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FHNTODAY.COM - FRANCIS HOWELL NORTH HIGH SCHOOL - 2549 HACKMANN RD. ST. CHARLES, MO

january 19, 2011 volume 25 issue 6

NORTHSTAR


KEEP YOUR EYES PEELED We are working this month to make the paper a bit more interactive for readers. You will notice little tags like this throughout the paper.

Download the free app and scan.

Here’s how to use them.

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STEP ONE Look around the paper for tags like the one our friend the hedgehog is looking at. You will find these in a few different spots throughout the paper. They are QR Codes. In essence, they are barcodes that can be read by your smartphone. STEP TWO Download the free application to your mobile device found at http://gettag.mobi Once the application has downloaded to your phone, open it. STEP THREE With the application open, use your smartphone’s camera and position the crosshairs over the barcode. It should automatically open your web browser and direct you to the page we are sending you to. Sometimes that page will be a video or photo. Other times it will be an audio clip or a web page. We will work to include URLs next to the barcodes as well so those without smartphones can access the content by simply typing a URL into a web browser. Happy scanning!


2549 Hackmann Road St. Charles, MO. 63303 Distributed for free to FHN by the North Star staff. “Providing an open forum for Francis Howell North since 1986.”

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06 NEWS Find upcoming events of five clubs including Spectra, Metal, Sign Language, Speech & Debate, and FBLA. Also find out what important dates are coming in the next weeks.

08 FEATURES Through his faith, Paul Kruse helps the homeless find a home again through his ministry, “First Step Back Home.”

36 SPORTS

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Junior Trevor Gorsuch protects North’s Varsity Hockey team as goalie, but also travels around the world serving as the main goalie for the AAA 18U Blues ice hockey team

42 OPINIONS

This month, the editorial board takes a look at the importance of keeping social media sites clean as they impact not only students now, but in the future as well.

22 IN-DEPTH

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For centuries, interacting with the Paranormal has fascinated people. This month, the North Star goes behind the scenes of some of the Paranormal Activity that has been reaching out to students at North.

COVER

Reaching out to the Paranormal has been a fascination of people at North for a while. Interactions with dead can be exhilarating, an experience worth reaching.

3 easy tips to gettag app

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1. Works with all smart phones 2. Free app on itunes- http://gettag. mobi 3. Scan over box and it will immediately take you to web site, photo or video For any questions go to room 026

FHNTODAY.COM


A sculptor at the Fete de Glace is working on an ice sculpture on Dec. 31, 2009 on Main Street. The event brought many spectators out to judge an all day contest for the best ice sculpture. (file photo)

Main Street prepares for another freeze out

Professional and amateur ice sculptures prepare to show off their talent during the 12th annual Ice Festival. christy maupin

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ain Street in Historic St. Charles will be hosting the 12th annual Fete de Glace (pronounced Fet-de-Glass) competition on Jan. 29. Each year, the Fete de Glace organizers hope for a cold overcast day, but even on a sunny, hot day or humid, rainy day, the Festival will still be in occurrence. Fete de Glace, also known as the Festival of Ice, is free, and is held outdoors on the 100-200 block of North Main Street from 9:30 am to 3:00 pm. During this festival, spectators are allowed to watch professional and amateur ice sculptures transform 100 to 200 pound blocks of ice into works of art. This event is known to be family-friendly and even has fire pits and warm drinks available to the public. “I think it’s family-friendly and anyone can go,” Holly Tate, a viewer, said. “It was fun to see all the creativity that all the ice sculptures had, and it was cool to see how they made it look so easy when everyone knew it was really difficult.” During the competition, the carvers make sculptures that please a variety of people such as Dragons, Winnie the Pooh and even King Kong, because ultimately the crowd will decide the winners. The carvers all use different tools ranging from chain saws, sanders, hand saws and wood carving tools. “Last year I did a tiger balancing on a ball standing on its front paws for a Circus theme,” Ice Cuisine competitor Terrence Hamner said.

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NEWS page by sidney shelton

According to Ice Champion John Russell, of Ice Visions in Kirkwood, the spectators make the Festival special. Russell was the winner of the “professional single” and team categories in 2010. He enjoys interacting with the crowd while he carves. “There are really nice people there, and I enjoy carving in front of them,” Russell said. Currently, Hamner and Russell do not know what they plan on carving for this year’s competition, but one thing’s certain; ice will fly.

FAST FACTS

The following facts are simple steps for beginner ice sculptures to follow. The information was found at http://library.thinkquest.org.

1.Draw a sketch 2.Cut the full block of ice into smaller pieces * Electric chainsaw-cuts and shapes the block of ice * Ice pick-breaks and cuts large pieces of an ice block 3.Transfer the sketch onto the ice and etch the design into the ice * Grinder-adds details to the statue. * Heat gun-glosses,rounds, and repairs a statue.


PHOTO POLL QUESTION: What are you most looking forward to in your new classes?

Alyssa Bocci, 12 “Hopefully that my new classes are much easier than last semester, and also be able to finish my senior year strong.” Freshman Nik Myers fills out a registration form for next year classes. Students meet with their counselors to discuss classes they need and classes that are available for them to take. Students need 24 credits to graduate. (jessica streiler)

Registration kevin beerman

Courtney Schulze, 12 “For the new semester I’m excited to have a gym class so I can finally get a break from all my hard classes.”

RJ Howes, 12 “I have gym and painting, I’m excited because I have more fun classes instead of all hard classes. It gives me a good break and also it’s also a good way to end the year.”

CLASS RINGS Ashley Trautman, 12 “The blue stone because it’s my favorite color.”

In just a few days, students will be registering for classes, deciding what they will be taking next year, and takingsteps to prepare for graduation. In order to help students with this, Guidance has initiated programs and classes to help with this, including a new engineering class, Principle of Engineering. The Principles of Engineering class is the second step of a four part process to phase into the school a more rigorous engineering program. Studies have shown that with in the next 10 years, there will be an expected shortage of engineers in the U.S., a problem that Project Lead The Way (PLTW) is trying to solve. In the next three years, the Guidance Department will be offering three new engineering classes (a new one each year), as part of a program approved by the Board of Education last year. After next year’s

District offering a new program to provide advanced engineering pre classes for students addition, the 2012-2013 year will see the addition of Digital Electronics. By the 2012-2013 school year, the Francis Howell School District will be one of a handful in the area, along with the Rockwood and Parkway districts to offer such a program. “They’re definitely a good idea,” Guidance counselor Tom Daugherty said. “There is going to be a shortage of engineers, and it brings a focus on math and science.” Among students at North, the program has, thus far, been received well, sparking interest for the new classes in the coming years. Junior Mack Weaver, who is currently taking the Introduction to Engineering class, sees the new classes as a great opportunity and suggests them for engineering prospects. “I’m sure it helps people who want to go into engineering,” Weaver said. “It’ll build on skills and let us do more.”

Below are pictures of three students’ class rings with Herff Jones. This year the sophomore class will be able to order their class rings and decide what they would like to add to their rings. Cody Frazier, 12

Kayln Jones, 11

“The stone and number because my favorite number is 18 and my favorite color is red.”

“I just like everything about it. But really how it just shines in the light.” page by olivia ong

QUICK FACTS •

Jan 27 the sophomores will go to the Auditorium to receive information about their rings.

They will be able to choose from a wide variety of different ring styles, stones, crests, and much more.

Herff Jones will sponsor the event.

FHNTODAY.COM

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SNOWCOMING THINGS TO KNOW Here are some tips to make sure your winter Snowcoming experience is a great time. For more information about the dance, go to Rm. 130.

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Dress accordingly Make sure to wear school-appropriate, casual clothing.

Bring people

School dances are more enjoyable when shared with friends.

Students dance while glow in the dark bubbles fall on them during the Snowcoming. Last year’s theme was Arctic Rush which included black lights and glow in the dark face painting. Snowcoming will be held on Feb. 12 and the theme will be Black and White. (file photo)

Changes in store for Stuco snowcoming Get involved Move out of the corner and join in with others on the dance floor.

Behave It’s a no-brainer, don’t be obnoxious. Acting out just annoys people.

Don’t boo Show respect for the snowcoming court and announcers; Stay quiet.

Have fun If you’re going to a dance, enjoy yourself. A good time makes the price of the ticket worthwhile.

NEWS page by nick ponche

abby west

This year, the winter dance is undergoing major overhauls compared to last year. For the first time in three years, instead of the glow in the dark ‘blackout’ theme, the dance will have a Black and White formal theme. Also, the forms which plagued the dance’s income last year are being removed from the checklist of criteria for attending the dance. Student Council President Alyssa Bocci is excited about the new changes to this year’s dance. “I like it because it’s a change from what we have been having,” Bocci said. “I makes it feel more like a club atmosphere.” The date is set for Feb. 12 in the FHN Commons. Tickets will be sold from Feb. 7 to 11, for $10 during lunches. This year, the ticket buying experience is going to be much different from last year. While those who have fines will still be required to take care of those before buying tickets those who have no outstanding fine will not be required to complete the signature forms. “It’s a way to get everyone’s spirits up in the middle of the year,” Bocci said, “Most students may start to drag, so it’s a way to pick people up

again.” Those who have no outstanding fine will not be required to complete the signature forms. “I think that with the fine forms removed, more people will go to Snowcoming,” sophomore Jenna Matye said. Last year, with the repeated theme and the hassle of the signature forms, Stuco lost more that $4500, due to that fact that less than half the people went to last year’s dance as those who went the year before. To go along with the new black and white theme, the Commons will be decorated in a more elaborate way. Stuco members are trying to make it a more classy atmosphere, even going as far as to purchase a chandelier. But the new theme is still keeping with the idea of casual, school-appropriate attire. “It will be better than last year because we have more to build off of,” sophomore Matt Miller said. “Such as, if something was bad last year, it might be better.” While Stuco has been focused on meeting the demands of the student body, they are also working on coming up with new spirit week ideas, such a Snuggie day, for the dance to get the whole school involved and raise school spirit.


Senior Stephanie Blanchard and junior Samatha Best play saxophone during a performance. (file photo)

JAZZ BAND It’s more than just a band, students have built relationships and are offered opportunities outside of school. morgan carlson

Senior Ryan Gannon escorts 2010 graduate Samantha Bruni at last year’s Prom Fashion Show. The Prom Fashion Show is a preview of the latest fashion trends for prom dresses. Students are used as models to show off the work of the designers and find potential buyers. The Prom Fashion Show for 2011 will take place on Feb. 16 in the auditorium. (file photo)

Juniors host upbeat fundraiser shannon ward

The model walks down the runway, stops, looks into the light and strikes a pose for the audience. The audience goes wild with excitement. This is the Prom Fashion Show. An event which will be held Feb. 16 at 7:00 p.m. in the school auditorium. The junior and senior models will be selling tickets for $5, which will help fund prom. “I’m very excited for the show, we have been working very hard,” junior class sponsor Lori Lutz said. The Junior Class Delegates have been working hard on the details of the show such as getting sponsors to contribute to the event and getting students to sign up as models. This year, everyone who attends

will be entered into a raffle and could have a chance at winning two prom tickets. This is just one of the many things they are doing differently from last year. The delegates are excited to present all of their hard work off to everyone. “This show is going to be fun and upbeat, people are going to have a great time”, Junior Class Delegate and host Maggie Curran said. Not only are the Junior Class Delegates excited about the show but so are the models. “The show is always fun and entertaining,” senior Chip Dozier said. “It’s a good way to get a couple of ideas of what styles look good for Prom.”

DOS AND DON’TS

There are many events that the Jazz Band takes part in throughout the year. They will begin in the spring with their first competition, the “The First Annual MU/Rock Bridge Jazz Festival,” on Feb. 5 at Mizzou. To prepare for this, the band will be having a rehearsal day with professional jazz artists on Martin Luther King Day, who will critique them so they can improve their skills. Opportunities that can be gained such as this are unique to Jazz Band. “The ability to express themselves through an instrument,” Moorman said. “They can play gigs. You can play outside Cards’ games and probably make 200 bucks if they’re a good player.” The students in Jazz Band have become close not only from the class itself, but from the experiences that come from being a part of it. A lot of the effort and dedication goes into being a part of this team has brought the members closer. “I’m really grateful for the friends I have in Jazz Band,” senior Stephanie Blanchard said. “Playing in this band is far from easy, but having so many people there for support helps tremendously.”

Below is a description of the qualifications for every contestant that will be participating in the prom fashion show. The checks will stand for what the judges will be looking for, while the x’s will be what they are not. For more information see Ms. Lutz in room 22. ( Info by Ms. Lutz)

If throughout the performance you show confidence

If you have a good personality If throughout the performance you have a bad attitude

If your apparel is handsome or cute

If you are able to make the audience laugh

If you are nervous or hold back during your performance

page by morgan may and chelsey damalas

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UPCOMING EVENTS 2

Below are 5 clubs randomly chosen and a brief update and description on what they are and what they are involved with.

FBLA

jordan bryson

Junior Missy Holmes recites a piece from a story to parents of the students on the speech team to give them a better understanding what it is about. (file photo)

1 Speech and Debate kyle schikore

At their competition on Jan. 8, the Speech and Debate team won 8 rounds. The team also showed off their talents in front of students at North during their English classes on Jan. 6. “Showing 200 students what we do on weekends was a great success,” Coach Theresa Maher said. The team members have been learning a lot about current events and having a great time using that information for their entertainment. They hope to use this information to win their competition on Jan. 22.

For those who don’t know, FBLA is a club set to educate high schoolers in all grades about the business field. FHN’s FBLA attends District, State and even National business competitions. For the past few weeks, the club members have been practicing for the Feb. 15 District competition with skills and online tests sponsor Angie Mason handed out. “FHN has always done really good in district competition,” Mason said.

Senior Ben Langess works on a laptop alongside fellow students during a Spectra class on Jan. 12. (lydia ness)

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Spectra

andrew curran

As the new semester begins, Spectra classes will be working to finish honors projects. Students involved in Spectra are ones who excel in learning and creativity. Spectra is considered an elective course, this means new students and changes are always coming in and out of the Spectra classroom. Jon Travis, the Spectra teacher, is always trying to keep the program going strong. “I’d like to get more kids involved,” Travis said. “Eventually, I hope we could get a mentor-ship and a shadowing program started.”

5 KOE taylor berra

Senior Chip Dozier and other DECA members hang out at the mall after competition at St. Charles Goverment building. During the competition, members did group performances and listened to a guest speaker. (file photo)

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DECA

chelsey damalas

As of right now DECA members are preparing for their next competition that will be held on Feb. 9 at the St. Louis Mills. Members will be taking practice tests and perform practice role plays. 150 members will be a part of this competition. Last year, 26 members made it to State and out of that, 2 members went to Nationals. Whoever wins at the competition will move on to State at the Ozarks. After that will be Orlando, FL. For more information see Ms. Lutz in room 22.

UPCOMING DATES 21

January

Winter Warm-Up

27 January -1/2 day -Group Photo Day

Nicole Yuede and Jack Ameis posed for a photo after being recognized for exceptional student performance throughout the year. (file photo)

Jan. 27 KOE will have their first meeting to start planning the Knights of the Round Table ceremony. They are beginning to ask teachers for nominations and ordering medals. At this ceremony all staff members will nominate a student for any reason that they have done something outstanding. On Feb. 28 the students will find out who gave them the award and why they are receiving it.

Below is the following upcoming events that will be taking place in the upcoming weeks. To see more information on these dates, go to the school calendar.

12 February

17-18 February

21 February

Snowcoming dance

North Street Coffee House

NO SCHOOL

page by shannon ward & chelsey damalas

FHNTODAY.COM

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Homeless, not Hopeless Kruse devotes life to help those in need logan ponche

Winter Wonderland Paul Kruse hosted a Christmas toy drive for the homeless at the Budget Inn Motel in Wentzville on Dec. 17 and 18. At the drive, families could make crafts, receive presents, and celebrate the birth of Jesus. Scan Here

Scan the barcode to the left for the video on a FSBH gift drive by Kelsey Habighorst and Logan Ponche. Get the free mobile app for your phone at: http://gettag.mobi No smart phone? Here’s the URL. http://bit.ly/filHc5

08 FEATURES page by emily forst

He’s unemployed. He never knows where money will come from next - yet people request it from him constantly. He doesn’t even know when, if ever, he will be able to retire. More importantly, he doesn’t really care. In the past five and a half years, Paul W. Kruse has become one of the most highly regarded individuals in the tri-county (St. Charles, Lincoln, and Warren) area. He has put over a half-million dollars into (and out of) his bank account, and that number grows every day. He has influenced the lives of more than 5,000 people, giving them a first step for a fresh start. The Komerous’ A faint odor of cigarette smoke lingers in the small lobby of the Budget Inn Motel in Wentzville, MO. The smell can be traced to two faded, forest green sofa-chairs that sit against the far wall from the entrance, sandwiching a wooden pamphlet holder that advertises seemingly all of the attractions Missouri has to offer. The smell can also be found in the chairs’ matching sofa with the orange quilt resting atop, which sits adjacent against the glass paneled wall. On the right side of that couch sits Paul Kruse, who carefully fills out a piece of paper. Paul, who is in his 60s, is a man of average height with a thicker build. He wears his flannel shirt tucked into his denim jeans with a belt, wrist watch and reading glasses on. He wears his graying black hair slicked back over his head and appears relaxed, content. The man sitting to his left looks anything but.

Dave Komerous sits on the sofa in a state of shock. After all that has happened, they are finally somewhere he and his wife can safely stay, and he can’t believe it. In a little over a week’s time, Dave and his wife Joann have had to go through the emotional roller-coaster of going from being homeowners in Edina, MO, to broken down on the side of the road, to the brink of homelessness, and to the safety of a motel. All things considered, it was a lot to take in. After watching Joann’s health condition deteriorate and a trip to the doctor’s office, Dave made the decision to pack up their belongings in the RV and the van, leave their house in Edina, and go to stay with Joann’s daughter in St. Charles. Everything appeared to be fine until the Komerous’ closed in on Macon, when both the van’s water pump and timing belt, and the RV’s transmission broke down. The Komerous’ were forced to stay in Macon for the night, and had to pay for the van to be fixed. With neither of the two having a job, and having already used their $1,800 monthly disability checks up, the couple rode into Wentzville with only $5 left between them. It was then that they found out Joann’s daughter was out of town, and would be for the next four days. With no money, and no place to stay, the couple sat in a Waffle House and drank coffee as they started to make phone calls to ministries and churches in the area searching desperately for anyone to help. Sts Joachim & Ann? Too full. Salvation Army? “They wouldn’t even pick up the phone,” Joann said. First Step Back Home?


No problem. After their talk with Paul, Dave and Joann found themselves in the lobby of the Budget Inn with an entire week booked before they knew what hit them. If you had asked them, they wouldn’t have noticed the smell of smoke. This is what Paul does, what makes him feel most fulfilled in life. For the past five and a half years, Paul has been helping homeless people any way he can; whether it’s buying Walmart cards, helping to pay bills, or just giving someone a lift, helping the less fortunate has consumed Paul’s life in a way nothing else could. Which is why he founded First Step Back Home, a not-for-profit, faith-based Christian homeless ministry where he tries to change as many lives as he can, everyday that he can. “I was only looking for a night, but he put us up for a whole week,” Dave said shaking his head. He then lapsed into silence, deep in thought. Paul was the first to break it. “I’ve got back packs in my car, y’all hungry? Do you have food?” “No we don’t,” Joann said looking up from her chair. Paul stood up from the couch and walked out of the lobby; moments later, he returned with two bags, one book bag, and one beach bag, both filled to the brim with various canned foods and boxes. “Oh my gosh, thank you so much,” Dave said, taking the bags from Paul. “God bless you,” Joann said, beaming, her eyes watering. Later, after Dave had taken the food to their room, he came to the lobby to return the bags. “No, keep them.” “God bless you sir.” The Beginning Paul Kruse isn’t Superman; however, there are times when the founder and President of the ministry is expected to be by those who he helps. Paul’s ministry is essentially the only place that homeless men in the tri-county area are able to seek help from, as there are no shelters in the vicinity that will accept men. Add all of the women and families he supports on top of that, and you get a phone that rings off the hook literally all

day long. Paul says he’ll get 20 to 40 calls a day on average asking for help. If the number of calls goes over 20, Paul has to put those people on a waiting list for him to call back. The list usually stays around 50 calls long. “I’m always running people around, I never catch up.” His solution to all of the calls, is to simply turn the phone off. Every night at 9:00, the cell phone is shut down and the home phone is unplugged until 9:00 the next morning. “The way I figure it, 12 hours a day should be enough for the Lord,” Paul said. It wasn’t always like this though. There was a time when Paul didn’t help any of the homeless, and worked for his own home repair and remodeling business; that was until he got involved with the truck stop ministry. Every Saturday, Paul would go to the local truck stop and preach the word of God as an outreach Deacon to truckers and anyone else passing through who wanted to listen in the truck stop’s dining area. It was here where Paul had some of his first interactions with the homeless. Back then, according to Paul, if Police were to find a homeless man in the county, they would drop them off at the St. Charles county line - which was right next to Highway T - which was right next to the tr-uck stop. Soon Paul began to see new faces at his services, faces that, after the sermon, would ask him for help. At first Paul told them to go to the Salvation Army, but when he found out that the Salvation Army turned away the men he sent there, and that those men were sleeping in the woods behind the truck stop, he decided to step in. “I went down there and said ‘Hey if I got you jobs, would you work?’” They said yes, and Paul did just that, finding jobs raking leaves and mowing grass for $6 or $7 an hour. While the jobs helped, $7 an hour wasn’t going to get them out of the woods soon; so Paul helped there too, and charged up a credit card bill in motel fees for over $1,000 in less than a month. It was at this point, when Paul was sitting $1,000 in the hole, that his wife Lana told him he better know what he was getting himself into. It was at this point, when Paul considered giving up the idea of helping the homeless. It was at this point, when what Paul later

Paul Kruse Kruse has lived in the St. Louis area his whole life. He attended college at Southeast Missouri State and served in the US Navy. Kruse and his wife, Lana have four children. Scan Here

Scan the barcode to the left for more video about Paul Kruse and what he does. Get the free mobile app for your phone at: http://gettag.mobi No smart phone? Here’s the URL. http://bit.ly/g3KhOK

page by emily forst

FHNTODAY.COM

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described as a miracle took place. Later that week, Paul received his miracle as a friendly neighbor made the first donation to his cause. An unprompted, random donation for exactly $1,000. “I knew right then, this is a sign from God that this is what I should be doing with my life,” Paul said. That was the day First Step back Home was truly born. And from that day onward, a snowball effect ensued, with bigger and bigger miracles happening all of the time. There was the miracle when the lawyer and the accountant offered their services free of charge to make First Step Back Home a 501(c)(3) organization, making them a public charity in the eyes of the IRS, and allowing them to receive tax-deductible contributions. There was the miracle when a woman called and said to Paul: ‘My husband left me, I have an empty house, put your homeless in my house.’ And now, there is the miracle in the form of more than $500,000 in donations to First Step Back Home. “I just can’t wait for the next day, to see what miracles the lord has in store,” Paul said. The Future Every day Paul Kruse gets up, he doesn’t know what is in store for him. He doesn’t know if he’ll be spending the day at a motel, or if he’ll be helping

drive people back and forth to work. He might just even spend the day at home, answering the phone, listening to stories, filling out paperwork. However, he does know that if he’s helping people, he will be happy. “He’s always had a heart for helping people,” Lana Kruse, Paul’s wife said. “Before he even had this ministry. As I look back through the 24 years we’ve known each other, he’s always helped somebody do something along the way.” Paul says that he’s going to keep running First Step Back Home, as long as he is financially able to do so. “All I say is ‘Lord if you get me the money, I’ll do it for you.” At the top of First Step Back Home’s website, there is a line that reads: Homeless, not Hopeless... Hope is exactly what Paul Kruse is trying to provide the homeless with. Hope that whatever situation they are in, will not be the situation they remain in. Hope that they will be able to find a steady job that pays above minimum wage. Hope that someday, they will no longer need Paul, and will be able to provide for themselves once again. That hope rests with one man who, for now, rests himself until 9:00 tomorrow morning, when the phones get plugged in and turned on, and that first call comes asking for help. When it does, Paul will be there armed with his generosity, his faith in God, and his hope that he can help this person find their first step back home.

HOW KRUSE HELPS OUT First Step Back Home has many ways of helping out, here are some general things that are done.

Pay for 3 nights lodging in a Motel

Provide bicycles for transportation

10 FEATURES page by emily forst

Search for housing during the motel stay

Offer counseling, church and Bible Study

Provide food, clothing, and toiletries

P SOA

Help find a job to provide money

PA Y OR TO DE TH RO E F

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Dancing

a life of

allie lukefahr

M junior,

aggie

r Jaspe

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he’s shaking, yet excited and ready to go, repeating the dance in her head over and over. She walks through the curtain and out on to the stage thinking, “This is it. This is what I’ve been preparing for. This is my time to shine.” The music starts, she’s blocking out everything else, she goes into her own little world and dances as if no one is watching. Maggie Jasper, 17, has been dancing 15 hours a week since the age of four at The Underground @ CAC Dance Studio. Maggie’s dancing affects more than just her. Her family spends a crazy amount of money each year for her to continue dancing. It can sometimes be stressful for both Maggie and her family because all of their time revolves around it. “I wish I could have more time for friends and I could have a job but I can’t,” Maggie says. “I just don’t have time for it, so sometimes I get burnt out.” Although Maggie spends most of her time dancing, it might not always be that way. If Maggie gets a scholarship for college, then she will continue dancing, but if she doesn’t then she will most likely stop dancing. “It’s a passion, not a career for me,” Maggie says. Maggie described the feeling as a rush. It’s exciting for her to perform for people. “I live for the reactions of people, like right after you perform and you do really good,” Maggie says. ”It makes me happy.” Maggie loves to perform for people, but it also makes her nervous especially, when she’s out there doing a solo. The day of a competition, she listens to the music she will dance to on her iPod, and goes over the dances in her head. Maggie won Top Gun in hip hop over the summer, and her team placed first at Nationals which was a big deal for her. Her dance team couldn’t have won Nationals without their coach. Kelly Hewitt, a 10 year dance coach, who has been coaching Maggie for three years. Hewitt is very proud to be her coach. “Maggie is always energetic, she’s a hard worker, she cares about everyone on the team, and she’s usually the class clown so to speak,” says Kelly. “She brightens my day.” Maggie and her coach have a very trusting relationship, but when Maggie slacks off or becomes worn out, Kelly motivates her and makes sure she gets back on track. Kelly isn’t the only one who motivates her. Her mom, Alice Jasper, is also a motivation. She is proud of Maggie and she enjoys watching her dance. Alice would be elated if Maggie received a scholarship for it. “I’m happy Maggie is dancing because it gives her a lot of confidence to get up on stage, and she has learned a lot from dance,” says Alice. “I love watching her too. She is so animated, the faces she makes, and she’s really into it. You can tell she loves what she’s doing.” Dancing means so much to Maggie, even though it can be tough at times. According to Kelly, if Maggie chooses to have a future in dance, she will be very successful. “It’s fun. I’ve made lifelong friends, it’s taught me to grow as a person and it’s good for school dances because I actually know what I’m doing,” says Maggie. “I couldn’t imagine life without it.”

page by kelsey bell

FHNTODAY.COM 11


Kelley lends a hand sam dulaney

December 15 enior Kelley Philabaun walks up to The Children’s Home Society, carrying boxes, bags of clothes, and a smile. “I’m so nervous!” she said. “You have no idea!” November 17 While working at her cashier job at JCPenney’s, Kelley was ringing up a customer buying a ton of children’s clothes of all sizes on clearance. Being a naturally curious person, Kelley asked what the clothes were for, to which the customer responded that they were for kids in an orphanage who had never had brand new clothing to call their own. “It bothered me because I go and buy clothes and they don’t have clothes to completely call their own,” Kelley said. Kelley began her search for a cause by Googling orphanages nearby. After recognizing the Children’s Home Society that she passed daily, she decided to make clothing those children her mission. That in mind, Kelley began advocating. Since that fateful day in JCPenney’s, Kelley raised $142.17 from friends, classmates and coworkers at JCPenny’s for developmentally disabled children at the Children’s Home Society. She campaigned in classes, had a table during lunches to collect money, and carried her big blue money bucket with sequins around with her everywhere. “I [was] really nervous that people are thinking I’m stealing their money,” Kelly said. “I just want them to get the same feeling I have.” At first, Kelley started off collecting for only five kids living at the Home Society on Muegge. Later, she found out about 10 others in Brentwood. Wanting to buy each one an entire outfit, Kelley needed help from anybody and everybody that could to raise all the money. “At first I was keeping hardcore track of who gave what, but I was falling asleep in class and I would count it after class to make sure nobody took anything but there was more in there than when I fell asleep,” Kelley said. December 15 Senior Kelley Philabaun walks up to The Children’s Home Society, carrying boxes, bags of clothes, and a smile. “I’m so nervous!” she said. “You have no idea!” Clothes in hand, on the blistering cold December day, though, all the discomfort of advocating and asking for donations was forgotten. Now it was replaced with a huge smile, and a certain nervousness to meet the children. The first to meet Kelley was Ryan. Ryan shook her hand with a smile and wheeled away in his chair to go watch TV. Walking through the halls, Kelley waves to those she can see, introducing herself when she can, with her ever present smile. While taking a tour, she is introduced to Joey, who she brought clothes for. “Joey!” Kateri Chapman-Kramer, a Children’s Home Society worker says to a boy laying on his bed. “Hey Joey!” The boy smiles back to Kateri and Kelley. “See, that’s how he responds.” All the kids at the Children’s Home Society have some sort of developmental disability, which allows them to stay there to receive the proper treatment they need and couldn’t get elsewhere. With state budget cuts, the Home has been feeling the strain. “The kids have an allowance but there’s not much to go around,” Kateri said. “[Kelly’s] gift is what’s really going to make their Christmas. It’s a basic need we take for granted.” Later that day, at the Brentwood Home, Kelley checks her well-worn list of children. The list contains their sizes, ages, and styles of clothing they like. With the rest of the clothes, and this time a few toys and lotions for the younger kids and the girls, she once again is struck by nerves, only to forget all about them once she meets the kids she has been advocating for for over a month. One such boy named James sits in his wheelchair in the warm living room in Brentwood. The room is decorated for the holidays, but James is looking out the window. “Hi James!” Kelley says. “Well you’re handsome, aren’t you?” James looks to Kelley for a few minutes before replying with a resounding “Hello!” After tours of both houses, Kelley heads home. No more advocating. No more bargain shopping. But still that smile. No longer a nervous smile, but one of relief and satisfaction. “It was a lot of fun, a lot of work,” Kelley said. “I don’t regret any of it. And I’m going to do it again next year, but on a bigger scale.”

S

Senior Kelley Philabaun embraces her donation collection bucket in front of the St. Charles Children’s Home Society (brandon neer).

WHERE DO YOU VOLUNTEER AND WHY?

Amanda DeJarnett, 12 Humane Society “I like to give back.”

Andrew Brodnik, 12 Greenway Network “I enjoy helping others because I want to help my community.”

Makenzie McColloch, 12 Oasis Food Pantry “I feel like I’m actually helping someone and making a difference.”

12 FEATURES page by christy maupin


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14 FEATURES page by taylor berra & amanda cornett


Taylor Trice, 12 Heels: Shi Jeans: Pac Sun T-shirt: Wet Seal Purple Shirt: Body Central Converse: Journeys Skirt: Rave

Alec Broker, 12 Coat: Target Flannel Shirt: Target T-Shirt: Hot Topic Jeans: Target Shoes: Vans Gray Jacket: Target Purple T-Shirt: GAP

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page by taylor berra & amanda cornett

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15


Picasso’s: Beyond the Coffee W michelle mottin

hen most people go to a coffee shop, they get their drink, and when they walk out, that’s all they have, but at Picasso’s, people leave with much more. Chris Schulte, owner of Picasso’s, opened the VKRSĂ€YH\HDUVDJR%HIRUHWKLV&KULVZDVDPDUketing manager for the Gallo Winery in Iowa, and DQDUHDVDOHVPDQDJHUIRUWKH0LOOHU%UHZLQJ&R for Kansas and Missouri. “I always wanted to have my own business,â€? Chris said. “I just wanted to create something instead of just working for a paycheck in a corporate job.â€? He chose to have his coffee shop on Main Street because of the historic district, and because there is no other coffee shop on Main Street. This gives many passersby by the chance to discover Picasso’s. “I think one thing we focus on more than other coffee shops is the coffee,â€? Chris said. Picasso’s says that they brew the freshest and best coffee possible, with plenty of friendly, well trained baristas. Another unique thing about Picasso’s is the events that draw people in. Open Mic Night is every Thursday, a book club meets once a month and WKHUHDUH%LEOHVWXG\JURXSVLQDGGLWLRQWRPXVLF on Friday and Saturday nights. This month’s featured artist at Picasso’s is Kim William Gordon, a landscape photographer who also builds “found objectâ€? sculptures. The name of KLVH[KLELWLV´5LYHU%RQHVÂľ+HJRWWKHLQVSLUDWLRQ from the massive accumulation of driftwood at the 6W &KDUOHV %RDW +RXVH )DFLOLW\ &XUUHQWO\ 3LFDsso’s is booked with artists wanting to rent out the space at least two years in advance. Each artist also gets a reception for the opening of their display, where the general public is welcome. Kim brought his additional prints and sculptures. ´,WZDVĂ€QH²DJRRGFURZGÂľ.LPVDLG 2SHQ0LF1LJKWLVGHĂ€QLWHO\RQHRI3LFDVVR¡V most popular events. Every Thursday, this event gives musicians a chance to play in front of a crowd. There are about 12-15 performers a week. “It’s a great social event, it’s a great place to

On the corner of Jefferson Street and Main Street people gather to read poetry, have a cup of coffee, and enjoy the relaxing atmosphere Picasso’s gives costumers. (kelsey habighorst)

16 FEATURES

page by abby west

meet people and hang out,� Chris said. David Cattani is the host of Open Mic Night, and in charge of running it. It begins at seven and usually goes past midnight, as it’s usually the busiest night of the week. According to Chris, they have Open Mic Night as a way to engage the community. Cattani often performs at Picasso’s on his own and also with his dad. He plays a blend of his personal favorites, along with popular music. “[My favorite part of performing is] the intimacy of a crowd, the place itself holds 30 people like sardines,� Cattani said. “Just having the feeling of the people listening.� Another band that often performs is the Peaches Jazz Messengers. Dennis Ellerbeck, a regular at Picasso’s who plays the tenor sax in Peaches says, “The culture, it’s almost like a social club culture.� Picasso’s has such a strong group of regulars, that a group of them decided to name themselves the Main Street Rats. The members are all people who regularly come to Picasso’s, in addition to the motorcycle club for the regulars who own one. “It’s a homey kind of place, all the people are nice,� Dennis said. What makes Picasso’s unique is its friendly environment, how it draws the community in, and that it’s a place where people come in for coffee, but also leave with friends. “The people really make the shop, it’s a community stop almost,� David said. “Coffee shops are about people.� “It’s a community of familiar faces,� Kim William Gordon said. Picasso’s focuses on its customers, and getting involved with the community, always looking to give back. They’re having a canned food drive for WKH6W/RXLV)RRG%DQNQRZXQWLO&KULVWPDVZLWK a box near the door to collect the canned goods. “I think what every coffee shop should try to do, some do it better than others, and it’s try to be a part of the community,� Chris said.

Scan Here Scan the barcode to the left for a video of an Open Mic Night at Picasso’s. Get the free mobile app for your phone at: http://gettag.mobi No smart phone? Here’s the URL. http://bit.ly/fdkW4k

Picasso’s isn’t a typical coffee shop, everyone can go to open mic nights which are held every Thursday. Festivals held on Main Street also attract costumers to Picasso’s. (kelsey habighorst)


Something’s

CHEESY

New restaurant on the loop offers a “cheesy” experience

amanda cornett

In the heart of the Delmar Loop sits a restaurant serving up food especially for cheese lovers. That restaurant is Cheese-ology, which offers more then a dozen unique combinations of macaroni and cheese, along with salad and dessert options. The restaurant is owned by former chemist Bill Courtney. Bill opened the restaurant at the end of June and has seen it become successful for a little over six months. “My wife and I went on a trip to New York City and while we were there we visited a restaurant that served macaroni and cheese and that is where I got the original idea,” Bill said. “I had been out of work for a while and finding a job was hard due to the recession [until] one day my wife turned to me and said, ‘Why don’t you just make macaroni?” Although Cheese-ology is fairly new, it already has many regulars who frequently visit. Jill Heigher is one such person who often comes with her husband Christopher. Every time Jill visits, she orders one of the four cheese, one of the vegetation options, which she describes as a classic. “It is a restaurant literally dedicated to mac and cheese, which is one of my favorite foods,” Heigher said. “We like how it is both fun and casual.” Samantha Bueler, who has worked at Cheeseology since it opened, feels as though the restaurant is exciting, but laid back at the same time. She says there really is something that anyone can enjoy. “It’s really a great place its always upbeat and lively,” Samantha said. “People always seem so happy to be here, and it is in such a diverse locaCheese Ology owner Bill Courtney, proudly displays his tion as well.” macaroni and cheese dish at he resturant located on the Delmar Loop. (brandon neer)

18 FEATURES

page by abby west


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20 IN-DEPTH page by  kelsey  bell


page by  kelsey  bell

FHNTODAY.COM 21


taylor  berra

On a bitterly cold night after Halloween, seniors Brett Sloan, Logan Ponche, Mike Wilson, Brittney Kelly and Taylor Bell crammed into Ponche’s red Chevy %OD]HUKHDGLQJWRWKHÀUHVWDWLRQ)+1(QJOLVKWHDFKHU5RQ2FKXKDGWROGWKHP WRORRNIRULIWKH\ZHUHWRÀQG0ROO\&UHQVKDZ·VJUDYH1RZWKH\ZHUHRQD TXHVW7KH\GURYHLQFLUFOHVWU\LQJWRVHDUFKIRUWKHWZRURDGVWKDW2FKXKDGWROG WKHPWRORRNIRUWRQRDYDLO(YHU\RQHLQWKHFDUEHFDPHQHUYRXV7KHDQWLFLSDWLRQZDVJURZLQJLQHYHU\RQH·VVWRPDFK)LQDOO\WKH\GURYHXSDKLOODQRWDEOH ODQGPDUNZKLFKZDVOLVWHGLQ2FKX·VGHWDLOV ´,·PQRWRQHWREHOLHYHLQJKRVWVEXWHYHU\RQHZDVJHWWLQJUHDOO\VFDUHG DQGHYHU\RQHHOVH·VIHDUZDVUXEELQJRIIRQPHµ%HOOVDLG´(YHQNQRZLQJWKDWQRWKLQJZDVJRLQJWRKDSSHQ,ZDVVWLOODOLWWOHKHVLWDQWWRJHWRXW RIWKHFDUµ 7KH\ZHUHVXGGHQO\VWRSSHGE\DKHUGRIGHHUFURVVLQJWKHURDG :DLWLQJIRUWKHPWRFURVVWKHJURXSEHFDPHQHUYRXVZLWKDQWLFLSDWLRQ:KLOHWKHGHHUVWRRGRQWKHSDWKWKHJURXSJRWRXWRIWKHFDU DQGORRNHGDURXQGVHDUFKLQJIRUDQ\KLQWRIWKHJUDYHEXWWKH\ FRXOGÀQGQRWKLQJ1RWDFOXH$VDQ[LRXVDVWKH\ZHUHWRÀQG ZKDW2FKXKDGGHVFULEHGWKH\KDGQROXFNGLVFRYHULQJLW7KH\ FDOOHGLWDQLJKW/DWHUWKRXJKWKH\ZRXOGEHEDFNWRÀQGWKLV WKLQJ 7KH\ ZRXOG EH EDFN ODWHU WR ÀQG 0ROO\ &UHQVKDZ·V JUDYH ´, ZDV WHUULÀHGµ VHQLRU %ULWWDQ\ .HOO\ VDLG ´,W LV YHU\ FUHHS\WRNQRZWKDWVRPHWKLQJOLNHWKDWKDSSHQHGDQGWKDW ZHZHUHJRLQJWRORRNIRUKHUµ 7KURXJKWKHJHQHUDWLRQVDVWKHOHJHQGRI0ROO\&UHQVKDZKDVEHHQSDVVHGGRZQWKHVWRU\KDVH[SHULHQFHGVRPH GLVWRUWLRQ7KHPRVWFRPPRQO\WROGYHUVLRQRIWKHVWRU\ZDV WKDW0ROO\ZDVDVODYHZKROLYHGLQ6W&KDUOHV&RXQW\GXULQJWKHODWH·V$VVKHZDVNQRZQWRSUDFWLFHYRRGRR DQG ZDV RIWHQ FDOOHG XSRQ E\ WKH WRZQVSHRSOH WR GLVSHQVH VSHOOV DQG SRWLRQV IRU WKHP VKH ZDV ORRNHG XSRQ DV WKH FDXVHRIDSRRUKDUYHVWRQH\HDU,QWKHLUUDJHDQGIUXVWUD-

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FHNTODAY.COM 23


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24 IN-DEPTH page by  kelsey  bell

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Curiosity surrounding the paranormal plagues many. However, being a professional in paranormal investigations is not DQHFHVVDU\TXDOLÀFDWLRQWRVHHNVRPHVRUW of proof that there is life in the after-life, as these students from North have proven.

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Bobby Garner

snow boards. Patrick Fountain

skis. Together,

they ride. (abbey grone)


Hitting the

slopes abbey grone

30 SPORTS page by abbey grone

Bobby Garner lands his 360 spin. This is one of Bobby’s numerous landed jumps. (abbey grone)

It’s December 18, the nine month wait is over. Two boys jump in a black Cobalt and start listening to Dead Mau5, Girl Talk and Dubstep as they head down Highway 94 to I-64. In the back of the car there are some boots, gloves and water resistant pants. More importantly, there’s a pair of ski’s and a snowboard. For the past three years Juniors Bobby Garner and Patrick Fountain have been going to Hidden Valley in Chesterfield together. They have both put a lot of heart, money and time into their sports. And the skill, enjoyment and friendship they’ve gotten has made all of the heart, money and time worth it. It’s 11 a.m. when Bobby and Patrick hop out of the car and gear up for the first ride of season at Hidden Valley’s opening day. Snowboarding and skiing wasn’t the first sport these boys participated in together, they met through the junior Knights football program in 8th grade. The boys got to talking and found out their love for the sport and have been riding together ever since. “I didn’t think that many people in Missouri knew how to snowboard or ski,” Bobby said. “It was cool to have someone to ride with.” Bobby started snowboarding three years ago- when he took his first ride during a midnight run with his friend senior Nick Clippard- and has been riding since then. “Nick invited me to go with his dad at a midnight session and I started shredding the park that night,” Bobby said. “I’ve loved it ever since.” Patrick started skiing simply for a badge at age thirteen. “There was a ski badge for boy scouts when I was little,” Patrick said. “I wanted it.” Although the boys started for different reasons and ride different boards, they both say they are very close in skill level and enjoy going together. “Patrick and I like to go together because we can do the same stuff and we don’t slow each other down,” Bobby said. The boys walk up the steep parking lot hill and head to a building with three windows in it. Their oversized boots make it a little bit harder to walk. Bobby pays his $43 admission and Patrick flashes his season pass. Patrick made a $300 investment in a season pass, but Bobby pays the $43 admission every time he goes. With the purchase of equipment, gas and admission, Bobby racks up about a $950 bill throughout the year. Patrick pays more than $1000 because of the high price of skiing equipment and the out of state trips he takes almost every year. “It’s completely worth the price,” Patrick said. “The amount of joy I get from skiing is worth any price.”


Snow boarder Bobby Garner

Grade: Junior Favorite trick: Double Cork 1260 Years boarding: three Favorite song to ride to: “Cream” by Wu Tang Clan

Celebrity comparison:

“Torstein Horgmo because we both wear yellow snow pants.”

Bobby and Patrick strap on their board and ski’s and head down the bunny hill. There, they hit a crowd of people ready to get on the lift to take their first run on the hill known as “Backlands.” Bobby and Patrick ride the lift, and get off at the top of the run. Together, they take off bobbing and weaving between other skiers and snow boarders. Instead of finishing the hill, they decide to stop at the terrain park, where they spend most of their day. With only three years of experience for both of them, Bobby has managed to land a tweaked tail grab, a shifty shift 180 and a lipslide. Patrick has taught himself to land a 360, a truck driver and a switch 180. “You have to practice until you do it,” Patrick said. “In the end, you just have to man up and do it.” Landing these tricks was a challenge but learning the basics seems to be the biggest challenge according to Bobby. “The biggest challenge is learning how to carve and ride,” Bobby said. “The first time I kept falling and it put me in a bad mood.” It’s 9 p.m, they have already spent 10 hours going down the shaved ice covered hill and still aren’t ready to leave. Plans to stay until when the park closed at 2 a.m. were put to a halt when friend of Patrick and Bobby, junior Austin Doeren, was cut off by a younger snow boarder causing him to fall and break his nose. “Breaking my nose wasn’t good,” Austin said. “But I took the fall for the kid. Overall it was a good day and riding with Patrick and Bobby was fun.” The boys walk their boards to the car, saying goodbye to the park until next weekend. Their wet pants, boots and coats are put in the back. The right side of the back seat is folded down and the boards and ski’s are slid in. Austin sits in the back, Bobby plays DJ in the front passenger seat and Patrick drives. Despite leaving earlier then expected, the boys said they had a good day, and are already talking about what they hope next weekends trip to Hidden Valley will bring. Will Bobby land the back flip he’s working on? Or will Patrick land the Hippy Killer? It’s only a matter of time until the next ride, and the excitement of next weekend is already rushing through them. “It makes me feel good,” Bobby said. “I get excited every time I strap on my board.”

Skier Patrick Fountain Grade: Junior Favorite trick: Hippy Killer Years skiing: four Favorite song to ride to: “Roll Out” by Chrispy

Celebrity Comparison:

“Tupac because we’re straight riders.”

Patrick Fountain jumps up on a rail. His goal this season is to land a Hippy Killer. (abbey grone)

page by abbey grone

FHNTODAY.COM

31


Teams shoot for a cure Pink. The color could be found in the headbands, pre-wrap, and socks of North basketball players on Jan. 7. That was the night of their home games against the Timberland Wolves. That was the night of the third annual pink ribbon game.

Rising up at the baseline, junior Summer Pauley shoots the ball while being pressured by Timberland defense. Pauley has been playing for the last three years but this year she is considered a swing player in which she bounces from JV to Varsity. The Knights won in last few moments with a final score of 49-47. (lydia ness)

Senior Emily Brady lunges for a loose ball just out of reach after a missed shot. Brady has been playing basketball since she was in sixth grade, for the last two years she has been on the Varsity team at North. She got her start on Varsity her sophomore year, while swinging on the JV and Varsity teams. Aside from participating in basketball, Brady is involved in many other clubs, such as NHS, DECA, and Mu Alpha Theta.(kelsey habighorst) First time Varsity player, Hali Long, drives the ball to the basket while senior Sierra Haymes of Timberland attempts to block her shot during the second half of the game. The Knights fought hard, but had a devastating loss with a score of 43-33. (kelsey habighorst)

Junior Sydney Swing jumps at the free throw line and makes the basket allowing the Knights to be ahead 2 point against the Wolves at the end of the third quarter with a score of 27-25. This is Swingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first year on JV but second year playing at North. (lydia ness)

32 Sports

page by emily forst, kelsey habighorst and lydia ness


e

Freshman James Gleeson looks to the right for an open player to inbound the ball to in the end of the third quarter. The JV Knights won with a close score of 56-53. (kaitlyn williams)

Captain Brooke Oostendorp hugs her grandma Carri Tate after giving her the jersey she made; Tate survived breast cancer 22 years ago. Hahn says “it was humbling to watch the impact [the team] had on the crowd.” Oostendorp has been on Varsity for three years, but has had to sit out for most of the season this year due to a pulled groin. She hopes to come back to play in districts, which will be held on Feb. 21-25. (kelsey habighorst)

Going up for a layup, freshman Kyle Lemons charges the net while being guarded by the defense. Lemons made the basket for 2 points pushing his team further ahead of the opposing team. Lemons first started on JV but quickly moved up to Varsity making him the only freshman on the team. (sarah teson)

Raines jumps in preperation for the rebound although the ball went in for a basket instead. The Varsity boys won with a score of 65-49 making this game the fifth consecutive win for the Knights. This is Raines’ first year on Varsity at North because he did not attend North his sophomore and junior year. (sarah teson)

Varsity starter Steve Raines runs through the tunnel of Varsity cheerleaders before the pink ribbon game. This is FHN’s third annual pink ribbon game started by former coach Hahn.”The year before we started the pink ribbon game my mom passed away during the basketball season,” Hahn said. “I wanted to do something I know she would be proud of me for.” (sarah teson)

Senior Kelsey Fouch embraces her former coach, Dawn Hahn, after giving her the jersey the Varsity team made in memory of the tradition Hahn started at FHN. “They cease to amaze me,” Hahn said. “It was very overwhelming and hard to hold it together, but I did.” The jersey now hangs in Hahn’s room along with memories of the past two pink ribbon games. (kaitlyn williams)

Scan Here

Scan the barcode to the left to see the Varsity boys Pink Ribbon Basketball game against Timberland. Get the free mobile app for your phone at: http://gettag.mobi No smart phone? Here’s the URL. http://bit.ly/dS4ewf

Scan Here

Scan the barcode to the left for videos of the Varsity girls Pink Ribbon Basketball game. Get the free mobile app for your phone at: http://gettag.mobi No smart phone? Here’s the URL. http://bit.ly/dS4ewf

page by emily forst


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MEET THE ATHLETES

Members of the Girls Swim team discuss what they like best about swimming

Rowan Pugh , 9 Junior Becca Hutson swims the 500m freestyle in her meet against FZN on Jan. 5. The meet took place at the Rec Plex. Francis Howell North, although never giving up, took a hard loss to Fort Zumwalt North in this meet. (kaitlyn williams)

Leadership found in younger swimmers

“I like how when you’re at practice, you take your time, but when you get in the water and it’s for a race there’s all that adrenaline

elizabeth diggs

The underclassmen are taking over the Varsity girls Swim team this year, seeing as there are no seniors on the team, and two of the youngest swimmers are stepping up as the leaders of the team. “They’re those kinds of kids that you don’t have to explain things to,” Head coach William Crow said, “They know what their roles are, and they are just good kids.” Sophomore Alexis Christo and freshman Megan Hampson have been on North’s Varsity team since entering high school. They both swim competitively on club Swim teams in addition to being on North’s team, and both have been working together to lead the team this season. “It feels good to know that I’m up there, and that I’m fast,” Christo said, “It’s cool since I’m younger.” The girls on the swim team mainly swim to improve their own times, while improving North’s team as a whole, so naturally there is some competition between each of the swimmers. However, the swimmers leave the competition at practices, and mainly focus on beating members of other teams according to Christo. As for Hampson and Christo, they don’t necessarily feel the competition between each other because it is so early in the season and there haven’t been very many meets yet. “I haven’t compared myself to [Christo] yet,” Hampson said, “But I’ll probably end up thinking about trying to beat her times.” Friendly competition or not, Hampton and Christo will be looked on to lead the team the rest of the season. And with the GAC tournament coming up in less than a month in February, they will have to step up and prove that their times and not their grade, will be what the rest of the team takes notice of. “I’m sure it’s frustrating to have someone younger be ahead of them,” Christo said. “If I was in their position, I would see it as incentive to work harder.”

DIFF’RENT STROKES

Freestyle- junior Sarah Asega

Sam Price, 9 “[I like] just being able to compete and being with friends and making new

Amanda Iborg, 11 “[I like] hanging out with everybody.”

Below are some of the strokes that are used in competitive swimming as performed by the girls swim team.

Back Stroke- junior Carolyn Malkmus

Breast Stroke- junior Danielle Meyer page by elizabeth diggs & sam dulaney

FHNTODAY.COM 35


Junior Trevor Gorsuch stands holding the hockey stick he has been using for his past North hockey games this season. Gorsuch has played on four teams during his hockey career, one of which took him all the way to Sweden. Gorsuch has been playing since he was three, which has helped him to play for the U18 AAA Blues Ice Hockey team. (sam hurrell)

Passion for hockey drives Gorsuch to a national top spot lindsey harms

People that know Trevor Gorsuch know that his life revolves around his favorite sport- hockey. Gorsuch, a junior, is a goalie on FHN’s Varsity Hockey team based out of the Saint Peters Rec-Plex. Playing hockey for 13 years, Trevor’s love for the sport has only increased, while many’s around him have faltered. While one ice hockey player may find enough gratification from playing in only one league, Trevor does not. Trevor plays on a traveling AAA 18U Blues Ice Hockey team. Trevor has played for this league for nine years and is the youngest player on his team. His youth does not correspond with his playing time, as Trevor is the first string goalie on his traveling team. “Trevor as an athlete is very, very good,” father Jack Gorsuch said. “He is dedicated, self-driven, and he works out very hard.” While most teenagers have not had the opportunity to travel all around the U.S., Trevor has. Hockey has taken Trevor to more than 30 of the states. Not only that, but Trevor has also traveled internationally, going to such countries as Mexico and Sweden, living with host families and being afforded valuable experiences. In addition to these exotic experiences, his hard work has earned him the rank of being one of the top goalies in the nation. This ranking is a result of Trevor’s self-drive and dedication, as he works out for a total of 18 to 20 hours a week- about the equivalent of working a part-time job. His many college offers and constant scouting opportunities are what he has to show

for all of this hard work. His parents are his main supporters, giving him positive feedback and criticism that helps push Trevor to work harder. “My parents push me because they know my potential, and they know that I can go the distance,” Trevor said. Going the distance entails many sacrifices, however. Baseball, another sport Trevor loves, is going to have to wait for now, as his hockey schedule is too busy to allow him to participate on another team. FHN’s hockey team is also going to have to take a backseat to Trevor’s traveling hockey team. Although Trevor plays with FHN for about half of the games, he misses most of the practices. The missed practices do not affect Trevor’s relationships with his teammates; they know his exceptional abilities are always improving. FHN Varsity Hockey coach, Paul Bruemmer, agrees, stating that FHN’s biggest strength is Trevor’s goal tending, and believing Trevor to be “one of the top goalies in the state.” Trevor’s absences affects the team not only by the outcome of the game, but emotionally as well. “It’s a real bummer,” Bruemmer said. “[Without Gorsuch] the kids almost feel defeated before they even set foot on the ice. However, his absence does not affect the amount of Trevor’s playing time for the FHN team, because his coaches know he is working hard playing hockey elsewhere. Whether Trevor is playing at the local rink or across the country, he is giving 100 percent.

WHAT’S IN YOUR HOCKEY BAG? Mikey Pavolka, 12 stick tape, sock tape, helmet, jerseys, shoulder pads, elbow pads, mouth guard, hockey pants, shin guards, socks, and skates. Mark Jones, 10 wax, tape, sweat towel, inhailer, screwdriver, and all pads.

36 SPORTS page by elizabeth diggs & sam dulaney

jock,

Trey Davenport, 12 helmet, all pads and pants.

Kyle Kateman, 9 elbow pads, gloves, shouder pads, skates, helmet and shin guards.

Athletes at North have some pretty unique things in their sports bags. Here are some things in our hockey players’ bags. Drew Ortcheid, 12 air freshner in the shape of a hockey puck and a spit rag

Kenny Ruiz, 11 a can, gloves, helmet, tape, socks, shorts and a water bottle.


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Jan. 19th JV & Varsity Girls Basketball Vs. Hazelwood Central 5:00 PM and 6:30 PM Jan. 21st Soph & Varsity Boys Basketball Vs. Troy/Buchanan 5:30 PM and 7:00 PM Jan. 24th JV & Varsity Girls Basketball Vs. Lafayette 5:00 PM and 6:30 PM Jan. 31st Soph Boys Basketball Vs. Marquette 5:00 PM Feb. 1st JV & Varsity Girls Basketball Vs. Ft. Zumwalt South 5:00 PM and 6:30 PM Feb. 11th Pep Assembly Morning Feb. 11th Soph & Varsity Boys Basketball Vs. Holt 5:30 PM and 7:00 PM Feb. 15th Soph & Varsity Boys Basketball Vs. Ft. Zumwalt S. 5:00 PM and 6:30 PM

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SPORTS REVIEWS 2

Senior Andre Wooten forces the ball down the court in attempt to make a layup for his team. The Knights came up short in their efforts to beat Lindbergh at the Family Arena. The game ended with a final score of 59 to 44 with Lindbergh winning. (tori hanke)

CHEERLEADING

abby west

On Jan. 9, the FHN Varsity cheerleaders participated in the National Cheerleading Association competition, in which they placed first. It took place at the Family Arena in St. Charles. They performed a routine which was set to FHN’s fight song. Last year, the team took first place at this competition, so expectations were set for a repeat performance this year. “I feel we did good because all of the stunts hit, no one touched knees on their back handsprings, and we got a big applause from the audience,” sophomore Kaitlyn Casey said.

3

lydia ness

Practicing for an upcoming competition, Seniors Kelsey Short and Cori Bradly, and sophomore Bailey O’Neal go over the FHN fight song routine. This is the squad’s second time competing this year. (jessica streiler)

5

GIRLS BASKETBALL

brandan sandbothe

Senior Tyler Schaefer spins the ball as he throws it down the lane. The bowling team pactices at Brunswick Zone in O’ Fallon. Schaefer has been bowling for 4 years. (file photo)

1

BOWLING

wade dismukes

As the new year begins the bowling season continues. Through the snow and rain of the winter break the team carried on in the shelter of the bowling lanes, improving and proving their skills. The bowling team has practiced and performed as well as they could, achieving 3rd as a team among schools in the area. The new year will surely see this same consistency and skill that has been seen in the season thus far. “I feel that we are doing pretty good. We have a positive record,” said Darin Voyles.

4

WRESTLING

The Varsity girls Basketball team is stalling in the GAC South with a 4-7 record. They have lost two games straight and have to win against Fort Zumwalt South on Feb. 2 to have a fighting chance in their district. They’ve been winning by an average of 17 points and losing by an average of 13 points. “We are working really hard, we just aren’t doing the little things right,” player Emma Nicolli said. “We are just concentrating more to do things right.”

kendra barnard

With a record of 0-3, the Varsity Wrestling team has gotten off to a frustrating start. All three losses have been closely contended affairs, with the biggest lost being by 10 points to Howell and the smallest by 1 point to Holt. “Well, out of 14 weight classes to lose by a point, there is surely somewhere down the line where we could have made up that point.” Coach Harold Ritchie said. But with six meets left (two double dual meets and two single meets) and two tournaments, the coaches and players are confident that by practicing 15 hours a week, they can finish the season strong.

1

Girls Swim

- Jan. 21- Westminster - Jan. 25- Wentzville/Holt - Feb. 4 - Ft. Zumwalt South

2

BOYS BASKETBALL

Ice Hockey

- Jan. 24 vs. Parkway South - Jan. 28 vs. Fort Zumwalt South

38 SPORTS page by elizabeth diggs & sam dulaney

3 Boys Basketball

The Varsity boys Basketball team had a rocky start to the season, with a 0-7 record. However, the team did have a success in the Seckman tournament, with two wins and a 45-41 victory over Rockwood Summit High School, securing the team a championship. Since the tournament, the Knights have won six of their last seven games as of press time, holding a record of 6-8. Many on the team feel the Seckman tournament was a turning point for this season, giving the team more confidence for the rest of the year. “[In the tournament] we started playing better as a team and executing what we learned in practice,” senior Dan McGraw said. “Everything came together at the same time.”

6 KNIGHTLINE paige yungermann

As the Knightline season nears its end, the team is hoping to finish on a positive note by doing well in their last competitions. From Jan. 7-12, Knightline was in Chicago competing against dance teams from across the nation in the Windy City Championships. At this competition, Knightline received second in poms and first in hip hop. “Everybody was really excited,” junior Brea Holmes said. “We worked hard and our work showed on the dance floor.” Knightline is now preparing for their next and last competition, the State competition, which will take place the last weekend in February. Last year,

4

Wrestling

- Jan. 20: SCW/Troy Tri- - Jan. 21 vs. Troy/ Meet Buchanan - Feb. 4 vs. Francis Howell - Feb. 2 vs. Howell Central

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they took fourth in dance and in jazz and are hoping to improve on that mark. “I want to do well at State, but I also hope we enjoy the rest of the season,” Holmes said. “We’ve had a lot of fun times together.”

5

Girls Basketball

- Jan. 24 vs. Lafayette - Feb. 1 vs. Ft. Zumwalt South


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ENTERTAINMENT “Little Fockers” sidney shelton

Alyssa Bernal is an up-and-coming artist in the music industry. Her career began on YouTube and she has progressed to recording her own album and her own songs. This artist is good for any listener who enjoys variety in their music. (photo courtesy of Moxie)

MUSIC

A YouTube sensation emerges as musical art ist Currently, her style wavers between Pop and Country. Personally, I was intrigued by her when Alyssa Bernal is one of the newest up-and- I first saw her on YouTube. She had a sweet coming artists. Her fame started a few years ago voice and a really peppy personality. Her voice when she began making sounds good on vidScan Here YouTube videos of herself eo even without it Scan the barcode to the left for the video of Alyssa singing covers of other artbeing enhanced by Bernal’s song “Cali Cali Cali.” ists such as “Train” and a studio recording. Get the free mobile app for your phone at: http://gettag.mobi “Lady Gaga.” Now, she Because her fame No smart phone? Here’s the URL. http://bit.ly/gCaBFZ has her own songs and her started on Youtube, first album “In Love Again I think she’s very For The First Time,” whose songs reflect her life inspirational. Now that Alyssa Bernal has been experiences. discovered, I think that she has the potential to I like her versatility because, even though not go far, and really please people with her music many artists try different techniques, she does. in the same way she has done for me.

nick bussell

TELEVISION The Sing-Off will make you want to turn it off taylor bartram

The other night, flipping through the channels, I stumbled upon a new show on NBC, “The Sing-Off”. I watched an episode and quickly knew how I felt about it- it was the worst show I have ever watched. I couldn’t stand to watch it; I turned the show off after the first half hour. It was a bad combination of American Idol and America’s Best Dance Crew.

First of all, the singers didn’t sound good. The groups lacked grace and harmony. The performances were also lackluster. The contestants didn’t do anything that caught my attention during the performance to distract me from the mediocre singing. Most of the groups just stood around. The performances weren’t the only thing that were bad- the judges were bad as well. They had no clue what they were talking about. Nicole Scherzinger,

Ben Folds and Shawn Stockman would say someone sounded perfect, when actually, they didn’t hit any of the notes. The judging didn’t seem based on a criteria of good or bad, it seemed based on the judge’s reaction to the performance. The the show was plainly unoriginal, as are the 20 other shows just like it. Next time I’m bored, instead of wasting my time, I think I’ll just watch the news.

PG-13

In ”Little Fockers”, the third installment of the Focker movies, Greg Focker has finally come to terms with his crazed father-inlaw Jack (Robert De Niro). After a heart attack, Jack appoints Greg to be the next head of the family:“The Godfocker.” As Greg pursues this title, Jack closely watches his every move, suspecting him of cheating and stating that Pam’s ex-fiance Kevin is better suited for Pam than Greg. “Little Fockers,” did not live up to the previous installments. This movie seemed to drag on with a number of pointless subplots that never came full circle. This movie felt more like a drawn out cast reunion then an actual film. Yes, the movie did have it’s funny moments but the poor story line, pointless plots and forced jokes made this movie extremely annoying to watch. Not only as fan of the first two movies but also as a fan of comedy, I would not recommend this film to anyone.

“How Do You Know?” emily forst

R

Reese Witherspoon plays an ex-Olympic softball player, named Lisa, who’s looking for her way in the world after she found out she was cut from the Olympic team. Throughout the movie, I laughed at the jokes and the comical struggles that Lisa had with her two love interests, George (Paul Rudd) and Matty (Owen Wilson). With these A-List actors, I knew there was no doubt that the movie was going to be funny, but it seemed to lacked a good story. The whole movie was kind of slow and predictable. When the movie was over and I found out who Lisa ends up with, I felt like I completely saw it coming. Overall I would classify this movie as just another generic romantic comedy that comes out every few months.

page by kyle schikore & andrew curran

FHNTODAY.COM 41


NORTH STAR TAKE:

KEEP IT

CLEAN ONLINE

Facebook has changed the way we communicate, especially as teenagers. Since 2006, when the website allowed anyone 13-years-old or older to join, the way teenagers express who they are has been focused onto their Facebook page. The pictures they put up, the quotes they pick as favorites, the things they like- it all paints a picture of how the person wants to be seen. And in the way that a bad attitude and stand-out clothing styles make people different in a negative manner, inappropriate pictures and immature “likes” do the same. In recent years, students at North have given little thought to what they put up on their Facebook pages. If one were to go online and look through the average student’s profile, more likely than not, with 15 minutes of search, inappropriate

pictures, wall posts, or comments could be found somewhere. Recently, the pictures and other content on the pages of some students have lead them to stop using it for the time being and remove inappropriate content, for fear that a college recruiter will see something negative. In some cases, the only solution was deleting the account altogether. Teens are doing a poor job of managing what they broadcast to the world about the decisions they make. The problem lies in the fact that students and athletes have done such a poor job of managing what goes out on the Internet about them. When managed responsibly, Facebook can be a great place to meet people like yourself and keep in contact with friends who can’t be seen every day. However, it can also set teenagers back in the future. When students make a slap-shod effort to

manage their online content, as is the current predicament some find themselves, it becomes overwhelming for students and applicants to manage all of the content. Teens need to stay on top of what they put out on the web sooner rather than later. A seemingly harmless picture now can turn out to be detrimental later. Just as a poor credit score makes getting a loan difficult, a poor social networking profile prevents people from getting good jobs. When it comes time for coaches to be looking at athletes; when it’s time for judges to be picking scholarship recipients; when it’s time for an employer to pick their next new hire, the best candidate, the one who is chosen, has a clean profile- on paper and online. And that starts in high school. Keep it clean now, because it makes everything better later.

On behalf of the editorial staff

Funky chicken fouls up pro-football logan ponche

Excessive victory dancing has not yet become a problem in high school but it may begin to happen due to the fact that it has been happening in the professional collegiate teams. This unsportsmanlike conduct has been happening over the last couple of seasons. (lydia ness)

42 OPINIONS page by lindsey harms

When the Philadelphia Eagles’ Desean Jackson broke a tackle after a catch for a 91-yard touchdown, he put his team up by 7 over the Dallas Cowboys. That single play is representative of professional athletics at their best, showcasing supreme athletic ability, strength and speed. However, when Jackson reached the end zone on that play and turned around, stuck his hands out, and fell over backwards, it was representative of professional athletics at their worst, showcasing self-centered arrogance. While this football season has had plenty of fantastic plays like Jackson’s, more and more of those plays are also regrettably including celebrations like Jackson’s. This is a problem; and I, as a fan, can hardly stand to watch anymore. Instead of celebrating a player making a great play, we are left to watch that same player who just displayed such skill make a fool out of himself. In the past few years, players have done almost anything to keep the spotlight on them including pull-

ing out cell phones, signing the football and even doing the funky chicken. What those players don’t realize when their elbows are flapping is that the impression they’re giving off is not one of their skill as athletes, but one of their immaturity as adults. Celebrations have been around for a long time, and there is nothing wrong with them. Some of the most lasting moments in sports history are the ones that happen after the play. One of Michael Jordan’s best known moments came against the Cleveland Cavaliers in game 5 of the opening round of the 1989 NBA playoffs. Jordan hit “The Shot,” a buzzer-beater to win 101-100. He then turned around, leaped into the air, and pumped his fist three times. Moments like that, where the true emotion that players feels comes through, are the ones worth watching. Not the pre-planned antics seen today.

Scan Here

Scan the barcode to the left for a video of Desean Jackson’s touchdown celebration against Dallas. Get the free mobile app for your phone at: http://gettag.mobi No smart phone? Here’s the URL. http://bit.ly/eYyFWW


Wiki Leaks create nation wide scandal aurora blanchard

T

he controversy surrounding WikiLeaks is enormous. It’s the first website of its kind, one that reveals top-secret government documents to the public. WikiLeaks’ concept is a noble one, and I value the freedom of speech and expression that they strive to promote. In my opinion however, WikiLeaks is like a ticking time bomb in the stomach of democracy. WikiLeaks’ main objective is to create “an uncensorable Wikipedia for untraceable mass document leaking and analysis.” Any submitted report could look like a direct attack against the U.S. government, causing a negative reaction from them. Threatening a person who has a lot of power in the government and access to all types of resources is asking for conflict. If WikiLeaks gains massive public support from revealing scandalous and ugly truths about the government, I believe that the people of America could look like a threat to national security in the government’s eyes.

In a democracy, members of society are supposed to collaborate with those in power to carry out the wishes of the people. If those in power feel attacked by the ones they’re supposed to be advocating for, they will have no reason to want to collaborate with them. In order for this collaboration to occur, the citizens and the people in power need to trust and respect one another. WikiLeaks has the potential of destroying that trust. When WikiLeaks exposes top-secret government documents to the masses, the orga-

nization is only causing damage to itself and the people who support it because ultimately, the government has the final say. It will always have the final say if it is unable to cooperate with its citizens. Citizen-government cooperation is impossible if the government doesn’t trust its citizens to make decisions. The government won’t value public opinion if they feel threatened by it. The government will then begin to horde its power and regulate freedom of speech. Although the Constitution is in place to protect democracy,

it’s also susceptible to change. When the founding fathers wrote it, they knew it wasn’t perfect and gave future generations the chance to change it as the times changed. If the times change dramatically because of the effects WikiLeaks, the government could make a dramatic change to the Constitution, causing true democracy to vaporize before our eyes. Today, WikiLeaks seems harmless enough; but in the future, it could potentially be the destroyer of our freedom.

Start doing things on your own, be independent As graduation approaches seniors should stop relying on others elizabeth diggs

A

ttention all FHN seniors: we graduate in exactly 137 days. Come June 4, we’ll have to live, cook, work, clean, and do most everything on our own. Some people in the senior class could do this well, step right out into the world and take it on. Others, however, still have a lot of maturing to do in the next five months. Students are very dependent. We depend on our teachers and friends. We depend on the people around us to help us out with necessary things. Most of all we depend on our parents. While we may not want to admit it, we rely on them to do a lot of things for us. Cook our meals, do our laundry, spot us the occasional five bucks. Next year, actually in seven months, none of those things will be provided for us.

Do most teens know how to wash clothes sufficiently, without dying white shirts pink because of red socks? I do not. I am working really hard to become an independent person. I have a steady job because I know that going to college costs a lot of money, and my parents don’t need to help me with such a finance. I make my own meals when I am hungry, and don’t rely on my parents to do it for me. College is more than just a time to meet new people and learn new things. It is all one big learning experience. However, if people do not try to learn how to survive on their own, they may struggle throughout college and the rest of their life. I would say that while there is time to become independent, do it and learn from older people, before it’s too late. Try to lean away from others’ help with necessary things, like cooking and cleaning. It will help greatly in the long-run. page by nicole renner

FHNTODAY.COM 43


WASH amanda cornett

A product that I have recently come across is Olay Quench In-Shower Body Lotion. I like this lotion because it makes your skin feel nice and soft, and it’s not very thick, so it doesn’t leave a residue after you leave the shower. The lotion has a great scent, and even leaves a sheer sparkle on your skin in any light. It is perfect for this cold weather by keeping your skin flawlessly moisturized. Using the in-shower lotion eliminates that extra step after getting out of the shower to put lotion on, and makes your life a little easier. I definitely recommend it to all who are seeking improvement in their skin.

PLAY

Senior Sam Dulaney sits with her boyfriend Dakota Rhoads on Jan. 6. Dulaney and Rhoads have been together for over a year and still have very strong feelings for one another. Dulaney believes that just because you are young, does not mean you cant find true love. Dulaney and her boyfriend Rhoads show off their promise rings. They bought the rings to show their commitment to one another. (michelle spencer)

nick ponche

Getting into the Wii experience with multiple players has always been difficult for one reason: Lack of space. All too often I have accidentally hit someone or been hit during a friendly Wii tennis match or Just Dance competition. For this reason, I was excited to receive the new wireless Wii Ultra Sensor Bar made by PowerA. I love the larger sensor and adjustable distance settings on the bar, because they allow for a greater range (about double that of the original sensor) for Wii remotes to be used in. The wireless capacity is also a nice feature, but it comes at the price of four AA batteries, which can add up over time. To help counteract this, the bar has a power save feature which will shut it off after one to two hours of inactivity. With all the features and extra room that the bar offers at the low price of $15, the Ultra Sensor Bar is a must-have for anyone who cherishes their elbows.

44 OPINIONS page by jordan bryson

Dulaney believes falling in love has no age limit sam dulaney

Age is just a number. The mantra is well known to be used by a person dating someone 20 years younger than them. However, the same can be said for those of us who aren’t even 20 to begin with. Age is just a number and has no effect on a person’s feelings. As an 18-year-old female, I’d like to think I know what I want. I know I want to be married, and I know who I want to be married to. But I hear it time and again. I’m too young. I realize marriage any time soon would be illogical. I’m still in high school. I’m barely out in the world yet. But don’t anyone dare tell me I’m too young to feel this way or that. I cringe whenever I hear the condescending term “puppy love” which is used to describe anyone- infatuated, in like, in love, in whatever, -who is somewhat young. Really, it is

just a way to belittle someone’s feelings. Granted, not every relationship in high school will last forever, but the feelings that these high school sweethearts feel can be just as genuine as anybody else’s. To assume that all high school romances are merely a passing fancy because we aren’t old enough yet is insulting. In times past, it was nothing out of the ordinary for people to marry young. My own grandmother, Alice married when she was only 16. Obviously she was not too young considering she was happily married for more than 50 years. Society assumes nowadays that if a sophomore were to claim they wanted to marry their significant other, then something surely must be wrong. An unplanned pregnancy maybe. Plain and simple naivete most likely. But if the couple truly loved one another, not that inane puppy love mumbo jumbo, it is

nobody else’s right to tell them that they can’t possibly have those legitimate feelings. However, by no means am I saying that every strong relationship formed in teenage years can make the cut. Many actually don’t. But it is not because we are young. Yes, we may grow apart because we haven’t actually found ourselves out yet. But people that wait until they are “old enough” to get married grow apart. They get divorced. They were not too young to have true love. And yet, things don’t work out. To anyone who is young and in love, in like, whatever it is that you are, I say nobody is too young. Romeo and Juliet were 14. Noah and Allie were 17. Grandma Alice and Grandpa Freddy were 16. Love has no limits. Anyone who says otherwise, you can wait all you want. I’m not putting a hold on my feelings until I’m old enough.


NORTH STAR

STAFF

New Year’s Resolution

Editor-in-Chief: Sam Dulaney Managing Editors: Logan Ponche Kelsey Bell

Head -to- Head

Editors: News Editor: Chelsey Damalas Features Editor: Abbey Grone Sports Editor: Elizabeth Diggs Opinions Editor: Adam Rapert Publicity Editor: Taylor Berra Copy Editor: Kevin Beerman

The debate is on as junior Chelsey Damalas and junior Nicole Renner duke it out over the effectiveness of the New Year’s Resolution chelsey damalas

While most people may think that having this once a year opportunity to be able to change your life around is a good idea, I beg to differ. New Year’s resolutions are a joke. The fact that people use this as a way to do something that they have already had a year to do is pathetic. Honestly, what is the point of on Jan. 1 saying “Yup this is the year that I lose those 15 pounds.” If you have a goal, then you should start it immediately, you don’t need this old tradition to finally get you motivated. One may argue that this is the start of a new year, it’s time to wipe the slate clean. But if you already have that state of mind, then this process should have started a lot sooner. In most cases, New Year’s resolutions last only, what, two weeks? So why keep eating that junk food when you know you’re going to regret it the day the new year begins? If you know that you’re wanting to lose those extra pounds, then start now. Throw away that cupcake. Don’t wait for the new year to finally say “This is the year, I’m finally going to do it.” Because let’s not fool ourselves, that’s most likely not going to happen. .

General Staff:

nicole renner

Many of us go through life constantly looking for opportunities to change ourselves for the better. I completely agree with this way of life, but how can we go about doing so? The New Year’s resolution is perhaps the best way for someone to have a clean start and make positive changes to their lifestyle. What could possibly be a better time to turn over a new leaf then at the beginning of a new year? Aside from that, there is the unmistakable aura of a clean slate and the feeling that anything is possible that nothing else like the New Year can provide. No doubt some may think that creating a New Year’s resolution is just an excuse to do what we’ve put off or even perhaps that is is just something we tell ourselves. To an extent I cannot blame them for being skeptical since most of the time people really are all talk and take no action. I myself have made resolutions that over time have slipped through the tiny cracks of my life. But I do believe that there is an abundance of inspiration when that clock strikes twelve on New Year’s eve. It beckons us to make the most of the time we have. I know I for one will work to make my resolution- living life to its fullest- going throughout the year.

LETTERS TO THE

EDITOR GUIDELINES

• Letters must be signed by the author and verified for publication

• Letters may be submitted to room 026 or Mr. Manfull’s mailbox • Letters must include the author’s phone number and e-mail for verification • Letters should not exceed 300 words

• Letters will not be printed if content is obscene, profane, invasive of privacy, encouraging physical disruption of school, and/or implies libel • Letters may be edited for length, grammar, spelling, and content

Abby West Amanda Cornett Aurora Blanchard Christy Maupin Emily Forst Lindsey Harms Morgan Carlson Nicole Renner Kyle Shikore

Nick Bussell Nick Ponche Olivia Ong Paige Yungermann Shannon Ward Sidney Shelton Taylor Bartram Jordan Bryson Andrew Curran

Director of Photography: Sam Hurrell Director of Online Photography Kelsey Habighorst Photographers: Erin D’Amico Jessica Streiler Tori Hanke Sarah Teson Brandon Neer Nicole Thompson Michelle Spencer

FHNTODAY.COM STAFF Editor-in-Chief: Lydia Ness Editors: Online Editors: Dan Spak Podcast Editor: Lauren Smith Webmaster: Jared Tompkin Interactive Director: Kaitlyn Williams General Staff: Stephanie Sage Kieran Myers Wade Dismukes Jaxon Nagel Christina DeSalvo Nicole Piatchek Chandler Pentecost Kayla Vogt Ryan Gannon Emily Wilkins Jon Doty Dan Wolters Kendrick Gaussoin

Advisers: Aaron Manfull Beth Phillips

• Authors will be notified if any changes are made to the letter by the editorial staff

page by nicole renner

FHNTODAY.COM 45


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North Star January 2011  

The Francis Howell North publications January 2011 edition of the North Star.

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