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Volume XIII, Issue 8

Fishers High School

May 14, 2019

Tiger Topics:

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Photo by Nate Albin.

ʼ shersnthered.com


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TABLE OF CONTENTS EARLY GRADUATION NON-DISCRIMINATION POLICY TRANSPORTATION BEHIND THE SCENES OF PLAY FARMERSʼ MARKET FOOD REVIEW: CCA PIZZA ALBINʼS ANGLE: INDYCAR QUALIFYING GIRLS TENNIS UNIFIED TRACK BOYS GOLF ACT-OPTIONAL COLLEGES ZERO TOLERANCE POLICY EDITORIAL: SCHOOLS NEED LONGER SUMMER BREAKS BEHIND THE COVER

A cake from Simply Baked by Kate sits on a table at the first farmersʼ market of the year on May 4, hinting at a feel of summer in Fishers. Photo by Nate

Albin.

4-5 6-7 8-9 10 - 11

fhsnthered.com: Chick-Fil-A Leadership Academy trains leaders

12 - 13 14 15 16 17 18 - 19 20

fhsnthered.com: Road to College: Graduating High School

21 22 - 23

fhsnthered.com: State of senioritis, how to overcome it

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Check out our exclusive online coverage

fhsnthered.com Fishers High School 13000 Promise Rd, Fishers, IN 46038 317-915-4290 fax: 317-915-4299

@fhs_NtheRed @fishershighnews


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Early graduation brings benefits, requires work

Janie Van Overwalle vanojan000@hsestudents.org

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aving the chance to graduate early opens up opportunities for students to take the next step in their life decisions. Guidance counselor Matt Swaim explained that early graduation gives students an option to enter the next phase of their life earlier than others, but certain conditions must be met. There are four reasons the state will allow students to graduate early. One is students want to start college early, that could be any college, but that needs to be part of the student’s plan. The other three reasons include students with medical conditions, financial hardships or plans to oin the military. Swaim explained that the earliest a student can graduate is the end o their unior year. Students can also graduate one semester into their senior year. Those who graduate a full year early are called six-semester graduates, and those who graduate one semester into their senior year are called seven-semester grads. Six-semester graduate Leyton Dale plans to attend Indiana University after graduating in June. “I know [graduating early] will be a different experience, but I’ve known I wanted to do this for this since my freshman year, so I’ve prepared myself,” Dale said. According to Swaim, six-semester grads walk at graduation with the class ahead of them, while seven-semester grads wait until the spring of senior year to walk with their class. “Most seven-semester graduates come back to walk with their class unless they have already moved on to college or the next step,” Swaim said. Although early grads do not go through as many semesters as most, they are still required to do extra work to get where they are. Students still need to obtain all of the state-required credits. This requires most of the students to double up on classes that require eight credits to graduate, such as English classes. Swaim added that students interested in early graduation are also required to fill out an application and write an essay on why they want to graduate early. “Most students don’t realize they have to write an essay and fill out an application, which then has to be approved and signed by Mr. Urban,” Swaim said. “There is also having to fill out student financial aid or college which most students do as seniors, but depending on when students want to graduate, they may have to fill this out earlier.

Swaim said students who are interested in graduating early usually have everything planned out beforehand. He said this requires talking to your counselor a lot throughout the school year. “In most cases early grads take a few classes over the summer, so by the time they are a unior or senior they have very few required classes left,” Swaim said. Dale said he has taken summer classes in order to not have to squeeze too many in as an upperclassman. Six-semester graduate Abriel Cameron said she has never had a study hall in order to stay on top of her required credits. “You don’t want to get too far behind or else it could lead to too much stress that then leads to regretting your choice of graduating early,” Cameron said. Swaim e plained there are other ways to ad ust students’ high school careers. He said throughout the years as more and more AP classes have been introduced to the school, this results in mores students participating in the fle schedule. “ ith the fle schedule students don’t have to be at school all day,” Swaim said. “Some classes also give students more opportunities to get college credit in high school which is much cheaper here than at colleges.” Swaim said students who graduate early often think they will miss out on certain opportunities. If a student were to graduate after six semesters, they are still allowed to participate in privileges such as senior week. Cameron explained other challenges she faces when trying to graduate early, such as the college admission processes. “College definitely elt rushed on my part and I think getting accepted is more stressful and a longer process,” Cameron said. “There are disadvantages when thinking about colleges, explaining to the administrators why you decided to graduate early is di cult and you need to make sure you are constantly proactive when meeting requirements to get into college for what you want.” The school offers many ways to shorten students’ high school years, but it depends on the student and what they feel most comfortable with. Swaim said counselors do not encourage nor discourage early graduation. If students are interested in early graduation, they should talk to their counselors as soon as possible in order to get their application filled out.


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Non-discrimination policy causes controversy Benjamin Grantonic grantben000@hsestudents.org

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ontroversy occurred over the school board’s non-discrimination policy decision at an April 24 meeting. The board had been discussing various versions of a non-discrimination policy, with three versions presented. The first policy discussed at the April 10 meeting, backed by board member Julie Chambers, proposed specific protections. It stated, “The school corporation will not discriminate in its educational or employment activities on any basis of race, color, national origin, sex (including transgender status, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression), disability, age, religion, military status, ancestry, or genetic information, nor on any basis prohibited by applicable federal or state laws.” The policy the board voted in favor of at the April 24 meeting was less specific. The policy did not contain clear language that specifies the protection of ethnic minorities, religious minorities or LGBTQ+ studentsand staff. It solely states, “The school corporation will not discriminate in its educational or employment activities on any basis prohibited by applicable federal or state laws.” This decision caused controversy among some of the school community, especially among members of HSE Students for Equity, a student and community group with 3400 members with the goal to bring the non-discrimination policy to include the aforementioned groups. The group has handed out fliers, as well as holding multiple meetings to organize for these board meetings. “Why wasn’t this condition [transgenderism] acceptable in the past and is now? Now, it seems that being straight is less acceptable almost,” school board vice president Sylvia Shelper said at the April 24 board meeting. Shepler also stated that she did not want want to list specific groups

in the non-discrimination policy, as to not make some groups feel less important. Shepler’s language has caused concern among members and supporters of the LGBTQ+ student body.This has caused further student and community opposition. “It’s hard to make the argument we’re [LGBTQ+ students] protected when we don’t see ourselves in any of those [the protected] categories,” junior Jace Hughes said. “My car was egged twice after getting home from each board meeting.” Many people within the local community, such as Mayor Scott Fadness, have shown support for the passing of Chamber’s version of the non-discrimination policy. Fadness, in a video message, states that he hopes the school board will “enumerate those most vulnerable in their antidiscrimination policy.” On May 6, a new policy was introduced, which states “Hamilton Southeastern school district will not discriminate or tolerate any form of discrimination in its educational or employment activities for any reason or any basis prohibited by applicable federal and state laws, including race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender nonconformity, national origin, age or disability.” The new policy also contains extended language: “This includes but is not limited to a characteristic, trait, belief, practice, association, or other attribute. Hamilton Southeastern schools will foster a culture and environment that does not marginalize, treat unfairly or disrespect any member of our school community and will recognize the uniqueness and individuality of all students, educators, staff and administrators, so they have an opportunity to succeed.” This new version has caused some controvery “In our [HSEqual] opinion, “gender nonconformity” does not protect trans students


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2 1, diverse crowd at a Football game on 10/5/18 against westfield 7-11 Photo courtesy of Tiger Tracks 2, senior Logan Faircloth, junior Jace Hughes, and sophmore Easton Good call another stduent over at a HSEqual meeting on May 2 Photo by Ben Grantonic 3, Junior Mia Morales addresses a group of HSEqual members at the may 2 meeting Photo by Ben Grantonic because it refers to the fashion or choice to not conform to gender stereotypes and trends. Trans students will often conform to gender roles or fashion,” Hughes said. “We are for changing ‘gender nonconformity’ to ‘gender identity’ though because that would include transgender students.” HSEqual planned to speak at the May 8 meeting in favor of this language change. They also planned to continue to advocate for the inclusion of protected classes in the non-discrimination policy. The board was expected to vote on the revised policy on May 8. As of printing on May 7, the result of the vote was not available. An online follow up on the decision made is currently up on our webesite. “This policy is not the inclusive language for which HSEqual has been advocating since day one. Hamilton Southeastern schools should seek to create an enviroment where all students are welcome, valued, respected, and protected,” said an HSEqual press statement. “We are not backing down and will continue this fight unitl all are protected in the ant-discrimination policy.”

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HSE students to lose bussing to FHS next year Ben McHenry mchenben000@hsestudents.org

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he student body is growing larger than ever, said. “It would be harder to get to school, but it with next year’s freshman class expected would be worth it to keep the same friends and to be almost 1,000 students, according to keep playing ootball here. assistant principal Steven Loser. With this rise Another issue plaguing bus transportation is the in students comes a need for increased bussing lack of bus drivers. According to transportation transportation to and from school. However, next director Zach McKinney, the district has had a year, the district will be cutting bussing throughout tough time finding and retaining bus drivers, and the district. it makes it di cult to get so many students to These cuts are a result of the four-year bussing school on time every day. promise for “Everyday we neighborhoods have 25 to 27 in the HSE open routes, school zone which means on coming to an a typical day all end. Four years o my staff, my ago, when the mechanics, my HSE area of assistant and the district was myself are all growing quickly, driving a route, many eighth McKinney said. graders were “And we are considering always looking attending FHS for ways to hire, instead of HSE. train and retain A promise was drivers. made that any However, some student in the of this stress HSE school regarding bus Students converse before boarding the bus to go home at the zone would drivers should be end of the day on Jan. 6. Photo by Symone Kinnebrew-Ledford. be provided alleviated with bussing, according to transportation director Zach the HSE school zone routes ending after this year. McKinney. “Currently we have eight buses providing Those students are now seniors, so the bussing bus service for those who are not guaranteed guarantee runs out after this year, according to transportation, c inney said. “So, with these McKinney. FHS has also now grown larger than routes dissolving at the end of this year that HSE, so cutting off this transportation will even will free up eight bus drivers to cover routes for out the student bodies without redistricting. students with guaranteed transportation. However, this means many younger students who With these freed up bus drivers, they may use those buses will be without transportation. potentially be used for an after school activities “Next year I’ll have to either carpool with bus, which the school is considering putting into my neighbor or get dropped off by my mom, place for next year. The bus would be available to freshman Ravi Kaur said. “Which would be pretty students who are not able to drive home but have di cult because I’d have to get up earlier and academics, clubs, sports or any other activity after it would be harder for both of them to take me school. However, the school has not yet decided everyday. on what time the bus would leave. Any student in an HSE area neighborhood “I would be more willing to participate in without bussing transportation to FHS next year clubs or sports if I had a guaranteed ride home would have transportation to HSE, but whether or everyday, sophomore yan oore said. “I not students would be willing to transfer schools couldn’t always get a ride home after football due to transportation is yet to be seen. practice so I would have to walk, and especially “I’ve gone to Fishers for two years now, so I after running around at practice for a couple definitely wouldn’t be willing to trans er to HSE hours, it would be a lot easier if I could take a ust because o a bus, sophomore Connor iller bus.

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Backstage crew sets up shows for success Kristen Rummel rummekri000@hsestudents.org.com

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tudents frantically run around looking for mics, makeup is being powdered on and last minute touches are being made to costumes. Teen spirit runs through the halls as actors and tech crew take their places as the audience anxiously awaits for the show to begin. Students from the tech theater classes and the club make up the backstage crew. Performing arts department chair Andy Smith teaches two different tech classes, Tech Theater 1 and Tech Theater 2. In the higher tech class, students learn the basics of how to build scenery. In Tech Theater 2, students learn more about the lights, sound systems and other hardware they used in productions.

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Tech Crew, the club, is where they will take the scenery that the classes have worked on and, if needed, finish and paint them. A ter that, they practice moving the set on and off the stage or the show according to the chairmen. Students who are in the class do not have to be in the club and vice versa. The club is who assigns the jobs and takes care of who mans the lighting, sounds, props, costumes and makeup. “I would say that the majority of kids that are in the class don’t do after-school tech,” sophomore stage manager-in-training Meg Gibson said. “It’s a really un opportunity to show off and practice what you learned in class, and you meet new people that are passionate about theater.”

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3 1. Performing arts student teacher Tristan Zavaleta mans the sound board as practice for “All I Really Need to Know I Learned In Kindergarten” proceeds on April 25 in the auditorium. 2. Tech Theater 1 constructs a house for the play with tools and paint. Photos courtesy of Meg Gibson. 3. e ts de t e t d t s ll w d d t ls te te l sses w during fourth period for next production. Photo by Kristen Rummel.


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Regardless of the size of the performance, the backstage crew usually needs to be as big as forty to fi ty people or each per ormance. Last year in “Seussical,” there were more backstage crew members than actors or the actual production. Everyone has different obs to fill to make everything run according to plan. They have si main departments. The people that run props on and off the stage are called grips. These people put the props in the correct places once the curtains go down. They rehearse with the actors to help them visualize what the production would go. e t, are the fly students that fly the curtains in and out on command by the Performing arts department chair and whenever the script calls or. The fly students also have to be on the lookout or when anything could go wrong. I something should happen they are responsible for drawing the curtains down. After that is the sound crew, they hook up all the mics to the actors and monitor the sound from booths located around the auditorium. They also control music and other special effect sounds that go along with the production. The lights are manned by the lighting students that walk around in the rafters during the production. There are also stationed lights that do not move, they are responsible for hooking them up to the correct location. The props are gathered by the prop kids, they make sure they have all that they need for the production. They find it in the prop closet, gather it rom other actors, and the last effort they buy it. Makeup and costume are the students who decide what makeup and costume look they want to do with each character, with input by the director, script, and the actual actors that are playing the role. Costumes are altered i necessary and are left in the green room ready for the actors

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“We do work well together,” senior stage manager onah Sanche said. “At the end o the day, we are cohesive enough to pull together and take what we have learned in practice and put on a show that we will look back on and be proud o . The amount o time Tech crew practices depends on the type of production they are putting on. The crew practices longer or musicals than or plays because musicals are typically longer. or musicals, they will generally practice every day rom 3 p.m. to p.m. a ter school. They practice with and without the actors, along with sound and props as they get closer to the showing date. e t year, the auditorium will be getting some new features for a smoother performance and a better e perience or the audience. There will be new sound systems, lighting and director’s chair put in place and other features that will help the production o the show. “We are trying to slowly implement the changes and get used to the changes so when the fall comes around again, we can get into the swing of things fairly quickly and we avoid the messy struggle of getting used to a new system,” senior assistant stage manager Allison Bufkin said These changes were incorporated in “All I eally eed to now I Learned in indergarten by Ernest ulia. ith so many crew members and different people oining every year, it is hard to make sure everyone is up to speed when it comes to all of the procedures. “I always say do it or the inner clap, meaning that you know that the applause at the end of the show isn’t directly for you, but you know you did your part and that the show went smoothly because o you, Gibson said. “ I eel like a lot of people, in the beginning, have a hard time realizing that the applause is as much as it is for them then it is or the actors.

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Fishers farmers’ market provides unique vendors Grace Mossing mossigra000@hsestudents.org

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endors line the streets while people wander about finding products o their liking. Smells o resh baked goods and the music o local artists playing engul visitors. The ishers Summer armers’ arket contains vendors o all types that present products ranging rom meat, produce, baked goods and drinks with live music every Saturday. It happens rom ay 4 to ct. 2 rom a.m. to noon at the ickel late istrict Amphitheater. The open space allows people to have room to eat the ood they buy, let their kids and dogs run around, and talk to their riends. The market runs rain or shine. Students like sophomore aegan ol gang visit the market throughout the summer. “I love being outside, meeting new people I live around and seeing people en oy the warm weather, ol gang said. ver 0 vendors come to the market with a range o products that they sell. Categories o vending include produce, flowers, animal products, ams, dog treats, specialty drinks, concessions and more.

Simply Baked by Kate

Simply Baked by ate offers a wide variety o

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baked goods that range rom indulgent to light. They also offer gluten ree options as the owner aitlin Haaning eats gluten ree or health reasons. “I have attended the ishers armers arket or many years with my mom, the owner aitlin Haaning said. “I love supporting local vendors and e periencing all the great products Hoosiers have to offer. I eel it’s incredibly important to support your local state and all it has to offer. ur state cannot grow and improve i we don’t support each other. Haaning only uses ingredients without chemicals, dyes, additives and preservatives. She loves to get creative by finding ways to incorporate healthy ats and sugars into her goods without ruining the taste. Her most popular items are her iced lavender oatmeal cookies and dark chocolate espresso date bars. Haaning’s personal avorite is the granola she will be selling or the first time this year. “I also put a large amount o thought and care into the goods I bake, Haaning said. “I want customers to eel they are being pampered and taking a bite into something special. ishers hosts many other baked good vendors all with their own specific twist. Gluten ree

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1. Produce from Simply Baked By Kate attracts customers walking by. Photo by Nate Albin. 2. Owner Avanti Snyder hands bubble tea to a customer from her booth at Fishers Farmers Market on May 4. Photo by Kristine Brown.


Arts & Culture Creations offers many different types o baked goods all gluten ree. Lisa’s ie Shop speciali es in her award winning pies but also sells many other desserts.

Bu bble T ea L ady

The Bubble Tea Lady gives customers a do it yoursel e perience. The customer can pick their drink o tea, lemonade, smoothie or slushy and put in bursting bubbles. The bursting bubbles are ull o ruit uice and have 11 different flavors, so customers have many options to choose rom. wner Avanti Snyder first learned about bubble tea while on a trip to Seattle with her husband. She believed it could become very popular in the Hamilton County area and opened her business here on the side o teaching at Carmel. “I love the ishers armers arket the people there are very riendly and accommodating, Snyder said. “Compared to other markets, the ishers armers arket doesn’t do a lot o repetition o the same vendors with the specialty items. ther markets do and they tend to put the same type o vendors close to each other, and with that there is a lot o competition, whereas ishers wants everyone to be success ul. This will be the business’s si th year at the market. Besides drinks, they also offer I bursting bubble kits. ith these, people can order bursting bubbles or parties, events or ust or un. “I love what I do and it means everything to me, Snyder said. “I en oy what I do so much that I have decided that I am going to try and open up The Bubble Tea Lady Ca this summer, where we will not only serve our ama ing Bursting Bubbles, but we will also have great ood and customers will not have to wait until Saturday to get their drinks. ther drinks sold at the market are wine, kombucha, coffee and tea. Harvest Coffee and Tea provides customers with conventional and organic ingredients in their drinks. Circle City ombucha wants to give healthier beverage choices to consumers by using low to no added sugars.

Bec ker F ar ms

Becker arms is a small, amily owned livestock arm. They provide customers with nutrient dense proteins including bee , pork, chicken, eggs and turkey. “ wning a business is definitely a labor o love, owner Emily Becker said. “It is a never ending, always challenging and usually rewarding venture. e work incredibly long hours and put everything we have into what we do. e see the ruits o our labor in raising children who know where their ood comes rom, are hard working, respect ul, connected with nature, and take pride in offering a high quality product or others to en oy. Becker and her husband began their arm in 200 , right a ter college, and attended their first armers’ market in 200 . All o their animals live outside, gra e on pastures o biodiverse soil and

N the Red live a low stress li e, which results in nutritious and flavor ul meat. Their our kids between the ages o 1 months and are involved on the arm in some way. The older three kids have different responsibilities on the arm each day, like milking cows, collecting and labeling eggs, and eeding livestock. “ e are so encouraged by the olks that have an interest in connecting with where their ood comes, Becker said. “There is so much to be gained by getting people back in the kitchen, preparing homemade meals, and engaging with one another. ood brings people together and we are honored to be a part o that in our community. ther arms offer a variety o other products. Bliss Haven arms sells customers resh cut flowers. Grace and Truth arms and Gallagher arms provide customers with resh produce that is non G and organic. The ishers armers arket offers an opportunity or people to be part o their community and buy local products. Live entertainment and open space to sociali e gives an amiable environment to the downtown ickel late district.

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3. Owner Emily Becker talks about her livestock business in her booth. 4. Awaiting costumers on May 4, owner Kaitlin Haaning stands in her booth at the Fishers Farmers Market Photos by Nate Albin.


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CCA pizza brings grate expectations John Yun yunjoh000@hsestudents.org

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lates o toasting paninis and pi as fill the CCA with aroma right a ter school as students line up to get a quick bite be ore their a ter school e tracurricular activities. An option that the CCA serves is pi a, and it comes with three toppings cheese, pepperoni, or veggie. The pi a’s bread looks almost like naan and is spread with tomato sauce and topped the option o your choice.

C h ees e P iz z a ( $ 4 . 2 5 )

4 out of 5

The cheese pi a is a classic option that never gets old. It takes about five minutes to receive, which may vary depending on how many people are waiting. The pi a is premade with raw ingredients but placed into an oven when it is ordered. The pi a comes out hot with the cheese melting. It is a circle cut into ourths, making it easy to eat. The amount o cheese on the pi a dominates the bread, being about twice as thick. This disproportion causes the pi a to be quite greasy and overwhelms the stomach. It tastes like a regular cheese pi a but not as seasoned as pi a ordered rom restaurants. ather than having having basil, oregano, garlic and other seasonings in the tomato sauce, like a classic pi a, the CCA pi a sauce places a dominant emphasis on the tomato. Although lacking in seasoning and having an e cess o cheese, the pi a serves as a good option or a reasonable, quick bite.

P epper o n i P iz z a ( $ 4 . 2 5 )

5 out of 5

At first glance, the pepperoni pi a looks almost identical to the cheese pi a. However, underneath all the cheese, thinly sliced pepperoni rests on top o the pi a sauce. The pepperoni adds more taste to the pi a than ust having cheese on it. The salty and spicy flavoring o the pepperoni helps add seasoning to the sauce while also providing the acidity to cut through all the cheese. Although the pepperoni adds even more grease to the pi a, it seems a air trade or the improvement o taste. or the same cost as the cheese pi a, the pepperoni pi a seems like a better investment as it brings a lot more flavor and ingredients.

V eg g ie P iz z a ( $ 4 . 2 5 )

3 out of 5

A color ul array o peppers, mushrooms and onions cover the cheese when you receive the veggie pi a. The pi a seems to acknowledge that there are students that can not have meat and want something different than ust cheese. The vegetables do a good ob at combating the greasiness o the cheese. The peppers and mushrooms add te ture and taste while the acidity o the onions cut through the grease. However, in the mi o vegetables, there is an e cess amount o onions, giving the pi a an e tremely harsh taste. A ter eating it, your mouth tastes o onions and eels bitter. ather than having “onion breath a ter eating the veggie pi a, students should stick to the cheese pi a i they are not able to have the pepperoni pi a or ust ask or less onions when the lunch ladies add the veggies on the regular cheese pi a.


Alb n's Angle

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IndyCar races into changes too fast Nate Albin albinnat000@hsestudents.org

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ast year, Indianapolis 00 Quali ying was the definition o intense. n ole ay, the hometown hero Ed Carpenter electrified the crowd with a quali ying speed o 22 . 1 miles per hour. He snagged the pole, the astest quali ying speed, or the third time. The field o 33 was not finali ed until the last quali ying run. In the surprise o the weekend, an avorite Canadian ames Hinchcliffe missed the field due to mechanical problems. or the first time in years, Indy 00 quali ying was the must watch event it had ormerly been. The ratings showed that it was popular all across the country. According to Sports edia atch, 201 Indy 00 quali ying hit ratings that had not been seen by the event in five years. And, or some reason, IndyCar and the Indianapolis otor Speedway decided to mess with recent success. The Indianapolis otor Speedway’s website shows quali ying being broken up into three separate groups ositions 1 , 10 30 and 31 33. n ay 1 , nine drivers will advance to the ast ine and positions 10 30 will be solidified. n ay 1 , the ast ine will all requali y, with the astest getting the pole position. The second day o quali ying will also include the Last ow Shootout. Any driver that has not made the top 30 will fight to get one o the last three spots. The ast ine is nothing new. It has been a staple o 00 quali ying in the 2000s. The new aspects o quali ying, solidi ying spots 10 30 and then the shootout, seems like a good idea. It prevents drivers that are already sa ely qualified in the field rom taking up track time that entries on the outside looking in could use to get in the field. It sounds like a great idea, but the timing of the move seems off. ith a an avorite like Hinchcliffe missing the race last year after a disastrous second day, these rule changes would likely be able to protect against one o the series’ stars missing the biggest race in the world. Having a driver like Hinchcliffe, a known commodity, instead o the lesser known drivers who qualified instead of him could have helped bring even higher fan interest to the race. ther than that one reason, the timing o this all makes absolutely no sense. irst, Indy 00 quali ying is coming off its best rating in years. The move to not ollow this upward trend is pu ling. Second, and more importantly, the IndyCar Series is in the midst o a network switch. 201 is the first ull year o IndyCar being e clusively on BC. As ABC had slowly begun to show less and less races, it always made sure to show all aspects o Indianapolis. This is the first time in 0 years that someone other than ABC is broadcasting the 00. Trying a new qualifying format and trying a new network makes for a bad e periment. Too many variables are being tested. hen the higher lower ratings come out for qualifying, there will be questions about what was the biggest actor in the change. Lately, IndyCar has been on an upward trend in popularity. A lot o the new success can be attributed to smart decisions by higher ups. But quali ying should not have been changed this year. They should have collected data and then made changes based o what they ound rom their first year on BC.

ls machine sits in Gasoline Alley for last-minute adjustments before requalifying on May 20, 2018. Photo by Nate Albin.


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nifie tr k s rints to t e finis ine wit s i es Rebekah Shultz

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Paul Casey Graphic by Grace Mossing “I had previously coached ootball and basketball sport created by the Special Olympics, the Recipe from or 20 years and participated in track in college. HS unified track team is filled with ath Schooley said. “It was an easy decision to say yes. letes with and without disabilities partici Athletes who participate in unified track get pating together competing against other track and opportunities to run in college. field teams. Students in this sport get the opportunity to be nified track was established in 201 by the in unified track as well as other clubs and sports IHSAA and the Indiana Special lympics. Since because o the fle ible time schedule unified track 201 , more sports have been added like bowling, provides. urphy is able to be involved in eight bocce and flag ootball with the partnership o other clubs, practicing three times a week, urphy Champions Together. can still be involved in other activities. Champions Together is a partnership between The team set several goals this year with the the IHSAA and the Special Olympics that athletes on the team. The first goal is to get to encourages the leadership o student athletes, state finals and put themselves in a position to win with and without disabilities.Champions Together state. To quali y or state the team must win first pride themselves on changing the athlets lives and place in the top three sectionals and the top five in the lives around them. regionals. “I started out by doing unified track and “ e also strive to win the county and con erence Champions Together, and then I went on to oin meets, said Schooley. “Individually, I’d like to see best buddies and be a peer tutor,” sophomore all students compete and challenge themselves Elaine urphy said. “I love unified track and each other and to improve in their events because I love to help spread inclusion and build throughout the year. Above all else, the biggest riendships. goal is to have un and create lasting riendships. Building riendships is a common goal or The unified team has two more meets sectionals unified track athletes. reshman ristyn Santiago at oblesville ay 1 , and regionals ay 2 at and reshman addie Long both agree that their okomo. avorite part o track is hanging out with their “I like everything about unified track, senior close riends. Lauren Grater said. “I like the people, the sport, Coach atrick Schooley, has been running the Freshman Jacob Hay the atmosphere and the purpose. Everyone en oys team since the beginning. Schooley took the jumps toward the dirt competition and every meet and practice is ull o position when athletic director im Brown asked during the high jump smiles. him to coach the newly created unified track. st estfield t t e away meet on April 17. Photo by Alex Craig.


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ir s tennis fin s t eir Rebekah Shultz

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shultreb000@hsestudents.org

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o achieve conference this year, the girls tennis team began early winter conditioning as well as a different approach to the doubles team. “I know we have the ability to place higher than we have previous seasons, doubles player senior Catherine Hutchinson said. “And I would e pect us to each rank better at con erence. Although the team believes they have much to improve on since losing con erence or the past couple years, the girls continue to strive to become a stronger unified team a ter conditioning all winter. “The biggest thing we need to improve on is confidence, Hutchinson said. “ e all have such great potential to play well, and sometimes we ust go out there to win and not play our best. Throughout the season, the girls faced challenges like staying motivated and losing to HSE 4 1, but that only motivates the team to get better. “Singles is keeping the ball deep, wait for the short ball, try to get in there and put the balls away, varsity head coach ave Heffern said. “I think the biggest thing we did well was in doubles we lobbed on the line better and took over the net, took the net away from our opponents. It worked pretty well, because both our doubles teams beat teams they lost to earlier in the year. Although the girls lost the udsock match on April 2 , they still have time to beat HSE at the HCC championship two day match being held on ay 4 at Avon High School. The first day o the HCC championship was postponed until ay 11 initially it was supposed to be ay 3. ith no home games remaining, the ne t and last game is on ay 14 at Lawrence Central. “I really en oy tennis, senior Avery urphy said. “ y team and our coaches ust make it all even more rewarding. e may not be the best team in the con erence, but we have a lot o heart.

Senior Claire Blake serves the ball at the home game against North Central losing 4-1 on April 24. Photo by Malak Kakour.


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May 14, 2019

Purgatory tees up challenges for seasoned golfers

1 Nate Albin albinnat000@hsestudents.org

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or every high school sports team in Indiana, the first win or go home date on the calendar is always the sectional. n une 3, the boys gol team will be hitting the greens at urgatory Gol Club in oblesville. or the program, it is a amiliar location. “It’s been a good eight or nine years we have been playing our sectional at the urgatory gol course, coach aniel Smith said. Smith’s experience with urgatory, as both a coach and a player, helps him prepare the players, especially those who have never played the course. “I have never played the course mysel , reshman atthew Albright said. “But coach tells us specific things to look or and watch out or. Seniors can also serve as leaders. or some o these veteran players, their trips to urgatory have been requent with the sectional always being there, as well as other meets throughout the season. “I have played urgatory way too many times to count, senior Caleb Bopp said. “I’ve been able to score a at the course. That score is two strokes over the course’s 1 hole par o 3. urgatory’s website cites its high risk, high reward course model as to why it is so challenging.

“It’s lots o trouble i you’re not hitting the right spots, Bopp said. “It’s very challenging, but i you’re playing well, it’s very rewarding. urgatory’s challenges come in a variety o ways. The course’s website prides itsel on challenging the players’ accuracy with its 130 bunkers. “ ou’ve got to stay away rom the bunkers, Smith said. “There are hidden bunkers you must watch out or. The game plan at urgatory is to ust get on the airway and then the green. Success ully avoiding the bunkers does not necessary mean a good score at urgatory because one must also actor in its si e. “It is a very long course, Smith said. “I you’re not in the airway, it is very hard to be able to get a par. The Tigers will ace more challenges than ust the course. ith rivals like Hamilton Southeastern and oblesville in the sectional, they will ace other members o the states’ top 2 poll. “It’s a very tough sectional draw, Smith said. “It is always our goal to get out o sectionals and then obviously we want to get back to state a ter missing it last year. any tasks lie ahead or the team to accomplish. But or right now, all that is guaranteed is the rest o the regular season and a sectional date at urgatory Gol Club. “ urgatory is set up to separate those who can play well on a tougher set up, Smith said. “It separates those who know how to play any gol course.

If you’re not in the fairways, it’s a very hard course to get par on. -Daniel Smith


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May 14, 2019

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Graphic by John Yun

Test-optional policies bring opportunity for students John Yun yunjoh000@hsestudents.org

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undreds of colleges such as the University of Evansville and Ball State University have started to follow a trend that has become popular: making SAT and ACT score submissions optional. Although it is too early to determine how or in what ways this will help colleges and applicants, it may be a start towards helping students develop their own identities rather than focusing on a standardized test. Looking at the explanations of the schools that have made standardized test scores optional, they seem to be wanting more diversity in their campuses. For example, Augsburg, a university in Minnesota, announced that they followed the policy to boost the diversity of the student body. Studies appear to support this claim about optional test scores boosting diversity, especially a study conducted by Steve Syverson from University of Washington, William C. Hiss from Bates College and Valerie W. Franks. Drawing data from 28 colleges and 955,774 applicants, the study showed that the total number of applications increased after the test-optional policy was implemented and that the number of black and Latino students applying and being admitted increased as well. A test optional policy can also help benefit high school students. Rather than worrying about getting a suitable score for the college of their dreams, students can use that time to really grow as an individual and figure out who they want to become in the future. Standardi ed tests do not reflect who the student is as a person. The tests are ust an effort to udge each person the exact same way. A person’s

success on these tests not only depends on the knowledge a person has, but also depends a person’s socioeconomic status. People of lower socioeconomic groups would not have enough money to pay for review books and courses that are designed to help boost scores and knowledge. Furthermore, they would not be able to pay for multiple attempts for the test while other students would be able to use these books and courses and purchase multiple attempts. So, test-optional policies provide these less fortunate students with a chance to prove their drive to succeed and obtain a better education. Rather than trying to stand out in test scores, these students can utilize the essays to show the college that they are the right fit. or e ample, an engineering student may want to appeal to Purdue while an economics student would want to appeal to Indiana University. Students can now use that time to work towards their dreams rather than spending time scheduling test days and solving practice tests to prepare for these standardized tests. Students can invest more time into the clubs and extracurriculars in what they are interested in, creating their own unique personalities and goals. Standardized tests should not be used to measure a student’s worth to a college but rather students should be measured by their personality, their personal values, their experience and their goals. This new policy that colleges have trended towards is something that should be met with open arms as they seem to wish to change what education means and their assessment of applicants.


Opinion

Zero-tolerance policy fails to is our e fi tin Ben McHenry mchenben000@hsestudents.org

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The state applies using reasonable orce to student walks into the bathroom, and he protecting oneself and another person, but the sees a gang of students all holding up their school only applies reasonable force to protecting phones, chanting “fight, fight, fight. The another person. last thing that student wants to do is fight, but his Essentially, the school allows you to fight back i opponents’ heart is set on punching him in the you are protecting someone else, but not yoursel . face, and the only way this can end is with both But nearly everyone would be more willing to students out o school or a week. de end themselves rom a fight than de end n airly being suspended or fighting is a reality another person rom one. or ar too many students. The source o this is A Georgia supreme court case takes a more the schools’ ero tolerance policy on fighting. The assertive position on what a students’ rights are handbooks’ rules fail to protect a student who in terms o sel de ense. The court ruled that fights back in sel de ense and un airly dishes out students have the inherent right to assert that they an equal punishment to the student defending were de ending themselves, and sel himself as to the student who started the de ense can be used as ustification. fight. While this has no legal Section 28 of the student significance on Indiana law, handbook on inappropriate this ruling was based on conduct, on page 4 , defines Georgia Code 1 3 21, fighting as “Intentionally which states that “A person or recklessly injuring is ustified in threatening another person except for or using force against self-defense or reasonable another when and to action taken on the the extent that he or she reasonable belief that it reasonably believes that was necessary to protect threat or force is necessary to some other person. defend himself or herself or a So, according to the third person against such other’s handbook, fighting back in imminent use o unlaw ul orce self-defense is not considered This code shares some inappropriate conduct, but the distinct similarities to the school narrowly defines this rule. Juniors Dominic Castellani and Riley Padron face off before a Indiana Code in that it discusses According to Indiana Law, a fi t Photo illustration using force against another to self-defense argument means protect onesel or a third party. that you admit to using physical by Ben McHenry. This means this case could be force, but you should not be used as precedent in re defining Indiana sel legally guilty because you were protecting yourself de ense rights. or someone else. However, I do not know o a The ero tolerance policy would be more single student who has successfully argued selfeffective i students were not aware o it, but they de ense and avoided a suspension. are. I a student gets into a fight, and they hit their When discussing the second part of the school’s aggressor even once, he or she knows they will inappropriate conduct policy, the waters get receive the same punishment as the person who murky. age 4 o the handbook states that a hit them first. Students know that their first punch student can use “reasonable action taken on the has already earned them a significant punishment, reasonable belief that it was necessary to protect so there is nothing stopping them from escalating some other person. the fight urther, as the punishment is the same This is similar to Indiana Code 3 41 3 2, either way. which states that “A person is ustified in using I administration wants to minimi e violence reasonable force against any other person to protect the person or a third person from what the in school, a student should be able to briefly fight person reasonably believes to be the imminent use back enough to make the other student retreat, and not receive a suspension or this. I this were o unlaw ul orce. the case, the number o fights may not drastically HS and Indiana Code have similar policies on all, but the severity o them certainly will. using reasonable orce as a means o protection.

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Students need more summer, relaxation

Editorial Opinions: Do you believe students need a longer summer break?

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3:Yes 5: No

Editor-in-Chief: Helen Rummel Copy Editor: Ashley Steele Web/News Editor: than ʼ lli an Features Editor: John Yun Arts & Culture Editor: Carson Lilley Sports Editor: Ellie Albin Social Media Editor: Lance Marshall Unity Director: Hallie Gallinat Cartoonist li ia htenkir h Videographer Laney Kyle Reporters Nate Albin, Andrew Bauer, Sam Bauer, Marie Gabbard, Ben Grantonic, Ben McHenry, Curren Gauss, Sydney Greenwood, Tony Martinez, Grace Mossing, risten mmel ebekah h lt anie an er alle atie iseman Photographers le rai alak ako r Principal Jason Urban Adviser Kristine Brown Associations IHSPA CSPA NSPA Quill and Scroll Printer: AIM Media

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armers markets symbolize summer in Fishers. The stroll through the stands of fruits, vegetables and 25-cent honey sticks resembles a feeling that not many students cannot experience these days: relaxation. Indiana requires students to attend 180 days of school a year, which cuts into summer time. However, more school actually happens to be the last thing students need right now. According to a Pew Research Center study conducted in 2018, 70% of U.S. teens aged 13 to 17 see anxiety and depression as major problems in their school. Anxiety and depression have severe impacts on students and their academic performance according to the Child Mind Institute, including attendance problems, not turning in homework, disruptive behavior, the inability to answer questions in class and trouble in certain subjects. Anxiety and depression rates have skyrocketed and will get worse without an implemented plan to stop the growing struggle of modern students. According to a study by Ramin Mojtabai, a professor at Johns Hopkins niversity, the odds o kids suffering rom clinical depression grew by 3 between the years 2005 and 2014, a number that continues to grow. Ideally, adding days to summer break would be a helpful solution. Weather can actually have a profound impact on health. According to a study by the University of Michigan, warmth and sun improve mood and memory. It may seem that with improved mood and memory during the summer, going back to school during August sounds reasonable, but that is quite the contrary. Students get locked inside a building during their time at school, lacking exposure to the sun, and, therefore, do not have the chance to get some vitamin D in their system. That vitamin D from summer weather will not go to waste, though, like educational leaders seem to think it will, hence the required and unnecessary 180 days of school. Students utilize longer summer breaks to put their energy towards their passions, whether that be reading, writing, making music, hanging out with friends or a plethora of other hobbies. Passions are just as important, if not more important, than taking tests, doing homework or stressing over the SAT. After all, Albert Einstein said, “Imagination is more important than knowledge. For knowledge is limited, whereas imagination embraces the entire world, stimulating progress, giving birth to evolution.” And he dropped out of school at 15. Summer makes students smarter. It makes them well-rounded human beings; they learn the lesson that life is not just about absorbing information in a building full of fellow sweaty kids on a day that begs for them to be outside, not inside. Learning is about exposing yourself to all the world has to offer. And that is something you cannot do in ust a classroom. Hopefully students will one day get to enjoy an extra month of summer, an extra month of no homework and an extra month of, yes, just being a kid. At the end of the day, we all just want to be a kid for a while. Before we graduate high school, move on to college and find obs, we deserve the chance to stroll through the farmers markets of childhood.


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Graphic by Olivia Buchtenkirch.

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ISSUE REVIEW

May 14, 2019

TWEET US YOUR ANSWERS FOR A CHANCE AT A PRIZE

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4. Which fan-favorite IndyCar driver missed the 2018 Indy 500? 5. Which Minnesota university reports that not requiring SAT/ACT scores boosts diversity? 8. When does the golf team play at Purgatory? 10. How many versions of the non-discrimination policy are there? 11. At the end of which year is the earliest a student can graduate? 12. Who takes the props on and off stage?

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Profile for Tiger Topics: N the Red

Tiger Topics N the Red: Volume XIII, Issue 8  

Fishers High School's print newspaper from May 2019

Tiger Topics N the Red: Volume XIII, Issue 8  

Fishers High School's print newspaper from May 2019

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