Page 1

FIGHTING THE FLOOD · MARKETS ZERO IN ON TRACEABILITY

THE BEEF MAGAZINE

AUGUST 2013 $3.00

WWW.CANADIANCATTLEMEN.CA

Norwich Packers How it withstood the test of time

Matthew Heleniak

Look for your copy of the STOCK BUYER’S GUIDE inside this issue. Sponsored by:

Publications Mail Agreement Number 40069240


ANGUS

providing a satisfying eating experience!

“We find value in the [Canadian Angus Rancher Endorsed] tags. Our goal is to keep our consumer happy with a quality end product, which is why we use Angus and promote it. This approach creates repeat buyers.” - Mike Beretta

Beretta Farms, a Canadian Angus Rancher Endorsed licensed participant

quote given at the recent Canadian Angus National Convention, Guelph, ON

Canadian Angus Association The Canadian Angus Rancher Endorsed program endorses Angus beef with our logo stamping the approval of quality. Products bearing this label come from cattle with 50% or more Canadian Angus genetics. Order your Angus tags today to quality for the program. Visit www.rancherendorsed.com for more information.

142, 6715 – 8 Street NE Calgary, AB T2E 7H7 Phone: 1-888-571-3580 www.cdnangus.ca email: cdnangus@cdnangus.ca


Established 1938 ISSN 1196-8923 CATTLEMEN EDITORIAL Editor: Gren Winslow 1666 Dublin Avenue, Winnipeg, MB R3H 0H1 (204) 944-5753 Fax (204) 944-5416 E-mail: gren@fbcpublishing.com

Contents CANADIAN CATTLEMEN · AUGUST 2013 · VOLUME 76, NO. 8

 PAC K E RS

Field Editor: Debbie Furber Box 1168, Tisdale, SK S0E 1T0 (306) 873-4360 Fax (306) 873-4360 E-mail: debbie.furber@fbcpublishing.com ADVERTISING SALES Deborah Wilson RR 1, Lousana, AB T0M 1K0 (403) 325-1695 Fax (403) 944-5562 E-mail: deb.wilson@fbcpublishing.com HEAD OFFICE 1666 Dublin Avenue, Winnipeg, MB R3H 0H1 (204) 944-5765 Fax (204) 944-5562 Advertising Services Co-ordinator: Arlene Bomback (204) 944-5765 Fax (204) 944-5562 E-mail: ads@fbcpublishing.com Publisher: Lynda Tityk E-mail: lynda.tityk@fbcpublishing.com Associate Publisher/Editorial Director: John Morriss E-mail: john.morriss@fbcpublishing.com Production Director: Shawna Gibson E-mail: shawna@fbcpublishing.com Circulation Manager: Heather Anderson E-mail: heather@fbcpublishing.com President: Bob Willcox Glacier Media Agricultural Information Group Email: bwillcox@glaciermedia.ca

Brand... Brand... Brand

NORWICH PACKERS

HOW IT WITHSTOOD THE TEST OF TIME  R ES EA RC H

FEATURES The Onefour research herd is up for sale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Contents of Cattlemen are copyrighted and may be reproduced only when written permission is obtained from the editor and proper credit is given to Cattlemen. Cattlemen and Canadian Cattlemen are Trade Marks of Farm Business Communications.

True conservationists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Cattlemen is published monthly (with the exception of July and 2 issues in January and October) by Farm Business Communications. Head office: Winnipeg, Manitoba. Printed by Transcontinental LGMC. Cattlemen is printed with linseed oil-based inks.

The redneck cattle drive. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Norwich Packers How it withstood the test of time . . . . . . 22

Subscription rates in Canada — $36.75 for one year, $55 for 2 years, $99 for 3 years (prices include GST). Manitoba residents add 8% PST. U.S. subscription rate — $35 (U.S. funds). Subscription rate outside Canada and U.S. — $55 per year. Single copies $3. We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund of the Department of Canadian Heritage. Publications Mail Agreement Number 40069240. Canadian Postmaster: Return undeliverable Canadian addresses (covers only) to: Circulation Dept., PO Box 9800, Winnipeg, MB R3C 3k7. U.S. Postmaster: Send address changes and undeliverable addresses (covers only) to: Circulation Dept., PO Box 9800, Winnipeg, MB R3C 3k7. PRINTED IN CANADA

Markets zero in on traceability . . . . . . . . . . 28

8

The Onefour research herd is up for sale

Verified Beef Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

 E N V I RO N M E N T

DEPARTMENTS Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Newsmakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Nutrition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16

Member

Vet Advice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

LIVESTOCK PUBLICATIONS COUNCIL

Our commitment to your privacy: At Farm Business Communications we have a firm commitment to protecting your privacy and security as our customer. Farm Business Communications will only collect personal information if it is required for the proper functioning of our business. As part of our commitment to enhance customer service, we may share this personal information with other strategic business partners. For more information regarding our Customer Information Privacy Policy, write to: Information Protection Officer, Farm Business Communications, 1666 Dublin Avenue, Winnipeg, MB R3H 0H1. Occasionally we make our list of subscribers available to other reputable firms whose products and services might be of interest to you. If you would prefer not to receive such offers, please contact us at the address in the preceding paragraph, or call 1-800-665-1362.

Capturing cattle at their best . . . . . . . . . . .30 Surviving the flood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Eighty-six-year-old station closing.

Circulation inquiries: Call toll-free 1-800-665-1362 or email: subscription@fbcpublishing.com U.S. subscribers call 1-204-944-5766

The editors and journalists who write, contribute and provide opinions to Canadian Cattlemen and Farm Business Communications attempt to provide accurate and useful opinions, information and analysis. However, the editors, journalists, Canadian Cattlemen and Farm Business Communications, cannot and do not guarantee the accuracy of the information contained in this publication and the editors as well as Canadian Cattlemen and Farm Business Communications assume no responsibility for any actions or decisions taken by any reader for this publication based on any and all information provided.

22

Holistic Ranching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Research on the Record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Surviving the flood Everyone pitched in.

36

Congratulations!

Straight from the Hip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Prime Cuts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 CCA Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Our History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 News Roundup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

To our August survey winner, Garth Maier of Medicine Hat, Alta. This month’s survey is on page 38.

Purely Purebred . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

Cover Photo: Our photo is supplied by the Heleniak family.

Sales and Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

The Markets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Market Talk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49

C AT T L E M E N · AU G U S T 2 0 1 3

3


 COMMEN T

By Gren Winslow

SEVENTY-FIVE YEARS YOUNG Now for the next 75

T

he philosopher George Santayana said those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. His words resonate with those of us who work at this magazine, particularly in this our 75th anniversary year. In upcoming issues we will be dipping into our past to see what it has to say to those of us who work in the industry today. The first issue of Canadian Cattlemen was published in June 1938. Some mistakenly think it began as the official magazine of the Western Stock Growers’ Association (WSGA), but more on that later. We can’t say it was the first cattle magazine put out in Canada. But we are pretty safe in stating that it is the oldest cattle publication that is still in operation. It would be nice to think that the Canadian Cattlemen began with high-minded ideals, but that would be stretching reality a bit. As former editor Frank Jacobs told us in 1988, in our 50th anniversary issue, it was a little more basic than that. Those were hard times for a cattle industry coming out of the worst Prairie drought in anyone’s memory. In 1936 the federal government established a guaranteed price of one cent per pound for all cattle, including cows, so a producer was sure to get at least $10 for a 1,000-pound cow before trucking, commissions, yardage and condemnation insurance. In reality he could expect anywhere from zero to $8 per head net, and this was an improvement on what the market was offering. If you had young stock and no feed the government would also pay the freight cost of moving your cattle to where there was feed. “To administer this latter policy the government man who had a long and good relationship with ag minister Jimmy Gardner, was Jack Byers, who also happened to be secretary of the WSGA,” recalled Jacobs. “Byers hired a very intelligent and aggressive young man named Kenneth Coppock to do the job. Coppock, who had been educated in California, was a director of the WSGA. “Byers was so impressed with Coppock’s handling of the Freight Assistance Program that he hired him as his assistant. The WSGA at the time had precious few

4

C AT T L E M E N · AU G U S T 2 0 1 3

members and no money, so some method of payment for Coppock had to be worked out. Since good fortune always has many sponsors, I never was sure whether Byers or Coppock dreamed up the solution but without question it was Coppock’s genius that made the scheme work. Coppock was told he could have whatever profits he made out of a magazine and a stockman’s supply company if he could make these enterprises fly, which he did, with flying colours. “Years later he told me how the industry was bankrupt and, worse, had no identity, no direction and no focus. What it needed, he said, was a sense of pride, in its origins and development and what it was now doing. His new magazine would be the medium to accomplish these goals.” In time Coppock became the secretary-manager of the WSGA in addition to publisher of the magazine. Initially Canadian Cattlemen was billed as the “official organ for the Western Canada commercial cattle industry.” In his first issue Coppock wrote, “We have diligently endeavoured to create a publication of which the industry and the WSGA may justly be proud,” but there was no suggestion that the WSGA owned the paper, and in fact, as Jacobs explains, the magazine was published by Kenway Publishing Company. The ownership became more clear in 1952 when Coppock resigned from the WSGA and offered to sell the magazine to the association. But the association didn’t have any money, and even less experience in publishing. In the end, Public Press in Winnipeg, the publishing wing of United Grain Growers, bought the magazine and agreed to run a regular column supplied by the WSGA. Some years later that page was turned over to the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association. Twenty-five years ago on this page I wrote that no one can come to the editor’s chair of Canadian Cattlemen without being influenced by the history of the magazine and the industry it serves. Those words still ring true to me today. Not many publications have so long a life, and for that we gratefully thank our readers. After all this time you remain our sole clients, and the reason for our existence. c

www.canadiancattlemen.ca


ADD SAFE-GUARD ADD POUNDS

TM

Safe-Guard TM (fenbendazole ) is a different class of dewormer than pour-ons and injectables. It works fast to stop internal parasites and the hidden damage they cause. These parasites suppress feed intake, reduce average daily gain, hurt nutrient absorption and immune function, reducing the health and performance of your cattle.1,2 Use Safe-Guard as part of your parasite control program for more pounds of high quality beef in the feedlot.3,4 Visit www.AddSafe-Guard.com for more information or contact your veterinarian. 1 Endoparasite control, L.R. Ballweber, Veterinary Clinics Food Animal, 2006, 22:451-461. 2Economic analysis of pharmaceutical technologies in modern beef production, J.D. Lawrence and M.A. Ibarburu, Iowa State University, 2007. 3Pasture deworming and (or) subsequent feedlot deworming with fenbendazole. Effects of grazing performance, feedlot performance and carcass traits of yearling steers, R. Smith, et al., The Bovine Practitioner, 2000, 34:104-114. 4A fenbendazole oral drench in addition to an ivermectin pour-on reduces parasite burden and improves feedlot and carcass performance of finishing heifers compared with endectocides alone, C.D. Reinhardt, J.P. Hutcheson and W.T. Nichols, Journal of Animal Science, 2006, 84:2243-2250.

Safe-Guard is a trademark of Intervet International B.V. Used under license. Merck Animal Health (known as MSD Animal Health outside the US and Canada), operating in Canada as Intervet Canada Corp., a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc., Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA. MERCK and MSD are trademarks of Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp., a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc., Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA. Copyright Š 2012 Intervet International B.V., a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc., Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA. All rights reserved.

TM

SafeGuard Bovine ad Canadian Cattlemen.indd 1

13-06-13 15:57


 THE INDUST RY

NewsMakers Arnold Drung is the new president of the Canadian Meat Council. He is the president  of  Conestoga Meat Packers in Breslau, Ont., a subsidiary of Progressive Pork Producers Arnold Drung Cooperative. The Saskatchewan Stock Growers Association elected Swift Current rancher Harold Martens to a third term as president during its 100th anniversary annual meeting in June. Doug Gillespie of Neville is first vice-president and Shane Jahnke of Gouldtown is Harold Martens second  vice-president. Brooks Whitney of Maple Creek is the finance chair and past president Calvin Knoss of Rockglen rounds out the association’s new executive. New to the board are directors-at-large Henry McCarthy of Wawota and Fred Lansdall of Leross. Dr. Bart Lardner, senior research scientist at the Western  Beef  Development  Centre  (WBDC), received  the  Canadian Animal Industries Award in Extension and Public Dr. Bart Lardner Service during the Canadian Society of Animal Science annual meeting in June. He was cited for his

down-to-earth style of helping beef and forage producers find the practical value in research results to improve their own operations. Kelly Carson is the new general manager of the Canadian Charolais Association. He comes to the association  with  extensive feedlot and purebred experience and for Kelly Carson the past seven years has been the operations and general manager of the World Professional Chuckwagon Association.

Dave and Wanda Casorso (above) of Casorso Ranch in Oliver are the 2013 Environmental Stewardship Award winners for British Columbia. They developed a dam and gravity-fed watering system in this arid part of B.C. to irrigate enough fields and pastures on their 1,400 deeded acres to supplement the native grazing on 70,000 acres of forested Crown lease to support their 240 Angus cows.

Allen and Lillian Patkau of Sandy Arrow Ranch Ltd., at Hanley are the 2013 Environmental Stewardship  Award  (TESA) winners  for  Saskatchewan. Over  more  than  three decades they have slowly converted their land from Allen Patkau grain to grass while using best management practices to ensure the most efficient use of water and soil. They have been involved in the Ministry of Agriculture’s Environmental  Farm Plan program,  in  addition to being federal pasture Lillian Patkau patrons. Allen is also on the federal committee that is advising the minister on how best to transition 60 federal community pastures to the province by 2018. Bob Balog of Balog Auction Services was recently named the 2013 Lethbridge Citizen of the Year, an award presented by the Rotary Club of Lethbridge and the Lethbridge Herald to recognize individuals for their extraordinary service and contributions to the community. Scott Postlewaite is the new chief operating officer of Livestock Identification Services Ltd. (LIS), Alberta’s private brand inspection  agency.  He replaces Jeff Bilow who has become the general Scott Postlewaite manager  of  equipment optimization and technology with Rocky Mountain Equipment. Postlewaite has been a business consultant for several years and previously was president of the Canadian division of Walco Canada Animal Health Inc. and Western Veterinary Supplies Ltd. Beef extension co-ordinator Tracy Sakatch with the Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC) has relocated from the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association Calgary headquarters to a satellite office in Saskatoon. Her contact information remains the same.

6

C at t l e m e n · au g u s t 2 0 1 3

www.canadiancattlemen.ca


NEWS MAKERS

Diane Knight from the University of Saskatchewan’s College of Agriculture and Bioresources (department of soil science) has been appointed to the board of directors of the Saskatchewan Forage Council, replacing Fran Walley of the University of Saskatchewan who retired after serving a two-year term. Re-elected to the board for a renewed term were chairman Aaron Ivey, a producer from Ituna; Sarah Sommerfeld with the Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture in Outlook and Alan Iwaasa, a forage researcher with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada at Swift Current. Provincial forage specialist, Kevin France, was appointed as an ex officio member of the board. Jolene Noble, the contracted program coordinator of the Cattlemen’s Young Leaders (CYL) program, has been given a full-time position with the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association. She holds a B.Sc. in Agriculture majoring in range and pasture management from the University of Alberta. The Canadian Forage and Grassland Association is seeking a new executive director

to replace Wayne Digby who is retiring. Responsibilities include providing direction to the forage and grassland sector in areas such as, research and extension; domestic and export forage market development; and responding to priority issues identified by producers and users. Kevin Blair of Blairs.Ag in Lanigan, Sask., was affirmed as president of the Canadian Angus Association at the breed’s annual meeting in June. Corinne Gibson of Six Mile Red Angus at Fir Kevin Blair Mountain, Sask. was chosen as president elect. During the meeting the association recognized Conlin Feeders of McGillivray, Ont., with its Eastern Feedlot of the Year Award; Valley Auction of Armstrong, B.C., with its Corrine Gibson Auction Market of the Year Award; and a CAA Heritage Award was pre-

WH PP - 7 x 5 -_AGI 2013-02-26 1:37 PM Page 1

sented to Roger and Jo Hillestad (above) of Ebon Hill Angus for the farm’s 50 consecutive years of membership in the CAA. Dr. Martin Gooch, CEO of Value Chain Management International and director of the Value Chain Management Centre (VCMC), was one of 21 Canadians who were recognized for contributions to science and innovation by Bayer Inc. during the company ’s 150-year anniversary gala. Cory Van Groningen of VG Meats in Simcoe, Ont., has been elected as president at Ontario Independent Meat Processors Association. c

Doesn’t take breaks or call in sick:

YOUR NEW FENCING CREW

Wheatheart offers a complete line of Heavy Duty & Hard Hitting fencing equipment designed to make fencing jobs safer, faster and more efficient. Wheatheart post pounders include conveniently located joystick controls and four way tilt mast with a post hugger. Drive wood or steel posts up to 12" in diameter. Available in 3 point hitch mount, versatile trailer models and skid steer mount with optional pilot auger attachment. Contact your local Wheatheart dealer!

1-877-934-0649 www.wheatheart.com www.canadiancattlemen.ca

C AT T L E M E N · AU G U S T 2 0 1 3

7


researc h

By Debbie Furber

The Onefour research herd is up for sale Closing the books on the 86-year-old research substation

Blacktail Ranch house being moved to become the first station office at Onefour ranch in 1928.

T

he Onefour Research Ranch herd dispersal sale on November 28 at the Balog Cow Palace in Lethbridge will mark the end of 86 years of range and livestock research at this storied ranch hugging the U.S. border in Alberta’s southeastern corner. It is one of several hallmark Ag Canada facilities and programs lost in the shuffle to streamline agricultural research and services across the country since the 2012 budget came down. Operating as a substation of Ag Canada’s Lethbridge Research Centre (LRC), Onefour had its livestock genetics research program transferred to the University of Alberta in 2005. The rangeland research component will be transferred to Ag Canada’s research centre at Swift Current, Sask., leaving the beef research program at LRC to concentrate on its work with feedlot cattle. In recent years, the breeding program at Onefour under the management of Ian Walker has been geared toward raising market-acceptable commercial cattle selected for optimal maternal performance on the range, balanced with feedlot efficiency and carcass quality, explains Byron Templeton of XTC Hereford Farms, Lethbridge, who chairs the Canada/Alberta Livestock Research Trust (CALRT). The trust was formed in 1990 with a

8

C at t l e m e n · Au g u s t 2 0 1 3

volunteer board of producers and industry people to facilitate timely commercial transactions when buying and selling cattle for LRC and providing feed and all other supplies required to care for the cattle at Onefour. It also serves as a sounding board to give industry perspective on research trials. The CALRT owns the Onefour herd and all proceeds from the sale of Onefour cattle go into the trust with profits supporting beef research at LRC. Ag Canada pays the lease on the provincial Crown land comprising most of the ranch, maintains the facilities, and looks after staffing. All of the cattle produced at Onefour, with the exception of the replacement heifers, are sent to the LRC feedlot at weaning and most of the steers wind up in research programs. Cows and heifers not retained in the breeding program or required for research have been an important revenue stream that will dry up after ranch operations wind down. “CALRT will still exist after ranch operations cease, though its workload will likely be lighter,” Templeton says. Cattle for LRC research programs will be sourced from the marketplace with a view to purchasing market-acceptable calves that will have the best salvage value possible at the end of the research projects.

CALRT board member Jamie Christie of Alberta Prime Beef at Picture Butte heads up the marketing program, which for research cattle is a different ball game because science needs blue-tag data from the packers and there is no sort, he explains. They are usually sold in small groups that aren’t necessarily uniform because they’re not all fed the same ration given that LRC does a lot of research looking at the feed value of various feedstuffs and feed-processing methods. “That said, Ian has a great eye for cows. These are good, good-quality cattle that when finished are respected by packers. They have been well accepted by Cargill because they fit into the branded programs very well,” he comments. Carcass data from the past three years show that 81.4 per cent of the 616 finished calves (481 steers, 115 heifers, 20 bulls) graded Canada AAA or higher with the dressing percentage averaging 60.47. As of early July, the fate of Onefour’s 42,000-acre short-grass prairie range was uncertain. It has been an important site for research in other fields of science through the years as well and today is home to at least 23 federally listed species at risk. The provincial government has already designated parts of the ranch as a Heritage Rangeland Natural Area. The Alberta Wilderness Association is seeking protected status for the entire range to keep it intact for Prairie research and grazing for local producers. Research highlights

Range and livestock development were central to the federal government’s goals in 1927 when it established Dominion Range Experiment Station, Manyberries, so named because the station received its mail at the post office there. However, the station was located in the Onefour district with a post office at the Wetherelt farm on the SE3-27-1-4-W4, ergo the name, Onefour. The station eventually acquired the farm and it was later discovered that a saving on postal delivery charges could be had if the old Onefour post office could be

www.canadiancattlemen.ca


RESEARCH

relocated at ranch headquarters on SW215-2-4, where a village-like atmosphere had evolved with ranch and research facilities, homes for employees and community buildings, including a store and school. The name change to Onefour followed accordingly. Allan Ross, CALRT secretary and former manager of Onefour from 1978 to 2000, provides a rundown of some of the major research projects as detailed in the book 75 Years of Research, 1927-2002, Research Substation, Onefour, written by former head of the animal science section, Dr. John E. Lawson. CALRT board member and Canadian Cattlemen Association’s research director Reynold Bergen says a lot of the production practices that Western Canada’s beef industry is based on, and a lot of everyday knowledge that producers take for granted exists because of the research that was done at Onefour. The Dominion’s experimental farms service branch had dispatched two agrologists to the area to determine why settlers had been abandoning their homesteads in droves. They identified soil that produced light crops, inadequate rainfall, heat and high winds, and grasshoppers as the main reasons. This set the direction for research during the first 25 years dealing with reclamation work, developing water resources, evaluating grazing capacity, determining climate effects, assessing various forages and feed supplements and establishing management procedures for cattle and sheep handling, treating and marketing. Recommendations were laid out for dehorning, castrating, branding, parasite control, mineral supplementation, spaying heifers, breeding yearling heifers and artificial insemination. Cattle-breeding programs to evaluate breeds and crosses for hardiness and productivity and to develop selection methods and technology started in 1950 with several long-term (15 to 20 years) projects. Work with Cattalo (cattle-buffalo cross), Brahman-British crosses, a Highland-Hereford line and the Ross project with dairy and Red Angus sires on Hereford cows, identified the advantages of hybrid vigour. Ross recalls that when he started as a ranch hand in 1971, the program was midway through a 20-year genetic selection study to evaluate feedlot performance in Angus and Hereford lines fed either a high-energy diet (HED, 80 per cent grain, 20 per cent hay) or a medium-energy diet (MED, hay only). www.canadiancattlemen.ca

Manager Ian Walker (l) oversaw the breeding and selection of most of the cattle up for sale.

Calves fed the MED had fewer digestive disturbances, bloats and founders, while those retained as cows produced more milk and offspring with heavier weaning weights than those fed the HED. Yearling bulls in the HED program had lower sperm reserves and at two years of age produced only half as many sperm with inferior quality compared to bulls managed on MED. No  sire-diet  interaction  was  found, implying  that  individual  animals  with genetics for superior post-weaning gain would retain that advantage relative to other individuals in the same group whether fed HED or MED. Similarly, when given an HED ration, bull calves from the cows in the MED program grew as fast as those from cows in the HED program. Next came another long-term study, the foreign cattle-breeding evaluation project, that looked at the productive value and feed efficiency of crossbred cattle using Hereford, Angus, Shorthorn, Charolais, Simmental and Limousin cattle for a total of 10 firstcrosses with the Hereford-Angus cross as the control. The heifers were bred Red Angus or Beefmaster and the mature cows to the three exotic breeds or Chianina. This project, carried out at Manyberries and in the Parkland Region at Brandon evaluated the environmental and genetic effects on pre- and post-weaning performance of some 3,700 calves in all. Rankings were established for terminal sires of the calves and sires and dams of the cows.

Location differences were significant. The environment at Manyberries resulted in lower lifetime production efficiency than at Brandon, leading researchers to conclude that, while rankings for mature breed crosses may be similar among locations, their rankings for net productivity weren’t likely to be constant in differing environments. Researchers found that the NRC feeding guidelines would need to be adjusted to address environmental variation and that the recommendations for lactation feed requirements for all crosses had been underestimated. Project data and simulated ranches were used to model the relative profitability of each of the crosses in both environments. It was learned that the breed of the terminal sire was an important consideration when determining the profitability of a dam cross. For example, a certain cow cross could rank first when bred to a terminal sire one breed, but way down the list when bred to a sire of another breed. Profitability was largely determined by the percentage of calves weaned and calf weight, with calving difficulty and feed requirements having a lesser effect. However, researchers concluded that reproductive performance should not be sacrificed for heavier weaning weights and, in a commercial herd, cow performance is more Continued on page 11

C at t l e m e n · Au g u s t 2 0 1 3

9


SMART

GETS IT DONE. New Holland equipment gives you a tough, productive edge on your operation. You work faster, stronger, more comfortably all day long. And that adds up where it counts. For hard-working producers, New Holland is the SMART way to work.

To see our SMART construction lineup, visit your local New Holland dealer.

Š2013 CNH America LLC. New Holland Construction is a trademark of CNH America LLC. NHCE07138378AG


RESEARCH

An aerial view of the headquarters area of the Onefour ranch Continued from page 9

important to profitability than the terminal sire breed. The performance of calves from firstcross cows was shown to be superior to that of backcross (one-quarter- and three-quarter-cross) females. As little as one-eighth of a change in breed composition could significantly affect carcass traits. The top-performing first-crosses from this project formed the herd for a bioeconomic efficiency study of delved-into genetic parameters needed to assess breeding strategies, including the calculation of direct and maternal heritabilities, and phenotypic and genetic correlations on growth and carcass traits. It was discovered that simple tools, such as the bull’s scrotal circumference and heifer growth traits, were good predictors of lifetime pregnancy rates. At the turn of the century, new computer programs allowed researchers to use data from these long-term studies and the Angus and Charolais herds at Onefour to advance the technology for selecting economically important traits. Some of this work looked at the influence of eating patterns, preconditioning, shrink during transportation and real-time ultrasound on selecting for carcass merit. When this program was transferred to the University of Alberta, most of the Charolais and Angus herds were leased to the university’s Kinsella Ranch. Onefour has rebuilt a commercial herd, currently numbering 235 first-cross Hereford-Angus and 450 straight Black Angus cows and heifers. Onefour Cow Herd

Walker, who has managed the station since 2000, worked with the Onefour crew for nine years in the ’80s before he went on to manage Ag Canada’s Kamloops ranch. He looks for bulls with moderate EPDs from proven cow lines and older dams, adding that the actual birth weight of a www.canadiancattlemen.ca

bull’s dam is just as important as the bull’s own birth weight EPD. Particular attention is paid to milking ability to produce females with ample milk for calves but not so much that they won’t be able to maintain body condition and rebreed on time. Each dam is scored on conformation and mothering ability at calving. The top 200 to 250 Angus cows are bred to herdsire-quality bulls to produce fertile, moderate-type females with longevity in their lines that do well on native grass. The replacements are wintered in the yard where they are weaned on to a ration of grass hay and screening pellets containing 20 per cent barley, which he starts feeding at about a pound per head per day, working up to 2.5 pounds. The pellets are pail fed daily so the heifers get used to having people walking near them. This makes a huge difference down the road if the crew has to lend a hand at calving, though only nine of the 240 heifers that have calved in the last two years have needed assistance. The bulls went out for 45-day breeding seasons with the heifers on June 2 to start calving March 1, and with the cows on July 2 to start calving April 5. Normally, the breeding season for the replacements is only 30 days and conception rates have averaged 85 to 90 per cent for the past five years. The conception rates for the cows have averaged 90 to 95 per cent, with close to 80 per cent of the calves coming in the first 21 days of calving this spring. Average weaning weights in early October for the past three years have been 508 pounds for the heifers and 543 for the steers. “This is an extremely rare opportunity to purchase a set of reputation, proven cows,” says Bob Balog of Balog Cow Palace. “All successful ranches keep good records, but because of the research, the amount of data on these cows is magnified three to four times. If you are building a new herd, you’ll be 20 years ahead with a group of uniform cows of this calibre.” For details: www.balogauctions.com. c

SUMMER

OF SAVINGS SALES EVENT

WARMER WEATHER CALLS FOR

HOT DEALS! This summer is the time to get sizzling savings on select equipment built New Holland SMART.

VISIT YOUR LOCAL NEW HOLLAND DEALER TODAY AND ASK ABOUT our HOT DEALS! www.newholland.com

©2013 CNH America LLC. New Holland is a registered trademark of CNH America LLC. NHCE07138308FT

C at t l e m e n · Au g u s t 2 0 1 3

11


environ m e n t

By Duane McCartney

True conservationists Conservation is paid more than lip service on the Zehnder family ranch

T

he Zehnder brothers, John, Dave, Mark and Chris have conservation in their blood. Originally from Switzerland, their parents started ranching in the Columbia Valley near Invermere, B.C. in the early 1970s. Their father was involved with the development of Panorama Ski Resort and the boys all had an active role on the 3,500acre ranch. Conservation was always important to the family over the years. Recently their efforts have been recognized by a regional conservation award. John currently manages the ranch with about 130 Gelbvieh/Angus cows. “In the past we had a much larger herd of 300 head which was reduced because of the BSE crisis and required hired help which was very hard to get. Now I can almost run the whole operation by myself,” John says as we walk through the pasture as part of a tour with “Wings Over the Rockies” a weeklong interpretive conservation and naturalist program held every May in the Columbia Valley. On this day our group is touring the Zehnder Ranch to see first-hand examples of conservation initiatives on their grassland. It is fascinating walking with John and his brother David, an agriculture and conservation consultant, as they identify all the birds on their ranch. As the ranch is in the Rocky Mountain Trench, their grazing lands are at different elevations and in different eco systems. In the summer, the cattle are on forested range in the mountains while in the winter and spring the cows are on seeded pasture closer to home. Calves are sold in the fall to Alberta feedlots but some of the beef is managed organically and sold locally in Invermere. The brothers have diverse interests. In his spare time John trains border collie dogs to move cattle and wildlife and for many years he has helped move the elk out of the Banff townsite with his dogs. John gives us a small demonstration working some sheep with his dogs. From the herding demonstration we make our way off the field and through what was once an area cultivated for Christmas trees. The family used to grow Douglas fir Christmas trees using a traditional method of cultivation known as stump culture. Christmas tree production served

12

C at t l e m e n · au g u s t 2 0 1 3

Dave Zehnder discusses the goals of the Ecological Services Initiative on their family ranch.

as a means of farm diversification. Some of the remaining trees have grown beyond the Christmas-tree size but provide excellent habitat for songbirds. We continue on down to the lake which the family developed for irrigation, and now provides excellent waterfowl habitat. The riparian area surrounding this lake is the focus of a demonstration site. This is where Dave introduces us to the concept of Paid Ecological Services, which is about paying farmers and ranchers to produce cleaner air, water and enhance wildlife habitat on their land. Dave has been instrumental in advancing the concept. He also assisted in the formation of a new Local Conservation Fund which has provided the funding for the pilot now underway. “We started the Ecological Services Initiative program in 2010 with a few demonstration and research sites on some ranches in the area. The concept was to develop and test a model where ranchers could be financially rewarded for protecting the watersheds for clean water, and conserve critical wildlife habitat in a proactive manner,” says Dave. “During the recent regional elections we were able to include a referendum question asking people in the area if they would financially support local conservation projects through a $20-per-parcel annual tax. The money would go directly to supporting conservation efforts on private land in the area. The community voted in favour

of the fund which has supported many projects including this pilot project.” The initial demonstration sites proved successful and we have expanded the program to include many more demonstration sites all across B.C. and into Alberta. “We have the help of six universities in Canada and the United States monitoring the project sites and financial assistance from the B.C. minister of agriculture, Columbia Basin Trust Fund, B.C. cattlemen, B.C. Agriculture Council, Ducks Unlimited, University of Alberta’s Institute for Land Use Innovation and Agriculture Environment and Wildlife Fund, and now Environment Canada has come on board. It’s very exciting! “The big questions we are trying to answer are... if you pay a farmer or rancher for producing ecological services does it work for the farmer and does it make a difference in the big picture. Is a long-term program to encourage landowners to maintain ecosystem services viable?” Dave continues and tells us about how his uncles in Switzerland and farmers elsewhere in Europe and Ireland are compensated for conservation efforts on their farms. “In British Columbia we only have about three per cent of the provincial land base in agriculture. Most of that limited agricultural land is in the valley bottoms, and Continued on page 14

www.canadiancattlemen.ca


From mining to agriculture, Super Duty is the truck of choice for those who do the toughest jobs across the toughest industries.± With best-in-class horsepower,† conventional towing ‡ and even fuel efficiency,* we believe in a job well done as much as you do. See all the ownership numbers and tell us how you own work at ford.ca/WeOwnWork.

TRUCK OWNERSHIP (US INDUSTRY DATA) ±:

63%

MINING

FORESTRY

SUPER DUTY

SUPER DUTY

SILVERADO HD

23%

RAM HD

8%

44%

SILVERADO HD

28%

RAM HD

17%

AGRICULTURE FARMING SUPER DUTY

39% 30%

SILVERADO HD

18

%

RAM HD

BEST-IN-CLASS – HORSEPOWER,† CONVENTIONAL TOWING ,‡ AND FUEL ECONOMY* † Maximum conventional towing capability of 18,500 lbs. on F-350. †Max. gas horsepower of 385 and diesel horsepower of 400 on F-250/F-350. Class is Full-Size Pickups over 8,500 lbs. GVWR vs. 2012/2013 competitors. *Based on Ford drive-cycle tests of comparably equipped Ford and competitive models. Class is Full-Size Pickups over 8,500 lbs. GVWR. ±Percentage based on Polk U.S. heavy-duty pickup and class 2-5 Conventional Chassis Cab combined new registrations (2011 CYE – 2012 CYTD JUNE) within the following U.S. industries: Mining/Quarrying, Mining & Quarrying-Nonmetallic Minerals, Agricultural Production-Livestock. ©2013 Ford Motor Company of Canada, Limited. All rights reserved.


E N V I RO N M E N T

Continued from page 12

A BEEF I AD

C. N

CA N

it is the same land that contains the highest biodiversity values. Unfortunately it is also prime land for real estate development, and when development occurs, the province loses both its best agricultural land and the land containing the highest levels of biodiversity. The paid ecosystem services model could ultimately help keep that land in agriculture and producing valuable ecosystem services. For example: ranchers might fence off a riparian area and control the grazing or simply develop an off-stream cattle-watering site as a method of improving wetland habitat. Paying landowners to preserve wetland and wildlife habitat or improve sensitive areas around a stream or river can have as big an effect as building public infrastructure such as water treatment plants.” The Ecological Services Initiative uses the demonstration sites as a catalyst to promote discussion with policy-makers and the general public. Cattle producers support keeping a land reserve for agriculture but unfortunately government support

ANNUAL FORUM 2013

lg a r y, A l b er

official opening of another Zehnder brother’s wildlife project, a raptor flight cage for rehabilitating injured birds. Mark Zehnder is the local veterinarian in Invermere and in his spare time nurses injured raptors such as eagles, hawks and owls back to health. Mark told our group it takes up to 12 weeks to bring the birds back so that they can survive back in the wild. With an increased demand for rehabilitating birds, he needed a better way to exercise the injured birds. The 20x20, 100-foot-long cage can be divided into several compartments if a bird needs to be isolated. The doors can also be left partially open so the birds can fly left to right down the entire length of the cage. It is one of the largest flight cages in Canada. The Zehnder brothers have really made a mark as true conservationists in the beef industry. They have led initiatives to retain land for agriculture rather than seeing it developed into housing. Perhaps some of their initiatives will encourage others to initiate similar projects on their ranches. c Duane McCartney, is a retired forage and beef systems research scientist at Lacombe, Alta.

Canada Beef Inc.

Annual Forum 2013 Building Brand Loyalty – A Commitment to the Brand

t

a

Ca

has been removed. “In the past there was strong support for goods and services as all of society would benefit, but it didn’t go anywhere,” says Dave. “Now with Environment Canada involvement maybe things will change.” Farmers and ranchers may already do a good job of maintaining and improving their ecosystems. This program focuses on giving them some financial assistance to do a better job beyond what is required by law. As we look through a telescope at the mountains that border the Zehnder property we spot a mountain goat making its way down to a salt lick at the back of the ranch. John describes a project that he has been working on that has been monitoring the endangered goat population that calls this area home. The project has been monitoring the population with wildlife cameras and collecting hair samples for DNA analysis to determine the size of the population and how they utilize the area. The Zehnders have protected the area near the salt lick to avoid any unnecessary harassment of the goats. The next day, our group attended the

You’re Invited! September 19 - 20, 2013

Join Canada Beef Inc.’s Board of Directors, staff and industry partners as we discuss the importance of having, building and maintaining a strong brand in today’s marketplace. At the Annual Forum you will hear from our board, marketing team, partners and others on many topics including: • Canadian Beef Brand Mark: what does it represent? • Industry panel: the value of the brand to our various partners. • What is on the horizon for Canada Beef Inc.? Thursday, September 19 A full day of presentations and information sessions, followed by a special dinner. Friday, September 20 The business meeting including a review of the company’s performance and election of the new Board.

We welcome recommendations for individuals to stand as voting delegates for the business meeting. Please submit by August 15, 2013 for consideration by the governance committee to: tfraser@canadabeef.ca

The Annual Forum is open to everyone. We hope you will join us. Thursday and Friday, September 19 and 20, 2013 Sheraton Cavalier, Calgary Alberta Check www.canadabeef.ca/producer for more information.

14

C AT T L E M E N · AU G U S T 2 0 1 3

www.canadiancattlemen.ca


S:7.625”

A T B LE E H T

IS SET INNOVATION 4-H Canada and Bayer CropScience believe the agricultural leaders of tomorrow can help find sustainable solutions for the world’s growing need for safe, nutritious food. That’s why we’re gathering 120 bright minds, ages 18-25, from around the world to share their perspectives at the 4-H Youth Ag-Summit in Calgary. From August 19th-25th, 2013, these delegates will be tasked with identifying actionable agriculturally sustainable solutions to feed a growing world. Let’s talk change. To find out what topics are on the table and join the growing conversation, please visit facebook.com/youthagsummit.

S:10.25”

for


 Nutriti o n

By John McKinnon

Corn: The New Kid on the Block?

W

hile Quebec, Ontario and southern Manitoba have long been Canada’s focal points for corn grain production, you can’t help but notice as you drive around Western Canada that we are starting to see more and more grain and livestock producers focus on corn whether it is for grain, silage or stockpiled forage for winter grazing. This trend may snowball as the major seed developers put more emphasis on corn variety development for Canadian growing conditions. From a nutrition perspective, corn is a very versatile crop, particularly for cattle feed. Compared to barley there are several important differences when used as a feed grain. First, barley grain has an outer hull which corn does not. As a result, processing requirements differ between the two grains. Barley is typically dry or temper rolled prior to feeding to allow for optimum nutrient utilization. Corn grain in contrast can be fed whole, dry rolled, tempered or as is common in certain areas of the United Sates, steam flaked. Surprisingly, from a performance perspective it is hard to show a difference between cattle fed dry rolled barley versus dry rolled corn, although more intensive processing of corn (i.e. steam flaking) results in more efficient gains relative to barley. From a nutrient perspective, corn has a higher starch and lower fibre content, which results in a higher energy content — 88 versus 82 per cent Total Digestible Nutrients (TDN) DM basis — for corn relative to barley grain. In contrast, corn contains less crude protein (CP) than barley grain, 10 versus 12.5 per cent on a DM basis. Another important difference is that starch and protein degradation in the rumen is slower with corn than with barley. This leads to higher rumen bypass of both nutrients in corn-fed cattle. This has implications for bunk management as well as for protein supplementation. For example, while acidosis and digestive upsets are still issues for corn-fed cattle, they are not as great a problem as with barley. The relatively low protein content of corn means that corn-based finishing rations typically need some form of protein supplementation. Rumen degradable protein supplements such as canola meal or urea-based supplements are ideal, as they complement the high bypass nature of corn protein. To date most of the corn feeding in Western Canada has been in the finishing feedlot and has simply been a matter of economics with American corn replacing barley when pricing and supply dictate. In contrast, the use of corn in the forage program either as silage or as whole plant standing corn offers more immediate opportunities for beef producers. The development of lower corn heat unit varieties adaptable to Western Canada has allowed a number of feeding operations to switch at least part of their silage acres to corn. As with grain corn, corn silage is typically higher in energy (i.e. 68 versus 62 per cent TDN for barley silage,

16

C at t l e m e n · Au g u s t 2 0 1 3

DM basis) but lower in protein (nine versus 12 per cent, DM basis). Its relatively low protein content usually means that protein supplementation is a requirement for most corn silage-based diets for growing and finishing cattle. In addition to its nutritional value, a major benefit of corn silage is its superior yield potential relative to barley silage under both irrigation and dryland conditions. The use of whole plant standing corn for winter grazing of the cow herd is a unique use of corn that is gaining momentum with cow-calf producers. In 2011, at the Western Beef Development Centre Ranch at Lanigan, Saskatchewan, dry matter yields of five corn varieties grown for winter grazing ranged from 4.0 to 5.7 tonnes per acre with an average energy and protein content of 62.5 per cent TDN and 8.3 per cent P (WBDC Fact sheet #2012.03). In a five-year winter corn-grazing trial at Ste. Rose, Manitoba, calculated cow days per acre averaged 250 while calculated grazing costs ($/hd./day) ranged from $0.59 to $1.09 (Manitoba Agriculture). These applied research trials show that standing corn for winter grazing can be a cost-effective alternative to traditional cow wintering programs.

John McKinnon is a beef cattle nutritionist at the University of Saskatchewan

Grain corn has higher energy content and lower fibre content than barley

However, for those considering corn a word of caution. One cannot overemphasize the importance of correct variety selection. Specifically, a variety selected for the corn heat units for your growing area. Corn is highly dependent on appropriate growing conditions (i.e. temperature and moisture) in order to achieve its yield potential. Lack of heat and/or moisture will not only reduce dry matter yield of the crop but also nutritional value due to immature plant development at ensiling or prior to a killing frost in the case of whole plant corn. In such situations, it will be hard to recover the higher cost of seeding corn. As mentioned above, western Canadian producer interest in growing corn has attracted the attention of the major seed development companies. Monsanto Canada for example has recently announced a 10-year, $100-million research program targeted at developing earlymaturing corn hybrids adapted to western Canadian agronomic conditions. Considering the genetic progress in corn breeding over the last quarter-century, one gets the feeling this is only the beginning of the story! c

www.canadiancattlemen.ca


We’ve Got Your Back, canada.

It’s a hard day’s grind from sun up to sundown. You know your fields but can never know for sure what the day will bring. You trust your instincts and rely on the knowledge you’ve picked up through the years. It also helps that you’ve got the right equipment. Not to mention a dealer network that’s ready to provide expert support whenever you need it. You’ve got work to do and Vermeer is here to help. We’ve got your back, Canada.

Watch it workproducts at vermeer.com. See Vermeer work and find your local dealer on vermeer.com. Vermeer and the Vermeer logo are trademarks of Vermeer Manufacturing Company in the U.S. and/or other countries. © 2013 Vermeer Corporation. All rights reserved.

AIRDRIE Airdrie Tractorland AssInIboIA Young’s Equipment Inc. AthEns Feenstra’s Equipment Ltd. bRAnDon Hepson Equipment Inc. CAlgARy Calgary Tractorland ltd ChEslEy J & H Sales & Service CypREss County Ag-Plus Mechanical Ltd DAVIDson Young’s Equipment Inc. EstEVAn E. Bourassa & Sons glAslyn Glaslyn Power & Equip. Inc.

403-948-7400 306-642-5991 613-924-2805 204-727-1050 403-240-1977 519-363-3510 403-504-1111 306-567-3074 306-634-9444 306-342-4808

lEDuC Key AgVentures Inc. 780-980-4005 lInDsAy Callaghan Farm Supply 705-324-8686 MEAfoRD Earth Power Tractors & Equipment, Inc. 519-538-1660 MoosE JAw Young’s Equipment Inc. 306-694-1800 olIVER Gerard’s Equipment Ltd. 250-498-2524 owEn sounD Earth Power Tractors & Equipment, Inc. 519-376-5880 pAngMAn E. Bourassa & Sons 306-442-2033 pIERson Lee’s Service Centre 204-634-2293 powAssAn J & J Equipment Repair Inc. 705-724-6565 pRInCE gEoRgE Huber Equipment 250-560-5040

RADVIllE E. Bourassa & Sons RAyMoRE Young’s Equipment Inc. RED DEER County Key AgVentures Inc. REgInA Young’s Equipment Inc. RussEll Therkelsen & Sons LTD stAynER Earth Power Tractors & Equipment, Inc. wEybuRn E. Bourassa & Sons wInDthoRst Young’s Equipment Inc wooDstoCK Lely Center Woodstock

306-869-2277 306-746-2288 403-343-6342 306-565-2405 613-445-2818 705-428-3132 306-842-6626 306-224-2110 519-602-6737 226-236-3261


 manage m e n t

By Steve Kenyon

the redneck cattle drive

A horseless cattle drive.

I

was at a very large cattle ranch this spring that was very traditional in that everything was done on horseback. As the manager stated, “If these boys can’t hold a rope in their hand, they won’t do it.” I like the fact that they are keeping the tradition alive and it was a very impressive operation to see. On my ranch however, I have found that I just can’t get enough done in a day on horseback. I will admit, I am a quad cowboy, and a bit of a redneck. Crossing a pasture with multiple electric cross fences is so much faster on a quad and I have trouble carrying barbed wire on a horse.   Let me tell you a bit of a story. Quite a few years ago I had to do a cattle drive in the fall to get a herd to a new pasture I had just added to my cell. The cattle owner was happy to get some fall pasture so he said he would bring out eight cowboys to help with the cattle drive. (Free labour.) This seemed like a better plan than hiring a stock trailer. The plan was

18

C at t l e m e n · Au g u s t 2 0 1 3

to move the cattle about six miles down the road and we only had a half-mile that was not fenced on one side. Other than driveways and crossroads, it looked like a pretty easy drive. A couple horses in back, a lead truck and eight horses along the sides to keep cattle out of the hayfield, should be plenty of horsepower. There were a couple of driveways near the hayfield that I knew might be an issue and I had a thought to put up a fake electric fence across them just to help the cowboys out.   It started out fine. We got past a driveway. Perfect. We then crossed a side road. Easy.  We even made it past the hayfield without a glitch. The cowboys were experienced riders and did exactly as they were supposed to and we were heading on up the road like pros. But, as the road narrowed between two farm sites, the cattle balked and turned back. The first thing they did was pile into a driveway. “There goes my fake fence,” I said to myself, but no… they respected it and headed back out to the hayfield. 

This flimsy little wire with no electricity tied to a couple shrubs stopped the herd of 300 head. But to get into the hayfield the herd had to get past 10 horses. The cattle blew right by and started up a square dance party in the centre of the hayfield. They took turns calling out moves and they do-se-doed with the cowboys for a good hour. We tried everything to get them moving back out onto the road and past the farmyards. We allemanded left, we allemanded right, we bribed, we called, we chased, we huffed and we puffed. It was not fun. Eventually they tired out enough that they decided to head on down the road. We finally made it to the pasture but we were not done. In the chaos we had a few escapees to collect. Now it was time for these cowboys to practise their roping. Let’s just say the day did not go well. I created negative relationships with a neighbour, a customer and everyone else who helped out that day.   

www.canadiancattlemen.ca


management

But from every mistake, (I mean experiment that did not turn out the way I expected) we learn something. The cowboys were experienced riders, but the fake electric fence worked better. Now, I would like to explain to you my present-day, redneck cattle drive. Two people, a dog, a 1996 Geo Tracker, a 1991 quad and we are set. Here is the scenario; we need to move 800 head down the road to another pasture. I go out in advance with some electric fence supplies on the quad. I run fake electric fences across any openings along the cattle drive. This might be driveways, road crossings, acreages, unfenced land or even ditches that the neighbours don’t want trampled by my herd. Most of the land is fenced in my area but on one of my drives there was almost a full mile of electric fence to put up. On all driveways or road cross# 1106844 ingsJob I make sure I put the wire flat on the client: Novartis ground as traffic might still need to cross T: 7x5 // 4C my Specs: fake fence. We have the pasture cell set up so that the1.herd is coming out of a smaller 3. padDesktop:JhW aD: dock 2. with Proof:no bush so that it is easy to make 4. cD: sure we get them all out on the first try. I

don’t like running a cattle drive with 797 animals and then having to do another with three animals. I always come out of an easy paddock. If we are all set, I open the gate and take the lead with the quad calling the herd. I am the lead vehicle as the cattle are very used to following the quad. My help is in the tracker with my working dog. They block the road in the opposite direction as we head on down the road. This is usually a very easy job for my help in the followup vehicle as my working dog loves to push up the back of a cattle drive and he is only as aggressive as he needs to be. He’s got 12 years of experience doing it.  As I come up to a crossroad or a driveway where I left the fake electric fence on the ground, I set up a post to raise the wire and continue on my way. After the herd passes aD #:nvcSB06126844 the followup person drops the wire on the ground to allow traffic to cross again if need be. My neighbours all know what a fake fence along the road or across their driveway means and they really appreciate it as 5. cW: they know my cattle respect it. Mgr: 6. Prod. A half-hour of setup, 15 minutes of tear-

down and a 20-minute cattle drive with only two people and a dog. My redneck cattle drives are easy, low cost and effective. Those 10 horses square dancing with the herd is only a distant memory.  That little fake electric fence is very powerful to a well-trained herd.    I have even used my fake electric fence to cross a highway. However, I will warn you, solid painted lines on a highway cause issues as cattle are hesitant to cross it. The dotted lines seemed OK. To help get over a solid line on the highway I pull out grass from the ditch and spread it on the pavement to partially cover the line. It does not have to completely cover the line, just break it up. So if you are ever driving by Busby, Alta. and you see some fake electric fence strung down the edge of the road, take a break and wait for a bit. It is quite a sight to see when 800 head of cattle head on up the road following a redneck on a quad! c Steve Kenyon runs Greener Pastures aS:in Busby, Alta., www. Ranching7.Ltd. greenerpasturesranching.com, (780) 307-6500, email skenyon@greenerpasturesranching.com.

A DVE RTOR I AL

ScourS Prevention StartS With the coW Ensuring next year’s calves get off to a fast, healthy start begins long before calving season through careful management and vaccination of the dam.

Vaccinating pregnant cows with SCOUR BOS® 9 has the added benefit of reducing the number of disease-causing pathogens shed in manure, thus reducing the calf’s chances of exposure.

Calf scours, or neonatal diarrhea, continues to be a leading cause of mortality and sickness among calves. Viruses and bacteria that can cause calf scours are naturally present in every calf’s environment. So how do you ensure that your calves are equipped to deal with this challenge?

Of course, vaccination and good colostrum management are only part of an effective scours prevention strategy. To ensure the health of your calves it is essential to incorporate other management strategies, including:

The most vital factor in the control of calfhood diseases, particularly scours, is colostrum. Newborn calves depend on colostrum for immunity against diseases until they are old enough to generate their own protective immunity. Vaccinating your pregnant cows and heifers against the common scours pathogens with SCOUR BOS® 9 will increase the protection against scours through their colostrum. Two things need to happen in order for this method to be effective. First, the cow must have optimum antibody concentrations present in her blood before she starts to make colostrum. Since cows begin to make colostrum 4 to 6 weeks before calving1 vaccination should occur ahead of this, following label directions. Second, the calf needs to receive 4 – 6 liters of colostrum within the first 24 hours of its life. If you’re not sure whether a calf has received enough colostrum, provide additional colostrum from the calf’s mother or a high-quality supplement.

• Reducing manure contamination in the calving area by moving cows away from the calving area when possible. • Providing adequate shelter for your cow-calf pairs in the calving and nursery areas. • Keeping calving and nursery areas well-bedded and well-drained. • Refraining from bringing in new animals to your herd during mid-to-late pregnancy and calving to reduce the spread of disease. • Isolating scouring calves in a separate area, away from the herd. Calf scours is a complex and multi-factorial disease, but with the right tools and timing you can reduce the risk it poses to next year’s calf crop. Plan ahead and talk to your herd veterinarian about making SCOUR BOS® 9 a part of your fall management to provide the best preventative strategies for your herd.

Scour BoS

EARLIER

BETTER

LONgER

1 Radostits O, gay C, Hinchcliff K, Constable P (editors). Veterinary Medicine, 10th ed., 2007. Scour Bos is registered trademark of Novartis Ag; used under license.

www.canadiancattlemen.ca

C at t l e m e n · Au g u s t 2 0 1 3

19


 vet aDv i c e

TEN YEARS AFTER BSE:

HAVE WE LEARNED ANYTHING?

T

he only mistakes in life are those that get repeated. To disregard a mistake and move forward undeterred expecting different results is the classic formula for failure. One of my greatest fears about BSE is that the industry has brushed aside this incident that consumed it for 10 years. Despite the damage that it has caused, many in the industry remain reluctant to step back and institute the changes that would prevent another disaster from a similar nondescript disease like BSE. What’s happened? The aftermath of May 20, 2003: In 1996 Alberta had 32,000 cattle producers. In 2011 only 18,600 remained. An aging population, drought, rising feed and labour costs, the rising value of the dollar and BSE accelerated the retraction. The size of the Canadian beef cow herd today stands around four million head, down from 5.2 million in early 2003. Beef exports that totalled 521,000 tonnes valued at $2.22 billion in 2002 fell to virtually zero in the months following BSE and crawled back to 271,000 tonnes valued at $1.2 billion in 2012. To some degree BSE also appears to have had a lasting impression on consumers. Even in Alberta beef consumption declined by more than 10 per cent over the past decade. Ellen Goddard, co-operative chair of agricultural marketing and business, University of Alberta, says the decrease was a lifestyle choice for some but for others it was about risks associated with eating beef. The future of disease control in Canada depends on the capacity of current and future leaders to work together — uneasy ground for many in the beef business. Despite BSE and the repercussions following a crisis, there are still few outstanding examples of resurgence. Instead industry leaders seem to have assumed a posture of nonchalance. Progress on things like animal welfare, food safety, biosecurity, strategic planning, disease control and agri-intelligence become the victim of reasoning backward rather than forward. Regulatory agencies and producer organizations are forced to repeatedly look at the “reasons” why we need things like disease surveillance. Canada has tried several times to become a leader in agri-intelligence only to have the playbooks gather dust, or be neutralized by fiscal restraint. With few exceptions, meaningful systems that would allow the industry to monitor and anticipate health risks never materialize. Five years ago, Canada went through the exercise of formulating a National Farmed Animal Health and Welfare Strategy (NFAHWS). Though well written, easily understood and of substance, this strategy has so far not garnered the required teams of advocates within the

20

C at t l e m e n · au g u s t 2 0 1 3

industry who are willing to nail the NFAHWS to the wall of boardrooms across the country, and use it as a map to protect the future of the meat business. We remain unprepared for future threats to animal health and trade. Diseases like the Schmallenberg virus that spread throughout Europe in only a few years, is now endemic just across the Bering Sea in Russia. Then there’s the discovery of a troublesome medical allergy to beef following the bite of lone star ticks. It was first diagnosed in Texas and recently was found in New York state. These are just two examples of the diseases that require watching. Ticks are now recognized as an important part of maintaining Q-fever in nature. Almost overnight pig epidemic diarrhea virus is devastating the U.S. swine industry. Dengue fever, one of the world’s fastest-spreading viral pathogens, has landed in Florida. These diseases are indicators of how serious diseases emerge and spread quickly. The E. coli 0157:H7 debacle at XL Packers might not have happened if inspection systems and risk management strategies in the meat industry had moved sooner from paper to everyday practice. Poor risk communication that was an underlying cause of the BSE crisis, surfaced again. The hapless communication effort at XL not only interrupted international trade, it blunted consumer confidence about those in charge of managing risk in the beef industry. In the end, it broke XL. CFIA investigators concluded the infected cow diagnosed as BSE positive in 2003 ate supplement contaminated with prions as a calf. Throughout the BSE fiasco, significant changes were made to prevent high-risk material from finding its way back into cattle diets. In 2007, all high-risk materials were banned from all animal diets. How this material gets handled and disposed of remains a problem and a huge financial burden for the beef industry. Despite many millions of dollars invested in finding new technology to deal with safe disposal or destruction of prion-containing tissue, much of it out of public coffers, little has come from the effort. The insular rendering industry was a significant part of the BSE problem between 1993 and 2003, but has done little in the way of finding solutions. Time between the mid-1990s and now can be neatly divided between what came before the BSE crisis and what followed. What came after 2003 should have been much different. Unfortunately learning gets lost in the distorted belief that the industry has resurrected itself to the stage of being bulletproof. That is a dangerous assumption. c Dr. Ron Clarke prepares this column on behalf of the Western Canadian Association of Bovine Practitioners. Suggestions for future articles can be sent to Canadian Cattlemen (gren@fbcpublishing.com) or WCABP (info@wcabp.com).

www.canadiancattlemen.ca


We’re in it for life.

Ag for Life delivers educational programming that will serve to improve rural and farm safety, as well as build a genuine understanding and appreciation of the impact agriculture has on lives.

Founding members: Agrium Inc. ATB Financial

ATCO Group Penn West Exploration

Rocky Mountain Equipment TransCanada Corporation

Contributing members: AdFarm

06/2013-18514_01

Glacier Media Group

Mosaic Studios

UFA Co-operative Ltd.


 packers

By Debbie Furber

Ron and Stan Heleniak examine some of the lean breed certified carcasses Norpac markets in Ontario.

norwich packers

How it withstood the test of time Brand… brand… brand

T

he eat-local food movement and the resurgence of butcher shops in urban Ontario has played straight into the hands of Norwich Packers. Owned and operated since 1953 by the Heleniak family of Norwich, Ont., the company revamped its business strategy two decades ago to zero in on its high-end, lean, tender beef sold under the Norpac brand name. Today, it is one of only four major beef packers remaining in the province, which in the ’80s boasted as many as 40 plants. This was during a time of consolidation within the meat-packing and grocery industries, explains Matthew Heleniak, who is the third generation of the family involved in managing the business. The company had grown from a small custom butcher shop handling cattle and hogs for farmers in his grandparents’ day, to estab-

22

C at t l e m e n · Au g u s t 2 0 1 3

lishing a wholesale division supplying two major regional retailers during the 1980s under the management of his late father, Richard, and uncles John, Stan and Ron. When those retailers sold out to larger companies, the family decided to buck the trend toward consolidation in the supply chain. “Instead of getting bigger and concentrating on supplying one or two larger customers, we began to feature our strength — lean, tender beef — and we also vertically integrated by adding a feedlot. In the mid-1990s we worked with a nutritionist to develop a custom ration for a whole-corn diet and have built our business on the lean and tender business.” The finishing ration includes whole corn grain with custom pellets containing minerals, vitamins and roughage to balance the diet. It is fed free choice with no addi-

tional hay or silage. The new ration effectively improved quality and consistency of the beef from the family’s feedlot and from other producers aligned with the Norpac program. It also positioned Norwich Packers to become the first processor to sign on with the Ontario Corn-Fed Beef program, launched by the Ontario Cattle Feeders Association in 2001. Today, the family feedlot finishes approximately 3,000 head a year, which represents about 20 per cent of the plant’s annual production. Leanness is assured by purchasing heavily muscled finished and feeder cattle, primarily Limousin, Lim-Flex (LimousinAngus cross), Belgian Blue and Blonde d’Aquitaine, from farms across Eastern Canada and the Prairies. While genetic selection has increased overall marbling in these exotic breeds,

www.canadiancattlemen.ca


packers

Heleniak says marbling has more to do with taste and texture than tenderness. In the company’s experience, tenderness is greatly aided by minimizing stress on the cattle. Stress causes lactic acid to build up in the muscles resulting in tough beef, he explains, so the less stress on the animals, the less lactic acid and the more tender the beef. To minimize stress, cattle must be delivered 12 to 24 hours ahead of harvest to allow time for them to be fed, watered and rested with lots of bedding and the sounds of Led Zeppelin and other classic rock artists playing through the night. The music helps condition them to noise so they aren’t alarmed when activity resumes in the morning, though every attempt is made to maintain a calm, quiet workplace. Norwich Packers’ processing protocol is unique in that it blends new technologies with old-time skills, such as manual removal of the hide, shrouding (covering) each side of beef with a sheet soaked in an antibacterial solution during cooling, air chilling (as opposed to applying water during cooling to minimize shrinkage), and hand trimming down to a quarter-inch fat thickness. These steps ensure a pleasing presentation and yield that’s as good as it gets in the industry for customers, Heleniak explains. Norwich Packers is known for yield on its wholesale rail and vacuum-packaged primals, just as the Norpac brand name is known for quality by consumers even in large centres like Toronto, London, Hamilton and Kitchener. Together, the feeding and processing protocols create a differentiated product that would be very difficult for large-scale plants to duplicate. The dry-age program, introduced last year, has taken off in a huge way with sales increasing nearly 700 per cent in the first half of 2013. This method of aging beef was used extensively before the advent of vacuum packaging, which allows beef to continue the aging process after boxing. Norpac’s dry-aged beef is a Canada AAA or Prime loin product aged in a controlled environment at 60 per cent humidity with salt blocks to draw moisture out of the beef. This gives beef a more concentrated flavour and drier texture than beef processed the traditional way. The “Family Farmed” program has gained quite a following since it started up three years ago with five head a week. Today, 80 head a week are processed for this antibiotic-free, hormone-free program. The www.canadiancattlemen.ca

majority of the young (16- to 18-month) cattle in this program are purchased directly from local farms, which again helps hit the tenderness target because the cattle haven’t been environmentally challenged in any way during their lifetimes, Heleniak explains. All of the cattle must be breed, age and source verified to be certified and selected for this program.

“As a family business we take caring about beef to heart and don’t treat the animals simply as numbers .” Matthew Heleniak Norwich Packers

Diversification through the 1990s saw the introduction of value-added lines including Canada A, AA, and AAA ground beef patties, sausages, franks and portioning steaks at the plant for high-end restaurants and frozen box steaks for retail customers and small grocery stores. Toronto’s strong ethnic market takes all the offal products the plant can supply. The company has steered away from processing over-30-month cattle because of the significant amount of byproduct now classified as SRM in this class of ani-

mal. Since Canada’s enhanced feed ban was introduced in 2007, packers have had to pay renderers to handle processing waste. While the company’s reputation and word of mouth has always been the foundation of its marketing program, the Heleniaks can’t rest on laurels as their beef pledge reminds them each working day. “Norpac beef pledges to remain the premier choice for the highest-quality beef products in the province. We treat our customers as we do our family: with honesty and integrity. We pledge to uphold the highest standards in cattle husbandry, procurement and processing, while maintaining the unwavering level of safety and quality you have come to expect from the Norpac brand.” Heleniak is proud to say Norwich Packers is still very much a family business with himself and his two uncles, Ron and Stan, managing the day-to-day operations, while his grandmother, Mary, still checks in from time to time. The company also counts itself fortunate to have an excellent and loyal workforce, with more than half of its people having been with them for more than 15 years. Norwich is in a rural area with a strong manufacturing base, largely in the automotive industry, which makes the cost of doing business higher than in Toronto. The labour force is getting tighter, but it does help that the old trade as a butcher is making a comeback so people are interested in learning the skills. Norwich Packers operates as a provincially licensed plant and is proud to have one of the highest provincial ratings for any existing Ontario beef plant as well as an HACCP (hazard and critical control point) program to ensure food safety. Grading is contracted to the Canadian Beef Grading Agency. Heleniak says they are often asked why the plant doesn’t go federal, which would allow its products to be exported to other provinces and countries. “A big reason is that we sell all our beef within Ontario and there is still room for expansion here. We are happy with this size and as busy as can be,” he adds. “As a family business we take caring about beef to heart and don’t treat the animals simply as numbers. We can go the extra mile for quality standards and have the satisfaction of producing a very high-end product.” For more information visit www.norpacbeef.com, or call the office, 1-800265-5410. c

C at t l e m e n · Au g u s t 2 0 1 3

23


 Holistic R a nc hi ng

By Don Campbell

EXTENDING THE GRAZING SEASON

T

here has been a big push to extend the grazing season for the last several years. This has been promoted as a good idea for everyone… no questions asked. As with most things one size doesn’t fit all. Whether it is a good decision or a poor one depends on your situation. Instead of asking, how can I extend the grazing season? A better question might be, how can I increase profit? This example is not meant to give you an answer, only a template you can use to arrive at your own best answer. The only numbers that matter are your numbers. A good place to start might be to look at our grass requirements. To keep this simple and hopefully meaningful we will start with 100 cows weighing 1,200 pounds. We are currently grazing for 180 days. We have decided to extend our grazing season by 30 days. A cow consumes about three per cent of her body weight per day (this is 85 per cent dry matter, roughly the same as hay). • Using these numbers each cow will require: 1,200 x 3 = 36 lbs. per day. • The herd will require: 36 lbs. x 100 hd. = 3,600 lbs. per day. • Thirty days will require: 3,600 lbs. x 30 days = 108,000 lbs. of feed. We now know our feed requirement to extend our grazing for 30 days. The next important question to ask is: What percentage of the feed I have produced will I be able to utilize? For this example I will utilize 50, 75 and 100 per cent (100 per cent implies that I will be able to harvest the same amount I would during the summer grazing season). A utilization rate of 100 per cent means I will need to produce 108,000 pounds of grass. A utilization rate of 75 per cent means I will need to produce 144,000 pounds of grass. And 50 per cent means I will need to produce 216,000 pounds of grass. The grass that is not utilized will become biological capital that improves our land in future years but will not contribute to cash flow in the current year. A good next step might be to do a gross profit calculation. This will show us how things might change when we extend our grazing season. Gross Profit/Cow-Calf

The formula for gross profit is income (per

24

C at t l e m e n · Au g u s t 2 0 1 3

cow) minus variable expenses. A variable expense is one that increases with increased cow numbers. The result of gross profit is dollars to cover overhead which will be constant in the different scenarios.

Strong prices Income: 450-lb. steer @ $1.74 = $783 405-lb. heifer @ $1.57 = $635 $1,418/ 2 = $709 x 90% = $638 per cow Low prices Income: 450-lb. steer @ $1.30 = $585 405-lb. heifer @ $1.17 = $474 $1,059/ 2 = $530 x 90% = $477 per cow

Example 1 values a steer calf at $1.74. This was the average price for 450-lb. steers in Sask. in Nov. 2011. Example 2 values a steer calf at $1.30. This is the average price for 450-lb. steers in Sask. in Nov. (2007 to 2011, Canfax). Heifers are 90 per cent of steer weight and price. variable expense Winter feed

$200

Death loss

$24

Depreciation

$36

Marketing

$30

Breeding

$35

Vet

$30

Salt/mineral

$20

Total

$375

Winter feed: I have used a 1,200-lb. cow eating three per cent of her body weight. Feed requirements will be 36 lbs./hd./day. Example 1 has hay at $60 per ton. The feeding period is 185 days. Depreciation: I have valued a bred heifer or young cow at $1,200. A cull cow is 1,200 lbs. @ $.70 = $840. The depreciation is the difference in price 1,200 - 840 = 360 x 10% = $36 per head. I hope that the rest of the numbers are self-explanatory. I have put summer grazing costs as an overhead. This applies if you own the land. If you rent summer pasture on a per-headper-day basis summer pasture will be a variable expense. Gross Profit equals: Income minus variable expense:

Strong prices $638 - $375 = $263

Low prices $477 - $375 = $102

Extending the grazing season will reduce winter feed costs by $32. (36 lbs. x $.03 x 30 days)

Gross profit with extended grazing will be:

Strong prices $638 - $343 = $295

Low prices $477 - $343 = $134

We now know what extending our grazing season will do for our bottom line. If we are interested in profit we might look at other scenarios for our extra grass production. We know how much grass we need to extend our grazing season. How many more cows would this grass support and how would the increased numbers impact our bottom line? One 1,200-lb. cow plus the average weight of the calf at 250 lbs. grazing 180 days will require: 1,450 lbs. x 3% x 180 days = 7,830 lbs. gross profit per 100 cows Strong prices

Low prices

180-day grazing

$26,300

$10,200

210-day grazing

$29,500

$13,400

13 more cows

$29,719

$11,526

18 more cows

$31,034

$12,036

27 more cows

$33,401

$12,954

To achieve our extended grazing we have produced 108,000, 144,000 or 216,000 more pounds of grass depending on our utilization rate. Knowing that each pair requires 7,830 lbs. of grass we can calculate how many extra cows we could carry. The results will be 13, 18 and 27 more cows (108,000 / 7,830 etc.). Conclusions

1. Extending the grazing season may be a wise decision. This must be figured out on an individual basis. 2. When gross profit is low extending the grazing season is the most profitable choice. 3. When gross profit is higher increasing cow numbers is the most profitable choice. I hope 2013 is a profitable year for your operation. Happy trails. c Don Campbell ranches with his family at Meadow Lake, Sask., and teaches Holistic Management courses. He can be reached at 306-236-6088 or doncampbell@sasktel.net.

www.canadiancattlemen.ca


WHERE BEEF FARMERS MEET ™

The Anderson Family from Anderson Farms Oil Springs, ON

NEW LANE FOR MORE SELECTION CORN STALK CHOPPER DEMOS SPSP • SINGLE PASS SEEDBED PREPARATION NEW FUELS/NEW TRUCKS EXPO CANADIAN ENERGY EXPO • Presented by Faromor Energy Solutions

BALE WRAPPING DEMOS BEEF PAVILION

GROBER YOUNG ANIMAL DEVELOPMENT CENTRE DOZENS OF NEW PRODUCT LAUNCHES MULTI-DAY WRISTBAND

www.OutdoorFarmShow.com

info@outdoorfarmshow.com

@outdoorfarmshow

Canada’s Outdoor Farm Show

1-800-563-5441


 researc h o n t h e r eco r d

By Reynold Bergen

ANTHRAX

A

nthrax is a soil-borne disease that occurs sporadically in Western Canada, especially after floods or during hot, dry weather. Ask your veterinarian whether vaccination is recommended. Anthrax is a reportable disease in Canada. If anthrax is suspected, • DO notify your veterinarian • DO remove surviving animals from the pasture • DO try to prevent scavenging • DO NOT move dead animals • DO NOT call for deadstock pickup • DO follow the veterinarian’s instructions regarding deadstock disposal Cause: When the anthrax bacterium is exposed to air, it forms inactive spores that can survive in the soil for decades. Animals get infected when they consume contaminated soil, feed or water. The spores “germinate” into active bacteria in the animal, and cause death within hours. The bacteria multiply in the carcass, which bloats and decomposes very rapidly. Spores are formed when blood containing anthrax bacteria leaks from body openings and is exposed to air. More spores are formed if the carcass is opened through a post-mortem or scavenging. If the carcass is protected from scavenging and reaches a high temperature, such as under plastic, the bacteria will die off without forming spores. As unburied carcasses decompose, the anthrax bacteria are exposed to air and form spores. Animals crowded into dry spots during a flood may churn the soil and consume spores. Soil erosion can also expose and move anthrax spores. Spores concentrate in low spots when flood waters evaporate and infect cattle that drink standing water. During droughts, animals graze closer to the ground and may consume soil. Contaminated feed and soil excavation can also spread anthrax. Anthrax is most common at 20 C or higher; cases in Western Canada since 1999 have mostly occurred from July through mid-September, and have followed periods of hot and dry or hot and wet weather. Symptoms: Animals may appear weak, feverish or excited, then become depressed, unco-ordinated, have difficulty breathing, and convulse. Animals die very quickly, so dead cattle (perhaps with a bloody discharge) are usually the first sign of anthrax. Disease response: Call your veterinarian. Post-mortems can cause more soil contamination, so the veterinarian will draw a blood sample from a dead animal instead. If the sample tests positive for anthrax, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency will be notified. The provincial Agriculture Department may also be notified. The CFIA no longer investigates, tests, quarantines, vaccinates, or assists with anthrax mortality disposal, but some provinces pay for diagnostic anthrax tests and provide advice on proper disposal and control. Vaccination and treatment: Anthrax is susceptible to most antibiotics, so prompt treatment of animals at the earliest sign of illness should be effective. Antibiotics counteract the vaccine, though. Do not treat animals with antibiotics if they have been vaccinated less than two weeks previously, and do not treat with antibiotics if you plan to vaccinate them within the next two weeks. Deadstock disposal: Proper disposal helps limit the spread and recurrence of anthrax. Follow the advice of a provincial government

26

C at t l e m e n · Au g u s t 2 0 1 3

veterinarian or your private veterinarian when disposing of anthrax carcasses. Wear gloves and long sleeves if it is absolutely necessary to handle or move the carcass. Anthrax does not naturally disperse in the air, so a breathing mask isn’t necessary. Incineration destroys anthrax spores. Your veterinarian can tell you if incineration is legal in your area, recommend the best fuels to use, and the safest way to manage the incineration. Burial: If intact carcasses are buried early, they will decompose naturally and kill the bacteria (but not spores). Do not bury carcasses in flood-prone areas. These areas will flood again, and spores will return to the surface. The bottom of the burial pit should be three feet above the waterline. Natural disposal and deadstock pickup both increase the risk of future anthrax outbreaks by spreading the spores over a wider area. Thoroughly wash your hands and arms when you are done, wash your clothing, and disinfect your boots.

It pays to know the dos and don’ts of dealing with anthrax before you see it for real

Danger to humans: In rare cases, producers or veterinarians handling infected cattle may be infected through a cut or skin abrasion. Symptoms generally appear within seven days of exposure. A raised, itchy bump like an insect bite appears and develops into a painless ulcer (one to three cm in diameter). A black spot appears in the centre within two days, and adjacent lymph glands may swell. Immediately contact your doctor if this occurs. There is about 20 per cent mortality if untreated; mortality is rare if treated with antibiotics. The disease is not known to spread from person to person. Vaccination may be recommended if anthrax has historically occurred in your area, or in an area you purchase hay from. Producers can obtain the vaccine through their veterinarian, who can order it from a supplier. The vaccine costs about $2 per dose. The Beef Research Cluster is funded by the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada to advance research and technology transfer supporting the Canadian beef industry’s vision to be recognized as a preferred supplier of healthy, high-quality beef, cattle and genetics. c Reynold Bergen is the science director for the Beef Cattle Research Council. A portion of the National Checkoff is directed to the BCRC to fund research and development activities to improve the competitiveness and sustainability of Canada’s beef industry.

www.canadiancattlemen.ca


STOCK BUYER’S C FALL FEEDER SALES

AUGUST 2013

SPECIAL PULL-OUT SECTION


PRODUCER LOYALTY PROGRAM

FALL 2013 PROMOTION FROM AUGUST 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 2013

7.5X

YOUR PLP POINTS ON ALL PURCHASES OF DRAXXIN速 IN 250 ML AND 500 ML FORMATS.

Draxxin - The name you can trust to manage calves at risk.

Visit our website for further details. www.plp-cattle.ca

Zoetis and Draxxin are trademarks of Zoetis or its licensors, used under license by Zoetis Canada. PLP JADP03 0713 E

M-1842_CANCAT_PLP_JAD_Draxxin_EN.indd 1

2013-07-17 4:40 PM


BRITISH COLUMBIA

ALBERTA

ABBOTSFORD

BONNYVILLE

McClary Stockyards Ltd.* Box 40, Abbotsford, B.C. V2T 6Z4 Phone: 604-864-2381 • Fax: 604-854-3038 Email: mcclarystockyards@shaw.ca • Website: mcclarystockyards.com Contact: Jono Rushton .............................................................................604-823-2125 Dave Rushton ............................................................................604-823-6692 Regular Sales: Every Mon., 11 a.m. .......................................Slaughter & feeder cattle, sheep & goats Every Wed., 1 p.m. ............................................................................Dairy & beef cattle

Western Pride Auction Co. Ltd.* Box 6587, Bonnyville, Alta. T9N 2H1 Phone: 780-826-2233 • Fax: 780-826-2243 Contact: Marc Jubinville...........................................................................780-826-0992 Andy Jubinville ...........................................................................780-645-9593 Robert Gagne .............................................................................780-826-1131 Regular Sales: Every Tues., 10 a.m. Special Sales: Contact for details

Special Sales: Contact for details

BROOKS

ARMSTRONG

Bow Slope Shipping* Box 1299, Brooks, Alta. T1R 1C2 Phone: 403-362-5521 • Fax: 403-362-5541 Email: bowslope@eidnet.org • Website: www.bowslope.com Contact: Manager, Rod MacLean .............................................................403-793-3060 Lachie McKinnon Lowell Johnston Regular Sales: Every Fri., 9 a.m. Special Sales: Fri., Sept. 6, 10 a.m..........................72th Annual Anniversary sale, yearlings & calves Mon., Sept. 16, 1 p.m. ............................................................................ Sheep & goats Wed., Sept. 25, 5:30 p.m. ........................................................................ Horses & tack Oct. 21, 22, 28; Nov. 2, 10 a.m.............................................Red & Black Angus calves Oct. 23, 30; Nov. 2, 10 a.m......................................................... LimoX & CharX calves Oct. 26; Nov. 4, 10 a.m.......................................................................... Rancher calves Nov. 11, 13, 20; Dec. 2, 10 a.m...................................................................All breed calves Nov. 18, 20, 27 ..................................................................................... Bred cows & heifers Internet Sales: Every Thurs. DLMS • www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton)

Valley Auction Ltd.* 903 Raffan Rd., Armstrong, B.C. V0E 1B7 Phone: 250-546-9420 • Fax: 250-546-3399 Email: mail@valleyauction.ca • Website: www.valleyauction.ca Contact: Peter Raffan ..............................................................................250-260-0758 Donald J. Raffan ........................................................................250-558-6789 Regular Sales: Thurs., 11 a.m. ...............................................................................................All breeds Special Sales: Check website for details Internet Sales: Canadian Satellite Livestock Auction www.cslauction.com (see Red Deer)

DAWSON CREEK VJV Dawson Creek Auction 301-116th Ave., Dawson Creek, B.C. V1G 3C9 Phone: 250-782-3766 • Fax: 250-782-6622 Contact: Don Fessler ................................................................................250-719-5561 Regular Sales: Every Thurs., 10 a.m. Special sales: Mon., Sept. 16; Oct. 7, 21, 28; Nov. 18; Dec. 9, 16 ...........................Calves & yearlings Mon., Nov. 4, 25; Dec. 2 .................................................................Bred cows & heifers Sat., Sept. 28.......................................................................................................Horses Internet Sales: Canadian Satellite Livestock Auction www.cslauction.com (see Red Deer)

KAMLOOPS B.C. Livestock Producers Co-operative Association* #1 10145 Dallas Dr., Kamloops, B.C. V2C 6T4 Phone: 250-573-3939 • Fax: 250-573-3170 Email: info@bclivestock.bc.ca • Website: www.bclivestock.bc.ca Contact: Tom Vicars ...............................................................................250-3193-3992 Wilf Smith ..................................................................................250-398-0813 Al Smith .....................................................................................250-570-2143 Larry Jordan ...............................................................................250-319-0872 Wayne Jordan .............................................................................250-319-0873 Regular Sales: Okanagan Falls: Mondays Kamloops: Tuesdays Williams Lake: Thursdays Vanderhoof: Fridays Special Sales: Horse sales/equipment/bred cow & heifers/bull sales Internet Sales: TEAM (The Electronic Auction Market) www.teamauctionsales.com (see Calgary)

LANGLEY Fraser Valley Auctions 21801 – 56th Ave., Langley, B.C. V2Y 2M9 Phone: 604-534-3241 • Fax: 604-534-4770 Email: livestock@fraservalleyauction.com • Website: www.fraservalleyauction.com Contact: Ken Pearson ...............................................................................604-534-3241 Regular Sales: Every Wed., 11 a.m. ................................................................... Cattle Special Sales: Aug. 27; Sept. 17; Oct. 8, 7 p.m. .................................................................... Mixed feeder

CALGARY Calgary Stockyards – Strathmore 1 mile west of Strathmore on Trans Canada Hwy. Phone: 403-934-3344 • Fax: 403-934-4383 Email: info@calgarystockyards.com • Website: www.calgarystockyards.com Contact: Don Danard................................................................................403-234-7429 Bryan Danard.............................................................................403-934-1644 Jason Danard .............................................................................403-519-8916 Will Irvine ...................................................................................403-560-4343 Bill Wilson..................................................................................403-560-5265 Lester Gurnett ............................................................................403-681-3151 Cliff Pahl....................................................................................403-854-1900 Ben Payne ..................................................................................403-633-4175 Jeff Van Wert ..............................................................................403-793-9988 Regular Sales: Thurs., 8 a.m. ................................................................................................All classes Every Wed. starting Nov. 2 to Dec. 14, 11 a.m................................Bred cows & heifers Special Sales: Calf sales every Sat., Oct. 13 to Dec. 1 Internet Sales: TEAM (The Electronic Auction Market) • www.teamauctionsales.com Calgary Stockyards Ltd. #200-5925 12th St. S.E., Calgary, Alta. T2H 2M3 Contact: Jason Danard .............................................................................403-519-8916 Don Danard................................................................................403-234-7429 Bryan Danard.............................................................................403-934-1644 Will Irvine ...................................................................................403-560-4343 Bill Wilson..................................................................................403-560-5265 Lester Gurnett ............................................................................403-681-3151 Cliff Pahl....................................................................................403-854-1900 Ben Payne ..................................................................................403-633-4175 Jeff Van Wert ..............................................................................403-793-9988 TEAM (The Electronic Auction Market) Contact: Jason Danard .............................................................................403-234-7429 Regular Sales: Thurs., 9:30 a.m. MST ..........................................................................Slaughter cattle Fri., 9 a.m. MST .........................................................................................Feeder cattle Real time bidding, picture, pre-approval required for bidding www.teamauctionsales.com


CLYDE

INNISFAIL

Nilsson Bros. Inc. Box 119, Clyde, Alta. T0G 0P0 Phone: 780-348-5893 • Fax: 780-348-5704 Email: jchesher@nbinc.com • Website: www.nbinc.com Contact: Len Hrehorets..............................................................................780-991-6737 Garth Rogers...............................................................................780-349-1491 Purebred & special sales Travis Rogers..............................................................................780-307-3144 Regular Sales: Tues. & Thurs., 9 a.m. Special Sales: Contact for details Internet sales: DLMS • www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton) Contact: Reagan Huculak.........................................................................780-554-4939

Innisfail Auction Mart* 4504 – 42 St., Innisfail, Alta. T4G 1P6 Toll free: 1-800-710-3166 • Phone: 403-227-3166 • Fax: 403-227-2202 Email: iamarket@telus.net • Website: www.innisfailauctionmarket.com Contact: Jack Daines.................................................................................403-227-5113 Danny Daines.............................................................................403-391-0580 Duane Daines.............................................................................403-358-4971 Grant Daines...............................................................................403-350-1519 Kyle Daines............................................................................... 403-598-0311 Regular Sales: Every Wed., 12 noon........................................................................ All classes of cattle Every Mon. in the fall, 10 a.m..............................................................................Calves Bi-weekly..............................................................................................................Horses

Edmonton DLMS #303 13220 St. Albert Trail, Edmonton, Alta. T5L 4W1 Phone: 780-554-4939 • Fax: 780-7324385 Email: rhuculak@dlms.ca • Website: www.dlms.ca Internet Sales: Thurs., 10 a.m. MT– DLMS Direct Off-farm cattle sales Daily (fall, winter & spring) – Live broadcast of presort sales from auction rings across Western Canada. Purebred and Specialty Sales. Pre-approval required for bidding. Participating markets: Assiniboia Livestock Market; Balog Auction Services; Bow Slope Shipping Assoc.; Burnt Lake Livestock Market; Cowtown Livestock Exchange; Highwood Livestock Auction; Fort Macleod Auction; Grande Prairie Livestock Market; Heartland Livestock Services (HLS) Lloydminster; HLS Yorkton; HLS Prince Albert; HLS Swift Current; HLS Moose Jaw; HLS Brandon; HLS Virden; NBI Clyde; NBI Vermilion; Provost Livestock Exchange; Saskatoon Livestock Sales; Weyburn Livestock Exchange.

FORT MACLEOD Southern Alberta Livestock Exchange Box 1330, Fort Macleod, Alta. T0L 0Z0 Phone: 403-553-3315 • Fax: 403-553-4264 Email: darren@livestock.ab.ca • Website: www.livestock.ab.ca Contact: Darren Shaw...............................................................................403-601-5165 Justin Keeley...............................................................................403-627-6534 Dan McDougall...........................................................................403-634-0604 Allan Lively.................................................................................403-627-7776 Sheep/ hog Blaine Kellington.........................................................................................403-312-1279 Regular Sales: Every Tues., 9 a.m....................................................................................... Mixed cattle Every Thurs., Oct. & Nov., 10 a.m.........................................................................Calves Internet sales: DLMS • www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton)

Grande Prairie Grande Prairie Livestock Market 14809 – 100 St., Grande Prairie, Alta. T8V 7C2 Phone: 780-532-3949 • Fax: 780-532-2211 Website: www.gplmcattle.com Contact: Marty Gilfillan.............................................................................780-831-4399 Ralph Calder...............................................................................780-518-5586 Regular Sales: Every Wed. Special sales: See our website or a calendar from the GPLM Internet sales: DLMS • www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton)

HIGH RIVER Southern Alberta Livestock Exchange Box 5145, High River, Alta. T1V 1M3 Phone: 403-652-3343 • Fax: 403-652-3446 Email: darren@livestock.ab.ca • Website: www.livestock.ab.ca Contact: Darren Shaw...............................................................................403-601-5165 Allan Lively.................................................................................403-627-7776 Justin Keeley...............................................................................403-627-6534 Sheep & hogs Blaine Kellington........................................................................403-312-1279 Regular Sales: Every Wed., 9 a.m........................................................................................ Mixed cattle Fri., Oct. & Nov., 10 a.m........................................................................................ Calves Internet sales: DLMS • www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton)

LETHBRIDGE Balog Auction Services Inc. Box 786, Lethbridge, Alta. T1J 3Z6 Toll free 877-320-1988 • Phone: 403-320-1980 • Fax: 403-320-2660 Email: sold@balogauction.com • Website: www.balogauction.com Contact: R.C. (Bob) Balog.........................................................................403-382-5727 Louis Balog.................................................................................403-331-0611 Brad Balog..................................................................................403-642-7444 Mark Lenz...................................................................................403-330-7600 Andy Carrol.................................................................................403-308-9493 Ron Reid.....................................................................................403-625-0233 Jason Aman................................................................................306-948-2019
 Calm Ramsay.............................................................................306-398-7343 Regular Sales: Every Wed., 10:30 a.m........................................................................ Finished cows & bulls 1 p.m................................................................................................... Special yearlings Special Sales: Fri., Aug. 16, 1:30 p.m..................... The Fall Roundup Brand of Excellence video cattle ..........................................................sale feat. yearlings & calves – Balog Cow Palace Every Fri., Sept. 27 to Dec. 20, 10:30 a.m. ............................................ Rancher calves Tues., Oct. 22; Nov. 5 10:30 a.m........................................British breed rancher calves Tues., Oct. 29, 10:30 a.m..................................................... Angus appreciation calves Fri., Oct. 25, 10:30 a.m.........................................Angus and Charolais rancher calves Fri., Nov. 1, 10:30 a.m.................................................................. Angus rancher calves Every Mon., Nov. 4 to Dec. 16, 1 p.m....................................... Stock cow & bred heifers Perlich Bros Auction Market Ltd. Box 1057, Lethbridge, Alta. T1J 4A2 Phone: 403-329-3101 • Fax: 403-327-2288 Email: auction@perlich.com • Website: www.perlich.com Contact: Bob Perlich.................................................................................403-382-7800 Darcy Moorhead..........................................................................403-635-0308 John Perlich................................................................................403-331-9911 Ken Lidberg.................................................................................403-382-8189 Regular Sales: Thurs., 10:30 a.m..................................................................................Slaughter cattle Thurs., 12:30 a.m.................................................................................... Yearling cattle Special Sales: Every Mon. & Wed., Oct. to Dec., 10 a.m................................................ Rancher calves Every Sat., Oct. 12 to Nov. 16 .................................................................. Presort calves Every Tues., Fri., Sat. Nov. to Dec., 1 p.m. ...........................Stock cow and bred heifers

MEDICINE HAT Medicine Hat Feeding Co.* 3381 Gershaw Dr. S.W., Medicine Hat, Alta. T1B 3N2 Toll free 1-800-452-3129 • Phone: 403-526-3129 • Fax: 403-528-9355 Website: www.mhfc.ca Contact: Lyle Taylor...................................................................................403-528-0797 Nolan Herman.............................................................................403-502-6417 Regular Sales: Every Wed., 9:30 a.m. Special Sales: Fri., Aug. 16, 23, 30; Sept. 6, 9 a.m.....................................................Presort yearlings Mon., Oct. 21, 28; Nov. 4, 11, ......................................................................................... Wed., Oct. 23, 30; Nov. 6, Fri., Oct. 25; Nov. 1, 8, 15, 22, 10 a.m............. Presort calves Wed., Nov. 20, 27; Dec. 4, 11, 18, 1 p.m.........................................Bred cows & heifers Mon., Nov. 25, 1 p.m........................................................Stryker purebred Black Angus ........................................................................................................... female dispersals


OLDS Olds Auction Mart Ltd.* 4613 – 54 St., Olds, Alta. T4H 1E9 Phone: 403-556-3655 • Fax: 403-556-2688 Website: www.oldsauction.com Contact: Dan Rosehill...............................................................................403-556-4458 Jim Crawford...............................................................................403-556-4457 Greg Sanderson..........................................................................403-559-7204 Joel Waddell................................................................................403-512-6151 Tyler Rosehill...............................................................................403-507-1782 Patrick Cassidy...........................................................................403-559-7202 Regular Sales: Every Tues., 9 a.m. ........................................................................................All classes Special Sales: Every Fri., Sept. to Dec., 10 a.m..............................................Presort calves (load lots) Every Fri., Dec. to Apr., 2014, 10 a.m...........................................Preconditioned calves Every Tues., Oct. to Dec., 1 p.m....................................... Bred heifers & cow dispersals

PICTURE BUTTE Picture Butte Auction Market 2001 Ltd.* Box 6, Picture Butte, Alta. T0K 1V0 Phone: 403-732-4400 • Fax: 403-732-4405 Website: www.picturebutteauction.ca • Email: operations@picturebutteauction.ca Contact: Erik.............................................................................................403-308-6662 Steven.........................................................................................403-715-9305 Regular Sales: Tues., 10:30 a.m....................................................................................................Cattle Sat., 11 a.m.................................................................................................All livestock Special sales: 10:30 a.m. Tues., Aug. 20; Sept. 10...................................................................................Yearlings Tues., Oct. 22, 29; Nov. 5, 12 and every Sat. in Oct./Nov......................................Calves

Ponoka Vold, Jones and Vold Auction Co. Ltd.* 4410 Hwy. 2A, Ponoka, Alta. T4J 1J8 Phone: 403-783-5561 • Fax: 403-783-4120 Email: office@vjvauction.com • Website: www.vjvauction.com Contact: Mike Brennan.............................................................................403-783-1074 Neil Campbell.............................................................................780-814-4113 Trevor Duke.................................................................................403-740-5753 Donny Fessler..............................................................................250-719-5561 Mel Heintz...................................................................................780-922-3449 Mitch Hettler...............................................................................403-302-0681 Craig Jacklin...............................................................................403-783-1453 Ron Kramer.................................................................................250-827-3245 Doug Lamoureux.........................................................................403-392-4317 Harry Makkinga(dairy)..................................................................403-783-1274 Stan Skeels.................................................................................403-704-0288 Nansen Vold................................................................................403-783-0349 Andrew Wildeboer.......................................................................780-348-9358 Trapper Green.............................................................................780-837-0171 Regular Sales: Every Wed. 8:30 a.m........................................................................ Butcher cows/bulls (rings 1, 2) 9 a.m....................................................................................Stockers & feeders (ring 1) 11 a.m............................................... Canadian Satellite Livestock Auction followed by ..................................................................... Canadian Gold Show Alley with live online ..........................................................................bidding (ring 1);Hay & straw (outside); 12 noon..............................................................Dairy cows/baby calves, hogs (ring 3); 2 p.m...............................................................Bred cows & heifers, cow-calf pairs (ring 2) Special Sales: Sat., Oct.12................ Calf/yearling sale feat. Speckle Park, Charolais and Simmental Sat., Oct. 26............... Calf/yearling sale feat. Angus, Limousin, Simmental, Charolais Sat., Nov. 16, 30; Dec. 14..................................................................Bred cow & heifers Sat., Nov. 30, 10 a.m........................................................................Purebred Gelbviehs Internet Sales: Canadian Satellite Livestock Auction www.cslauction.com (see Red Deer)

PROVOST Provost Livestock Exchange* Box 808, Provost, Alta. T0B 3S0 Phone: 780-753-2369 • Fax: 780-753-2493

Email: plec@plecattle.com • Website: www.plecattle.com Contact: Jerry Hewson...............................................................................306-753-7788 Dean Lawes................................................................................780-753-0803 Jack Lawes..................................................................................780-753-0813 Darcy Lakevold...........................................................................780-753-8669 Wayne Black...............................................................................403-578-4640 Regular Sales: Every Fri., 9 a.m...................................... Butcher cows & bulls, yearlings & reputation .......................................................................... stocker calves (presort cattle sell first) Special Sales: Every Mon., Oct. 21 to Nov. 25, 9 a.m.................Presort live broadcast all breed calves Mon., Oct. 28; Nov. 11 ..........................Black & Red Angus, Limosin X calves featured Wed., Nov. 13, 20, 27; Dec. 4, 11, 18 ................................... Bred heifers & stock cows Internet Sales: DLMS • www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton)

RED DEER Burnt Lake Livestock Mart 131A-28042, Hwy 11, Red Deer, Alta. T4S 2L4 Phone: 403-347-6100 • Fax: 403-340-3560 Website: www.burntlakelivestock.com • Email: kduncan@burntlakelivestock.com Contact: Mel Glencross.............................................................................403-358-9442 Ken Buckland.............................................................................403-350-0889 Regular Sales: Every Thurs., 9 a.m.................................................................Slaughter 10 a.m......................................................................................... Feeder cattle & calves Special Sales: 10 a.m. Aug. 22, 29; Sept. 5, 12, 19.............................................................................Yearlings Sept. 6........................................................................................Ace of Clubs horse sale Sept. 26.................................................................................................Calf & yearlings Oct. 3, 24; Nov. 7................................................................................... Angus influence Oct. 10, 17, 31............................................................Charolais &Simmental influence Nov. 7........................................................................................ British influence calves Nov. 14, 21............................................................................................ All breed calves Nov. 14, Dec. 5..................................................................................Bred cow & heifers Internet Sales: DLMS • www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton) Canadian Satellite Livestock Auction Box 26005, Red Deer, Alta. T4N 6X7 Phone: 403-346-8365 • Fax: 340-2019 Email: csla@cslauction.com • Website: www.cslauction.com Canadian Satellite Livestock Auction now offers a total internet service, in association with OnLine Ringman, the largest Internet auction company. Live sales are broadcast every Wednesday at 11 a.m. on www.cslauction.com featuring live video with internet bidding on the cattle as well as phone-in bidding. Live Auctioneer, Live Video, Real-Time Bidding. Call for details on bull sales or farm sales.


RIMBEY Sekura Livestock Ltd./Rimbey* Box 680, Rimbey, Alta. T0C 2J0 Phone: 403-843-2439 • Fax: 403-843-3485 Email: jeffram@live.ca • Website: www.sekuraauctions.com Contact: Jeff Fritz......................................................................................780-203-4953 Mack Vars...................................................................................780-898-5604 Barry Neumeier...........................................................................403-350-8222 Regular Sales: Every Tues., 9 a.m.......................................... All classes with feeders first after Aug. 1 . .............................................................................followed but butcher cows and bulls Special Sales: Every Thurs., Oct. 24 to Nov. 28, 10 a.m. ....................................................Fall feeders Oct. 24; Nov. 21..........................................................................Angus influence calves Oct. 26; Nov. 9, 30; Dec. 14, 12 noon............................................................. Bred cows Internet Sales: TEAM (The Electronic Auction Market) www.teamauctionsales.com (see Calgary) Contact: Mack Vars or Jeff Fritz

STAVELY VJV Foothills Livestock Auction Stavely Box 10, Stavely, Alta. T0L 1Z0 Toll free 877-549-2121 • Phone: 403-549-2120 • Fax: 403-549-2253 Email: foothillsoffice@vjvauction.com • Website: www.vjvfoothillsauction.com Contact: Rob Bergevin..............................................................................403-625-7171 Kim Cochlin................................................................................403-625-1035 Lorne Depaoli..............................................................................403-652-0344 Steve Schlaht..............................................................................403-485-8348 Regular Sales: Every Fri., 9 a.m. ............................................. Slaughter cattle, feeder cattle to follow Special Sales: Every Mon., through out Oct. & Nov...................................................Contact for details

Internet sales: Canadian Satellite Livestock Auction www.cslauction.com (see Red Deer)

STETTLER Stettler Auction Mart (1990) Ltd.* Box 1238, Stettler, Alta. T0C 2L0 Phone: 403-742-2368 • Fax: 403-742-8151 Email: sam1990@telusplanet.net • Website: www.stettlerauction.ab.ca Contact: Jim Abel......................................................................................403-740-9609 Greg Hayden...............................................................................403-740-9610 Brad Lohr....................................................................................780-679-5500 Dick Creasey...............................................................................403-740-9434 Regular Sales: Every Tues., 9 a.m................................................................................................. Mixed Fri., 10 a.m..................................................................................Special calf/bred cows Special Sales: Aug. 13, 27; Sept. 3, 17...........................................................................Yearling feeder Sept. 24; Oct. 4, 11, 18, 25; Nov. 8..........................Presorted calves, single owner lots Oct. 11; Nov. 1................................................................................Angus/British calves Oct. 26; Nov. 15, 22, 29; Dec. 7, 14, 21...........................................Bred cows & heifers Nov. 1....................................................................................................Limousin calves Nov. 5............................................................................. Charolais & Simmental calves Dec. 3, 10.....................................................................................Preconditioned calves All cattle scanned. Watch for age verified sales Internet Sales: www.stettlerauction.ab.ca

THORSBY Thorsby Auction Mart Ltd.* Box 379, Thorsby, Alta. T0C 2P0 Phone/Fax: 780-789-3915 Contact: Harley Steinke (Res.)..................................................................780-986-1097 (Cell)...........................................................................................780-991-6307 Regular Sales: Every Mon. at 12 noon............................................................. All breed mixed livestock 1st Thurs. of the month, 6 p.m.............................................................................Horses Special Sales: Bred cow, heifer & bull sales to be announced — contact for details

VERMILION Nilsson Bros. Livestock Exchange Box 3300, Vermilion, Alta. T9X 2B2 Phone: 780-853-5372 • Fax: 780-853-2521 Email: vermilion@nbinc.com • Website: www.nbinc.com Contact: Rusty Stalwick............................................................................780-853-7669 Jim Pulyk.....................................................................................780-853-0626 Bob Foxwell.................................................................................780-842-0410 Les Trach....................................................................................780-645-0939 Harvey Trach...............................................................................780-645-5172 Pat Lawerence............................................................................780-826-2655 Steiger Stalwick..........................................................................780-853-7946 Dave Crittal...................................................................... 306-344-2188/2184 Ryan Noble..................................................................................306-839-7949 Roland Goertz ............................................................................780-656-0506 Regular Sales: Every Wed., 9 a.m..........................................................................Butcher cows & bulls 12 noon.........................................................................................Presort Internet sales Special Sales: Sat., Oct. 19; Nov. 2, 10 a.m............................ Angus influence presort Internet calves Sat., Oct. 27, 10 a.m............................................Exotic cross presort Internet calves Mon., Nov. 18, 12 p.m............................................Transcon Simmental Herd Dispersal Sat., Nov. 23, 30; Dec. 7, 12 noon........................................................Bred cow/heifers Mon., Dec. 2, 12 noon........................................................Westman Farms bred heifers Mon., Dec. 9, 12 noon....................................................................Y-Coulee bred heifers Sat., Dec. 14, 12 noon................................................... Bred cows (open consignment) Mon., Dec.16, 12 noon................................................ Bred heifers (open consignment) Internet Sales: DLMS • www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton)

VETERAN Dryland Cattle Trading Corp. Box 615, Veteran, Alta. T0C 2S0 Phone: 403-575-3772 • Fax: 403-575-3935 Email: office@drylandcattle.com • Website: www.drylandcattle.com


Contact: Ian Goodbrand ...........................................................................780-753-1515 Graham Schetzsle......................................................................403-575-4001 Bob Wills....................................................................................403-575-1108 Kirk Goldsmith ...........................................................................403-575-5654 Kurt Cole ....................................................................................403-575-5388 Regular Sales: Every Mon. ...................................................................Slaughter cows & bulls, feeders Special Sales: Please check our website for dates for feeder calf, bred cow & bred heifer sales

VIKING Viking Auction Market Ltd. Box 100, Viking, Alta. T0B 4N0 Phone: 780-336-2209 • Fax: 780-336-2278 Email: vikauc@gmail.com • Website: www.vikingauctionmarket.ca Contact: Cliff Grinde ................................................................................780-336-6333 Darcy Sheets ..............................................................................780-336-6485 Allen Stefiuk...............................................................................780-632-8701 Garry Zimmer .............................................................................780-889-3793 Robert Kunnick ..........................................................................780-336-6301 Garry Zimmer .............................................................................780-889-3793 Regular Sales: Every Tues., 9 a.m ................................................................................................Cattle

WESTLOCK Sekura Livestock/Triple J 9004 – 110 A St., Westlock, Alta. T7P 2N4 Phone: 780-349-3153 • Fax: 780-349-5466 Email: kenjjj@live.ca • Website: www.triplejlivestock.com Contact: Ken Assenheimer Ivan Potts ...................................................................................780-349-1270 Bob Scott ...................................................................................780-689-9203 Trent Ewasiw..............................................................................780-349-0239 Hank Stach ................................................................................780-898-3733 Wade Schaupmeyer ...................................................................780-305-4104 Wade Meakin ........................................................................... 780–349–1650 Regular Sales: Every Fri., 9 a.m. Every 2nd & 4th Wed., 11 a.m. ............................................................... Sheep & goats Every 3rd Sat., 10 a.m. ........................................................................................Horses Special Sales: Check our website for details

SASKATCHEWAN ALAMEDA Alameda Auction Market Box 370, Alameda, Sask. S0C 0A0 Phone: 306-489-2221 • Fax: 306-489-2238 Website: www.naslivestock.com Contact: Brad Knutson .............................................................................306-594-7637 Regular Sales: 10 a.m. starting Mon., Aug. 19 Call or check the website for dates on yearling, presort calf and bred cow sales

ASSINIBOIA Assiniboia Livestock Auction* Box 1328, Assiniboia, Sask. S0H 0B0 Phone: 306-642-5358 • Fax: 306-642-4549 Email: ala@assiniboiaauction.com • Website: www.assiniboiaauction.com Contact: Roy Rutledge Ryan Rutledge Rene Boutin Chris Hannah Regular Sales: Every 2nd Wed. starting Oct. 9 to Dec. 18 Special Sales: Mon., Aug. 19.............................................................................................. Yearlings Sat., Dec. 1, 8, 15, 22 .......................................................................... Bred cow/heifers Internet sales: 11 a.m. (Pre-approval required for bidding) Sat., Oct. 26; Nov. 23, ......................................... Presorted Angus & Hereford calves Sat., Oct. 19; Nov. 2, 9, 16 ....................................... Presorted Angus/AngusX calves Tues., Oct. 22; Nov. 12, 19 ..................Presorted CharX & Red AngusX calf/yearlings Tues., Oct. 29; Nov. 5 .....................................Presorted CharX or Red AngusX calves Tues., Dec. 3, 10 ..............................................Presorted all breeds calf/yearlings Internet Sales: DLMS • www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton)

GLENAVON Candiac Auction Mart Box 39, Glenavon, Sask. S0G 1Y0 Phone: 306-424-2967 • Fax: 306-424-2097 Contact: Kevin Czerwonka........................................................................306-539-4090 Janet Czerwonka ........................................................................306-539-0165 Brad Stenberg............................................................................306-551-9411 Regular Sales: Every Fri., 10 a.m. Special Sales: Contact for details

KELVINGTON Kelvington Stockyards Box 640, Kelvington, Sask. S0A 1W0 Phone: 306-327-4642 • Fax: 306-327-4311 Contact: Clint Peterson ............................................................................306-327-4642 Gary Rudychuk ...........................................................................306-865-7448 Special Sales: Contact for details

LEROSS Parkland Livestock Market* Box 250, Kelliher, Sask. S0A 1V0 Phone: 306-675-2077 • Fax: 306-675-2033 Email: parklandlivestockmarket@sasktel.net website: www.parklandlivestockmarket.com Contact: Brian Murry ................................................................................306-621-1239 Robert Ross ...............................................................................306-795-7387 Regular Sales: Every Thurs., Aug. 22 to Dec. 12, 10 a.m. .......................................Slaughter cows & bulls, ..................................................................................................................feeder cattle & calves Special Sales: Aug. 22, 29; Sept. 5, 12, 19, 26 .....................................................Off grass yearlings & calves Thurs. Oct., 31; Nov. 7, 21; Dec. 5 ...................... Red & Black Angus influence calves Sat., Nov. 2, 16, 30; Dec. 14 .............................................................Bred cow & heifers

LLOYDMINSTER Heartland Livestock Services Box 930, Lloydminster, Sask. S9V 1C4 Phone: 306-825-8831 • Fax: 306-825-7713 Email: lloydminster.lmc@hls.ca or rcopeland@his.ca • Website: www.hls.ca Contact: Russ Copeland...........................................................................780-808-6548 Wayne Woodman ........................................................................306-821-6310 Doug Health ...............................................................................306-821-6668 Regular Sales: Every Thurs., 9 a.m. Special Sales: Every Wed. 8:30 a.m.,Oct. 2 to Dec. 18 ...........................................Presort calves Wed. Oct. 23; Nov. 20; Dec. 18, 8:30 ................................ Black and Red Angus ..............................................................................................influence calves Mon., Nov. 4, 8:30 a.m. ...................... Special annual presort Black & Red Angus Every Thurs., 10 a.m....................................................................Off farm Internet sale Internet Sales: DLMS • www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton)

MANKOTA Mankota Stockmen’s Weigh Co. Ltd.* Box 248, Mankota, Sask. S0H 2W0 Phone: 306-478-2229 • Fax: 306-478-2443 Email: mankotastockmens@sasktel.net • Website: www.mankotastockmens.com Contact: John Williamson .........................................................................306-478-2433 Ev Chanig ..................................................................................306-478-2229 Special Sales: 12 noon Sept. 6 ...................................................................................All classes feat. yearlings Oct. 4.................................................................................................. Special yearlings Oct. 11.........................................................................................All classes/yearlings & calves Oct. 18..............................................................Canadian Angus rancher endorsed calves Oct. 25............................................................ Red Angus, Hereford & Charolais calves Nov. 1 ....................................................................................................... Angus calves Nov. 8 ..................................................................................................All breeds calves Nov. 22 ..........................................................................................................All classes Nov. 29 ............................................................................................. Subject to booking Dec. 6 .........................................24th annual select bred heifer, open replacements & ...........................................................................................................long yearling bull Dec. 10 ......................................................................................Scott Cowie bred heifer Dec. 13 ................................................................. All classes with bred cows & heifers


MAPLE CREEK

PRINCE ALBERT

Cowtown Livestock Exchange Inc.* Box 730, Maple Creek, Sask. S0N 1N0 Toll free 1-800-239-5933 • Phone: 306-662-2648 • Fax: 306-662-2615 Email: cowtown.ls@sasktel.net • Website: www.cowtownlivestock.ca Contact: Wayne Bowyer.............................................................................306-662-2648 Gordie Cameron..........................................................................306-622-2234 Rocky Houff.................................................................................403-527-0352 Darvin Mason.............................................................................306-662-8218 Regular Sales: Tues., Aug. 6 to Oct. 15 & Nov. 12 to Dec. 17, 11 a.m. Special Sales: Thurs. Aug. 22, 29; Sept. 5, 12......................................................... Presorted yearlings Tues., Sept. 24; Nov. 12.........................................Off-truck yearlings with regular sale Sat., Oct. 19; Nov. 16................................................................ Presort all breed calves Tues., Oct. 22 & Thurs., Oct. 24..................................................... Presort Angus calves Sat, Oct. 26................................................................. Presort Angus & Hereford calves Mon., Oct. 28............................................................Presort Charolais & Simmental calves Thurs., Oct. 31; Tues., Nov. 5..................................Presort all breed calves feat. Angus Sat., Nov. 2; Thurs., Nov. 7...................Presort all breed calves feat. Angus & Hereford Tues., Nov. 19, 26; Dec. 3, 10, 17....................... Regular sale with bred cows & heifers Thurs., Nov. 21, Nov. 28;..................................................................Bred cows & heifers Thurs., Dec. 5.................................................................Money in the bank bred heifers Sat., Dec. 7......................................Presort freshly-weaned & preconditioned calves Thurs., Dec. 12......................................................... Cowtown cowmaker bred heifers

Heartland Livestock Services Box 186, Prince Albert, Sask. S6V 5R5 Phone: 306-763-8463 • Fax: 306-763-4620 Email: prince.albert.lmc@hls.ca • Website: www.hls.ca Contact: Glen Smith..................................................................................306-960-4732 Regular Sales: Every Tues. and Thurs. 8:30 a.m. Special Sales: Check our website for the fall schedule

Internet Sales: DLMS • www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton)

Meadow lake Meadow Lake Livestock Sales Ltd. Box 130, Meadow Lake, Sask. S9X 1Y1 Phone: 306-236-3411 • Fax: 306-236-3412 Email: mlstockyards@sasktel.net • Website: www.mlstockyards.com Contact: Brent Brooks...............................................................................306-240-5340 Blair Brooks................................................................................306-240-9883 Boyd Stuart.................................................................................306-841-7998 Regular Sales: Mon., 9:30 a.m......................................................................................Calf & yearlings Thurs., 11 a.m.............................................................Presort Internet sale from Oct. 4. Fri., 12 noon.............................................................................. Bred cows from Nov. 30 Fri., 5:30 p.m...............................................................Horses (check website for dates) Internet sales: TEAM (The Electronic Auction Market) www.teamauctionsales.com (see Calgary)

MOOSE JAW Heartland Livestock Services Box 608, Moose Jaw, Sask. S6H 4P4 Phone: 306-692-2385 • Fax: 306-692-7996 Email: mjaw.lmc@hls.ca Contact: Grant Barnett......................................................................................631-0410 Tyler Cronkhite....................................................................................630-6846 Jerrad Schollar....................................................................................630-4059 Regular Sales: Thurs. starting Sept. 19 (after the presort sale) Special Sales: 9:30 a.m. Mon., Aug. 19, 26...........................................................................Off truck yearlings Tues., Sept. 3. 10,.....................................................................................Off truck yearlings Tues., Sept. 24....................................................................... Presort yearlings & calves Tues., Oct. 1, 15; Nov. 26; Dec. 3, 10, 17............................................... All breed calves Tues., Oct 22; Nov. 5, 19.................................................... Black and Red Angus calves Thurs., Oct 24, 31; Nov. 7, 14, 21, 28.................................................... All breed calves Tues., Oct. 29 ...........................................................................Charolais extravaganza Tues., Nov. 12................................................................. Charolais & Simmental calves Internet sales: DLMS • www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton) Johnstone Auction Mart Ltd.* Box 818, Moose Jaw, Sask. S6H 4P5 Phone: 306-693-4715 • Fax: 306-691-6650 Email: info@johnstoneauction.ca Website: www.johnstoneauction.ca Contact: Scott Johnstone..........................................................................306-631-0767 Wayne Johnstone........................................................................306-631-7709 Corey Mantell..............................................................................306-631-1888 Regular Sales: Every Sat......................................... All breeds bred cows/heifers/pairs

Saskatoon Saskatoon Livestock Sales Ltd.* Box 60, Saskatoon, Sask. S7K 3K1 Phone: 306-382-8088 • Fax: 306-382-8319 Email: sls@yourlink.ca • Website: www.saskatoonlivestocksales.com Contact: Michael Fleury.....................................222-9526 Harvey Welter......................................227-8684 Alvin Busby.........................................221-0905 Regular Sales: Every Mon., Tues., Wed., 9 a.m.......................................................................All classes Special Sales: Sat., Nov. 2, 23, 10 a.m.................................................... Presorted all breed calf sales Mon., Nov 4, 18; Dec. 2, 9 a.m........................................Calf sales featuring Angus calves Fri., Nov. 8; Dec. 13; Thurs. Dec. 19, 12 noon..................................Bred cows & heifers Purebred bull & female sales(refer to our website) Internet Sales: DLMS • www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton) TEAM (The Electronic Auction Market) • www.teamauctionsales.com (see Calgary)

SHAUNAVON Shaunavon Livestock Sales (88) Ltd. Box 1419, Shaunavon, Sask. S0N 2M0 Phone: 306-297-2457 • Fax: 306-297-2371 Contact: Ralph Oberle............................................................................. 306-297-2304 Kelly Oberle............................................................................306-297-3430 Regular Sales: Usually Mon. at least one per month, 12 noon...............................Contact for details Fall Sales: Contact for details Special Sales: Fall sorted calf sales & bred sales............................Contact for details

SPIRITWOOD Spiritwood Stockyards (1984) Ltd.* Box 160, Spiritwood, Sask. S0J 2M0 Phone: 306-883-2168 • Fax: 306-883-3913 Email: ssy@sasktel.net • Website: www.spiritwoodstockyards.ca Contact: Brian Jacobson...........................................................................306-883-7375 Fred Walter.................................................................................306-883-7368 Regular Sales: Every Wed., 9 a.m. on real-time Internet (includes individual producer presort show pens) Special Sales: Fri., 1 p.m. as needed (bed cows, pairs, herd dispersals, purebreds etc.) Internet Sales: TEAM (The Electronic Auction Market) www.teamauctionsales.com (see Calgary)

swifT Current Heartland Livestock Services Box 367, Swift Current, Sask. S9H 3V8 Phone: 306-773-3174 • Fax: 306-773-8570 Email: swift.current.lmc@hls.ca Contact: Lee Crowley.................................................................................306-741-5701 Richard Gallinger.......................................................................306-741-5701 Jim Jeffrey...................................................................................306-741-8331 Donnie Peacock..........................................................................306-662-8288 Regular Sales: Every Tues., 9 a.m................... All classes of feeder & Slaughter cattle Special Sales: Tues., Aug. 20, 9 a.m..........................................Off-truck yearlings Thurs., Sept. 5, 9:30 a.m..........................................................Off-truck yearlings Fri., Sept. 15, 1 p.m..............................................................Horse sale (tentative) Thurs., Oct. 10, 9:30 a.m........................................Sorted all breed calves feat. Angus Thurs., Oct. 17, 9:30.................................................... Sorted all breeds feat. Charolais Sat., Oct. 19; Nov. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, 9:30................ Sorted Black and Red Angus calves Thurs., Oct. 24, 9:30 a.m.................................... Sorted Charolais and Gelbvieh calves Sat., Oct. 26, 9:30 a.m.................................................................... Sorted ranch calves


PRODUCER LOYALTY PROGRAM

FALL 2013 PROMOTION FROM AUGUST 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 2013

3X

YOUR PLP POINTS ON ALL PURCHASES ® OF EXCEDE 200

COST EFFECTIVE, LONG LASTING, ONE-DOSE THERAPY EXCEDE 200 – GOES ABOVE AND BEYOND YOUR EXPECTATIONS! Visit our website for further details | www.plp-cattle.ca

Zoetis and Excede 200 are trademarks of Zoetis or its licensors, used under license by Zoetis Canada. PLP JADP05 0713 E

M-1842_CANCAT_PLP_JAD_Excede200_BEEF_EN.indd 1

2013-07-17 4:42 PM


Thurs., Oct. 31, 9:30 a.m......................... All breeds feat. Black and Red Angus calves Thurs., Nov. 7, 9:30 a.m. ........................................All breeds feat. SimmentalX calves Thurs., Nov. 14, 21, 28, 9:30 a.m. ........................................................ All breed calves Tues., Nov. 12, 19, 26, 1 p.m. .......................................................Bred cow and heifers Thurs., Dec. 5, 12, 19, 1 p.m. .......................................................Bred cow and heifers Mon., Dec. 2, 1 p.m. ........................................................................ Six Mile Red Angus Mon., Dec. 9, 1 p.m., ................................................................. Rock solid bred heifers Sat., Dec 7, 14, 9:30 a.m...................................................................... All breed calves Internet sales: Direct Livestock Marketing Systems www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton)

Oct. 2.........................................................................................Angus featured presort Oct. 9; Nov. 6 .......................................................................Charolais featured presort Oct. 23; Nov. 20 ..................................................................Simmental featured presort Oct. 30.....................................................................Rancher’s choice Angus green tag presort Nov. 27 .................................................................................. Hereford featured presort Fri., Nov. 8, 29; Dec. 13 ...................................................................Bred cows & heifers Fri., Sept. 20; Oct. 18; Nov. 22; Dec. 6 ....................... Sheep, lamb & goats at 12 noon, .............................................................................................................horses at 5 p.m. Internet sales: DLMS • www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton)

MANITOBA

TISDALE Edwards Livestock Centre Box 727, Tisdale, Sask. S0E 1T0 Phone: 306-873-5049 • Fax: 306-873-2328 Contact: Bruce Edwards ..........................................................................306-873-5049 Bruce Edwards(Cell) ..................................................................306-873-7779 Bryan Hadland(Cell) ..................................................................306-921-7667 Regular Sales: Assembly for all local auction markets. Contact for details Special Sales: Livestock sales facility available for your elite purebred bull & female sales & commercial stock cow sales. Contact for details

WEYBURN Weyburn Livestock Exchange* Box 1504, Weyburn, Sask. S4H 3N8 Phone: 306-842-4574 • Fax: 306-842-3610 Email: wle@weyburnlivestock.com • Website: www.weyburnlivestock.com Contact: Dean Martins & Roy Rutledge Regular Sales: Every 2nd Wed., Sept. 4 to Dec. 11, 9 a.m. ................Cull cows & bulls Special Sales: Mon., Aug. 26; Sept. 16 .......................................... Presorted yearlings Internet sales: (pre-approval required for bidding) Mon., Sept. 30; Nov. 18; Dec. 2, 9, 11 a.m. ........... Presort all breed calves & yearlings Mon., Oct. 7, 28; Nov. 11, 25, 11 a.m. ..............Presort Angus or AngusX calf/yearlings Mon., Oct. 21; Nov. 4, 11 a.m. .... Presort Charolais, Simmental & Xbred calf/yearlings Fri., Nov. 29; Dec. 6, 13, 20 ............................................................Bred cows & heifers Internet Sales: Direct Livestock Marketing Services • www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton)

WHITEWOOD Whitewood Livestock Sales* Box 68, Whitewood, Sask. S0G 5C0 Phone: 306-735-2822 • Fax: 306-735-4284 Website: www.whitewoodlivestock.com Contact: Gene Parks.................................................................................204-729-7118 Rhett Parks ................................................................................306-735-7813 Glen Vargo .................................................................................306-736-7710 Chad Kelly .................................................................................306-735-7810 Regular Sales: Every Tues., 9 a.m. .............................................................................All types of cattle Special Sales: Oct. 8................................................................................... Simmental influence presort Oct. 15, 29; Nov. 12, 26............................................................Angus influence presort Oct. 22.................................................................................Charolais influence presort Nov. 5, 19 ...........................................................................................All breeds presort Nov. 8, 29, Dec. 13, ....................................................................................... Bred cows Dec. 17 ...............................................................................................Last sale of 2013 Visit: www.whitewoodlivestock.com for delivery schedules, market reports & contacts.

YORKTON Heartland Livestock Services Box 490, 107 York Road E., Yorkton, Sask. S3N 2W4 Phone: 306-783-9437 • Fax: 306-782-4110 Email: yorkton.lmc@hls.ca • Website: www.hls.ca Contact: Clayton Hawreluik......................................................................306-621-3824 Harvey Exner ..............................................................................306-621-5486 Brett Callin ................................................................................306-621-5649 Brian Rathgeber ........................................................................306-621-5421 Regular Sales: Wed. Apr. to Sept. 11; Oct. 16 to Nov. 13, 8 a.m. ...................................................All classes Special Sales: Sept. 18, 25; Dec. 4,11, 18, 8 a.m..................................................................All breeds Wed., 10 a.m. .........................................................................................Presort feeders

ASHERN Interlake Cattlemen’s Co-op Assoc. Ltd.* Box 599, Ashern, Man. R0C 0E0 Phone: 204-768-2360 • Fax: 204-768-3690 Email: icca@mymts.net • www.ashernauction.com Contact: Lorne (Buddy) Bergner ...............................................................204-768-2669 Regular Sales: Every Wed. from mid-Aug. to June, 2013, 9 a.m. ..........................All classes of cattle Special Sales: Sat. 11 a.m. .................................................................... Fall feeders Contact for details.

BRANDON Heartland Livestock Services* 329 – 12th Street North, Unit A, Brandon, Man. R7A 7K4 Phone: 204-727-1431 • Fax: 204-727-6520 Email: kcleaver@hls.ca • Website: www.hls.ca Contact: Keith Cleaver (mgr.)...................................................................204-761-0668 Brad Delgaty ..............................................................................204-724-0421 Aurel Vodon ............................................................................... 204-851-0425 Regular Sales: Every Tues., 9 a.m. & Every Thurs., 9 a.m. (Sept. to April, 2014) Special Sales: Internet presort calves Bred cows ............................Contact for details Internet sales: DLMS • www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton)

GLADSTONE Gladstone Auction Mart Ltd.* Box 318, Gladstone, Man. R0J 0T0 Phone: 204-385-2537 • Fax: 204-385-2582 Email: auctmart@mts.net • Website: www.gladstoneauctionmart.com Contact: Gerald McGowan........................................................................204-385-2043 Regular Sales: Every Tues., 9 a.m. Special Sales: Contact for details

GRUNTHAL Grunthal Livestock Auction Mart* Box 71, Grunthal, Man. R0A 0R0 Phone: 204-434-6519 • Fax: 204-434-9367 Email: g_lam@hotmail.ca • Website: www.grunthallivestock.com Contact: Harold Unrau .............................................................................204-871-0250 Regular Sales: Tues., 9 a.m. ................................................................................Cattle Special Sales: Check the website Internet Sales: TEAM Auction Sales • www.teamauctionsales.com (see Calgary)

KILLARNEY Killarney Auction Mart Ltd.* Box 1435, Killarney, Man. R0K 1G0 Phone: 204-523-8477 • Fax: 204-523-8190 www.killarneyauctionmart.com Contact: Allan Munroe..............................................................................204-523-6161 Scott Campbell ..........................................................................204-724-2131 Regular weekly Sales: Mon., 9 a.m. Special Sales: Thurs. ....................................Feeder and bred cow sales as advertised Contact for details

MELITA Taylor Auctions Box 568, Melita, Man. R0M 1L0 Phone: 204-522-3996 • Fax: 204-522-8121


Email: srtaylor@mts.net Contact: Ross Taylor.................................................................................204-522-5356 Brock Taylor ...............................................................................204-522-6396 Regular Sales: Every Thurs., 9 a.m..............................................................Cows, bulls, fats & feeders Special Sales: Bred cow sales as scheduled. ..................................Contact for details

STE. ROSE DU LAC Ste. Rose Auction Mart Ltd.* Box 450, Ste. Rose du Lac, Man. R0L 1S0 Phone: 204-447-2266 • Fax: 204-447-3369 Email: myles@srauction.ca • Website: www.srauction.ca Contact: Myles Masson .......................................................................... 204-447-7054 Regular Sales: Every Thurs., 8 a.m................................................ Feeder calf sales (1,500 – 2,000 head) Special Sales: Nov. 7, 8 a.m. ....................................... Angus influence feeders (1,500 – 2,000 head) Every Thurs. 11 a.m.........................................................Preweighed show listed sales Bred cow and special purebred sales to be listed this fall. Call for details.

VIRDEN Heartland Livestock Services* Box 340, Virden Man. R0M 2C0 Phone: 204-748-2809 • Fax: 204-748-3478 Email: virden.lmc@hls.ca • Website: www.hls.ca Contact: Robin Hill ...................................................................................204-851-5465 Rick Gabrielle ...........................................................................204-851-0613 Brock Taylor ........................................................................... 204- 522-6396 Jim Blackshaw ......................................................................... 204-748-2809 Regular Sales: Every Wed., 9 a.m. .....................................................................................Feeder cattle Every Mon. Oct. 1 to Apr. 28, 2014, 9 a.m. .......................... Butcher cows, bulls & fats Special Sales: Wed., Oct. 2, 9, 23; Nov. 13 ........................................................ All breed presort sales Wed., Oct. 16; Nov. 6, 20 ................................................................ Angus presort sales Wed., Oct., 30 ..............................................................................Charolais presort sale Fri., Oct. 25; Nov. 8, 22, 29; Dec. 6, 13, 20.............................................Bred cow sales Sheep & horse sales: Call for details Jan. to Apr. 2014 ............................................................... Special presort & bred cows Internet sales: DLMS • www.dlms.ca (see Edmonton)

WINNIPEG Winnipeg Livestock Sales Ltd.* Box 13, Group 220, R.R. 2, Winnipeg, Man. R3C 2E6 Phone: 204-694-8328 • Fax: 204-697-4476 Website: www.winnipeglivestocksales.com email: info@winnipeglivestocksales.com Contact: Scott Anderson...........................................................................204-782-6222 Mike Nernberg............................................................................204-807-0747 Jim Christie................................................................................204-771-0753 Regular Sales: Every Fri., 9 a.m. ........................................................................Feeder/slaughter cattle 1st Wed. of the month, 1 p.m. ................................................................ Sheep & goats

ONTARIO NORTHERN CATTLE SALES NETWORK For sale results of the Northern Cattle Sales Network, check our Website at www.northerncattlesales.com for location details and sale results. We are expecting 15,000 head.

HOARD’S STATION Sponsor: Quinte Cattlemen’s Association Contact: Denton Meiklejohn 2530 Spring Brook Road Spring Brook, Ont. K0K 3C0 Email: farmerdenton@yahoo.ca Phone/Fax: 613-395-2008 Sale week: 705-653-3660

Special Sales: Register with www.CattleinMotion.com for on-line bidding Sept. 20, 11 a.m............................................... 700 yearlings/calves, 90% vaccinated Oct. 25, 11 a.m. ............................................... 700 yearlings/calves, 90% vaccinated Nov. 29, 11 a.m. .................................................... 700 head calves, 100% vaccinated Jan. 24, 2014, 11 a.m. ..................................................... 800 head, 100% vaccinated Mar. 14, 2014, 11 a.m. ....................................................... 700 head, 90% vaccinated May. 2, 2014, 11 a.m. ...................................................... 900 head, 100% vaccinated Location: Hoard’s Station Sale Barn, 15 miles north of Belleville, halfway between Stirling and Campbellford on the county road

PETERBOROUGH/ VICTORIA COUNTIES Sponsor: Peterborough-Victoria County Cattlemen’s Association Contact: Wayne Telford 2264 Chemory Road R.R. 1, Peterborough, Ont. K9J 6X2 Phone: 705-292-9531 Sale week: 705-439-4444 Special Sales: Oct. 2, 11 a.m. ...........................................................750 yearlings, 100% vaccinated Nov. 6, 11 a.m. ................................................................... 1,000 head certified calves Nov. 20, 11 a.m. ..................................... 300 yearlings, 400 calves, 100% vaccinated Jan. 15, 2014, 11 a.m. ..................................................... 600 head, 100% vaccinated Mar. 19, 2014, 11 a.m. ..................................................... 600 head, 100% vaccinated May 7, 2014, 11 a.m. .................................................... 1,050 head, 100% vaccinated Location: Kawartha Lakes Co-op (KLC) Sales Barn, County Road #9, Woodville, Ont.

THESSALON Sponsor: Algoma Co-operative Livestock Sales Contact: Dennis Kirby R.R. 2, Iron Bridge, Ont. P0R 1H0 Phone: 705-842-5534 Sale Barn: 705-842-2249 Special Sales: Sept. 17, 10 a.m....................................................................................1,200 yearlings Oct. 19, 10 a.m. ........................................................................................... 400 calves May 3, 2014, 11 a.m. ......................................................................................200 head Location: East of Thessalon, off Highway 17 at Green Lane, at the Stockyards


Wiarton Sponsor: Grey-Bruce Livestock Co-operative Contact: Ron Cunningham 1153 Bruce County Road #9 R.R. 6, Wiarton, Ont. N0H 2T0 Phone: 519-534-2651 Sale day: 519-534-0400 Email: n.cunning@bmts.com Special Sales: Sept. 5, 10 a.m.............................................................................800 – 1,000 yearlings Oct. 24, 10 a.m...................................................................................500 – 600 calves May 3, 2014, 10 a.m............................................................................. 600 – 700 head Location: At the base of Bruce Peninsula on Hwy # 6, just south of Wiarton Free transportation available from the airport at Wiarton

BRUSSELS Brussels Livestock* Box 59, 42857 Newry Rd., Brussels, Ont. N0G 1H0 Phone: 519-887-6461 • Fax: 519-887-9449 Email: info@brusselslivestock.ca • Website: www.brusselslivestock.ca Contact: Mark Ferraro...............................................................................519-492-0181 Len Gamble.................................................................................519-887-6461 Kevin McArter..............................................................................519-357-0594 Steve Hutchison..........................................................................519-292-1163 Regular Sales: Fri., 10 a.m............................................................................Stocker calves & yearlings Tues., 9 a.m................................................................................. Fed cattle, bulls, cows Thurs., 8 a.m...................................................... Bob calves, veal, lambs, goats, sheep Special Sales: Sat., Oct. 12, 10 a.m............................................................................ 4-H show & sale Fri., Oct. 25, 1 p.m.....................................................................Hereford influence sale Tues., Oct. 28; Mon., Nov. 18, 10 a.m...........Vaccinated calf & yearling sale sponsored .....................................................................................by Huron County Beef Producers Sat., Nov. 2, 11 a.m.................................................................................. Bred cow sale Fri., Nov. 29, 1 p.m.........................................................................Angus influence sale

campbellford Community Livestock Exchange Hoard Station 2508 County Road 8 • R.R. 5, Campbellford, Ont. K0L 1L0 Phone: 705-653-3660 • Fax: 705-653-4610 Email: daveyd@xplornet.com • Website: www.hoardstnsalebarn.ca Contact: David DeNure..............................................................................705-653-3660 Regular Sales: Every Tues., 12 noon........................................Special sales by request Special Sales: 11 a.m., Quinte Cattlemen’s Stocker sales. Stocker sales will be on live video. Online bidders please register. Fri., Sept. 20................................................................................Vaccinations preferred Fri., Oct. 25; Nov. 29............................................................................ All vaccinated

CARGILL Cargill Auction Market Inc. Box 64, Cargill, Ont. N0G 1J0 Phone: 519-366-2214 • Fax: 519-366-2444 Contact: Alan Anstett................................................................................519-366-2214 Calvin Anstett.............................................................................519-881-6623 Brian Kirkland.............................................................................519-797-1668 Regular Sales: Every Wed., 7 p.m.....................................................Stockers & feeders Special Sales: Fri., Sept. 6; Oct. 5, 7 p.m..............Charolais & exotic cross yearlings, steers & heifers Fri., Sept. 27, 7 p.m...............................................................................All breed heifers Fri., Oct. 25 7 p.m.......................................................................................Local calves Fri., Nov. 1, 7 p.m.....................................................................Local calves & yearlings

COBDEN Renfrew Pontiac Livestock 18156 Hwy. 17, R.R. 3, Cobden, Ont. K0J 1K0 Phone/Fax: 613-646-7335 Contact: Harry Dick...................................................................................613-649-2426 Regular Sales: Every Tues., 1 p.m..................................................................All breeds

COOKSTOWN Ontario Stockyards Inc.* Box 402, Cookstown, Ont. L0L 1L0

Phone: 705-458-4000 • Fax: 705-458-4100 Email: info@ontariostockyards.on.ca • Website: www.ontariostockyards.on.ca Contact: Wayne Small............................................................................. 705-435-1423 Murray Morrison.....................................................................416-233-1526 Brian Pascoe..........................................................................705-878-7026 Regular Sales: Every Thurs., 11 a.m..........................................................................Stockers & feeders Special Sales: Tues., Sept. 17; Oct. 1, 22;Thurs., Dec. 5, 11 a.m............................................Yearlings Thurs., Oct. 17, 11 a.m............................................. Canadian Angus Certified calves/ ...............................................................................Canadian Hereford Association sale Thurs., Oct. 24, 11 a.m....................................................Annual Leeds/Grenville calves . .................................................................................... in conjunction with regular sale Tues., Nov. 12, 26, 11 a.m.................................. Ontario Stockyards Inc. all vaccinated Bred cow sale and Ottawa Valley/Renfrew calf & yearling sale: Date to be announced.

DENFIELD Denfield Livestock Exchange R.R. 2, Denfield, Ont. N0M 1P0 Phone: 519-666-1140 • Fax: 519-666-1143 Contact: Stan Rees.................................................................................. 519-871-5968 Regular Sales: Every Tues., 12 noon Special Sales: Sat., Sept. 21; Oct. 5, 19; Nov. 16, 11 a.m......................Stockers, cows, cow/calf pairs Sat., Nov. 2, 11 a.m......................................................................................Local calves

GREELY Ottawa Livestock Exchange Ltd.* Box 340, 1643 Sale Barn Road, Greely, Ont. K4P 1N6 Phone: 613-821-2634 • Fax: 613-821-4594 Email: ottawalivestock@bellnet.ca • Website: www.ottawalivestockexchange.ca Contact: Steven Spratt..............................................................................613-822-1351 Charles J. Menard.......................................................................819-983-1056 Robert/Richard/Denis..................................................................613-821-2634 Regular Sales: Mon., 11 a.m........................................................................................................Calves Mon., 1 p.m.......................................................................... Slaughter cows & stockers Thurs., 11 a.m............................................................................Calves, slaughter cows Thurs., 12:30 p.m...........................................................................................Dairy cows Thurs., 2 p.m..................................................................................................... Stockers Special Sales: For upcoming stocker & bred cows sales visit our website

Hanover Maple Hill Auctions Box 341, Hanover, Ont. N4N 3T2 Phone: 519-506-1400 • Fax: 519-506-1402 Contact: Andy McCulloch.......................... 519-379-1370 Regular Sales: Mon., 7 p.m. Special Sales: Every Mon. from Sept. 2 through fall, 7 p.m................................................ Stocker sale Sat., Aug. 31, 1 p.m..........................................Ontario autumn Angus classic females Sat. Sept. 14, 1 p.m.................................. Ontario autumn Simmental classic females Sat., Sept. 28, 1 p.m......................................................Up the ante Charolais females Sat., Oct. 19, 1 p.m........................................................Bluewater Angus bred females Mon., Oct. 21; Nov. 11, 7 p.m....................................................Local vaccinated calves Sat., Oct. 26........................................................................................John Vansize sale

Listowel David Carson Farms & Auction Services Ltd.* R.R. 3, Listowel, Ont. N4W 3G8 Phone: 519-291-2049 • Fax: 519-291-5065 Email: info@davidcarson.on.ca Website: www.davidcarson.on.ca Contact: David/Brad Carson.....................................................................519-291-2049 Don Robertson............................................................................519-291-8582 Bill Haalstra...............................................................................905-774-1739 Regular Sales: Sat., 11 a.m....................................................... Stockers, cow/calf pairs, cows & bulls Special Sales: Mon., Oct. 28, 11 a.m. – Carson’s special fall stocker sale – approximately 600 preconditioned, bunk adjusted and age verified steers and heifers of various breeds Live video of sale on the website


Listowel Livestock Ltd.* R.R. 3, Listowel, Ont. N4W 3G8 Phone: 519-291-2200 • Fax: 519-291-1381 Email: listowellivestock1@bellnet.ca Contact: Grant Jackson ............................ 519-291-4450 Bob Jackson ............................... 519-291-3365 Graham Jackson ........................ 519-291-4528 Regular Sales: Every Tues., 1 p.m..................................................................All breeds Special Sales: Fri., Oct. 25, 12 noon ............................................................... Local vaccinated calves

MILVERTON Parks Livestock of Canada LP 6 Spencer Street, Milverton, Ont. N0K 1M0 Phone: 519-595-8555 • Fax: 519-595-8552 Website: www.parkslivestock.com Contact: John Nicholson ...........................................................................519-595-8555 Regular Sales: Every Mon., 12 noon ..........................................................................Farm fresh bob calves & veal

NEW LISKEARD Temiskaming Livestock Exchange 883006 R.R. 3, New Liskeard, Ont. P0J 1P0 Phone: 705-647-5415 • Fax: 705-647-4411 Contact: Bill Stewart ............................................................................... 705–544-3508 Regular Sales: Every Mon., 2 p.m. .....................................All classes of livestock Special Sales: Oct. 4, 18, 12 noon ..............................................................................................Calves Oct. 25, 12 noon ............................................................................................ Bred cows

SELBY Selby Livestock and Auction Centre Box 453, Selby, Ont. K7R 3P5 Phone: 613-354-6260 • Fax: 613-354-5884 Website: www.selbyauctions.ca Contact: Bert Nibourg ..............................................................................613-536-9157 Doug Lewis ................................................................................613-388-2355 Regular Sales: Every Mon., 1 p.m. .....................................All classes of livestock

TARA Keady Livestock Market R.R. 4, Tara, Ont. N0H 2N0 Phone: 519-934-2339 • Fax: 519-934-2715 Website: www.keadylivestock.com Contact: Garry Kuhl ..................................................................................519-934-1626 Scott Kuhl ..................................................................................519-477-2339 Tom McNabb ..............................................................................519-794-3072 Regular Fall Sales: Every Tues., 9 a.m. Special Fall Sales: Fri., Sept. 27; Oct. 4, 11, 18, 9 a.m. ............................1,200 to 1,500 head of yearling .................................................................................................steers & heifers on ONS ............................................................. Calf-O-Rama presorted calf sale week, 9 a.m. Sat., Oct. 26 .............................................................Bruce Peninsula Calf Club sale .................................................................................. vaccinated & presorted calves Tues. Oct. 29............................Georgian Bay Charolais Calf Association sale, 1,000 to ..................................................1,500 mainly Charolais, vaccinated, presorted calves Thurs., Oct. 31 .................................... Bluewater Black Calf Club sale, 1,000 to 1,500 ......................................................................mainly Black, vaccinated, presorted calves Sat., Nov. 2 ............................................Central Calf Association sale, 800 to 1,000 all ...............................................................breed vaccinated calves selling in owner lots Fri., Nov. 8, 22, 9 a.m .............................Local calves, preweaned or right off the cow ...................................................................... in owner lots (1,000 to 1,500 per sale) Fri., Nov. 15, 9 a.m. ........................... 1,200 to 1,500 head of yearling steers & heifers Fri., Nov. 29, 5 p.m. ..........................................................................Bred cow & heifers Tues., Dec. 17, ...................................................................................Last sale of 2013 Tues., Jan. 22, 2014 ...........................................................................First sale of 2014

VANKLEEK HILL Vankleek Hill Livestock Exchange* Box 134, 1239 Ridge Road • Vankleek Hill, Ont. K0B 1R0 Phone: 613-678-3008 • Fax: 613-678-6017 Email: francois-tremblay@live.ca Contact: Francois Tremblay......................................................................514-233-9383

Regular Sales: Every Mon., 4 p.m.; Wed., 2 p.m. Special Sales: Last Wed. of the month 7 p.m. .....................................Stockers & cows

WATERLOO Ontario Livestock Exchange Inc.* Box 443, Waterloo, Ont. N2J 4A9 Phone: 519-884-2082 • Fax: 519-884-0509 Website: www.olex.on.ca • Email: dropp@olex.on.ca Contact: David Ropp ................................................................................519-749-5072 Brian Yost ..................................................................................519-741-6205 Larry Witzel ................................................................................519-741-6333 Allen Colwell ..............................................................................519-501-0147 Live Sales: Wed, 1 p.m. ............................................................................Vaccinated Feeder Cattle Thurs., 11 a.m. ....................................................................................Regular stockers Special Sales: Daily Internet presort sales & direct from ranch sales, contributing markets: Moose Jaw Swift Current Provost Lloydminster Vermilion Yorkton Maple Creek Meadow Lake Assiniboia Weyburn Mankota Prince Albert

WOODVILLE Kawartha Lakes Co-op 580 Woodville Road, R.R. 3, Woodville, Ont. K0M 2T0 Phone: 705-439-4444 • Fax: 705-439-3145 Email: info@klcauction.ca • Website: www.klcauction.ca Contact: Jane Barker .............................................................................. 705-439-4444 Sales Barn (cell)..................................................................................... 705-928-7858 Regular Sales: Every Sat., 10 a.m. ..................................Cull cows, bulls, finished cattle, veal calves, .............................................................bob calves, replacement cattle, stocker cattle, .......................................................................................bred cows & cows with calves Special Sales: Wed., Oct. 2; 11 a.m. ............................ Peterborough/Victoria County cattlemen’s sale Wed., Oct. 23; Dec. 4, 11 a.m.......................................................................... Stocker sales Wed., Oct. 16, 11 a.m. ........................................................ Eastern Angus stocker sale Wed., Nov. 6, 11 a.m................................................Peterborough/ Victoria cattlemen’s .................................................................................... certified stocker sale (live video) Wed., Nov. 20 ................................................... Peterborough/ Victoria cattlemen’s sale To consign to Peterborough/Victoria Cattlemen’s sales: Contact: Wayne Telford.............................................................................705-292-9531 Dave Fell (sale week) ................................................................705-887-5670 For the Eastern Angus stocker sale: Contact: Ron Bryan ..................................................................................705-374-4853 Sun., Oct. 20, 1 p.m. ................................................Autumn Harvest Angus purebreds Sun., Nov. 17, 1 p.m. ..............................................Central invitational Simmental purebreds Wed., Nov. 27, 6 p.m...................................................................................... Bred cows Date to be determined, 11 a.m. .................Peterborough Victoria cattlemen’s stockers

QUEBEC The Feeder Calf Sales’ Agency 555, blvd. Roland-Therrien, suite 305 • Longueuil, Que. J4H 4G2 Phone: 450-679-0540 ext. 8891 Contact: Eve Martin Feeder calf development marketing officer, Email: emartin@upa.qc.ca

BIC Coopérative des encans d’animaux du Bas-St-Laurent 3229, Route 132 Ouest, Bic, Que. G0L 1B0 Phone: 418-736-5788 Special Sales: 9 a.m. Aug. 22 ............................................................................................................750 head Sept. 19Z .........................................................................................................500 head Oct. 31Z...........................................................................................................875 head 2014 Special Sales: 9:30 a.m. Jan. 22,............................................................................................................750 head Mar. 20 ...........................................................................................................750 head Apr. 24 .............................................................................................................700 head June 5 ..............................................................................................................875 head


LA GUADELOUPE

ST-ISIDORE

Marché d’animaux vivants Veilleux & Frères Inc. 1287, 14th Avenue, La Guadeloupe, Que. G0M 1G0 Phone: 418-459-6832 Special Sales: 9 a.m. Sept. 5Z ...........................................................................................................750 head Oct. 3 ..............................................................................................................950 head Oct. 23A........................................................................................................1,400 head Dec. 4 ......................................................................................................... 1,000 head 2014 Special Sales: 10 a.m. Jan. 23Z...........................................................................................................950 head Feb. 27 ............................................................................................................550 head Apr. 9 ..............................................................................................................500 head May 22.............................................................................................................850 head

Réseau Encans Québec 2020, Rang de la Rivière St-Isidore-de-Dorchester, Que. G0S 2S0 Phone: 418-882-6341 • Toll free 1-866-839-9475 Special Sales: 9 a.m. Aug. 23 .........................................................................................................1,800 head Aug. 30 .........................................................................................................1,400 head Sept. 6 .............................................................................................................950 head Sept. 13 ........................................................................................................1,100 head Sept. 20Z ......................................................................................................1,050 head Sept. 27 ........................................................................................................1,400 head Oct. 4............................................................................................................1,000 head Oct. 11..........................................................................................................1,400 head Oct. 18..........................................................................................................1,650 head Oct. 25A........................................................................................................1,750 head Nov. 1 ...........................................................................................................1,200 head Nov. 8 ...........................................................................................................1,600 head Nov. 15 .........................................................................................................1,650 head Nov. 22 .........................................................................................................1,750 head Dec. 6 ...........................................................................................................1,850 head Dec. 13 .........................................................................................................1,850 head 2013 Special Sales: 9 a.m. Jan. 17..........................................................................................................1,850 head Jan. 24..........................................................................................................1,750 head Feb. 7Z ............................................................................................................950 head Feb. 14A .......................................................................................................1,200 head Feb. 28 ........................................................................................................1,400 head Mar. 7 ..........................................................................................................1,450 head Mar. 21 ........................................................................................................1,550 head Mar. 28 .........................................................................................................1,350 head Apr. 4 ............................................................................................................1,550 head Apr. 11 ...........................................................................................................................800 head Apr. 25 .............................................................................................................550 head May 9............................................................................................................1,850 head May 16..........................................................................................................1,050 head May 23..........................................................................................................1,800 head May 30..........................................................................................................1,870 head June 6 ...........................................................................................................1,875 head

SAWYERVILLE Encan Sawyerville Inc. 420, Route 253, Cookshire, Que. J0B 1M0 Phone: 819-849-3606 • 819-875-3577 Special Sales: 9 a.m. Aug. 29 .....................................................................................................900 head Sept. 12Z ....................................................................................................800 head Sept. 26C .................................................................................................1,000 head Oct. 10Z ...................................................................................................1,350 head Oct. 24A ...................................................................................................1,500 head Nov. 7.......................................................................................................1,350 head Nov. 21.....................................................................................................1,100 head Dec. 5 .........................................................................................................800 head Dec. 12 ....................................................................................................1,200 head 2014 Special Sales: 9 a.m. Jan. 16 .....................................................................................................1,400 head Feb. 6Z........................................................................................................850 head Feb. 13A......................................................................................................800 head Mar. 6 ......................................................................................................1,400 head Mar. 27 .......................................................................................................900 head Apr. 10 .....................................................................................................1,250 head May 8 .......................................................................................................1,050 head May 29 .....................................................................................................1,400 head June 26 ....................................................................................................1,000 head

C: Charolais special sale

NOTES

__________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________

A: Angus special sale

Z: Zoetis special sales

NEW BRUNSWICK FLORENCEVILLE Carleton Co-op Sales Barn Florenceville, N.B. E7L 3G2 Phone: 506-392-5587 Contact: Carvell Crandlemire .....................................................................506-375-8161 Regular Sales: Every Mon., 12 noon

SUSSEX Sussex and Studholm Agric. Soc. Auction Barn P.O. Box 5063, Sussex, N.B. E4E 5L2 Phone: 506-432-1841 • Fax: 506-432-1825 Regular Sales: Every other Wed., 11:30 p.m...........................................................................All breeds Feeder & stock cow sales start at 11:30 a.m. ........................................Call for details

NOVA SCOTIA TRURO Atlantic Stockyards Box 293, Truro, N.S. B2N 5C1 Phone: 902-893-9603 • Fax: 902-893-4483 Contact: Sean Firth ..................................................................................902-670-5999 Regular Sales: Every Thurs., 1 p.m. ...........................................All classes of livestock Fall Feeder Sales: 10 a.m. Sat., Sept. 14; Oct. 19; Nov. 16; Dec. 7 Special sales: Contact for details *2013 member of the Livestock Markets Association of Canada (LMAC)


PRODUCER LOYALTY PROGRAM

FALL 2013 PROMOTION FROM AUGUST 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 2013

3X

YOUR PLP POINTS ON ALL PURCHASES OF THE FOLLOWING MEDICATED FEED ADDITIVES: AUREO® S 700 G AUREO® S -700 G CRUMBLES AUREOMYCIN® 220 G AUREOMYCIN® 220 G CRUMBLES BOVATEC® 20

NEW OPPORTUNITY TO EARN PLP POINTS! MEDICATED FEED ADDITIVES ARE NOW ELIGIBLE ! Visit our website for further details. www.plp-cattle.ca

All trademarks are the property of Zoetis or its licensors, used under license by Zoetis Canada. PLP JADP08 0713 E

M-1842_CANCAT_PLP_JAD_MFA_EN.indd 1

2013-07-17 4:44 PM


peace of mind on arriVal Visit www.plp-cattle.ca to find out what saVings the producer loyalty program has in store for you! TALK TO YOUR VETERINARIAN TODAY ABOUT ThE 30-DAY gUARANTEE.

Zoetis is a trademark of Zoetis or its licensor, used under license by Zoetis Canada. DXN JADP03 0713 E

M-1872_CANCAT_AD-BRD_EN.indd 1

2013-07-17 4:49 PM


ď ľ straigh t f ro m t h e h i p

By Brenda Schoepp

THE PRECAUTIONARY PRINCIPLE

M

oving the beef industry ahead will be a result of a response to the environment in which we live. In that process the industry will ask itself just what it wants to be and to also ask the customer how the beef industry is seen. As these two simple questions are addressed the road to which the answer comes will likely take two forms. The first is with limitless energy and inspiration and a constant measurement of the consumer or buyer response. That response may be from a trader, country, consumer, retailer or processor, feedyard or feeder buyer. The second is to move with abundant caution and keep the discussion alive. Keeping the discussion alive may inadvertently kill movement. The principle of precaution is to think about or calculate harm before it happens. It is managing the risks of current or future activities and extends into a principle of obligation. For example, a motorist may use the principle to determine not to drive past the school during school hours to reduce the risk of accident. This is fine, but if the school is the only route for the motorist to drive to work, the principle has moved beyond risk mitigation and is now a cost or a limitation. When the principle is used for obligation the motorist will still drive past the school but always obey the speed limit and stop signs as he is obliged to do by law. As for the principle, scholars have long argued that agriculture as a whole has been ruled by the precautionary principle to the point of crippling itself. Perhaps the one very real measurement of this is the entrants into agriculture and the enthusiasm that they bring for the business of food. When an industry has failed to attract the best and brightest minds, avoids the development of centres of excellence that define the profession, and is reactive rather than proactive on policy or has a reliance on external financial aid, it is fair to say that the caution has extinguished creation. The transparency of our world has also shifted the outcomes of production. Now the consumer may have as much or more interest in animal welfare than in the nutritional value of food. To react to that concern and say, our industry does things right, is insular. No company, industry or farm is entitled to a customer. It is they who are watching us. Success is enjoyed by those who appreciate precaution and use it to their advantage but are not limited because of the principle. To accept that health and safety concerns must be part of any growth strategy is responsible. To reject growth because of regulations in terms of health and safety is to overextend the precautionary principle. The balance lies not in the result but in the definition of self that can easily be related to by the consumer.

www.canadiancattlemen.ca

Solutions are often simple and revolve around being able to identify and verify opportunity. If the information is not verified then it is all risk. A blanket statement like, we will sell more beef to Japan, is all risk. The success lies with the identification of how we are seen in Japan, how we identify with that image and an evaluation of a strategy that allows for those differentiated parts to bloom. Just as cow-calf producers may say they will sell all their beef through the farmers’ market. The first question is who is there and how will they see you, and then how will you verifiably differentiate yourself within that system? And lastly, what processes do you have in place to measure the response and to address changes that will be made? If the last part is missing then it is only a hollow promise that eventually prohibits growth. When young entrepreneurs come to me for help with their business plans we do not talk about failure. We talk about success. Failure is only an outcome of being tied to the precautionary principle to the point of suffocation and we will not be limited in this way. Just as a hostess is always prepared for tea and a jet is always prepared for takeoff, we succeed when we live in a state of preparedness and envision only our success. That takes risk and being outside a zone that we are comfortable in and for many it is a huge leap. I have yet to see it fail. When it comes to food policy it is not agriculture that is leading the way. While we think about what food policy in Canada should look like in terms of production, processing, human health and consumer needs, cities have already developed and implemented their food policies. And since we all grow food this strategic planning involves us. We need to ask: Does the precautionary principle keep us hostage because we fear consumers and insulate ourselves from them? Or can we develop our story along with consumer input so they are engaged in our activities? There is a world of difference between the two actions and no amount of product differentiationwill save us from the imprisonment of entitlement, if we needlessly fear the consumer. The source of wealth for the beef industry has traditionally come from outside of itself. Throwing the precautionary principle aside, I challenge us to define the industry, by sector, so the wealth is generated from within. Now that is risk worth taking! c Brenda Schoepp is a Nuffield Scholar who travels extensively exploring agriculture and meeting the people who feed, clothe and educate our world. A motivating speaker and mentor she works with young entrepreneurs across Canada and is the founder of Women in Search of Excellence. She can be contacted through her website www.brendaschoepp.com. All rights reserved. Brenda Schoepp 2013

C at t l e m e n ¡ Au g u s t 2 0 1 3

27


 auction m a r k et s p ec i a l

By Debbie Furber

markets zero in on traceability

L

ivestock Markets Association of Canada (LMAC) members breathed a collective sigh of relief coming out of this year’s annual general meeting at Calgary with the realization that technology for traceability movement reporting is finally coming into line with cattle-marketing tradition. “Reports from the two big livestock summits held in Saskatoon and Ottawa indicate that the federal and provincial governments have accepted group animal movement as a way to trace animals,” says LMAC president Ken Perlich of Lethbridge. “Beyond assurance from regulators that reporting group movement is OK we don’t know details. It could be a long process, but eventually it will happen.” Group movement is facilitated by the use of livestock manifests. Currently, Alberta, Saskatchewan and British Columbia have livestock inspection/brand services that require the use of manifests. Livestock Inspection Services, Alberta’s private brand inspection company, is in the process of developing and testing an electronic manifest capable of putting forth the required data set when moving cattle. “It will be a technological improvement that still fits with tradition,” Perlich adds. In Western Canada, the tradition has always been group movement in and out for commercial sales, yet, some want to rebuild the system based on single animal movement. Pilot studies across Canada showed that there was always a limiting factor when trying to report individual animals in a group movement system. Animals would still have to be individually tagged with some kind of technology for animal identification before leaving the farm of origin, so group movement reporting wouldn’t preclude individual animal movement and reading for businesses that prefer this option. “It has a lot to do with markets getting together to do the pilot projects across Canada and in Alberta,” Perlich says of the recent development. “Because of members like Jim Abel, our president for the past three years, Rick Wright, our CCIA (Canadian Cattle Identification Agency) rep, and Larry Witzel, our IGAC (industry-govern-

28

C at t l e m e n · Au g u s t 2 0 1 3

Ken Perlich of Lethbridge is the 2013-14 president of the Livestock Market Association of Canada.

ment advisory committee) rep, who have put so much time and effort into this, we are on the way to a workable traceability system.” The traceability file will remain a priority for LMAC throughout the upcoming year and the association will continue to assist members in whatever ways they identify. “LMAC is an association of independent businesses that benefit from sharing information and experience. Its role is to support business, never dictate how to run business, Perlich explains. “Running an auction market is easy, it’s the execution that can be difficult. A market that takes care of its customers, cattle and staff, will probably have long-term success if it covers those pieces. I see LMAC as an organization that can assist with those pieces. If we can help, we will.” Perlich, whose family owns and operates Perlich Bros. Auction Market, is currently the president of the Alberta Auction Markets Association as well. Having served as LMAC’s vice-president, Perlich

succeeds Jim Abel of Stettler Auction Mart for a two-year term as president. Abel stays on as past president, with firstvice Scott Anderson, Winnipeg Livestock Sales; second-vice Stewart Stone, Heartland Livestock Services, Regina; Larry Witzel, Ontario Livestock Exchange, Waterloo; Rick Wright, Heartland Livestock Services order buyer, Virden, Man.; Steve Spratt, Ottawa Livestock Exchange in Greely, Ont.; Rhett Parks, Whitewood Livestock Sales, Whitewood, Sask.; Tom Vicars, B.C. Livestock, Kamloops; and Rob Bergevin,VJV Foothills Livestock Auction, Stavely, Alta., replacing Bob Perlich, Perlich Bros. Auction Market. Executive secretary Jim Wideman of Kitchener, Ont., who will be retiring at the end of the year, was chosen as this year’s inductee into the LMAC Hall of Fame, not only for his many years of commitment to LMAC, but for his industry leadership during his time with the Ontario Livestock Exchange and pioneering electronic livestock marketing. c

www.canadiancattlemen.ca


ď ľ 2013 lmac Auctioneering championship

2013 LMAC Champion: Sponsor, Canadian Charolais Assoc. Travis Rogers, Nilsson Bros. Clyde, Alta.

Reserve Champion: Sponsor, Canadian Angus Assoc. Cliff Pahl Calgary Stockyards, Alta.

3rd place: Sponsor, Canadian Hereford Assoc. Rob Bergevin VJV Stavely, Alta.

4th place: Sponsor, Canadian Limousin Assoc. Shawn Gist VJV Dawson Creek, B.C.

5th place: Sponsor, Canadian Simmental Assoc. Rhett Parks Whitewood Livestock, Sask.

Jim Wideman, LMAC executive secretary, was inducted to the Hall of Fame. Jim has been a tremendous asset Rookie of the Year: Ryan Hurlburt to the organization. He retires this year. Heartland Livestock Services, Sask.

Calgary Stockyards Team hosted the 16th Annual LMAC Convention: Sponsor, Canadian Hereford, Limousin, Simmental, Angus and Charolais

www.canadiancattlemen.ca

C at t l e m e n ¡ Au g u s t 2 0 1 3

29


 auction m a r k et s p ec i a l

capturing cattle at their best

I

nternet cattle auctions that give producers the option of selling cattle directly from the farm or feedlot to buyers literally anywhere in the world have become a sign of the digital times. We asked some of the pros in this line of work for tips on how to prepare cattle and shoot images that will show your cattle at their best to catch buyers’ attention. Reagan Huculak, commercial sales director with DLMS headquartered at Edmonton, Alta., says accurate representation of the entire group of cattle on offer is the No. 1 consideration when taking pictures, just as it is when describing your cattle. One confirms the other and both are required for DLMS direct off-farm sales. Generally, the DLMS agent who comes out to your place to consign the cattle will take photos, but sometimes weather conditions or time restraints make it difficult to picture the cattle at their best that day. Today’s communications technology makes it possible for producers to take pictures ahead of time if the weather forecast doesn’t look favourable or go out later to snap more shots for a wider selection. “Buyers will want to see as many of the cattle as possible, so take pictures with

Buyers respond to representative group photos that accurately display colour, breed, flesh and horns.

groups of animals showing colour, breed, flesh and horns that accurately represent the entire pen,” Huculak explains. It’s OK if you want to take a picture or two of single animals to highlight certain characteristics, but the others should be of groups representative of the entire lot. Eight to 10 good

pictures showing approximately 75 per cent of the cattle is sufficient. “Nothing irritates buyers more than buying cattle under a certain premise and then finding they’re not what was described when they arrive. Be totally honest. It saves time on the buyer’s side

auction market Directory zXX Brooks, AB. Ph: (403) 362-5521 Fax: (403) 362-5541 Website: www.bowslope.com E-mail: bowslope@eidnet.org Rod MacLean 793-3060 Lachie McKinnon 362-1825 Ross Annett 793-4715 Lowell Johnston 820-0516

Serving Alberta’s Livestock Industry since 1940 Regular Sales: Every Friday @ 9 a.m. Special Sales Fri., Sept. 13 @10 a.m. 73rd Ann. Anniversary Sale, Yearlings & Calves

TEAM “Bringing Buyers and Sellers together through the Power of the Internet”

Calgary Stockyards “The Hub of Livestock Marketing”

Feeder cattle sales every Friday. Slaughter cattle sales weekdays. Broadcasting Ring Sales Daily

Regular cattle sales every Thursday. Special calf sales Saturdays.

www.teamauctionsales.com

www.calgarystockyards.com

403-234-7429

Mon., Sept. 16, 1 p.m. Sheep & Goat Sale Wed., Sept. 25, 5:30 p.m. Horses & Tack Sale Fri. Sept. 27, Oct.11, 25

Special Yearling Sales

Oct. 21, 28 & Nov. 4 @ 10 a.m. Red & Black Angus Calf Sales Oct. 23, 30 & Nov. 6 @ 10 a.m. LimoX & CharX Calf Sales Oct. 26 & Nov.2 @ 10 a.m. Rancher Calf Sales Nov.11, 13, 20 & Dec. 3 @ 10 a.m. All Breed Calf Sales Nov. 16, 23, 27, 30 & Dec. 4, 7,11,14,18 @ Noon

Bred Cows & Heifers

Internet Sales: Every Thurs. DLMS www.dlms.ca @10am All calf sales are pre-booked sales. Call early for a good spot.

Alberta’s Largest Producer Owned Auction Market

30

C at t l e m e n · Au g u s t 2 0 1 3

Regular cattle sale every Tuesday 9 am Please check our website for all special sales. Office - 204-434-6519 • Fax - 204-434-9367 Email - g_lam@hotmail.ca Harold Unrau - 204-871-0250 (cell) - manager Henry Penner - 204-355-7518

www.grunthallivestockauctionmart.com

Innisfail

auctIon Market

Regular Cattle Sales — Every Wednesday Special Fall Feeder Sales — Every Monday Horse Sales Every 2 Weeks

The Heart of Alberta’s Finest Feeder Cattle 4504 – 42 St., Innisfail, AB T4G 1P6 403-227-3166 • 1-800-710-3166 iamarket@telus.net • www.innisfailauctionmarket.com Jack, Danny, Duane and Mark Daines

Meadow Lake Livestock Sales Ltd. • Regular Cattle Sales - Monday’s 9:30 a.m. • Presorted Internet Calf Sales - Thursday’s 11:00 a.m. • Regular Monthly Horse Sales - Friday’s • Bred Cow & Heifer Sales scheduled throughout the fall - 1:00 pm

Order buying services available. For sale information & market info. visit our website www.mlstockyards.com Brent Brooks (306) 240-5340 Boyd Stuart (306) 841-7998

Blair Brooks (306) 240-9883 office (306) 236-3411

E-mail: mlstockyards@sasktel.net www.canadiancattlemen.ca


marketing

and the producer’s side and avoids conflicts,” he stresses. If, for example, you have a pen of 200 red steers of a certain breed or cross and 180 of them are top quality, but 20 are of lesser quality, another breed type or colour, they should be described that way so there are no surprises. When a buyer looks at your listing and knows a few calves are not in the same class as the others, he has time to make arrangements. If those 20 calves show up unexpectedly, he may be left scrambling to work them into another order or get them onto another truck. He could decide to send them back or even refuse to accept the entire lot. Prepare yourself before listing time by jotting down pertinent information, Huculak adds. Buyers want accurate descriptions of the breed, veterinary work (vaccinations, implants, castration method, etc.), feed program, flesh the animals are carrying, any horns and base weight. All information you can provide to get that weight as accurate as possible will be helpful. If you don’t have a scale to weigh a few representative animals, the DLMS agent will be able to estimate weight. Information such as start weight, details of the feeding program, and days on feed can be very helpful in establishing an accurate base weight. The image capture itself is about presentation, so the cattle and surroundings should be reasonably clean and dry. Cattle with tag, wet hair coats or covered in snow

 Cat t l e - i n - m ot i o n

Shooting singles Cattle-in-Motion (CIM), with its home base at Bryan, Texas, has been videotaping and photographing cattle since 2002, first making DVDs of breeding stock for mail-out distribution and then adding Internet-based services as technology evolved. CIM specializes in producing custom videos and photographs of breeding stock for clients’ own use on websites, at shows and in online and print sales catalogues, ads and other promotional material. The company also facilitates online auction sales, live auction broadcasts, and Internet broadcasts of major cattle shows, including Canadian Western Agribition. Sarah Buchanan, one of two CIM contacts for Canada, says getting good images is definitely worth the effort when marketing your cattle. She offers some tips to prepare for a good experience when videoing or taking still photos of individual animals, pairs or small groups. Presentation of the animals should be directed toward the target audience, so that may mean cleaning and clipping ahead of time. It’s important to have lots of patience

and work cattle in a calm setting so they remain calm and appear good tempered, which is always a positive selling point. Buchanan suggests setting up a location at least 60 x 40 feet to give the cattle plenty of space for walking when taking video footage. The area can be smaller for still shots. Good fencing is important — single-strand electric wire is not a good option, she adds. Tying or penning a few cattle inside the video pen will help to draw the subject animals into the area and have a calming effect on them. A trip or two through the pen to familiarize the animals with the area will make the new surroundings less stressful for them come video day. A team of handlers who can quietly work cattle through the pen and are creative about getting and holding the animals’ attention when necessary will really help to make the day go more smoothly and quickly. Remember to stay ready with the camera because the perfect pose may be fleeting! For more information, contact Buchanan at 888-554-8437 ext. 708 or through www.cattleinmotion.com.

Continued on page 32

OntariO LivestOck exchange inc. P.O. BOx 443 WaterlOO, OntariO n2J 4a9

Phone: (519) 884-2082 Or 1-800-265-8818 Website: www.olex.on.ca e-mail: dropp@olex.on.ca CONTACT LIVE SALES SPECIAL SALES

David Ropp (519) 749-5072 Allen Colwell (519) 501-0147 Wednesday - 1:00 PM - Vaccinated Feeder Cattle Thursday - 11:00 AM - Regular Stocker Sale Daily internet presort sales & direct from ranch sales. Contributing markets: Moose Jaw, Swift Current, Provost, Lloydminster, Vermilion, Yorkton, Maple Creek, Meadow Lake, Mankota, Assiniboia, Weyburn

AUCTION MARKET LTD.

In the hub of the livestock industry since 1967

SPECIAL SALES Calf Sales. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Every.Mon ..&.Wed .,.Oct ..to.Dec .,.10.am Stock Cows & Bred Heifer Sales . . . . . . . Every.Tues .,.Nov ..to.Dec .,.1.pm Special Yearling Sales . . . . . . . . . . Every.Thurs .,.Sept ..to.Oct .,.11:30.am Pre-Sort Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Every.Sat .,.Oct ..to.Nov . For a complete listing of our sales visit www.perlich.com Or contact us by phone at:

403-329-3101

We’re.3.miles.East.of.Lethbridge.on.Highway.3.&.¼.mile.South.on.the.Broxburn.Rd .

www.canadiancattlemen.ca

PICTURE BUTTE Auction Market

Box 6, Picture Butte,

Connection AB T0K 1V0 Your Total Auction

Reg. Feeder & Slaughter Cattle Sales–Tues. 10:30 a.m. Reg. Mixed Cattle, Hog, Sheep Sales – Sat. 11 a.m. Special Calf Sales in the Fall Phone 403-732-4400 Fax 403-732-4405

Owner/Auctioneer: Erik Dunsbergen Office: Jenn Koot

Welcome to

Special Calf Sales Mondays throughout the Fall

vJv Foothills Livestock auction Box 10, Stavely, AB T0L 1Z0 email: foothillsoffice@vjvauction.com Rob Bergevin, Manager 403-625-7171 (cell) Sales Barn 403-549-2120 Fax: 403-549-2253

Toll Free: 1-877-549-2121 Regular sales eveRy FRiday at 9 a.m. For all your marketing needs please give us a call or stop by!

www.vjvfoothillsauction.com

The Quebec Feeder Calf Sales Circuit • Fresh calves straight from the producer • Checked for castration and clearly identified • 65 special feeder sales, all vaccinated calves Information and pocket calendar at: Feeder Calf Sales Agency Phone: (450) 679-0530, ext 8891 Fax: (450) 442-9348 E-mail: emartin@upa.qc.ca

Fédération des producteurs de bovins du Québec

FEEDER/SLAUGHTER SALES SHEEP & GOAT SALE Every Friday 9AM First & Third Wed. of Receiving open until every month. Receiving 11PM Thursdays open until 9PM Tuesday Gates Open Mon.-Wed. 8AM-4PM Thurs. 8AM-11PM Friday 8AM-6PM Sat. 8AM-4PM For more info call: 204-694-8328, Jim Christie 204-771-0753, Scott Anderson 204-782-6222, Mike Nernberg 204-807-0747 www.winnipeglivestocksales.com Licence #1122

C at t l e m e n · Au g u s t 2 0 1 3

31


M a r k et i ng Continued from page 31

 t ea m

don’t look their best. Sunny days will always be best. Consider moving cattle to a drier location if possible or taking pictures on fresh bedding when pen conditions are poor, he suggests. DLMS hosts regular direct off-farm sales every Thursday for feeder, finished or breeding stock and broadcasts presort ring sales daily from markets across Western Canada. Numerous purebred/ production sales are slotted in as needed. Agents located across the Prairies will work with you to list cattle according to your marketing strategy or they can be quickly listed in reaction to market conditions, Huculak explains. Load-sized lots are desirable because it’s not economically feasible for buyers to be sending liners out to farms for part loads, however, accommodations for part loads can be made by changing the delivery point from the farm to an auction market or facility where the buyer can put together a full load or share shipping on another truck. “Off-farm Internet auctions have become a great strategy in the marketing tool box for producers. Consigned cattle are exposed to buyers around the world. Not only are buyers and sellers brought together across vast distances, the price information provided is current and specific. With a few clicks of the mouse, producers can easily stay up to date with the state of the market and confidently plan their selling and purchasing strategies,” Huculak sums up. Contact Huculak at 780-554-4939 or go to www.dlms.ca for more information. c

Digi-Star Scales

Tru-Test

S W 2 6 0 0 E ID

- DIgi-Star Scale systems use cable guards to protect against animal biting & undue wear - Allows accurate weighing on uneven surfaces - 3 year warranty - Offers 24 hour help desk

SW 3 0 0

North American made!

Squeeze Chute

Panels & Feeders Livestock Trailers Stationary Handling Systems & more!

Classic Portable Handling System

3 year structural warranty

- Quick setup time - 1 piece transportable unit - fully loaded with 3 jacks - 2 double sided rolling gates - built with animal & operator safety in mind

Real Industries Ltd. call for a sales outlet near you

www.realindustries.com

32

1-888-848-6196

C at t l e m e n · Au g u s t 2 0 1 3

Time well spent TEAM (The Electronic Auction Market), a division of Calgary Stockyards with its auction facility located at Strathmore, hosts regular online sales every Thursday and Friday, video broadcasts of live sales on and off location, as well as weekly from several auction markets in Western Canada. It has been 12 years since TEAM started Internet sales and they have become part of what TEAM does on a daily basis marketing cattle, says manager Jason Danard. TEAM field reps will take pictures and videos when they go out to farms or feedlots to list cattle, but more and more, he says producers are taking their own pictures and videos. Not only could it be more convenient to do it on your own time when weather conditions are right, but range cattle not used to much human contact may be more likely to stick around for the photo op. It’s best if cattle can be pictured in their natural environment, whether that’s cow-calf pairs on pasture, yearlings on grass, feeder cattle in a pen, or bred cows in their winter feeding area. Good daylight conditions are important for clarity, but you don’t want to be shooting into the sun and shooting with bright sun directly at your back may throw your shadow across the image. Cover your bases by taking pictures from all angles if possible and selecting the best. Cattle on grass generally show up better in images than cattle in a corral, and cattle in feedlots show better on bedding because of the contrast and pleasing setting, he adds. Group pictures are desirable because they give potential buyers a better idea of the size, type, colour and evenness of the cattle. Video footage has become standard with TEAM listings to compliment the still photos because potential buyers can see how the cattle move and get a little better sense of what they are, Danard explains. A photograph can make cattle look better or worse, but a video will show exactly what they are. Though high-definition videos are ideal, many people have smartphones and digital cameras with built-in video cameras that will do a nice job. Skimming through some of the videos on Calgary Stockyards YouTube channel will give you some pointers, such as having adequate light, getting close enough so that individual animals can be seen, and moving the camera slowly to prevent blurring. “In my experience, if the seller puts time and effort into taking photos, he or she will almost always be rewarded in the marketplace,” Danard comments. “That said, the advantage may not be as noticeable at times of the year when we are selling high volumes and pen conditions aren’t so good. In March, it can be hard to get away from mud in pens, but bedding up a pen or moving the cattle to another area can make a huge difference in how they appear in a photo or video. The more time TEAM has to list your cattle the better, but it’s not uncommon to list cattle one day and sell them the next. Last-minute, on-location listings with the field rep sending photos and videos directly from a smartphone are even possible with today’s technology. For more information, contact Danard at 403-5198916 or go to the company's marketing website at www. teamauctionsales.com. www.canadiancattlemen.ca


 prime cuts

By Steve kay

Two-plant concerns

C

attle producers in Western Canada have rightly felt concerned for some time about the slim options they have for selling fed cattle or cull cows. Alberta and Saskatchewan have been pretty much a two-plant region for several years. Last fall’s massive E. coli-related beef recall at the XL Foods plant in Brooks brought these concerns into even sharper focus. Everyone breathed a sigh of relief when the plant reopened under JBS’s management. No one would have foreseen that historic flooding would shut down Cargill’s High River plant on June 20 for nearly two weeks. The plant escaped flood damage but lost its water supply. Large plants like High River use millions of gallons of water per week to harvest cattle, so a secure water supply is just as important to a beef plant as electricity. That the plant resumed any production as quickly as it did was a testament to the round-the-clock work by Cargill and local and provincial officials to restore the supply. One can only hope the temporary shutdowns of both plants were one-off events. For the reality is that Western Canada will remain essentially a two-plant region for the foreseeable future. JBS has no interest in reopening the former XL plant in Moose Jaw, Sask., and it seems unlikely that anyone will reopen the former Ranchers Beef Ltd. plant in Balzac, Alta. The only other options producers have are very small provincial plants or sending cattle south to the U.S. Given the growing costs incurred by country-of-origin labelling, the latter option is even less attractive for cattle feeders. Meanwhile, JBS Canada is using branded beef to add value to its Brooks operation, and possibly to offset some of the impact of COOL. It is using or will develop six brands with which to market its beef. Some of these

are brands that JBS already uses in the U.S. so the move reflects the close collaboration between JBS Canada and JBS USA. JBS co-ordinates its sales very closely with JBS USA, JBS Canada president Willie Van Solkema told attendees at the Saskatchewan Stock Growers Association’s 100th annual convention in June. This means co-ordinating its cow beef business with JBS’s in Green Bay, Wis., and its fed-beef business with JBS’s in Greeley, Colorado. The person who prices Canadian boxed beef sits next to the person who prices U.S. boxed beef, he said. The co-ordination means JBS Canada has aligned its computer sales system to that of JBS USA. This caused some technical issues in late May and June that forced the Brooks plant to reduce production until the issues were resolved. To the chagrin of producers, the reduced kills came as the floods shut down the High River plant. JBS’s six brands include: Blue Ribbon Angus Beef; the Packerland (U.S.) cow beef brand; Aspen Ridge, JBS USA’s natural beef brand; La Herencia, JBS USA’s brand for thin meat and end cuts; Certified Angus Beef; Chef ’s Exclusive for high-end restaurants. The Brook’s plant’s challenge week in, week out is to have a consistent supply of high-quality cattle, Van Solkema told the Saskatchewan meeting. But his message was: quality beef improves profits for everyone. He admitted though that one challenge is how to convince consumers and retailers that beef is a good protein option and said JBS believes it has to work with retailers as well as with producers. Like other JBS executives, Van Solkema was upbeat about beef exports, saying the huge global increase in protein consumption is positive for everyone. This message might encourage producers in both Saskatchewan and Alberta to consider expanding their cow herds. c

A North American view of the meat industry. Steve Kay is publisher and editor of Cattle Buyers Weekly

PHOTO: REUTERS/TODD KOROL

www.canadiancattlemen.ca

C at t l e m e n · Au g u s t 2 0 1 3

33


 CCA repo rts

By Martin Unrau

Taking COOL to Court

P

rime Minister Stephen Harper’s cabinet shuffle contained a few surprises but thankfully not too many for the cattle industry. By keeping Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Minister Gerry Ritz and International Trade Minister Ed Fast at the helm in their respective posts, the cattle industry is assured that important files like U.S. mandatory country-of-origin labelling (COOL) and a CanadaEU comprehensive economic and trade agreement (CETA), don’t miss a beat. Both of these files are at critical junctures after considerable effort from government and industry. The Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA) looks forward to a continued working relationship with ministers Ritz and Fast on these and other issues of importance to Canada’s beef cattle producers. The CCA looks forward to working with two new ministers, Rona Ambrose as minister of health and Leona Aglukkaq as minister of the environment. With Minister Ambrose the CCA will continue its work to achieve the approval of beef irradiation technology to enhance food safety for consumers and to support Health Canada’s work in evaluating approvals of new veterinary medications. We look forward to a continued collaboration on the environment file with Minister Aglukkaq on issues including the Species at Risk Act and a National Conservation Plan. Earlier in July, the CCA joined a coalition of meat and livestock organizations in the U.S. and Canada in filing a lawsuit to block the implementation of the recently amended U.S. COOL regulation. The lawsuit was filed in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. The complaint is made on the grounds that the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) May 23, 2013 COOL amendment violates the U.S. Constitution and the U.S. Agriculture Marketing Act, and is arbitrary and capricious. Other plaintiffs include the American Association of Meat Processors, American Meat Institute, Canadian Pork Council, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, National Pork Producers Council, North American Meat Association, and Southwest Meat Association. One question that I encountered a fair bit following the announcement is why the CCA is participating in what is essentially a U.S. Constitutional challenge. The CCA was invited to participate in the coalition lawsuit and did so because the desired outcome — blocking the implementation of COOL — is a shared objective. Participation in the lawsuit is one piece of a multi-pronged strategy the CCA has in play to end COOL discrimination against imported cattle, and that is to amend the COOL legislation to allow either a single mandatory label for all meat produced in the U.S. or to allow for voluntary labelling.

34

C at t l e m e n · au g u s t 2 0 1 3

The legal action is warranted because the increase in discrimination against imported cattle inherent in USDA’s May 23 amendments to the COOL rule will irreparably injure Canada’s livestock producers and their U.S. customers. The USDA’s chosen path of unfair trade discrimination also undermines the job security of American workers and harms the U.S. meat-processing industry, which will directly impact the productivity of Canada’s cattle industry. The lawsuit follows a move earlier in June by the Government of Canada to release a list of U.S. commodities that could be targeted for retaliation in relation to the COOL dispute. The Government of Canada has said it could seek retaliatory compensation of approximately $1.1 billion following the completion of ongoing World Trade Organization (WTO) proceedings, which will move forward independently of this U.S.-based litigation. The CCA is pleased to see operations returning to normal at Cargill’s High River facility. The plant processes about 40 per cent of western Canadian capacity and employs about 2,000 people. The facility was forced to reduce and then cease processing beef for a period due to a lack of fresh water supply following the floods in southern Alberta that devastated High River. The CCA was in regular contact with Cargill throughout the situation and worked in support of their activities to normalize their operations as quickly as possible. Cargill’s current fresh water supply is sufficient to harvest cattle and process beef for the time being. The amount of available fresh water supply will continue to drive Cargill’s operational decisions moving forward. Later in July, CCA officials met with Cargill senior leadership in Wichita, Kansas, and had good discussions on international trade priorities, sustainability and the future outlook of the industry. The CCA supported the B.C. Cattlemen’s Association effort to have Vancouver City Council revisit its decision to become Canada’s first city to adopt the anti-animal agriculture campaign, Meatless Monday. The Meatless Monday campaign contains falsehoods that eating meat damages the environment and negatively affects health. The so-called studies the campaign relies on to support its premise have been refuted by numerous experts. We’ll keep you posted on any updates regarding our request. I also participated in the first meeting of the Canadian Roundtable for Sustainable Beef (CRSB). Spearheaded by the CCA and modelled after the Global Roundtable for Sustainable Beef, of which CCA is a member, the CRSB aims to be a national, multi-stakeholder initiative developed to advance existing and new sustainability efforts within the industry. c

Martin Unrau is president of the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association

www.canadiancattlemen.ca


BUILDING TRUST IN CANADIAN BEEF

MEAT PROCESSoR TALKS BROKEN NEEDLES, BUCKSHOT IN MEAT Workflow disruption, product loss and a hit to beef’s reputation

You get to know a thing or two about meat processing and product quality when you’ve been at it for 65 years. That’s the history of Winnipeg-based Smith’s Quality Meats. A family-owned, federally inspected plant, the company has built a reputation for quality and a loyal clientele over those years. Today product sales include corned beef for Safeway in Western Canada, sausages for Sobeys in Manitoba and fresh and frozen meats into Co-op channels in Northwest Territories. Andy Van Patter, Smith’s operations manager, knows that anything that threatens that reputation, threatens the company. Broken needles and buckshot pellets certainly fall into that category. He gives producers a look inside the issue in his plant with a plea for their understanding of three main things. This is an ongoing issue. It costs big. And producers are a key part of the solution. Incidences continue

Despite efforts to prevent the problem, incidences of broken needles continue to occur. One example at Smith’s was a nondetectable needle that passed through their metal detector unnoticed. It ended up in a deli product and the deli hit it with its meat slicer. “That needle was about half an inch long and definitely could have caused an injury if

Cost is substantial

Van Patter says the company looks at broken needles and buckshot as separate but related problems. Obviously, needles have more capacity to injure so they are the highest concern. But many producers would be surprised at the buckshot incidences. The cost for managing these is significant, says Van Patter. To find a broken needle in a roast, for example, the only way is to keep cutting it in half and check each half until you find it. That often means lost product and lost time in the plant. There’s a hit to beef ’s reputation. Problems hit social media quickly and every recall shows a beef consumption drop that affects every producer, he says. The beef industry doesn’t want an injection error ending up on the dinner plate.

someone had eaten it with a meat cut,” says Van Patter. Buckshot pellets in meat are a growing issue. Pellets show up deep in meat. It doesn’t appear to be accidental in many cases with a significant number showing up in the rump area. “We’ve had two broken needles the past two years. We’ll have about 10 incidences of buckshot pellets during hunting season and more sporadically throughout the year,” he says.

Producer help critical

“Think what a half-inch needle could do stuck in someone’s throat,” says Van Patter. “Then imagine if this happened to your own family or friends. “We need every beef producer’s help to manage this.” Inject in the neck. “Our broken needles are showing up in the rump which means producers are not following recommended injection protocol.” Use detectable needles — because they allow metal detectors to do their job. Be judicious about who you let hunt on your land and consider setting restrictions to avoid buckshot incidences.

DEVELOPED BY PRODUCERS. DEVELOPED FOR CONSUMERS

One implant. That’s it. You’re done! Avoid the inconvenience and stress of re-implanting. Do it right. Do it once. Merck Animal Health, operating in Canada as Intervet Canada Corp., a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc., Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA. MERCK is a trademark of Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp., a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc., Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA. Copyright © 2011 Intervet International B.V., a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc., Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA. All rights reserved.

For more information, talk to your veterinarian or call our technical service at 1-866-683-7838.

® Registered trademark of Intervet International B.V. Used under license.

REV-XS Canadian Cattlemen QSHere.indd 1

13-07-24 14:49


 ENVIRON M E N T

By Michelle Bryan

SURVIVING T

he Alberta floods of June 2013 will go down in history for the extensive damage and chaos created by a record-breaking rainfall. Many people were caught off guard and could never have dreamed of the nightmare they were about to experience. Populated residential areas were hit the hardest with people being rescued in homemade boats, combines, pay loaders and even manure spreader trucks. When the water level was over the wheat and oats, ranchers had to scramble to save what they could from their homes and barns and get their cattle to safety Wade and Jaimie Nelson and Wade’s parents at Highwood Valley Ranch are one of the many families operating along the Highwood River that will long remember what it was like when the water started to rise the morning of June 20. Wade remembers the cattle were agitated, almost as if they could foresee the flash flood coming. The family tried to get the cattle to higher ground but by then the water was flooding in too fast. “When the water really started to rise, the cattle seemed to know to get to high ground and to just stand,” says Wade. When the water reached their bellies he remembers the cattle became unexpectedly calm. Once the family was able to cut some

36

C AT T L E M E N · AU G U S T 2 0 1 3

fence the cattle calmly started swimming behind them until they reached higher ground. Wade says he’d never seen anything like it in his life before, and is thankful they never lost any animals. At one point three bulls and seven horses were cornered between a fence and the quickly rising water. Wade and his uncle waded through the rising water, caught two of the horses and rode them out bareback. Miraculously the bulls and remaining horses followed them back upstream to safer ground. Amid the chaos of looking after the cattle the Nelsons along with a number of friends and neighbours spent their time hauling and stacking straw bales to create emergency berms to try and protect their homes. “Without the support from the neighbours, things could have been a lot worse,” says Wade. A YouTube video shot by the family shows the depth of the flooding along with some footage of Wade hauling straw bales through the water to his parents’ house. It can be found on the Nelsons’ Facebook page at www.facebook.com/HighwoodValleyRanch. Their fourth-generation ranch lies southwest of High River. The family has a strong connection to their land, especially the area along the river. The riparian area

PHOTO: LR HELICOPTERS

THE FLOOD along the river is protected by a conservation easement to ensure it remains undeveloped in perpetuity. Future owners will have to follow the management practices called for in the land trust holding the easement. The family markets hormone- and antibiotic-free beef from their Red and Black Angus herd directly to consumers from the ranch and at a number of local farmers’ markets. Downstream from the Highwood Valley Ranch, Bob Fraser lives along the Little Bow River. Most of the year the Little Bow is a shallow, gentle creek, but this June it was transformed into a raging river that flooded some of the primary pastures for Fraser’s 300 range cows and 1,200 yearlings. “The water just came so fast it was hard to prepare for it,” recalls Fraser whose house, barn and corrals are set less than 100 yards back from the Little Bow. Members of nearby Cayley Colony quickly raced over to help Fraser get his two tractors, trucks and stock trailers out of the yard. They used a front-end loader to get whatever belongings they could grab out of his house that was already inundated with three feet of water. Before he even started to clear the yard

www.canadiancattlemen.ca


envi ronment

Fraser first ran to the barn to rescue his two dogs that were struggling in two feet of water. Thankfully, people from Foothills Pet Resort of Cayley came within minutes to take the dogs and free up Fraser to tend to his livestock. When he first got to the pasture he found 80 head of yearlings on an island surrounded by raging flood waters. The yearlings were rotating between knee-highdeep water and the high ground where the water was ankle deep. He figured the water surrounding the island was anywhere from three to 15 feet deep and flowing fast. A helicopter was standing by to herd the cattle to higher ground but Bob was afraid to call it in for fear a helicopter might scare

www.canadiancattlemen.ca

 e returned to find the H water had subsided and his yearlings were safe but on the move them into running the wrong way toward the brush and trees hidden under the 15-foot-high water. Instead he followed the advice of a couple of older ranchers who had experienced floods in the past. They recommended leaving the cattle to fend for themselves.

Fraser kept tabs on the yearlings until dark and then headed to bed, hoping for the best. At dawn when he returned Fraser found the water had subsided and his yearlings safe but on the move. The fences in the area were demolished by the flooding so once the cattle got off the island they started heading toward town. Fraser and a crew of hastily gathered cowboys headed cross-country to gather up the yearlings and bring them back home. Like  the  Nelsons,  Fraser  has  some unpleasant memories from the flood of 2013 and plenty to be thankful about. In particular he is thankful for the many neighbours and friends who were so quick to help him out in his time of need. c

C at t l e m e n · Au g u s t 2 0 1 3

37


 OUR HISTO RY

PACKER WOES IN THE ’30s

W

riting in the first issue of the Canadian Cattlemen, in June 1938, Frank M. Baker of the Industrial and Development Council of Canadian Meat Packers put our current troubles with COOL into historical perspective. “Before the enactment of the Underwood Tariff in the United States in 1913, the exporters handled from 15 to 25 per cent of the marketings of Canada (as live cattle); the packers the remainder. With the free entry of cattle into the United States the proportion of cattle handled for export at once jumped to as high as 37 per cent in the war years (1914-18). “With the Fordney-McCumber Tariff in operation in 1922, the percentage exported alive at once dropped back to about the average of the years before free entry was possible. But the passage of the HawleySmoot Tariff in 1930 dealt the Canadian cattle exporter a body blow and almost at once his handlings declined to about six per cent of the marketings. “Once again the responsibility for clearing the markets was transferred to the packers, regardless of the fact that the domestic outlet, geared to absorb about 75 per cent of total production could not be stepped up to take 95 per cent without some drastic adjustments. With cattle prices in the United States relatively low, the small

export possible, both in cattle and beef, was transferred to Great Britain. Only by marked reductions in price of beef to Canadian consumers could the cattle marketings be cleaned up, and with those price reductions the per capita consumption of beef rose more than 12 pounds in 1934. The market was cleared of cattle but at a price which brought recriminations on the heads of those who were trying to make the best of a very bad job. “Cattlemen and packers alike were gratified when in January 1936, the provisions of the Canada-U.S.A. Trade Agreement became effective and part of the tariff burden was removed from live cattle entering the United States. Once again the live cattle exporter stepped into the picture and was active in both 1936 and 1937 until the quotas were filled. Then the packer was again asked to assume full responsibility. “While the provisions of the CanadaU.S.A. Trade Agreement undoubtedly gave the cattlemen of Canada a temporary lift, they have placed the packers at a disadvantage in competition with the exporter of cattle markets. Before 1936 United States tariffs were so framed as to give parity to exports of cattle and beef. Under such conditions Canadian packers were able to bid on more cattle than were needed for domestic consumption and could export beef to the large centres in the United

States, thus always checking the operations of the live cattle exporters and keeping values fully in time with the market to the south. But the reductions allowed on live cattle up to the quota limits did not apply to dressed beef. The cattle exporter can ship live cattle to the United States under a two per cent duty; the packer must pay six cents on beef. “It is obvious that under such conditions until the live cattle quota is filled each year, the packer can purchase only such cattle as can be absorbed in the domestic beef trade. The bulk of our small beef exports in the last two years has gone to Great Britain and other countries. “A healthy cattle industry in Canada must be predicated upon an export outlet which will continuously take the number of cattle over and above those which Canadians can consume at prices which will allow the cattleman to stay in the business. “The packer does not welcome low cattle and low beef prices. Instead we look forward to the time when the cattle exporter will again be performing his full share in the handling and marketings; when the packer will be distributing the beef needs of the Canadian people and exporting beef when cattle marketings make that course advisable and necessary; and when the cattleman will smile instead of frown when discussing his business.” c

 COVERS – A LO O K BAC K

1950

38

C AT T L E M E N · AU G U S T 2 0 1 3

1960

1970

1990 www.canadiancattlemen.ca


 THE INDUST RY

NewsRoundup Politics

Governance issues settled by BCCA

The adoption of a new governance structure was one of the highlights of the 2013 British Columbia Cattlemen’s Association (BCCA) annual meeting in Vernon earlier this summer. This was the final step in a process that began two years ago with an extensive review of the association’s bylaws. With cattle and producer numbers dropping sharply, and little likelihood of a rebound any time soon, the association says it wanted to ensure its 1,100 members were being represented fairly. Membership in the BCCA is voluntary. In the past, 16 regional cattle associations elected one director to the board of the BCCA. Starting next year 12 directors will be elected from seven regional zones, two each from five zones with heavy cattle populations and one each from the remaining two zones. The board members elect the president and vice-president of the association. The standing committee structure remains unchanged. David Haywood-Farmer of Savona, B.C., who was elected to a second term as president at the meeting, says the vote was 90 per cent in favour of the streamlined structure. “The bylaws haven’t had a major change in 40 years, so this is a big step and we hope a positive step.” The first zone elections will be held next spring. “The big push right now is to meet with the new ministers to make sure we get our messages delivered,” Haywood-Farmer says. “It’s positive that the ministers appointed to

the five departments we work with are from rural ridings. Now with a strong Liberal government with a four-year mandate, it should be steady going.” As in past years most of the resolutions at the B.C. meeting dealt with natural resource issues — forage, timber, wildlife and water. Several concerned the damage caused by the mountain pine beetle epidemic. Removing dead trees from private fences and vast acreages of Crown land raise concerns about personal injury, liability, and cost for ranchers. The BCCA continues to lobby the province to allow for the creation of rights-of-way by clearing one tree length of timber along both sides of fences on Crown land. The goal is to prevent further damage to fences, and create fireguards on land where the forest has been wiped out by the bugs. Ranchers are concerned about dwindling forage resources on Crown land and will press government to give reseeding of forages the same cost-allowance consideration as reforestation of land that has been logged. They will also be asking the Agriculture Ministry to start managing the burdensome ungulate populations that are devastating both standing and stored feed supplies in some areas of the province. “It’s very difficult for ranchers to manage grassland when they don’t know how many ungulates are out there,” says Haywood-Farmer. Unfortunately, more deer and elk in an area doesn’t translate to a drop in the wolf and coyote numbers. “Whether it’s going up or down is hard to say,” says Haywood-Farmer. “Personally, I could have no predation prob-

lems one year, then substantial problems the next year and I am in a light area. Those in heavily impacted areas experience wolf problems on a continual basis. Again, wolves need to be managed with a plan.” He feels the mountain pine beetle epidemic has had a lot to do with the advancing encroachment of wildlife on ranchlands. “It’s difficult to even imagine the vastness of forest killed by the beetle. It has changed the topography of the land and the way wildlife travel. It has changed the balance.” During the meeting the ranchers resolved to lobby the ministry to include the BCCA in the planning process to restore some managed balance to wildlife numbers and compensate ranchers for the impact these growing populations are causing on their operations. Continued on page 40

GREENER PASTURES

RANCHING LTD. Presents:

*Year-Round Grazing Systems* A Business Management School Topics include: • Human Resources • Economics and Finance • Pasture Calculations • Grazing Management • Pasture Rejuvenation • Weed Control • Cell Designs/Water Systems • Swath Grazing/Bale Grazing

Location: Westlock, AB

When: Nov. 5th, 6th & 7th, 2013 Or ask us about setting up a school in your area. Can you Graze 365 days a year? We provide a 3-day course that will take you right into the design and planning of a year-round grazing system. The course tuition is $800/Farm Unit, which allows two members from your farm business to attend. This course is well worth the investment.

Check out our website for details about funding availible! To register please contact:

Steve Kenyon

Elected to serve on the British Columbia Cattlemen’s Association’s 2013-14 executive are (l-r): John Anderson (Merritt); Linda Allison (Princeton); Lary Fossum, vice-president (Dawson Creek); David Haywood-Farmer, president (Savona); Martin Rossmann (Quesnel), Leroy Peters (Heffley Creek). www.canadiancattlemen.ca

Greener Pastures Ranching Ltd.

(780) 307-2275

www.greenerpasturesranching.com skenyon@greenerpasturesranching.com C at t l e m e n · Au g u s t 2 0 1 3

39


News Roundup Continued from page 39

Politics

SSGA looks to next 100 years

The Saskatchewan Stock Growers Association’s (SSGA) 100th anniversary celebration this summer was a great time to reflect on the past, but it didn’t stop the members from focusing on the future when they got down to the business part of the weekend. SSGA president Harold Martens says the immediate issues facing the SSGA and the provincial beef industry are the transfer of the brand inspection service from the Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture (SMA) to an industry-led agency, and a review of the Provincial Lands Act (1978). Reviews of forage insurance and farm plastic recycling are two other emerging issues on their agenda. Martens and Saskatchewan Cattlemen’s

Saskatchewan Stock Growers Association 2013-14 board of directors. Front row (l-r): Terry Ostrander, Robin Wiggins, Lloyd Thompson, Calvin Knoss (past president), Shane Jahnke (second vice), Harold Martens (president), Doug Gillespie (first vice), Brooks Whitney (finance chair). Back row (l-r): Brent Griffin, Ryan Beierbach, Kelcy Elford, Keith Day, Henry McCarthy, Bill Huber, Larry Flaig, Gerald Schultz, Chad MacPherson (general manager). Missing, Fred Lansdall, Roy Rutledge, Helen Finucane, Laird Senft, Grant Alexander, Ken McDonald, Jack Ford, Garner Deobald, Tara Fritz, and Aaron Huber.

Association (SCA) chair Mark Elford, cochair the industry advisory committee put in place last summer by Agriculture Minister Lyle Stewart to make recommendations for an industry-led brand inspection service. While Livestock Inspection Services (LIS) in Alberta is confident it can provide the service to Saskatchewan producers, SSGA and SCA members passed

resolutions at their respective AGMs throwing their support behind the formation of a Saskatchewan agency. Martens says a separate agency will ensure the service is directed by the Saskatchewan industry and that the province will retain its branding legislation. That doesn’t preclude contracting aspects of the service to an outside provider such as LIS.

Answer our survey — and have a go at winning one of our caps

We have a goal to be the best beef cattle magazine in the business. But we need your help. If you could just fill in this survey and return it to me, you would be helping us set the future editorial direction for Canadian Cattlemen. All you have to do is tell me what you like about the magazine, and what you

We’d appreciate it if you could tell us a little about yourself. It makes it easier for us to keep your main interests in focus  I’m ranching or farming Enterprise Total beef cattle Yearlings on feed/pasture Registered cows Fed cattle (sold yearly) Commercial cows Horses Calves on feed/pasture Other livestock

# of head

 I no longer take an active part in farming If not an owner/operator of a farm, are you:

 In agribusiness (bank, elevator, ag supplies, etc.)  Other (please specify) ____________________ My approximate age is:  a) Under 35  b) 36 to 44  d) 55 to 64  e) 65 or over

40

 c) 45 to 54

C at t l e m e n · Au g u s t 2 0 1 3

don’t like. There’s also some space for you to tell us what you would like to see in future issues. ClIp And enClose your mAIlIng lABel. each month, we will draw one name from all the surveys sent in and send that person a Cattlemen cap. It could be you!

What do you think of: On a scale of 1 to 5, how do you and your family like these features? 5 – I always watch for it; let’s see more of it 4 – I regularly read it and like it 3 – I usually read it 2 – There are things I’d rather read 1 – I don’t want it; get rid of it Regular Columns 5 4 3

Regular Columns News Roundup Purely Purebred The Markets

5

4

3

2

1

Market Talk Sales and Events

2 1 Nutrition Comment Research Special features 5 4 3 2 1 Newsmakers Letters Calving Issue (Jan.) CCA Reports Custom Feedlot Guide (Sep.) Prime Cuts Stock Buyers’ Guide (Aug.) Straight From The Hip Animal Health Special (Sep.) Holistic Ranching Beef Watch (May & Nov.) What would you like to see? __________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ How much time do you and your family spend reading 1666 Dublin Avenue Canadian Cattlemen?  Under 2 hours  Over 2 hours Winnipeg, Man. R3H 0H1

www.canadiancattlemen.ca


NEWS ROUNDUP

According to Martens, Alberta’s brand inspection service differs from Saskatchewan’s in several ways. The point of inspection, administrative authority for the Stray Animals Act, and role of the Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals are some of the differences that can’t be aligned overnight. The biggest challenge is employee succession because the government contract with brand inspectors can’t simply be voided to allow the new agency to rehire, as was done in Alberta, says Martens. This human element makes the brand inspection file one of the most intense projects he has worked on in his time with the SSGA — but progress is being made. The advisory committee as reached a consensus on the establishment of a nonprofit corporation and a memorandum of understanding has been worked out with the SMA Livestock Branch that has the province retaining the overall role of holding the regulations. The next step is to establish the non-profit corporation and its bylaws. Then the new corporation will be able to sign agreements with the employees. “We are about one-third of the way there, with the underlying goal as we outlined with government at the start, that this is a process toward a western Canadian cattle movement and inspection system,” says Martens. A western model would ultimately tie brand inspection services and traceability requirements together through the use of an electronic manifest. Since no two provinces are at the same stage in this process, he likens the project to four buses converging on an intersection. All will get there, but not at the same time. In contrast the work on the Lands Act review has advanced with lightning speed, says Martens. The review itself was officially announced a couple weeks ahead of the SSGA meeting. Three public meetings have already been held and there is an expectation that draft legislation will be introduced this fall. According to government briefing documents, the ministries of Environment and Agriculture share responsibility for the act. Agriculture administers 8.6 million acres of provincial land in the southern surveyed part of the province, with 6.5 million acres used for agricultural activities, primarily grazing. Environment manages 93.3 million acres, largely in northern and central Saskatchewan. The ministries have identified several ways in which the act could be improved to clarify its intent, streamline service and offer greater flexibility in meeting client

www.canadiancattlemen.ca

needs. Outdated sections will be removed and the authority for land-use planning will be added. The new act will be written in the enabling style that allows for details to be prescribed in the regulations rather than in the act itself. In general, the SSGA views the review as an opportunity and Martens was pleased that 20 members attended and spoke at the first public meeting. “We need to be there because there are some things in the old act that we want to keep there — not see (them) go into the regulations,” he explains. The SSGA, SCA and Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipalities were drafting a joint document to present to the government at press time. Topping their list is retaining a lessee’s ability to control public access on the lease. The risk of fires, the spread of noxious weeds, animal disease control, protection of species at risk from ATVs and snowmobilers, protection of livestock, vegetation and infrastructure from vandalism, and patron liability for trespassers are among the reasons why cattle producers say lessees need to be able to control access to the Crown land under their care. These aren’t what-if scenarios, Martens adds. Alberta producers

don’t have this right and they are dealing with very real problems as a result. Unlike other jurisdictions, Saskatchewan requires lessees of Crown land to pay a property tax on their leases, which the producers claim is further justification for them retaining the right to control access. In another resolution the SSGA members backed this stand and called on the province to retain the 33-year renewable lease policy, claiming it serves the environment, livestock production and producer security. The joint document also addresses the importance of retaining the appeal board system because the province has indicated that certain decisions can be appealed to the Court of Queen’s Bench. Martens has been advised that not only is this procedure very costly, but it can take years to get a court date. Other points to be considered on regulations include the right of first refusal to purchase a lease; the right to pass a lease to family members; the right to sell a lease with the sale of deeded land; development of watering facilities; and getting the right mix surrounding registration of leases as security for financing. Continued on page 42

ONLY ONE FENCE HAS EARNED THE RIGHT TO BE NAMED AFTER THE

LEGENDARY KING RANCH The strongest, most durable wire fence money can buy.

The one. The only. King Ranch Fence from Red Brand.

Square Deal® Knot is the strongest available and prevents buckling or sagging Heavy duty wire with 2½ times more zinc coating Extra tall to safely contain large animals

Find dealers, expert advice and installation videos at redbrand.com • 800.447.6444 C AT T L E M E N · AU G U S T 2 0 1 3

41


News Roundup Continued from page 41

Safety

Move bales safely

It’s easy to become complacent about safety when you’re putting up large bales, but that can be a tragic mistake, says Glen Blahey an agricultural safety and health specialist with the Canadian Agricultural Safety Association (CASA). “The majority of injuries occur when bales are being placed onto or removed from transport vehicles, or when an operator is lifting the bales incorrectly, either with improper spearing techniques or lifting the bales beyond their centre of gravity. If a bale falls, it could crush the operator or anyone nearby. So handlers need to ensure they are lifting correctly and that their operating space is totally clear of bystanders,” he says.   Bruce Johnson, executive director of the Farm and Ranch Safety and Health Association, (FARSHA), says a transporting checklist starts by making sure your equipment can safely carry and secure the load. “Moving and transporting large bales whether round or square requires specialized equipment, usually things go wrong when proper equipment and procedures are not being used or followed,” he says. There are four main steps in bale transport, each with their own risks. Lifting

Improper lifting can cause a rollover, or bales to be dropped and start rolling, put-

ting operators and bystanders at risk. Before you start, check that the lift capacity on a front-end loader or telehandler is sufficient to handle the load, and you have a clear space around the machine without anyone in the way. Don’t try lifting bales with buckets on a front-end loader. Double spears work well but beware of single spears unless they have a stabilizer to keep the bale from rotating and sliding off the spear. Pierce the centre of the bale. If the spears are set too low the bale could rotate forward enough to slip off; pierce it too high and it could rotate back and crush you. Loading

Loading too quickly can unsettle already placed loads, creating risks for loaders and bystanders. Be sure no one is in the way, on either side of the truck bed, before you start. And take your time. Stack bales in a tight, pyramidal layout, and guard against pushing bales so hard that you shove the bale on the opposite side out of position. Finally, secure the load with straps in both directions, as is required in most parts of Canada. Transport

Use proper warning lights and consider using a pilot vehicle to help warn motorists when you need to turn, especially left turns. And be cautious. The motorist behind you may not see your turning light, or even recognize that it means you are turning. Unloading

Select a location on even, hard ground with adequate space for manoeuvring. Clear the area of bystanders. Determine if the load has shifted, and if so make adjustments to reduce the risk

of bales falling. Remove the straps but do not begin unloading until the driver is clear of the site. Once again, ensure your equipment is adequate for the weight of the bales and the height of the bale stack, pierce each bale in the centre, and unload from the top. So far in 2013, according to media reports, three Canadians have been killed while transporting bales and another two have been badly injured. In February, an Ontario man was struck by a falling hay bale while hauling it with a front-end loader. He died of his injuries. In May, a man in British Columbia was injured when a bale gave way and struck him while he was repairing the wrapping when the bale was being moved from the field to a barn. He suffered non-life-threatening injuries. For more information on safe bale handling contact CASA at info@casaacsa.ca or FARSHA at farmsafe@farsha. bc.ca, or visit agsafetyweek.ca to learn how to develop a complete farm safety plan.

packers

Elanco registers new pre-slaughter hide wash

Elanco Food Solutions Canada has gained a registration from Health Canada for Finalyse, a pre-slaughter hide wash that is applied to cattle before slaughter. Already registered in the U.S., Finalyse is the first pre-harvest hide wash for live animals in Canada. It contains a mixture of bacteriophages that specifically target E. coli 0157:H7. Based on research reports the company says Finalyse can substantially reduce the number of E. coli bacteria on hides to reduce the risk of exposure in the plant once the hides are removed.

Markets

ILC points to emerging markets

A recent Alberta Beef Producers newsletter says the takeaway message from the International Livestock Congress in Calgary last month was Canadian beef producers need to look to emerging markets to manage longterm margin pressures from rising feed costs and stalled demand in developed markets. Lowell Catlett the dean of the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences at New Mexico State University said that by 2020 there will be another 500 million people on the planet to feed and another 500 million who will rise into the middle class, mostly in countries that cannot supply the necessary amounts of meat

42

C at t l e m e n · Au g u s t 2 0 1 3

www.canadiancattlemen.ca


NEWS ROUNDUP

protein. “The demand for beef has no known bounds,” he said. Aaron Goertzen, an economist with BMO Capital Markets said emerging markets like India and Brazil have recorded steadily increasing beef consumption, and the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization expects the pace of that expansion to be sustained over the next decade. In a release, BMO Capital Markets said total domestic consumption of beef and veal in India was over two million tonnes in 2012, an increase of 73 per cent since 2000. In Brazil, consumption was nearly eight million tonnes, up 29 per cent. In contrast, Canadians consumed just over one million tonnes last year. Goertzen acknowledged that increasing overseas exports “is not a straightforward undertaking, and that it will depend on domestic and foreign regulatory factors that are outside of the industry’s direct control.” The ABP release notes the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association has already notified negotiators working on a Canada-India Free Trade Agreement that India maintains a religious-based prohibition on imports of beef from bos Taurus and bos Indicus cattle. Much of the beef consumed in India is from domesticated water buffalo.

an s

Research support

800-235-6140

ore on the web

ainjans.com

Better Bulls...Better Results.

www.salerscanada.com

“A GOOD BOTTOM LINE STARTS WITH A GREAT COW HERD!”

CANADIAN GELBVIEH ASSOCIATION 5160 Skyline Way NE, CALGARY, ALBERTA, T2E 6V1 PH: (403) 250-8640 • FAX: (403) 291-5624

WWW.GELBVIEH.CA CANADIAN HEREFORD ASSOCIATION

5160 Skyline Way NE Calgary, Alberta T2E 6V1 Phone: (403) 275-2662 Toll Free (888) 836-7242 Fax: (403) 295-1333 Toll Free: (888) 824-2329 CSA Bus. Card Jan04 12/9/03 www.hereford.ca

Unbeatable Maternal Performance Canadian Simmental Association

403-250-7979

13 - 4101 19 Street, N.E. Calgary, AB www.simmental.com

More on the web

those s” “famou

plainjans.com

Roper

gloves

620-872-5777

from

:

p la i n j a n s

DON’T MIS S

“THE WELSH BLACK ADVANTAGE” Canadian Welsh Black Cattle Society Box 546 Trochu, AB T0M 2C0 Ph/Fax: (403) 442-4372

www.canadianwelshblackcattle.com

00-235-6140

p l a i nj a n s

Forage Additive For alfalfa silage, corn silage and baled hay

Dry granular or ready-to-use liquid Canadian Angus Association board of directors (l-r): Rob Smith, CEO; Dawn Wilson, Alta.; Bob Hahn, Alta.; Jon Fox, Sask.; Lorraine Sanford, B.C.; Jim Colodey, Maritimes; Gary Latimer, past president; Kevin Blair, president; Tammi Ribey, Ont.; Lois McRae, Man.; Jérôme Richard, Que.; Corinne Gibson, president elect; David Sibbald, Alta. www.canadiancattlemen.ca

11:21 AM

More Efficient Means More Hereford

Value of dry matter saved - treatment cost = dollars saved INTERNATIONAL STOCK FOOD

1-877-473-2474 info@isfcanada.ca www.isfcanada.ca

C at t l e m e n · Au g u s t 2 0 1 3

more on the web

plainjans.com

MARKETPLACE

Storage life of the product is an important selling point if you are marketing highvalue fresh beef in these distant markets. It is generally agreed you need a minimum storage life of 90 days. Storage life is important to overseas importers because it allows them to hold beef until the retail demand is right rather that having to sell it as it arrives by ship. Australian product has long been able to offer a shelf life of 120 days and one product has pushed that limit to 160 days. There

seems no reason to think that Canadian beef could not supply a similar timeline, but until recently we never had the research to back up the claim. Now we do. In March meat researcher Colin Gill and his team at the Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada research station in Lacombe reported on a trial that demonstrated Canadian vacuum-packed beef stored at -1.5 C has a storage life of 130 days or more. They compared vacuum-packaged bonein and boneless cuts from two plants at -2 C, the standard storage temperature in North America, and -1.5 C, the standard for beef shipped to overseas markets. Cuts in each test group were opened on the day they arrived and every 30 days after that up to 160 days. When opened, each package was assessed for odour and bacteria in the rinse fluid. Three steaks were prepared from each cut. One was frozen and subsequently assessed for flavour. The other two were displayed at 4 C and assessed daily for appearance and odour. Storage life was defined as the last sampling date before the beef was deemed unacceptable because of odour, appearance or flavour. The storage life for all cuts was longer at -1.5 C, the coldest temperature at which beef can be stored without freezing. Boneless cuts had a longer storage life than bonein cuts; the spoilage of the bone-in cuts was due to odours associated with the exposed bone marrow. Cuts from one plant were not spoiled after 160 days. Further tests are being done to try and identify the factors that gave the plant’s meat such a long lives. As a general recommendation Gill’s group looked at the entire sample and put the minimum for Canadian beef at 130 days. The project was funded by the Beef Research Cluster. c

43

Page


 NEWS AB OUT YOU

By Deb Wilson

PurelyPurebred n The Calgary Stampede is proud to host the richest steer show in Canada, the United Farmers of Alberta (UFA) Steer Classic and draws the best of the industry. From 11 breed class winners, one is crowned Grand Champion Steer and earns $10,000 in prize money. 2013 marks the 30th anniversary of the UFA Steer Classic. It’s the largest steer show in Canada, and Riley Chalack has been trying to win it for years. “This is probably my 10th year at stampede. We’ve had a few Reserve Champions, but never a Grand Champion before,” says the young showman from Carstairs, Alta. “I think it’s a big deal.” The Grand Champion steer, sired by a Maine-Galloway-cross bull from a Maine-Angus cow, also won the UFA Steer Classic Open class. Co-owned by Riley Chalack, Fairland Cattle Co., Logan Chalack, Royden Anderson and Flewelling Cattle Co., it weighed in at 1,317 pounds. The UFA Steer Classic Reserve Grand Champion and Champion in the Hereford class is co-owned by Nicona Brost, Fairland Cattle Co., Logan Chalack, Flewelling Cattle Co. and Deerview Meats. The steer won $4,000 from Merck Animal Health, plus a $1,500 breed class prize from the Alberta Hereford Association. The Junior Champion was owned by Grayden Kay of Lloydminster and Michael Jones.  Other breed champions were: Cody Lafrentz of Bienfait, Sask., Angus; Kelsey Knott, Ardrossan, Red Angus; Jon Fox, Lloydminster,  Charolais;  Jake  Rawluk,

Moosehorn, Man., Hereford Influence; Ryley and Toby Noble, Lloydminster, Sask., Limousin; Darrell Comazzetto, Knutsford, B.C., Maine Anjou; Laurie Morasch, Bassano, Shorthorn; Matt Criddle, Balgonie, Sask., Simmental and Jim Fox, Lloydminster, Sask., Speckle Park. Reserve Champions were: Megan Mcleod, Cochrane, Angus; Davis Schmidt, Watrous, Sask., Red Angus; Taylor Giles, Cochrane, Charolais; Grady Conway, Innisfail, Hereford; Tanya Belsham, Houston, B.C., Hereford Influence; Kathryn Dolliver, Stettler in Junior Steer; Ryley Gutzke, Weyburn, Sask., Limousin; Les Watson, White Fox, Sask., Maine Anjou; Wade Brokenshire, Estevan, Sask., Shorthorn and Simmental; Kyza Taylor, Warner, Speckle Park and Chance Jackson of Sedley, Sask., in the open class. n Farmfair International celebrates its 40th year this fall. With nearly 40 per cent of Canada’s beef-breeding herd located in Alberta and the highest density of Canadian cattle located within 300 km of Edmonton, Farmfair has become a premiere venue for producers looking to do some business. This year’s Farmfair hosts eight national breed shows: Red Angus, Black Angus, Charolais, Gelbvieh, Lowline, Limousin, Shorthorn and Simmental. In addition, the commercial cattle program is being enhanced. In all 1,200 head of cattle are expected to be onsite during Farmfair.

Suggestions are always welcome. My phone number is 403-325-1695 Email: deb.wilson@ fbcpublishing.com

n Farmfair will be the location of all things Limousin November 6-8 this year starting with the Limousin pen show on the Wednesday, the National show on Thursday and the Last Man Standing event on Friday followed by the Headliner sale at 4 p.m. Limousin headquarters will be at the Holiday Inn Express, 13742 50 St. NW Edmonton, Alta.; Phone 780-476-9898. Group Code: ALA, Group Name: Alberta Limousin Association Members. The deadline to book under the group rate of $129.99 a night is Oct. 5. n The second Canadian Angus Foundation (CAF) Building the Legacy sale produced big money for the Canadian Angus Foundation during the Canadian Angus National Convention in Guelph, Ont. The sale was initiated last year to support the CAF in preserving and expanding the Angus breed for future generations through education, youth development, scientific and market research and historical restoration. n Our deepest sympathy to the Bollum family of Airdrie on the loss of Randy’s brother Wayne. Wayne Bollum was a Limousin enthusiast in Minnesota. n It’s with a great deal of sadness that we announce the passing of Leone KarwandyHagel. Leone was a dedicated volunteer at all levels, a wonderful ambassador for the Limousin breed and a friend to everyone she met. n Longtime Limousin breeder Lillian Larsen passed away on May 25 at the age of 91. The L-Pine Limousin herd remained active until the fall of 2012.

n I am out of pictures folks, help me out here, please!!! The picture (above) in the last issue was of a carload of show steers at the Toronto Royal in 1963. The individuals in the picture are (l to r) Ken Cox, Louie Alm, Bob Smith, and Walter Byer. The steers were entered under Byer Flour Mills of Camrose, Alta. Ken Cox was excited to see the picture and phoned me to tell me who everyone was, which gave us a chance to visit. (That’s why I need more pictures! I will miss the visits.)

44

C at t l e m e n · Au g u s t 2 0 1 3

n More than 140 Canadian Angus Association members joined industry leaders in Guelph, Ont., for the second annual Canadian Angus Rancher Endorsed day in early June as part of the Canadian Angus National Convention. The day began with an industry panel of speakers featuring Mike Beretta of Beretta Organic Farms, Steve Eby of JSE Farms, Dave Ropp of Ontario Livestock Exchange, Matt Heleniak of Norwich Packers and Dr. Rob Bell of Zoetis, previously Pfizer.

www.canadiancattlemen.ca


PURELY PUREBRED

n Congratulations to the Rea family of Bar 3R Limousin for receiving the Century Family Farm Award. Their operation is located in Marengo, Sask. n A summary in the May 2013 Charolais Banner shows the Charolais bull sales in the spring of 2013 had the second-highest average since they started documenting them 32 years ago. Based on 77 sales reported to the Charolais Banner from across Canada, it was also the second-highest-grossing spring bull sale season at over $10.5 million. Nearly 2,600 bulls, over 70 per cent of them yearlings, posted an average $4,095, surpassed only by spring 2012. Helge By, publisher of the Charolais Banner, sees this as a positive spring for the Charolais breed. “With more bulls selling and with only a small decrease in price from last year, we definitely increased market share. We saw many new buyers, including large orderbuying firms and feedlots, buying Charolais bulls to put on their own cows. Many of these are black females in operations using Charolais for the first time. The trend of using Charolais bulls on black cows is

gaining momentum, and with crossbreeding the easiest way to increase pounds and profits, I believe it is going to explode.” n Congratulations to Scott and Rebecca Bohrson, of Bohrson Marketing Services as they announce the birth of their daughter Gracie Brooklyn on May 30, 2013, weighing 7 lbs., 1 oz. n The Davidson Gelbvieh and Lonesome Dove Ranch 24th Annual Bull Sale sold 76 yearling bulls at an average of $3,875. The 25th Anniversary Bull Sale is scheduled for Saturday, March 1, 2014 at the family’s bull yards near Ponteix, Sask. n Becky Domolewski of Taber, Alberta, is the second winner of the $1,000 Dick Turner Memorial Scholarship presented by the Canadian Angus Foundation. Domolewski is an active Red Angus breeder and the daughter of Doug and Cheryl Domolewski of CD Land and Cattle, which holds an annual Quality Counts bull sale. She has finished her first year in agribusiness with a focus on livestock management at Lakeland College. She is also the

Are you mobile?

treasurer of the Alberta Junior Angus Association and is a 4-H ambassador. In a separate ceremony the foundation named Chad Lorenz of Markerville, Alta., as the Robert C. McHaffie Becky Domolewski Junior Ambassador of the breed for 2013-14. Chad and his family run 90 head of purebred Black Angus cattle at Lorenz Angus Farms. He sits as a director on the board of the Canadian and Alberta Junior Chad Lorenz Angus  associations and was the purebred beef team leader of the student-managed farm at Lakeland College in Vermilion where he received a diploma in animal science technology. n Canadian Angus Association members affirmed Kevin Blair as president for 2013–14 Continued on page 46

What’s better than sitting down with a coffee and the latest edition of Cattlemen? How about getting the latest ag & livestock news on your smartphone with Cattlemen Mobile. } Set your local weather } Set news subjects relevant to your farm or ranch } Set notices on the futures contract prices of your choice } Cattlemen version is FREE to Download } Available for Android, iPhone and BlackBerry smartphones

iPhone, Android & BlackBerry

} Visit agreader.ca/cc today to download the app or text “cc” to 393939 to be sent the link. Standard text messaging rates apply.

Versions Available

Get Cattlemen mobile. All the livestock news and information you’re looking for — on your smartphone. www.canadiancattlemen.ca

Part of the

network

Canadian Cattlemen Mobile is sponsored by

C at t l e m e n · Au g u s t 2 0 1 3

45


PU R E LY PU R E B R E D

Continued from page 45

at their annual meeting in Guelph this summer. Kevin and his wife Noreen own and operate Blairs.Ag with their family and staff. For more than 35 years, Blair’s family has been involved in the purebred beef industry. Their primary focus in recent years has been Red and Black Angus with a total of 350 purebred females, an extensive embryo program and 10,000 acres of grain and pasture land at Lanigan, Sask. Blair is a strong supporter of the Canadian Junior Angus program; Blairs.Ag offers a scholarship program for youth who purchase heifer projects from them. They also support the Canadian Angus Foundation (CAF) and the CAF Building the Legacy Sale, which has raised more than $110,000 for Canadian Angus youth programs over the past two years. Corinne Gibson of Six Mile Red Angus at Fir Mountain, Sask., was elected president elect at the meeting. Her family has been raising Angus cattle since 1954. She and her husband Clayton had their 36th Annual Bull Sale in April averaging nearly $6,000. n Canadian Hereford Association president Burt Grundy and general manager Gordon Stephenson met with importers looking to potentially import 1,200 purebred cattle during the Canadian trade mission to Russia and Kazakhstan led by federal Minister Ritz and Alberta Minister Olson. Jim Weaver of Weavercraft International will do the followup with both importers. In Kazakhstan, Grundy, Stephenson and Rod Guilford of Xports International

Canadian Charolais Association board. Front row (l-r): John Wilgenbusch (first vice-president), Halbrite, Sask.; Brent Saunders (president), Markdale, Ont.; Brian Coughlin (second vice-president), Cobden, Ont.; Wade Beck (past president), Lang, Sask. Back row (l-r): Lyle Bignell, Stettler, Alta.; Ricky Milton, Cornwall, P.E.I.; Bernard Begin, Ste-Marie de Beauce, Que.; Kelly Carson (general manager). Missing: Rod McLeod, Cochrane, Alta.; Dory Gerard, Innisfail, Alta. and Campbell Forsyth, Eriksdale, Man.

had private meetings with ministers Ritz and Olson in conjunction with Bakyt Ataibekov of the Dinara Ranch. Minister Ritz and Grundy presented Mr. Ataibekov with the Canadian Hereford Ambassador Award during a reception at the Canadian Embassy and Gordon Stephenson presented him with a cheque for $5,000 as a sponsor of the Almaty Farm School, which is a Dinara Ranch project. n The Canadian Simmental Association has a new corporate relationship with New Holland Agriculture with New Holland becoming a Platinum Sponsor of the Beef Innovations 2013 Symposium, a supporter of the YCSA National Classic and the Guelph Beef Innovations Field Day. It is

(l-r) Diana Raffan, Don Raffan, Margarette Raffan, Peter Raffan and CAA’s Brian Good.

n Valley Auction, Armstrong, B.C., has been chosen as the Canadian Angus Association’s Auction Market of the Year in recognition of its work promoting Angus and Angus-cross cattle. Brian Good, director of field services for the Canadian Angus Association, presented the award at the Livestock Markets Association of Canada annual convention. Don and Peter Raffan currently run the auction mart. The decisions their parents made in 1963 to purchase the auction mart and move their family from Calgary to Armstrong, have impacted the Raffan brothers for nearly 50 years.

46

C at t l e m e n · Au g u s t 2 0 1 3

also a contract advertiser in the Simmental Country Magazine and a supporter of other CSA promotion. n The Canadian Junior Hereford Association held its Bonanza in Brandon, Manitoba from July 30-August 3 in conjunction with the Canadian Hereford Association’s annual meeting. There were 199 head of cattle, 131 juniors and 100 adults registered for the event. Guest speakers included Dr. John Basarab and geneticist/rancher Sean McGrath. n Congratulations to the Cattlemen’s Young Leaders who brought home the win in the Five Nations Beef Alliance Challenge on the FNBA YouTube Channel (www. youtube/fivenationsbeef) with over 7,000 views. The one-month contest recorded a total of 11,000 views on the site in total with Australia as the runner-up. One of the CYL representatives will win a free trip to the FNBA Summit in Australia. n The largest number of golfers yet took to the links for the T Bar Invitational Sixth Annual Golf Tournament in June. In the last six years this event has raised $243,000 to support the activities of eight national junior breed associations, representing approximately 2,100 members. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to the Canadian Western Agribition Junior Beef Extreme. n Helge and Candace By of the Charolais Banner were asked to speak to the Norwegian Beef Breeders Association when they were in Norway in June. The Bys hosted some of the Norwegians at Agribition. c

www.canadiancattlemen.ca


 Market Su mma ry

By Debbie McMillin

TheMarkets Fed Cattle June finally saw upward movement in the fed-cattle market as highs were made at $122.70 per cwt due to the tight fedcattle supply and increased summer beef demand. Current price levels (in late July) of $118.91 are $11.06 higher than the same week in 2012. Since the high, Canadian prices have fallen back three per cent, while U.S. prices have fallen nearly eight per cent. Stronger prices and current feedlots left packers reaching further into the calf supply and consequently carcass weights are lighter than a year ago. Currently steer carcass weights are an average of 842 pounds, which is 19 pounds lighter than last year at this time. The fed-cattle cash basis is currently -6.08 per cwt, which marks the first time in several weeks that the cash basis is wider than the five-year cash-to-cash average. On July 1, the total number of cattleon-feed in Alberta and Saskatchewan was 748,137 head, unchanged from a year ago. The 54,369 head of cattle placed on feed in June was 17 per cent fewer than a year ago. The largest difference in the weight categories was a 25 per cent decline in placements of feeders over 800 pounds. Slaughter slowed somewhat toward the end of June with the

flooding at High River. Year-to-date national fed slaughter is down. Steers are down five per cent at 696,718 head while the heifer kill is off by 17 per cent on the year with 433,559 head processed to date. A smaller cow herd and heifer retention indicates a smaller supply of calves this fall. Tighter basis levels over the past several weeks with current feedlots and tightened supplies have led to a decrease in exports to the U.S., however, year-to-date total fed-cattle exports are still four per cent larger at 216,399 head.

Feeder Cattle Feeder cattle volumes at auction this time of year are always small however, prices on the cash market improved slightly for quality cattle over the past few weeks. Lightweight calves gained $2.75 per cwt from a month ago with 550 steers averaging $150.50 by mid-July. Heavier feeders trended seasonally higher on light trade, gaining $8.50 over the month to average $135.50. The feeder basis is still considerably wider than what we would consider normal for this time of year, with a spot basis of -23.52. It has narrowed some in recent weeks, however, the five-year average for the same week is -8.50 per cwt.

Feeder exports remain well ahead of last year’s pace, at 160,023 head to the first week of July, up 62 per cent from 2012.

Non-Fed Cattle Cow prices rebounded in the past month on strong demand from the U.S. where soft cow slaughter numbers have packers reaching to secure inventory to satisfy a demand for grinding cuts. D1,2 cows averaged $79.67 in the second week of July, just 23 cents under the current spring high. Exports are more that double last year’s pace, at 156,394 head but domestic cow slaughter is down six per cent to 234,157 head. Overall, it appears combined cow marketings will be up again in 2013. The butcher bull market has also benefited from short supplies and strong demand for grinding meat, averaging $89.41 per cwt in mid-July. Export shipments at 34,370 head are running 62 per cent ahead of last year while domestic bull slaughter is off by 78 per cent at 2,005 head year to date. c Debbie McMillin is a market analyst who ranches at Hanna, Alta.

More markets 

 DE B’S OUTLOOK Fed Cattle In the near term extreme heat in parts of the U.S. is negatively impacting beef demand as consumers generally reach for lighter meals when weather warms. Expect a typical summer for beef demand and fed-cattle trends with sluggish summer lows ahead before it begins to pick back up in the fall. However, there are some positives moving forward. Packers are not long bought, feedlots are current and carcass weights in both Canada and the U.S. are below year-ago averages, which should support prices as we move toward our summer lows. In addition, historically tight on-feed numbers scheduled for summer and fall marketings should limit the downside. Feeder Cattle Interest in grass cattle is picking up and will continue through late August and early September. In general yearling highs are made through this time and the 2013 feeder market is showing signs of following this seasonal pattern. All eyes remain on grain production in Canada and the U.S. as extreme heat in some areas threatens crops. As we move into fall and crops start

www.canadiancattlemen.ca

to come off the impact on cost of gain will certainly play a roll in pricing the fall feeder run. Sellers will be watching the U.S. buyers in the coming month to see how they are reacting to the uncertainty created by the new rules on COOL. Overall, tight supplies due to the small calf crop and empty feedlot pens should lead to good buyer competition on quality calves during the fall run. Forward-priced sales to date support a strong fall run ahead. Non-Fed Cattle Heading into fall cow marketings will pick up as calves are weaned and culling decisions are made. Across much of the Prairies grass conditions are stable, which will delay cows coming in off grass, however, producers are currently working to get hay supplies up in good condition. Once that’s done decisions will be made as to selling additional hay at current strong prices, or keeping additional cows through the winter. Solid demand for grinding meat will cap the downside ahead for cows in the fall run before prices pick up again further out. Look for a seasonal decrease in prices, however, not as steep as traditional slumps.

C a t t l e m e n · a u g u s t 2 0 1 3 47


M A R K ETS

Break-even Prices on A-Grade Steers

Market Prices

140

190

ALBERTA

130

170

120

160

110

150

100 90

Steer Calves (500-600 lb.)

180

140 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

155

ONTARIO

145 135

130

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

95

D1,2 Cows

85 75

125

65

115

55

105 95 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Canfax weighted average price on A-Grade steers 2013 2012

Break-even price for steers on date sold 2013-14 2012

July 2013 prices* Alberta Yearling steers (850 lb.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $127.58/cwt Barley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.28/bu. Barley silage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78.50/ton Cost of gain (feed) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83.87/cwt Cost of gain (all costs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108.1 7/cwt Fed steers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120.22/cwt Break-even (November 2013) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120.63/cwt Ontario Yearling steers (850 lb.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $134.44/cwt Corn silage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54.64/ton Grain corn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.58/bu. Cost of gain (feed) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98.84/cwt Cost of gain (all costs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124.21/cwt Fed steers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122.45/cwt Break-even (January 2014) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130.21/cwt *Mid-month to mid-month prices Breakevens East: end wt 1,450, 183 days West end wt 1,325 lb., 125 days

45

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

Ontario

Alberta

2013 2012

2013 2012

Ontario prices based on a 50/50 east/west mix

Market Summary (to July 6) 2013

2012

Total Canadian federally inspected slaughter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,312,888. . . . . . . . . 1,454,906 Average steer carcass weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 874 lb.. . . . . . . . . . . . . 873 lb. Total U.S. slaughter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17,047,000. . . . . . . . 17,298,000

Trade Summary Exports 2013 2012 Fed cattle to U.S. (to June 29). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213,880.. . . . . . . . . . 203,703 Feeder cattle and calves to U.S. (to June 29) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159,413.. . . . . . . . . . . 98,943 Dressed beef to U.S. (to May). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182.89 mil.lbs.. . . . 226.60 mil.lbs Total dressed beef (to May). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255.07 mil.lbs.. . . . . 291.61 mil.lbs 2013 IMPORTS 2012 Slaughter cattle from U.S. (to May) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 *Dressed beef from U.S. (to May) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144.53 mil.lbs. . . . . . 131.65 mil.lbs *Dressed beef from Australia (to May) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14.73 mil.lbs. . . . . . . .11.90 mil.lbs *Dressed beef from New Zealand (to May) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15.75 mil.lbs. . . . . . .25.29 mil.lbs *Dressed beef from Uruguay (to May) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17.79 mil.lbs. . . . . . . .11.35 mil.lbs Canadian Grades (to July 20) % of A grades +59% AAA 22.3 AA 27.2 A 1.7 Prime 0.2 Total 51.4 EAST WEST

Total graded 326,751 1,072,873

Yield – 53% Total 12.3 57.0 2.2 37.6 0.0 1.8 1.0 1.8 15.5 Total A grade 98.2%

54-58% 22.4 8.2 0.1 0.6 31.3 Total ungraded 16,769 133

% carcass basis 78.8% 86.6% Only federally inspected plants

48

C at t l e m e n · au g u s t 2 0 1 3

www.canadiancattlemen.ca


 market ta l k

By Gerald Klassen

barley and corn price outlook

C

ash barley values in southern Alberta have been grinding lower throughout July as the market anticipates an increase in new crop supplies. Crop conditions in Western Canada have been quite favourable throughout the growing season and above-average yields are expected. At the same time, a year-over-year increase in corn acres along with moderate temperatures had traders projecting a record-large corn crop and a burdensome carry-out for the 2013-14 crop year. I’ve received many inquiries over the past month regarding the price outlook for the feed grain complex and I thought it was prudent to discuss the overall fundamental situation. The fundamentals suggest further downside risk but there are a few  u. s. w e e k ly c ru d e o i l i n v e n to r i es 1,100,000 1,090,000

1,000s of barrels

1,080,000 1,070,000 1,060,000 1,050,000 1,040,000 1,030,000 1,020,000 1,010,000 1,000,000 990,000

1

4

7

10

13

week

16

19 22 25 28

31 34 37 40 43 46 49 52

5-year average

2013

Supply and disposition of Canadian barley (’000 tonnes) 09/10

10/11

11/12

10-year average

Estimated 12/13

Estimated 13/14

8,663

6,911

6,472

9,910

7,405

7,150

Acres harvested

7,209

5,899

5,843

8,428

6,850

6,900

Yield (bu./ac.)

60.60

59.21

61.00

56.00

54.10

60.00

Opening stocks Aug. 1

2,844

2,583

1,441

2,235

1,222

1,220

Production

9,517

7,605

7,755

10,270

8,068

9,014

Acres seeded

SUPPLY

Imports TOTAL SUPPLY

42

42

14

66

10

11

12,403

10,230

9,210

12,571

9,300

10,245

1,300

USE Exports

1,301

1,272

1,200

1,482

1,300

Seed

256

233

257

336

280

280

Human food/industrial/1

954

902

933

963

950

950

Feed-waste-dockage

7,309

6,382

5,598

7,633

5,550

5,600

TOTAL USE

9,820

8,789

7,988

10,413

8,080

8,130

TOTAL CARRY-OVER

2,583

1,441

1,222

2,157

1,220

2,115

1/includes barley processed domestically and then exported as malt

www.canadiancattlemen.ca

caveats to the price outlook. Crude oil stocks have been decreasing and the market appears to be in an upward trend which will limit the price downside on the feed grain complex. Statistics Canada estimated Canadian barley seeded area at 7.2 million acres which is marginally lower than last year. Using an average yield of 60 bushels per acre, production has potential to reach 9.0 million mt; up from the 2012 crop of 8.1 million mt when yields were only 54 bushels per acre. Given the larger production, the function of the market will be to encourage demand through lower prices. The Canadian barley carry-out has potential to reach 2.1 million mt, which is basically the same as the 10-year average; therefore, prices will likely move toward the 10-year average price level. It would not surprise me to see barley in southern Alberta trade in the range of $190 to $200 in the first half of the crop year. It is important to realize that cattle-on-feed inventories move through a seasonal low in August and September; therefore, domestic demand is not that significant during the harvest period. The market will move to levels where offshore movement is encouraged. At this time, the major competition stems from the Black Sea region where feed barley is offered at $245 U.S. per mt f.o.b. The $180 to $210 price range in southern Alberta would make barley in central and northern regions of Alberta and Saskatchewan competitive in the world market to major destinations in the Black Sea region. The major influence on the coarse grain market is U.S. corn production. The USDA is projecting a corn crop size of 13.9 billion bushels, compared to the 2012 crop of 10.8 billion bushels. Weather conditions may temper the yield potential so there is some uncertainty moving forward but given the current crop ratings, the downside on yields is limited. The U.S. corn carry-out has potential to drop to 2.0 billion bushels, which is up from the five- year average of 1.4 billion bushels. Similar to barley, the corn market will function to encourage offshore movement in October and November. It is important to realize the corn crop was seeded quite late. Last year, there were approximately 1.1 billion bushels of corn harvested by August 31 but this year, analysts feel there will only be about 300 million bushels harvested by August 31. Most analysts have been quite bearish on new-crop feed grains since the winter period. One factor that will limit the downside is the ethanol demand and crude oil prices. Given the robust U.S. economic expansion, energy demand is rising and stocks are declining. The chart shows that 2013 comparison to the five-year average. The crude oil futures market is currently in an inverse price structure, which is bullish. I’m projecting weaker feed grain prices during the 2013-14 crop year; however, the downside will be limited by rising energy values and ethanol demand. We’ve seen in the past that even a bearish fundamental structure can be offset when energy values move higher. Therefore, we have to keep in mind all influences on the grain markets when forecasting the price outlook. c Gerald Klassen analyzes markets in Winnipeg and also maintains an interest in the family feedlot in southern Alberta. He can be reached at gklassen7@hotmail.com.

C at t l e m e n · Au g u s t 2 0 1 3

49


 GOINGS O N

Sales&Events EVENTS

 ADVERTI S E R I N D EX Ag Growth Industries Agriculture for Life Bayer CropScience Bow Slope Shipping Assoc. Calgary Stockyards Ltd. Canada Beef Canada’s Outdoor Farm Show Canadian Angus Assoc. Canadian Charolais Assoc. Canadian Gelbvieh Assoc. Canadian Hereford Assoc. Canadian Shorthorn Assoc. Canadian Simmental Assoc. Canadian Welsh Black Society Direct Livestock Marketing Federation des producteurs de bovines du Quebec Ford Motor Company Canada Greener Pastures Grunthal Livestock Auction Mart Innisfail Auction Market International Stock Foods Meadow Lake Stockyards Ltd. Merck Animal Health New Holland Novartis Animal Health Ontario Livestock Exchange Perlich Bros. Auction Market Ltd. Picture Butte Auction Market Plain Jans Real Industries Red Brand Fence Salers Assoc. of Canada Spring Creek Simmentals The Cattle Range Vermeer Corporation VJV Foothills Livestock Auction Winnipeg Livestock Sales Ltd. Zoetis Animal Health

Page 7 21 15 30 30 14 25 IFC OBC 43 43 37 43 43 29 31 13 39 30 30 43 30 5, 35, IBC 10, 11 19 31 31 31 43 32 41 43 29 6 17 31 31 A1-A16

NOVEMBER

AUGUST 10

13

14 17

19

2-9

Gelbvieh Assoc. of Alta. and Royal Western Gelbvieh B.C. Field Day, Innisfail, Alta. Alberta Angus Association AGM and Bashaw Ag Society Hall of Fame Gala and Awards, Bashaw, Alta. All Breeds Junior Show, Bashaw Ag Society, Bashaw, Alta. Calgary Police Rodeo Assoc. 31st Annual Rodeo, Airdrie Rodeo Grounds, Airdrie, Alta. Cattlewomen for the Cure Golf Tournament, Cotton Coulee Golf Course, Medicine Hat, Alta.

DECEMBER 2-4

Alberta Beef Producers Annual General Meeting, Calgary, Alta. 9-11 Canada’s Forage and Grassland Association Conference and AGM, Olds, Alta.

SEPTEMBER 10-12 Canada’s Outdoor Farm Show, Canada’s Outdoor Park, Woodstock, Ont. 15-18 Agri Biotechnology International Conference, Marriot and Telus Convention Centre, Calgary, Alta., www.abic.ca/abic2013 18-20 Canada Beef Annual Forum, Sheraton Cavalier, Calgary, Alta.

SALES MARCH 2014 1

OCTOBER 4-6

Farmfair International, Northlands Edmonton, Alta. 6 Canadian Gelbvieh Association AGM, Northlands, Edmonton, Alta. 6-9 Agritrade, Westerner Park, Red Deer, Alta. 7 National Gelbvieh Show, Farmfair International, Edmonton, Alta. 10-16 Canadian Western Agribition, Evraz Place, Regina, Sask. 21 Best of Canadian Agrimarketing Awards, Chateau Frontenac, Quebec City, Que. 26-27 Canfax Forum, Deerfoot Inn Calgary, Alta.

Olds Fall Classic, Olds Ag Society, Olds, Alta., www.oldsagsociety.com 22-23 Livestock Gentec 4th Annual Conference, Coast Plaza Hotel, Edmonton, Alta., www.livestockgentec.com

Davidson Gelbvieh and Lonesome Dove Ranch 25th Anniversary Bull Sale, bull yards, Ponteix, Sask.  Event listings are a free service to industry.  Sale listings are for our advertisers. Your contact is Deborah Wilson at 403-325-1695 or deb.wilson@fbcpublishing.com

Search ag news and stories from the sources you trust. Network 50

C AT T L E M E N · AU G U S T 2 0 1 3

SEARCH

www.canadiancattlemen.ca


Introducing ZUPREVO

TM

, the longest-lasting on-arrival antibiotic on the market today.*

Talk to your veterinarian about using ZUPREVO on arrival.

* Huang R.A., et al. (2009) J. vet. Pharmacol. Therap. 33, 227-237. Menge M., et al. (2011) J. vet. Pharmacol. Therap. Nowakowski M.A., et al. Veterinary Therapeutics, vol. 5, no. 1, Spring 2004.

TM

Trademark of Intervet International B.V. Used under license.

Merck Animal Health, operating in Canada as Intervet Canada Corp., a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc., Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA. MERCK is a trademark of Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp., a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc., Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA. Copyright Š 2012 Intervet International B.V., a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc., Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA. All rights reserved.

Zuprevo Ad Canadian Cattlemen.indd 1

13-06-13 15:21


Project8_Layout 1 7/16/2013 4:31 PM Page 1

CCT130812  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you