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HANNA BELLA PUBLISHING

BARAKAT P

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INTRODUCTION AND FOREWORD GODFREY BARKER DREW McRITCHIE EDITED BY HEND EL SAKET PHOTOGRAPHY IGOR ERMAKOV YOUSEF AL-ZOUBI GRAPHIC DESIGN PETER KEENAN PRINTED BY DECKERSSNOECK NV COPYRIGHT © FAYEZ BARAKAT TEXTS © THE AUTHORS ISBN 987-0-9567936-1-4 PUBLISHED BY

HBP HANNA BELLA PUBLISHING

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form of electronic or mechanical means including storage by information or retrevial systems without written permission of the authors except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical articles or reviews.


CONTENTS ARTIST’S STATEMENT

7

Fayez Barakat INTRODUCTION

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Godfrey Barker FOREWORD

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Drew McRitchie CATALOGUE

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A R T I S T

IT

S T A T E M E N T

IS MY BELIEF THAT FEELINGS, SENSATIONS, THOUGHTS

EXPECTATIONS

AND

DREAMS

ARE

FREQUENCIES

THAT

RESPOND TO COLOURS, SHAPES AND FORMS THAT ARE EMBEDDED IN OUR SUBCONSCIOUS MINDS .

WHEN I

PAINT

I

TRY TO SHARE MY EXPERIENCES THROUGH COLORS.

THIS

THE

VIBRATION

OF

DISCIPLINE OF MY

DISTRIBUTION OF MY MEMORIES IS REFLECTED IN THE PAINTINGS.

IT

IS MY HOPE THAT MY PAINTINGS WILL

ENHANCE THE AESTHETIC FREQUENCIES OF THE VIEWERS TO A HIGHER LEVEL OF THEIR PRESENT CONSCIOUSNESS, ENABLING THEM TO SEE THE BEAUTY OF THEIR GENETIC IMPRESSION IN

THE ABSTRACT FORMS AND SHAPES CREATED.

THE ECSTASY I FEEL AFTER THE COMPLETION OF EACH ARTWORK IS THE BASIS OF A NEW CREATION AND A PROCESS OF SPIRITUAL GROWTH.

TO

SHARE THIS JOURNEY WITH

MY VIEWERS IS MY ULTIMATE JOY IN THE BRIEF EXPERIENCE WE CALL LIFE .

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overleaf Happy Family | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 152cm x 121cm | F.1459


INTRODUCTION BY GODFREY BARKER FAYEZ BARAKAT the artist is unknown to the world. He has painted in secret for over sixty years. Only a few museums and fellow painters have seen his work. This is his first exhibition. His decision to go public is unexpected and exciting. He has 5000 paintings behind him. “Always I intended to keep them in hiding”. What you see before you is exactly that - Abstract, yes, but radically different from Jackson Pollock, Williem de Kooning, Sam Francis, Juan Miro, the talents of our time. Fayez Barakat is his own man and an important ‘new’ painter - one who has started work in the 1950s in Jerusalem and California yet whom nobody has known about. This is a dramatic moment. Barakat is famed for running one of the world’s prime businesses in Islamic, Egyptian, Chinese, Khmer, pre-Colombian and Graeco-Roman antiquities from galleries [located in] Abu Dhabi, London and Los Angeles; the company was founded in 1864 after Roman dishes were excavated by Fayad Barakat, great-grandfather of Fayez, in the family vineyards at Hebron near Jerusalem. But across thirty of the last sixty years, Fayez Barakat has been also a secret painter – secret, in the sense that he has never exhibited and still owns the vast majority of his 4000-plus abstract paintings. This secrecy is coming to an end. Fayez has taken a huge space in the Khalidia Palace in Abu Dhabi and in this exhibition unveils to the world his lifetime’s achievement as an artist. He is doing this not just because it deserves to be shown; plainly, he ranks high in the league table of 20th/21st century Arab artists. He has gone public also at the urging of critics and scholars who are amazed at his stylistic variety and quality of execution, and who find it hard to believe that a painter of this merit has worked alone, and unknown, for so long. THIS IS ABSTRACT ART. But it is an abstraction that stands outside any obvious Western tradition. Only a lazy gaze could relate Barakat’s highly individual work to the paintings of Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning or Sam Francis. He paints, most of the time, more thickly and densely and with much richer colour than the American abstract expressionists. He places highlights and dark lights in unexpected places, places which show little interest in the Western sense of proportion and the golden mean. His paintings are more powerful and explosive in mood than most abstracts by Pollock and de Kooning and they

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are more elegant than those of Francis. They have their own language and they are born of visions and drives and compulsions within him that Fayez Barakat does not wholly understand. This is where he talks like no other artist I have met and where his revelations fascinate. “When I am not painting I feel lost,” he said after the spring surge in London which produced nearly 270 paintings. “Something powerful is overflowing here, something beyond my own comprehension drives me to achieve. I feel at times I am a medium, that something is tapping into me. I receive a lot of subliminal messages that I seek to share.” These are promptings that creative spirits know and Barakat finds extraordinary words to describe what is not easily described in his act of creation. “A musician’s ear resonates to sounds and to fields of energy when he composes. A poet’s ear responds to the good uses of combining words. An artist’s eye resonates to colour and to combinations of colour. They move him to create an energy field that has form, substance and identity.” This “submersion in an energy field” which Fayez feels as an artist is, he believes, something a viewer can achieve too. “If you stand in front of some of my best works, you can enter a state of oblivion”. When I ask what oblivion means, Fayez replies, “…unconsciousness of what is going on around you”. Abstract paintings do indeed take you to a different dimension, the dimension of discovering yourself, who you are in relation to the world you are living in. They can reach into our eyes and souls, into places where words are insufficient to describe and lose clear definition. Of all forms of art, abstract art comes closest to music, to expressing the inexpressible. That highest sensation of the mind, what musicians call listening to “the music of the spheres”, is something that abstraction comes closest to delivering among all forms of art. How, exactly, does abstract art enter the soul? Fayez Barakat believes that it rouses a sense of “the ideal” within us. Without knowing the ideal, we lack a deep sense of pleasure or fulfilment. Our souls and bodies yearn for the ideal and seek it in many forms - in supreme wine and food, in


great music, in the touch of a close friend or lover. The ideal we find in communion with Nature, standing before a sublime landscape or climbing a high mountain, is no less fulfilling. All nourish our souls. And all of us are different. The art, the music, the wine that speaks to my deepest feelings and fulfilment will not be the same as whichever speaks to others. So too with abstract paintings. “Sometimes I create art works that may have meaning for just one person,” says Fayez Barakat. “Others may look and see nothing. I am confident that something that my mind reproduces subliminally or subconsciously is an image of something that exists somewhere in the world. It is a resonance of something that exists or I could not paint it. It is a message to someone”.

BARAKAT was a great friend of Chagall and watched him paint in Jerusalem in the 1960s. He was acquainted with Chagall’s granddaughter Bella. Perhaps he saw in Chagall’s studio how densely colours could be combined. Or perhaps it took his own courage and imagination to use colour as he does. These paintings are passion, they are made with a frenzy of reds, golds, yellows, turquoises, pinks, violets, blacks and oranges. They exude a desert heat. So frenzied are they that in some paintings, these colours fight. Fayez likes that. “The majority of Old Master painters apply only three to five colours,” he observes equably. “But I have 30 or 40 bottles.” I raise my eyebrows; is this the world’s largest palette? This large number does not make an artist’s life easier, it makes it infinitely harder. “It takes a true master,” Fayez continues, “to mix more than five colours in a painting and for a viewer still to consider it beautiful.”

Some of his

pictures, like Celestial Knights, Orange Recipe and Blossom on a River Bank are so overloaded that they serve as dictionaries of colour. When his multiple colours work, the effect is like no abstract art anyone has painted before. When they don’t, harmony – important to beauty, whatever beauty is – is the first casualty. The parts become more beautiful than the whole. Fayez confesses to composing many of his highly coloured images in his sleep. “Sometimes they come like a flash. Sometimes if I have an idea I jump out of bed at 3 or 5AM and attack the canvas. I have to; if I don’t, I become sleepless and restless. These

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visions are never concrete images, sometimes they are only thoughts. And they come only if I have gone to bed thinking and dreaming of colour and of the rhythm of colour.” His pictures are not all products of the dark hours. So how does he start a picture by day? “Sometimes I take a bottle and splash. Or I throw paint and see what happens. Or I squeeze a tube and move the colour about with a sponge.” Accident starts it, as it does for many abstract artists. Drive takes over. Colour is only half the explosive power in his works. Their frenzy – note the urgency and attack in the abstracts in this exhibition - comes also from whirling, slashing brushstrokes and from convulsions in the paint like nuclear fissions and explosions. Barakat accelerates this speed and attack by big-brush jabbing, by building heavy piles of impasto and by mixing primary reds, blues and yellows in combinations that often assault the Western eye. In some pictures the paint is wheeled, in others bottled. In some it implodes and descends into vortices, in others it bubbles in atomically tinted clouds. Sometimes the artist drips his colours, or puddles them, or throws or combs or skeins or dots them. At times mad, childlike faces appear within the abstraction. When Fayez is at his most intense and uncontrolled, he digs into and excavates the paint. Viewing his abstracts is no peaceful or relaxing experience, as he is the first to admit.

THAT THESE PAINTINGS are emotional is obvious. “The best art comes from emotion,” Fayez declares. But he admits to something more: to the presence of the irrational in them, to a sense that he is driven to paint by a force outside himself and to a belief that some of his paintings are “messages”. “Lately, I have been through scary experiences. I have felt a powerful source of energy pushing me. It comes in the form of positive spirits and negative spirits, of angels and devils. The colours resonate for me.” He pauses; this is not easy to explain. “The energy I feel is translated into a vibratory frequency which leads me to choose this colour or that. Sometimes I feel as if I have stepped on a spirit.” Shakespeare believed that the air was full of fairies, benign and malicious. I ask if the source of energy behind his paintings is outside him or within him. Fayez is troubled to answer. “I am gradually developing spiritually, developing in my mental sensitivity. But


there are many things I do not understand.” He pauses, at length. “Sometimes when I get deeply involved, I feel that another person inhabits my body. I feel another person is painting and not me.” He then admits to something astonishing, something that embarrasses him. “I once painted 50 pictures in one day. 50! Non-stop! It lasted seventeen hours. Honest to God, it was scary.” I do not ask for an explanation, and Fayez does not offer one, except to say: “there is a source so minute that in science we call it an atom. If you multiply the atom it becomes my painting.” Few artists talk like this. Fayez Barakat is unusual among painters whom I have met in his ability to translate abstract art into words. Artists are visual, not verbal people and most cannot begin to describe their art in words. Fayez is also unique for talking as if his paintings were external to him, as if they had a life of their own. “They feel like DNA prints of my own emotions. They have their own energy fields. Every painting is a lesson to me.” He stops to reflect. “This is very satisfying to my senses.” What is this powerful thing that overflows in him? Self-expression, yes. But is he also a medium for something in somebody else? “It is a beautiful thought. If the right medium took over I could be more famous than Picasso. Well, if I am a medium, I am happy to share with the world the beauty that I see in life.”

ABSTRACT ART is of course “life” and not just art - Fayez Barakat’s life. Some of his paintings are violent, some burn with passion, others exude a pink-sugared calm. Fayez accepts this. He is not easy with the phrase “abstract art”, denying that it is what the term supposes; “there is no abstractness”. There is always something external. Picasso’s paintings, though not abstract, point to his angers, passions and furies, to his loves, loyalties, successes, triumphs and catastrophes, to his pains across a 92-year life. No less do the images of Fayez Barakat. All his life is here. They define the man. Fayez Barakat has lived a hidden life as an artist but intends to reveal in forthcoming books some of the human dramas that explain and underpin his art. “I will do it not just to enlarge the meaning of the pictures. I will do it in hope that the story of my life will help others to live,” he declares.

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The art that now bursts forth in his mature years is bottled-up creation. “For three decades I did not paint, I kept my art in my head, Mrs Barakat did not like the smell of paint” he explains. Is he angry that this happened? Though not painting, Fayez was not idle these thirty years.

Drawing on the Barakat family background

in antiquities, he monopolised the market in the Old City of Jerusalem, buying out the stock of thirteen rival dealers when hardly out of school. At age 18 he became a self-made millionaire. In the next ten years he acquired a large range of funerary objects from Hebron, Middle Bronze Age to Byzantine, creating a wide-ranging personal collection and becoming dominant among the world’s antiquities dealers. His gallery in Los Angeles, home of a major Greco-Roman collection at the Getty Museum, came in 1982, his gallery in London in 2003. Barakat’s scholarly research and expertise in antiquities and Chinese art are widely attested. Yet in all these years, his deepest passion lay away from the gallery. It lay in what was forbidden to him, in paint. Fayez Barakat is by origin a Palestinian. He has lived in California for 30 years. “I am a citizen of the world,” he declares, “a very free spirit”. Do his remarkable paintings stand in the Arab or the Western tradition? They stand in both, but I press for a decision. This abstract art, I say, is unlike anything in American abstract expressionism. His colours have Arab heat to them. “Undoubtedly,” he agrees. “I grew up in the Arab world so I am happy to be identified with it. My loyalties and my sympathies are there. But I aspire to think with the world. My passion is universal and is not bound by any single culture or religion. I engulf all religions with respect and appreciation and I create to be appreciated by all. There are no limits or borders to my art.”

AN ENGLISH PROVERB asserts that “the world wants to know you for only one thing”. This is a simple wisdom that most artists (though not Picasso, Matisse or Kandinsky) have followed. Work in one style, be known for it, stay with it, don’t confuse the public by being too various. This wisdom Fayez Barakat has steadfastly ignored. Not only does he mix in his day-to-day life of antiquities and contemporary art. His paintings differ hugely. They are not one thing. They are unified by being abstract, but that’s not all.


Far from being known for one single highly recognisable style, Fayez works in an immense variety – in a dozen or more. In this I believe him to be unique among abstract artists. He does not stay loyal to a single style for a year or a decade and then, tiring of it, move on. He keeps them all. At least a dozen types of imagery are in his repertoire in 2010. He can work in all of them in a single week or month of painting. Does this matter? Not at all. His art is something that Fayez Barakat makes for himself, not for the public. His ‘secret’ paintings are his life, his self-expression, his passion, his frenzy. They follow his rules and no one else’s. They are a private art. It is, now, for the first time, shared with the world. Fayez Barakat is “going public” and working harder than ever. The pace and the drive of his art, as of his life, are increasing. In this catalogue, you are staring at the best of his work executed in 2010 alone. There was much before it and much to come. He remembers a talk with Picasso, forty years ago, about Africa. Fayez complained that its art was ‘primitive’. Picasso replied that this was a great advantage; its art had escaped from rules, schools, academies and teaching standards and was rich in individual feeling and message. “Sometimes artists are born naturally, born to produce great statements,” he said sternly. Picasso’s words seem an excellent definition of Fayez Barakat and of an art which exudes a rare intensity and power.

GODFREY BARKER 18 July 2010 Barker is an art critic and art market specialist whose work has appeared in many national newspapers and art journals, including The Daily Telegraph, The Times and The Guardian in London, Die Welt in Berlin and The Wall Street Journal in New York. He broadcasts on the arts for BBC TV and radio and for the BBC World Service.

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FOREWORD BY DREW McRITCHIE Very few artists have the ability to grasp the internal and manifest it externally. Fayez Barakat is one of those rare souls who has courageously looked into his own aesthetic ontological depths and returned to share those myriad gifts with the rest of us. He is a true polymath, having been involved in the arts all his life, establishing an early career in antiquities, then contemporary arts and historical masters. His encyclopedic knowledge on the arts, philosophy and other subjects is truly remarkable. All of which have contributed to shape the person he is today. Fayez Barakat’s recent paintings share the dynamism of essence, immediacy, expression, deliberation and delivery while at the same time fuse existence with a timeless ouevre. He directly confronts the viewer to engage his or her own visual journey. His chromaticity exchanges mixed with various techniques are tempered with interactive compositions that literally resonate into the viewer’s minds, very similar to the great classical composers who created auditory polysymphonies. The art of Fayez Barakat does just that: creates polysyndetic visuals that are his creative testaments for the world.

DREW McRITCHIE PH. D. A.M. Artist, Art and Social critic

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CATALOGUE


Aching Heart A | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 68cm x 150cm | F.0648


Norway | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 122cm x 92cm | F.2280


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Adorna | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 101cm x 76cm | F.1498


Pensacola | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 122cm x 92cm | F.2287


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Azra | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 153cm x 102cm | F.1459


After Hibernation | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 203cm x 84cm | F.0288


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Blossom on a River Bank | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 152cm x 91cm | F.1079


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Everlasting Love | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 152cm x 91cm | F.1084


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Madras | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 92cm x 92cm | F.2299


Green Mosaic 1 - 3 | 2010 | Oil on canvas | 100cm x 100cm each | F.0776


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Underwater Fantasy | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 152cm x 91cm | F.1080


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Beijing | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 102cm x 77cm | F.2315


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Shiraz | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 102cm x 77cm | F.2218


Tallinn | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 122cm x 91cm | F.2333


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Blissful Fascination | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 152cm x 91cm | F.1085


Tourmaline Splash 1 - 6 | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 76cm x 61cm each 76cm x 366cm total | F.1123


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Poseidon | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 153cm x 122cm | F.1474


Red Sperm 1 - 4 | 2009 | Acrylic on canvas | 56cm x 71cm 224cm x 71cm total | F.0055


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Ailis 1 - 2 | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 153cm x 92cm each | F.1486


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Afina | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 72cm x 56cm each 216cm x 56cm total | F.1654


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Milieux de la Nuit | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 184cm x 122cm | F.1661


Aneolela | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 184cm x 122cm | F.1663


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San Jose | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 183cm x 92cm | F.2341


Marmaris | 2009 | Acrylic on canvas | 92 cm x 62 cm | F.2149


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Volcanic Eruption | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 200cm x 140cm | F.0298


March 14th a&b | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 122cm x 92cm each | F.1493


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Dallas | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 153cm x 122cm | F.2350


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Baba Noel | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 122cm x 122cm | F.1048


Virgo | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 122cm x 122cm each | F.1040


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Costa Rica | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 61cm x 61cm | F.2376


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Ayla | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 182cm x 121cm | F.4356


Lavender Glory | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 122cm x 153cm | F.1120


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Red Dance | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 152cm x 91cm | F.1082


All is God | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 122cm x 76cm | FB.285


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Seoul 1-3 | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 92cm x46cm each | F.2404


Sian 1-3 | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 92cm x 46cm each | F.2406


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Garden Fantasy 1 | 2010 | Oil on canvas | 100cm x 100cm | F.0759


Star Fantasy 1 | 2010 | Oil on canvas | 100cm x100cm | F.0765


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Global warming in the North Pole | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 148cm x 130cm | F.0301


Global Warming 2016 | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 122cm x122cm | F.1278


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Baku | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 51cm x 51cm | F.2421


Blue Bliss | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 8 panels | 46cm x 46cm each | 92cm x 184cm total | F.0353 - F.0360


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Josephus Flavius | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 40cm x 40cm | FB.271


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Whirlwind in the Sky | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 122cm x 91cm | F.1617


Karachi 1 - 2 | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 46cm x 46cm 46cm x 92cm total | F.2445


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Serenity 1 - 8 | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 30cm x 30cm 60cm x 220cm total | F.0578


Butterfly effect 1 - 12 | 2010 | Acyrlic on canvas | 30cm x 30cm each 60cm x 180cm total | F.0454


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Sperm of Life 1 - 4 | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 61cm x 76cm each 244cm x 76cm total | F.0037


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Snow Storm | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 90cm x 60cm | F.0271


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Animal Kingdom | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 90cm x 60cm | F.0856


Winter in Sudan 1 - 4 | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 51cm x 41cm | 204cm x 41cm total | F.0339


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Enlightenment | 2010 | Acrylic on board | 90cm x 60cm | F.0292


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Cosmic Transformation | 2010 | Acrylic on board | 90cm x 60cm | F.0303


Geranium Feast A | 2009 | Acrylic on canvas | 122 cm x 122 cm | F.1050


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Cape Town | 2009 | Acrylic on canvas | 122 cm x 122 cm | F.2117


Lisbon | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 183cm x 92cm | F.2344


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Shoot me | 2009 | Acrylic on canvas | 91 cm x 61 cm | F.1570


Abraham’s Garden | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 46cm x 46cm | F.1556


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Barbados | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 31 cm x 31 cm | F.2265


Contradictions | 2010 | Oil and Acrylic on canvas | 85cm x 205cm | F.0787


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Alina 69 | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 152cm x 122cm | F.4677


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109

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Beatrice | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 122cm x 152cm | F. 4344


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111

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Chittagona | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 122cm x 92cm | F.2192


Celestial Knights | 2010 | Oil on canvas | 87cm x 205cm | F.0788


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Malmo | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 122cm x 92cm | F.2163


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Tropics | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 122cm x 92cm | F.2151


Orange Recipe | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 170cm x 142cm | F.0800


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Colour Parade | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 110cm x 155cm | F.0793


Paris 1&2 | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 122cm x 91cm each | F.2290


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Alexandria | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 92cm x 92cm | F.2295


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123

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San Francisco | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 153cm x 122cm | F.2176


Surrey | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 183cm x 92cm | F.2181


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Tangier | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 183cm x 92cm | F.2182


Tehran | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 183cm x 92cm | F.2185


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Aleppo | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 183cm x 122cm | F.2304


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129

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131

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Boston | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 183cm x 122cm | F.2305


Rabat | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 122cm x 92cm | F.2332


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Argentina 1 - 2 | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 91cm x 61cm each | F.2204


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137

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Belize | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 183cm x 92cm | F.2342


Singapore | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 183cm x 92cm | F.2343


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139

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London | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 153cm x 122cm | F.2345


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141

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Matilda | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 122cm x 92cm | F.2210


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143

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Copenhagen | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 102cm x 77cm | F.2222


Budapest | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 153cm x 122cm | F.2347


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145

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Monte Carlo | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 153cm x 122cm | F.2346


Mesmerised | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 122cm x 92cm | F.2208


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147

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Untouchable | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 92cm x 92cm | F.2213


Mogadishu | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 102cm x 77cm | F.2225

Lagos | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 122cm x 122cm | F.2119


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151

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Calgary | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 92cm x 61cm | F.2361


Timbuktu | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 122cm x 122cm | F.2120


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155

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Ife | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 153cm x 122cm | F.2121


Phez | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 72cm x 41cm | F.2241


Mahe | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 46cm x 46cm | F.2248


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159

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Baule | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 153cm x 77cm | F.2123


Barbados 1 - 3 | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 30cm x 30cm | F.2265


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161

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Bamoon | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 153cm x 77cm | F.2124


Benin | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 153cm x 153cm | F.2129


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Aquamarine | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 183cm x 122cm | F.2157


Bethlehem | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 122cm x 92cm | F.2134


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Malazia | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 183cm x 122cm | F.2180


Kawasaki 2 | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 72cm x 56cm | F.2398


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Kawasaki 3 | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 72cm x 56cm | F.2400


Oslo | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 102cm x 77cm | F.2221


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Ireland | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 102cm x 77cm | F.2216


Marseille | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 92cm x 92cm | F.2214


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Sydney | 2010 | Acrylic on canvas | 92cm x 92cm | F.2215


BARAKAT GALLERY Emirates Palace, Abu Dhabi, UAE 58 Brook Street, Mayfair, London 421 North Rodeo Drive, Beverly Hills, California Khalidiya Palace Rayhaan, Abu Dhabi, UAE 31 Nagdawist, Rabieh, Amman, Jordan WWW.BARAKATGALLERY.COM BARAKATLONDON@NETSCAPE.NET

+971 2690 8950 +44 (0) 207 493 7778 +1 310 859 8408 +971 2 6570000 +962 (0) 655 45 960


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