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N S Francis Howell North St. Charles, MO 03.16.16 Vol. 30, Issue 07

REIGNITING THE FLAME

Suicide is an issue that affects numerous people in our community, and our school PG. 20


contents NEWS PROM PREP

5 Tips to keep in mind when promposing.

EOC schedule EOC Testing for English II, Government, Biology, Algebra I and Algebra II students start April 11. All Fridays follow the regular bell schedule.

PRESIDENTIAL RACE 6 Hear FHN students’ perspectives about the upcoming election.

FEATURES ENGINEERING

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Caitlind Walker, Amber Pryor and Estefania Cruz-Casillo join the Boeing Explore Post program.

THE HILL 13 Learn about the famous Italian-based neighborhood in St. Louis.

SPORTS

MONDAY, APRIL 11

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13

TUESDAY, APRIL 12

THURSDAY, APRIL 14

2:

7:20 - 9:00

1:

7:20 - 9:00

2:

7:20 - 9:00

1:

7:20 - 9:00

Homeroom:

9:05 - 10:35

3:

9:05 - 10:35

Homeroom:

9:05 - 9:40

3:

9:05 - 10:35

4:

10:40 - 12:35

5:

10:40 - 12:35

4:

9:40 - 11:50

5:

10:40 - 12:35

6:

12:40 - 2:20

7:

12:40 - 2:20

6:

11:55 - 1:35

7:

12:40 - 2:20

MONDAY, APRIL 25

TUESDAY, APRIL 26

THURSDAY, APRIL 28

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27

2:

7:20 - 9:00

1:

7:20 - 9:00

2:

7:20 - 9:00

1:

7:20 - 9:00

Homeroom:

9:05 - 10:35

3:

9:05 - 10:35

Homeroom:

9:05 - 9:40

3:

9:05 - 10:35

4:

10:40 - 12:35

5:

10:40 - 12:35

4:

9:40 - 11:50

5:

10:40 - 12:35

6:

12:40 - 2:20

7:

12:40 - 2:20

6:

11:55 - 1:35

7:

12:40 - 2:20

ATHLETIC PREP 29 An inside look at how FHN athletes prepare for state

GIRLS LACROSSE 31

FHN introduces its first girls lacrosse team.

OPINIONS 34

PATRIOT ACT

A look at the reasons that the Patriot Act violates personal liberty and the Constitution.

on the cover A closer look at how suicide affects the community and where to get help if you’re feeling suicidal. Photo by Madi Graves. (Pages 20-25)

letters to the editor Have an opinion on something in this month’s paper? Send us a letter in 026 or an email to yourfhn@fhntoday.com.

Distributed for free to FHN by the North Star Staff. Providing an open forum since 1986.

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FHNTODAY.COM PAGE BY EMILY HARDIN

03.16.16

Mock Trial Team Prepares for State Championship in Kansas City After winning trials against Cor Jesu on Tuesday, Feb. 29 and Lafayette on Thursday, March 2, the FHN mock trial team will be advancing to regionals, which take place April 1-3 in Kansas City, MO. In each trial, teams are given ballots from each of the three judges. FHN won five of their six total ballots. “Winning is great,” senior Marygrace Cole said. “State is an exciting prospect. I think we did a really great job. There are definitely things that need to be fixed, but it was a good effort by everyone.” Coached by Randy Pierce and lawyers Contessa Brundridge and Phil Groenweghe, the team is split into two sides - the plaintiff and the defense. On each side, students portray both lawyers and witnesses that are involved in the case, which is given to students at the beginning of each season by the Missouri Bar Association. This year’s case is a civil lawsuit, in which the plaintiff is the Billings family, who are arguing that the Metro City School District’s negiligence led to the bullying of their child, Alex, who is portrayed by senior Marygrace Cole. The defendants are Metro City School District and the Pearson family, who say that it was actually Alex’s failure to inform anyone of the situation that led to the alleged bullying, not the school district’s negligence. “I feel [the case] was put together in a way that

Members of one of the FHN mock trial teams stands in a court room after having won one of their preliminary trials. They will attend state in Kansas City at the beginning of April. (Submitted photo)

makes it challenging for both sides, but you can find creative ways to explain scenarios on both sides,” freshman Riley Lawson said. In order to prepare for the upcoming state competition, the mock trial team will be meeting twice a week, on Tuedays and Thursdays in the evening at the FHN library. “It will probably go well,” Lawson said. “I think people will continue working hard through state, and maybe even work harder.”


One Big Production FHN and Hollenbeck Middle School put on the spring play For the first time ever, FHN has combined with students from Hollenbeck Middle School to put on the spring production of “Beauty and the Beast.” “The fact that they’re younger didn’t play into what role they got,” drama teacher Kim Sulzner said. Instead of doing the normal spring play with only FHN students, Sulzner decided to add Hollenbeck students to the mix. Sulzner teaches at both schools. Since both of the schools put on two plays a year, Sulzner would normally have to go back and forth between schools for rehearsals and such. According to Sulzner, spring productions are bigger than fall productions, so instead of dividing herself between both schools, she allowed Hollenbeck students to audition for cast and be a part of crew at FHN. “There’s just not enough days to

prepare two different spring shows,” Sulzner said. The actual play has 21 parts. There’s 37 total cast members, 10 of which are Hollenbeck students. About 15 Hollenbeck students are in crew. Hollenbeck students are expected to be at practices after school just as if they were FHN students. According to Sulzner, the only difference with working with both middle and high schoolers is the level of maturity. The FHN cast and crew members however, say there isn’t much difference at all. “We hold them at the same level of professionalism,” cast member Zac Cary said. “The only difference is they’re shorter.” Practices started Feb. 18 and the cast and crew are confident everything will be ready by show time, April 7, 8, and 9. (brief by Kylah Woods)

Junior Brianna Smith, senior Erika Paar, and sophomore Kayliani Sood practice the choreography for the song “Be Our Guest” after school. This is the first year that Hollenbeck has joined any production at North. (Photo by Alyssa Savage)

Upcoming Events Here’s a quick overview of some of the major events that will be going on in the weeks to come

FHN Band Goes to Solo and Ensemble FHN band students were at Fort Zumwalt East on March 5 for districts to see who would qualify for state. “[Districts] was cool, really easy to figure out what to do,” freshman Nate Williams said. For two months now, band students have been practicing and perfecting their performances. Some students had solos, while others were in ensembles. However, some people had both. Some students picked their performances while others had theirs chosen for them. “I think it went really well,” sophomore Emily Helmick said. “We got a lot of ones, but we also got twos, which was disappointing but it happens.” Performances are scored on a one to five scale. If a solo or ensemble scored a one, they will be going to state. Anything above a one doesn’t. In total, 38 people from FHN will be attending state on April 30. “I was really nervous I didn’t think I would get a one, but I was really happy when I did,” Helmick said. Districts lasted all day. Each solo or ensemble had to be there at different times. They all had time to warm up and tune, then they played for the judge. (Brief by Kylah Woods)

March 17

March 17-22

March 28-29

April 6-9

FHN will be open to students’ parents for Parent Teacher Conferences. From 4 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. parents are welcome to come visit with teachers. The parents will be able to get to know their child’s teachers as well as discuss their grades, behavior and any other concerns they may have.

Knightsound will be leaving for Disney World in Orlando, FL on March 17 and staying until the 22. They will be competing against other choirs from across the nation to try to gain the top choir title. To prepare for this event, they are practicing with each other and preparing their voices to sound their best.

Health Occupations Students of America (HOSA) is headed to Rolla, MO, on March 28 and 29 for a state competition and leadership conference. They are preparing as much as possible so that they can have a successful trip. About 50 students and four chaperones are attending the event.

Winter guard is leaving for WGI world championships in Dayton, Ohio, on April 6-9. This event is a national competition to see who comes out on top. Winter guards from all over the nation are competing. FHN is preparing to perform their show, “Alone Together,” to the song “Everybody Hurts” by R.E.M.

FHNTODAY.COM PAGE BY KYLAH WOODS

03.16.16

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Bailey Corcoran and Colton Maurer walk home from school on March 8. Due to some potential budget cuts for the next fiscal year, the budget allotted for transportation may be reduced. This will mean that more students may have to find other ways to get to school besides riding the bus. (Photo by Ashleigh Barlow)

All About the Vote

The school board elections are coming up next month on April 5, and here is all you need to know about voting.

Where to vote?

Who can vote?

These are some polling places close to FHN, to find your exact location go to http://goo.gl/ECB2ZN • Barnwell Middle School • The Family Arena

• 18 years of age or older

• Hollenbeck Middle School • St. Charles Convention Center • McClay Library

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FHNTODAY.COM PAGE BY MCKAYLA BOGDA

03.16.16

Any registered voters who live in the Francis Howell School District can vote on April 5 from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. To be registered voters, these requirements needed to be filled:

• Citizen of U.S. • Live in election district for at least 28 days

Why vote?

The terms of both Dr. Cynthia Bice, current treasurer, and Amy McEvoy, one of the current directors, will expire in April this year. If you want to have a say in the future of the Francis Howell School District, then voting for who should be on the board can be a way to do that.


Q&A With the Candidates Members of the FHN publications staff sat down with the current candidates running to fill the two spots opening up on the FHSD Board of Education to talk about their goals for the district.

Michelle Walker Q: How long have you been in the district? A: Since seventh grade. So, a long time. I’m an alumni of Francis Howell High of 1994.

Q: Why do you want to serve on the Board? A: I’m running to do my part and build consensus among the board members, try to get all the board members to work together to come up with some solutions that the entire community can get behind and support. Q: What do you think are the biggest challenges the board faces for the coming year? A: Finances, for sure. But I think that together, the board can overcome it, but it’s going to be the board and the community and everbody’s going to have to get on the same page to work together. Q: What are you looking forward to most in the coming year? A: Hopefully, the mistrust that the dysfunction of the board has caused in the community; I’m looking forward to that being repaired. I’m looking forward to the community respecting our school district again so that’s what I’m excited about for next year.

Mike Hoehn Q: How long have you been in the district? A: Over 30 years. Q: Why do you want to serve on the Board? A: I guess the main reason that I want to serve is because I feel that I can help the district with the issues they have. I think knowledge of the board, district and serving in the board [in the past], I have a wide range of exposure. Q: What do you think are the biggest challenges the board faces for the coming year? A: I think the biggest challenge is managing student’s learning with the budget that we have. We have to get our budget under control, that’s one, but we have to do it in a way that doesn’t harm students.

Q: What are you looking forward to most in the coming year? A: I look forward to making decisions that are in the best interest of kids, get the budget crisis under control, address and own the problem and solve it. [I also look forward to] getting more community involvement.

Cynthia Bice (Incumbent)

Kimberlyann Granger

Q: How long have you been in the district? A: Since the ‘80s, I moved away and came back. So, for a total of 15 years.

Q: How long have you been in the district? A: I’ve lived in the district for three years.

Q: Why do you want to serve on the Board? A: Once I received my doctorate in education, I felt strongly about the obligation to give back to the community. Since I served in such a broad range of education, I’ve just worked in so many positions in the past 30 years. I feel that I could bring a lot to the table. Q: What do you think are the biggest challenges the board faces for the coming year? A: It’s going to be about funding; it’s going to be about the PR requirement to remain an accredited school district. Q: What are you looking forward to most in the coming year? A: I do look forward to working with the new superintendent this next year and really thinking outside the box so we can better fund academic opportunities for the students. I also look forward to better opportunities to communicate and collaborate with community members and other stakeholders.

Q: Why do you want to serve on the Board? A: I am a teacher, and my life career has been teaching. I have a doctorate in how to make decisions for schools, and I got an opportunity to serve the community with the field of my expertise. Q: What do you think are the biggest challenges the board faces for the coming year? A: One, everyone is aware that there is a financial challenge that our district has right now, and I believe that we can overcome this challenge with the least negative affects on students possible. The other challenge that our district is in the middle of right now is a big change in our school curriculum from the state. So implementing the state standard, to do that well will be important. Q: What are you looking forward to most in the coming year? A: “I think it’ll be really fun to get to know the students. I’ll enjoy getting to know the community members better because we have a very active community. I’m looking forward to working with the administration, teachers and all of the staff to hear how the community can support them because I know first hand that it’s a very important job.

FHNTODAY.COM

PAGE BY MCKAYLA BOGDA

03.16.16

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On Feb. 26, the Junior Delegates meet in Marissa Cohen’s room after school to discuss center pieces for prom. The Delegates meet two times a week after school to plan for the dance which will be held on April 31. (Photo by Kyra Peper)

Forming the Formal

Junior Class Delegates have been preparing and are making final decisions with Marissa Cohen for Prom BY SAMMIE HERR sammieherr17@gmail.com

On April 30, FHN’s 2016 Prom will take place. Junior Delegates are working with Junior Class Sponsor Marissa Cohen. The themes that the juniors and seniors got to choose from were Arabian Nights, Grecian or Fairy Tale. Ultimately, the upperclassmen chose Fairy Tale. They started preparing early to get a nice start so they would be done at the right time. Decorations are just beginning to make an appearance in their planning, along with caterers for the menu that was chosen. “I really enjoy it [planning for prom] and it’s fun and we only meet two days after school,” Junior Class President Michael Shine said. “We all work really well together and things are going out really smooth.” Cohen has been sponsoring prom for three years now and is positive that she can get her fourth year sponsoring done with ease. She’s helping the officers and delegates finalize some details. “I’m a little nervous because I’ve never [been] before so I don’t know what it’s going to be like but I’m also excited because it’s going to be a lot of fun,” junior Bryan Chac said. Tickets have already started to be sold before and after school all through February, March and April, sales of the tickets will help pay for prom. The tickets include an invitation, cost of the DJ, the photo booth, dinner and the cost of venue for the night. The tickets cost $60 before April 4, after that, they go up to $70.

“I think the day of prom is really exciting because all the work pays off and everybody’s just really having a great time,” Cohen said. The caterers provide a menu and when people buy their ticket they get to choose what they want to eat. Cohen has relationships with the caterers so it’s easier for them to pick out the menu. “Well, I already know their prices are more expensive and it’ll be more extravagant,” senior Mallory Schaffrin said. “I’m excited. I liked planning it last year so I’m excited to go this year and not know what to expect.” The recent Prom Fashion Show was a fundraiser to help with the costs of the formal. Cohen has also been in contact with the convention center and other companies that will help support them for prom, as she is the contact person for all of these. “Right now, it’s a lot of planning so we’re talking about what we really want to see and then we’ll start implementing,” Cohen said. “I’m working with the Junior Class Delegates and Officers to finalize some details.” For Shine, the best part of this process is putting this whole thing together. He likes to share his opinions and be a part of coming to a compromise for details for this year’s prom. Both he and Cohen claim the stress hasn’t hit them yet, but they don’t think there will be much stress since they started to prepare so early. “We all work really well together,” Shine said. “Things are going out really smooth. I was thinking it would be a lot more stressful and we started early so it’s no stress at all. It’s not gonna be a worry I have that we’re not going to be ready for the date.”

10 Tips For Promposals

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When planning for a promposal try to make it personal by including inside jokes.

Make sure you know the person you’re asking, or try and hint to them that you’re going to ask them.

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FHNTODAY.COM PAGE BY SAMMIE HERR

03.16.16

Try a poem or something that rhymes, something other that the usual ‘roses are red.’

Incude food or candy, these could potentially be two important key elements.

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Don’t know the person you’re asking? Find out about them, ask around.

Choose a color scheme that works, if you both like the same color.

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WATCH

Follow the link http://goo.gl/UjIhLW to see some other ways to do a promposal.

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Attempt pick-up lines. For example, Make a photo collage and use the line, “Can you picture us at Prom?”

Don’t be afraid to be yourself. Bring up something that’s personal and be unique.

See if you can get people to help out if you’re making it public.

If all else fails, hey, at least you’ve got great friends who would be happy to save a dance for you.


Differing Ideas Cause Diverse Choices

Members of Francis Howell North who are heavily engaged in the presidential Race share their personal takes on the candidates and their views Students and Faculty answer what the positivites of each candidate running for president are. Bernie Sanders “I think that he has a lot of ideas that a lot of good people could agree with. He is very understanding, socially aware and reliable.” Brittany Mathis, 12

Hillary Clinton “I think Hillary Clinton could improve America by being the first female president, bringing more attention to inequality of sexes.” Elise Gordon, 9

Ted Cruz “Ted Cruz is a bit more extreme than Trump, but has a strong turnout with Evangelic Christians. His experience in the Senate plays a role in that. He’s catching up to Trump and it will be close.” Chris St. Aubin, 11 Donald Trump “The reason he has so much support is because one, his name. Two; he’s successful. Three; people equate political success with business success. So I think the non-establishment people see that he will do to America what he’s done to his business. William Crow, Teacher

Student Poll The North Star polled 243 students on what their political views are, they responded with which political party they are affiliated with and who they want to win each nomination.

Dem. Out of the Democratic Candidates, who would you like to see win the Democratic Nomination?

Hillary Clinton (24%) Bernie Sanders (76%)

Rep. Donald Trump (26%) Out of the Republican Candidates, who would you like to see win the Republican Nomination?

John Kasich (8%) Ted Cruz (28%) Marco Rubio (38%)

Which political party do you align more with?

Marco Rubio “The establishment would want to align with Rubio as he applies better for moderate voters. Moderate voters have a very influential role. Rubio is less extreme so he could appeal to these voters.” Mensur Koso, 12

Democrat (42%) Libertarian (2%) Republican (37%) Independent (8%) Other (12%)

FHNTODAY.COM PAGE BY BENNETT SMALLWOOD

03.16.16

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s V . F h a t ct y M Saint Patrick’s Day Every year on March 17, the annual holiday of Saint Patrick’s Day comes back around. However, some people don’t know the differences between the real facts and the myths that are often told about this Irish holiday

Myth 1

Saint Patrick’s Day is a day to celebrate the Irish culture by eating, drinking, and wearing the color green.

Contrary to popular belief, this day is celebrated to commemorate the death date of the patron saint of Ireland, Saint Patrick. He is still the foremost patron saint today but blessed Ireland from 385–461 A.D.

Myth 2

Saint Patrick was born in Ireland and was of Irish descent since he is a patron saint for the country.

Even though he was a patron saint of Ireland, Saint Patrick was British and born in Europe.

Myth 3

The color used to commemorate Saint Patrick for his time in the church is green.

The Saint was depicted in many paintings wearing blue. King Henry VIII also used the Irish harp in gold on a blue flag to represent the country. The color blue was therefore used on flags and coatsof-arms. There’s no clear reason why green has been associated with Saint Patrick’s Day or even why blue was picked instead.

Myth 4

The national symbol for the country of Ireland is a shamrock.

Starting in medieval times, a has been put on manuscripts, gravestones and has been popular in Irish culture. The harp represents the countries battling for their freedom. The symbol was eventually named the official coat of arms in 1921.

Myth 5

Drinking alcohol has always been a popular tradition for this Irish holiday.

Contrary to what many believe, starting in 1903 Ireland declared Saint Patrick’s Day a dry holiday in respect to the saint. This was lifted in 1970 when it became a national holiday.

Corned beef and cabbage is a classic dish from Ireland that most Irish people eat on Saint Patrick’s Day.

Most Americans eat corned beef and cabbage on this green holiday. It was adopted in the late 19th century by Irish immigrants in New York in order to save money. However, in Ireland they eat a type of bacon similar to ham since pork is available all over Ireland.

Myth 6

Sources: History.com & Catholic.org

fact 1

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Bronte Bradshaw models her favorite blue nose ring. This kind is called a nose bone. A nose bone is a short stud that has a rounded end to ensure it doesn’t fall out. Bradshaw mostly wears nose bones because they aren’t as noticeable as a nose hoop and they’re easier to insert than a nostril screw or an “L” shape. (Photo by Kristen Pike)

A Piercing Creating a Bond Bronte Bradshaw and her mom both have a nose ring and they can relate to each other better because of their piercings BY KARIS SKAGGS karisskaggs@gmail.com

“Proud” is the word junior Bronte Bradshaw used to describe her mom’s feelings about her nose piercing Bronte got for her 15th birthday. Bronte’s mom, Alex Bradshaw, got her first nose ring when she was 14 and now has two, so she was excited that her daughter wanted to follow in her footsteps. “I liked it,” Alex said. “I had no problem with it at all. I got mine at 14 so I thought it was about time. If it was a tattoo that would be different because that doesn’t go away, but a nose ring you can take out.” They can split nose ring packages and shop for them together, and Bronte and her mom have been able to bond over their piercings. Recently, they bought a pack together that had one ring that Alex really wanted and kept, and she gave Bronte the rest. Bronte is glad that she got her nose pierced because she likes the way that it looks. She got her nose pierced in Virginia before

she moved to Missouri. “I went in there terrified,” Bronte said. “I started shaking and my mom was trying to calm me down because she’s got piercings everywhere. It started out as me holding my mom’s hand for dear life.” It was a spontaneous decision for Bronte, but many people didn’t notice it at first. Bronte said that some of her teachers in Virginia didn’t ask her about it until a month later. One of Bronte’s friends, FHN senior Cassondra Tompkins, said she thinks it’s unique and expressive. Bronte is graduating a year early and she wants to be a teacher. She isn’t afraid about the nose ring affecting her future because it is easy to take out. She also has the option to put a less noticeable ring in. She doesn’t plan to get any more piercings either; she wants to keep it simple. “I don’t want anything weird, because I’m trying to be a teacher and I’m not going to have it all over the place, and plus I just don’t want it,” Bronte said. “This one’s low key so it’s okay.”

Bradshaw holds a gold nose ring she bought with her mom. There are multiple types of rings and studs for a nose piercing. Bradshaw mostly wears studs. (Photo by Kristen Pike)

FHNTODAY.COM

PAGE BY KARIS SKAGGS

03.16.16

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Estefania Cruz-Castillo, Amber Pryor, Caitlind Walker and other students watch an engineer during their monthly meeting at Boeing. Boeing is the world’s largest aerospace company that designs, manufactures and sells airplanes, rotorcraft, rockets and satellites. (Photo by Madi Graves)

Exploring Boeing’s World of Engineering Sophomores Caitlind Walker, Amber Pryor and Estefania Cruz-Casillo go to Boeing for an engineering program for high schoolers BY CAROLYNN GONZALEZ carolynnnn.182@gmail.com

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FHNTODAY.COM

PAGE BY CAROLYNN GONZALEZ

03.16.16

The field of engineering is becoming increasingly more important to today’s society. Because engineering is so vital, programs such as the Boeing Explore Post have been established for kids. While some people view programs like the Boeing Explore Post as something to put on their resume, others like sophomores Caitlind Walker, Amber Pryor, Estefania Cruz-Casillo and five other FHN students see it as a stepping stone into their future careers. “I really like how creative we get to be with it,” Estafania said. “No one can tell is exactly what to do. We get to figure out what works and what doesn’t work.” The Boeing Explore Post is a program for high school students to further their knowledge of engineering. It shows them what it’s like to have an actual engineering occupation and provides a more hands-on experience that isn’t found in schools.

“Since they’re being guided by engineers that have already experienced what their careers are like, it makes the program a closer simulation to an engineering job,” Cindi Walker, Caitlind’s mother and executive director of global support and services at Boeing, said. According to Pryor, the Boeing Explore Post was advertised to them in their engineering class and both Caitlind and Amber took interest. With encouragement from Cindi, they applied. “We both want to be engineers, so we wanted to be exposed to different forms of engineering,” Caitlind said. “Plus, since Boeing is an actual company, you know the program is going to be legit.” In order to be chosen to be a part of the Boeing Explore Post, an essay must be written on why the applicant believes they should receive a spot in the program. Only 80 applicants out of the 200 that applied are accepted each season, which begins in


Th

The Engineering process Step 1: Identify the Problem Using prior knowledge, you must identify the problem the engineering team wants to solve. Research on the problem and its feasibility may also be needed at this stage.

Step 2: Identify Criteria The criteria for design requirements is determined. Deciding upon design requirements is one of the most important steps because it is what controls the project throughout the duration of the engineering process.

Step 3: Brainstorm Solutions Quick drawings are made by the engineers in the team for the project. At this step, possible solutions to the problem are discussed within the group.

Step 4: Generate Ideas Two or three ideas are to be chosen from the brainstorming step and developed more thoroughly individually. New, more precise and neat drawings should be made by each member of the team.

Step 5: Explore Possibilities New designs and ideas are to be shared and discussed with all the engineers in the group. A list should be made of all the pros and cons of each design.

s,

September and ends in May. “The essay had to be constrained to 300 words, and it was really hard to fit what you wanted to say in that space,” Amber said. The 80 high schoolers accepted into the Boeing Explore Post are split into two sessions which both meet once a month. According to Caitlind, they are guided by engineers from Boeing, which provides a more accurate look into what being an engineer is like. “It’s a good opportunity to work as a team,” Cindi said. “Teamwork is critical in any job, but especially in engineering.” Caitlind, Amber and Estefania’s project for this year’s Boeing Explore Post is to construct a Rube Goldberg machine, which is an over-engineered contraption that performs a simple task, typically through a chain reaction. Through the process of planning and working on their machine, they learn the engineering process, a main concept in any engineering profession,

and how to work together in groups. Their team receives a marble from another team’s machine, which travels through a PVC pipe to a box with a sensor that allows the marble to land on a pressure plate of the next team’s machine. “We started building recently,” Amber said. “They have bins of materials we can use that range from pipe cleaners to heat guns. As a team, we looked through the parts and determined what we would use to make our design most effective.” According to Amber, the Boeing Explore Post has shown them what it’s like to work with peers who are actually interested in becoming engineers. Working in teams is a large part of engineering and a history of teamwork is something engineering companies like Boeing look for in clients. “It’s nice to work in a group of people who have engineering minds and put out good ideas,” Caitlind said. “I plan on doing it [the Boeing Explore Post] next year too.”

Step 6: Find an Approach The design that seems to solve the problem in the best, most efficient manner is chosen during this step.

Step 7: Build a Model Following the drawing, a prototype of the project should be constructed among the engineering team.

Step 8: Refine the Design Based on the criteria established for the project during step two, evaluate the model(s) and its success. Improvements on the project are to FHNTODAY. COM be PAGE discussed, and the process may BY CAROLYNN GONZALEZ repeat itself. Source: nasa.gov

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Senior Jennifer Byman practices her routine for an upcoming competition, For this routine she is skating to the song "Skyfall" by Adele. She mostly practices at the St. Peter’s Rec Plex. There are 4 major branches of figure skating: singles, pairs, ice dance, and synchronized skating. (Photo Illustration by Lauren Price)

Figuring It All Out Although senior Jennifer Byman doesn’t plan on pursing figure skating professionally while in college, she is working hard to improve and enhance her skill level before she graduates and her last season ends BY ERIN LEVINS

erlevins013@gmail.com • @ItsLevins

As she laces on her ice skates for what seems like the millionth time, senior Jennifer Byman runs through the competition routine in her head. Every twist, jump and turn matters. Countless hours of practice consume her thoughts as she meticulously stretches each muscle. She double checks her makeup and hair while she smooths out her dress. As she steps out onto the ice, her name is called. She takes a deep, chilly breath and glides. “She is a natural performer,” Jennifer’s mother Kristine Byman said. “She never looks nervous on the ice and she is very confident in her skating skills.” Jennifer began skating at the age of three when her parents slapped a pair of ice skates on her and pushed her out onto the ice. Although she wasn’t given a the link choice in the matter, she quickly fell in love with the fun Follow http://goo.gl/zH8YnZ to see atmosphere and creative routines. Soon after, her parents senior Jennifer Byman in action. got her into practicing several times a week and even hired a private coach for her at the St. Peter’s Rec Plex. With these years of hard work and passion, she started pursuing her competitions and skating more rigorously. She competes with a synchronized skating team called Onyx Ice, along with doing individual events. She has competed at the St. Peter’s Rec Plex, Webster Groves, Jefferson City, Miami University in Ohio and in Wisconsin. Although she has competed nationally, she is still working hard to improve. “I want to improve on my ice presence, which is pretty much how I execute my program and make it smooth and entertaining to watch,” Jennifer said.

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Jennifer is currently working hard to finish her last competitive season successfully before she heads off to college. She is practicing more than ever to improve her skill level. She spends hours, multiple times a week, practicing her routines over and over until they’re perfect and up to her coach’s standards. No matter how sore or tired she is, she continues pushing herself harder. “If I don’t have a competition coming up, I just practice my skills individually so I can test and move up in skating levels which is usually pretty hard,” Jennifer said. Normally, competitions last an entire weekend and mainly consist of a lot of waiting. Jennifer spends her time making sure her appearance is acceptable for when she competes because it factors into her final score. After she performs, she spends time anticipating and watching the award ceremonies. Her favorite moves are the flip jump and sit spin because she likes how they look in programs. She enjoys the moves where she can show her flexibility and test her endurance. “She always looks incredible when she performs,” Jennifer’s friend, senior Samm Heupel said. “She masters every move like she’s practiced it millions of times.” Although Jennifer loves ice skating, she plans on putting away her sparkly skating dresses and going to college to pursue radiology. Most colleges don’t have ice skating programs so she’s content with keeping it as a hobby after this year. She’ll continue practicing and having fun, just without the intensity. Her parents are more than proud for how long she’s stuck with it and how hard she has worked to be the best she can. “I love skating and I would so do it forever if I could,” Jennifer said. “I’ll always skate in some way or form.”


Senior Abby Day talks to FACS teacher Marissa Cohen about pleating the sleeves of her prom dress. Day is making her dress for a project in Advanced Clothing II. Day is planning to make the sleeves of her prom dress hanging off of her shoulders. (Photo by Abby Temper)

The Perfect Prom Dress

Senior Abby Day created her own outfit from scratch for the last dance BY KYLIE MOSER

kylie.moser@gmail.com • @kyliemoser14

Since, the beginning of the year, senior Abby Day has been working on a project: creating her own prom dress. Day began drafting the dress when the year started and has been making progress on it all year. Day grew up sewing with her grandma, but really only started making clothing as of last year. Day enjoys making clothing because of the sense of fulfillment it provides. “I really like it, it makes me feel accomplished especially when it fits really nice and it looks well done,” Day said. “It’s a cool feeling because you know you made it yourself.” Follow the link So far, she has made a variety http://goo.gl/YMWvo8 see Abby Day’s dress and of things such as shirts, dresses, to process. pillowcases, and even crocheted stuffed animals for her cousins, however this is the first time she has made something formal. She got the idea to make her prom dress when she realized it would be the perfect way to ensure her dress was exactly what she wanted it to be, as well as being a fun project. “I’ve always liked making my own things and it’s kind of something I’ve always wanted to do,” Day said. “I really like prom dress shopping and finding stuff but I couldn’t find exactly what I wanted and so I think it’ll be cool to put everything together myself so it’ll fit right and it’ll be what I want.” One of Day’s friends and classmates, Rachel Elder has witnessed all of Day’s work and has been

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supporting her along the way. “She’s put a lot of effort into it,” Elder said. “Almost every class period she works on it and I think she did some over fall break too. There was a lot of prepping before she could even start, like buying the materials.” Creating clothing can be quite challenging as it requires strict following of instructions. According to Elder, this is no problem for Day and that’s part of what makes her so good at creating clothing. “Making clothing is a lot about following instructions and she’s good about being detailed with that,” Elder said. Day had help from teacher Marissa Cohen, in putting together the design and advice on fixing any problems she encounters along the way. “Cohen’s been helping me along the whole way,” Day said. “If I have any problems she tries to figure out what I should do. She’s definitely been a big help.” Day works on the dress primarily in Cohen’s Advanced Clothing class and the dress is being stored there as she works. She uses the class’s sewing machine, but she has brought in all of her own fabrics and beading. She bought most of her materials from JoAnn’s Fabrics, though some had to be ordered online. So far, the body of the dress is complete but the detailing is not yet finished. Elder and Cohen both agree the dress is beautiful and are proud of Day’s hard work. “I’m really proud of her for taking the initiative to make her own prom dress,” Cohen said. “That’s not something you see all the time.”

FHNTODAY.COM PAGE BY KYLIE MOSER

03.16.16

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The Hill is an area in St. Louis that is known for its extensive Italian culture and is home to many relatives of settlers from Lombardy and Sicily. The Hill features many Italian shops and restaurants such as Gioas Deli and Gelato di Riso. (Photos by Ashton Stegman)

Little Italy on the Hill

The Hill is a neighborhood in St. Louis that is famous for its Italian-based culture BY SAMI SCHMID saminicole102@gmail.com

A man sits outside at Shaw’s cafe with some friends as a white convertible Carretero from Spain. Many of these restaurants, such as Amighetti’s Cafe and drives up to a stop sign next to coffee shop. The man calls out to his friends in Bakery, still use traditional recipes passed down and brought from overseas. the car and they wave him over. He gets up, walks to the car and gives them “My family is just one of the many that have been here for a very long time handshakes and pleasantries. It turns out that he also knows the people in where generation after generation has been here,” Amighetti’s owner Dominic a black car behind his friends in the convertible and Consolino said. “It’s what makes the Hill.” Location of The Hill moves a step back to greet them. The whole time St. Ambrose Church, many locals will say, is another he is temporarily impeding the flow of traffic. No one large part of the community. seems to get angry or honk at them. Everyone seems “In Italy, in the towns, the social life centered to simply smile and watch. This is the kind of sight that around the local church and here on the Hill over the can be seen in St. Louis’s own version of Little Italy generations again the social life is centered around known as the Hill. St. Ambrose church,” Consolino said. “So, St. Ambrose The Hill is one of St. Louis’ main attractions, bringing church will have different events that kind of keep the in tourists from all over. The Hill was the starting place community together.” for quality Italian food in the St. Louis area and while The family atmosphere is not lost in the swarm of many of the restaurants have expanded they have not fancy dine-in eateries. On a nice day, many people left their roots behind. prefer outside dining. Many people are smiling and “The restaurants, or the authentic Italian restaurants walking their dogs. in St. Louis, came from the Hill,” son of Giovanni’s “We have a mixture of clientele,” a manager of owner Carmelo Gabriele said. “That’s why it’s such a Charlie Gitto’s, Todd Newman said. “It’s a family and draw to the Hill because it’s the founders of the Italian a business clientele mixture. Actually, we have all restaurants in St. Louis. Now the kids have come in walks of life here so it’s kind of a new thing everyday and expanded to West County and North County and all you know you never know what you’re gonna have. The Hill is located on high ground south of that. This is where it originated.” It’s always changing and it’s always exciting. We’re Forest Park. This community is so large it’s The Hill is full of restaurants, delis, bakeries and always busy here.” official boundaries are Manchester Avenue to homes. It is well known for its Italian heritage that There are a variety of restaurants ranging from the north, Columbia and Southwest Avenues to dates back to the 1800s and is named the Hill because the south, South Kingshighway Boulevard to the white tablecloth dining, to more casual seat-yourself the neighborhood contains the highest point inside cafes. east, and Hampton Avenue to the west. city limits and looks off onto semi-sloping streets. It “[It’s] like when you go on vacation and all the wasn’t until the beginning of the 20th century that it souvenir shops sell the same T-Shirt,” Consolino really kicked off. This was due to the proximity of their said. “That’s not the case on the Hill. We all kind of homes to the clay mines that many of them worked. Others brought over their specialize in different things and it works.” craftsman skills and imported their foods. Now, generations later, the Hill still Many shop owners and employees like the location for its accessibility and stands and the people have clung to their Italian heritage. Many restaurant attraction to customers. owners have stories to tell of their own establishment in the area, such as “I think it’s a perfect location,” Jenifer Gunter, manager of Guido’s Pizzeria and Gabriele, who was originally from Italy, or Guido’s Pizzeria and Tapas’ Miguel Tapas, said. “I couldn’t imagine it any other place.”

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To start off, Connor Lucas paints a layer of liquid latex on a smooth surface to create a headpiece. This is used to make To create the burned look, Lucas uses alcohol soluble body paints to fill in the it easier to cover his hair with makeup. After the latex dries, he paints another layer, and lays down a layer of tissue gelatin, meaning that alcohol must be used to remove it. He uses colors like red, paper. This is used in order to make the head piece more durable. This is repeated until a desired thickness is achieved. to look like blood and flesh, and black, to look like charred skin.

Monster In the Making

Connor Lucas is a sophomore who has an interesting hobby. Lucas is a skilled prosthetic makeup artist. He specializes in gore and wound makeup. Lucas has been doing prosthetic makeup since he was in sixth grade and plans to continue doing makeup for shows and haunted houses. Lucas was in charge of the zombie makeup during the drama club escape room. “I like doing prosthetic makeup because you can let your imagination go crazy and have fun with it,” Lucas said.

Photo story by Kristen Pike To be sure the headpiece doesn’t move, Lucas adheres it to his skin with more liquid latex. Liquid latex and gelatin are the main ingredients of this prosthetic look.

Lucas applies gelatin to the latex headpiece. He chose gelatin because it looks and feels closer to the texture of skin. To make the gelatin mixture, he adds glycerin, a small amount of water, and a packet of gelatine, then he puts it in the microwave for 30 seconds. After the gelatin dries, he can start to apply makeup over it. Lucas poses with the final product. He decided to add lines down the middle to give a two-faced look. To make his eyes look sunken in, he used black body paint to contour around his eye.

Lucas adds the finishing touches, including one white contact. You can find white contacts at halloween stores or online. He also used a stippling sponge to add flecks of black to the burn.

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PAGE BY RILEY MCCRACKIN

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REIGNITING THE FLAME

With roughly 42,000 deaths per year and 117 deaths per day, suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the US. Many people hear about instances of suicide, and some of us may even know someone who has attempted or even taken their own life. As suicide becomes a growing problem in the U.S, it affects everybody in one way or another. (Photos by Madi Graves and Lucas Tabaka)


Sophomore Madison Meers holds a single lit candle to signify her life. Madion is involved with the school yearbook and works at Fazolis. (Photo by Madi Graves)


The Road to Recovery Sophomore Madison Meers shares her story about how attempting suicide affected both her and those around her and how she has recovered since then. BY PRISCILLA JOEL

The hospital staff took all of Madison’s belongings jewelry, hair ties, even most of her clothing and had her wear a hospital gown. She was then moved her to a room adison came home after a normal school-day this with nothing but a bed and two chairs. Just outside, a past November. But what happened after that was hospital staff member sat watching Madison to make sure not normal at all. Madison had a good week at that she wouldn’t try to harm herself again. school, but ended up in a disagreement with her parents “I think I needed to be there because I felt like maybe this when she got home. Madison had suffered from depression would grab my parents’ attention more to see ‘yeah, I need since middle school, but this year, she felt its effects help’ and that I’m not okay,” Madison said. stronger than in the past as she attempted to cope with Madison was in solitary confinement for her self-image and personal problems at about 6-8 hours, until she was discharged home. to go home, after her parents assured her “I just kind of felt like things weren’t safety. worth living for anymore.” “I saw how emotional and hard it was These were the thoughts that were [for my parents] because I’m their oldest going through Meers’ head as she took child,” Madison said. “I really took to heart a handful of Prozac, her depression how they felt and how they reacted.” medication, and stuffed them into her Additionally, one of Madison’s closest mouth, hoping to take her own life. “Though you may friends, Kylie Loveless came to see her “I was so overwhelmed in the situation think your life is as soon as she heard about what had that I didn’t know what to do,” Madison, not precious, and happened. who is a sophomore, said. “I was scared,” Kylie said. “I was worried Luckily, her mother walked into the that people don’t about her. I wondered why she would kitchen where Madison stood soon after care, I promise you do that and, you know, even though and ran to her daughter’s side. there is one person somebody may look happy on the outside, “She shoved her hand down my mouth on this planet that it doesn’t always mean that they’re truly and got as many as she could out,” really cares about happy, and that’s what I think she was Madison said. you and would hate going through.” Madison wasn’t taken to the hospital to see you gone,” Kylie visited Madison often and checked until later, when she began to feel -Madison Meers on her to make sure she was okay. sick and nauseous. Madison’s mother “I think of her as a little sister I never did some research on the effects of had,” Kylie said. “She’s my best friend. I overdosing on Prozac, then Madison was could never imagine losing her when she rushed to the emergency room. has so much to live for.” “I couldn’t believe this was happening,” After Madison came home, she took a week off of school Madison’s mother Jennifer said. “I couldn’t believe we were during which she had several doctor, psychiatrist and in the ER. It’s scary. You just want to fix it and make it therapist appointments which helped her cope with the better for her.” problems she faced. She also received constant support The hospital called it “situational suicide,” and they had from her friends and family. her sit with her mother inside of a small room as Madison “When I first saw her [after her suicide attempt], I just and her mother explained to a nurse what had happened. automatically hugged her and I was shaking,” Madison’s “Personally, I was very shocked that I actually would do boyfriend Anthony Spinaio said. “I saw the hospital band on something like that because before, I had thought about it, her arm and I just kept staring at it.” but I never thought I could actually try to do something to In the past few months since her suicide attempt, hurt myself, ever, like that,” Madison said. “And, I was very Madison has recovered from her past. Each day is one small scared about what was going to happen next. After I got to step towards her happiness. the hospital and stuff, I realized how precious life really is.” “Even if you’re going through therapy or working to get Madison had her blood drawn, which was tested to see over it, you’re not always going to be happy,” Madison how much Prozac was in her blood. Fortunately, she hadn’t said, “You’ll have your moments, I still have my moments. swallowed enough pills to require her to get her stomach I still have good and bad days. The good and bad days will pumped, however she would feel sick. never stop, but when I’m having a bad day, I just always “They put me in solitary confinement after that,” Madison remember that good times are coming. It will be okay.” said.

pjchristo16@gmail.com • @JCPjchristo

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Where to Get Help With teen suicide rates at their highest ever, FHN offers a variety of ways to guide students who are feeling suicidal BY ANTHONY KRISTENSEN anthony.kristensen17@gmail.com • anthonyk17slsg

If deemed serious enough, the student is then referred to local emergency rooms, such as SSM or St. Joseph’s. Then, they make sure the student is admitted Family problems. Depression. Emotional pain. These somewhere that the family’s health insurance is are common reasons that a student would typically accepted so they can afford the cost of treatment. be faced with suicidal thoughts at FHN, according to “We would try to connect families guidance counselor Mary Kerr-Grant. with mental health resources in our Most of the time, according to Kerrcommunity,” FHSD Director of Student Grant, the situation isn’t reported by Services Jennifer Patterson said. the student who is feeling suicidal. “Our counselors and our educational “Sometimes a student will come support counselors have a resource to me directly,” Kerr-Grant said. “I guide of providers in the community would say most often, a friend or a to give to the parents the list so they parent will contact me and express can get an in depth assessment of concern about someone.” their child.” Once someone goes to the With suicide rates on the rise, Kerrguidance office or is referred to Grant believes that there is more to there, the person goes through a be done to prevent and help those number of questions from their that are faced with suicidal thoughts. counselor. They are also sent A purple and turquoise ribbon stands According to Kerr-Grant, someone who to work with FHN’s Educational for suicide awareness and prevention. is showing suicidal feelings should never Support Counselor, Barry Morrison, go under the radar. to get additional help dealing with “The suicide rate is going up in our country, and their suicidal thoughts. that’s a big concern because there’s more awareness “We will assess the level of risk,” Morrison said. “If and more prevention,” Kerr-Grant said. “I think it’s very someone really is suicidal, we will contact a parent or important we never ever underestimate when someone guardian and we will inform them of the situation and says something that sounds like a suicidal thought.” what the student has shared.”

How to Reach Out When Help is Needed Psychologists There are foundations within the St. Louis area that provide free help from licensed professionals. Reaching out to these organizations can get you the help you need. Megan Meier Foundation 636-757-3501

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Counselors Guidance counselors will talk with you and your family to assess the level of risk. If need be, the counselor will refer you to different mental health clinics around the area to get professional help. The Guidance Office is located off the main lobby at FHN.

Trusted Adults If you are having suicidal thoughts or impulses, talking to trusted adults can help. They know you best and can provide you personal support and be with you as often as you need. Going to your teachers, or relatives who know you well.

Crisis Hotlines Crisis hotlines offer anonymity. If you are not comfortable talking to someone you know or in person, they can talk you through your issues and refer you to professionals if need be. Missouri Crisis Hotline 1-800-811-4760


Common Suicide Warning Signs Unusual phrases that hint at taking their own life

Fluctuation of mood and/or outlook on life

Gradual withdrawal from family and friends

Giving away valuables and settling financial situations Recent health or weight issues

How to Help Someone Who is Suicidal

1

Notice the warning signs. This is crucial in making sure that they do not act. Suicidal people will not always convey what they are thinking directly, but may drop hints.

2

Be a sympathetic listener. Take them seriously. Don’t trivialize their struggles or say that they won’t really do it. Reassure them that you and many others do care about them. Making them feel cared for may help deter feelings of isolation.

Abrupt use of drugs or alcohol

Loss of motivation and energy

Sources: PsychCentral SuicideLine

Suicide warning signs vary from person to person. Depending on who the person is, they may show physical signs, verbal signs or no signs at all. No matter what kind of signs are shown, people can never know what the person is considering

doing to themselves. The best way to work to prevent somebody from hurting themselves is to take immediate action by recognizing the warning signs, being there for them, getting them help and supporting them through the road to recovery.

Phrases to Listen For Suicidal people may hint at the way they’re feeling with the things they say

3

Do not try to handle the situation all by yourself. Suicide is an issue that affects everyone involved, and even if you are knowledgeable, you do not have the experience that a counselor or mental health professional may have. Refer them to a mental health professional or suicide hotline. These are trained professionals who are experienced in dealing with people who are suicidal.

“I feel alone.” “I don’t have anything worth living for.” “Nobody feels the way I do.” “Life isn’t worth living.” “I’d be better off dead.”

“I just can’t deal with anything.”

“I won’t be a burden much longer.”

4

Support them through their recovery, even when they seem to be feeling better. Suicidal feelings frequently come and go, and knowing that they have someone to talk to is very important.

Sources: SANE Australia, www.suicide.org

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Recognition and Action Suicide’s prevalence is far from a new issue, and while those who experience suicidal thoughts may have some things in common, the causes of suicide vary greatly from person to person BY CLAIRE BOENITZ claire.boenitz@gmail.com

long-term effects, according to Kircher-Morris. Spectra and physical science teacher Jon Travis has dealt with a number of students with uicide is an issue that devastates, shocks and perplexes. Many suicidal thoughts in his years of teaching. people wonder what drives a person to do such a thing to both “Kids are expected to be adults,” Travis said. “They’re having to cope themselves and the people around them. Bullying, mental illness, with all of these pressures without having the tools available to deal with loss, substance abuse, family situations and exposure to suicide them. Sometimes, though, I wonder if kids wonder if it’s temporary, and whether through the Internet or direct whether they really realize the finality experience with losing someone - can of death.” NEED HELP? all contribute to contemplation of In helping those with suicidal 1-800-273-8255 National Suicide Prevention Lifeline thoughts, suicide. listening to them and 741-741 Crisis Text Line “A lot of times it starts with feelings believing what they say is crucial, of ‘I don’t want to be here anymore, I according to Kircher-Morris. Suicidal 800-784-2433 Suicide Help Line don’t want to deal with this,’” licensed people do not always act sad or professional counselor Emily Kircherhopeless, but rather drop hints, such Morris said. “Then it goes toward more concrete thoughts, like thinking as not thinking long-term and joking about dying or the act of suicide. ‘maybe I should kill myself.’ Beyond that, people make plans, and then the Recognizing warning signs and spreading awareness are key to helping last step would be an attempt. It’s cyclical, generally, and tends to vary. fight suicide’s prevalence. People may be triggered, or they may just start feeling worse.” “Everyone is qualified to help somebody,” FHN educational support In 2013, the most recent year from which data is available, suicide was counselor Barry Morrison said. “Even just by listening or saying ‘let’s get the 10th leading cause of death in America, with one in every 25 recorded you help.’ That is the most important thing, when I work with people, is attempts being lethal, according to Medical News Today. It tends to be that you do not have to have an advanced degree to help people. It’s just most prevalent in teenagers and young adults, which can be attributed taking it seriously when someone feels that way or offers those thoughts to lack of coping mechanisms that develop with age and difficulty seeing and getting them help the best you know how to.”

S

Amount of suicide deaths in the US per year:

42,773

Cost of suicide in the US per year:

$44.6 billion

Amount of suicide Suicide rate in the US out of every deaths in the US 10,000 people: per day:

117

12.93

Females: *More likely to have suicidal thoughts *Fourteenth leading cause of death *Most used method is with poison

Males *Take their lives four times more than women *Seventh leading cause of death *Most used method is with firearms

Sources: American Foundation For Suicide Prevention Centers For Disease Control And Prevention

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This Season Will Not Be His Last Senior Austin Price will be finishing his last high school season before moving on to college volleyball next fall

Austin Price, 12

After talking to 10 different colleges, senior Austin Price has decided to attend St. Ambrose University in Davenport, Iowa, on both academic and athletic scholarships. “They have a great volleyball team and are very prestigious with my major, which is criminal justice,” Price said. The scholarship will give Price $15,000 a year to play for St. Ambrose. Price is excited to be playing volleyball for his favorite college and likes that they have a large fan base. Price will be majoring in Criminal Justice and plans to

VOLLEYBALL

graduate in five years. “[I’m looking forward to] having a big crowd come to watch me play volleyball, the whole team and having a good record and hopefully going to the championship,” Price said. Price will also be playing his final year of high school volleyball for the FHN varsity team. This will help him prepare for the new, tough, challenging and competitive college volleyball season. “Hopefully, there will be a lot of conditioning to get me ready for college and a lot of reps so I don’t suck when I get into college,” Price said. (Brief by Garret Griffin)

Senior Experience Senior Ryan Dickey has been preparing for the new golf season by keeping up with his long game. “I’ve played a lot and hit a lot of balls in the offseason,” Dickey said. Dickey joined the FHN Golf team his freshman year and being the only senior on the team feels he has the most experience and knows the courses the team will be playing this year. The team’s first tournament will be at Bogey Hills on March 28 at 9 a.m. “[This season] I’m looking forward to getting to play some of the nice courses we get to play like Winghaven or Bogey Hills,” Dickey said. After this year, Dickey will be attending Mizzou on the Business track. He will not be playing golf in college but will miss being a part of the FHN varsity golf team. “I’ll miss getting to play so much free golf and being a part of the team,” Dickey said. (Brief by Garret Griffin)

GOLF

Senior Ryan Dickey hits the golf ball at one of the golf courses last season. FHN was third at districts last year. (FIle photo)

Graduate Returns to Play His Second Season Gage Gruenenfelder graduated from FHN early in December but will still be able to play for the Francis Howell Force Rugby team this upcoming season. He is capable of playing for the team because the team is not a funded FHSD team. Gruenenfelder was on the varsity team last year and has been offered an athletic scholarship from Lindenwood University. He will not be accepting it due to the fact that it was not a full-ride. “I have one year of experience with the team and it made me a better player because now I know what to do and I’ve learned the game fast,” Gruenenfelder said.

RUGBY

Lindenwood University has offered Gage a $9,000 scholarship to play rugby this upcoming fall season. Although Lindenwood is ranked third in the nation for Division 1 rugby, he will not be accepting the offer and instead will attend SCC for two years to receive his assosiates degree while playing in a men’s rugby league. The team’s first game was Saturday, March 12. Playing for the Force rugby team this final season, Gruenenfelder hopes it will help him for his future in the men’s league. “It gives me a better idea of the game so that way when I get to the men’s league I have some experience under my belt,” Gruenenfelder said. (Brief by Garret Griffin)

Graduate Gage Gruenenfelder tries to retrieve the ball from an opposing player last season during a game. This is the second year the rugby is offered at FHN. (File photo)

FHNTODAY.COM PAGE BY GARRET GRIFFIN

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What Does It Take To reach state? The Roster

III

I

These are all of the spring sports at FHN, with colors corresponding with the other infographics found on this spread. II II

IIII III

Baseball

As games and matches begin, FHN spring athletes are aiming high and setting new goals for the season. We’re breaking it down to what it takes to succeed during the season and we polled the athletes to see what they’re looking forward to.

I

Girls’ Lacrosse

1. Clocking in hours in the off season

Boys’ Tennis

For athletes looking to become better, the sports season never really ends in the first place. Here are the average number of hours students reported practing per week in the offseason.

Boys’ Golf

7

Girls’ Soccer

6.8

5.2

5.1

4.6

3.9

2.3

Boys’ Volleyball Boys’ Track & Field

76.5%

of spring athletes practice in the offseason

100%

of students that have made it past districts practice in the offseason

Girls’ Track & Field

When They Started While practice makes perfect, it doesn’t hurt to have a few extra years under your belt. Here are the average number of years FHN spring athletes have been playing coming into the season.

10

Athlete: Will Stephens One point at a time Sport: Tennis Grade: Senior I think it’s really important to practice in the offseason. If you’re going to play and be competitive, and you want to go up to varsity level, it’s really crucial. Without practicing in the offseason, it’s going to be really hard for you to climb up.

2. Practice like you mean it Once practices start on Feb. 29, teams only have 18 days, marked in orange, before MSHSAA officially allows games to begin on March 18, with strict guidelines as to how many practices coaches must have before each team’s first game, marked in each sports’ color.

March

8

Years

6

4

M

T

W

T

F

S

28

29

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

Athlete: Gianna Sulzner by leaps and bounds Sport: Girls’ Track and Field Grade: Junior I want to break the school record. I think the record is 5’ 2” [for high jump]. I’ve tied it in practice, but I haven’t beat it in a meet yet, which is what it has to be for it to be recorded. That would be really nice.

2

“ 0

29

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3. Make every game count

Upcoming Games

The number of games each sport has varies, with baseball and boys’ volleyball having the most at 17, while varsity girls’ lacrosse only has four games on the schedule. These are the number of games each varsity team has this year.

3/18 V Baseball Troy Tournament 4:15 p.m. @ FHN

3/19 Athlete: Jacob Kalusniak Sport: Baseball Grade: Senior

V Baseball Troy Tournament 11:30 a.m. & 2:00 p.m. @ FZW

stepping up to the plate

3/21

[Offseason training is] very important so that you’re prepared for the game. I think we need to just come together as a team, focus on the game at hand, one at a time.

V Boys’ Tennis 3:30 p.m. @ St. Charles

3/22

4. Know your Opponents We asked the teams who they thought their toughest competitors will be this season. While FHHS and FHC came up high on every list, here are some other schools to watch for during the season. Lafayette

FZS

CBC

Track & Field 3:30 p.m. @ FHN

St. Dominic

Incarnate Word

De Smet

JV Boys’ Volleyball 4:00 p.m. @ FZN

JV Baseball 4:15 p.m. @Troy

C Team Boys’ Volleyball 4:00 p.m. @ FZN

C Team Baseball 4;15 p.m. @ FHN

V Boys’ Volleyball 5:00 p.m. @ FZN

3/23 JV Girls’ Soccer 4:00 p.m. @Incarnate

Track and Field

Boys’ Tennis

Baseball

Girls’ Lacrosse

Girls’ Soccer

Boys’ Volleyball

V Boys’ Tennis 3:30 p.m. @ FHHS

V Girls’ Soccer 6:00 p.m. @ Incarnate

3/24

5. Dominate Districts After all of the training, some extra confidence doesn’t hurt when it comes to competition. Here’s how students responded when asked about how well they think they will do this year.

JV Girls’ Soccer 4:00 p.m. @ St. Charles

JV Girls’ Lacrosse 4:15 p.m. @FHHS

V Girls’ Soccer 5:30 p.m. @ St. Charles

3/26 JV Boys’ Baseball Francis Howell Tournament @ FHN

3/28 Extremely Well

Fairly Well Not Great

Athlete: Madison Vanek Sport: Girls’ Soccer Grade: Senior

Half and Half Poorly

Returning with a goal

State was really kind of like a shell-shock, more or less. You can’t believe that you worked so hard to get there then it’s right there within your grasp. I mean, it’s just amazing that you’re even there because, from each class, you’re there from out of four teams across the whole state, so it’s pretty cool to be there.

C Team Boys’ Volleyball 4:00 p.m. @ De Smet

Boys’ Tennis 3:30 p.m. @ FHN

JV Boys’ Volleyball 5:00 p.m. @ De Smet

C Team Baseball 4:15 p.m. @ FHN

V Boys’ Volleyball 6:00 p.m. @ De Smet

Boys’ Golf St. Charles Invitational

JV Track & Field 3:30 p.m. @ McCluer South-Berkeley

FHNTODAY.COM PAGE BY EMILY WILSON

03.16.16

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The girls lacrosse team does high knees during one of their practices on the football field. The girls team is jsut staring this year and was created to get girls more involved in sports. The first Varisty game is on April 6 at St. Dominic. The first JV game is on March 24 at Francis Howell. (Photo by Alexis Rowe)

Girls’ Lacrosse Team Starts up at FHN This Spring After an overwhelming response and in order to get more girls to play sports, FHSD decided to add a new sport BY ETHAN SLAUGHTER ethanslaughter0@gmail.com

Starting this spring FHN will offer a new sport: girls lacrosse. “Being the head coach and being able to come up with the whole season plan and going through the whole process is a lot of fun,” Head coach Ryan Darks said. According to Coach Darks, the idea about forming a girls lacrosse team was first conceived after a nonsports related complaint was filed. Then the school district saw that less girls played Follow the link sports in the district when http://goo.gl/2MMWxZ on to learn more compared to boys. The district FHNtoday about girls’ lacrosse did a survey amongst high school and middle school girls to see what sport they would want to see offered, and girls’ lacrosse had an overwhelmingly positive response. “When I first found out that they were adding lacrosse I was kind of stunned, and it was a sport that I absolutely loved in high school,” Darks said. “For me, it ended up being a sport that I loved and made a

WATCH

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FHNTODAY.COM PAGE BY ETHAN SLAUGHTER

03.16.16

lot of life long friendships that I got through the sport.” There are many different pieces of equipment when playing lacrosse- like the lacrosse stick which is used to catch and hold the ball, goggles to guard the eyes, a mouth guard, arm pads and gloves. Girls’ lacrosse has up to 12 players on the field at once compared to boys lacrosse which has only up to 10 players each time, with 25-minute halves. “I thought it would be something new, interesting and fun to learn and I like team sports,” sophomore Briana Schmidt said. “I figured it would be something to expand my horizons.” The team has their first game March 24 at FHHS. Most of the teams that they will compete against are private schools. It was decided that they wouldn’t have tryouts this year since most people who are on the team haven’t had any experience playing the sport. Practices started Feb. 29 and are every day after school. The first informational meeting had roughly 40 girls interested in playing this year. “I like to stay active and meet people who have the same interest,” Schmidt said.


The new cement bleachers are ready just in time for the start of the boys baseball season. The team, consisting of 15-18 players, will utilize all the new equipment like the batting cages. (Photo by Katie Worsham)

A New Field for a New Season The boys’ baseball team has a newly refurbished field to play on this season BY DAVID BODDEN davbodd@gmail.com

Just before the beginning of this school year, some students noticed that there was big construction underway near the baseball fields. The well-needed additions included nets, fences, batting cages and seating. The coaches planned the renovations and the construction took months. They were finished just in time for the baseball season. “There had been no improvements to the fields in the past 30 years,” assistant varsity baseball coach Mike Freedline said. “We got the money the district gave to us to do improvements on it, so we got some batting cages, the stadium seating and more.” Some of the additions include new cement bleachers on the hill by the field. This will prevent families and students from having to sit on the hill or bring their own chairs to every game. Measures were also taken to improve the field itself. The new batting cages

are enclosed and have turf in them. They also have a combination lock to keep anyone besides students from using them. The combination is only given out to players, so they can come in whenever they want to practice. “Our fields were definitely in bad shape,” senior Jordan Throgmorton said. “The outfield flooded a lot, and most of our fences either were rusted or had holes in them. The worst thing would probably either be the flooding or just the random holes and bumps in the field.” The upcoming season will be very different for the baseball team. They will have better equipment, and more opportunities to practice and improve their skills. Senior Jake Viehman believes they have a good team coming out and hopes they will improve off of last year. “We got a good team coming out,” senior Jake Viehman said. “Hopefully, we can be more successful than last season, maybe even in districts.”

FHNTODAY.COM

PAGE BY ETHAN SLAUGHTER

03.16.16

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The Not Very Patriotic Act WASHINGTON - OCTOBER 26: Protesters rally against mass surveillance during an event organized by the group Stop Watching Us in Washington, DC on October 26, 2013. (Rena Schild / Shutterstock.com)

When the government installed the U.S. Patriot. Act in 2001, the government went against the very principles that the United States was founded on and it must be put to an end immediately BY ANTHONY KRISTENSEN

put to an end. Also, this is proven to not be effective whatsoever. According to NBC News, the NSA has stopped an incredible number of zero terrorist attacks under the Patriot You wouldn’t want someone to be able to track your calls. You wouldn’t want Act’s spying. Instead, planned attacks or threats of attacks have been thwarted by someone to be able to look at your web browser history at any time. You wouldn’t the FBI and CIA, two very old and obviously very effective agencies. What this says want someone to monitor you text messages. So, why would you let the federal is that the NSA’s spying is essentially a waste of the $10 billion of U.S. taxpayers’ government do those exact things? hard earned money, only there to build a false sense of security by collecting your Not only does the government do this, but they do this, indiscriminately, to all data. In fact, the NSA has been caught lying about stopping terrorist attacks, as Americans. It doesn’t matter if there’s a warrant for your arrest, if you have a they stated that they had thwarted 54 terrorist attacks, which is simply not true, criminal record, or even if you’ve been a law abiding citizen your entire life. as reported by the Washington Post. This also goes against the Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. The So, aside from being unconstitutional, ineffective and a waste of money, what Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution has been completely ignored for almost else is there to be said about the Patriot Act? Well, rewind 15 years. The Fourth Amendment essentially ensures all to December, when the tragic terrorist attacks in San Americans that their privacy will be protected and that The NSA, under the Patriot Bernardino, California took the lives of 14 innocent civilians the federal government cannot and will not look though and injured 21 others. The entire attack was planned by your information without a warrant. This amendment Act... the terrorists on their cell phones and online. You would was seemingly overturned after the Sept. 11, 2001, think that an policy whose sole purpose is to stop terrorist terrorist attacks. • has stopped no major terrorist threats attacks by spying on anyone and everyone would be able This catastrophe began on Oct. 26, 2001, when to stop this attack, wouldn’t you? The simple answer is yes, • can track both sides of any phone call President George W. Bush gave the NSA an if they have all of these resources at their disposal, then unprecedented amount of unconstitutional power • can access your app data they should be able to stop any terrorist threat that would by signing the United and Strengthening America by come about in the U.S., especially with the Patriot Act being Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and • can monitor you text messages in place. You would also think that they could’ve stopped the Obstruct Terrorism Act, more commonly known as the Chattanooga shooting, the Boston Marathon bombing and Patriot Act. This act was signed into law in response many more attacks with these resources. • can spy on other countries, including allies to 9/11, and while it may seem like a step in the right While on the subject of terrorist attacks, let’s look abroad. direction for our national security and the safety of the Sources: Washington Post, Slate In France, which is said to have more robust security American populace, this is just simply not the case. measures than the U.S. does under the Patriot Act, they were The Patriot Act went directly against the Fourth attacked twice last year, with the Charlie Hebdo shooting Amendment to our constitution by giving the NSA the and the Paris attacks in November. In fact, according to The Guardian, most of ability to spy on each and every American’s phone records, data- just about the men that attacked Paris in November were known to be a threat by French anything. According to Slate, some of this includes, but is not limited to, tracking security forces. This goes to show that even if the U.S. were to beef up the NSA, it both parties of a phone call, including the location and time, spying on the still wouldn’t be able to stop these attacks. cellphones of not only American citizens, but also the cellphones of foreign leaders, The NSA’s illegal and unconstitutional spying under the Patriot Act on each and infiltrating text messages, checking web browser history, even hacking into the every citizen of the U.S. needs to be put to an end. Justifying the NSA’s actions, United Nations video conferencing system. according to former congressman and two-time presidential candidate Ron Paul, is By the way, they are doing all of this indiscriminately to all Americans. It doesn’t essentially the same as wanting a camera or policeman in every house to prevent matter if you haven’t ever been arrested, if there’s no warrant for your arrest, domestic abuse. The longer the U.S. leaves the Patriot Act in service, the longer we if you have a clean record, if you’ve never done anything wrong in your life. The will have strayed away from the freedoms that our founding fathers promised to NSA can, and probably has, looked into your private text messages and your web us in the Constitution. As best said by Benjamin Franklin, “any society that will give browser history. They have no warrant, they have no right to do this, yet this is up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both.” being overlooked. This unconstitutional spying of each and every American must be anthony.kristensen17@gmail.com • @anthonyk17slsg

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FHNTODAY.COM PAGE BY DAVID BODDEN

03.16.16


Seasons Greetings and Meetings Hello everyone, I’m Mother Nature and welcome to the annual seasons meeting, Are all the seasons here?

OOHHH okay! This is like the third year in a row that I’ve had to fill in for you after I’m supposed to be off!

Sorry that I’m late guys, Spring is now in the house!

Summer, Autumn, and Winter are all present.

Sorry I’ve been late every year winter, but c’mon man just chill out...

I AM ALWAYS CHILL, I AM THE EPITOME OF CHILL!!!!

(Comic by Riley Kampff)

(Cartoon by Riley Kampff)

The Hot Topic Of. . .

Longer or Shorter Spring Break?

With spring break being shortened by a week, some argue that it’s good while others want to go back to the old ways. BY CHASE MEYER

BY MCKAYLA BOGDA

A short spring break, despite backlash from many students, is one of the most beneficial decisions this school board has ever made. The typical second week of break was seemingly unnecessary and only served the purpose of cutting into our school year and shortening the amount of summer vacation days. While many students and their Less Free Time families chose in the past to use a week out of spring break to travel, Now, More Later and many are complaining that this year they won’t have time to do so. There was plenty of time over winter break to go on vacation, and there will be over even more opportunities to get out of town over summer. Sure, we all need a break, but what harm will a few more weeks of the St. Louis area really do? As students in the FHSD, we are incredibly lucky to have as many days off as we do throughout the year. Our teachers and administrators have over 20,000 students to educate throughout the school year, and every second of that year they use is vital. By cutting the last week of spring break, we’ve been allowed to get out of school for the summer a few days earlier. If a student can’t be responsible enough to complete their homework within a week, how do their grades survive in day-to-day life while school is in session? How students use their time outside of school is up to them. We, as students, have a commitment to ourselves, our schools and our education system as a whole to take the time out of our lives and get our work done. By taking away that extra week of spring break, our district officials are working in our best interest. Not only will we be in school to do our job, to learn, but we’ll also be out of school that much sooner. Generations of students in the past have gone with short breaks, and even no spring break at all. Students in the FHSD should consider themselves lucky they even get a break at all.

Spring break is a much needed time off where students and faculty go on vacations, catch up on work or just hang out with friends and family, but now it has been cut short. The second week was important because it is when students and faculty can do these things, plus it was a better time to make up snow days. We Want a Longer Some students go on vacation the Break first week of spring break and then work on schoolwork the second week, but with only one week students won’t think to do their schoolwork or they won’t have time to relax. If they don’t get to do these things, then it kind of defeats the purpose of spring break for students. The reality is that students will most likely choose to relax over catching up on schoolwork and there are some students who could really use that time to do schoolwork, but they won’t do it the first week of break and without a second week they just won’t do it. The second week of spring break was a better time to make up snow days, than at the end of the school year because most students don’t want to stay any longer. Even though students want to get out of school at the end of the year, summer break is already long enough and adding the extra week to summer wasn’t necessary because most people are ready to do something different by the end of summer. The week was in better use with spring break because the time is needed more at that time. Cutting the break shorter also affects the teachers because a lot of them catch up on grading work and planning for the rest of the year. The teachers deserve a break and if they have to do school work the whole time, then they will be just as stressed as they were before break. If the teachers choose to not catch up on grading though then it stresses out the students more.

stlavjournalist@gmail.com • @AvJournalist

mckayla5bogda@gmail.com • @mbogda5

FHNTODAY.COM PAGE BY CHELSI HOSKINS

03.16.16

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Student Take:

“I think it’s important because it affects a lot of people in the nation, and especially can happen to students as well, not just adults.” Grant Freitas, 10

“I think it’s important that students are well-informed about all issues even if they’re not easy to talk about. Students need to be aware of the issues going on.” Mackenzie Eaker, 12

North Star Take: For the Students, By the Students Missouri State Representative Elijah Haahr has introduced the Walter Cronkite Act, a bill that, if passed would protect high school and college students from school censorship ON BEHALF OF THE EDITORIAL STAFF yourfhn@fhntoday.com • @fhntoday

“The most effective way to find solutions for problems is to talk to a younger generation so they can form educated opinions.” Meredyth Wood, 10

37

Missouri Representative Elijah Haahr proposed a bill that would allow college and high school student journalists the freedom to produce content they choose. This bill, now awaiting House vote, is known as the Walter Cronkite New Voices Act. This bill was drafted after Jack Dalrymple, North Dakota’s current Governor, signed a similar bill known as the New Voices Act into law in April of 2015. We believe that this bill should be passed not just in Missouri, but in every state across the country because of the benefits it gives student journalists. The Walter Cronkite New Voices Act gives student journalists freedom to produce any content they deem appropriate to their audiences, as long as it does not violate any state or national laws. Unlike many schools throughout the state and country,

FHNTODAY.COM PAGE BY PRISCILLA JOEL

03.16.16

the school administration at FHN does not review or oversee any of the media that the student journalism department creates prior to its publishing. Other schools aren’t so lucky, and administrators review the publication before printing (prior review) and even keep material from being printed sometimes (prior restraint). There are many reasons why censorship is detrimental to a student journalism environment. For instance, school publications have covered a variety of important, difficult and relevant topics including homosexuality, suicide, rape and divorce. Often times, in schools that are subject to censorship, the staffers are unable to cover in-depth topics that affect their student body that are of great relevance and importance. School administrations deny publications the right to produce media that they believe would cause a disruption or spark controversial discussions at school.


N

S Editors-in-Chief: Priscilla Joel Bennett Smallwood Business Manager: Austin Ferguson Business: Brandon McCarty Editors: Sports Editor: Garret Griffin Opinions Editor: Anthony Kristensen Copy Editor: Zoe Lawson Design Editor: Erika Paar Content Editor: Jamie Hetlage General Staff: David Bodden Riley Kampf Claire Boenitz Erin Levins McKayla Bogda Joe Luley Aly Doty Kylie Moser Carolynn Gonzalez Samantha Schmid Emily Hardin Karis Skaggs Sammie Herr Ethan Slaughter Chelsi Hoskins Noah Slaughter Kayla Martinez Emily Wilson Kylah Woods Editor in Chief of Photography: Alyssa Savage Photo Editors: Photo Essay Editor: Abby Temper Newspaper Photo Editor: Amanda Eckhard Yearbook Photo Editor: Ashton Stegman Sports Photo Editor: Lauren Price Portrait Editor: Madi Graves

(Cartoon by Joe Luley)

However, what we all need to realize is that students must have the power to publish information relevant to their audience. If an article about suicide is published, the topic will more likely than not be discussed by many different students and teachers when it is released. It is important to realize that these are the types of issues that high schoolers face in reality. Topics that need to be discussed and not hidden to pretend like they don’t exist. According to the Jason Foundation, over 5,400 children between the seventh and 12th grade attempt suicide each day. With such an overwhelming number, there is no reason that students should be shielded from topics such as suicide. In addition, coverage of these topics by media can actually help students who may be struggling with these issues by informing them about where and how to get help. Furthermore, school publications are produced for the students, by the students. Young journalists should be trusted to make responsible decisions for themselves. They need to learn from experience. By allowing students the opportunity to discuss and plan coverage of various topics, journalists learn to take a step back and think about all of the potential harms and benefits

that could result from publishing their content. If they don’t learn about how their writing affects their school community, how will they be able to make educated decisions about the content they push out later in life? When else will they be given the opportunity to learn how? They won’t. Finally, we must realize that the majority of the time, students have heard of the frequently discussed controversial topics, but often, they only have a surfacelevel understanding of them. Nevertheless, simply knowing of a topic is not enough in order to be fully informed. It is the student journalism department’s obligation to ensure that their student body is well-informed about the issues that high schoolers face daily, and about what is going on in the world around them. Student journalists cannot fulfil their duty if their school administration is overshadowing them. If the Walter Cronkite New Voices Act is passed, the proposed date that the bill will be effective is Aug. 28 of this year. We believe that this bill should be passed by the House and Senate, then signed into law by Governor Jay Nixon so that student journalists can cover relevant topics that affect their peers and community without a fear of censorship or condemnation.

Photographers: Samantha Alexander Riley McCrackin Ashleigh Barlow Hannah Medlin Emily Floyd Kyra Peper Daisha Harris Kristen Pike Jared Kinnard Alexis Rowe Bernadette Kornberger Katie Warsham Alex Lane Lucas Tabaka Katie Warsham

FHNTODAY STAFF Web Editors: Webmaster: Chase Meyer Managing Editor: Michal Basford Web Staff: Martin Groves Jacob Lintner Joe Luley Breighen Williams Chris Wood Editor-in-Chief of Video: Autumn Todd Video Editors: Brayton Larson Video Staff: Alyssa Barber Ben Moxley Monica Buckner Adam Quigley Laraya Griffith Joseph Samuels Sasha Kaganov Taylor Sheridan Brayton Larson Nathan Williams Kamila Zendron Advisers: Aaron Manfull Jordyn Kiel

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