alejandro B. Ac-ac " Catalina D. Rivera " Emilio Arevalo Aurelio L. Lucero Agustin L. Mathay " " " Amadeo M. Cabe Nemesio Y. Sarmiento " " Pedro J. Bitanga " Mariano E . Tanwangco " " Isidro A. Perez " Fermin J ongko " " " Benedicta E . Desiderio " Benito V. Guevarra " " Rufino J. Palma " " Alberto M. Llanes " " Florencio Medina " JuHo F. Arzaga " Luciano Calavera " " Telesforo M. Pe ral ta " Senen J. Gabaldon Bonifacio M. Manalo " " Miguel Ramualdez, Jr. " Alberto V. Abeleda " " Vicente' Yap-Diangco Ananias Y. RosaI " Fortunato B. Racelis " " Leonardo V. Banaag " Juan Marqueta

"

"


854

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEA LT H DIRECTORY OF THE PHILlPPINEÂŁ

Prob. 3d Lt. Amado B. Barroquillo Pedro G. Alcantara " Cp'estino R. Sabala " Felmin F. Peralta "

Prob. 3dl Lt. Rufino G. Nartatez Eulalia O. Olaza " Damian Lasam " " Fl'uto Ancheta

"

"

To be SecoDd Lieutenants, Infantry:

Prob. 3d Lt. Modesto R. Montemayor

I smael D. Lapuz

"

Catalino B. Sipriaso

" " " "

Leopolda N ievel'a Emj li o S. Almario Antoni o A. Alejandre, Jr. Alfredo 1. MaHari

"

" "

"

"

Alfon so S. Marcelo Manuel C. Martin

" " " " "

Severino M. Obana Franciso Gestoso Simeon Hidalgo Ciriaco V. Mirasol

" "

" " "

Santiago L. Imperial J uan A. Cruz Augusto R. Roa Nelsonl 1. Regalado

"

"

" ' enceslao S. Figueroa

Leandro R . Atayde

" "

Prob. 3d Lt. Nicolas C. Bretafia Pedro N. Raralio " Pedro S. Hernando " Simplicia Navarro " " Osrnundo Galang Carlos Reyes " Bricco S. Henson " " Leo S. Yadao

N icanor R. Ca rlos

" " "

" " "

Au gusto F. Alfonso

"

Celestino S. Monroy

"

Dominador Tan

"

Decaredo Reyes

"

Demetrio P. Tabije H ectO I' R. Franco

"

Preston T. Brown Baltazar S. Rey Fortunato P. Catalan Urbano C. Francisco CiI'ilo S. Esp il'idion Vicente N. Noble Alfredo V. Javier Felnando P. Ja vier Manuel T. Aquino Alfredo Buenaven t ul'a F elicisimo R. Aguin aldo A lberto I. Enriquez Abelardo R. Reyes Pacifico G. Bugarin Rafael de Guzman Edi lbetro M. Ramos Fausto H. Fermin Roman R . Aquino Jose L. Bayan Delfin Santos

To be Third Lieutenants, Infantry:

Prob. 3d Lt. Jacinto T. Gavino Salvad or J. Campos " Macario Peralta, Jr. Com'ado B. RigaI' " Aleja ndl'O T. Regala Francisco H. Li cuanan, Jr. Valentin D . Ve':asco " Luzci elo I. Guirnela " " S isena nd o T. Perez Sergio M. Maulawin

Prob. 3d Lt. Leopoldo R. Relunia

"

"

"

"

"Avelino D. Villafria Se rafin J. Melegrito Francisco Gomez " Francisco D. Gonzal es " Leon idas de la Llana Jose A . Faustino " Antonio C. Alberto " Gabriel Mariano

"


PHllLIPPINE ARMY

855

To be Third Lieutenants, Inf.-(Continued) Prall. 3d Lt. Amadeo B. Samson Vicente Macatangay " Benjamin I. Mata " Vicente A. Garcia " " " Demetrio C. Enriquez " Mariano R. Ta'ag " " Isauro M. Sison " " Carlos G. Cruz Jesus L. Rodriguez " Jose A. Lozano " " Hilario G. Fusilero " Ruperta Luzon " " Roque A. Pereda, Jr. " " Eladio G. Samson, Jr.

â&#x20AC;˘

"

Prob. 3d Lt. Vicente L. Santiago

" " "

" " " "

" " "

Filoteo E . Bernabe Guillenno S. Barretto, Romeo A. In tengan Gregorio C. Katimbang Esteban M. Portacio Santiago T. Pagcaliwaga Alfredo E. Lumang Aurelio M. Abrenica Pedro B. Cabreros Jacob F. Quirante

By" Corrunand of Major General SANTOS: F. G. OBOZA Major, A. G. S. The Adjutant General DISTRIBUTION: C-700 See. to the Pres.: Mil. Adv.; See. ; GS; Go! 1-2-3----4; C. G.: 1st RD; Supt.. PMA; Comdt., ROSS: Supt., ROTC Units: C., QMS; C., MS; C., AC; All Div. & See. Chil., HP A & QMS; All Reg. & Bat. Comdrs., 1st RD; DC: DB; All PO: Co. & Det. Comdrs.; C.O., Tr. Cadres; File; Com., OS: All eoneerned..

ARMY GRADUATES OF MARCH 31, 1937 One hundred fifty members of the Reserve Officers' Service School, Baguio, Mt. Province, graduated on March31, 1937. The graduating class, the second to graduate since the creation of. the Philippine Army by Commonwealth Act No.1, was headed by Assemblyma.n Romualdo C. Quimpo of Davao. Following are the members of the graduating ciass: Robin Y. Abao Jose A. Acevedo Ramon Aguirre Jose Amorin Jose L. Alejandro Leopoldo A. Alicbusan Nicanor L. Almendralo Telesforo O. Alminiana Constante V. Alzate Jose V. Antonio Rafael G. Arce Mauro A. Ausejo Nicanor S. Bartolome Ambrosio P. Eayan Atanacio S. Bayan Lui s BoIinao Luis P. Bringas Basilio T. Briones

S ixto M. Brual Juan Buenaflor Alejandro R. Bumanlag Mariano H. Cabarrubia Pacifico C. Cabrera Perfecto M. Cabrera Pedro Cagalawan Marci ano Calderon Federico W. Calma German F . Candari Genovevo Caiiete Justo P . Capili Petl'onilo A. Carambas Pedro R. Caroonel1 Hermenegi ldo A. Carpio Abelardo R. Carrillo Juan C. Casa SimpliCia de Castro

Jacinto B. Chong Procopi o A. Coloma Ilumin ado N. Columna Santiago I. Concepcion Ramon V. Cruz Timoteo S. Cruz Jose M. Cui Eugenio N. Cunan Cirilo C. Daza Cornelio B. Deleiia Elpidio P. Duque Melchor L. Duque Valentin Edralin Fernando R. Escurel Burgosino Fausto Demetrio B. Fernandez. J ose P. Fernandez Patricio Fernandez


856

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE

Narciso V. Ferrer Cenon R. Florcruz F elix de Leon Flores Victoriano N. Galang Juan Galeon Sa ntos S. Garcia Venancio R. Garcia Carlos Gatmaitan Placido G. Gonzales F,rancisco M. Gregori o Mariano Grino Leon Guinto, Jr. Servillano S. Gut ierrez Mauro T . Miguel Eugenio S. Morales Ernesto Munsayac Salvad or F. Olivenza Salvador S. Orbeta Arturo R. de Guzma n Lorenzo de Guzman Nemesio de Guzman B asilio Hernandez Joaquin Hidal go

Eduardo S. Hipolito El'ibel'to P. Ignaci o

PHILIPPINE~

Felix E. Orlino Marcelo G. Payomo

Manuel D. Jaldon Maximo S. J ante

Juan V. Pecache

Celestino C. Juan

Romualdo C. Quimp? Alfonso Quintana Primitivo I. Ramirez Edilberto F. Ramos Francisco N. Reyes Juan D. Reyes Federico Silverio Miguel Sison Luis L. Reyes Napoleon de losl Reyes TeOfilo B. Rivera Fortunato C. Roque Alfredo P. Royeca Manuel B. Ruiz Alfredo A. Sabado Angel S. Salcedo Diego A. Sevilla Jorge S. Simon

Victor M. Juan, Jr. Augusto E. Kabigting Vicente T. Lazo Jacinto B. Leoncio An geles L. Limena Pedro G. Magleo Alfredo G. Manialong Francisco O. Manzon

Pablo M. Martmez Alfredo M. Marlirez Modesto T. Mascardo Demetrio R. Mendoza Pablo A . Merced Mamerto R. Montemayor Jose M . Morales Basilio E. N olledo Mel encio Orbase

Arcadio R. Querijero

RESERVE OFFICERS, PHILIPPINE ARMY (Announced June 15, 1937) Leoncio B. Monzon, Dean路 of the In stitute of Law of the Far Eastern University, to become Major in the Judge Advocate's Service . Angel Zamora, Ramon Caro, Rufino Arzadon and Benito Legarda, Captains in the Quarter. mastel' Service . Gabriel Daza, consulting electric engineer, to be Captain of the Signal Corps. Alejandro T. Lim, Vicente Salumbides and Fr an cisco Santos, to be Captains of Infantry. To be Captains. Judge Advocate's Service:

Vicente P . Fonnoso

Jose R . Carlos. To be 1st Lieutenants, Infantry:

S ilverio G. Ruiz. Alejandro R. Catambay. Hernando J. C. Cervera, Primo R. Ca rreon.

Antonio Isidro. Hermenegildo B. Rosales. Eusebio Brosas. To be 1st Lieutenants, Engineer Corps:

Afonso G. Oboza. Jose S. Alejandrin o. Bartolome Puzon. Macario R. Abad. Ernesto B. Ledesm a.

Leonardo A. Anthony. Ramon M. Madrigal. Marcos C. Amponin. Nicolas R. Jimenez.


PHILIPPINE ARMY

(Rc.'lervc)

(Rcserve)

To be lst Lieutenants, Judg-e Advocate's Service:

Jose Razon.

Eliseo G. Montemayor. Luis Ortega.

To be lst Lieutenant, Adjutant General's Service:

Amador M. Buenaseda. To be lst Lie u tenants, Medical Corps:

Amado V. Halili. Jose A. Ramos. Vicente E. Orlino. Eusebio S. Garcia. Cirilo C. Cruz.

Alfredo Dimayuga. Amando M. Perez. Agapito L. Tiongson. Eduardo V. Canicosa. Antonio V. Bellen.

To he 1st Li'e utenants, Dental Corps:

Emiliano J. Bobadilla. Ciriaco S. de Leon. Jacinto C. Castillo. Carlos Bawalan. Panfilo P. Canto. Ambrosio H. Lacuna. Pedro P. Yaneza. Elpidio P. Pacia. Montefredo M. Torres. Antonio V. Cavestany. Doroteo J. Garcia.

Miguel M. Galang Ramon S. Sevilla. Pedro D . Juan. Ceferino B . Gonzales. Jose A. Carrilo. Alejo L . Paguia. Carlos Go' Macasaet. Tomas M. Gabanalan. Jose S. Sian. Mariano Lacsamana.

To be 2 nd Lieutenant, Infantry:

Serafin N. Salvador. To be 3rd Lieutenant, Engineer Corps :

Augusto Garcia. To be 1st Lieutenant, Quartermaster's Service:

Ricardo C. Santos. To he 1st Lieutenants, Veterinary Corp s:

Ignacio V. Austria.

Macario M. Feliciano. To he 2nd Lieutenant, Infantry:

Valentin V. Grasparil.

857


858

CORNEJO'S COM MONWEAL'fH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILlPPINES

BUREAU OF PRISONS AZCARRAGA â&#x20AC;˘ .STA. CRUZ, MANILA

TEL. 2-17 -06.

l\'! ajor-Ge neJ'al

PAULlN O

SANTOS .... Director

Ma jor ERIBERTO B. MI SA . .

ADMINISTRATIVE DIVISION Generoso Castaneda, Chief Clerk and Executive i nspector. Abundio L. Aquitania, Asst. Chief Clerk & Chief of Provo Sec. Generoso Latorre, Chief of Section. Angel del Rosari o, Chief of Section . Antonio Lim, Chief of Section. Silvestre Tapales, Band L eader . Guillermo Tello, Chaplain. Alejandro Remollino, Chaplain. Hermenegildo Cope, Principal Teacher. Atty. Alfredo M. Bunye, Superintendent. ACCOUNTING DIVISION Antonio Olympia, Chief Accountant.

Valentin Castelo, Chief of Section. Basilio Gaerlan, Cashier & Disbursing Offi cer. Ricardo D. Enriquez, B ookkeeper. SANITATION DIVISION Mariano Dimanlig, Intern and Chief of Sanitation Division. Enrique Cruz, Nurse. Jose F. Cabrera, Pharmacist. Pedro R. Diaz, Dentist. Faustino Pugeda, Sanitary Inspector.

INDUSTRIAL DIVISION Luis Miranda, Chief of Section. Rafael Car ating, Chief of Section. Teof ilo de Ocampo, Chief of Section. Manuel E, Pablo, Supt., Dept. lIA". Jul ian Santos, Supt., Dept. "B". Rafael Pulmano, Supt., Dep t. "C". Maximo Garcia, Supt., Dept. "D". Raymundo Gutierrez, Sup t. , Dept. "F". J oae Sarmiento, Supt., Dept. HG".

~

Assistant Di'rectoT

GUARDS DIVISION Guillermo S. Peralta, Supt. Bilibid Prison . Vidal Diaz, Guard inspector. Pedro P. Guerrero, GUMd Inspector.

Sergeants of the GU.Mds: Eustaquio Bungalon. Pascual Prado. Casimiro Vivar. CORRECTIONAL INSTITUTION FOR WOMEN Cesarea M. Goduco, Matron.

Foremen: Romualdo Mananzala. Anacleto Alalay. Cecilio Sandro. Aproniano Istomen. Jose A velino. Juan Aranda. Forewomen : Melania G, Baja. Demetria Juan engo. Quirina Estrada. Concordia Mendoza. Flaviana B. Santos. IW AHIG PENAL COLONY Francisco B. Santos, Superintendent. Pedro S. Paje, Asst. Supt. Amando M. Perez, Intern. Atilano Santiago, Chief Clerk and Cashier. Jorge S. Simon, Property Clerk. Maximo M. Francisco, Band Leader. Manuel Garcia, Chaplain. Jesus Gonzales, Chaplain. Juan B. Bautista, Nurse. Luis F. Macrohon, Gene'ral Ove'"J'seer.


859

GENERAL AUDJ'flNG OFFICE

polic~rpio D. Dellosa, Ranch Foreman. Sebastian Eustaq uio, R oad & Bridge F oreman. Marcos Cayari, Supply & Equ.ipment Foreman. Andres M. Nono, Farming Inst?·uctor.

SAN RAMON PRI SON & PENAL F AR!,! Manuel Liwanag, Superintendent. Severo G. Yap, Asst. Supt. Eufronio M. Versola , Intern. Ofrecino T. Santos, Property Clerk. Timoteo B. Almonte, Nurse .

Severino L. Salvado, F arming InstJructor. Arsenio F. Rivera, Property Clerk. Leocadio Cabanatan, Chief Clerk and Cashier. Manuel Ignacio, Field Accountant for Penal Colony. Santiago Apostol, Foreman. Timoteo Balahadia, Foreman. Valentin G. Amon, Industrial Supervisor. Alberto Vocalan, Industrial Supervisor. Damian C. Domingo, Industrial F oreman.

COMMONWEALTH FARM DAVAO PENAL COLONY

Melecio M. Manio, Superintendent General Kitchen. Diego Santos, Master Mechanic. Vicente Cabrera, Master Ca,rpenter. Au gusto Kabigting, Foreman Poultry. Feli x Fer Villa, Farming IMtructor. LadisIawa S. Sacuerza, Foreman, Poultry .

Pablo J. Norona, Superintendent. Victoriano Quitzon, Intern. Gregorio T. Reyes , Nurse. Ramon T. Garilao, Pharmacist. Vicente D. Lagrosa, Intern. Daniel F. Asuncion, F arming Instructor.

GENERAL AUDITING OFFICE INTENDENCIA BLDG .. PLAZA

ESPAl'IA. MAN I LA.

TEL. 2-24-71.

JA I ME H ERNANDEZ

ADMIN ISTRATIVE DEPARTMENT Emiliano Remo, Special Agent and Manager. ACCOUNTING AN D CLERI CA L DI VI SIO N Luis N. Roque, Coll., Disb. and P'roperty Officer. A ccoun t i ng and P e r sonne l S e ction

Rufo Cas pollan , Chief. Ste nographe r 's S e ction

Maria E. Men doza, Chief.

RE CORDS DI VI SIO N Nazario Nadurata, Superintendent. Francisco Ma lig, Chief of Section. DEPARTMENT OF DI SBURSEME N T AUDITS Apoli nario S. de Leon, 1I1anager.

.... Audi tor General.

DIVISION A Pedro M. Gimenez, Asst. Manag e,'. S e ction No.

P io Rivera, Chief. J ose R. Amoyo, Exmnine1·. Honorio David, Examiner . Catal ino Echavaria, EXa?n1·n cr. Cirilo Miran, Exam,iner . S e cti on N o. 3

Vidal Buenavista, Chief. J uan Labsan, Examine1·. S ect io n

~o .

6

Angel Gonzales, Chief. Victorino Narcelles, EX(lJlninc1·. Alfonso Para iso, Examinc1·. S e ctio n

Man uel E scobar , Chief.

N o.

7


860

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINE.!:

-----

Santiago Puertollano, Examiner. Gaudencio Joaquin, Examine'l". S,e c:tion

No.

8

Marcelino Bongeo, Chief. J ase Velasco, Examiner.

DIVISION B Andres Francia, Superintendent. Section No . 2

eal'Ios Merced, Chief. Juan Marqueta, Examiner. Emiliano Angeles, Exa1niner. S'ec tion

No.

4

Julian Gimenez, F ield Accountant. Satero H. Bay, Examiner. Cirilo Dimaguila, Excvminer. P ablo DaYTit, Examine?', Section 'No.

5

Graciano Rapatan, Chief. Mariano Abriol Santos, Examiner. Timoteo Hermosa, E xaminer. Miscellaneous Group

Rafael Ortiz, Property Inspector.

DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL AND MUNICIPAL AUDITS Manuel Agregado, Manag er. Pio Javen, A sst. Manage?', Elias M. Ataviado, Supervising Auditor. Ricardo Dimalanta , Supervising Auditor. Severo de Ungria, Supervising Auditor. Eugenio de Vera, Supervising A u dito?·. Alfredo Liboro, Provincial A uditor-at-Lwrge. Amado B. Magtoto~ Provincial A u ditor-atLa1·ue. Benito Guia, Provincial Auditor-at-Large. Jose V. Parras, Provincial Auditor-at-Lan·ge. CENTRAL DIVISION Modesto A. F errera, Superintendmt. Aguedo Y. Gepte, Chi£1 01 S ection. PROVINCIAL AND CITY AUDITORS Northern Luzon Division: Felipe Jimen ez, Supervising A uditor. Gerardo Aseneta, Bangued, Abra. Agapito Flores, Basco, Batanes .

Juan Villena, Malclo8, Bulacan. Conrado Alcaraz, Baguio, Baguio . Venancio Madrid, Tuguegarao, Cagatyan. Casimiro L. Dacanay, Laoag, [locos Norte. Rafael Uson, Vigan, [locos Sur. Nicanor Sarmiento, !lagan, Isabela. Juan Suva, San Fernando, La Union. Pedro C. Palafox, Bontoc, Mt. Province. Mariano SaIud, Cabanatuan, Nueva Eciia. Amadeo R. Quintos, Bayombong, Nueva Viz. caya. Marcelino G. Torres, San Fernandc, Pampanya. Pelagio F. Sison, Lingayen, PangMinan. Francisco M. Alejo, Tarlac, Tarlac. SOUTHERN LUZON DIVISION:

Ceferino Ramos , Supervising Auditor. Ramon E. Fernandez, Legaspi, Albay. Jose V. Parras, BaZanga, Bataan. Jose A. UmaIi, Batangas Batangas. Vicente Atos, Daet, Camarines Norte. Getulio F. Ramos, Naga, Camarines Sur. Lupo Guzman, Cavite, Cavite. Pio Pedrosa, Sta. Cruz, Laguna. Zosimo J . Rosal, Boac, Marindu que. Montano Iligan, Masbate, Masbate. Leocadio Gozum, Calapan, M indoro. Isidoro Rosete, Puerto Princes a, Palawan. Angelo Angeles, Pasig, Rizal. Nicanor Reyes, Sorsogon, Sorsogon. Roman J. Andal, Lucena, Tayabas. Mauricio Salvador, Iba, Zambales. VlSAYAN DIVIS ION

Rufino Arzadon, Supervising Auditor. Liberato Evangelista, San Jose, A n tique. Juan Concon, Tagbilaran , Bohol. Dalmacio Ramos, Capiz, Cap'b. Alberto Sta. Cruz, Cebu, Cebu. Roman F. Tuazon, Iloilo, Iloilo . Bartolome Fernandez, Tacloban, L eyte . Roman T. del Bando, Bacolod, Negros Occi· dental. Lorenzo V. E sguerra, Dumaguete, Negro8, Occidental. Fortunato Alabagan, Romblon, Ro.m blon. Jose Desa, Catbalogan , Sannar. MINDA NAO AND SULU DIVI SION:

Severo de Ungria, Supervising Auditor. Nicolas Ibanez, Butuan, Agusan. Tiburcio Silverio, Malaybalay, Bukidnon.


861

GENERAL AUDITING OFFICE

Lorenzo Tongco, Cotabato, Cotabato. Ricardo Santos, Davao, Davao. Rafael Parcon, Dansalan, Lanao. Catalina Balili, Oroquieta, Misamis Occ. Roman Q. Moreno, Cagayan, Misamis Or. Pet. I. Vallejo, Jolo, SuI... Irineo V. Austria, SurigM, Surigao . Castor Silvestre, Zamboanga, Zahmboanga. Central Office:

Santiago Ramos, Manila.

Isaias F. Castro. Toribio San Juan. Martin Quezada. Bonifacio Guirindola. Damian de Peralta. Melencio Yutuc. Roman L. Mendoza. Anastacio BoJisay. Fortunato Racelis. Issue Audits Section

DEPARTMENT OF PROPERTY AND AUDITS

Hennenegildo Santos, Chief. Irineo C. Blanco, ASBt. Chief.

Numeriano Rojas, Manager. Stamp Section

INVENTORY DIVISION Federico S. Romero, Superintendent. Section

No. '1

Pedro Torneros, Chief. Agapito Velasco, Property Inspector. Secti.on

N.o.

2

Anacleto Caces, Chief. Saturnino Dacquel, E x amin er. Ricardo Feliciano, Examine",..

Laureano Ferrer, Chief .

DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE AND MISCELLANEOUS AUDITS Jose Gonzales, Manager. Federico David, S u perintendent. Inocencio Monillas, F ield A ccountant. David Galicia, Field Accountant. Arsenio C. Gonzales, Field E xaminer. Cen tral Office Section

Edilberto Y. David, Chief. Section

No.

3 Customs Section

Julian E squillo, Examiner.

Rafael Ramos, Chief. Section

No.

4

Nicolas Z. Yabut, Chief. Godofredo Famy, Pro perty In.spector.

Postal Section

Domingo Du, Chief. Brigido Navarro, A sst. Chief.

PROPERTY AUDITS DIVISION Porfirio Pen a, S u perintendent. Inspection Section

Proper ty Inspectors: Honorato Trinos. Casimiro C. Soriano. Anacleto Briones. Domingo D. Rubia s. Juan A. Aspillera. Jose BarEs. J ose R. de San Agustin.

DEPARTME N T OF ACCO UNTANCY AND STATISTICS Juan D. Quintos, Manager.

DIVISION OF FISCAL RECORDS Zacarias Gapusan, Superintendent. Marcial de Ocampo, A sst. Supt. In s ular Section

Roman Frias, Chie f. .Q uirino VilIavicencio, A sst . Chief.


CO R NEJO'S COMMONWEA LTH DIRECTORY OF THE P HILIPPI NES

862

BUDGET COMMISSION INTENDENCIA BLDG., PLAZA ESPA1\lA, MANILA. TELS. 2-14-66 & 2-24-91.

SERAFI N

l'vlARABUT

... .• •• • •.•• • ..•

Commissioner of the Budget and Chairman of the Budget Commission. ~

MEMBERS OF THE COMMISSION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , ... , . . . . . . . , •... Auditor General. J OSE GIL .... , . .. ............. .... •.. . Commi ssioner of Civil Service.

JAIM E HERNA NDEZ

OTHER OFFICERS OF THE BUDGET COMMISSlON:

Lorenzo Celeste, Asst. to the Commissioner of the Btu/get and Secreta'I'Y 0/ the Budget Commission. Faustino Sy-Changco, Actg. Chief, Ad'minist1'ative Division. Zacarias Gapusan, Chief. Hudget D1·vision. Gregori o de 1a Torre, Chief, Expense Cant'ro l Division. Lope O. Tayao, Ch1'ef, Service Inspection Division . Ambros io Gabriel, Caskie1' and Disbursh~g Officer. Simeon Pineda, P'rope1·ty Clerk. Luis J. Cinco, Chief, R equisition Control Section. P otenciano R. Cruz, Chief, R ecords Section. Service Inspecto1's: Alejo Celi. Da vi d Galicia Cali xto Uma li. Benjamin Remollino. A ccounting O/ficers-at-Large: Getuli o Ambrosio.

Venancio P. Sanoy. Fernando Dizon.

Accou.nting Office1's: Inocencio Dumpit. Eugenio Tadle. P edro Rodriguez. Plac ido Manalo. Dionis io Facelo. Victoriano Enriquez. Alfonso Perez. Antonio G. Olympia. Ramon Roque. Juan Felix. Macario Juinio. J osefin Velasco. Monico Benigno. Flav ian o Bautista. Leo poldo O~gkiko. Vicente N . Lim. Pedro Rivera. Eugenio N abong. Nemesio Santos. Eduardo Ge slani. Pablo M. Cruz. Tranquilino Cortes. Antonio Perez.

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION MU R ALLA . TNTRAMURQS, MANILA T EL. 2·24·6G.

JOSE GIL . . . . . . . . . . . . . AMADO DEL ROSARIO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

• 'Vith the rank o r Under Secretary of Depa rtme nt.

. . . . . . . . . . . .. Commission er. '" . . . . . . . . . .. Assistant Commissioner.


CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION

ADMINISTRATIVE DIVISION Mariano Gonzales, Chief. Antonio E. Mata, Assistant Chief. Chiefs of Sections

Metodio Mendoza, Service Examiner. Ramon F. Samaniego, Personne'l Service Section. Francisco Santiago, Leave Section. Juan Ramos, Stenographers Miscellaneous Section. Gregorio S. Licaros, Accounting and Property Section. Mariano Agustin, Monthly and Efficiency Reports Section. Manuel Angeles, Records Section.

Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr.

863

BOARD OF DENTAL EXAMINERS Domiciano Sandoval, President. Jose V. Gloria, Secretary . Felix Hocson, Member. Antonio H. Boncan, Member.

BOARD OF EXAMINERS IN OPTOMETRY Dr. Joaquin del Alcazar, President. Dr. Jose V. Gloria, Secretary. Dr. Cipriano Lara, Member. Dr. Antonio Sabater. Member. BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR NURSES Dr. Josefa M. llano, P'l'esident. Dr. Jose V. Gloria. Secretary. Mrs. Damiana D. Ambrosio, Member. Mrs. Carmen O. Desiderio, Member.

EXAMINING DIVISION Ladislao Yap, Chief Examiner and Secretary, Boards of Examiners. Gregorio Rasalan, Asst. Chief Examiner and Asst. Secretary, Boards of Examinen. Dr. Jose V. Gloria, Secretary, Boards of Medical, Pharmaceutical, Dental, Optical and Nurse Examiners and Pha'l'macy Ins pectors.

BOARD OF ACCOUNTANCY Rufino Melo. Chairman.

BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR MARINE OFFICERS Capt. Ramon de Altonaga, Chairman. Capt. Rafael J. Cisneros, Member. Capt. Adolfo Llanes, 1I1ember.

Examiners: Jose Vel' Pedro Revilla Jose Quiray Ruben Ledesma Cesareo Romero Paterno Lopez Federico Semilla Juan Sahagon Alipio L. Buenaventura

BOARD OF MEDICAL EXAMINERS Dr. Dr. Dr. Dr.

Rufino Abriol, President. Jose V. Gloria, Secretary. Ramon Macasaet, Member. Cesareo Sta. Ana, Member.

BOARD OF PHARMACEUTICAL EXAMINERS AND IN SPECTORS Jose E. Jimenez, President. Dr. Jose V. Gloria, Secretary. , Mamerto Manalo, Member. Florencio Gavino, Member.

BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR MARINE ENGINEERS Vicente G. Manalo, President. Jose Crespo, Member. Jose Reyes, Member.

VETERINARY EXAMINING BOARD Dr. Vicente Fel'l'iols, Chai1路-,nan. Dr. Teodulo Topacio, Memb er. Dr. Faustino Turla, Member.

BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR SURVEYORS Antonio Manahan, Chairman . Juan Coronado, Member. Jose Suguiton, Member.

BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR CIVIL ENGINEERS Domingo Guanio, Chairman. I sa ias Fernando, Memb er . Jacinto Gochoco, Member. Apolinario Baltazar, Member.


864

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEA LTH DlRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR MINING ENGINEERS Quirico Abadilla, Chairman.

BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR MECHANICAL ENGINEERS Henry Leopolda Re ~ ch, Chairman. Arturo V. Tanco, Memb er.

George T. Geringer, Vice ~ Chairman. Ramon T. Abarquez, Member. Francisco C. Joaquin, Member. Ernesto C. Bengzon, Member.

BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR CHEMICAL ENGINEERS

BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOR ARCHITECTS Juan M. Arellano, Chairman. Carlos A. Barretto, Me'mber. Andres Luna de San Pedro, Member.

Angel S. Arguelles, Chairman. Francisco D. Reyes, Vic e-Chairman. Ramon J. Feliciano, Member. Rafael H. Aguilar, Member.

GOVERNMENT SURVEY BOARD ROOM 356 LEGISLATIVE BLDG., MANILA TELS. 2-29-94 AND 2-32-41 •

MIGUEL UN SON

J OSJ!: PAEZ . .. .... LEONARDO FESTIN

. .. ....... . ...•.. .... . . . . Chairman. . . • .•. • • •• •• •• • •• . . . . . Member. ....• _ . . . . . • . . . • . . . . . . . Memb er.

Elias M. Ataviado, Actg. Secretary and E:xe· cutive Of ficer. Pedro Elizalde, T echnical A ssistant.

Godofredo V. Salamanca, Stenographer. Vicente S. Torralba, Stenographer.

CENSUS BU.REAU PHILIPPINE COLUMBIAN ASSOCIATION TAFT A VENUE, MANlLA TEL. 6-74"36.

LFO N ARDO

FESTI N

....•.......

JOSE CABALLOS .... ' ... ' .... '"

Din-ector. Chief Clerk.


DEPART ME NT OF P UBLI C I NST RUCTIO N

865

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION OFFICE: COR. GENERAL LUNA AND V I CTO RI A. W. C .. MAN I LA TEL. 2- 14-02

HON. SERGIO OSME J< A

HON . SERGIO OSMEi'iA ...

. .. Vice-P re .. ide nt

DR . GABRIEL MAtiiALAC ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DR. JOSE FABELLA .

and S ecne ta ry o f Public Inltru ction .

Under S e cre t a ry of Public Inltruction .

. .. ..• .. . ...• . . . ... C o mmiss ione r of H e altb a nd ' Velfa r e.

MR . AMADOR BUENASEDA .... . • . . • . .• . ................. . ..... . ... Chief Cle r k . 2S


CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILlPPINES

866

BUREAU OF EDUCATION CORNER OF CABILDO AND RECOLE'1'Q S, INTRAMUROS

TEL. 2路18路79. LUTHER B.

BEWLEY

CELEOOKIO

SALVADOR

Director . .. . ... , ......... " Assistant Director

ACADEMIC DIVISION Orville A. Babcock, Acting Chief. PROFESSIONAL AND SURVEY STAFF Tito Clemente, Supervising Teache'r on Special

Detait Pedro Ablan, Assistant SUPC?'vi...;;O?' of Physical Education. Mrs. Petrona Ramos, SupervisO'1' of Music..

MEASUREMENT AND RESEARCH DEPARTMENT Manuel C3irI'eon, Chief. Isabelo Manalo, Superviso?', Manuel Escal'illa, Superviso'!".

CU RRI CULUM DEPARTMENT Cecilia Putong, Chief. Library Section

Prudencio M. Lim, Chief. Statistical Section

Benito Leuterio, Chief. Clerical Section

Paulino Sancho, Supervisor on Spe cial Detail. Eulalio Aguilar, Stock Clerk. Raymundo Fabros, Property Clerk.

VOCA TIONAL DIVISION Gilbert S. Perez, Chief. Marcelino P. Samson, Supe'rvisor on Special Detail.

DEPARTMENT OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES Miguel Guerrero, Chief. Pedro Licuanan, :'::;uperV1Sor of Industrial A'rts. Mariano Borja, Travelling Indu strial T eacher, Manila. Juan Plopenio, Travelling Industrial Teacher, Manila.

DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS Miss EJvessa A. Stewart, Chief. Mrs. Clara P. Cariiio, Supe1'visor, Home Economics. Mrs. Francisco M. Vega, Supe1'visQ?' Home Economics. Miss Adelina Alvarez, Supe1'vis01', Home Economics. Miss Judit Harder, Supervisor, Home Economics. Miss Teresa Moncada, Teacher on Special Detail.

DIVISION OF PUBLICATION Fred J. Passmore, Acting Chief. Salvador Fel'nandez, Asst. Editor.

OFFICE OF THE CHIEF CLERK Jose A de Kastro, Chief Clerle. Service Section

Benito Santa roman a, Acting Chief. Petronilo G. Dulay, A.,>st. Chief.

PROPERTY DIVISION Alberto Dalusung, P1'operty Officer. Audit Section

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL INSTRUCTION Felipe O. Ceballos, Supe1'visor, AgTicultural Instruotion. Teodorico T agu inod, Superviso'l' on Special Detail.

Santos Sagayadan, Chief. Ponciano Valdes, Asst. Prope1路ty ClM-Ie. Requisition Section

Celerino Navarro, Requisition Cleric. Anastacio Salazar, Asst. Requisition Clerk.


BUREAU OF EDUCATION

Storehouse

Cirilo Abella, Storekeeper. Lorenzo de la Cruz, Receiving Clerk. Property Custodian

Arthur E. McCann, P""operty Custodian.

RECORDS DIVISION A. M. Razon, Chief. F. M. Camacho, Assistant Chief. Miscellaneous Section

Gaudencio Lacson, Chief. Personnel Section

Jose Malino, Chief路 Mailing Section

Julian Villanueva, Chief. Printing Section

P. Matienzo Bay, Chief.

BUILDINGS DIVISION Cayo Manzo, Chief.

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH EDUCATION Miss Rosa Militar, Supe7'1Jisor, H ealth Education. Mrs. Concepcion S. Cepeda, Super1)isor, He alth Education.

DIVISION SUPERINTENDENTS: Demetrio M. Andres, (Actg.), Bangued, Abra. Agustin Pai'iares, (Actg.), Bu.tuan, Agusan. Alexander Monto, (Actg.), Legaspi, Albay. Gonzalo Guzman, (Actg.), San Jose, A.ntique. Pedro G. Guiang, (Actg.) , Balafiga, Bataan. Victor de Padua, Head Teache..,路, Basco, Batanes. Esteban R. Abada, Batangas, Batangas. Albert Haynes, Tagbilafran, Bohol. Roman F. Lorenzo, (Actg.) Maiaybalay, Bukidnon~

Leodegario Victorino, Mnlolos, B'Ulacan. S. M. Antonio, (Actg.), Tuguegarao, Cagayan. Glicerio C. Tayco, (Actg.) , Daet, Camwrines Norte.

867

Benigno Aldana, Naga, Caman-ines Sur. Jose V. Aguilar, Capiz, Capiz. Ceferino Pu-risima, Cavite, Cavite. Charles V. Cline, Cebu, Cebu. Reece A. Oliver, (Actg.), Cotabuto, Cotabato" John D. Stumbo, (Actg,), Da'IJao, Da1Jao. Estanislao R . Lopez, Laoag, !locos N01'te. Macario Naval, Vigan, !locos Sur. John H. McBride, Jr" Iloilo, Iloilo. Antonio A. Maceda, /lagan, l sabela. Vicente Garcia, Santa Cruz, Laguna. Robert M. Dickson, (Actg.) , Dansalan, Lanao. Fortunato de Veyra, (Actg.) J San Fernando, La Union. Federico Piedad, Tacloban, Leyte. Prudencio Langcauon, City of Mamila. Marcelino Bautista, (A sst. ), Manila. Augusto Flores, (Actg.), Boac, Marinduque. Venancio Nera, (Actg.), Ma sbate, Masbaw. Fernando S. Fuentes, (Actg.), Calapan, M'indoro. Isabelo Tupas, (Actg.), Cagayan, Misal1tis Oriental. Richard D, Patterson, (,4.ctg.) Baguio, Mountain. D. 'Villiams, (Actg . ), Bacolod, Negros Occidental. Archer B. Pal'ham, Dumaguete, Neg1'os Oriental. Apolonio M. Ramos, (Actg.), Cabanatuan, Nueva Ecija. Roman L. Santos, (Actg.), Bayornbong, Nueva Vizcaya. Jose R. Suarez, (Actg .), Pto. P1'incesa, PaLawan. 8. Fielden Nutter, San Fernando, Pampanga . Martin Aguilar, Jr., Lingayen, Pangasinan. Benito Pangilinan, Pasig, Rizal. Santiago Dumlao, Romblon, Rornblon. Urban L. Coble, (Actg.), Catbalogan, Samta1路. Carmelo P. Quintero Sm'sogon, SO'1'sogon. Edward M. Kuder, (A ctg.), Jolo, S1.Llu. Mauricio Datoc, (Actg . ), SU'rigao, Su'rigao, Abdon Javier, TarLac, Tllh'lac. Venancio Trinidad, Lucena, Tayabas . Venancio Nebrida, Iba, Zantbales. James A. Milling, (Actg . ), Zarnboanga, ZMn 路 boanga.


CORNEJO'S COMMONWEA L TH DIRECT ORY OF T a E PHILIP P1NES

868

BUREAU

OF EDUCA TIO N - (Continued.)

I NSULAR SCHOOLS. C. Reimers, (Actg.) t Muiioz School, P.O., N. E., Central Luzon Agricultural School. Francisco Castaneda, (Actg.), Philippine Nau-

tic(tl School, Pasay, Rizal. Roy K. Gi lmore, Philippine Normal School, Manila.

Gregorio J. Sevilla J (Actg.), Philippine School of A?,ts nne! Trades, Manila.

THE FOLLOWING IS A LIST OF PUBLIC SCHOOL TEACHERS WHO RETIR ED UNDER ACT 3050 AS AMENDED:

ABRA Balmaceda, Isabel BandaYI'ei, Clemente BandaYl'el, Florentino Bello, Eulalia Bersamin, Luisa F. (Mrs.) Bigornia, Anacleto Blando, Rosendo Brillantes, Teodoro J. Cardenas, Santiago Cas tillo, I1defonzo Dasallo, Ambrosia Javier, Alejandro Parada, Agapito L. Rigor, Agapito Villaf'ce, Lino AGUSAN Galon, Antonio Gamotin, Casiano Pates, Angel ALBAY Aspra, Candida M. Azul, Marceliano Baclao, Nicasio Barrameda, Jose Basmayor, Bonifacio Bellen, Eleanor C<lma, Simeon D. Casia, Apolonia Castro, Balbino Cerdenia, Mrs. Sergi a Cleofe, Francisco J . Cruz, Urbano de La Espinas, Pedro Garcia, Isidro

Guerrero, Juana Guillenno, 1\1,rs. Matilde S. H izon, Ped 1'0 Icamen. Candido O. Luna, Felix Luna, Sergio Luna, Vedas to Mallarca , Simeana G. Manlangnit, Matilde R . Navera, Catalina V. N-a vera, Gregorio Osia, Eligio Padua, Mrs. Flora M. Pefiafior, Enrique Pula, Teodoro Patriarca, Isabelo Quintana, Lanbel'to Rapay, Vicente Ricaiort, Segundo R ivera, Venancio Ruivivar, Jose Sabile, Faustino Salting, Diascoro Samarista, Bernardo Salmiento, Paulin a C. Senora, Luis Vergara, Crispin

ANT I QUE Alon, San tos Alonsagay, Vicente Cardenas, Alejandro Dioso, Mar ia no S. Encarnacion, Severo Laboneto, Fernando Ledesma, Ramon Mahaqu iao, Cr isan to

Magluyan, Celerina Mission, J uan Mandolado, Gerardo Mont ill a, Cirilo Morales, Mrs. Susana G. Natividad, Jose Onanad, Senon Rivero, Ab elardo Rodillon, Delfin R. Salvani, Faustino M. Sumugat, Anselmo T ating, J acinta Vedeja, Melencio Vego, J uan Yasay, Gregorio

BATA AN Batol, Pablo Buesuceso, Marcos Camacho, Catali na D izon, Lazaro J . H errera, J osefa Ma nahan, Maria Navarro, Tranquilin o P a laypay, Melchor G. R amos , Martin S. Romero, Asuncion Sevilla, Roque B ATA N E S Cultura, Viven cio Saligumba, Teodorico B ATAN GAS Adap, E steban Y. Anda l, Domi ngo Asu ncion, Ju a n Ad ajar , Vicente


869

BUREAU OF EDUCATION

RETIRED TEACHERS- (Continued)

Atienza, Francisco Atienza, Dionisio At.ienza, Santiago Azucena, Tirso Aquino, M.rs. Cal'men B. Afria, Marceliano Asuncion, Juan Bercilla, Leonardo Boongaiing, Leoncio Briones, Baltazar Casanas, Martin Catangay, Juana Cuidadano, Victoria C. Clet, Sancho Cordero, An selmo Cortinas, Maria Dimaculafigan, Basilio Dimayuga, Benita Garcia, Domingo Generoso, Segundo Gomez, Guillermo Gomez, Julio Gonzales, Marciano Gonzales, Mrs. M.aTia M. Hernandez, Aurelio Hernandez, Timoteo Ilagan, Julian Jimenez, Macario D. Lardizabal, Sergio Leyco, N"icolas Librea, Pascual Macalindong, Teodosio Macatangay, Florentino Madlangayan, Felix Magad ia, Atilano Magsino, Lucio Malabanan, Lazaro Martinez, Isabel Medina, Pedro H . Medrano, Gavino Mercado, Miguel M. Pastor, Jose Pargas, Melchora Payoyo, Glicerio Pentinio, Esteban Reyes, Federico Rodriguez, Maria Reyes, Paulino Ronquillo, Pedro Santos, Bernardo Suiso, Rita

Tapia, Roman Ternpli, Cristina Tolentino, Benito Tol entino, Filomena Tolentino, Nicolas Veyra, Benito Villadolid, Mal'iano L. Virtusio, Norberto

BOHOL Abueva, Casiano Abcede, Jose Achacoso, Eutiqu iano Aclao, Cristina Abarquez, Marcos Amper, Basilio Ancag, Antonio Arcaba, Honorata Ayaay, VictoTia Acenas, Paulina A. Acenas, Regina R. Bagtasos, Mario Bagtasos, Narciso B. Bautista, Leoncio Bernaldez, Eulalia Bongalles, Guillermo Borja, Luciano Butalid, Claudio Cagata, Tomas Cagulada, Agapito Casefias, Ines S. Castro, Eustaquio Castredes, Teodoro Cero, Mrs. Claudia A . Cimafranca, Emiliano Cruz, Liberato Dano, J uanaria Digal, Pedro Dinsay, Francisco B. Doblados, Ceferina Doblados, Mauricio Doblados, Rosario Escobal, Anacleta Falcon, Basilisa A. Galguiera, Teodoro Hordista, Nicolas Inting, I sidro J ala, Brigido Jalap, Susana Karaan, Ceferina M. Maglinto, Emiliano

Piezas, Tito Pahang, Antonio Olano, Esteban Paraguya, Hipolito Piezas, Gorgonio Rances, Bonifacio Rasco, Pedro Sale, S i~to Sale, Tomas Salinas, Romualdo Sarte, Mariano Tocmo, F elipe Tolang, Eusebio Torres, Simeon Vale, Si.meon Visarra, Cipriano Visaya, Simeon Yumo, Gl'egorio

BULACAN Ai ran, Soledad An selmo, Rosario Arcega, Poiicarpio Arcillas, Asuncion Baltazar, Petra Bartolome, Gregorio Bernabe, Cons tan cia Bernardo, Andres Cabangis; Juan Castillo, Mrs. M.arciana A. Catindig, Alej andro Clemen a, Isabel Coronel, Damaso Cortez, Ambrosia Cruz, Agapito Cruz, Alejandro Cruz, Mrs. Rosalia Felipe, Mrs. Fla viana Flores, Remigio Galang, Juan Gatmaitan, Escolastico Geronimo, Rosa Guzman. Si mplicio de Guzman, Teodorisa de Ligon, Antonio Lucero, Demetria M. Manalo, Juan M.al'ques, Tomas M.e rcado, Angel E. Mendoza, Tomas Pafiganiban, Lucia


870

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

RETIRED TEACHERS- (Continued)

Pafiganiban, Maria Ramirez, Gregorio

Ramos, Donato Rameo, Justo Reyes, Ester U. Rivera, Domingo Samson, Gerardo San Luis, Pedro Santos, Rosario Santos, Justo 'fabian, Marcelo Tancingco, Mrs. Maria Tenerio, Quintin Toleniino, Lucio Tuason, Francisco Veioira, Ariston Ventura, Segundo Vergel , Candido VillacoTte, Benito Villacorte, Onofre Villariba, Dolores BUKIDNON Astete, Juan L. Madjus, Felix Ondevilla, Emigdio Rara, Teodoro Taga, Julian Villanueva, Ramon CAGAYAN Agdamag, Candido V. Baculi, Alfonso Bangayan,l\1.agno Baguiran, Mrs. Braulia F. Baguiran, Braulio Battung, P edro M. Campo, Gregorio Collado, Andres Calabiao, Basilia Faraggunan, Nemesio Guzman, Pablo Guzman, Pedro Luyan, Anastacio Mallillin, Jose Mercurio, Jose Navarl'O, Federico Pallonan, Pedl'O Puruganan, Leov igilda Quintos, Benigno Rivera, Felix de

Ruelos, Victorino Sapitula, Mrs. Hermogena B. Soriano, Maria D. Taguinod, Galicano Villanueva, Macario K. CAPTZ Advincula, Pablo Alba, Digno Alba, Julia N. (Ml's.) Asis, Felicisimo E. Benliro, Jose D. Constantino, Eligio Dalisay, Mrs. Clotilde R. Declaro, Edaria Diestro, Timoteo Exmundo, Hospicio Fadriga, Mrs. Valentina I. Feliciano, Celestina J. Fresnido, Gregorio Fulgencio, Jose Ibanez, Mrs. Jacoba Iban'eta, Teodoro Ignis, Ceverino (C / o Mrs, Irene I, Ignis) Igual, Juan Isberto, Manu el Favato, Pedl'O Kimpo, Leoncio Lalisan, Magno Macabilig, Rogelio Orola, Aproniano G. Pader, Felipe Pader, Anm'es Palomata, Aristeo Pastrana, Ju stino Patiiio, Mrs. Rosario Pelayo, Ambrosio M . Ponce, Mateo Rosa, Dimeon de la Rosario, Candido del Rosario, Francisco del Taay, Casimiro Torre, Dionisio de la Tupas, Gregorio C. Ureta, M,ateo V illarus. I lumi nado

CAM. N'ORTE Belm onte, Ambrosio Diezco. Eustaquio Pajaril1o, Froilan

CAM. SUR Alisago, Andres Amparado, Genaro Aureus, Regina Auste, Pascual Beltrano, Mrs. Genal'a J. Belza, Faustino Bustamante, Benito Camacho, Miguel Canuto, Jose Cayetano, M.amerto Elevado, Paulino Federis, Dorotea Flores, Teofilo Francisco, Emiliana P . Francisco, Juan Fragio, Juan Gelman, Mrs. Ramona R. Gonzales, Aniccto Leon, Cil'ilo de Lima, Agapito de Llagas, Froilan Mataya, J uan('! J. Meliton, I gnacio Mendizabal, Juli a T. Napoles, Lutg2.l'da Pardalis, Julian Pelenio, Dor.lingo Praxidio, Rufo Priela, Jose RefugIO, Lucia Relleta, Pedro Rojano, Edu:ll'do Sanchez, Marcid San Juan, Pedro Taduran, M,ela nio Tomalo, Toribio Samodio, Asuncion

CAVTTE Abueg, Ricardo Ambalada, Jose Angeles, Faustina Bayot, Luis Bayot, Miguel B. Cenizal, Julio Concepcion, Artemio CordJ..Cruz, J osefa Creencia, Mrs. Francisca E. Cuajunco, Pilar Darvia, Meliton


BUREAU OF EDUCATION

871

RETIRED TEACHERS- (Continucd)

Dorninguez, Mrs. Margarita I. Encarnacion, M.arcelo Fernandez, Ruperta Gonzales, Juana Javier, Calixto Javier, Norberto Leano, Gaudencio Litonjua, Luis LJamado, Francisco Madlansacay, Ceferino Madlansacay, Sole<lad Mendoza, Modesto Miguelino, Crispulo Miguelino, Jacinto Potento, Antonio Prodigalidad, Mariano Rosario, Paz del Santy, Ricardo L . Sarroal, Maeario Sayoc, Sotera Tirona, Estanislao T. Val buena, Justina Velasco, Esteban

CEBU Abellana, Teofilo R. Abellaneda, Eulogio AbellaJ1eda, Maria A. Abello, Diego Albarracin, Vicenta Alooydo, Francisco Alcoceba, Merced Alino, M,anuel Almodal, Fidel Alvarex, Romana Angos, Pio A\'ila, Teofila L. (Mrs.) Agravante, Emigdio Babiera, Demetria C. (Mrs.) Babiera, Petronilo Baj~, Fidel Blanco, Eulogia Belamide, Demetria A. (Mrs.) Binhay, Mrs. Basilisa B. Bontoc, Bruno Borlasa, Jacinto Briz, Soledad Buagas, Silverio Bujay, Francisco Eujay, Marciano Cagigas, Leon Canonigo, Emilio

Cafiete, Luis Cannen, Narciso del Castro, Domingo Caballos, Pedro Cedefio, Damaso Cerna, Rafael K. Cinco, M.rs. Vicenta M. Doena, Marcelino Dayanan, Filomeno Dayanan, Gregorio Ejercito, Leon Enriquez, Andres Espina, Eleno Espinosa, Ambrosio Estudillo, Urbano Evangelista, Matilde R. Fajardo, Gegardo Fano, Narciso B. Fernan, Mrs. Luisa C. Fernando, TOTibio Ferrer, Jose Flores, Jose Flores, Pedro Flores, Primo F lores, Tirso Fuentes, Hilarion Gacrana, I saias Gador, Vicente Galeos, Ramon Garciano, Cesario Garciano, Eutiquio Gil, Juan Fernandez, Marta M. Homecillo, Eusebio Languido, Tomas La 0, Numeriano Larrobia, Gregorio Laspifias, Maternidad N . (Mrs.) Layese, Jacinto Lazaga, Mrs. Dorotea N. Lepatan, Moises Lepiton, Clemente Licayan, Gregorio Llanto, M;rs. Consolacion G. Lumbab, Carlos Luna, Consolacion R, (Mrs.) Luna, Juan Ma neao, Pedro A. Mangubat, Zacarias Manila, Mateo

Manlunas, Galicano Mansanares, Domingo Mal'amara, Genaro Mariscal, Gregorio Matanug, Vicente Mendez, Pio M~ndez, Roque Miel, Mrs. Rufina F. Montayro, Dominador Montebon, Fausto Mendoza, Francisco M.ontero, Hermogenes Nazareno, Felix N gujo, Petronilo Ocampo, N orberto Orat, Alej andl'o Pacifico, Gregorio Palang, Mrs. Concepcion C. Parawan, Pedro Pedrosa, Anastasio Pedrosa, Rufino Pesta no, Alejandro Prado, Quiterio Padilla, Mi guel Pafigiiinan, Florentino Rafanan, Carlos Reyes, Hennenegildo de los Reyes, Mrs. Maria Reconalla, Lucio Rivera, Sergio Rojas, Quirino Rosal, Bonifacio Rusiana, Julio Sacedon, Tirso Salgado, Filomeno Sanchez, Mariano Sandulo, Braulio Sanson, Mrs. Soledad D. Santos, Flaviano Saniel, Macario Sarona, Donato Sayson, Mrs. Maxima F. Sevilla, Jose Sevilla, Matias Socorro, Clemente del Stella, Agustin Suico, Filomena Suico, J ose Suico, Madalena Sasing, Eduardo Tagalog, Perfecto


872

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

RETIRED TEACHERS- (Continued)

Tecson, Asuncion Tesaiuna, J orge Trazo, Ermeniana Twuu!ak, M,l's. Melchora Unabia, Jose Velasco, Juan V idal, Mariano Vill alon, Lorenzo Vill amor, Maximino Villa rosa, Ad olfo Villarosa, Mrs. Beatl'iz A. Virtucio, Agapito Wiron, 路W ashington A. V. Yap, Anastacio R. Ylaya, Mrs . Fortunata O. Zabala, Celestino COTABATO Bariaan, Albino R. Bayguen, Benigno Burgos. I gnacia Castro, Paulino Doctolero, Ju stina Dumlao, Donato Fuerte , Victoria Gohetano, Alfonso Manion, 路William Manubag, Alfonso P. Manubag, Nemesio M atro, Fernando Panes, Cali>..1:o D. Rosario, Mrs. Remed ios V. DAVAO li11a1'io, Anastacio B. PrOSpeI'D, Maximo

ILOCOS N'Ol ~ TE Aguinaldo, Domingo Aguinaldo, Santos Albano, Jose Albano, Ju a n R. A ncheta, Pablo Antonio, Emeterio p. urelio, Acisclo naldomir, Higin o Bernabe, Potenciano Castro, Osmundo S. de Cabanas, H onoria Cabanas, Agapito Cadiante, Gregorio

Calixto, Felix Caluya, Rosalia Castillo, Domingo Cid, Esteban P. Cid, Rafaela Cid, Timoteo G. Constan tino Casimiro Cruz, Evaristo de la Cruz, Leonru:o de la IJuldulao, Alfonso Elmi tanio, Alejandro Eugenio, Fidel F ernandez, Manuel Fagaragan, Basilio Foronda, Mariano Galapon, Luis L. Garaga, Bruno Guittap, Teod ulo Guntang, Toribio Gabriel, Felisa Ibalio, Esteban Lucas, Clara Lara, Salvador Lazaro, Dionisio Limos, Lu ciano I una, Hipolito de Magbua l, Felix Narciso, Teodor o Pena, Angel C. .Pera lta, Francisco L. Quetulio, Demetrio Ramiro, Jacobo C. Hafiesso, Ma ri ano I\aval, Gil Ruiz, Santiago Sales, I smael Urbi, Crescenciana C. Valbuena. R uperta Ventura, Mrs. Emiliana P. Ventura, Hilario ILOCO S SUR Abaya, Placido Abundo, Ma ca rio Abundo, S ilvestra (Mrs.) Aguilar, Pantaleona Aherrera, Honesto Al viedo, Jose AI-boleda, J ovenal C. Arizaba l, Lourdes Baut ista , Santiago

Bello, Artemio Bueno, Celestino Casia, Cirila Castillo, Geronimo Cueva, Justa de la Dagdag, Ciriaco Desierto, Leoncio Felix, M.rs. Rufina L. Florendo, Helen I<'oronda, Clara Foronda, Dorotea Garcia, Mariano M. Guerzon, Donata (Mrs.) Guerzon, Juli a Imperial, Ilumina do Ip ac, Anadeto Javier, Eulogio Lallana, Aniceto Lamadrid, Andres Leon, Eleanor de Leon, Rosario de Mendoza, Cipriano Pi lar, Jose R. I'urisima, Marcos Reyna, Ju an Hostia, F elicidad L . (M rs.) Rafael, Enriquez Sipin, Carlos Somera, Gaspar Soria, Rufino T agorda , Vivencio L . Vergara, Florentina Viloria, Bruno Viloria, Leoncio ILO ILO Abadiano, David B. Altar, Ju stin a Amiscua, Alejandro Armada, Rosa ri o B. ( Mrs.) Aspera, Aniceto S. Eaylol1, Luis Bautista, Gervasio Bermudo, Juan Bibat, Magdaleno Bion, Pablo Bamaras, Salutiano Caro, Agapito Callado, Marcelo Caoyonan, Purificacion CasaJmir, Jorge


BUREAU OF EDUCATION

873

RETIRED TEA CHERS- tContinucd)

Castigador, Hilarion Ceballos, Sancha Chavez, Josefina Confesor, P edro Cortez, El eonor Cruz, Ambros io de la DobIes, Cristina Domafeliz, Clemente Desa, Honoria Enrique, Is iderio Escoto, Agap ito Fabrigas, F ederico pullon, Jose Garcia, Felipe Gildoro, Leoncia Gimono, Manuel D. Grio, Cipriano Grio, Wenceslao Grio, Mrs. Sotera Guitanguijo, M,a rtin J aena, Socorro Jara, Mrs. Concordia Jara, Mrs. Emilia .Jaranilla, Mrs. Justa Legaspi, Geronimo Leones, Andres Legislador, Raymundo Mabunay, V.icente Macainan, Paz A. (Mrs.) Miraflores, Jose Muralina, Juan Muyola, Bernardino 'Nobleza, Mrs. Maria C. Nobleza, Miguel Ortigas, Julian Pacardo, Agustin Paicol, Marcos Paniza, Luis Pari an, Martin Pasaporte, Ricardo QUidato, Cornelio Regalado, Gregorio Sarutan, Antolin Sartorio Amadeo S. SHorio, Segundo Silubrico, Teodulo ~olidarios, Nicomedes Tamayo, Maria Tafiasana, Consorcia Tenefrancia, Tomas 1 irador, Asiselo

Vargas, Cecilio P . Villanueva, Leondro I SABELA Ancheta, Julian A vecilla, Bernabe Bagunu, Juana Balabbo, Juan Calinag, M.al'tin Ces pedes, Sergio Z. r'IOl'eS, Doroteo Layugan, Moises A, Melegrito, Teadoro Neyra, Gerardo M. Palattao, Valeriano Palogan, Luciano F, P accaran, Lorenzo Taguinqui, P edro Zipagan, Ceferino JOLO Ducao, Juan LAGUNA Abarr)" Marta O. (Mrs.) Abril, FUemon Alfonso, Dolores Alf.onso, Mateo Cabrera, Mercedes Copon, Ananias Dia, Generosa Egasa ni, Antonia Eleria, Pablo E strada, Emerenciana Fabella, Mrs. Narcisa A. Francia, Mrs. Maria A. Faraon, Salome Isaac, M,rs. Melitana A. Ecarangal, Esteban Jimenez, Jose Y. Lavina, Francisco B. Manguerra, Sotero M, N acorra, Valentin Faoo, Mrs, Miguela T. Padilla, Juan Pena, M.artina de la Perez, Placid.o Roa sa, Irineo Torres, Julia G. Torres, Vicente Tanalega, Catalina

LANAO Doherty, Frederick V. Spencer, Pearl F. LEYTE Ablen, Nicolas Almadro, Carlos Ariza, Dionisio Baldo, Fortunata Baguion, Pedro Basco, Felipe Beringuel, Julia K. Bautista, Luciana Conrado, Capacio Capacio, Mrs. Gregoria N. Cinco, Alejandro Delicano, Panfilo IJu rana, Miguela Gray, Tayne Cali a, Felix Gobens iong, Federico Gonzaga, Bernardo Kimbo, Calixto Quinbo, Lucilo Latol'eno Modesto Loreto, F eliza (Mrs.) Lucero, Sul picio M,acariola, Gorgonio S. Maglinto, Julian Mari, Saturnino l\f odesta, Eugenio Modesto, Manuel Monaste ri a l, Cenon Monteselaros, Flaviano Moreto, Ines Mariles, Bartolome Pad ere, Constantino Panzo, Victoriano Polo, Saturn ino Pundavela, Emilio Racho, Epifanio Ratcliffe, J esse Silao, Clafil'a Sabarl'o, Aurelio Sal vatierra, Gl'egorio Sevill a, Fortunato M. Sevi ll a, Francisca Tu gada, Valeriano Villamol', Gaudencio Yanuario, Mrs. Victoria Y


874

CORNEJO'S COM MONWEALTH DfRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPlNES

RETIRED TEACHERS-(Continued)

MANILA Abad, Anastacio N. Abad, Victoria (M.rs.) ACi-ac, Luciano B. Adea, Alejandro A guilar, Pia AlanD, Tomas A130n, Pascuala Ampioco, Arsenio Ancheta, Isidro G. Angeles, Trinidad C. (Mrs.) Antonio, Teodol'a A. (Mrs.) Arabit, Galatino Arboleda, Pedro Ardefia Arce, Andrea V. (Mrs.) A rcellas, Mercedes Aragon, Mary T. (Mrs.) Alvior, Patrocinio BacoI, Fidel Bennet, Roy D. Bendoe, Santiago Bravo, Mrs. Manuela A. Buenaventura, Mrs. Veronica Butler , John H. Manning Cafiizares, Pablo Cardenas, Bonifacio Carzon, M ,TS. Mina A. Castro, Mrs. Juliana D. de Ciriacruz, Dorotea Concha, Mrs. Asuncion A. Cruz, Ambrosio David, Abelardo N . Disacaii, Mrs. Maria R . Encarnacion, Eugenjo Eppstein, M.l's. Emily E. Esguerra, Mrs. Feliza R. E strada, Daniel Farre, Angel F ernando, Guia Francisco, Mrs. Agripina Francisco, Nicolas Francis, Beat y M. Galang, Jose Galang Mrs. Porfiria Gansico, Luciano Garcia, Ml路S. Emilia V. Gibson, Vernon D. Gloria, Juliana (Mrs.) Gonzales, Leoncio R. Grajo, Baldom er o

Guill enno 1st., Juan Ha/ber, Apolinar Hernandez, Teodora Ig-nacio, Amado Israel, Dalmacio Jaranilla, Angela ( Mrs.) Javier, Agapito Javier, Mrs. Constancia D . .Tavier, Mrs. Rafaela C. Jesus, Pascuala de Kasilag, J osefa Laquindanum, Angel Lazaro, Maximino Leon, Doroteo de leyco, J osefa Limchangco, Ju ana C. (Mrs.) Lisk, Louis H. Luietro, Arsenio S. Lukens, Sarah (Mrs.) Lincoln, Bertha Madrigal, Mrs. Veronica M. Mendoza, Floro M,ercado, Aurora Milam', Petrona B. Miller, Elizabeth F. (Mrs.) M,e neses, liucio N era, Antonio Na ldo, Eufemia Natividad, Emiliana (Mrs.) Kavarro, Feliciano Osborn, John 'W. Parker, Elbert Paguia, ,M,rs. Apolonia P. Paguia, Clotilde Pelayo, Mrs. Feliza S. Perez, Petronio Pleno, Joaquin Ponce, Mrs, Ramona de Leon Prida, J eanno D. de Piansay. Concepcion Quimson, Ver onica Quinto, Visitacion J. Ramillosa, Domingo Ramirez, Ramona RByes, Castor Robancho, Silvesb:e M. Rodrigo, Sergio Romans, Ambrosio Rosario. Arcadio del Rosario, Gregorio del

RotOT, Mrs. Engracia B. hubio, Jose Salas, Pedro San Buenaventura, Quirino Salvosa, Leonila Santos, Alejandro R. Santos, Guillermo Santos, Juan ~aracho, Luis Sen-ano, Mrs. Paula Silva, Adela Silva, Mrs. Ana Simeon, Mrs. Maria Sisson, Rufina C. Tacorda, Mrs. Eustaquia S. Tecson, Limbano Togado, Dionisio Tormey, lla S. Tormey, Harty T . Torrij os, Mrs. Luisa F. Tuazon, Mrs. Magdal ena M. Tumbokon, Sauro Valte, Ildefonso Velo, Jose C. Wright, James J. 'Wright Samuel Yamzon, Mrs. Engracia Yamzon, Placida Yamzon, Mrs. Rosa Zamora, Pilar Zurbano, Ildefonso MARINDUQUE Barbosa, Vicente Chavez, Mrs. Antonio R. Farin, M.r s. Francisca G. Garcia, Jose Hiyas, Praxedes Lavarex, Alfredo M.alvar, Apolonia Mendoza, Zacarias h epomuceno. Maria Regalia, Mrs. Silvestra Rejano, Teodoro Rey, Vicente Ricamara, Roman MASBATE Aguilar, Gimeno Rarlet, Louis Boro, Doroteo Cruz, Mrs. Maria de la


BUREAU OF EDUCATION

875

RETIUED TEACHERS-(Continued)

Gonzales, Leon Legaspi, Vicente Valencia, Rafael MINDORO Abeleda, Josefa V. Acedil1o, Leandro Bundang, Miguel Bernardo, Lorenzo Magcamit, Pascual Mesa, Pedro de Sapunga n, Marciano Salvo, Casiano A. \. illar, Francisco Villar, Roman MISAMIS OCCIDENTAL Ambolong, Manuel Calamba, Telesfor o Descallar, Baltazar Digamon, Exequiel Dana, Francisco Maravillas, Victoriano Nagac, Mrs. Gregoria C. Postrero, Elpidio Villanueva, Josefa Guigayona, Rufino Jumalon, Antonia Hayo, Santiago MI SAMI S OR. Bautista, Filomeno Mo Chavez, Jesus Eblacas, Quintina Galimpin, Marcelo Rellin, Eugenio Roa, Rosario Shapit, Alfredo Veloso, Paz MOUNTAIN PROV o Estabillo, Pedro Gil, Dionisio Guerrero, Juan L . Guzman, Domingo M.edina, Juan Nivera, Mrs. Cristeta F . Obar, Emiliano Paraguas, Leon O. NEGROS OCC. Bando, Si meon Bancal, Ramon Bafiares, Amando Barilea , Godofredo

Bisocos, Moises B. Borromeo, Rustico Cala, Rafae l B. Cal ineo, Simplicio Cuachon, Mrs. Aurora N. Cuachon, Vicen te Endrera, Leo ncia Fernandez, Daniel Gabanto, Clemente Gomez, Victor Gonzales, Mr s. Donata Gracia , Fermin Guillen, Pablo Ignacio, Mrs. Priscila P. J alan don i. Fidel J alandoni , Aniceto J aro, Agaton J ason, Salvador J avelona, Ramona Justiniani, Maria Lan gco, Florenc io Legaspi, R amon Liboon, Alfonso Liboon, Mari ano Macoy, Pilar A. Magapan, Eladio Palacios, Jose P echera, Francisco P. Rocello, Tiburcio Sanniento. Agapito Te1ic, Vicente J. Tabligan, Filemon Teves, Margarito Verdeprado, CirHo Yulo, Mrs, Maria G. NEGROS OR. Alviola. E stanislao Arbas, Lucio Bonochita, Salomon Corsino, Pablo Cornelio, Victor Corsino, Pablo Dael, Fulgencio Emperado, Martiniano M.iraflor, Nemesio Munoz, Antonio N ocete, Dionisio Pinili, Francisco R eal, Santiago Selim, Francisca Saga, Timoteo

Samson, B ernardo Samson, Manuel Senador, Teodoro Sinda, Daniel ViliI'an, Alfonso Villami l, Mrs. Juana Villanueva, Narciso Villanueva, Mrs. Ponciana B. NUEVA ECIJA Abesames, Casiano Agaton, Olimpia Aguilar, Asuncion T. Antonio, Norberta Ayroso, Feliciano S. Ayroso, Jacinto S. Batongbacal, Anton io Burgos, Edilbel路to Calao, Lorenzo Carrillo, Diego M. Castillo, Agustin Chi co, Felipe 1. Crispino, Mariano Coloma, Balbino Dizon, ~a rcelino Empainado, Catalino Empainado, Mrs. Pelagia V. Estioko, Macario Galang, Ma riano, L. Goc.o, Desiderio Godoy, Felipe Guian g, Sixto Guillenno, Gregorio Guzman, Anastacio de J amlang. Teodoro B. Longalong, An dres Lazaro, David Lina, Antonio R. Lopez, Francisca B. Lu st re, Sixto Magallon, M,iguel Magno, G rego1oio L. Maniaue, Eusebio Mart inez, Trinidad Padiernos, Agustin V, Pascual, Crispin B. Pascual, Agustin Padilla, Victorio Paruiigao, Lui s Punsalan, Juan Roque, Pelagia Salita, Eu genio P. Sison, Lino


876

CORNEJO'S COMMONWEALTH DIRECTORY OF THE PHIWPP1NES

RETIRED TEACHERS- (Continlled)

Tan Felix, Isidoro Tolentino, Aurelio Trinidad, Gregorio Tuason, Tomas Villona, Maxia Zabat, Apoionio V. Zabat, Fructuosa V.

NUEVA VIZCAYA Baguisi, Alberto Basat, Arcadio Barzabal, Albedo Cabal, J UaJ1 H ernandez, Jose Light, Mrs. Agustina F. Lumauig, Cecilio M,e ndoza, Casiano Pol e, Luisa P. Rojas, Sal vador Zarate, Vicente PALAWAN Gonzales, Generosa Maherit, Melquiades Maniavi, Fabian Seastres, Agustin Setias, Alberto Soborano, Pilar N. PAMPANGA Aniceto, Posidio B aking, Gel'onimo Bernardo, Maria Carlos, Pedro Dalljruan, Feliza Dayrit, Soledad Dizon, AlejandTo Eusebio, Trinidad I. Fin, Mrs. -M aria L. del Franco Tolentino Galang, Benigno L . Galang, Felixberto Garcia, Aniano G. Garcia, Mrs. Potenciana Gopoz, Hu rpiano Gulapa, Felix Javier, Mrs. Fennina O. Licup, Meliton Liuanag, Apolonio L . Laxamana, Lorenzo Magtoto, Ma ria M.alig, J ovita P. Manabat, Ju sto P. Manabat , Mrs. Mercedes

Manabat, Tirso Marian o, Vicente Ordonez, Leoncio C. Panganiban, Mariano Panganiban, Narciso Pineda, Narciso Pabustan, Hermeniano Rf;Yes, Leonor Santos, Canuto A. Sicat, Julio C. Simon , Pedro Songco, Francisco P. Tamayo, Remedios T. (Mrs.) Tiangson, Severin a Yamhao, Aurea Yanzon, Victoria Zabala, Servillana Zapanta, Lazaro

PAN'GASINAN Abad, Juan Abad, Leon Abalos, Jose Abuan, Roman Acosta, Rufino Acosta, Pedro V. Alana, Felipe Angel es, Dalmacio C. Antonio, P edro D. Apellido, Felix A l1nas, Francisco Balolong, Eugenio Bandong, Joaquin Barlaan, Domingo R. Barroso, Juan Beltran, S antiago Bibay. Francisco Bill ote, Ciriaco Braga, Santiago Brazal, Ildefonz o Cagampan, Rober to Calado, Alfredo Calimlim, Maria Canto, Buenaventura Ca nto, Constancio Casiano, Federico Cerezo, Tomas Cruz, Tomas Dios, Ram on de Diccion, Luis Doctor, Pedro Duque, Francisco V.

Duterte, Marciano Estrada, Rufino J. Fajardo, Mrs. Leoncia F. Fernandez, Ponciano Fernandez, Proceso Ferrer, Jacinto Flores, Mrs. Briccia B. Galsim, Bernardo Galvez, M.aximo Garcia, Vicente Guzman, Narciso de Lagera, Rodrigo P. Legaspi, Felisa C. Le,on, Angel de Leon, Vicente de Lledo, Hipolito Lomibao, Roque Macaraeg, Eustaquia Magceno, Maria C. Malinit, Ambrosio L. Manaois, Cuadrato Mejia, Nicolas B. M.endoza, Martin Meneses, Josefa Ll. (Mrs.) Micll, Juan G. Nabor, Gerardo Nastor, Rufino Natino, Alejandro Natino, 9'uillerma N路. (Mrs.) Ne,al, Thomas G. Pad lan, Marcelino Pal'agas, Rufino G. Parras, Eustorgio Parras, Mrs. Victoria B. Perez, Quirino Pimentel, Anselmo Pinla.c, Antonio C. Poyaoan, Eusebio Prado. Melecio Reinoso, Benedicto Racsa, Anacleto Reyes, Dalmacio Reyes, Felix P. Reynoso, Ramon Rodriguez, Ramon Rollolazo, Juan C. Romero, Alej andro Romero, Juan Rosario, Francisco A. Rosario, Salvador Rosete, Mariano Sison, Inocencio Samson, Anton!o


877

BUREAU OF EDUCATION

RETIRED TEAC HERS-(Contifl\lcd)

Sennonia, Feliciano Serraon, Macaria Sison, J osefa Sison, Pastora Tand<><; Sixto Ten'ado, Bas ilio Tiong, Nemesio Ugto, Mamerto Soriano, Basilio Valdez, Santiago Vidal, Victoriano Villamil , Roman N. Vinluan, Concepcion Ylarde, Florentino Yuson, Luz Zamora, Domingo RIZAL Al ca ntara, Juan Alcaraz, Mercedez Angeles , Rosario F. (-M.rs.) Baltazar, Emilia Bernales, Herrnogena C. (Mrs.) Buenaventura, Emigdio Calingo, Geronimo J. Capi strano, Remedios Carios, Ananias Cifra, Eladia Cayco, Florentino Cruz, Paulino Cruz, Serapio Cu eto, Mrs Macaria C. Carballo, Francisco Cayco, Mrs Elisa B. Espiritu, Celedonio Fernando, Carmen Ferrer, Catalina Ginogino, Sotera (M,l's,) Hernandez, Ildefonso Herrera, Januaria (Mrs.) Ison, Maria Jonson, Antonio Leon, Agustina de Manuel, Felix N oval, J osefa Nery, Maria Nicolas, Guil1enno Ocampo, R osar io O'hara, James Ord iales, Felix Pasco, Andres Paz, Fla viana

Poblador, Honorio P ickell, William H . l\onquiIlo, M,arcelino San Miguel, F eli x Sia. Ana, Mrs . N'ieves Sta. Maria, Cannen San tos, Mrs. Mari a P. S imeon, Eusebia Sianghio, Serafina T a blante, Mrs. Alejandra R. 1 a ntion g co, Roman Tenerio, Antonio V ictor, Ciriaca Viola, Amando ROMBLON Dario, Soter o Fabellon, Marcos Famarin, Rufo F. Lan zona, I saias Moiiez, Mateo Montana, M.a ximo Mortel, Andres l\lusca, R amon Musico, Uldarico Olgada, Mrs. Clemen t a A. Rafas, Dionicia Rabino, Pelagia Roca, Amanci o R. Solidum, Jose S AM.AR Alar, Flaviano Alcazar, Mam erta Amante, Ju an Ami. Ceferina B. (Mrs.) Arcefio, Baldomero Asis, Celerina lJalagui:t, S ixto A yllen , Mateo Balleza, Proceso Batica, Andres E rosas, Ignacio Cabarnilla, Leon Campomances, Si mplicio Cervero, Juana C. Ce r vero, Luis Ci dro, Mrs. J osefa D. Daois, Jose Daradal, Ponciano Distrajo, Silvina Donceras, Mrs. Maria A. Fornillos, Candido Japson, Manuel I.

Juanito, Mrs . Fabiana G. Lomuntad, Jose !..agarto, Aquilino Lagarto, Mrs. Inocenta B. T,agrimas, Escolastico J ,atone, Eleuterio G. Macabanag, Eugenio Marcial, Cirilo Montallana, Norberto M uncada, Antonio Norom baba, T ranquilino Rama, Francisco Salameda, Genoveva S uares, J ose D. Tizon Pilar Torri jas, Rufo Villarin, Gonza les Zartiga, Eli seo SORSOGON Abot, Francisca Babasa, Timoteo Bongon, Gerollimo Bonifacio, Numerlano Cervantes. I gnaclO Dimen, Magno Diiio, Regino G. Dionela, Crispin Duazo, Jose D. Escaroba, Miguel Escobar, M,al'ia Esporlas, Inez Gallindes, Bernardo Ca rcia, Emilio Grajo, Anacleto H agosojos, Anastacio Lagard o, Al ejandro Laban, Magno l\!ayores, Au reI io Pura, Jose P u ra, T eodora Teodoro, Alfonso V. Villareal, Da lmacio SULU Aguilar, Ig-nacio Carlos, Agustin Gepigon, Pablo Javier, N'icanor Wilson, Hugh A.

SURI GAO Al fon so, Victorio Arreza, Geminiano


878

CORNEJO'S COM.MONWEALTII DIRECTORY OF THE PHILIPPINES

RETIRED TEACHERS-(Continued)

Cagalawan, Mrs. Tomasa N. Darigay, Benito H. Elumba, Pilar lrisari, Sotero Manalang, Alejandro Santos, Bartolome Solatan, Alfredo Vjolon, Lucio TARLAC Aganon, Moises Aguas, Luciano Austria, Pedro Agustin, Gervacio Baiuyot, Isayas Baiuyot, Santiago Ealmores, Timoteo Bartolome, Leonides

Castaneda, Mrs. Julia S. Cura, Amando Dizon, I gnacio

Domingo, Perfecto M. Duque, Feliciano Evangelista, Arcadio

Flores. Eleuterio Flores, Troadio Gualberto, Catalina Guiang, Dionisio Guzman, Faustino de Ignacio, Manuel Lorenzana, Maximo l\'lafiago, Perfecto Mateo, Crisanto M.e ndoza, Cristobal Ch. NavaJ:To, Alejandro Ocampo, Venancio de Pagaia, Ignacio Paginag, Juan Palarca, Anastacio Pamintuan, Marcelo Pontanilla, Victor Reyes, Gegina Sagun, Juan Sanchez, Victoria Simeon, Segundo S ubaran, Rufino Timbol, Gonzalo Timbac, Basilio Tabago, Pablo Terso, Clemente Thalia, Sergio Umagat, Bernardo

Urbi, Jose Yusuico, Mrs. Bartola M. TAYABAS Abuel, Marcelino Alivia, Marcelo Almacen, Froilan Alpuerto, Hipolito Amarillo, Dalmacio Arceo, Alipio C. Armenta, Leon B. Camacho, CipTiano Caparros, Ramon M. Castro, Diego Capistrano, QuiI'ico A. Desembrana, Rustico Ferre, Gil Florido, Tomas U. Garcia, Antonio Gloria, Gertrudis S. Guia, Teodoro de Idea, Primitivo R. Jara, Iluminada Z. Jervina, Victorio L. Juvida, Cornelio Lafuente, Victor Luna, Pedro A. Martines, Felipe Masagunda, Pedro Nanes, Susano Oblefias, Eligio Oblefias, Victor Palacio, Mrs. Consolacion A . Para iso, Pablo Pellosa, Apolonio Perez, Antonio Pineda, Miguel Quejano, Filomena S. Qujzon, Julian Racell s, Rosa11o Rodriguez, Florentino R. Romey, Ramon ' Salvaleon, Ramon Sulit, Julio Tanairanca, V ictoriano Valencia, Timoteo Villasenor, Mrs. Fehcidad N . Yonzaga, Marciano LA UNION Alban, Maximino Asfiras, Pablo Padilla, Ceferino

Baradi, Cornelio Raradi, Rufo Borjoa, Fermin Caburian, Aquilino Caburian, Timoteo Calica, Catalino Collado, Fernando Hidalgo, Luis Costales, Juan B. Dacanay, Mrs. Florencia N. Difuntorum, Pedro Estolas, Venaneio Florendo, Cirilo Florendo, Federico Fontanilla, Agustin Gaerian, Francisco Garcia, Claudio Laigo, Federico Leon, Justo de Legunas, Felipe B. Lomtoy, Joaquin Lopez, Honorato Navarro, Pablo N iseo, Francisco N. Nuval, Antonio Nuval, I saac Octabiano, Sabas Orencia, Marcos Oriell, Eusebio Padua, Josefa Puzon, Gregorio Ramos, Alejandro Ronquillo, Juan Saluta, Daniel Sanchez, Epifanio Sanchez, Laureano Sanchez, Teodorico Sa nsano, Hilario Valmores, Leon Vereales, Constantino Villanueva, Teodoro Zarate, Enrica Zarate, Camilo ZAM.BALES Abil1e, Gregorio Buenaventura, Melanio Difioso, Vicente Difioso, Silverio Espano}, Venancio Estella, Epifanio Fallorina, Felix

Cornejo's commonwealth directory of the Philippines (Part 4 of 10)  
Cornejo's commonwealth directory of the Philippines (Part 4 of 10)