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VILLAGE 3.0

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Participants

Minglu Wei Yisha Ding Xiaoxu Sun Nusrat Jahan Mim Shanaya Ram Girdharlal Jose Coba Sou Fang Ethan Shao Hsuan Li Ray Kuo-Jui Lai Sophie Fraser Hafter Sebastine Simonnet Le Yang Jacob Schulman Peder Ulven Alice Gorodetsky Khairi Reynolds Junseok Choi Song Wang Nicolas Carmona Guzman Yalun Li Amanda Liberty Tara Boonkhun Debbie Vapheas Kamila Varela Vivian Cheng Maria Clara Perez Irazabal Joshua Siev


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STUDIO I

DESIGN, THE FUTURE AND THE URBAN VILLAGE IMAGINING THE FUTURE OF URBAN VILLAGE IN SHENZHEN

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INTRODUCTION

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INTEGRATED BRIDGE

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METASYS

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WASTE MANAGEMENT

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UPPER LEVEL

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BAISHIZOU-TONE


STUDIO II

POST-INDUSTRIAL REGENERATION IN URBAN VILLAGE IN SHENZHEN

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INTRODUCTION

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HARVESTING 3.0 3.0

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BUILDING 2

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PUBLIC CIRCLE

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VERTICAL STRETCH

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RE-HINGED

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THE NANTOU FLOAT

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SPANNING

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS


Design, the Future and the Urban Village

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Rem Koolhaas suggested in his 2014 Venice Biennale catalogue that modernization began to accelerate in 1914 with the onset of the first world war, transforming national identity, and thus national architecture identity, into a Universal Modernism that today, more than 100 years later, can be seen in cities around the world. Cities, Koolhaas suggests, and the buildings that define them, which in 1914 looked very different from one another, today look very much alike. Koolhaas’s assumption is that modernization begins in the West and quickly colonizes the rest of the world, leaving only “non-architectural” building practices and customs as traces of national architectural identity. That, in fact, is one of the story lines of the 2014 Venice Biennale. If Koolhaas is right, modernization creates, as it byproduct, a paste of Universal Modernism made from the pulverized remnants of local, regional and national architecture identity, which is spread evenly around the world, pushed even into the most underdeveloped economic crevices, cracks and deformations, to create a uniformly smooth surface. Evidence of this spread has given adherents and antagonists alike reason to believe that global modernization is the completion of a linear process

that began in the West and that has smoothed over and re-made the rest of the world in its image and likeness. But Koolhaas is not right. Modernization is not homogeneous, and it is not linear. Modernization does not begin in the West, as Koolhaas and many others believe, and spread around the world, transforming difference into sameness. Rather, global modernization is heterogeneous and non-linear and is defined neither by space nor by time, but instead by speed. Global modernization is a humming, churning chaos that operates at different speeds in different zones, quarters, and districts of the city and, indeed, in different cities within different countries all around the world—all at the same time, all simultaneously. Even the paste of Universal Modernism is not uniform and smooth, but is revealed, upon closer inspection, as a fractal urban spread of pockets, bands and swirls, all modernizing unevenly, at a relentless, though uneven, pace. Nowhere is this more evident than in Shenzhen, a city that is simultaneously contemporary and ancient; that showcases one of the most impressive skylines in the world; that houses a significant percentage of its population in “urban villages,” the spread of dereliction and innovation that stands as the very antithesis of the Central Business District, the apotheosis of the kind of linear time and western modernization that Koolhaas and others see at work in Shenzhen and all around the world. For anyone who has actually visited Nantou Old Village or Baishizhou, nothing could be further from the truth: Linear time is out of place in the urban vil-


5

lage, and indeed in all of Shenzhen, for one is not the past or the future of the other—the urban village is no more the past of the CBD than the CBD the future of the urban village Instead, together they form the spread of a very different temporality than the one imagined by Koolhaas and other minor Enlightenment architects, urbanists and theorists. Science fiction writer William Gibson rather presciently remarked some years ago about the future that it “is already here, it is just not evenly distributed.” The future, then, is not distinct from the present, but is instead part of a marbled temporality where future and present coexist but do not overlap. Extrapolating from Gibson’s observation, we could say that the future is the name we give to all that we cannot know in advance, all that is unpredictable and uncertain even though it is in such close proximity to all that we do know, all this is present. The future is real but inaccessible and it shapes all that we are and can become. Viewed in this way, the urban village is the future—the inaccessible and fecund real that we cannot know despite its proximity to all that we do know so very well. And it is in the eddies and swirls of this unevenly distributed, marbled future, in the vortices of uncertainty and unpredictability, that we believe can be found the inspiration to design the solutions required to address the many challenges we face in the 21st century. That is why the organizers of this biennale have chosen as their site the urban village, a reality crucially important to designers, who are, by definition, unsatisfied with the inevitability of the present. For what is the present

but the linear projection forward of the past. Design, by contrast, is an inherently future-oriented practice which speculates through an iterative, prototype-driven process to pose and solve problems unanticipated by the problems of the present. Whether final built designs, or versions produced along the way, all designs are but provisional solutions. Each provisional design is also a means by which to interrogate existing problems and formulate unanticipated problems and solutions. Design and its designs thus anticipate the unknown, the unpredictable, the future. Our contemporary world is more unpredictable, interconnected, and more interdependent than Rem Koolhaas and the minor deities of contemporary Enlightenment thinking ever imagined. And by definition, so too is the city, which architects and urbanists are increasingly called upon to manage and smooth into the paste of Universal Modernism that Koolhaas and others simultaneously loath and love. Dependent on normative master planning and data-driven smart solutions, strategies that are inherently conservative rather than future oriented, our best architects and planners continue to focus on managing the present rather than on speculating about what might exist in the future. As professionals, they focus on what is rather than on what might be. Accepting Shenzhen and the urban village as a spread of global modernization moving at differentiated speed and experienced as a marbleized temporality, the two studios featured in this catalogue propose


temporary design solutions and provocations that pose problems unanticipated by the present: Each studio presumes to suggest, as do the organizers of this Biennale, that the urban village is more important now than ever; each project is a speculative aspiration to access the real-but-ultimatelyinaccessible temporality that is the future; and each student takes on the responsibility to become a designer and not merely an architect, planner or urbanist.

Michael Speaks, Ph.D. Dean and Professor Syracuse Architecture

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STUDIO I

Introduction


IMAGINING THE FUTURE OF URBAN VILLAGE IN SHENZHEN

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STUDIO I

Introduction

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Integrated Bridge Metsys Waste Management Upper Level Baishizou-tone

Over the past 70 years, China has urbanized and modernized with unprecedented speed and efficiency. One of the side effects has been the creation of a monotonous, undifferentiated urban fabric in many of the country’s newly developed cities, which are dominated by gated communities, shopping malls, isolated office towers and theme parks, and a general culture of conformity and homogeneity, which pervades all of urban life. The urban village typology is an exception to this tendency and has, by its very existence, focused attention on a contradiction between the fast urbanization characteristic of the market economy and the slower pace of urbanization characteristic of the urban-rural planned economy. Urban villages are real, existing urban forms, and vital source of informal social housing for the booming immigrant population who are attracted to the many economic opportunities provided by Shenzhen. But they are also among the most robust forms of urban experimentation in China and in the world, and as such, are living laboratories for urban planners and designers. And today they face an

existential threat from a wave of market-driven gentrification that threatens to transform them into the modern super-blockcomplexes against which they now distinguish themselves. In Spring 2017, Syracuse Architecture organized a Visiting Critic design studio of undergraduate and graduate students, led by MENG Yan and YING Yujun, assisted by Dean Michael Speaks and Professor WANG Fei. The studio researched the urban village typology in Shenzhen, China, and proposed alternative futures for its development. Students were asked to explore the history and existing conditions of Shenzhen, to discover the conflicts and possibilities offered by urban villages, and encouraged to radically rethink their value and development. Final designs were based on the students’ understanding of the existing sites, their findings and experience during a oneweek workshop in Shenzhen, as well as feedback from the four instructors and many scholars and architects in Shenzhen.

Yan Meng Yin Yujun Michael Speaks Wang Fei


1 2 3 4 5

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STUDIO I

Integrated Bridge

INTEGRATED BRIDGE

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The 400-year-old urban village in Nantou Old Town has dramatically increased in density over the past few decades and suffers from a dire lack of public space and from a “messy” disorder which degrades the quality of life for its residents. Much of the institutional and infrastructural programming— both inside and outside the urban village—has been demolished over time. Shennan Avenue and Zhongshan Park divide the urban village from the surrounding city. Nantou Old Town has become an island, inaccessible to outsiders. The City has demonstrated indifference to its urban condition. Our intent is to create an “integrated bridge” between the urban village and the surrounding urban area to break down the “invisible” border that currently exists between the two entities. The bridge serves as urban infrastructure improvement as well as a means for accessibility to public spaces and destinations. We view this project as an experimental prototype that will encourage the questioning of traditional approaches that have been used in urban village redevelopment efforts. Ultimately, we hope this prototype could provide alternatives for future urban village developments. Minglu Wei Yisha Ding Xiaoxu Sun

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28

Detail of long scroll plan


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Top to bottom: Long plan, long scroll, long section


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STUDIO I

Integrated Bridge


In response to the lack of library spaces in the neighborhood, the library we proposed need to be a Neighborhood Library where popular materials will be collected. It is mostly focusing on young people and students.

There is only one large performance space in the neighborhood. The theater can be a new destination to attract people from both outside and inside the urban village. The theater space is also focusing on young people and students.

Most of the commercial spaces are arranged along the main streets in the Nantou old town. There are about 150 shops in the village, and all of them are small restaurants and grocery spaces. However, it is hard for people from the dense residential area to access.

There are only two large sports centers here in this area. However, there are about one million people living in the Nanshan district. In response to this, we are planning to propose a sports center as an infrastructure that can satisfy people’s daily needs. The sports center needs to be fully accessible for residents and should focus on nonprofessional sports for students and young people.

There is almost no museum and gallery spaces in the neighborhood. However, there are lots of school in this area. In response to this situation, we are planning to build a museum and gallery space for students and young people. It should focus on nonformal and museum education.

The three parks in this area is now separated. The Lixiang park is separated from the other two by the Shennan Ave. the Zhongshan Park and the South Park are separated to each other by a very dense residential area in the urban village. The exterior public space and corridor we are proposing need to be a combination of different public spaces that can connect Zhongshan Park and the park near the urban village

There are 3 parking lots near the urban village. However, they are all separated from each other, and all locate on the east part of the village. So now the northwestern corner of the village is a dead end. Since we want to create a new major entry on this side, there need to be a parking space for people from the outside of the village.

Vertical circulation spaces now in the village are all serving single buildings. There is no public vertical circulation spaces that can lead people from outside the village to access the roof and the upper levels. The new vertical circulation spaces we are planning to propose should be fully accessible for people.

THEATER

COMMERCIAL & RETAIL

SPORTS CENTER

MUSEUM & GALLERY

EXTERIOR PUBLIC SPACE & PUBLIC CORRIDOR

PARKING SPACE

VERTICAL CIRCULATION

System diagrams

LIBRARY

33 There are already lots of vertical circulation spaces in the village now. however, they are all private and are only serving single buildings. Thus, new vertical circulation spaces need to be proposed to lead people from the ground to the roof.

There is only parking space for 1500 cars around the urban village. However, right now there are usually about 5000 people visiting the town in one day.

There are three public parks in the city. However, they are all separated from each other.

There are 13 schools in this area. However, there is almost no museum and gallery spaces in this neighborhood.

There are only two sports centers in the neighborhood. And they are not able to satisfy 1108.5 thousand people’s needs.

The commercial and retail spaces are arranged all around the neighborhood. However, it does not blend into the residential areas in the urban village.

There is only one public theater space in the neighborhood.

There is only one library in the neighborhood.


34

STUDIO I

Integrated Bridge


35

Left: Axon programs; Right: (top to bottom): Activities diagram for morning, afternoon and night


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STUDIO I

Integrated Bridge


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Left: Estimated urban development; Right (top to bottom): Axon details


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STUDIO I

Integrated Bridge


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Various views of Integrated Bridge proposals


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STUDIO I

Integrated Bridge


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Various views of Integrated Bridge proposals


STUDIO I

Metsys

METSYS

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An “urban village” comprises many forms—residential, commercial, and public spaces—offering opportunity for diverse functionality and a wide range of social interaction. On our visit to Nantou Old Town, we were reminded of our own roots— old Ahmedabad city in India, and Dhaka in Bangladesh. As in Ahmedabad, Nantou Old Town is strikingly different from the surrounding city, posing challenges to social interaction. We also found the evolution of Dhaka over time to be very similar to that of Nantou Old Town. We felt an inexplicable connection with Nantou and asked ourselves whether there was really a need to demolish, reconstruct,


or change what already existed. The voices of the local people need to be heard and social isolation broken down. Our intent was to preserve village traditions and cultures while ensuring overall economic sustainability for local residents, being ever-mindful of the area’s high density and over development. Through our proposal, METSYS, we hope to increase the porosity of the urban villages through an aggregation-based “middle-out� system that challenges existing approaches to design and development. METSYS provides villagers with tools and a flexible needsbased framework for developing an entire bottom-up system for generating spaces, programs, multi-use zoning, or complex street life. Nusrat Jahan Mim Shanaya Ram Girdharlal

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STUDIO I

Metsys


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Various details of Metsys proposals


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STUDIO I

Metsys


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Left: Programs; Right: Boundaries


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STUDIO I

Metsys


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Left (top to bottom): System mapping circulation and infrastructure; Right: System prototype


STUDIO I

Waste Management

WASTE MANAGEMENT

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Nantou Old Town residents and non-residents alike endure harsh living conditions, many of which are caused or exacerbated by its poorly developed and maintained sewage systems and inadequate waste recollection. Shenzhen is a large city surrounded by green areas; recycling facilities and practices run throughout, but effectiveness varies. Shenzhen’s technological hub serves as a breeding ground for the manufacturing sector to consider the region’s greater need for recycling as emergent business opportunities.


While the problems of the urban villages are many, the dire condition of waste and recycling culture within the neighborhood is among the most urgent for planners to address. Long-term solutions are critical, including educational approaches that involve both community and authorities. We propose major interventions that center on two local industries: a clothing factory and furniture refurbishment factories. Our intent is to encourage each to implement processes and production methods that encourage recycling for profit as well as the greater good of the community. Normal household goods— such as bio-degradable plastic bags, plates and disposable tableware, or plastic fabric for upholstering—can be produced within the village and sold to residents at low cost, encouraging a sustainable approach to re-use of materials that once produced waste. Jose Coba Sou Fang Ethan Shao Hsuan Li Ray Kuo-Jui Lai

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STUDIO I

Waste Management


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Scenarios for cycling infrastructures


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STUDIO I

Waste Management


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Left: Scenario for cycling infrastructures; Right: Scenario for pavilion


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STUDIO I

Waste Management


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Left: Program for Recycling Infrastructure; Right: Program for Pavilion Static


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STUDIO I

Waste Management


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Left: Schemes for various applications; Right: Phasing


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STUDIO I

Waste Management


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Various views of Waste Management proposal


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STUDIO I

Waste Management


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Various views of Waste Management proposal


STUDIO I

Upper Level

UPPER LEVEL

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During our research visits to Nantou Old Town and Baishizhou Village, we observed extensive horizontal variation throughout each area, but the vertical investigations were particularly captivating. As we focused on the density of Baishizhou Village and its imminent threat of demolition, we quickly understood that height was limiting further expansion of the village. The buildings in Baishizhou Village had already reached maximum height, while only maintaining single stairwells for egress and circulation. We observed an environment where every square meter was precious; we also realized that roof scapes were typically underutilized. We were inspired to find ways to develop elements of the urban village we felt were missing by considering these limited rooftop spaces. At the same


time, we sought to preserve and respect the diversity, lifestyle, and culture of village residents. We took on a minimalist, “acupunctural” approach and developed proposals for activating roof scape environments in the village. Our proposal, “Upper Level,” introduces the idea of public sector elevators to be scattered around the village. The elevators would be introduced into existing narrow alleyways as these areas offer a minimal level of intervention while also serving two buildings that share an alley. Sophie Fraser Hafter Sebastine Simonnet

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STUDIO I

Upper Level


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Left: Mapping diagrams; Right: Elevator details


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STUDIO I

Upper Level


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Left: Diagrams for Upper Level proposals; Right: Various views for Upper Level proposals


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Long section for Upper Level


STUDIO I

Baishizhou-tone

BAISHIZOU-TONE

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The urban village is a highdensity, low-cost residential area, typically viewed as dirty and out of sync with the urban fabric of Shenzhen. Accordingly, Baishizhou Village is currently facing pressure of demolition. We offer a contrasting perspective: that the urban village is a place of vibrancy and possibility and that it fits very well with the rest of the city. We argue that messy conditions are attributable to the disorganized spatial structure of Baishizhou Village. We propose a series light, simple architectural interventions that reorganize the spatial sequence and change the urban condition; such an intervention would create what we call an “eco-tone,� an area of transition between high-end communities and low-end urban villages. We propose an overall system that includes two separate features: an exterior walkway that provides several activities along its path; and an exterior communication balcony that provides connections between rooms. Le Yang Jacob Schulman

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Axon detail for Baishizhou-tone


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STUDIO I

Baishizhou-tone


Canopie Typology Along The Main Canopie Typology TheStreet Main Street Canopie Typology Along TheAlong Main Street CANOPY TYPOLOGY ALONG THE MAIN STREET

SingleSingle canopy canopy belowbelow Single canopy below the signage the signage the signage

Single canopy below

Left: Research for Baishizhou-tone; Right: Research for existing canopies and cages

the signage canopy Single canopy below SingleSingle canopy belowbelow the signage the signage the signage

Two canopies Two canopies both both Two canopies both belowbelow and above and above the the below and above the signage signage signage

Two canopies both

below above Twoand canopies both Two both Two canopies bothcanopies the signage and above the below above the belowbelow and above theand signage signage signage

canopy above Two both Types Types Types ofSingle ofExisting of Existing Existing Cage Cage Cage Conditions Conditions Conditions on oncanopies Facade on Facade Facade the signage (Steel plate) below and above SingleSingle canopy canopy aboveabove

Single Single canopy canopy above above the signage (fabric)

Single canopy above Single canopy above the siganage the the signage the signage Types Types of siganage Existing ofthe Existing Cage Cage Conditions Conditions on Facade on Facade siganage the signage Types of Existing Cage Conditions on Facade (Steel(Steel plate) plate) (fabric) (fabric) (Steel plate)

(fabric)

canopy Single canopy TYPES OF EXISTING CAGE CONDITIONS ONSingle FACADE Single canopy above Single canopy above SingleSingle canopy aboveabove canopy aboveabove the siganage the siganage the siganage (Steel plate) (Steel(Steel plate)plate)

Typical Typical Typical Flat FlatFlat Condition Condition Condition

the signage the signage the signage (fabric) (fabric) (fabric)

Flat Flat Condition Flat Condition Condition With With Curve With Curve Curve

Typical flat condition Typical Typical Flat Flat Typical Flat Condition Condition Condition

Flat condition Flat Condition Flat Condition withWith curve Flat Condition Curve With Curve With Curve

Typical Typical Typical Cage Cage Cage Typical cage Condition Condition Condition condition horizontal Horizontal Horizontal Horizontal and andand and vertical bars Typical Typical Cage Cage Vertical Vertical Vertical Bars Bars Bars Typical Cage Condition Condition Condition Horizontal Horizontal and and Horizontal Vertical Vertical Barsand Bars

Cage Cage Cage Condition Condition Condition Cage condition with with with Curve with Curve Curve curve surface overhead Surface Surface Surface Overhead Overhead and curve barsOverhead Cage Cage Condition Condition and and Curve and Curve Curve bars barsbars Cage Condition with Curve with Curve with Curve Surface Surface Overhead Overhead Surface and Curve andOverhead Curve bars bars

Two canopies Two canopies both both Two canopies both aboveabove the signage the signage above the signage

Two canopies both above theTwo signage canopies both Two both Two canopies bothcanopies the signage above the signage aboveabove the signage

Canopy disconnect with the shop umbrella Canopy Canopy disconnect disconnect Canopy disconnect with the withshop-umthe shop-umwith the shop-umbrellabrella brella Canopy disconnect Canopy disconnect Canopy disconnect withshop-umthe with shop-umthe shop-umwith the brellabrella brella

Simplest Simplest Simplest Cage Cage Cage Condition Condition Condition Vertical Vertical Vertical Bars Bars Only Bars OnlyOnly Simplest cage Simplest Simplest Cage Cage condition vertical Simplest Cage Condition Condition Condition bars only Vertical Vertical Bars Only Bars Only Vertical Bars Only

77 Cage Cage Cage Condition Condition Condition Cage condition varying Varying Varying Varying Distribution Distribution distribution ofDistribution bars ofof Bars Bars of Bars Cage Cage Condition Condition Cage Condition Varying Varying Distribution Distribution Varying Distribution of Bars of Bars of Bars


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Views of Baishizhou-tone


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STUDIO II

Introduction


POST-INDUSTRIAL REGENERATION IN URBAN VILLAGE IN SHENZHEN

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1 2

STUDIO II

Introduction

3 4 5

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Harvesting 3.0 Building 2 Public Circle Vertical Stretch Re-hinged The Nantou Float Spanning

This exhibition showcases the work of Syracuse Architecture students who sought to redevelop an urban village site, aiming to uncover its latent cultural and economic potential through a variety of interventions—from agricultural renovations, to experimental residential, and cultural event venues. The six projects presented interpret the social needs of the Nantou villagers and propose urban renewal schemes that integrate its existing industrial infrastructure. Nantou Old Town is among the large—but dwindling—number of urban villages in Shenzhen. As is common in its typology, Nantou has an extremely dense, centuries old urban fabric driven by an ad hoc urban development process lacking an overall master plan. The studio’s area of intervention is a series of 1980s era buildings situated on the northern end of the village—three large underutilized industrial buildings, and two smaller residential buildings. These five buildings stand in stark contrast to their surroundings due to their program, footprints and bulk.

This work was part of Syracuse University School of Architecture spring 2017 fourth-year undergraduate Integrated Studio taught by Professor WANG Fei. The studio is the culminating undergraduate studio, combining advanced architectural design with technical know-ledge acquired during the Building Systems and Structure sequences. Throughout the semester, students participated in a series of Systems and Structure workshops given by faculty and practicing professionals who provided real-world criticism and feedback. Parallel to technical and curricular requirements, the studio relied heavily on an introductory research component that examined the exceptional historic, political, and economic development of urban villages throughout Shenzhen. This enabled students to produce speculative urban regeneration projects in response to the needs of the Nantou Old Town community that could also serve as prototypes for other urban villages of similar characteristics. Fei Wang


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STUDIO II

Introduction


UP

Introduction

UP

STUDIO II

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Left: Combined plan and section; Right: Model before and after renovation


STUDIO II 88

3.0

Harvest 3.0

HARVEST 3.0

The Nantou Old Town urban village originated as an affordable residential oasis amongst rampant speculative development. But as housing demand spiked, urbanization brought about dramatic displacement of land use, local economies, and culture. A new urban typology evolved from being primarily residential to one that now offers a wide variety of rudimentary commercial services such as florists, butchers, restaurants, and barbershops. While the urban village has been praised for its self-sufficient economy, one of the aspects in which it falls short is tied directly to its rural past—the production of food. As a response to this inadequacy, our project reinstates farming as a symbol of the cultural heritage of Nantou, and as novel economic driver for the urban village.


Our main objective is to promote the notion of coexistence in order to balance the needs of a rapidly growing population—old and new, organic and man-made, economy and culture. The renovation reuses an existing concrete structure as a framework for the new pixelated building volume. We attempt to illustrate the historical collision between the village and its rapid urban development, while also showcasing agriculture as a timeless mediator between the two. The volumes are placed according to the grid of the existing structure and optimized for maximum daily southern sun exposure. The center atrium is carved to introduce passive natural ventilation and cooling. The pixelated volumes allow for different programs such as community gardening classes, food education, cooking classes, food market, restaurant and outdoor terraces and platforms—ideal for urban farming in practice. Peder Ulven Alice Gorodetsky Khairi Reynolds

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STUDIO II

Harvest 3.0


Attend children’s gardening class with school group

Attend advanced level gardening class/club

Maintain garden in rented planter space

Introductory gardening class

Purchase specific supplies Purchase children’s garden starter kit

Purchase organic localy grown produce Purchase basic supplies

Enjoy rooftop views of Shenzhen

Left: Floor plans; Right: Narrative axon

Utilize best gardening plots

91

Lunch date at salad bar

Enjoy organic locally grown juice

Enjoy organic locally grown juice

Enjoy dinner Enjoy dinner Enjoy dinner

Culinarily Challenged

Experienced Green Thumbs

First Time Gardeners

Tourists

Children

GOAL Delicious, organic, locally grown food

Attend couples cooking class

Space to garden

Gardening instruction and guidance

Something to look at

Hands on experience


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Section view of Harvest 3.0


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Technical axons


STUDIO II

Building 2

BUILDING 2

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Building 2, although developed at roughly the same time as its residential surroundings, seems drastically out of place. Given its original purpose as a light industrial manufacturing plant, its footprint of 50m x 36m is easily ten times larger than the typical building in Nantou Old Town. Today the building stands underutilized and unable to provide adequate spaces for its current users. The two teams working on this building proposed carving out the building’s inner structure to: introduce daylight to the previously deep floor plan while increasing natural ventilation; carve out a public courtyard for leisure and recreation. This move seeks to preserve the industrial heritage of the building, while utilizing its cultural and recreational potential to suit the current needs of the community. The building was split into two complementary projects: OUT, the preserved structure renovated for contemporary community programs; and IN, a new recreational facility growing from the carved void. Junseok Choi Song Wang Nicolas Carmona Guzman Yalun Li

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STUDIO II

Building 2: Public Circle

PUBLIC CIRCLE

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With the rapid urbanization of Nantou Old Town, many economically disadvantaged migrant workers settled in the village. Over time, an increasing need for social services has evolved. Like most urban villages, Nantou Old Town lacks public welfare facilities for its community and surrounding areas. We propose the creation of Public Circle, an inviting and open program to promote community wellness. It provides a community health center that integrates and collaborates with the infill project, providing access as well as support services. The project comprises two primary architectural moves that aim to amplify and celebrate the contrast between the renovation and the existing industrial structure.


The team designed a truncated, multi-level staircase that creates a passageway from its front plaza towards the rooftop garden of Building 3. The primary operational strategy of carving the inner structure of Building 2 provided the resulting building with a circular parti. The team developed a continuous circulation route that connects with the monumental main staircase at each floor, which then extends the circulation to the outside. This continuous route was then infilled with programmed filleted rectangular bubbles of various proportions. The coexistence between the bubbles and existing column grid expresses harmony of old and new. Junseok Choi Song Wang

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Exising Structure Model

STUDIO II

Building 2: Public Circle

New Structure Model

Facade Study Model

Structure Study Model

Form Study Model

Space Study Model

New Structure Model with Existing Facade

Massing Study Model

Massing Study Model

Circulation Study Model

Circulation Study Model

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101

Left: Study and structure modles; Right: Structure operation diagram


102

STUDIO II

Building 2: Public Circle


103

Narrative axons


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Building 2: Public Circle

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Wall Section Detail 2

Metal Capping Adhesive Waterproof Sheet Porous Masonry Block Matt Thermal Insulation Pour-In-Place Concrete

Glass Block Concrete Masonry Block Loss Thermal Insulation Masonry Veneer

Wall Section Detail 1

Pour-In-Place Concrete Meal Decking Steel I-Beam

Left (Top to bottom): Section detail and building axon; Right: Axon details

New Structure Axon

107

Scale: 1:200

Old New

Steel Angle

Fine Concrete Finishing Metal Mullion System Steel Channel

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STUDIO II

Building 2: Vertical Stretch

VERTICAL STRETCH

108

Despite being surrounded by parks and lush vegetation, the dense development of Nantou Old Town denies the area of public open spaces that would provide residents a leisurely respite. While we found that the urban village has more than enough restaurants, beauty shops and service programs, it lacks community spaces and recreational facilities. We were, however, inspired by one of the only open spaces we discovered in the neighborhood: a concrete basketball court surrounded by shops where many people gather to chat, eat and play.


Realizing the potential of the unmet needs this space provides, our project, Vertical Stretch, proposes a recreational sports facility that would occupy the sunken interior courtyard within Building 2. This sports facility is connected to the existing basketball court through an underground passage located at the industrial complexâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s entrance, and is also accessible via select floors from the Public Circle project. This building occupies the smallest possible footprint within the courtyard to maximize open space, but expands as it rises. The reinforced L-shaped core supports a long span truss system that allows the top level of the center to cantilever dramatically over the renovated structure. This hanging space hosts dance and performance studios that provide views over its host building towards the village. Vertical Stretch explores the lifestyle of urban villagers as a condition perpetuated by their surroundings. Our aim is to ameliorate this condition by providing a space for leisure and recreation that presents itself as a billboard for performance. Nicolas Carmona Guzman Yalun Li

109


110

STUDIO II

Building 2: Vertical Stretch


Sitting Area 观众席

Stairs 楼梯

Building A2-IN VERTICAL STRETCH Dance Room 舞蹈教室

Dance Room Lockers 更衣室

LEVEL 7

Elevator 电梯

七层

+22.30 m

Stage Storage 舞台储物间 Restroom 卫生间 Multi-purpose Stage 观众席 Stairs 楼梯

Building A2-Out

Elevator 电梯

Public Staircase

Office 办公室

Tunnel Entry

LEVEL 6 +18.70 m

六层 Elevator 电梯

Half Basketball Court

Entry Tunnel: Section View

Restroom 卫生间 Office 办公室 Visitor Platform 看台

Reception 接待处

SECTION Stairs 楼梯

Left: Courtyard view of Vertical Stretch; Right: Warped site plan and narrative axon

PLAN

Entry Tunnel: underground

Elevator 电梯

Visitor Platform 看台 Sitting Area 观众席

LEVEL 5 +15.20 m

Climbing Wall 攀岩墙

五层 Restroom 卫生间

Entry Tunnel: Plan View

Showers 淋浴间

Office / Storage 办公室

Multi-purpose Space 储物间

Stairs 楼梯

Rooftop Running Track

Elevator 电梯

Building A2-Out

Climbing Wall 攀岩墙

LEVEL 4 +11.70 m

四层 Restroom 卫生间

South Entry Gate

Showers 淋浴间

Showers 淋浴间

Gymnasium 健身房

Stairs 楼梯

Building A1

Elevator 电梯

LEVEL 3 +07.70 m

三层 Restroom 卫生间 Storage 储物间 Children’s Recreation Room 儿童娱乐室

Shops

Office 办公室

Stairs 楼梯

Elevator 电梯

Historic Governor’s House Complex

Hair Salon Climbing Wall 攀岩墙

Shops Zhongshan South

LEVEL 2

Street

+03.60 m

二层 Restroom 卫生间 Restroom 卫生间

Shop

Produce Market

Public Square Stairs 楼梯

Elevator 电梯

Restaurant Climbing Wall 攀岩墙

LEVEL 1 00.00 m

一层 Restroom 卫生间 Lobby 大堂

Cafe 餐厅

Climbing Wall 攀岩墙

Market

Office 办公室

Stairs 楼梯

Basketball Court

Half Basketball Court 篮球场

Elevator 电梯

Reception 接待处

LEVEL 0 -04.00 m

地下

111

Entry Tunnel 地下步道

PROGRAM AXONOMETRIC

NANTOU INDUSTRIAL AREA SITE VIEW

轴测图


112

STUDIO II

Building 2: Vertical Stretch


113

Model concepts


LEVEL 1

地下

一层

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LEVEL 6

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3 UP

3000

3000

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5200

LEVEL 3

LEVEL 5

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Building 2: Vertical Stretch

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STUDIO II

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Staircase

人流分析图

LOBBY STAIRCASE

THEATER STAIRCASE

LEVEL 1 CONNECTION

CIRCULATION DIAGRAM

ULATION DIAGRAM

One Elevator

Two Elevators

Staircase

LEVEL 5 CONNECTION

人流分析图

TUNNEL

ELEVATOR

STAIRCASE

Two Elevators

STRUCTURAL DIAGRAMS

TYPICAL FOOTING REINFORCED CONCRETE

DOUBLE FOOTING REINFORCED CONCRETE

W-SHAPE COLUMN 70˚ TILT, STEEL

BOX STEEL BEAM FAÇADE SUPPORT

GIRDER W-SHAPE BEAM W-18

W-SHAPE BEAM W

XXXXX

PARAPET SUPPORT

STEEL BOX BEAM

STEEL BOX BEAM

SKYLIGHT STRUCTURE COMPOSITE BOX STEEL BEAM

结构分析图 TRUSS SYSTEM

REINFORCED STRUCTURAL CORE

DISTRIBUTED COLUMN GRID

CONCRETE PAD + FOOTINGS

TH

LOCAL GEOTHERMAL EXCHANGE SYSTEM

CHILLER

PUMP

SUPPLY

RETURN

N

ST

EA

RT H

O

SYSTEMS DIAGRAMS

U

SO

W ES T

通风系统分析图

comfort zone

avg. low

mean

avg. high

LEGEND

comfort zone

4m

2m

.5 m

DEPTH

U

TH

-10

-5

0

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

-10

-5

0

5

10

15

20

25

30

02

03

04

05

06 07 MONTH

01

02

03

04

05

06 07 MONTH

TEMPERATURE RANGE

01

10

11

12

08

09

10

11

12

avg. high

record

avg. low

mean

avg. high

LEGEND

total cloud cover

avg. low

mean

0

4

8

12

16

20

24

28

0

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

UNDERGROUND PIPES

cooling during summer

90

09

heating during winter

100

LEGEND

PUMP

HEAT PUMP

500

40

08

1000

35

GROUND TEMPERATURE

hours / year

SO

1500

W ES T

winter heat gain

Staircase

DEGREES CELSIUS DEGREES CELSIUS

02

03

04

05

06 07 MONTH

01

02

03

04

05

RT H

06 07 MONTH

08

08

EA ST

O

WIND VELOCITY RANGE

01

N

SKY COVER RANGE

summer heat dump

Left: Program/structure/spatial models and system/structure/circulation diagrams; Right: Floor plans

PERCENTAGE (%) METERS/SECOND

115 09

09

10

10

11

11

12

12


Level 7 +22.30 m

6

Level 6 +18.70 m

5

Level 5 +15.20 m

4

Level 4 +11.70 m

3

Level 3 +07.70 m

2

Level 2 +03.60 m

G

Level 1 00.00 m

Level 0 -04.00 m

Level 7

STUDIO II

Building 2: Vertical Stretch

+22.30 m

Level 6 +18.70 m

Level 5 +15.20 m

Level 4 +11.70 m

Level 3 +07.70 m

Level 2 +03.60 m

116

Level 1 00.00 m

Level 0 -04.00 m

5

10

20


A

B SKYLIGHT 11 12 13 14

PARAPET

15 16

1 2 3 4

GUTTER

17

5 6 7

18 19

22 23

20

24

21

25

8

26

9 10

74

75

31

31

81

82

83

TYPICAL WINDOW TYPICAL FLOORING 27

33

34

35

36 37

38

39

40

28

Level 7 +22.30 m

42

29

96

98

84

30 31

Left (top to bottom): Logitudinal and transverse section; Right: Elevation detail section

76

85

28

97

85

39

41

86

Level 5 +15.20 m

4

77

VENTILATION

29 76

79

80

49

49

85

SAFETY NET 3 42 43

44

40

43

39

41

Level 4 +11.70 m

80

78

78

45 46

46

87 28

39

41

88

85

Level 3 +07.70 m

52

77

54

CLIMBING WALL

92

92

47

50

50 91 48 49 93 85 94

117

95

COURTYARD 57

58

CLIMBING SHOE

89

BUTT

90

59

60

61

53 52 94 93

55

DRAIN 62

63

64

65

66

67

68

39

41

51

Level 0 -04.00m

FOUNDATION 69

70

71

72

73

40

51

58


118

Various exterior views of Vertical Stretch


120

STUDIO II

Building 2: Vertical Stretch


121

Various interior views of Vertical Stretch


STUDIO II

Re-hinged

RE-HINGED

122


We considered Building 3â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bulk and position within the site to be antithetical to the master planâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s desire to promote free and fluid circulation. The building itself is an obstruction as its adjacency to a concrete wall tightens the circulation passageway in the middle of the site. Contending with programmatic requirements, ideas of preservation, and using the issue of circulation as one of the generators, we aimed to carry out our big formal gesture on the front end of the building while preserving the remaining half. We opened up the front of the building by carving out the non-structural elements, glazing the enclosure, and leaving the existing structure exposed. We then generated a volume of the same proportions as the carved area, which was rotated in plan and section to create a public plaza on the ground floor and display on upper floors. Amanda Liberty Tara Boonkhun Debbie Vapheas

123


124

Front view of Re-hinged


126

STUDIO II

Re-hinged


127

Left: Narrative axon; Right: short sections


site

squares

volume

volume: void

void shift

ceremonial circulation

void shift

STUDIO II

Re-hinged

entry

shifting

plaza

hinge

correction

128 new floor plates


shifting

plaza

hinge

correction

new floor plates

original floor plates

two cubes

original and addition

fire circulation

mechanical circulation

Axon diagrams

mehanical display circulation

129

original structure

additional structure

hinges


STUDIO II

The Nantou Float

THE NANTOU FLOAT

130


Buildings 4 and 5 were designed as worker barracks but today function as normative industrial buildings. As industry in the area dwindled, these dormitories succumbed to Shenzhen’s affordable housing demand to become permanent residential buildings. Contextual research of the industrial site and surrounding neighborhood revealed a lack of cultural and social spaces. Our project proposes a multifunctional building that provides flexibility to meet the community’s fluctuating needs. This is a projective development that anticipates Nantou Old Town’s growth as a commercial and cultural center. In order to accommodate a large variety of programs and free up a space, the building’s existing structure is hollowed out, and circulation routes are appended as cantilevered extensions surrounding the narrow building. These cantilevers serve as covered gathering spaces on the ground floor which is lined by rotating doors, creating an active, inviting, and porous atmosphere. The main space is divided into two floors activated by a rack and pinion platform in the middle of the floor plan, creating different spaces through alternative configurations of elevation. This project is driven by the need to maximize the building’s potential within a changing context, which we propose to accomplish by providing maximum program flexibility driven by different users and shifting needs. 131

Kamila Varela Vivian Cheng


132

STUDIO II

The Nantou Float


26.5’

117’

13’

14.5’

11.5’

12.5’

26.5’

117’

13’

14.5’

11.5’

12.5’

Left: Axon details; Right: Section details

SLENDER MAN

深圳 深圳 深圳 深圳 深圳 深圳

133

深圳

美食


134

Floor plans


EXISTING BUILDING

136

PROPOSED CIRCULATION

The Nantou Float

EXISTING STEEL STRUCTURE

STUDIO II

HVAC

PROPOSED CANTILEVER STRUCTURE

WATER

PROPOSED CIRCULATION

CART CONNECTION

HVAC


[R]

14.5’

[3F]

11.5’

[2F]

Left: Structure mechanic diagrams; Right: Short market section

12.5’

CULTURE:FASHION SHOW SECTION 1/4”=1’

[R]

14.5’

美食 深圳 有趣有趣

[3F]

11.5’

游游游

[2F]

12.5’

137

NIGHT MARKET SECTION 1/4”=1’


STUDIO II

Spanning

SPANNING

138

The northernmost building in the site is a three-story residential project with vertical circulation at both ends, and exposed corridors on the south facing faรงade that also serve as communal balconies. The goal of this team was to appropriate this efficient organization to increase the private residential space, as well as to incorporate spaces for the nearby community. The educational space would support the adjacent school, and the public space would connect the ground floor with the rest of the historic town. Particular emphasis was given to the act of preservation as an alternative mode of development. Consequently, the project maintained the existing structure and simply reorganized and reprogrammed their spaces. The ground floor was turned into a commercial space consisting of several public


areas: a local market space for the school and residents; a neighborhood café; and an upgrade to the existing laundromat facilities. The second and third floors were reprogrammed into a daycare and a night school—operating alternatively between day and night. Finally, the roof was transformed into a freely accessible lookout point. In addition to adapting the existing floors for community programs, the team committed to reinstating the units lost due to the site’s reprogramming. A massive addition consisting of four floors of affordable residential units hovers over the renovated building, perched atop heavily reinforced circulation cores on both sides and supported by a full-span, two-story truss system. The suspended volume follows the same layout as the previous residential development, providing units maximum cross ventilation and day lighting. The project adapts the layout to accommodate a wider array of housing options—from experimental microunits to large family units—bringing together different demographics to create a more rich social community. Our intent is to give affordable housing options back to families and individuals, provide community spaces, and generate jobs and income through retail spaces. Maria Clara Perez Irazabal Joshua Siev

139


140

STUDIO II

Spanning


141

Left: Design process; Right: Narrative axon


Roof Fl. 106’-6”

Roof Plan 1’0” = 1/8”

Floor 8 94’-6” Floor 6 70’-6”

6th & 8th Fl. Plan 1’0” = 1/8”

Floor 7 82’-6”

Floor 5 58’-6”

5th & 7th Fl. Plan 1’0” = 1/8”

Middle Patio 36’-6”

Middle Patio 1’0” = 1/8”

Floor 3 25’-2”

3rd Fl. Plan 1’0” = 1/8”

Spanning

Floor 2 13’-8”

2nd Fl. Plan

STUDIO II

1’0” = 1/8”

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

3

2 Ground Fl. 0’-3”

142 1

Ground Floor 1’0” = 1/8”

2’-0”


143

1

2

3

Left: Plans; Right: Section


Syracuse Program Faculty Michael A. Speaks Professor, Dean B.A., University of Mississippi Ph.D., Duke University Fei Wang Assistant Professor, MS.Arch Program Coordinator B.Arch, Tongji University M.Arch, Virginia Tech M.Arch, McGill University Syracuse Affiliated Faculty Yan Meng Principal Architect and Co-founder, Urbanus B.A., Tsinghua University M.Arch, Tsinghua University M.Arch, Miami University Yin Yujun Founder, Projective Architecture Office B.Arch, Chongqing University M.Arch, Harvard University M.LA, Harvard University

144

ISBN: 978-1-64204-484-3


Acknowledgements

Thanks to Reviewers Andrain Blackwell Gro Bonesmo Ted Brown Bing Bu Junho Chun Sam Cosamano Bob Cosselman Sekou Cooke Julia Czerniak James Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Aloisio Joseph Godlewski Terrace Goode Doreen (Heng) Liu Xiaodu Liu Bess Krietemeyer Kirk Narburgh Daekwon Park Daniele Profeta Francisco Sanin David Shanks Francisco Sanin Yuval Zohar Exhibition Design Nicolas Carmona Guzman Minglu Wei Editing Michael Speaks Elaine Wackerow Book Design Common Name


Profile for Fei Wang

DESIGN | ENERGY | FUTURES: CI-village-TY 3.0  

DESIGN | ENERGY | FUTURES is a concentrated research + design program at the Syracuse University School of Architecture that leads to a Mast...

DESIGN | ENERGY | FUTURES: CI-village-TY 3.0  

DESIGN | ENERGY | FUTURES is a concentrated research + design program at the Syracuse University School of Architecture that leads to a Mast...

Profile for feiwang9