Georgetown View • January 2022

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ge o r ge t own v i ew WE BUILD COMMUNITY

JANUARY 2022

New Year, New Name IN THIS ISSUE Redistricting: Approving the County Maps | 18 Heroes Helping Heroes: Teaching in a Pandemic | 26 SPECIAL SECTION: Healthy Habits for a New You | 38 J A N UA RY 2 0 2 2  G E O R G E TO W N V I E W

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georgetownview

INSIDE

THRIVING AFTER 55

FAVORITES

FEATURES ALTERNATIVE HEALTH 11 Non-traditional solutions to your New Year resolutions GOVERNMENT Approving the County's re-districting maps

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EXPERIENCE GEORGETOWN 8 Wilco Leadership Prayer Breakfast HOMETOWN HEROES 16 Garey's Bunkhouse at Living Grace SHELTER STORIES 2021 Tails from the WCRAS

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EDUCATION 26 Teaching in a Pandemic

GEORGETOWN WORKS Renaming the airport

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WHAT MAKES TEXAS "TEXAS" 46 A Hollywood Destination

EVERYBODY HAS A STORY Meet Jake French

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WHY IS THIS A THING? Organic food

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AROUND TOWN The Stroll returns!

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FIT AT ANY AGE 50 Get a healthy and safe start on your way to wellness MEMORY CARE 54 Navigating travel as a caregiver

FOOD 56 Healthy and new for '22 HOME & GARDEN Winter preparedness

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POPPY TALKS Holiday bingo

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PARTING SHOT Sun City stepping up

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Visit our Facebook page for follow-ups to these stories, outtakes & hints to those upcoming... GeorgetownViewMagazine 2

J ANUARY 2022  GEO R GE TO W N V I EW

ON THE COVER

A view of the Georgetown Municipal Airport terminal and control tower, as seen from the tarmac. Photo courtesy City of Georgetown, April 2016


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georgetownview Published by Optimus Media Group, LLC PUBLISHER | Cathy Payne

cathy@georgetownview.com

Like many of the best in her craft, Cathy has a specialized degree—in her case, hard science— and a gift for writing. She found her voice and fulfilment reporting and writing news and magazine features for a regional Central Texas audience. Along with serving as the publisher of the Georgetown View, Cathy oversees multiple news magazines, marketing campaigns, and books.

EXECUTIVE EDITOR | Ann Marie Kennon annmarie@georgetownview.com With a quarter-century of writing, reporting, and marketing behind her, Ann Marie enjoys sharing her vision and voice with a Central Texas audience. She believes being involved in and writing about local communities is the best way to show her affection and appreciation of everything Texan.

SENIOR WRITER / EDITOR Charlotte Kovalchuk CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Linda A. Thornton • Ruby Moseley • Greta Bauer GRAPHICS & DESIGN Sandra Evans • Ann Marie Kennon CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Rudy Ximenez • David Valdez • Todd White SOCIAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Jenny Campbell ACCOUNT SERVICES Debbie Tolliver IT / WEBMASTER Jesse Payne CONSULTANT W. Ben Daniel

ADVERTISING Mark Elliott 512-240-2267 • 512-598-3500 mark@georgetownview.com

Georgetown View is an Optimus Media Group, LLC publication. Copyright © 2022 All rights reserved. Georgetown View is published monthly and individually mailed USPS, free of charge, to homes and businesses in Georgetown, TX zip codes. Mail may be sent to Georgetown View, P.O. Box 203, Jarrell, TX 76537.

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EDITOR'S NOTE | ANN MARIE KENNON Happy New Year! If you read or watch the news, it sometimes feels like not much is new, but we can still enjoy the collective sense that January 1 brings some kind of change and renewed hope to all of us. Our cover story is about a positive change in Georgetown and we're happy to share. As I am writing this, it is an 80-degree December day and I'm thankful again that I live in Texas. That's a good start. I suppose, while I generally eschew resolutions, there is a lot of content in this issue that impresses upon me that I could be a teensy bit healthier. Thankfully, Tammy Stewart and Heather Hanson have some baby-step suggestions that even I can't mess up. Much of this issue is about healthy things; food, exercise, nutrition, doctors and dentists, and more, but we are delighted to also share a few of the ways our readers can help and support our GISD teachers and staff. They continue—often unseen—to go above and beyond for our children and, while I love being an editor, I still occasionally nurse my childhood dream of being a bus driver. In between, we have a wrap-up of shelter successes, and news from Commissioners Court about redistricting. Plus, I know we are all superstorm veterans, but there are also some reminders about preparing for a harsh winter. And, however you may be celebrating or fretting about the new year, I’ll just leave this...Forget the former things; do not dwell on the past. See, I am doing a new thing! Now it springs up; do you not perceive it? I am making a way in the wilderness and streams in the wasteland. Isaiah 43:18-19

A visit to the Georgetown Airport tower during construction in 2016.


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experience georgetown

by Ann Marie Kennon

"The Informant" to Speak at 2022 Prayer Breakfast Mark Whitacre to Share His Journey • March 29, 2022 Mark is the highest-level executive to turn whistleblower in U.S. history. His undercover work with the FBI was the inspiration for the major motion picture, "The Informant," starring Matt Damon.

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t is a wonderful thing when a community comes together to encourage morality and godly ethics in our government, business and professional leaders, and our citizens.

Scan the code to watch the Discovery Channel documentary. Jerry's also shared his goal for Mark's visit: "I want people to come away knowing that everyone's life matters to God, and that He has a Plan for everyone's life." (Jeremiah 29:11)

In 2018, Sun City's Jerry Geiger (pictured) introduced the Mayors' Prayer Breakfast, now called the Williamson County Leadership Breakfast. He explains, "The Christian Business Men's Connection began holding Prayer Breakfasts in Oklahoma and has been expanding these events nationwide for 38 years. The Georgetown event is an outreach to our community and the leadership of Williamson County to share the gospel of Jesus Christ."

BE PART OF IT You can hear Mark's courageous tale of faith and perseverance Tuesday, March 29 at the Main Street Baptist Center (1001 S Main St.).

WHO SHOULD ATTEND Jerry encourages elected officials, agency leaders, and everyone in the community to attend the 2022 event, hosted by Round Rock Mayor, Craig Morgan. Various professions will be recognized; law enforcement, education, faith, and business. Speakers will examine ways in which their leadership contributes to and enriches the spiritual well-being of the people in their stewardship. He adds, "We want leaders to consider whether they are living up to the idea of servant leadership. Others

Keynote Speaker Mark Whitacre

are invited to live up to the direction their leaders provide and be models for service."

THE KEYNOTE Drawing from his unique history, Mark Whitacre will share how his life changed because he was introduced to Jesus Christ, and his growth as a Christian while he was in prison for nine years.

Chris Logue, chairman of the event says, “This third annual Williamson County event is one of the most meaningful community events held in Central Texas. We are eager to recruit sponsors to keep the event affordable for attendees." Chris invites individuals and businesses to take advantage of available table ($300) and corporate sponsorships ($700). Contact Chris at 512-635-8815 chris@chrislogue.com or Jerry at 404-803-0773 gag3@live.com

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alternative health by Ruby H. Moseley

Options* for Out-of-the-Box Health Seekers

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ometimes, health issues don't have simple answers. We usually go to a primary care physician with symptoms, then follow their advice and direction. But, where can we go for more solutions or help give us the relief that sometimes eludes us? That's where alternative medicine can be considered. Alternative medicine may be called non-traditional or non-conventional. Conventional is a more accurate term because some non-traditional therapies have been used traditionally by indigenous or ancient cultures for centuries. Alternative methods are also referred to as "complementary" or "integrative" because these therapies can be used in tandem with conventional treatments. There is much that conventional and non-conventional approaches can gain from each other.

CHIROPRACTIC A well-known approach to health is Chiropractic care, which involves adjusting the spine to bring the vertebrae back into normal alignment to relieve pressure or pain in attached nerves. Chiropractors ensure the muscles surrounding the joints are working properly and can also treat arthritic joint functioning. Recommended at any age, including newborns, total treatment can include spinal rejuvenation, cold laser therapy, decompression, and heat. These therapies may reduce nerve damage, improve vital functions of the

nervous system, and increase the ability to move without pain. Chiropractic care focuses on sciatica, neck and back pain, headaches, and carpal tunnel syndrome. Individuals who should not seek chiropractic care are those with osteoporosis, bone cancer, bone and marrow diseases, and those with broken bones.

ACUPUNCTURE Acupuncture, a component of traditional Chinese medicine, is becoming more accepted in Western culture. This ancient practice involves inserting fine needles into the skin where "energy points" and meridians regulate specific body functions. It is most commonly used to reduce pain, stimulate the nervous and immune systems, and improve overall health. It may ease digestive and sleep problems and allergies, increase energy, and help couples struggling with infertility. Recent scientific studies show acupuncture may even aid in language and memory retention in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's patients.

*The content in this article is for informational or educational purposes only, and does not substitute professional medical advice or consultations with healthcare professionals. J A N UA RY 2 0 2 2  G E O R G E TO W N V I E W

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alternat ive health aches and pains, and digestive issues. Most people mix a powder form in water or juice. Chlorella also comes in tablet form. JUICING fresh fruits and vegetables may yield similarly high levels of vitamins and minerals, but for high protein content, algae and kelp substances are the clear winners.

One 77-year old male patient compared his experience with conventional medicine and acupuncture as an alternative means to find relief of chronic leg pain caused by surgical scar tissue, which worsened at night. After one month's time in treatment he was delighted to note a positive change. "I didn't want another surgery, so I saw three different specialists over two years. They prescribed pain relievers, physical therapy, and even shoe inserts. It wasn't until I tried acupuncture that I had a drastic reduction in pain. Now I sleep pain-free all night." Few risks exist with acupuncture, but a patient may sometimes have some pain and/or bleeding at the insertion site. And there's an inherent risk of infection. Some patients report feeling drowsy after treatment. It's important to note that acupuncture isn't recommended for anyone with bleeding disorders.

Adding these foods to your diet may boost the immune system and lower cholesterol, lower the risk of heart problems and high blood pressure, and perhaps prevent cancers and diabetes. Chlorophyll is part of these green foods, which detoxifies the liver of heavy metal poisoning. The drink fills the stomach, reducing hunger, thereby helping with weight loss. One long-time BARLEY GRASS devotee explained how it helped her 84-year old mother whose doctor presumed she might live just a few more weeks due to malnutrition and lupus. "Mom looked so shriveled and fragile. Since she couldn't eat regular meals, I put a small amount under her tongue each day. Three weeks later, she could walk half a mile. She started volunteering because she had too much energy to stay home." Barley grass is not recommended for people with allergies to barley or grasses and can be risky for those with celiac disease or phenylketonuria.

SUPERFOODS The high vitamin and mineral content found in superfoods can help the body fight disease and improve wellness. When incorporated into a well-balanced diet, these foods can promote heart health, weight loss, improve energy levels and even reduce the effects of aging. Superfoods include barley grass, spirulina, and chlorella, which contain high concentrations of vitamins, minerals, enzymes, amino acids, and antioxidants, plus they are rich in non-animal protein. These are recommended for people with low energy, allergies, 12

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CRYOTHERAPY Cryotherapy is the modern take on the ice bath. Called the "icebox difference," the process involves exposing the whole body to nitrogen-cooled air for three to four minutes. Coaching and soft music help to cope with mild discomfort. Exposure to very low temperatures elevates the body's metabolism and immune sys-


alternative health NUTRITIONAL COUNSELING Nutritional counseling is a process by which a health professional with special training in nutrition helps people make healthy choices and form healthy habits. The goal of nutritional counseling is to help patients stay healthy, fight infections, and prevent the recurrence of disease. In Georgetown, N4H Research uses a unique approach that combines medical history, labs, dietary habits, and personal goals to provide holistic healthcare. Dr. Glen Luepnitz, who has a Ph.D. in Nutritional Counseling believes, in some cases, genetic (DNA) predispositions play an important role in the client’s plan of action. He is also a Diplomat in Pastoral Medical Counseling and says, "My goal is to educate patients, so they feel comfortable with their medical decisions. I address their concerns with nutritional advice, a personalized supplement protocol, and a full review of their medical history and recent lab results. Together we decide on a preventive care plan, which may include supplements, exercise, diet, and other options."

This type of therapy assists clients with many health concerns including, but not limited to, digestive issues, autoimmune diseases, mental health conditions, and inflammation. Specifically, Dr. Luepnitz also specializes in counseling cancer patients and athletes.

tem and increases energy, aiding weight loss. It addresses muscle and joint pain, arthritis, the healing of wounds such as post-surgical incisions. Mood improvements can stem from the release of endorphins and natural adrenaline. Because of a metabolic boost, improved blood flow can give the skin a younger appearance. The main risk is possible skin irritation. Pregnant women and people with heart problems, high blood pressure, or neuropathy shouldn't try cryotherapy.

STRETCH THERAPY The average person sits for anywhere between six to eight hours every day, which adds up over time. Stretch practitioners help clients with assisted, dynamic stretching exercises using straps and stabilized tables or surfaces. Just like gym trainers, stretching practitioners ensure every muscle and joint of the body is healthy, relaxed, free from pain and stress. Developed in 1999 by Jorden Gold, practitioner-assisted stretching re-establishes a per-

son's ideal resting muscle tone. Jorden was encouraged to switch from training to stretching by the results he saw in his professional athletes, and he developed a proprietary methodology and table. Stretch methods address muscle imbalances, joint stiffness, and sleep problems but also improve circulation and can also heal joint ailments like arthritis. Regular stretching may improve overall health by reducing stress and muscle tension and gradually increasing the range of motion in joints. It is also known to boost athletic performance significantly. The process begins with clients lying down on a cushioned stretching table, while a trained practitioner positions, stabilizes, and isolates muscles. Clients relax while the professional isolates problems and holds the poses. The risk with stretching is having it done by someone who is not trained correctly in dynamic stretching techniques. This approach is not recommended for those with osteoporosis or hypermobility (extreme flexibility).

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hometown heroes

by Charlotte Kovalchuk photos by JoAnn Reiter

Big House for Big Dogs New Bunkhouse Opens Doors at Living Grace Canine Ranch

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hirty dogs deemed unadoptable by shelters have found forever homes at Living Grace Canine Ranch, thanks to its brand-new Garey Big Dog Bunkhouse and the generous dog lover behind the project. After visiting Living Grace last March, local philanthropist Jack Garey answered the call to help Texas senior dogs by funding the organization’s second bunkhouse. Currently home to 65 residents, Living Grace is a 501(c)3 nonprofit sanctuary on a five-acre ranch in Bertram for senior dogs labeled unadoptable. On October 15, Jack and Living Grace founder/executive director Rhonda Minardi cut the ribbon on the bunkhouse, a 4,000-squarefoot building for 30 large dogs that live in individual apartments complete with doggie doors and patios. The facility features Mason's Place Wellness Clinic, volunteer-staffed by Dr. Ashley Brooks, as well as a concrete storm shelter and lounging areas for cuddling and homestyle relaxing. “I’ve had dogs all my life, and I really admire Rhonda for what she’s doing,” Jack says. “She’s taking on

a whole lot and giving 100 percent. She’s running a good ship and taking good care of the dogs. It was important to me to help support this vital resource in our community.” Rhonda is grateful for Jack’s heart for dogs and Living Grace’s life-saving mission. “Thanks to Mr. Garey’s generous donation, we can save the lives of more homeless Texas senior dogs by offering new beginnings. For us, it began as a question, then

a vision of what could be and now Living Grace Canine Ranch answering the howls of old dogs to give the love and care they so deserve. We will continue to strive to bring the community together to do better by graying muzzles and people,” she says. Scan the code to learn more about Living Grace.

Pictured: Living Grace Canine Ranch founder and executive director Rhonda Minardi, left, cuts the ribbon with philanthropist Jack Garey, Operations/Director Karen Marengi, and volunteers Amy Johnson and Virginia Mullen. 16

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government

by Ann Marie Kennon • annmarie@georgetownview.com maps courtesy Office of Rep. Terry Wilson

Approving the County Map

A

s the State approved its redistricting maps, Williamson County Commissioners Court was able to complete a new redistricting map for Justices of the Peace, Constables, and Commissioners precincts. Following state law, Counties are also required to review the new census data every ten years to ensure their populations are also evenly distributed. Precincts are drawn only according to civilian numbers, and do not take into account the number of registered voters in each. Precinct 3 Valerie Covey explained the changes in precinct assignments, “In the past decade, Williamson County’s growth (44%) has been predominately focused on the west side of the county. Precincts 2 and 3 were over the population target while Precincts 1 and 4 needed more residents to make them as even as possible."

STATE MATTERS Williamson County Republican Party Chair Steve Armbruster explained, “This process is always a very challenging time for the politicians. Normally, the census numbers are provided in the Spring and Commissioners have months to adjust to changes in population. This year, prior to the State vote, they had many data points 18

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but had to wait to see where the new State lines would be. With a lot of hard work, they were able to complete the work in just two weeks, and allowed a full week of public comment. At the end of the day, they met the deadline and the maps were done well.” County Judge Bill Gravell commented that public feedback was largely positive as well. “The public was encouraged to comment on the proposed map at Wilco. org; 102 people supported it, 24 opposed it, and 13 had questions. I am pleased to say, no elected officials were kidnapped or drawn out of their current precinct. I believe this process was incredibly fair, given the time constraints to complete the work.”

NEW BOUNDARIES Precinct lines at the county level may appear to be irregularly shaped. However, with an overlay of the four statewide maps, they are in close alignment with House, Senate, and Federal boundaries. All maps combine to ensure citizen counts are evenly distributed and in alignment with census blocks. Changes in Williamson County start with the U.S. Congress. While, previously, the county was wholly within Congressional District 31, it is now divided—in different


government THE 2020 U.S. CENSUS SHOWED THE COUNTY’S POPULATION TO BE 609,017. THE REQUIREMENT FOR REDISTRICTING IS TO ALLOCATE 25 PERCENT OF THE POPULATION IN EACH OF THE COUNTY’S FOUR PRECINCTS WITH THE SAME "IDEAL" TARGET OF 152,254, PLUS OR MINUS 5 PERCENT (7,613 PEOPLE). deal of acreage, but contain no voters. As well, Precinct 1, which includes parts of Round Rock and Austin, has more people in the new map than other precincts because it is largely built-out; i.e., without vacant land, clearly visible in other precincts, and not much room for future growth.

NEXT STEPS

measures—among four members of Congress. This means Williamson County will have four voices on the Hill rather than three. As well, having 100 percent of House District 20 will allow House Representative Wilson to prioritize Williamson County concerns at the State level. Steve adds, “Our current representatives are doing a great job at the Capitol, but if our residents can get two Senators and four Congressmen all working on the same issues for Central Texas, it will be easier for them to get concerns addressed and problems solved.” At the state level, there are two Senators and two State Board of Education representatives rather than one, again, doubling the county’s voice in their respective houses. Combined, these represent significant increase in legislative impact. Another important consideration, with so many new businesses expanding in or coming to Williamson County, is irregular voter precinct lines that must wrap around or between large commercial sites; e.g., Dell Diamond or 1890 Ranch Cedar Park, that occupy a great

Welcome to Georgetown! House District 20 Representative Terry Wilson has moved his residence from Burnet to Georgetown to enable him to serve the majority of his constituency in Williamson County. He said, "It is important to me because these citizens elected me six years ago as an outsider, and three times since. It is my duty to stay with the people who brought me here and have continued to vote for me." He also believes that Williamson County is the center of growth in Texas. "It is a growing area and shares my vision for the future of Texas, including CTE training, workforce

Having drawn precinct maps to line up with State lines, Commissioners are preparing to complete voter precinct maps and, again, prevent vagaries between the newly-approved boundaries. Williamson County will be adding approximately 40 new voter precincts and, to meet deadlines associated with the March 1, 2022, primary election, commissioners will approve changes to election precincts by end of year. Ballots for 2022 will be created based on voter residence as of January 1, 2022.

KEY TAKEAWAY While the process and changes may seem overwhelming, residents need not be concerned about researching new information. All registered voters will receive notification in the mail from the Williamson County Elections Department regarding changes in their voting districts and precincts. Steve says, “Everyone will receive a new voter registration card in the mail. I encourage everyone to pay close attention for new information; which are your representatives in Congress, Commissioners, etc., and drilling down to your Voter Precinct Representative.” Nothing has changed with regard to where people vote. All voters still have the opportunity to vote at any polling place in the county. ~Steve Armbruster development, and provides a real pathway for people to grow from 7th grade and graduate high school with a great job. It is something Williamson County is heavily invested in and I believe in it—this the home for the American dream." In addition to his personal and legislative goals, the Representative was asked to stay by many constituents and community leaders. Now in his fourth term, he has seniority in the House and, with 20 members retiring or running for other offices, he will be in the top half for House seniority. He has been chair of many committees and has a record of getting things done for Williamson County. He said, "I am confident that adjacent counties will be well represented and this is a great way to build and provide for regional delegation strength at the capital." J A N UA RY 2 0 2 2  G E O R G E TO W N V I E W

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shelter stories

contributed by April Peiffer photos courtesy WCRAS

2021 Tails from the WCRAS

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he Williamson County Regional Animal Shelter had another great year of life saving. Overall, the shelter took in almost 7,000 dogs, cats, parakeets, guinea pigs, lizards, rabbits, mice, hens, and roosters. Most of these were, of course, dogs and cats—2,819 and 3,872 respectively—taken in as of mid-December. Despite having to close for eight days in February, this year has been another filled with many successes. The positive outcomes—pets returned to their homes, adopted, or transferred to other agencies or areas of the country—are just as impressive. There were 1,426 dogs and 2,674 cats adopted into loving new homes, plus 825 pets were reunited with their families. Thanks to a new part-time employee spending much of her time posting to lost and found pet pages on social media, WCRAS celebrated an increase of almost 20 percent in reunions... that’s an awful lot of tail wags, slobbery kisses, purrs, and kitty biscuits happening all over Williamson County, Central Texas, and other parts of the state.

VOLUNTEER THANKS The off-site team, a group of volunteers helps tackle kitten season each year by coordinating the placement of the hundreds of kittens, plus cats, in need of homes into off-site partner stores for adoption. This task is a logistical feat that takes a lot of communication and organization. This year, so far, the off-site team has been responsible for 389 cats and kittens finding forever homes. WCRAS is also grateful to partner stores and their off-site cat adoption team for their dedication.

FOSTER FRIENDS The foster program is an essential ingredient to the shelter's life-saving mission. Fosters provide extra space to house dogs and cats who come to the shelter. Fosters, as individuals, step up and make it possible for us to continue to meet the needs of each and every animal when: the facility is over capacity puppies or kittens are on the way or in need of a safe place to grow and learn dogs or cats need to heal from an illness or injury. In 2021, the community took in an incredible 2,394 foster pets—even a duck and a lizard! Every year the community steps up to support the efforts of the WCRAS staff, volunteers, and fosters. Adoptions, donations, social media shares and comments, volunteering and fostering add up to another year of life-saving and an incredible 94 percent save rate. Scan the code to learn more about how you can help continue the mission in 2022.

Blu is January's dog of the month.

The transport program is just as vital to the dogs’ positive outcomes as off-site is to the cats. Many areas of the country have few adoptable dogs, so our donation-based transport program sends dogs to those areas for adoption. The program has been a huge success, helping 438 dogs begin exciting new adventures.

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A D V E R T O R I A L

Geared for the Biker Community Open Road Biker Church Welcomes All

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xcept for some leather jackets and a horse trough that serves as a baptismal, Open Road Biker Church, at its heart, is not that different from other churches. “Every church is made of broken people. We are no different,” Pastor Butch Horton says. Reaching out to the broken has been his goal since 2009, when the Baptist General Convention of Texas asked him to start a non-traditional church in the area. At the time, Butch had just finished serving as a youth pastor at Crestview Baptist Church and believed God was leading him to start a church for bikers like himself who might feel uncomfortable bringing their tattoos, leather jackets, and checkered pasts into a traditional house of worship. The first biker church in Georgetown, Open Road Biker Church began at a coffee shop, quickly outgrowing the spot and moving around town to the VFW Hall, Community Center, and library before settling at its current location off I-35. In the last 12 years, Butch has enjoyed seeing more than 400 people come to Christ, especially

Sunday Service 10am Wednesday Service 7pm Services live streamed on Facebook Ministries available for people of all ages, including guys’ steak nights and prayer breakfasts, quarterly events for children,youth, and women, as well as monthly rides for bikers.

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one biker he has never forgotten. After church one Sunday, Butch listened as the man shared his story. “He said, ‘You don’t understand. God will never forgive me for what I’ve done.’ ” Shortly afterwards, he became a Christian. “He felt at home,” Butch explains. That’s his goal for every person who walks through the church’s doors. “We always tell everybody, ‘Welcome home.’ Our goal is that people would come in and just feel like they can be themselves and not have to hide.” While bikers are welcome, Butch emphasizes that you do not have to be a biker to attend Open Road Biker Church. “We have business professionals from well-known companies and people from all walks of life attending our church. We invite everyone to discover whether non-traditional, relaxed, and family friendly might just be their kind of church."

8420 NORTH I-35 • 512-966-8817 • MYBIKERCHURCH.COM


by Charlotte Kovalchuk photos courtesy Jay Gantt

georgetown works

New Airport Name Honors Aviation Icon

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viation icon and soon-to-be namesake of the Georgetown airport, Johnny Gantt spent almost 50 years spearheading a thriving flight industry in Georgetown and putting the city on the aviation world map. Following Johnny’s death in 2019, cattle rancher and Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) Chair Jim Schwertner sought to honor his legacy by advocating for the renaming of Georgetown Municipal Airport to Georgetown Executive Airport at Johnny Gantt Field. The City Council backed the proposal and voted in November in favor of the name change before passing it to TxDOT for final approval. “It’s very deserving,” Johnny’s business partner Larry Wood says. “Johnny did so much here. He was such an aviation icon.” A plane ride in high school inspired Johnny’s pilot dream and led him to buy his first plane with the money he earned working nights at a cotton gin. At 19 years old, he became a civilian flight instructor at Gary Air Base in San Marcos, ultimately finding his way to Georgetown to

develop an industry that barely existed at the time—aircraft resale. He built two 20,000-square-foot hangars at the airport, at the city’s request, in an effort to turn the airport into a profitable business for Georgetown. He also co-founded the National Aircraft Resale Association, which has recently been re-marketed as the International Aircraft Dealers Association. Johnny became known as a trusted dealer of quality airplanes and received his lifetime achievement award in 2019. His business, Gantt Aviation, brought people from all over the world to Georgetown to buy aircrafts. “Georgetown became a place known around the world in aviation circles,” says Jay Gantt, Johnny’s son and president of Gantt Aviation.

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education by Ann Marie Kennon

Helping Schools in a Pandemic

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t’s been more than two years since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. In that time, two new school years have begun and the impact of the pandemic continues. The Georgetown View reached out to GISD to learn and share some of the ways our community can help and support the needs in our schools.

A NEW NORMAL In the past, the basics of a teacher's day might have included assembling and organizing the day's materials, instructing students during class time, grading papers and cleaning up the classroom after the bell, and preparing a lesson plan before going home. Today, even without the double duty of online learning, teachers and staff continue to juggle supplemental roles and responsibilities unforeseen in a pre-pandemic world. All over Texas, as pandemic conditions persist, teachers, principals, and staff are greeting students in the drop-off line, filling in as crossing guards and cafeteria attendants, or even staying late to provide custodial support, in addition to daily classroom sanitizing.

IN THE CLASSROOM While many in the district are graciously wearing multiple hats to help each other, GISD is calling for more substitutes to alleviate the burden on these pandemic heroes. Elizabeth McFarland, newly appointed president of the Board of Trustees, says, "The substitute shortage is an important factor in every school's daily operation. We discussed options and possible solutions at a recent workshop because we just don't have enough folks signed up to fill those classrooms."

Melinda Brasher, executive director for GISD Communications, said, "The need for more supplemental staff in Georgetown is not unique, but we are fortunate to be in a much better position than other ISDs where administrators are in the classrooms or canceling bus routes." Every district needs plenty of substitutes for sick days or when compliance obligations draw teachers out of the classroom for professional learning. This is required for all teachers to maintain their certifications. Instruction takes place during the school day because it is not reasonable to schedule outside of work hours or on weekends, but it does require teachers to be outside of their classrooms. Elizabeth says, "Simply put, everything can't come to a halt because of the pandemic. As a district, we value and facilitate professional learning for our teachers to be in compliance and improve and augment their skills. Without substitutes, teachers have to cover for each Elizabeth McFarland other and end up losing their free and planning periods as a result. It is hard to ask people to consistently manage these multiple duties."

W E A R E R E A L LY G R AT E F U L F O R T H E S U P P O R T W E H AV E B U T W E D O N E E D TO G E T P E O P L E O N B O A R D TO H E L P U S , S P E C I F I C A L LY S U B S T I T U T E S AND BUS DRIVERS. ~MELINDA BRASHER

SUB FOR US Serve GISD schools Meaningful and impactful way to meet people and help students Flexible schedule; choose the days you'd like to work

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Great variety of work and grade levels available


education Juan Martinez, Supervisor at Cooper Elementary, taking on crossing guard duty at Purl Elementary

No special qualifications are required—applicants must have a high school diploma and pass a background check with fingerprints. Assignments vary and start at $95 per day. "The beauty of substitute jobs," Melinda adds, "is that you can accept or deny a job based on your needs and schedule."

SUBSTITUTES Last year, to encourage more applicants, the district created the Sub For Us campaign and recruited college students who were learning online and had time on their hands. Melinda says, "This year, we are hoping to hear from retired people, former teachers, or stay-at-home moms who are looking for opportunities to spend the day and engage meaningfully with students. The job is very flexible and is a great opportunity to have a positive impact in our schools." Combining flexibility and the chance to make a difference in students' lives, substituting at GISD can be incredibly rewarding.

BUS DRIVERS Melinda says the district is also working around a shortage of bus drivers. "We have drivers doing double duty to keep the routes covered—some work an elementary school then drive over to the middle school. Historically, we have been fortunate to have people in Sun City willing to come out and spend time with kids. It fills their cup when they

The only requirement for drivers is a CDL license but the district will provide training and testing at no cost for those who wish to make the commitment. "We just need people who love kids." She adds that bus driver positions and other supplemental staffing are posted on the district's job board. (Scan below.)

STAFFING Another reason to support the district is the benefits package provided to all full-time employees. Melinda explains, "Drivers, custodians, and teachers alike all receive health benefits and are included in the Texas Retirement System (TRS). Our pension program and benefits make working for GISD a win-win. I often tell people they might get a few dollars more per hour working in retail these days but having your health care paid for is a huge benefit in every sense." Scan the code for all positions and career opportunities at Georgetown ISD.

photo credit: Georgetown ISD

YOU CAN HELP

That flexibility is the reason one elementary substitute loves her job, which allows her to be a stay-at-home mom while using her skills and earning money for the family. "I wanted to work a few times a week, but I get requests and calls every day and I don't want to let them down because the need is so great."

are far from their grandchildren, but many have stepped away for health reasons."

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by Charlotte Kovalchuk • photo courtesy Jake French

everybody has a story

Meet Jake French: City Council District 6

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hen the opportunity to run for City Council came up, Jake French thought of two things—his love for Georgetown and the chance to make a difference in the community he’s called home for the last 20 years. “[My wife] Allison and I are committed to doing what we can to promote the prosperity and welfare of our city and, after a lot of prayer and discussion, we decided this is the best opportunity we could think of to seek the welfare of the city we live in,” he says.

Councilman French says, "We are a unique town with small-town charm, which District 6 embodies more than any other district. I hope future generations will appreciate the 150-year-plus history of our town because, while Georgetown continues to grow, it will still be Georgetown. I want my kids to be excited to be a part of the continuous story of a wonderful Texas town with friendly people who value service, community, and having a good time with good friends in a beautiful place.”

A construction project manager, Councilman French vied for the District 6 seat alongside local business consultant Cheré Heintzmann in the November election after Rachael Jonrowe’s resignation. Helping shape Georgetown’s growth is natural for Councilman French, who got his start in the construction field during college by building houses in the area for a local developer. Later working for Embree Group and now DPR Construction, he believes the leadership skills he has acquired will transfer well to being on the council—representative, collaborative, organized, and detail-oriented.

ON THE DAIS Just one month into his two-year term, Councilman French has been focusing on improving traffic infrastructure, especially when it comes to pedestrian safety. He is pushing for additional sidewalks, crosswalks, and a downtown parking structure. Ultimately, he hopes his time on the council will help future generations enjoy Georgetown the way he has for the last 20 years, and that Georgetown will manage its tremendous growth wisely and responsibly while maintaining its essential character.

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around town

by Charlotte Kovalchuk

Telling and Preserving Stories Library Award Empowers New Community Programs

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wo women at the Georgetown Public Library are carrying on former Library Director Eric Lashley’s innovative legacy—one via a program focused on telling stories and another on preserving them. With the goal of encouraging innovative project ideas from library staff members, the Friends of the Georgetown Public Library presented the inaugural Eric Lashley Trailblazer Award along with $1,000 to Margaret Lange (at right with Eric Lashley) and Joyce May to kickstart their Sensory Storytime and History Harvest programs.

PRESERVING STORIES Through History Harvest workshops, the library hopes to preserve the often-overlooked stories of Georgetown’s historic black and Hispanic Track-Ridge-Grasshopper and San Jose neighborhoods. The project would be patterned partly after the successful Archivist in a Backpack project launched at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and aims to empower these neighbors to record and preserve their own histories for future generations. The program will offer two types of kits— an oral history kit with a digital sound recorder and a digital scanner kit featuring a scanner to digitize items like family photos and memorabilia. A love of history and missed opportunities to record her own family stories inspired Adult Services Member Joyce May to create the History Harvest workshops. “As Georgetown changes and grows, it’s important to have voices heard and history kept alive,” she says.

TELLING STORIES After noticing some children found storytime overwhelming at the library she previously worked at, Margaret launched Sensory Storytime, a program that has continued its inclusive mission at the Georgetown Public Library. “I’ve had family members on the autism spectrum. These are programs we love to have seen when they were storytime age, so the fact that I’m able to make them happen here is very fulfilling,” the teen services librarian says. “We’re going to be an even more welcoming library than we already were.” Children with sensory processing disorders often find the traditional storytime environment stressful because of the many participants, more informal structure, and higher levels of noise and light. During Sensory Storytime, young library patrons can enjoy an environment tailored to their needs, with fidget toys, reduced lighting and noise, a limited number of participants, and a consistent visual schedule to ensure predictability for kids who get distressed by small changes. A time of free play will be offered at the end of the event, which Margaret says is essential for developing interpersonal skills with other kids. To learn more about Sensory Storytime and the History Harvest workshops, visit library.georgetown. org.

The Georgetown Public Library has become more than just a place to check out books. It’s now a community hub, with everything from programs for all ages to author talks and art exhibits. One of the ways the library serves the community is through Second-Hand Prose, a volunteer-run used bookstore operated by the Friends of the Library that functions as a major fundraiser for the library. Volunteers dedicate their time every month to manage the store, provide on-call assistance, and sort shelves. For many, the bookstore is a much-needed literary oasis during COVID. “During the past year and a half, it was pretty tough for some people who felt so isolated,” Manager Terrie Hahn says. “You should have seen the smiles on people's faces when they could come to SHP again and browse for those special books and actually have in-person conversations with other people!” Learn more about Second-Hand Prose at folgeorgetown.org/shp.

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why is this a thing?

by Ann Marie Kennon • annmarie@georgetownview.com

Organic Food

Benefits • Where to Find It

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he term “organic” refers to the way agricultural products are grown and processed. In the United States, the law requires produce to be grown and harvested without pesticides, synthetic fertilizers, or genetically modified organisms. Organic livestock bred for meat, eggs, and dairy products are raised in living conditions accommodating their natural behaviors (e.g., grazing on pasture) and fed organic feed and forage. Farmers and ranchers may not administer antibiotics, growth hormones, or any animal by-products. Research has concluded, for most products, there is no significant difference in the nutrition between conventional and organic food.1 A 2016 European study did show levels of certain nutrients, including omega-3 fatty acids, were up to 50 percent higher in organic meat and milk than in conventionally raised versions. It follows, for the most part, the goodness is not what is in the food but what is not. Organic produce does not have preservatives so it is sold fresher, often from nearby farms to guarantee viability. Experts recommend researching and buying in season; products are cheapest and freshest when they are at peak ripeness. All farming, by necessity, incorporates pesticides. The difference, for organic produce, is the pesticides' origin—organic pesticides are derived from natural sources. These natural sources are usually plants, as is the case with pyrethrum (pyrethins), rotenone or ryania (botanical insecticides), or minerals, such as boric acid, cryolite, or diatomaceous earth.

1 Mayo Clinic 2 wwmedgroup.com 3 Environmental Working Group

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Studies have shown a primarily organic diet may provide the following benefits. It gives children a lower risk of eczema and allergies. For all ages, higher levels of antioxidants found in certain organic foods can help strengthen immune systems and contribute to better overall health. The reduction in the amount of pesticides in organic foods may also be good for healthier, clearer skin.2

WHERE TO BUY Visit The Wilco Farmers Market at the Georgetown Library Parking Lot (corner of 8th & Martin Luther King, Jr. St.) Thursdays 10am–2pm, and in Sun City (2 Texas Drive) Tuesdays 9am–12noon. The Wolf Ranch Farmers Market is every Saturday, 9am–1pm in the parking lot of the Wolf Ranch Shopping Center. The Round Rock Farmers Market, Saturdays 10am2pm year round at 201 University Oaks Blvd, behind Ikea. Natural Grocers, 301 W University Ave, Georgetown, open 9am-9pm Mon-Sat and 9am-7:35pm on Sundays. These fruits and vegetables have the highest pesticide levels3, so are best to buy organic: � Apples

� Celery

� Cucumbers

� Potatoes

� Grapes

� Kale/Collard Greens

� Spinach

� Peaches

� Cherry Tomatoes

� Strawberries � Hot Peppers � Summer Squash � Sweet Bell Peppers

� Nectarines (imported)


Martin Luther King, Jr. The Martin Luther King Jr. holiday on Jan. 17, 2022, marks the 37th annual national celebration of his life and legacy. We may not be able to gather or have parades but this day is considered, by many, to be “a day on, not a day off.” MLK Day is the only federal holiday designated as a national day of service to encourage all Americans to volunteer to improve their communities. So, if you’re looking for a unique way to help in Georgetown... United Way of Williamson County unites people and organizations throughout Williamson County to build stronger communities and improve lives. Multiple projects for all age groups, Jan. 17, 9am-Noon. Email: jordan.gutierrez-ramirez@uwatx.org Project Linus has many chapters across the United States. Their mission is to provide love, a sense of security, warmth and comfort to childr0en who are seriously ill, traumatized, or otherwise in need through the gifts of new, handmade blankets and afghans, lovingly created by volunteer "blanketeers." CentexProjectLinus. wixsite.com The NEST Empowerment Center is a safe haven after the bell rings that offers basic needs, counseling, academic and enrichment support for GISD high school students who are homeless, at-risk or living in transition. Bebe Johnson, Center Coordinator, is at the NEST 3-7pm Mon–Thurs. 512-819-4200. There are many websites with opportunity searches to find just the right service project for your skills and interests. NationalService.gov VolunteerMatch.org CatchAFire.org JustServe.org MakeUseOf.com

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The Christmas Stroll Returns!  Mayor Josh

Schroeder, Chief Cory Tchida, and Chief

John Sullivan led the parade.

East View Marching Band 

 Lily (6), Willa (6), and Skylar (6)

Georgetown

Lacrosse 

 Georgetown HS Show Choir

 The

Grinch riding with Foy's

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Sun City Georgettes 


Georgettes Avery (12th) and Kamdyn (9th)

 "Benny" Claws

Bethlehem Village Centurions Clark Underwood and Tod Alderman 

 Miss Central Texas, Gracie Anderson

Ladda van an d Natha n Spen cer 

Santa arrives with Celtic Viking Studios

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H E A LT H Y H A B I T S

Master Your Wellness with a Health Coach

Y

ou have a financial planner, a personal assistant, and even a personal trainer but, if your goal is "quality of life," do you have a health coach yet?

SOLUTIONS How often have you been to doctor after doctor with concerns about general symptoms? You explain you're not sick but are experiencing stress, fatigue, or digestion difficulties, which might point to any one of a host of health concerns. Now, Flourish Nutritional Therapy & Health Coaching may have answers. Owner Heather Hanson is a local Nutritional Therapist and Health Coach working to get to the root cause of those symptoms. As an RMA, who has also been let down by traditional medicine, Heather is eager to help clients figure out the reason for their diminished quality of life, then create a plan of action. "I love empowering people to take back their health," she says. "As a nurse, I saw people in their 30s blaming their lack of wellness on getting old. Those things are not normal at that age and I was frustrated to see them given a bunch of medicine and still not feel well."

" H U M A N S A R E N OT MEDICINED E F I C I E N T. W E D O N ' T N E E D TO B E ON SO MANY PHARMACEUTICALS TO B E H E A LT H Y." Heather's process begins with a free 15-minute evaluation. "I get a full history, literally," she says. "I ask about a client's life since birth and pull clues together to see what might have gone awry, and when, in his or her health life. Then we figure out what we need to do, together, to be well."

GETTING BACK TO WELLNESS Heather's methods focus on teaching clients the magic—how to eat and exercise, restore digestion absorption, reduce the impact of stress, and increase things that make the body work effectively, like sleep, exercise, and hydration. "The human body is complicated, so I determine what is going on for each client, what he or she needs to become well, and create a plan based on that need." She acknowledges and understands that not everyone is ready for immense change; "It's not about

"I want to connect with people, create a plan for healing, and give them hope." never having chocolate cake again. We can take baby steps because each plan must be something the client will sustain long-term." She also believes strongly in holistic gut health and provides advanced testing for mold exposure, stool sampling (to study metabolism and microbe balance), and food sensitivity.

TRANSFORMATION Heather typically works with clients from three months to one year, and makes herself available to them as often as they feel comfortable. "I get my clients on a good roll and help as much as they need to figure out their plans. I understand the frustration of people who are not feeling well, and I always provide the care I, too, wish I could get at the doctor's office."

NUTRITIONAL THERAPY & HEALTH COACHING CALL, TEXT, OR EMAIL 512-762-4033 • HeatherHansonNutrition@gmail.com Appointments in Georgetown, or via Zoom 38

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t RR Dentistry, you’re one of the family. “It’s not a dental clinic with the sliding glass door where people don’t know your name,” Dr. Ryan Roberson says. “We treat everyone as a whole human being, and even call our waiting room a ‘Receiving Room’ because we would never make our family wait to see us. Our objective is to see our patients at their reserved appointment time,” says Dr. Roberson. “Treat everyone like family” was Dr. Bart Smith’s motto when he opened the practice in 1997. He was originally drawn to Georgetown’s small-town feel, but stayed thanks to parallel growth of the city and his practice. Others have since joined him in his mission to provide holistic, compassionate care, including current owners Dr. Ryan Roberson and Dr. Cory Roach, and Dr. Chad Abrams, who came on board in July.

THE DIFFERENCE RR Dentistry combines a state-of-the-art dental office with Texas hospitality. Doctors and staff provide a warm welcome to patients, cutting-edge technology, and ever-improving dental expertise in the evolving areas of health care. Their approach is proactive and holistic, going beyond just solving problems in a patient’s mouth to improving overall health and staying ahead of the problems. “We don’t want to do Band-Aid fixes,” Dr. Roach says. “If we can get to the root of the problem and keep your mouth healthy and well, you’ll have a healthier and happier life.” Dr. Roberson adds, “The mouth and surrounding structures are a doorway to the body where food, liquids, and air are responsible for sustaining and optimizing a healthy life. There is a huge correlation to the structure and function of the mouth and jaws to overall health, quality sleep, and optimal nutrition, which directly impact one's life and how we experience life on a daily basis."

SERVICES Full spectrum of general and cosmetic dentistry, orthodontic treatment, and periodontal care Implant restorations to replace teeth CEREC-same day crowns Air abrasion and laser dentistry, a less-invasive alternative to drilling cavities Cone beam 3D imaging, which identifies pain at the source and provides vital information for root canals, extractions, dental implants, and airway management Dental microscopy; care with a microscope Laser therapy, used in oral care, gum disease, tooth repair, air way health, and pain relieving treatments Dental sleep medicine treatment options that use a variety of oral appliances and laser therapies to treat snoring and sleep apnea When it comes to the future of RR Dentistry, Dr. Roach says, “We’re growing as Georgetown is growing.” To meet demand, RR Dentistry is building a new office that will allow for more comfort and conveniences for patients, earlier scheduling, and more patient openings. It will also provide room for additional technology and advancements as they come along. Dr. Roach says, “We want to keep serving the people of Georgetown and deliver an exceptional experience, which has been the expected outcome for the last 25 years.”

RRDentistry.com 512-869-5997 3006 Dawn Drive

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H E A LT H Y H A B I T S

RR Dentistry Carries on Legacy of Small-town Care


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H E A LT H Y H A B I T S

Fix the Cell to Get Well Health for a Purpose Promotes Healing with Cellular Detox

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ammy Stewart has seen many stories of healing thanks to cellular detox, a holistic treatment that targets the root cause of an illness instead of just the symptoms. “At the cellular level, toxins cause inflammation; the leading cause of 90 percent of degenerative conditions,” she says. “We go to a doctor and the only tools are drugs or surgery, which typically do not remove the cause of the problem.” Tammy became frustrated when her family began having health problems and their doctor simply prescribed pills. She embarked on a healing quest and discovered cellular detox, which removes toxins from cells through a cellular healing diet, exercise, elimination of household toxins, and safe, effective removal

of toxins that have been held in the cells since conception. When Tammy uncovered hidden health culprits her family's need soon turned into a calling. “I could have said ‘I’m done. I fixed my family,’ but I really just believed God called me to share that with other people.” She is part of Dr. Dan Pompa's Health Centers of the Future platinum group of practitioners and adheres to his slogan, “Fix the cell to get well.” Tammy says, “We believe God designed the body to heal. When the interference of toxicity and poor nutrition is removed and you give the body what it needs, you can achieve true cellular health.” Health for a Purpose teaches clients all over the world how to detoxify through self-guided programs and custom coaching to address

chronic illnesses. Tammy’s office offers a stem cell machine for pain reduction and improved blood supply as well as a hyperbaric oxygen therapy treatment, among other on-site therapies. While other natural health practitioners also focus on root causes of a problem, Health for a Purpose goes a step further. “Very rarely do you find one who asks, ‘Is there mold in your house? Is there lead in your body?’ A lot of them are getting into cell inflammation but not going all the way upstream to see what toxin is causing that inflammation. We go all the way upstream and remove the cause,” Tammy says.

HealthForAPurpose.com 817-488-7488 INFO@HEALTHFORAPURPOSE.COM

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WHAT MAKES TEXAS

A HOLLYWOOD DESTINATION

“TEXAS”? by Ann Marie Kennon

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exans won't deny the #1 and #2 ranking that California and New York hold as the states with the most television and movie projects; that's where most of the movie companies live, after all. Fortunately for Texans, our state ranks number three and we don't live in either of those other states. As of 2018, when data was compiled from the Internet Movie Database (IMDB.com), Texas has been the setting for 8,164 movies and shows filmed. Within Texas, the most filmed cities were Austin (2,257), Dallas (1,537), Houston (1,279), San Antonio (564), Fort Worth (331), Arlington (179), El Paso (177), Denton (137), Corpus Christi (97), and Plano (85). 46

WELCOME TO TEXAS On the business side, there are more than 160 Film Friendly Certified communities in Texas and the Governor's Film Friendly Texas program is working to add more. The program involves certification and marketing by the Texas Film Commission. Communities in the program receive training and guidance about media industry standards, best practices and how to effectively accommodate media production in their cities and communities. It is a valuable resource that helps maintain Texas as a premier destination for media production. Close to home, Williamson County has eight certified communities.


For the creatives, nothing compares to the history and romance that sets Texas apart in many ways, and none more so than in entertainment. The distinctive scenery and landscapes, colorful history, and unique character of Texans themselves have provided plenty of inspiration and content for filmmakers. More than a setting for classic westerns, Texas provides a full spectrum of angstfilled teens, big city business, and quirky folks who make Texas so "Texas" all over the world.

MOVIES YOU KNOW... Texas Chainsaw Massacre: Filmed in Round Rock, Bastrop, and Leander. The owners of the film's gas station in Bastrop held a grand reopening in 2016. There are four creepy little cabins on the property so fans can spend a night. There's a sign out front that says, "We Slaughter Barbecue." Pee Wee's Big Adventure: Hopefully people aren't still looking for his bike in the basement of the Alamo. Urban Cowboy started the modern wave of cowboy fashion and made Gilley's famous nationwide. Dazed and Confused: Matthew McConaughey's breakout hit. (Alright, alright, alright!) Lonesome Dove, The Last Picture Show, Hud; all based on books by Larry McMurtry. Blood Simple, a Coen brothers' thriller about a jealous husband, filmed in Pflugerville and Hutto. Office Space. The Initech Office is real, but goes by a different name; filmed in Austin at 4120 Freidrich Lane.

Texas on film TOWNS AROUND While you may not recognize Georgetown in every movie and TV show, our city has 60 entries in the database, from major motion pictures to shorts. Popular projects include the iconic "Friday Night Lights" television show and, in film, "What's Eating Gilbert Grape?", "Johnny B. Goode," and "Varsity Blues." While not in Texas' top ten, it's worth mentioning that "Bernie," starring Matthew McConaughey, was filmed here and also featured his mom, Kay, a resident of Sun City. "Temple Grandin" was filmed in Schwertner and Temple herself helped redesign the facility at the ranch where filming took place. Hutto has been featured on film 20 times, and just recently wrapped initial filming for a new Nicole Kidman project. Known for its late 19th- and early 20th-century architecture, Bartlett was the site for the filming of movies including "The Stars Fell on Henrietta" and "The Newton Boys," as well as two seasons of the NBC television drama "Revolution." Last February, Round Rock had to close a few roads while "Fear the Walking Dead" filmed part of season 4. Take a trip down memory lane with the Texas Classics Film Trail, highlighting 25 film destinations from some of Texas' most iconic projects.

Erik Bernard (center in red) prepares for a scene at the Georgetown Square in 2020. David Yusel Madison (far right) stars as Jack in "The Place We Hide."

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Thriving AFTER 55

WORKING OUT

TRAVELING

Fitness is for any age Page 50

Trips for travel as a caregiver Page 54

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Fitness is for Any Age

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s we age, our mission is to use sound scientific evidence to build effective counter strategies, not only to survive, but to thrive. Theo Thurston, 69, began training with weights when he was 48, and is committed to helping others learn about resistance training, intensity levels, and quality of life maintenance.

GETTING STARTED For those looking at the new year as an opportunity for a new lifestyle, Theo recommends a good first step is to find a personal trainer. "It is important to research your trainer and don't consider the trainer's age but how much he or she knows about training people your age. Your trainer should also be sure to build in a 2-3 week build-up period, that is age appropriate, to avoid injury." As part of the slow start, walking is an excellent way to go from sedentary to building cardio endurance. He adds, "If you haven't exercised for a long time, or perhaps your lungs are scarred from COVID, you must start very slowly and get your lungs full of air. Brisk or hill walking will help, and it is a good idea to fill our lungs deeply any time, even when not exercising."

Theo and fellow trainers at GetAgeFit in Georgetown

"Don't beat yourself up and eat nothing but salad. Starving our bodies means losing muscle mass, which lowers metabolism and sabotages your efforts. Protein gets more important as we age so have it at every meal; lean meat, cottage cheese, plant or whey powders, or Greek yogurt will help build and maintain muscle mass." Carbs are essential to good health and energy, but only as much as the body needs for movement. Theo says a little bread is acceptable but try to incorporate sweet or white potatoes, oatmeal, and brown or white rice where possible.

THE WORKOUT PRIORITIES While some may be tempted to recover from holiday eating by extreme dieting, Theo says, "God gave us marvelous variety in our food and it is important to maintain balance.

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For best results, and a good rule of thumb, is to begin with some form of light resistance training. Theo says, "Most people think the goal is use heavier weights. I train people to use light weights and slow the pace of their reps. What really builds muscle is time under

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tension. When you lift and lower a weight slowly, your body is working longer and not harder. It is also kinder to your joints and ligaments."

KEY TAKEAWAY "Get the trainer" is his best advice. "Getting fit sounds great but if you don't do it, it won't get done." Theo says trainers require exercise appointments to hold people accountable to their goals. If a trainer is not in the budget, making a personal schedule to set aside the time in the day may help maintain accountability for those exercising on their own. "More than anything," he adds, "make sure your plan is sustainable. If you know you will get tired of swimming in a few weeks, don't build that into your plan. This is a lifestyle change that, ideally, you will enjoy and continue. If you want quality of life, you need muscles, and if you want muscles, you have to work out."


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by Ann Marie Kennon

Navigating Travel and Memory Care

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here are more than 400,000 Texans living with Alzheimer’s disease. Additionally, more than one million family members and friends are serving as caregivers. As pandemic conditions continue to shift and change, travel is becoming possible in varying degrees. The Alzheimer's Association suggests, while the symptoms of this progressive brain disease can sometimes make travel more difficult, it doesn’t mean families can’t travel with a loved one. Theirs and other experts have collected some tips to ensure a safe and smooth trip when traveling with a person with dementia. Stick with the familiar. Travel to known destinations. Try to visit places that are familiar to the person with Alzheimer’s. Be prepared. Create an itinerary that includes details. Give copies to family members or friends. Keep a copy with you. Pick the right time. Travel during the time of day that is best for the person. For example, if he or she becomes tired or more agitated in the late afternoon, avoid traveling at this time. Learn to recognize the warning signs of anxiety and agitation and identify strategies to reduce them. Discuss this plan with the person living with dementia. Try not to overload the person with a lot of directions or too much information. Consider everyone’s needs and desires as you plan your trip; elaborate sightseeing trips or complicated tours may cause anxiety and confusion.

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Allow for plenty of downtime. Overscheduling can lead to overstimulation and agitation. Prepare friends or family members for the visit by explaining dementia and any changes it has caused. Go over any special needs and explain that the visit could be short or that you may need to change activities on short notice. It may be helpful to stay as close to your normal routine as possible. For example, keep meal and bed times on a similar schedule to that followed at home. Eating in may be a better choice than at a crowded restaurant. Don’t find logic. Your loved one has already lost some sense of judgment and reasoning, so you should not try to be logical with them. Correcting every single instance may trigger agitation or also lower self-esteem. It is best to agree to an illogical explanation rather than correct frequently. Best of all... if your loved one gets nervous or anxious about being out of the house, try holding his or her hand! Holding the hand of someone you love is proven to relieve stress and reduce pain.


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food

Healthy and New for '22 SHEET-PAN CHICKEN CURRY DINNER The month of New Year’s resolutions is officially here!

• 2 lbs sweet potato, peeled and cubed

DIRECTIONS

• 2 cups fresh cauliflowerets

Preheat oven to 425°. Line a 15"x10"x1" baking pan with heavy duty foil. Place sweet potatoes, cauliflower, onion and garlic on prepared pan. Drizzle with oil; sprinkle with 1 teaspoon curry powder, 3/4 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon lemon pepper; toss to coat.

We can certainly plan

• 1 large onion, chopped

healthy meals any time, but

• 3 garlic cloves, minced

for those who want to start

• 2 tablespoons olive oil

the new year with few new

• 2 teaspoons curry powder, divided

habits, here is a sprinkling

• 1-1/4 teaspoons salt, divided

of healthy dishes that are also hearty enough for a Texas appetite.

• 1 teaspoon lemon-pepper seasoning, divided • 6 bone-in chicken thighs (about 2-1/4 lbs), skin removed • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika • 1/4 cup chicken broth

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Arrange chicken over vegetables. In a small bowl, mix paprika and remaining 1 teaspoon curry powder, 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon lemon pepper; sprinkle over chicken. Roast until vegetables are almost tender, 30-35 minutes. Drizzle with broth; bake until thermometer inserted in chicken reads 170°-175° and vegetables are tender, 7-10 minutes longer.


food TEX-MEX POTATO SALAD • • 2 medium ears sweet corn • 1 large sweet red pepper • 2 pounds small red potatoes • 1 med ripe avocado, peeled/cubed • 1 cup grape tomatoes, halved • 2 green onions, cut into 1/2-inch slices • 1/4 cup reduced-fat sour cream or fat-free plain Greek yogurt • 1/4 cup reduced-fat mayonnaise • 1/4 cup salsa • 2 tablespoons lime juice • 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar • 2 teaspoons chopped pickled jalapeno slices • 1/2 teaspoon salt • 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder • 1/4 teaspoon onion powder • 1/4 teaspoon ground cumin • 1/4 teaspoon pepper • Dash cayenne pepper

DIANNA ACKERLEY, CIBOLO, TEXAS

DIRECTIONS Preheat oven to 400°. Place corn and red pepper on a greased baking sheet. Roast until lightly charred, 20-25 minutes, turning once. Let cool. Peel off and discard skin from pepper. Remove stem and seeds. Cut pepper into 1/2-in. pieces. Cut corn from cobs; set aside. Place potatoes in a large saucepan; add water to cover. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cook, uncovered, until tender, 1012 minutes. Drain and cool. Cut potatoes in half; place in a large bowl. Add sliced red pepper, corn, avocado, tomatoes and green onions. Place sour cream, mayonnaise, salsa, lime juice, vinegar, jalapenos and spices in a blender. Cover and process until blended. Pour over potato mixture; toss to coat. Refrigerate, covered, until chilled. Serve with cilantro.

• Fresh cilantro leaves

image: TasteOfHome.com

BEETROOT CHOCOLATE CAKE •

EMMA BROOME

Beetroot adds sweetness and keeps cake moist.

ground almonds, and melted chocolate. Mix together.

• 1 c raw beetroot

Separate eggs, stirring yolks into beetroot mixture and placing the whites in a large mixing bowl.

• 4 medium eggs • 1/4 c white sugar

Use electric whisk on the egg whites until they form stiff peaks.

• 1/4 c ground almonds • 2 tbsp cocoa powder • 1/4 c plain chocolate (melted)

DIRECTIONS Pre-heat oven to 350°F. Grease 8" springform cake tin. Top and tail beetroot; peel and cut into quarters. Place into a food processor and blend until coarse. Transfer blended beetroot to a mixing bowl and add sugar,

Add 1/4 egg whites to beetroot mix and gently fold in, to loosen the mixture. Add remainder of the egg whites in the same manner. Transfer the mix into the prepared cake tin and bake for 40 minutes, testing with a skewer to ensure that it comes out clean. Remove from cake tin and cool.

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home & garden

W I N T E R P RE PA REDNE S S T I P S Williamson County wants residents to be prepared for any severe weather that comes to Central Texas this winter. Departments are already planning and preparing for the possibility of ice and snow and now is also the time for residents to be prepared for severe weather. Following are some tips from our local experts.

FROM WILLIAMSON COUNTY ROAD AND BRIDGE Have materials handy to create traction on walkways. This includes sandbox sand, kitty litter, sawdust, or salt. Have the proper equipment. You will want an ice scraper for car windows and a shovel to spread material for traction. Keep your gas tanks filled. If road conditions are icy or dangerous, stay at home.

FROM EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT Scan the code to sign up for emergency alerts. Make a plan. Visit wilco.org/Departments/Emergency-Management for details on how to make a plan and build a kit with essential supplies like food, water and medicine for seven days. Include your pets in your plan as well. Protect your vehicle. Catch up on any needed maintenance now. Have an emergency kit for your car with jumper cables, flashlight, ice scraper for windows, blanket, bottled water and snacks. If you own a business, check your insurance coverage. Establish an emergency communications plan for employees.

FROM EMS If you use oxygen, are on dialysis, or take medications crucial to survival, have a plan to ensure an adequate supply for seven days. Stay off the roads if possible during inclement weather. Avoid walking on ice where you can slip and fall. Best to stay inside. Avoid carbon monoxide poisoning. Anything that uses fire to make heat in your home without proper ventilation replaces the oxygen in your body with deadly carbon monoxide. Only use generators and grills outdoors and away from windows. Never heat your home with a gas stovetop or oven. The early signs of carbon monoxide poisoning are headache, dizziness, and nausea.

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poppy talks

Holiday Bingo I

love the holidays. It’s a chance to stockpile things to keep my “ideas for Poppy column” notebook full. By that, I mean… family is here. Yippie-ki-yay! I love my family. I even love my family that are not my own people. Family is my favorite thing about Christmas and New Year. If I had a lot of money and a B&B in my backyard, I would probably love them even more. I don’t mind at all that I haven’t been able to do my own laundry for near’bout a week. BUT—there is never enough time to channel my inner Aunt Bea when someone asks, for the tenth time, “Are you going to let your son eat/watch/play/do that?” Why is it that relatives who eat healthy offer to cook whatever weird food they like, full of spices I've never heard of, and vegetables with hair, and insist I'll enjoy it “because it’s good for me”. So I’ll eat the veggie burgers and candied asparagus because I’m polite. And fortunately, January means no more brunches, lunches, dinners, parties, cookie exchanges, and, in my case, a visit from Insulin Claus, so I can go back to my bacon covered tater-tot waffles. Let's not forget the people who want to get up at 6am on a holiday to run a 5K. These are people you need to know about before you marry into them; a no-funrun pre-nup! I can’t remember the last time I Googled restaurants, job sites, or retail stores, that I didn’t include “within 10 miles” in the filter. I won’t even drive 26.2 miles. In any case, this year I decided to play "Family Bingo" with my favorite brother to make things more interesting. Here are some ideas if you are looking forward to the quiet of January, and the long dark days until Texas assumes my preferred surface-of-the-sun weather. Get yourself a 5x5 grid and add all the things you are most likely to experience—funny or annoying—when your family is gathered. The person with the most bingos doesn't have to host the holidays next year. It's only fair, right?

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Some of these classics will require a dabber at my house, and perhaps yours as well. "Are you going to let your son eat/watch/play/do that?" (I mention twice because it gets a full row of squares.) "Did I tell you how much is in my 401K?" Family member starting home business, brings samples, and/or needs "associates." "Whatever happened to [name of person you broke up with]?" "Your hair has gotten a lot grayer since I saw you last." Argument from ten years ago re-starts during meal or board game. "Have you lost/gained weight?" "You still haven't found a job?" Argument about masks and/or vaccine status. "Haven't you had enough [alcohol, TV, food, screen time] already?" "When are you going to settle down / give me grandchildren?" Child calls out adult for saying bad word. "Well that's nothing; let me tell you about the time I..." "Remember that time you snuck out of the house..." Strict avoidance of any words / topics that will prompt the 100th telling of a story. "Who stole the remote?" Story re-told for the 100th time anyway. New partner / spouse insists the pets be put outside or in a locked room. "It's all because the [Democrats / Republicans] didn't do something about it." CENTER SPACE: Hugs and kisses and exclamations that we need to not wait for Thanksgiving to do this again!


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parting shots

by Ann Marie Kennon

image: Facebook/GeorgetownTXFire

Sun City Stepping Up

Members of the Sun City Kiwanis visited Igo Elementary in Jarrell last month as part of their Literacy Program. Members spent time with and read to the K-2 classrooms and students were given books to take home. The club members meet at one or more of the Georgetown and Jarrell elementary schools each semester, and distributes thousands of books annually at no cost to students.

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images: Facebook/IgoElementary

Firefighters at Georgetown Fire Department Station #3 took some time to pose with a few neighbors and elves to express their thanks for holiday stockings filled with treats. Residents of Sun City neighborhoods 37 and 60 delivered gifts to the station, located in Sun City on Texas Drive. The first responders posted, "We are truly blessed to serve such caring community members."


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georgetown view P.O. Box 203 Jarrell, TX 76537

ECRWSS POSTAL PATRON GEORGETOWN, TX

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