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#04 / 2017

www.eye-photomagazine.com


Founder, Managing Editor Stefan Cimer

Cover photo by Wilco Westerduin Š

Because getting your work published DOES matter! EYE-Photo Magazine is an independent, online magazine, providing a platform to talented and enthusiastic photographers from all over the world to present their work, regardless their genre, to an international readership. All images and text, published in EYE-Photo Magazine are the sole property of the featured authors and artists and subject to copyright! EYE-Photo Magazine shall not be liable for the content, quality, relevance or accuracy of any materials used in this issue. Without written permission of its legal owner, no photo or text can be reproduced, edited, copied or distributed in any form. EYE-Photo Magazine Š - all rights reserved www.eye-photomagazine.com office@eye-photomagazine.com


Content Wilco Westerduin Photoreview - page 6 - 27

Ulf Granberg Photoreview - page 28 - 45


LoĂŻc

Guston

Photoreview - page 46 - 63

EYE-Catching Moments Photoreview - page 64 - 183


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EYE-Photo Magazine is an independent, online magazine, providing a platform to talented and enthusiastic photographers from all over the world to present their work, regardless their genre, to an international readership.

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W i l c o We s t e r d u i n INTERVIEW


+++ Interview Wilco Westerduin +++ Wilco, we’ve known each other for quite a long time and I was always captivated by your fantastic photos. So all the more it’s a great honour to have you here for this interview. Thank you very much for taking your time! Let’s make a “soft” start, please tell us a little bit about yourself to begin with. Thank you very much as well for this opportunity to talk about my photography. Great! Well, I am a 47 years old Dutch guy, using a camera to play with! Although I am officially still living in the Netherlands, I spend most of my time in the Basque Country (South-West France and North Spain). After my career as a Human Resource Consultant ended, I began my photography at the end of 2013. I started publishing my photos (exclusive) on 500px and Facebook. Many developments took place since then: Publications in magazines (print and online), features in various international (photography) media and blogs, awards from editors and -started from July 2016- nine (solo) exhibitions at very fine locations in the Basque Country. Could you share with us how you first became interested in photography – what is photography for you? It first started when I was using my iPhone 4 for some experiments with composition and image results. When my friends and family looked at the images, they encouraged me to do more in photography, as they were convinced I had a talent for it. I was a bit reluctant at first, but started to publish my images anyway. The response was very positive and gave me the courage to continue. I ran into the limitations of iPhone photography though, and at the end of 2013 I decided for a more serious approach. I bought an entry level camera to make images of landscapes, architecture, urban exploration and street scenes. I have never been comfortable with model shoots or studio work. I am not the traditional guy for events, portraits and weddings, either. Instead, I present myself as an artist in photography, exhibit and sell museum quality (big) prints of my works. I am really living my photography, dedicating (almost) all my time to it. Being autodidact, I challenge myself always for maximum results with my basic equipment. I do not use Photoshop. Instead, I strive to make a good basic image that only takes some standard optimization on my MacBook. My photos are real single exposures, no digital tricks. I find it a very satisfying experience to have success in photography, without a focus on expensive equipment. This proves to me that it actually is the EYE behind a camera, really making the image, instead of the price of the gear.


+++ Interview Wilco Westerduin +++ Before this interview I’ve viewed your photographs. Your images are a vivid mix between black and white and colour photos. You move between different photographic genres, like landscapes, architecture, street photography and many more. Where do you get your inspiration? My inspiration is mostly in imagery itself. I am truly fascinated by the many visual opportunities the world has to offer, sometimes up to almost graphical abstracts even. I do not feel limited to just one style or genre, even though we usually get advised to specialize as photographers. I just look in a different way at the world and my photographs allow me to share this view with others. Different but however not without beauty. Capturing various manifestations of beautiful light is an important element in my images. Especially with urbex and landscapes, the light can really transform an otherwise regular scene into a beautiful one.

Have you been involved in arts in some other form than photography? I make some music, but nothing really serious. I sing, play guitar, piano and have created some of my own songs. But I believe am not really on the level to publish my musical expressions!


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+++ Interview Wilco Westerduin +++ How much does your equipment help you to execute your artistic visions and what kind of equipment are you using? I am not equipment orientated at all. I consider it just tools to make my images, like a carpenter uses a hammer for his constructions. Nobody asks what hammer he is using, they just want to see what he builds! I find it funny how different this is in photography, where the kind of gear seems to play a big role. I use what I have: an entry level Sony A-58 camera, a 1020mm, 18-35mm f/1.8, 90mm macro f/2.8 and 55-200mm lens. An ND filter, tripod, remote control and an external flash. I use an old MacBook for editing. To achieve the results that I want, I do try to get the maximum out of my basic gear. I even use an ‘old school’ dark room technique to substitute for a (reversed) gradient filter: I wave a black plastic card in front of the lens to filter the light in certain areas for the right balance at long exposures. This looks very funny and often I get strange faces when I do this, but it works! That is what counts for me. Can you tell us about your work flow from the point you first step onto the scene until you showcase the developed picture? I have different approaches. Sometimes I just stumble upon a scene I like and try to capture it as well as I can at that moment. But most of the time I prepare and plan my images. I explore in the Basque Country for locations and study possibilities for good compositions and angles. When it looks like the conditions will be right (light, position of the sunset, etc.) I go back to make my optimal image of the location. Because I prepared the shooting in advance already, I can fully concentrate on the right moment for my shot. This way the picture does not take much developing for the desired result as well, so I can do without Photoshop. What is it in your subjects that make you want to capture it? To answer that I would have to make a separation in the different genres I shoot. For landscapes it is the beauty in nature and it’s symbiosis with light. I feel drawn to the force of nature, being so much larger than me as a tiny human being. I try to translate my admiration into my images. With architecture I love to capture the essence of a building or structure, beyond its first obvious visual appearance. I love the graphical opportunities it can give for my images. The lines and shapes. Or sometimes even create the illusion of something I see in it, other than the structure itself. To make this visible to my viewers is challenging, but a fun thing to do. With urbex it is the thrill of discovering new locations to shoot and present to the public. As a growing genre you see a lot of the same locations.


I like to discover and capture less known, but not less interesting locations. My urbex photos are also a metaphor for the course of my own life. When I started photography, it was in a very dark period of my life. I had lost three jobs, my relationship ended and I lost my house. Photographing functioned for me as a light to pull me out of this darkness. To capture beauty in the lost, left behind, abandoned and decay was almost like therapy for me. In a way one could say that I was like an abandoned place, and my photography pulled out the beauty of light in me. When it comes to street photography I like the awareness, needed to capture interesting scenes for story telling images that intrigue me. I love this hunting feeling on the streets. It is like being on an urban safari! To predict where something will happen, so I can position myself for a good shot of the scene. And then the joy when it indeed actually happens and I get my shot, a great satisfaction!

Especially in landscape photography, weather and light condition always play a certain role. How do you prepare for such shootings? I look at weather forecasts and information of position of the sun to set and info about tides. It helps in the preparation, but gives no guarantee for the moment itself. There is always some luck involved as well.


+++ Interview Wilc Your landscapes are really amazing – do you feel a deep connection to nature? I can imagine that those places have a certain aura that might inspire you. Thank you very much! I have a deep admiration for nature, yes. There is a lot we “control” as humans already, so sometimes I need a feeling there is something bigger than us. When I am in nature, I realize that. Being able to witness it is a real privilege for me. A question about your street photographs: Do you interact with your subjects on the street and if yes, how do they react on you? No I don’t. I have experienced that when I interact with them, their natural behavior is affected. I prefer to capture people in the street when they are not aware of it. After I have my shot, I do sometimes approach them to show the image and ask permission to use it for publication. Most of the time they are pleasantly surprised, and give their permission.


co Westerduin +++ Your architecture photos have stunning lines, curves, shapes and mostly had been taken from an interesting angle. Could you share with us how you prepare for architecture photos? When I visit an architectural location, I first just walk around a bit. Let the building or structure “get to me” in a way. In my head images then already slowly form. It can also be that I see something else in it, other than its first appearance. I study it for interesting angles, beyond the obvious surface, for creating a different view on it. I search for the essence or “soul” of it, to capture in my photos. I also look in a graphical way at the subject, see “trough” it, as it were, for the alternative lines or shapes to become visible to me. After this phase, I wait or come back when the condition of light is best to support my view and to create an effective, interesting or beautiful image.


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+++ Interview Wilc What would you say characterizes your work in comparison to other street photographers? That is a difficult question for me, because I do not compare myself that much with other street photographers. What I try in my street photos, is to capture a story, an expression or action that stands out from common situations in the streets. It has to be worth to me making a photo of, so to speak. Just a capture of people walking does not interest me, unless some different aesthetic composition, or light, makes the picture interesting to look at after all. Capturing the difference is what characterizes my work, I guess. Do you see your personality reflected in your work? In what image does that come apparent to you? I am quite a reflective person. My past as a Human Resource Consultant has also shaped the way I look at my relationship with the world. There was a significant amount of psychology and sociology involved in my previous career. Funny enough, this did not result in a big desire to shoot people, except for street photos. Perhaps I am still compensating the overload of human demands, hahaha! When shooting, I prefer to be alone as well. This way I do not get distracted in my process of creating how I want it. There is not really one specific image in which this became apparent to me, but more the global overview of my work, that contains not many pictures of people. Nevertheless, I enjoy the contact with people about my photography and with the visitors of my exhibitions a lot. What can you tell us about the factor “luck� in photography? You need it just as much as you need knowledge of photography, I think. Often the best shots were only made because of the luck factor: the right moment, the right position, the right light, coming together. It is that little extra that just turns a good image into an extraordinary one. As a photographer you just have to hope that you are ready enough to catch your luck! Your images are a vivid mixture between color and black and white. What is the crucial factor in your opinion to develop an image in black and white over color or vice versa? I know photographers who believe that it is only true photography in black and white. They say color is a distraction and black and white gives all attention to the message of the picture. I do not agree with them.


co Westerduin +++ Although fine art photography is indeed more common in black and white, I believe an image itself defines best to be black and white or in color. Not all images are best in color, but some just only work better in color. For instance: if the colors in a scene were one of the reasons you were drawn to it, bloody well develop the photo in color then! I do think that the more graphical an image is, the better it probably works in black and white.


+++ Interview Wilc Has your style of shooting changed since you started? Yes, definitely. I know better now what I am doing and how to get a desired result. I developed more an eye for a total composition approach: foreground, background, leading lines, thirds or Fibonacci’s golden ratio and I am more able to play a little with it for captivating images. I prefer more simple compositions now, compared to the start when I was tempted to put as much in a frame as possible. I am convinced now that less is more. The way I do a shooting has changed as well. In the beginning I made a lot of shots in a session, to select the good ones later. Now I know better how to do it, and just a few shots suffice to catch how I want it. In editing not much has changed. I always strive for a natural look of the image. This is probably the trickiest question of all. Among all your fantastic work, could you name one as your favourite, and if yes, why? This has to be my all-time best one: “Looking back on promise”. It‘s a landscape picture of one of the most epic places in the Basque Country: Gaztelugatxe. It is my most popular, most sold, awarded and most published photo. This image sort of put me “on the map” as a serious landscape photographer. I am very proud of it.


co Westerduin +++ What are some of the most important lessons you have learned? It sounds like an open door perhaps, but just to stay authentic and do things my own way. There is so much advice on how you should do it as a photographer, but nothing seems to apply to me. You should specialize, invest in equipment, use the latest technology and software, publish everywhere like on Instagram, Twitter, on many photo websites, sell Lightroom presets, tutorials, workshops, organize photo tours and so on, and so on. I don’t do anything of that, but still received almost 5,5 million views on my work, have thousands of followers, as well in 500px as Facebook, was internationally awarded and could have many exhibitions of my work. Based on your experience, what advice would you give people who are just starting out in photography? Keep your expectations low and have perseverance. If you want to succeed in photography, you have to stand out from millions of other photographers these days. That is really not easy. Define what makes you different and present that as the signature of your work. Invest in your knowledge of photography, both technical as artistic. Don’t follow. It has already been done… Dare to be different. Maintain a high quality standard in all that you do. This will always get appreciation. Be smart with your exposure. You need visibility, but if you overload it, it can work against you. Be selective. And most important: be authentic.


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+++ Interview Wilco Westerduin +++ Are there any special projects or exhibitions you’re currently working on and which you like to introduce here? My current exhibition about the abandoned Basque Country is touring to various locations in the Basque region. My work is also sold at gallery/decoration shop ‘Christelle Caudron’ in the centre of Biarritz, France. At the moment I am also in negotiations with a publisher for a photo book about the abandoned Basque Country. Furthermore I’ll have an exhibition in November in San Sebastian Spain, in an historic Chistera Fronton building which had been turned into a restaurant and brewery. For more information you can check out the following link: www.paysbasque.net If you like to stay informed about my exhibitions and activities, just follow it on facebook.com/ wilco.westerduin and facebook.com/differencephotography. My complete work can be viewed on 500px.com/wilcowesterduin. Wilco, thank you very much for this very interesting interview.


Ulf Granberg PHOTOREVIEW My name is Ulf Granberg. I`m a street photographer from Tjorn an island on the westcoast of Sweden.

Started with photography at the age of 14 when i got my first analog camera. Been away for shorter and longer periods but since 2008 when I bougth my first digital camera I spend most of my sparetime doing something that involves photography. I have used many cameras during the years but in 2015 I bought a Ricoh GR. For me it´s the perfect street camera, fits in the pocket, discreet, snap focus and great files for B/W. Street photography is a passion and hobby. Kind of like the feeling of being free to shoot what and when I want. www.flickr.com/photos/ulf-granberg/


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Loïc Guston PHOTOREVIEW I am a French photographer who undertook photography as a student in Fine Arts and Art History. Now an Art Teacher myself, my work is equally influenced by my favourite painters, photographers, writers and film-makers. Whether working in Paris, London, Berlin or anywhere else, I always start photographing with one initial idea in mind — then I let emotions do the rest. ‘Preparation and intuition’ is my working motto, be it when I photograph buildings, people, landscapes or special events. I favour black and white as a way to put a distance with the real, visible world, so as to create a photographic universe instead. My work has been shown in several festivals, and exhibited in Parisian art galleries many times. My photographs were also published in international magazines, and some are now in private collections, in France and in Japan. www.l-guston.com

Reminiscence #2


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Reminiscence #1


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Who are you Polly Magoo

Back to Camden, London


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Portrait of David Lynch


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Portrait of Mr. Albert


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Following Jack the Ripper #1


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Following Jack the Ripper #2


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Working-class neighbourhood, London

Following the footsteps of Antonioni


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Architectural Composition, London


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Tensed situation


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Walk on the wild side, London


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Far beyond the borders


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Over the horizon


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Tomorrow is another day, London #1

Tomorrow is another day, London #2


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EYE Catchin

Selection Septemb


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ber - October 2017


+++ EYE-Catchin Ai Tanaka ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Aiko Inamura ©


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Amandio Antunes ©

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+++ EYE-Catchin Andrzej Mikulski Š


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+++ EYE-Catchin Ankica Vuletin ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Antje Schirmaier ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin António Carreira ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin António Carreira ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Arshad Ron ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Avi Nahum ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Bob Chiu ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Brigitte DL Verhoeven ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Brigitte DL Verhoeven ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Christian Friedsam ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin David Mar Quinto ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Dominique Richeux ©


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Esther Löser ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Ed Peeters ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Ewa Senkalla-Rydzewski ©


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Fabio Maddogz Balestra ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Fernanda Magalhaes ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Fernando Branquinho ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Fernando Escrivá ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Fernando Figueiredo ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Frank Andree ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Gaspar Pappens ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Gaspar Pappens ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Goran Boricic ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Hasan Balci ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Irune Agirre Urkza ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Jens von Ewald ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Johanna Salenfalk ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Kowelanku ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Laurence Kler ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Leszek Stefanowicz ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Lron Bauer Fenik ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Luca Foscili ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Lucian Olteanu ©


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Massimiliano Mancini Š

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+++ EYE-Catchin Maya Iltus ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Maya Iltus ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Michal Magdziak ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Mirela Momanu Š


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+++ EYE-Catchin Mustafa Selcuk ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Nelita Specchierla ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Nugraha Noelle ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Panagiotis Grammatikakis Š


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+++ EYE-Catchin Quach Tuan Anh ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Quirin Gertz ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Riva Bubber ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Ryeo Baba ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Saturas Muhammad ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Susana Freitas ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Thanh Nguyen ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Thomas Vanoost ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Tiago Ribeiro de Carvalho ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Tomek Firek ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Tony Vt ©


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+++ EYE-Catchin Uwe Mochel ©


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EYE-Photo Magazine is an independent, online magazine, providing a platform to talented and enthusiastic photographers from all over the world to present their work, regardless their genre, to an international readership. All images and text, published in EYE-Photo Magazine are the sole property of the featured authors and artists and subject to copyright! EYE-Photo Magazine shall not be liable for the content, quality, relevance or accuracy of any materials used in this issue. Without written permission of its legal owner, no photo or text can be reproduced, edited, copied or distributed in any form. EYE-Photo Magazine Š - all rights reserved


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