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GLYNN COUNTY COMMUNITY SOLUTIONS

NOVEMBER 2014

RESEARCH BY


TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION

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COMMUNITY TRENDS COMMUNITY TRENDS OVERVIEW

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TOP 12 ISSUES EXAMINED BRUNSWICK ECONOMY CRIME ENVIRONMENT FAMILY STRUCTURE GLYNN COUNTY HOUSING K-12 EDUCATION RACIAL DISPARITY SENIORS’ QUALITY OF LIFE TREATMENT OF CHILDREN WOMEN’S EMPOWERMENT WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT YOUTH SEXUAL HEALTH

9 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22

COMMUNITY SOLUTIONS GRANT IDEAS CARENET PREGNANCY CENTER OF COASTAL GEORGIA CHILDREN IN ACTION SPORTS COLLEGE OF COASTAL GEORGIA FAITHBRIDGE FOSTER CARE GOLDEN ISLES CAREER ACADEMY ST. SIMONS LAND TRUST STAR FOUNDATION THE GATHERING PLACE ZION BAPTIST CHURCH

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VENTURE PHILANTHROPY KIDS ON COURSE GLYNN CRADLE TO CAREER COORDINATION UNITY COMMUNITY CENTER SOUTH

35

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 37 38 39

GRANT IDEAS PERFORMANCE METRICS

41

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

57


INTRODUCTION GOAL To translate qualitative and quantitative research into a simple guide for how to give wisely in Glynn County

AUDIENCE Generous Glynn County residents who give money or time to improve the community

COMMUNITY TRENDS Community trends give you a grid for assessing the strategic importance of charitable giving requests and community development initiatives. The actionable intelligence includes: COMMUNITY TRENDS

What is getting worse or better?

The top 12 Glynn County issues are labeled with a green, yellow, or red arrow indicating a positive, mixed, or negative trend. The Key Data Trends box and two charts on each issue page highlight the most relevant data demonstrating improvement or decline. CAUSES & CONTRIBUTING FACTORS

Why are community issues getting worse or better?

Knowing “why” precedes knowing “what” to do so each issue page summarizes the root Causes & Contributing Factors to a community issue. Isolating specific factors behind a community issue allows generous Glynn County residents to evaluate the strategy of local charities and community development initiatives based on how many factors are addressed.

COMMUNITY SOLUTIONS Community solutions make all the research practical by getting to the point of what is working and where to give. Some issues have “no known solution,” and the research only uncovered service gaps rather than programs that work. Other issues have seen isolated Stories of Hope, but the research did not detect a way to reproduce the success. Some proven or promising Solutions are able to replicate what works with additional funding. Those giving opportunities are summarized in the Community Solutions section of the assessment. STORIES OF HOPE AND SERVICE GAPS

STORY of HOPE

What is one story of progress or gap in service?

The Stories of Hope provide a few details about one person or organization which successfully improved the community. Specific gaps in services are listed when no such story has been acquired. This section personalizes the assessment and gives concrete examples to motivate action.

Prepared by Excellence in Giving ©2014

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COMMUNITY SOLUTIONS

How can you support what works?

SOLUTION

For community issues without a working solution, the assessment temporarily concludes “no known solution.” If a charitable organization or initiative addresses root Causes & Contributing Factors with sound leadership, strategy, and measurable outcomes, it is listed in the Solution section at the bottom of each community issue page. The name of the solution is linked to a full-page description in the Community Solutions section of the assessment. The full-page description presents seven elements: the organization’s mission, its strategy for tackling an issue’s root causes and contributing factors, its overall Community Value, summaries of Why It Works and its measurable OUTCOMES, a Recent Program Improvement, and a specific Grant Idea. When applicable, a link to the organization’s website has been provided in the grant idea section. Additional information about the leadership, strategy, finances, and impact for each GRANT recommended solution can be found in the appendix of nonprofit Analytical IDEA Overviews.

TARGETED TRANSFORMATIONS Common contributing factors to Glynn County’s negative Community Trends suggest the most leveraged results from effective giving would be: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

High school graduate married parents replace the norm of unwed teen moms Positive parental engagement replaces neglect and abuse Self-discipline and hard work replace urban crime Constructive teen activities in education, work and sports replace teen sexual activity Personal vision and responsibility to achieve bigger goals replace limited urban worldview

Informed donors in Glynn County should support charities with a promising solution or proven track record for facilitating these transformations.

FUTURE UPDATES The Glynn County Community Solutions assessment has been structured in such a way to facilitate progressive future updates. The data sources have been listed with hyperlinks for ease of updating data trends. A corresponding Excel spreadsheet can be provided to any group planning to update the graphs. Hyperlinks to webpages for contacting recommended Solution providers are included in the Grant Idea sections. If influential, networked organizations in Glynn County such as United Way and the Community Foundation use the assessment to direct community development efforts and local giving, then future updates will inform the community about measurable results. If the transformative programs reach a meaningful scale among the most affected populations in Glynn County, donors can expect to see positive signs of improvement in future data. Prepared by

Paul T. Penley & Joshua de Gastyne Excellence in Giving RESEARCH

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Prepared by Excellence in Giving ©2014


COMMUNITY TRENDS OVERVIEW

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BRUNSWICK ECONOMY Data Trends

Causes & Contributing Factors

#1 2% fewer Brunswick jobs in 2014 than 2013 vs. 1.8% more jobs in Georgia (BLS stats) #2 37% of Brunswick residents live in poverty vs. 17% in Georgia (2010 Census) #3 Brunswick income grew 34% from 1990 to 2010 vs. 43% in Glynn County (Census)

STORY of HOPE

Unsafe environment and no disposable income

Causes & Contributing Factors

#1 31% decline in Glynn County violent crime in 2007-12, compared to 9% increase in Georgia #2 41% decrease in local Property Crime versus 14% decrease in GA from 2007-12 (GAFCP) #3 Total 2012 crime rate of 5,354 in Glynn County is higher than 3,715 in Georgia (UGA)

Law enforcement effectiveness Strong or broken family structures Economic conditions and social opportunities

Joint task forces and citizen engagement reduced crime in the past decade

ENVIRONMENT

SOLUTION: St. Simons Land Trust

Data Trends

Causes & Contributing Factors

#1 15 Glynn County hazardous waste sites in 2006 has grown to 17 in 2014 (EPD) #2 Air Quality Index improvement from 44 in 2000 to 31 in 2013 (AQI Report) #3 84% of Glynn residents believe local leaders addressing environment is important (Needs)

Toxic waste from industrial activity Residential and commercial development Clean-up and preservation efforts

Almost 1,000 acres of land have been preserved on St. Simons Island

FAMILY STRUCTURE Data Trends

SOLUTION: No Known Solution Causes & Contributing Factors

#1 39% of children in Glynn County live with a single parent, on par with Georgia (FBFC) #2 Births to unmarried mothers in Glynn County increased 10% from 2000-2012 (OASIS) #3 110% growth in grandparents responsible for parenting children (ACS 2005-2012)

GAP

Reliance on handouts or criminal activity

SOLUTION: Children in Action (CIA) Sports Club

Data Trends

STORY of HOPE

Unskilled or unmotivated workforce

Brunswick entrepreneur Andrea Dickerson worked her way out of poverty

CRIME

STORY of HOPE

SOLUTION: STAR Foundation

Births to unmarried parents Unprotected sex leads to unplanned pregnancies Adults choosing not to marry or remain single

21% of adults in Glynn County and 38% in Brunswick are not forming families Prepared by Excellence in Giving Š2014

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GLYNN COUNTY HOUSING Data Trends

Causes & Contributing Factors

#1 51% of Brunswick homes were renter-occupied vs. 30% in Georgia in 2010 (Census) #2 6% fewer owner-occupied homes in Glynn County from 1990 to 2010 (USA Census) #3 23% of houses (Gloucester to L St) in “poor condition” or “uninhabitable” in 2013 (URDP)

STORY of HOPE

Scope and quality of educational opportunities Parental involvement in children’s education Supplemental student support programs

New career academy graduates over 90% of rising seniors in 18 career curricula

RACIAL DISPARITY

SOLUTION: No Known Solution

Data Trends

Causes & Contributing Factors

#1 9.5% of blacks versus 30% of whites over 25 have a bachelor’s degree (ACS 2012) #2 Blacks and Hispanics are 2x more likely than whites to be in poverty (ACS 2012) #3 41% of black Brunswick residents living in poverty versus 26% white (2008-12 ACS)

Legacy of segregation and generational poverty Cultural and linguistic barriers for Hispanics Brunswick problems overly impact blacks

No multiethnic pastor association effectively facilitates interracial dialogue

SENIORS’ QUALITY OF LIFE Data Trends

SOLUTION: No Private-Sector Solution Causes & Contributing Factors

#1 Percentage of households with seniors living alone did not change from 2000 to 2012 #2 Only 9.8% of seniors under poverty line in Glynn County vs. 11.3% in GA (2008-12 ACS) #3 Seniors’ home median value is $173,700 in Glynn County vs. $142,600 in Georgia in 2012 (ACS)

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Inheritance of homes and slum lords

Causes & Contributing Factors

#1 Glynn County graduation rate improved from 53% in 2004 to 81% in 2013 (AdvancED) #2 Glynn adults 25+: 26% had BA/BS & 87% HS diploma in 2010 vs 24% & 82% in 2000 (Census) #3 64% enrollment growth at College of Coastal Georgia from Fall 2000-2012 (Fact Book)

STORY of HOPE

Lack of income for home repairs

SOLUTION: Golden Isles Career Academy

Data Trends

GAP

Vandalism and crime lowering home values

Zion Baptist Church purchased 20 adjacent lots to redevelop dilapidated block

K-12 EDUCATION

STORY of HOPE

SOLUTION: Zion Baptist Church

Adults choosing to live in isolation Lack of accessible services designed for seniors Income level after earning years are done

Area Agency on Aging for coastal Georgia has robust programs for seniors Prepared by Excellence in Giving ©2014


TREATMENT OF CHILDREN Data Trends

Causes & Contributing Factors

#1 31% of children in Glynn County live in poverty—5,918 total kids (2012 SAIPE) #2 Substantiated child abuse up 93% and child neglect up 86% from 2008-12 (UGA, GAFCP) #3 126% increase in CPS cases and Juvenile Court hearings up 21% from 2012-14 (County Judge)

STORY of HOPE

Data Trends

Poverty stress and lack of moral fortitude

SOLUTION: No Known Solution Giving birth before adequate education Childcare resources and father engagement Gender wage equality

No women’s resource center exists to empower women to overcome obstacles

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT Data Trends

SOLUTION: College of Coastal Georgia Causes & Contributing Factors

#1 19% increase in Altamaha Technical College graduates from 2009-13 (GA DOL) #2 Coastal Pines Technical College has 98.2% graduate placement rate in its 22 programs #3 83% of Glynn County residents complete high school, only 18% finish college (2012 BGCDA)

Quality and extent of education among workers Local schools for technical & academic training The match between local skills and industries

Upgraded academic & technical colleges offer range of degrees & certifications

YOUTH SEXUAL HEALTH Data Trends

SOLUTION: CareNet Pregnancy Center Causes & Contributing Factors

#1 20% decline in Glynn County teen STD rate from 2003-12 while GA plateaued (OASIS) #2 15% drop in Glynn County teen birth rate from 2008-11, less than 26% drop in GA (OASIS) #3 Teen pregnancy rate per 1,000: 70 in Glynn Co, 38 in GA, 34 in U.S. (2010 GCAPP)

STORY of HOPE

Generational cycles of abuse and neglect

Causes & Contributing Factors

#1 19% of women in Glynn County live in poverty vs. 16% of men (ACS 2008-12) #2 28% gap between male & female median income in Glynn County vs. 21% in GA (ACS 2008-12) #3 Glynn Co. women earn 10% less than GA women, 15% less than U.S. (2012 ACS)

STORY of HOPE

Breakdown of traditional family structure

FaithBridge Foster Care plans to place 20-25 children per year into better care.

WOMEN’S EMPOWERMENT

GAP

SOLUTION: FaithBridge Foster Care

Sex education Contraceptive usage Abstinence and monogamy

CareNet’s in-school presentations on sexual risk elimination to 10,458 youth Prepared by Excellence in Giving ©2014

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COMMUNITY TRENDS TOP 12 ISSUES EXAMINED

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BRUNSWICK ECONOMY The system of exchanging money via producers, vendors, and consumers of products and services in Brunswick CAUSES & CONTRIBUTING FACTORS

KEY DATA TRENDS #1 2% fewer Brunswick jobs in 2014 than 2013 vs. 1.8% more jobs in GA (BLS stats)

An unskilled workforce, unsafe environment, and lack of disposable income prevent both producers and vendors from opening businesses in Brunswick. Generational poverty has created a culture that devalues education, limits exposure to future professional possibilities, and lowers expectations. Reliance on handouts (14% of the population receives SNAP benefits) or participation in criminal activity has prevented some residents from working their way out of poverty. Coordinating skills training, job placement, and character development (work ethic and integrity) with job creation are necessary for economic improvement.

#2 37% of Brunswick residents live in poverty vs. 17% in Georgia (2010 Census)

Median Household Income

Brunswick Employees

GA

Glynn County

#3 Brunswick income grew 34% from 1990 to 2010 vs. 43% in Glynn (1990-2010 Census) #4 8.3% average unemployment rate for January-July 2014 vs. GA 7.3% (BLS stats) #5 32% of county residents report “Poverty, Jobs, Economy” as greatest challenge in Glynn County (2009 Needs Assessment)

Brunswick

in Thousands

$50,000

46.0

$40,000

44.0

$30,000

42.0 40.0

$20,000

38.0

$10,000

Source: BLS stats

Brunswick entrepreneur Andrea Dickerson grew up in poverty, but she worked her way out of it. She turned a passion for children into a childcare business in 2004. She acquired licenses, earned multiple certifications, and launched 2 locations in Brunswick. She dreamed big, worked tirelessly, and stayed focused. Akeba Academy and The Rock Afterschool Center stand as beacons of hope for Brunswick residents who wonder if they can succeed financially despite humble beginnings in a bad economy. Read her story in Character magazine.

STORY of HOPE

SOLUTION STAR Foundation has a proven track record training Brunswick residents for available jobs with 70% of graduates finding a job within 12 months. Prepared by Excellence in Giving ©2014

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2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

Source: 1990-2010 Census

2006

2010

2005

2000

2004

$0 1990

36.0


CRIME Prevalence of Violent (murder, rape, robbery, assault) and Property crime (burglary, vehicle theft, larceny) CAUSES & CONTRIBUTING FACTORS While rates for both violent and property crime in Glynn County remain 3 times higher than Georgia, the overall trend for the past decade is a significant reduction. Brunswick’s crime rate decreased every year from 2006 to 2013 (except for 2008). Systematic crack-downs on gang activity by the Brunswick Police Department have reduced larceny and vehicle theft. The Glynn/Brunswick Violent Crime task force has also had success fighting gangrelated crime. Efforts to modernize include a public real-time CrimeMapping app and online officer training. Coordinating law enforcement, judicial convictions, and gentrification of impoverished areas is necessary to continue these positive trends.

KEY DATA TRENDS #1 31% decline in Glynn County violent crime in 2007-12 compared to 9% increase in GA #2 41% decrease in Property Crime vs. 14% decrease in GA from 2007-12 (GAFCP) #3 Total 2012 crime rate of 5,354 in Glynn County is higher than 3,715 in GA (UGA) #4 42% decrease in Larceny, 7% increase in burglary, and 43% decrease in vehicle theft in Glynn County from 2003-12 (GBI) #5 “Part-one crimes” up 9% in Brunswick, down 9% in Glynn Co for Jan-July 2014 (Brunswick News)

Glynn Co. Property Crime Rates Larceny

Burglary

Violent Crime Rate (per 100K)

Vehicle Theft

Glynn County

5000

25

4000

20

3000

15

2000

Georgia

10

1000

5

0

0 2007

2008

Source: GBI

2009

2010

2011

2012

Source: GAFCP

Captain Kevin Jones administers several P.R. programs for the Brunswick Police Department. Glynn County residents have become more involved in community law enforcement through the Citizen’s Police Academy and Citizen Observer Program. Comprehensive Security Surveys are available to businesses and families, and the active CBPD Facebook page has improved the rapid-response alert system. Lectures and workshops are available upon request for Neighborhood Watch, Child I.D., and Crimes Against the Elderly.

STORY of HOPE

SOLUTION 12

Children in Action (CIA) Sports Club provides constructive, intergenerational activities that prevent crime through positive options. Prepared by Excellence in Giving ©2014


ENVIRONMENT Planned efforts to preserve current ecological resources (land, water, air) & reverse effects of past toxic pollution CAUSES & CONTRIBUTING FACTORS 10 years ago Brunswick was named the “most polluted zip code” in the United States. The Glynn Environmental Coalition has been able to raise awareness and mobilize volunteers to participate in clean-ups, but much work is needed. Glynn County has 4 toxic federal Superfund sites: LCP Chemicals, Brunswick Wood Preserving, Hercules 009 Landfill, and Terry Creek Dredge. Chemicals released into air, water, and land affect respiratory health, drinking water, and local animals. Coordinating clean-up, monitoring industrial, commercial, and residential development, advocating for “Clean Power” and preserving priority wetlands will be necessary to improve the environment.

KEY DATA TRENDS #1 15 Glynn County hazardous waste sites in 2006 has grown to 17 in 2014 (EPD) #2 Air Quality Index improvement from 44 in 2000 to 31 in 2013 (AQI Report) #3 84% of residents: local leaders addressing topic is ‘important’ or ‘extremely important’ (2009 Community Needs) #4 26,737 pounds per year TRI chemicals released on Land from 2007-09; 173,110 pounds per year from 2010-12 (EPA) #5 Glynn County: 4 classified SuperFund Sites

Toxic Chemicals Released in Brunswick 3

Air

Water

Hazardous Sites

Land

Pounds (in millions)

2.5 2 1.5 1 0.5 0 2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

Source: EPA

Source: GA EPD

Founded in 2000, St. Simons Land Trust has worked tirelessly to protect natural resources and green spaces in coastal Georgia. Executive Director Ben Slade recently partnered with Wells Fargo on an 18-month capital campaign to raise $25 million to purchase the 608-acre maritime forest known as Cannon’s Point. Read in Savannah Morning News.

STORY of HOPE

SOLUTION The St. Simons Land Trust has actively involved citizens in preserving 1,000 acres on St. Simons Island, with plans to reach 2,000 acres.

Prepared by Excellence in Giving ©2014

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FAMILY STRUCTURE The support system providing care and stability for children, traditionally consisting of two married parents CAUSES & CONTRIBUTING FACTORS Rising rates in births to unmarried parents have destabilized the traditional family structure. Unprotected sexual activity without plans to provide a stable family result in sub-optimal living conditions for kids. Grandparents are increasingly responsible to caretaking of children instead of biological parents. Children who are not raised in ‘married-couple families’ are more likely to live in poverty, use drugs, and commit crimes. Particularly, fatherlessness causes these negative outcomes along with higher rates of incarceration, suicide, and mental illness. Promoting marriage, conjugal fidelity, and joint responsibility for raising children would improve children’s socioeconomic prospects.

Births to Unmarried Moms in Glynn County 60%

KEY DATA TRENDS #1 39% of children in Glynn County live with a single parent, on par with GA (FBFC) #2 Births to unmarried mothers in Glynn County up 10% from 2000-2012 (OASIS) #3 110% growth in grandparents responsible for parenting children (ACS 2005-2012) #4 14% of people 20+ years in Glynn Co. are divorced, but ‘people never married’ rose from 15.3% to 21.3% (ACS 2000-2012) #5 71% of families with mom but no dad to care for children under 5 live in poverty vs. 2% for married couples (ACS 2008-2012)

Grandparents Responsible for Kids ACS Estimates 1500

50%

1250

40%

1000

30%

750

20%

500

10%

250

0% 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012

0 2005-2007

Source: OASIS

2007-2009

2010-2012

Source: ACS 2005-2012

The Coastal Coalition for Children (CCC) offers programs that annually help 127 families implement best parenting practices and 57 ‘grand-families’ seek adoption. Using Cornell’s “Second Time Around” curriculum, CCC has achieved a 90% retained custody rate and 85% relationships with a family physician. But despite their work, still 72% of children in Brunswick and 43% in Glynn County do not have married parents living together.

STORY of HOPE

NO SOLUTION KNOWN. While CCC preserves family units and CareNet educates teens on sexual risk, no proven program to strengthen and promote stable family structure has been identified. 14

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GLYNN COUNTY HOUSING The condition and prevalence of housing units available for citizens to permanently purchase or temporarily rent

KEY DATA TRENDS #1 51% of Brunswick homes were renteroccupied vs. 30% in GA (2010 Census)

CAUSES & CONTRIBUTING FACTORS High crime rates in sections of Brunswick contribute both directly (i.e., vandalism) and indirectly (low incentive for maintenance) to housing disrepair. Few residents have the disposable income necessary to improve living conditions. Profiteering slumlords discourage construction of new, habitable apartments. Inability to sell old, family-owned facilities contributes to the large number of vacant lots. Coordinating redevelopment initiatives, gentrification efforts, and individual investment in housing maintenance with new construction is necessary for housing improvement.

#2 6% fewer owner-occupied homes in Glynn County from 1990 to 2010 (USA Census) #3 23% of housing units from Gloucester to L St were “uninhabitable” (102) or in “poor condition” (284) in 2013 (Urban RDP) #4 50% of these houses from Gloucester to L St “need major repairs”, & 512 are vacant #5 369 families on public housing & voucher waiting lists as of August 2013 (PHA)

Total Housing Units

Glynn County Housing % Owners

% Renters

Glynn County

% Vacant

60%

50000

50%

40000

40%

30000

30%

20000

20%

10000

10% 0% 1990

Brunswick

2000

2010

0 1990

Source: Census

2000

2010

Source: Census

Craig Campbell was born in Glynn County, attended Brunswick High School, and has served as Pastor at Zion Baptist Church since 2008. As the church grew, he started preaching at evening services, but they were frequently interrupted by illicit activity in the local neighborhood: violence, drug activity, and prostitution. Under Rev. Campbell’s leadership, the church purchased the 18 adjacent lots, leveled the dilapidated residences in October 2013, and started planning construction on the property. Read his story in The Florida-Times Union.

STORY of HOPE

SOLUTION Zion Baptist Church has demonstrated ability to partner with local government on cost-saving demolition and re-development of dilapidated city blocks. Prepared by Excellence in Giving ©2014

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K-12 EDUCATION Learning opportunities for children and teens in Glynn County with positive life and career-related outcomes CAUSES & CONTRIBUTING FACTORS Education has received a groundswell of attention in Glynn County. The construction of a new high school, launch of a new career academy, and upgrade to 4-year degrees at the College of Coastal Georgia have contributed to positive momentum. Glynn County Public Schools are helping parents get more involved in their children’s education with the Infinite Campus Parent Portal to track homework assignments, grades, and absences. Educational support initiatives like CIS, Blueprint, Baby Steps, and the Boys & Girls Club Teen Center have complemented the school system. Coordinating these efforts and completing the cradle-to-career continuum will perpetuate success.

KEY DATA TRENDS #1 Glynn County graduation rate improved from 53% in 2004 to 81% in 2013 (Adv) #2 87% of Glynn’s 25+ population had H.S. diploma in 2010 vs. 82% in 2000 (Census) #3 17% of teens 16-19 are neither in school nor working vs. 11% in GA (2012 GAFCP) #4 Enrollment up 64% at College of Coastal GA from fall 2000-2012 (Fact Book) #5 90% of kids’ parents at Risley Middle feel input is valued & staff are welcoming, but only 37% talk to staff >2x/year (Survey)

Glynn County Graduation Rate 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 2004

Teens not in school or working Glynn

Georgia

20% 15% 10% 5%

2009

2013

0% 2005 2009

Source: GA DOE

2006 2010

2007 2011

2008 2012

Source: GA Kids Count

Since opening in August 2009, the Golden Isles Career Academy has graduated over 90% of its rising seniors in 18 distinctive career curricula for Automotive Repair, Broadcast/Video, Culinary Arts, Criminal Justice, Cosmetology, Certified Nursing Assistant & Health Care, Graphic Design, Heating Ventilation & Air Conditioning (HVAC), and Robotics. The Academy is building its service learning program and training a skilled local workforce.

STORY of HOPE

SOLUTION Golden Isles Career Academy has contributed to rising graduation rates in Glynn County while training and connecting students to real jobs.

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RACIAL DISPARITY Outstanding discrepancies of income, service access, or accomplishments among ethnic groups

KEY DATA TRENDS #1 9.5% of blacks versus 30% of whites age 25+ have a bachelor’s degree (ACS 2012)

CAUSES & CONTRIBUTING FACTORS The legacy of racial segregation in the South lingers in Glynn County. Although schools were integrated in 1970 and minorities are bussed to elementary schools on St. Simons Island, generational poverty among blacks and cultural/linguistic barriers for Hispanics perpetuates racial disparity. The high crime rates, broken family structures, and bad economy in Brunswick disproportionately affect black residents (59.2% of city’s population). Gangs, violence, sexual assault, and drug-related activity all hinder black residents in Brunswick from achieving higher levels of income and education. The College of Coastal Georgia may be facilitating reduced educational and income disparity since the student population reflects Brunswick City’s racial make-up.

#2 Blacks and Hispanics are 2x more likely than whites to be in poverty (ACS 2012) #3 41% of black Brunswick residents live in poverty versus 26% white (2008-12 ACS) #4 Glynn County’s population is 26.6% black/69.5% white and Brunswick is 59.2% black/31.4% white (2010 Census) #5 In 2007, 5 of 10 Glynn County elementary schools were non-compliant with federallyrequired student racial balance (FL Times)

Brunswick Poverty Rate

Black/White Education Disparity White Male Black Male

2012

Bachelor's degree or higher

White Female Black Female

1999

Black

No high school diploma

White Hispanic 0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

0%

Source: ACS 2012

20%

40%

60%

Source: ACS 2012

FaithWorks provides a common vehicle for racially diverse churches to coordinate urban mercy ministries. However, no ecumenical association facilitates interracial dialogue about key community issues, as revealed following the 2013 baby murder. The lack of coordination reveals itself when Brunswick churches duplicate feeding programs without knowing who is taking advantage of their compassion. Because of a long history of racial discord, the moral leadership of the community must start to exemplify respect, cooperation, and shared service.

GAP

NO SOLUTION KNOWN. A comprehensive program to reduce racial disparity has not been identified. Prepared by Excellence in Giving ©2014

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SENIORS’ QUALITY OF LIFE Quality living conditions for senior citizens

KEY DATA TRENDS

CAUSES & CONTRIBUTING FACTORS

#1 Percentage of households with seniors living alone did not change from 2000-12

Isolation, lack of targeted assistance, and low income degrades health and quality of life for people 65+ years of age. However, Glynn County shows positive marks for seniors’ social engagement, assistance programs, and wealth levels. Rural seniors have transportation assistance via Coastal Regional Coaches and 8 other options listed in the Glynn County Resource Directory (see also the Senior Living publication from Brunswick News). The Brunswick Roosevelt Harris Jr. Senior Citizens Center has struggled to provide adult day care to 13 to 15 seniors per day and group meals for 75 seniors due to budget cuts. However, Glynn County has adequate senior living developments (e.g., Benton House, Magnolia Manor, Fairhaven Assisted Living, Marsh’s Edge) despite 17% of the population at 65+ years compared to 12% in GA.

#2 9.8% of seniors are under poverty line in Glynn County vs. 11.3% in GA (ACS) #3 $173,700 median seniors’ home value in in Glynn Co 2012 vs. $142,600 in GA (ACS) #4 New senior residences have opened to serve growing 65+ year population (e.g., Benton House opened in 2013) #5 Brunswick’s Roosevelt Harris Jr. Senior Citizens Center cut services as federal/state funding declined 70% in the past decade (Brunswick News)

65+ Years Population % Glynn County

Senior Households Households with seniors living alone Total households with seniors

GA

20% 50% 15%

40%

10%

30% 20%

5% 0% 1980

10% 1990

2000

2010

2013

0% 2000

Source: US Census

STORY of HOPE

2005-06

2007-09

2010-12

Source: ACS & US Census

The Area Agency on Aging for coastal Georgia has a robust set of programs for senior citizens. Case managers and call center representatives connect seniors to resources, transportation, medicare advice, caregiver assistance, in-home services for daily life, meals, legal assistance, chronic disease management, and adult day care.

NO PRIVATE-SECTOR SOLUTION. Senior citizen services primarily depend on government-funded agencies, though the Golden Isles Senior Citizens Foundation is supplementing for government cuts. 18

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TREATMENT OF CHILDREN Treatment of adolescents raised in poverty or plenty, with abusive or nurturing caretakers

KEY DATA TRENDS #1 31% of children in Glynn County live in poverty—5,918 total kids (2012 SAIPE)

CAUSES & CONTRIBUTING FACTORS The decline in family structure has led to children growing up in transitory, impoverished, or hostile conditions. In 2014, 215 children were enrolled in Protective Services compared to 95 in 2012. Between birth and high school graduation, Glynn County children are almost twice as likely to be abused or neglected, and ~20% more likely to be in poverty or get in trouble with the law, compared to just 6 years ago. Foster families are inadequate to care for kids locally so they are shipped out of town. Coordinating family education, poverty alleviation, foster care, and judicial crackdown on child abuse and neglect will be necessary to create an atmosphere in which children can thrive.

Glynn County Child Poverty

#2 Substantiated child abuse up 93%, neglect up 86% from 2008-2012 (UGA, GAFCP) #3 126% increase in CPS cases, 21% increase in Juvenile Court hearings from 2012-14 (County Judge Rountree) #4 37% increase of Glynn County children in foster care from 2012-14 (J. Rountree) #5 7% more Glynn County children live in poverty than 10 years ago (SAIPE)

Glynn County Child Treatment

% age 0-17 in poverty

Child Neglect

40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% 2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

160 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 2008

Source: SAIPE

Child Abuse

2010

2012

Source: UGA, GAFCP

Since 2007 the Bible’s imperative “to take care of widows and orphans” has motivated FaithBridge to recruit 250 foster families, place 600+ children into loving Christian homes, and facilitate 97 adoptions with zero cases of neglect or abuse. FaithBridge succeeds through extensive community research to understand what is driving Glynn County children into foster care (like sexual exploitation) and offering comprehensive services: tutoring, transportation, babysitting, respite care, ministry teams, and clothing/meals/supplies.

STORY of HOPE

SOLUTION FaithBridge Foster Care identifies top-notch foster families in local churches and plans to place 20-25 children per year into better care. Prepared by Excellence in Giving ©2014

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WOMEN’S EMPOWERMENT Societal factors influence the extent to which women can access education, job training, healthcare, & childcare

KEY DATA TRENDS #1 19% of women in Glynn County live in poverty vs. 16% of men (ACS 2008-12)

CAUSES & CONTRIBUTING FACTORS In 21st-century America, representation of women is growing rapidly in higher education and economic sectors. But in Glynn County, obstacles to empowerment still remain: a large gender wage gap, gender poverty gap, and increasing number of children born to under-educated females. Despite the Georgia CAPS Program subsidizing childcare for low-income families, parents seeking a college degree are not eligible. Coordinating access to healthcare, child-care, and vocational/higher education is essential for creating opportunities for economic advancement and escape from poverty.

Births to Moms with <12 Years Education Glynn County

Georgia

#3 Glynn Co. women earn 10% less than GA women, 15% less than U.S. (ACS 2012) #4 9% increase in babies born to moms with <12 yrs. education, 2007-11 (KidsCount) #5 27 childcare centers within 10 miles of Brunswick, avg. rate $94/wk (AllGAKids)

Glynn Co. Gender Income Gap Males

USA

Females

50 Salary, Thousand $

40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 2007

#2 28% gap between male & female median income in Glynn County vs. 21% in GA (ACS 2008-12)

2008

2009

2010

2011

40 30 20

10 0 2010

Source: KidsCount

2011

2012

Source: ACS 5-Year

No women’s resource center exists to empover and advocate for women despite serious obstacles. 1 in 5 women in Glynn County lives in poverty. On average, they earn $12,800 less per year than men in the county and $3,700 less than women in Georgia. One in four newborn children will have a mother who did not graduate high school, but rising childcare rates require strict budgeting or financial assistance to complete additional education.

GAP

NO KNOWN SOLUTION. A program has not been identified to empower women through comprehensive services like education, job training, family health insurance, and childcare. 20

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WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT Training opportunities available to citizens to increase job competence, skill sets, & general employability CAUSES & CONTRIBUTING FACTORS More education in the right profession equals a workforce with higher paying jobs. Occupations by sector were stable in 2000-12, with a 4% increase in management jobs and 2% decrease in service jobs. Workers are mostly in the private sector (78%), with 16% in government and 6% self-employed (ACS). Higher education is available at Troy University and Coastal Pines Technical College. A 10-course industry certification is also offered at the Coastal Business & Training Center. Brunswick Job Corps Center, ranked #24 of 124 government job centers for vocational credentials, offers high school dropouts certification training.

Glynn County Occupations 2000

KEY DATA TRENDS #1 19% increase in Altamaha Technical College graduates, 2009-13 (GA DOL) #2 Coastal Pines Technical College has 98.2% graduate placement rate in its 22 programs #3 87% of Glynn’s 25+ population had H.S. degree and 26% had Bachelor’s in 2010 vs. 82% and 24% in 2000 (ACS 2008-12) #4 $703 average weekly wage for labor force of 38,631 in Glynn County vs. $768 in U.S. in 2012 (BGCDA) #5 Brunswick ranked #175 (out of 184) in US Best Small Places for Business (Forbes)

Future Job Growth by Degree

2012

2012

40%

140,000

30%

105,000

20%

70,000

10%

35,000

0%

0

Source: ACS

2022

Source: BLS

In 2011, a small two-year community college in Brunswick changed its name to the College of Coastal Georgia and granted its first baccalaureate degrees to a class of 69. At the same time, CCGA finished construction of a new student center ($12M), 352bed dormitory ($14M), and Health & Science Building ($8M). The modernization and expansion lay the groundwork for recruiting and retaining a larger student body. Altamaha Technical College merged with Okefenokee Technical College to form Coastal Pines Technical College in July 2014 and serve Glynn County in coordination with the Golden Isles Career Academy.

STORY of HOPE

SOLUTION College of Coastal Georgia provides a full range of academic degrees with scholarships for 1 out of 9 students to increase retention. Prepared by Excellence in Giving ©2014

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YOUTH SEXUAL HEALTH Sexually risky behaviors in under-18 adolescents may lead to pregnancy or contraction of debilitating diseases

KEY DATA TRENDS #1 20% decline in Glynn County teenage STD rate from 2003-12, while rate for Georgia has stayed the same (OASIS)

CAUSES & CONTRIBUTING FACTORS Many children in Glynn County have grown up with parents who had poor role models in the 1960’s sexual revolution, combined with a morallyneutral public education system. Today, the local school board uses Sex/AIDS educational tools that promote abstinence as “the only sure method of preventing pregnancy and STDs.” But lower Youth STD and Pregnancy rates over the past 10 years can also be attributed to the push for ‘safe sex’, destigmatization of premarital intercourse, and increased contraceptive usage. Further education of youth about risks of early sex and the benefits of abstinence could continue to improve these trends.

#2 15% drop in Glynn Co teen birth rate from 2008-11, less than GA 26% drop (OASIS) #3 Teen pregnancy rate per 1,000: 70 in Glynn Co, 38 in GA, 34 in U.S. in 2010 (GCAPP) #4 14% increase in infant mortality rate per 1,000 from 2006-11 (FamConn) #5 12% of newborn babies in Glynn County had low birth-weight in 2011 (FamConn)

Teen Birth Rate Glynn County

Glynn Co. Teen STD Rate

Georgia

Cases aged 10-19 (*100K)

50

2,500

40

2,000

30

1,500

20

1,000 500

10

0 Source: OASIS

10,000 presentations to youth on eliminating sexual risk. 272 babies spared from abortion. 69 patients making purity commitments. Dozens of male mentorships growing around a 24/7 Dad curriculum. And the annual Golden Isles FatherDaughter Purity Ball. All thanks to the work of 32 dedicated staff and 112 volunteers at CareNet Pregnancy Center, in a high-traffic area of downtown Brunswick. These large-scale efforts to promote parental responsibility and healthy sexual behavior in the context of marriage are helped by a full range of services including ultrasounds and STD testing. Read about CareNet on their website.

STORY of HOPE

SOLUTION CareNet Pregnancy Center has delivered presentations on sexual risk elimination to 10,458 youth with 93% making purity commitments.

22

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2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

Source: OASIS

2006

2011

2005

2010

2004

2009

2003

0 2008


COMMUNITY SOLUTIONS GRANT IDEAS

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CARENET PREGNANCY CENTER To advance the sanctity of human life and sexual purity COMMUNITY ISSUE: YOUTH SEXUAL HEALTH The CareNet Pregnancy Center of Coastal Georgia directly helps teenagers and young adults confront the dangers and consequences of risky sexual behaviors. The educational staff promotes abstinence through purity pledges, offering medical and emotional resources to clients and community. These efforts combat the growing social pressure to participate in risky sexual behaviors. Purity can reduce unplanned pregnancies and STDs. Watch this video introducing CareNet’s “caring and confidential” services, including post-abortion support, at 3 locations in coastal Georgia.

COMMUNITY VALUE #1 Fewer unplanned births to single parents #2 Lower public health costs treating STDs #3 Lower infant mortality rate #4 Better parents of unexpected babies #5 Builds character as clients meet Jesus

WHY IT WORKS 

Caring, compassionate relationship with clients

Downtown Brunswick: location is easily accessible for clients it serves

Reward-based learning curriculum: EWYL

Practical assistance explores pregnancy options

Provide materials for moms & babies

Partnership with local schools to make presentations to youth about postponing sex until marriage and improving sexual health

OUTCOMES LIFE. 272 babies spared from abortion in past 5 years & 290 clients put their trust in Christ for salvation from 2009-2013 TREATMENT. 319 obstetrical ultrasound exams and 130 STD tests were given, with 37 patients receiving treatment for a sexually transmitted disease SEXUAL PURITY. 69 patients made purity commitments after treatment & 9,726 students made purity commitments after presentations at school

RECENT PROGRAM IMPROVEMENT "Earn While You Learn" curriculum with 40 lessons uses Mommy & Daddy Dollars to increase engagement with peer counselors and better outcomes for pregnancy and parenting.

$30,000 would provide ~10% increased income at Brunswick facility ($85,000 covers 10% of annual expenditures at all three locations). Increasing the annual budget would allow CareNet to pursue three new parts of their Strategic Plan: (1) doubling outreach to “abortion-minded clients”, (2) training enough volunteers to work at Brunswick facility full-time, and (3) opening a thrift store to generate more sustainable revenue.

GRANT IDEA

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CHILDREN IN ACTION SPORTS CLUB To put in action the gospel of Jesus Christ by building relationships, character, excellence, and teamwork through one-on-one interactions during sports practice, games, and devotion time with children, youth, & adults COMMUNITY ISSUE: CRIME The CIA Sports Club provides constructive afterschool activities for a racially-diverse group of children in high-crime areas of Brunswick. The inter-generational approach to inclusive sports programs, which emphasize character-building, reduces participants’ likelihood to engage in gang activity or illicit drug use. This preventative approach achieves longer-term positive results for children than traditional law enforcement and consequences through the justice system. Watch the video here about how Children in Action sports camps are used to teach perseverance, integrity, excellence, and teamwork.

COMMUNITY VALUE #1 Improves child conduct at home #2 Improves performance at school #3 Increases community service participation #4 Increases self-reported self-esteem #5 Reduces juvenile crime and gang activity

WHY IT WORKS 

Coaches engaged in the life of a child simulates the loving adult mentor every child needs

Motivates clients physically and spiritually

Provides safe, friendly, Christian environment for interaction with positive role models

Overcomes transportation barriers between low-income families and recreational activities

Partnership with four local churches, Rotary Club, Gathering Place & others to use facilities

OUTCOMES IMPROVED BEHAVIOR. Internal benchmarks indicate better child conduct, self-esteem, and school performance COMMUNITY. Internal benchmarks indicate more community service and time spent with family and friends HEALTH INFO. As an NIH We Can! partner, CIA weekly distributes 30 fact sheets to local employers on how to fight the status quo of high child obesity rates

RECENT PROGRAM IMPROVEMENT The "Barnabas Club" after-school program, launched in 2012, is free for at-risk children. The CIA Sports Club is able to track school records, hold teacher conferences, and pick the child up on weekday afternoons for transport to the activity facility.

GRANT IDEA 26

$11,000 would cover 10% of annual expenditures, and another $10,000 could launch a gift-matching capital building campaign. CIA Sports Club’s #1 priority is to purchase a permanent facility to house expanding programming in the next 3 years. Prepared by Excellence in Giving ©2014


COLLEGE OF COASTAL GEORGIA FOUNDATION To develop resources to support and further the goals of the college COMMUNITY ISSUE: WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT The College of Coastal Georgia Foundation funded the shift in 2008-2009 from a 2-year to 4-year institution of higher education. In fall 2009, CCGA had 266 students (9%) enrolled in bachelor’s degree programs and 2,109 (68%) in associate degrees. By 2014, those numbers had shifted to 1,239 (44%) and 1,192 (42%), respectively. These changes position CCGA to prepare students for a modernizing and increasingly competitive job market, with skill sets needed to fill workforce openings in Glynn County and throughout Georgia. 40% of students are from Glynn County, and 93% are in-state students.

COMMUNITY VALUE #1 Adds value to local K-12 education #2 Fuels local economy via student spending #3 Decreases student debt at graduation #4 Attracts more business to Glynn County #5 Increases average wages for graduates

WHY IT WORKS 

Provides scholarships to 11% of students, with average award of $1,800 (full in-state tuition)

Presents 19 annual leadership awards to spotlight student efforts, encourage ambition

Scales up college experience from commuter to residential, attracts more top talent in GA

Networks to establish community partnerships through “Complete College Georgia”

Rapid expansion: new writing center, honors program, and 7-week success seminar

OUTCOMES RETENTION. 92% of scholarship students stay through graduation versus 65% of paying students STUDENT-ATHLETES. Scholarship students participating in a varsity sport maintain an average 3.2 GPA DEBT REDUCTION. 263 scholarships awarded allow students to graduate with no debt burden and the freedom to pursue careers of choice

RECENT PROGRAM IMPROVEMENT In 2013, a new partnership with the Monticello Foundation and Jefferson School of AfricanAmerican Heritage started to place students into competitive internship programs.

GRANT IDEA

$30,000 could cover 2% of annual expenditures, provide scholarships for 15 students, or—in line with expansion priorities—be used to establish a named faculty chair. A gift could also support college credit courses offered in local high schools or other community partnerships encouraging post-secondary school continuation.

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FAITHBRIDGE FOSTER CARE To recruit, train, and equip churches to solve their communities’ foster care problem COMMUNITY ISSUE: TREATMENT OF CHILDREN FaithBridge Foster Care brings fresh energy and innovation to a historically bureaucratic and exhausting system. In just 8 years of existence, FaithBridge has become an industry leader, setting an example of comprehensive care, and is now expanding the model into new states. Watch the brief video of founder Bill Hancock speaking about the American foster care crisis: only 240,000 families available for 800,000 children. By recruiting Christians from congregations in the Glynn County faith community, FaithBridge will protect children from abuse, neglect, poverty, and involvement with the juvenile justice system.

COMMUNITY VALUE #1 Decreases foster care time-of-stay #2 Increases eventual adoption rate to 100% #3 Decreases abuse and neglect of children #4 Mobilizes churches to help local children #5 Decreases out-of-county child placements

WHY IT WORKS 

Superb communication throughout network

Management system focused on child welfare

Staff operate from Biblical worldview

Encourages safety, well-being, and permanency for children both through adoption and (when appropriate) restoration to biological family

Innovative support model incorporates child care, pastoral care, transporters, prayer leaders, medical counseling, and community groups

OUTCOMES QUALITY OF CARE. 600 children taken care of by 250 foster families recruited from churches, with 0 cases of abuse or neglect ADOPTION. Helped families acquire guardianship for 97 children from 2007-14, 100% rate for adoption of available children by their foster families NOTE: Institute is being established to share best practices & competency-based training curriculum

RECENT PROGRAM IMPROVEMENT "FaithBridge Psychological Services" was created under the leadership of licensed clinician Dr. Roselynn Miller to provide assessments, parent coaching, tele-psychiatry, trauma therapy, and marriage therapy.

GRANT IDEA 28

$25,000 covers 1% of annual expenditures. Funds should be earmarked for use in Brunswick since FaithBridge has other locations and their top priority for the next 12 months is expansion into 3 new states. Grants are needed to cover the cost of a local coordinator in Glynn County and recruiting events for Christian foster families.

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GOLDEN ISLES CAREER ACADEMY To ensure a viable 21st-century workforce for Glynn County, building resources to provide quality education in a charter school environment COMMUNITY ISSUE: K-12 EDUCATION The Golden Isles Career Academy charter school specializes in technical education. Glynn County students on scholarship grew to 12 in 2014, and the annual Candlelight Carnival plans to raise $30,000+ for more scholarships in 2015. GICA is a valuable stepping-stone near the final stages of the cradle-tocareer continuum, giving students a behind-thescenes look at local career options like manufacturing and healthcare. CEO Rick Townsend and new principal James McCarter are actively recruiting investment from local businesses (i.e., $180K from GP Cellulose). For more, watch this video of business executives discussing workforce opportunities for GICA graduates.

COMMUNITY VALUE #1 Improves high school graduation rate #2 Alternative to traditional public education #3 Rewards strong work ethic in students #4 Better skilled workforce for local jobs #5 Integrates community service projects

WHY IT WORKS

OUTCOMES

Win-win situation: students get jobs right out of high school, investors get skilled employees

GRADUATION. Graduation rates for students of GICA exceed 90% every year

Offering 18 distinctive career curricula with college credit and certifications (e.g., welding)

VOLUNTEERISM. 2,000+ hours of service-learning will be logged by fall 2015

Business-led governance of charter school

Competition for merit scholarships attracts the best and brightest students of Glynn County

Partnership with local university presidents, Greg Aloia (CCGA) & Glenn Deibert (CPTC)

WORK ETHIC. 20% of grades are based on demonstrated effort rather than merit to encourage work ethic NOTE: Better graduate data about job placement and school continuation needed

RECENT PROGRAM IMPROVEMENT Completing unique projects like Graphic Arts/ Broadcast Video students designing posters, invitations, and taping an event for Brunswick Goodwill.

GRANT IDEA

$15,000 (~15% of annual expenditures) could help GICA expand their servicelearning component, positively reviewed by GCN’s Dr. Chris Allers, by hiring a parttime program coordinator. Gifts could also be designated for merit scholarships to motivate student performance and post-secondary school continuation. Prepared by Excellence in Giving ©2014

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ST. SIMONS LAND TRUST To preserve the island’s natural and scenic character, enhancing the quality of life and environmental health of the St. Simons island community for present and future generations COMMUNITY ISSUE: ENVIRONMENT The St. Simons Land Trust is working to preserve the beauty and character of live oaks, freshwater marshes, creeks, and rivers on the island. Despite obstacles of being adjacent to the “most polluted zip code” in America and 4 toxic Superfund sites, SSLT has successfully preserved 976 acres and turned them into public-use property like the John Gilbert Nature Trail (2006), Alice Richards Botanical Trail (2009), and Old Stables Corner (2010). Watch this video about the recently completed work of rescuing a “disappearing ecosystem” called Cannon’s Point. SSLT has plans to conserve another 1,000 acres on St. Simons Island to meet the recommended standard of 20% green space.

COMMUNITY VALUE #1 Rescues land scheduled for development #2 Creates public parks and recreation trails #3 Ensures future enjoyment of parks through conservation easement agreements #4 Protects water sources from pollution #5 Prevents unhealthy future congestion

WHY IT WORKS 

Connections with active, concerned citizens

Deep and wide donor base

Active volunteer group of 200+

Partnership with local golf resort & restaurants

Task force divisions: Education, Recreation & Infrastructure, History, and Conservation

Education initiatives with G.C.P.S., CCGA, Coastal Wildscapes, & GA Historical Society

OUTCOMES PRESERVE. 776 acres preserved in Glynn County, plus 200 in another county, through conservation easements RESTORE. Construction of public trails with interactive signs, regular clearing of trash and weeding in parks by volunteers HIKE. Recreation options for residents and tourists include 8+ new miles of walking/hiking/picnic areas on St. Simons

RECENT PROGRAM IMPROVEMENT In September 2012, SSLT completed an 18-month, $25 million capital campaign to purchase the 608acre Cannon’s Point, the last intact maritime forest on St. Simons Island, with 6 miles of shoreline.

GRANT IDEA 30

$10,000 qualifies for the Live Oak Society Benefactor membership and covers operations and stewardship of current holdings with small savings for property acquisition. Larger grants can also be designated for purchasing new property on St. Simons Island. SSLT has plans to conserve another 1,000 acres on St. Simons Island. Prepared by Excellence in Giving ©2014


STAR FOUNDATION To teach people how to become financially self-sufficient through an empowering, holistic program of computer, financial, life management and job readiness education COMMUNITY ISSUE: BRUNSWICK ECONOMY The Star Foundation directly increases the employability of the labor force in Brunswick. Generational poverty has limited exposure to professional possibilities and disconnected people from the path to developing financial and personal skills necessary to obtain and retain a job. The Star Foundation reverses the effects and moves people from handouts to hard work. The 9-week program enhances computer skills, teaches financial literacy, and demands personal responsibility while assisting with job placement. The program teaches the soft skills and work ethic that complement rather than duplicate the hard skills training at local colleges.

COMMUNITY VALUE #1 Decreases in food stamp allocation #2 Reduces public housing residency #3 Increases income for families in Brunswick #4 Sets example of strong work ethic for kids #5 Helps businesses find good employees

WHY IT WORKS 

Trusting relationships with clients

Located inside the community it serves

Multiple incentives motivate good behavior

Positive word-of-mouth marketing and networking attracts new clients

Teach soft skills such as handling conflict resolution and employer expectations

9-week program enhances computer skills, teaches financial literacy, and demands personal responsibility while finding jobs

OUTCOMES JOBS. 70% of 149 STAR students found jobs within 12 months of graduation in 2008-2012 (versus 15% at enrollment) SELF-SUFFICIENCY. 30% decrease in food stamp allocation and 28% reduction in public housing residency NOTE: Future follow-up questionnaires will collect data about timely bill paying, budgeting, establishing a checking and/or savings account, purchasing a home or acquiring other assets (Board member video highlights success)

RECENT PROGRAM IMPROVEMENT "Attire for Hire" mobilizes volunteers to help upcoming graduates buy an interview outfit. The new program element attracts volunteers and establishes relationships with local merchants.

GRANT IDEA

$20,000 covers 10% of annual expenditures. Increasing the annual budget would allow STAR to deepen its service to clients with more training and internships while expanding opportunities in other neighborhoods. Prepared by Excellence in Giving ©2014

31


THE GATHERING PLACE To reach students with the gospel of Jesus Christ, equip them to be effective Christian leaders, and send them to impact their local schools, churches, and communities COMMUNITY ISSUE: WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT The Gathering Place (“GP”) has served Glynn County since 1981; watch 30-year anniversary video about humble beginnings of sharing Christ with just a few local youth at a house on St. Simons Island. GP mentors students, trains diverse young leaders (60:40 white-to-black ratio), and organizes large outreach events. The mentoring program called 707 (historically meeting at 7:07 AM) mobilizes GP alumni volunteers to reach hundreds of middle and high school students in Glynn County. The Gathering Place effectively recruits students to serve at the summer Main Event with an annual internship and paid fellowship (promo video here).

COMMUNITY VALUE #1 Connects 10% of Glynn County youth to older mentors encouraging good decisions #2 Presents positive role models for public school students in 3-day assemblies #3 Community service projects by students #4 Provides leadership training to interns via business partners: Chick-fil-a, law firms, etc #5

WHY IT WORKS 

Partners with influential local groups like Sea Island Foundation (2014 sponsor) and local businesses to develop skill sets for GP interns

Utilizes 300 high-school, college-age, and adult volunteers plus 50 seasonal workers for costeffective staffing

Maintains 7 permanent staff for strategic planning, program design, & fundraising

High donor retention rate, over 50%

Exclusive focus on ages 12-25 focuses efforts rather than permitting mission drift

OUTCOMES STUDENT OUTREACH. Sunday night summer events reach 1,000+ students weekly and mentoring groups reach 650 students/year with 112 adult volunteers COMMUNITY SERVICE. 6,000+ hours given to G.P. and 5,000+ hours given to local community by G.P. students MINISTRY TRAINING. 140 highschool & college-age interns annually learn to lead ministry through serving at summer Main Events

RECENT PROGRAM IMPROVEMENT Junior and Senior high-school interns work at the Main Event from June–July each year. Expanded curriculum has been incorporated into kickoff retreat and bi-weekly Christian leadership training.

GRANT IDEA 32

$61,000 would cover 10% of annual expenditures. Funds should be earmarked for use in Brunswick since The Gathering Place has plans to develop a replication guide and pilot program elsewhere in the next 2 years. GP needs more staff to manage all the events, internships, volunteers, evaluations, training, and planned expansion. Prepared by Excellence in Giving ©2014


ZION BAPTIST CHURCH To comprehensively link the community, government, and community stakeholder partners in providing positive opportunities to eliminate violence in Brunswick COMMUNITY ISSUE: GLYNN COUNTY HOUSING Rev. Craig Campbell is leading a comprehensive, collaborative effort to revitalize the neighborhood adjacent to Zion Baptist Church. All properties on the block bounded by H, G, Lee & Gordon Street have been purchased and demolished to make way for construction of a $1 million multi-purpose complex, of which the congregation has already raised $375,000. ZBC is partnering with community stakeholders like Boys & Girls Club, Glynn County PTA, Agency on Aging, and Special Olympics to develop workshops on financial literacy, community support, and crime prevention. Studies on the sociology of space suggest these efforts could lead to slow but steady, long-term revival of distressed housing areas in downtown Brunswick.

COMMUNITY VALUE #1 Reduces criminal activity #2 Improves housing conditions #3 Provides family-friendly programming #4 Creates sense of neighborhood ownership #5 Creates meeting space for local residents

WHY IT WORKS 

Networks family-friendly organizations

Targets youth susceptible to gang involvement

Mobilizes youth volunteerism to keep neighborhoods & historic structures clean

Promotes citizen involvement in anti-crime initiatives like NeighborWatch & SilentWitness

OUTCOMES CRIME REDUCTION. Demolishing dilapidated housing projects near the church has started to reduce civil discord CLEANLINESS. Community awareness of new building project from the cleared land has and should continue to inspire neighbors keep their property clean

RECENT PROGRAM IMPROVEMENT Developed architecture plans for construction of a modern multi-purpose facility that will have space to host several community-friendly activities at the same time.

GRANT IDEA

A capital campaign donation of $25,000-$100,000 would significantly help Zion Baptist move forward with its construction plans for a community center on the property adjacent to the church. Long-term plans for the block and nearby properties include not only a multi-purpose center but also affordable housing.

Prepared by Excellence in Giving ©2014

33


VENTURE PHILANTHROPY EXPERIMENT IN GIVING

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KIDS ON COURSE Inspires students with confidence to realize their academic and individual potential by providing creative and inventive opportunities that connect students and families to the community, schools, and higher learning COMMUNITY ISSUE: K-12 EDUCATION Kids on Course (“KOC”) specializes in providing creative enrichments, learning supports, and family engagement to help students overcome barriers to academic success. KOC has a demonstrated track record of success at low-income elementary schools in Cedar Rapids, Iowa and has the potential to fill a gap in elementary education support in Glynn County. Extracurricular enrichment programs like violin, yoga, and soccer combined with after-school tutoring, family club, and home visits supplement public school offerings. Summer camp helps students improve 5 reading levels and score 25% higher in math skills. Watch the brief video “Two Seconds” for a snapshot of KOC staff and students.

WHY IT COULD WORK 

Full-time staff dedicated to academic support

Technology tracks student performance trends

Staff offices are located inside schools

Emphasis on family engagement creates more comprehensive student support network

Strong financial support, engaged board

Connects students and families to needed mental or physical health services

COMMUNITY VALUE #1 Involves kids in constructive activities before and after school #2 Improves young students’ reading level, preparing them for higher education #3 Overcomes transportation barrier between low-income families and enrichments #4 Reduces summer learning loss

POTENTIAL OUTCOMES COLLEGE GOALS. KOC students develop goal to attend college in elementary school ATTENDANCE. KOC students miss fewer days of school than their peers TEST SCORES. KOC students should score higher on math and reading tests

RISKS. "2 paid + 2 AmeriCorps staff" model with unclear division of responsibilities for site managers and coordinators has not yet been replicated. Difficulty of accessing student records and obtaining office space inside public schools has hindered KOC in Cedar Rapids, IA.

GRANT IDEA

To launch the Kids on Course initiative in two of Brunswick’s downtown elementary schools (Burroughs-Molette and Goodyear), a multi-year funding commitment would be required. Elementary school principals have demonstrated openness to outside assistance and elementary education support is missing in Glynn County.

Prepared by Excellence in Giving ©2014

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“CRADLE TO CAREER” INITIATIVE To coordinate education and employment support programs from infancy to college or career COMMUNITY ISSUE: WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT & K-12 EDUCATION A “Cradle to Career” (“C2C”) Initiative could coordinate funding, strategy, and impact measurement of support programs from infancy to college or career. The Communities of Coastal Georgia Foundation could facilitate the initiative as community foundations do in other Strive Network C2C partnerships. The “Cradle to Career” Coordinator would measure the collective impact of all education and employment support programs to determine where improvements must be made. Some programs to coordinate are: Early Literacy Initiative, Blueprint Project (Middle School), Communities in Schools (High School), and College of Coastal Georgia.

WHY IT COULD WORK

COMMUNITY VALUE #1 Maximize impact of current efforts #2 Improve K-12 education outcomes #3 Create stronger local workforce #4 Unite disjointed programs and leaders #5 Raises parent confidence in kids’ success

POTENTIAL OUTCOMES

Using data effectively to drive improved results on the path from cradle to career builds a culture of continuous improvement

KINDERGARTEN READINESS. Measures for a child’s cognitive, language, and motor skills

Coordination around shared priorities and outcomes aligns a community’s leadership capacity and funding to what works

TEST SCORES. Higher math, reading, and ACT test scores

The Strive Network of “Cradle to Career” initiatives across the USA has demonstrated the measurable outcomes from this approach

GRADUATION RATES. Higher high school, college, and professional degree completion rates

C2C involves members of government, business, nonprofit and the community

JOBS. Job placement for graduates who do not pursue further education

RISKS. Some programs may resist heightened accountability from shared measurement. Divisive relationships among current leaders may prevent the unity necessary for a C2C initiative to succeed.

GRANT IDEA 38

If the Communities of Coastal Georgia Foundation committed itself to coordinating a CRC initiative in Glynn County, a multi-year funding commitment would be required to slowly build the coalition and its shared priorities and measurements. CCGF leadership would have to create and prioritize a C2C plan to warrant funding. Prepared by Excellence in Giving ©2014


UNITY COMMUNITY CENTER SOUTH To successfully help transform the lives of our children in the community to be productive and righteous COMMUNITY ISSUE: TREATMENT OF CHILDREN The new Unity Community Center South (UCCS) has potential to develop into a regional organization providing safe environments for Brunswick and Glynn County children. The end goal is to develop character and life skills needed to overcome socioeconomic disadvantages. With strategies for fighting youth crime and childhood obesity, UCCS is adopting a comprehensive approach aimed at improving educational resources and family dynamics. By starting with children 5-12, the community center plans to solidly establish a culture of values-based training that will also lower rates of drug use and gang-related activity.

WHY IT COULD WORK 

Character-building activities led by mature adults fill idle time for children

Potential to rally support for an elementary-age program targeted to disadvantaged, inner-city youth

Potential partnerships with churches and local religious community due to its nature as a character development initiative UCCS is organized and run by young AfricanAmericans born and raised in Brunswick

COMMUNITY VALUE #1 Less gang activity and violence #2 Lower child obesity rates and drug use #3 Cultivates personal responsibility and work ethic in future Glynn County employees #4 Increased high school graduation rate and lower unemployment

POTENTIAL OUTCOMES CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT. Kids’ changing values will be reflected in better behavior and less violence LOWER CHILD OBESITY. Increased physical extracurricular activity can improve fitness (should be tracked over several years, compared to controls) SUSTAINED EMPLOYMENT. Strong work ethic developed from a young age can increase job retention for young adults

RISKS. UCCS is a brand new idea without a proven track record locally or nationally. The founders have full-time responsibilities as owners of local daycare centers and may not have adequate bandwidth to launch and sustain a program. The founder also lacks nonprofit leadership experience.

GRANT IDEA

A matching gift offer could assess the Unity Community Center South’s potential for external fundraising. Securing matching funds would test the resolve and community standing of the CEO and founder, Mr. Dickerson. Though the untested nature of UCCS is a risk, the Brunswick-born leadership could have unique influence.

Prepared by Excellence in Giving ©2014

39


GRANT IDEAS PERFORMANCE METRICS ANALYTICAL OVERVIEWS

Prepared by Excellence in Giving ©2014

41


Analytical Overview of Nonprofit Organizations

GENERAL Care Net Pregnancy Center of Coastal Georgia HQ Street Address 3548 Community Road City and State Brunswick GA Primary Contact & Title Patrick K. Eades, Executive Director Contact E-mail patrick@coastalcarenet.org Organization Name

Nonprofit Accountability Listings

58-1967329

Year Founded HQ Phone

Zip Code

31520

Country

1991 912-264-0231 USA

912-264-0231 Website OurPartners.org, CoastalCareNet.org, BRAVEheart.org Care Net, Local Churches, Southeast Georgia Health System, Partner Online for Life, Health Departments, County School Systems, Boys Organizations and Girls Club, Family Connections, National Abstinence Association, College, Georgia Center for Nonprofits, and NIFLA Peer Group Crisis Pregnancy Centers, Abstinence Programs, Women's Health People Served Babies

Charting Impact Charity Navigator Charity Watch Ministry Watch

BBB (give.org) Give Well Guidestar ECFA

Tax ID #

Sanctity of Life Other Program Area(s) Character Development Primary Program Area

Contact Phone

GROWTH TRENDS FY 2010

FY 2011

FY 2012

FY 2013

34

22

23

32

Clients Served

2,438

3,018

5,089

5,171

Annual Income

$764,860

$822,642

$938,288

$763,487

Donors

2,090

2,543

2,585

2,600

Key Activity

3,597

3,275

3,574

3,435

Paid Staff

% Change

Explanation (optional)

6 % Do not have as many part-time youth as in the past. 112 % Larger group of youth reached plus patient load increase. 0 % Fund Raiser moved from FY13 to 14 so income down. 24 % Grateful for consistent community support for 20 years. 5 % Activity Description: Patient visits to three locations.

FINANCIAL Cash Reserves On Hand Donor Retention Rate Largest 2013 Gift Number of Donors by Gift Size Last FY

1-3 Months 43 % $15,000

Gift Size:

47% Government Funding % Unknown % of Gift Income from largest gift 2.4% Reserve Coverage %

< $1000

# of Donors: Total Amount:

$1 - 5,000

2,462 $264,061

123 $213,012

$5 - 25,000

14 $125,876

$400,397 Total Current Debt $0 Cost to Raise $1 $ 0.09 Current Net Assets

$25 - 50,000

$50 - 100,000 $100,000 +

1 $30,000

IRS 990 Forms Posted on Website

Yes

No

Annual Independent Financial Audits

Yes

No

Written Financial Controls

Yes

No

Annual Report Posted on Website

Yes

No

FISCAL YEAR

FY 2011

FY 2012

FY 2013

Other Revenue

$161,422 $603,438 $764,860

$170,102 $652,540 $822,642

$158,744 $779,544 $938,288

$130,538 $632,949 $763,487

$170,000 $836,511 $1,006,511

19 % 5% 0%

$764,795 90 % $15,608 2 % $70,154 8 % $850,557 $85,697

$728,387 92 % $14,865 2 % $52,531 7 % $795,783 $26,859

$682,001 86 % $13,918 2 % $97,952 12 % $793,871 $144,417

$782,404 92 % $15,967 2 % $56,386 7 % $854,757 $91,270

$910,880 90 % $20,131 2 % $75,500 8 % $1,006,511 $0

2 2 20 0

EXPENSES

INCOME

FY 2010

Cash Donations Total Income Program Services Administrative Fundraising Total Expenses

SURPLUS/DEFICIT

Copyright ©2014 Excellence in Giving. All Rights Reserved.

page 1 of 2

2014

BUDGET 2010-2013 ACTUALS FY TRENDS

10/01 TO 09/30

% % % %

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LEADERSHIP Patrick K. Eades

CEO Name & Tenure

Formal CEO Annual Evaluation

21 yrs Yes

Full-time: 4

Total Employees (FT & PT)

$ 88,000 Staff Turnover Rate 15  Total Volunteers 112 # of Board Committees 3 # of Board Meetings Per Year 10 # of Founder/CEO Family Board Members 0 Total CEO Compensation

No Part-time:

Denny Silva, CPA Total Board Members 9 Annual Budget % Funded by Board 2 % Board Chairman & Years on Board

28 2 yrs

OUR "ELEVATOR SPEECH" (external communication) What problem are you solving?

1. Lack of resources for men and women who are facing unplanned pregnancies. Georgia has the sixth highest rate of abortions in the country. 2. Many adults and youth are sexually active and unaware of the dangers of sexually transmitted diseases, some of which are rampant in our area.

What do you do to 1. Provide clients with information and practical assistance that educates them on pregnancy options and helps provide needed materials for solve the problem? moms and babies. 2. Presentations in schools educate youth and encourage sexual postponement until marriage and improved sexual health. Exemplary Project

The transition of our three centers to a medical model with ultrasound, sexually transmitted disease testing and sexually transmitted disease treatment, has almost doubled the client outreach of our three offices. More abortion-determined women are being served as a result of the increased outreach.

Big Organizational Goal

To eliminate the perceived need for abortion in Southeast Georgia because every family deserves to experience a heritage rather than the wounds often associated with abortion.

EXPANDED DRUCKER QUESTIONS (internal strategy) 1. What is our mission?

Care Net Pregnancy Center is a Christ-centered ministry dedicated to advancing the Sanctity of Human Life and Sexual Purity.

2. Who is our customer?

Mothers and Fathers who are dealing with a unplanned pregnancy and youth who need education on sexual health. Specifically our target customer is the abortion determined woman.

3. What does the primary customer value?

Moms and Dads value the caring, compassionate and confidential care they receive as well as the provisions for their specific needs during an unplanned pregnancy. Youth served are empowered to make wise choices with their sexual health.

4. What have been our most significant results? Provide relevant benchmarks that your beneficiaries exceed.

In the past five years 272 babies have been spared from abortion, 290 clients have put their trust in Christ for salvation, and 10,458 youth have heard presentations on sexual risk elimination with 93% making purity commitments. Discussed sexual purity commitments with 356 patients this past year with 69 making purity commitments. In the past year provided 319 limited obstetrical ultrasound exams and tested 130 clients for sexually transmitted diseases while treating 37 clients with positive results.

Measure outcomes against benchmarks? (If yes, describe above)

Yes

No

Completed independent evaluation of program outcomes?

Yes

No

Use internal scorecard to track Key Performance Indicators?

Yes

No

Survey beneficiaries about program quality and impact?

Yes

No

We have a four-year strategic plan in place that will help us ensure more effective outreach, ample funding and trained volunteers 5. What is our plan for the future? Provide timeline and for our growing ministry. This plan will also help strengthen and develop a more effective Board of Directors. The strategic plan is goals for the next 1-5 years. posted on our supporter website - www.OurPartners.org * Cite 1 recent & significant program improvement.

Received a grant that enabled us to purchase the complete Earn While You Learn Program curriculum and recently outfitted our Jesup Center with a Ultrasound machine to better serve clients in Wayne County. Now all three centers have medical services.

GEOGRAPHIC SCOPE How far do your programs reach?

Local

Regional

National

International (if applicable, list nations served below alphabetically)

We have three centers which served Glynn, Camden, Wayne and surrounding counties in Southeast Georgia.

S.W.O.T. ANALYSIS STRENGTHS 20 year reputation. Faithful trained volunteers, staff and donors with high retention rate. Consistent grass roots support.

SOURCE

WEAKNESSES

OPPORTUNITIES

Need for more volunteers to meet growing needs. Space limitations of facilities. Need more youth to participate in Teen Initiative. Lack of reserve funds. Completed By:

Copyright Š2014 Excellence in Giving. All Rights Reserved.

THREATS

More schools available for outreach. Vast target audience still under served. Greater foundation support and improvements in donor retention and relations. Growing local 4 year college.

Patrick K. Eades

Date: page 2 of 2

Economy. Planned Parenthood and other like organizations that attack culture of life ministries. Current national administration. Changes to our national health-care system.

02/28/2014 www.excellenceingiving.com


Analytical Overview of Nonprofit Organizations

GENERAL Children in Action Sports Club HQ Street Address 154 Granville Nix City and State Brunswick Primary Contact & Title Allen Benner, Jr. Contact E-mail allen@ciasportsclub.org Organization Name

26-2717334

Year Founded HQ Phone

GA

Zip Code

31525

Country

2008 912-230-7760 USA

912-230-7760 Website www.CIASportsClub.org St. Simons Community Church, St. Mary's Methodist Church, First Partner Baptist of Brunswick, The Chapel, New Life Sanctuary, Southeast Organizations Volleyball Academy, The Brunswick Exchange Club, Be Seen Outdoors Signs, Brunswick Rotary Club Contact Phone

Charting Impact Charity Navigator Charity Watch Ministry Watch

BBB (give.org) Give Well Guidestar ECFA

Nonprofit Accountability Listings

Tax ID #

Character Development Other Program Area(s) (Click additional areas w/ CTRL) Primary Program Area

Peer Group

Children

People Served

GROWTH TRENDS FY 2010

FY 2011

FY 2012

FY 2013

1

1

1

3

Clients Served

155

160

229

245

Annual Income

$38,962

$64,625

$75,148

$109,703

Donors

57

138

218

177

182 % 211 %

Key Activity

45

75

239

250

456 % Activity Description: Child participation in programs

Paid Staff

% Change

Explanation (optional)

200 % 58 %

FINANCIAL Cash Reserves On Hand Donor Retention Rate Largest 2013 Gift Number of Donors by Gift Size Last FY

1-3 Months (Select %) $19,000

Gift Size:

14% Government Funding % 0% % of Gift Income from largest gift 17.3% Reserve Coverage %

< $1000

# of Donors: Total Amount:

$1 - 5,000

163 $46,581

9 $14,864

$5 - 25,000

$15,600 Total Current Debt $0 Cost to Raise $1 $ 0.03 Current Net Assets

$25 - 50,000

$50 - 100,000 $100,000 +

5 $48,258

IRS 990 Forms Posted on Website

Yes

No

Annual Independent Financial Audits

Yes

No

Written Financial Controls

Yes

No

Annual Report Posted on Website

Yes

No

FISCAL YEAR

FY 2010

FY 2011

FY 2012

FY 2013

Other Revenue

$0 $38,962 $38,962

$0 $64,625 $64,625

$0 $75,148 $75,148

$0 $109,703 $109,703

$29,641 76 % $8,904 23 % $417 1 % $38,962 $0

$50,238 82 % $6,475 11 % $4,908 8 % $61,621 $3,004

$56,685 77 % $14,544 20 % $2,619 4 % $73,848 $1,300

$77,782 71 % $29,024 26 % $2,897 3 % $109,703 $0

EXPENSES

INCOME

01/01 TO 12/31 Cash Donations Total Income Program Services Administrative Fundraising Total Expenses

SURPLUS/DEFICIT

Copyright Š2014 Excellence in Giving. All Rights Reserved.

page 1 of 2

2014

BUDGET 2010-2013 ACTUALS FY TRENDS

$0 $131,844 $131,844 $76,459 83 % $10,649 12 % $5,295 6 % $92,403 $39,441

%

182 % 182 % 162 226 595 182

% % % %

www.excellenceingiving.com


LEADERSHIP Allen Benner, Jr.

CEO Name & Tenure

6 yrs

Formal CEO Annual Evaluation

Yes Full-time: 2

Total Employees (FT & PT)

$ 33,902 Staff Turnover Rate 0 Total Volunteers 39 # of Board Committees 6 # of Board Meetings Per Year 6 # of Founder/CEO Family Board Members 1 Total CEO Compensation

No Part-time:

1 4 yrs

Brad Kirkland Total Board Members 9 Annual Budget % Funded by Board 12 % Board Chairman & Years on Board

OUR "ELEVATOR SPEECH" (external communication) What problem are you solving?

Addressing child behavior and adverse conditions (poor conduct and academic performance) that are influenced by the media (television, internet, video games, movies), peer pressure, drug availability, family situations, idleness, and lack of positive role models or parental figureheads.

What do you do to Reach out to community offering a safe, wholesome, friendly, non-threatening sports/Christian environment to promote good character with solve the problem? positive influences. We also offer excellent role models, counseling/mentoring to address personal situations/issues at school and at home. Exemplary Project

The Barnabas Club (BC) is an after-school program, offered free of charge. BC started in 2012 to mentor at-risk children identified through other CIA programs and partners. Parental consent is required, giving CIA access to school records and conferences with teachers/principals. Children are picked up at local schools by CIA staff or volunteers and transported to our facility where they participate in program activities.

Big Organizational Goal

The Children in Action Sports Club is a Christ-centered ministry intentional in building relationships with children ages 7-12 and equip them to make healthy choices, to build character, integrity, and a personal life-long relationship with Jesus Christ.

EXPANDED DRUCKER QUESTIONS (internal strategy) 1. What is our mission?

To utilize sports and physical activities as an outreach to children, youth, and adults; to put in action the Gospel of Jesus Christ to build relationships, character, excellence, and teamwork through one-on-one interactions during practice, game, & devotion time.

2. Who is our customer?

Children ages 7-12. Parents and select youth also benefit from CIA programs and activities.

3. What does the primary customer value?

Through direct input from the children, we are pleasantly surprised they value the Biblical stories and resulting discussions of how those stories apply to their personal situations; they also value the sports activities and the safe, friendly environment, & snacks.

4. What have been our most significant results? Provide relevant benchmarks that your beneficiaries exceed.

Results: increased participation every year with significant impact on children's lives and their families. Benchmarks: attendance/referrals; self-esteem; conduct at home; conduct and performance at school; home alone; idleness; sports camps; community service.

Measure outcomes against benchmarks? (If yes, describe above)

Yes

No

Completed independent evaluation of program outcomes?

Yes

No

Use internal scorecard to track Key Performance Indicators?

Yes

No

Survey beneficiaries about program quality and impact?

Yes

No

Plan: identify, acquire, and develop a suitable permanent facility for CIA. 5. What is our plan for the future? Provide timeline and Years 1&2: identify property and obtain financial means to acquire and develop the facility; Year 3: acquire property and goals for the next 1-5 years. identify/acquire additional funding; Years 4&5: draw plans, identify contractor, commence construction, seek additional funds. * Cite 1 recent & significant program improvement.

Increased donations in 2013 allowed us to hire full and part-time staff with resulting significant improvement of program diversity and quality of children's activities.

GEOGRAPHIC SCOPE How far do your programs reach?

Local

Regional

National

International (if applicable, list nations served below alphabetically)

Glynn County, Georgia

S.W.O.T. ANALYSIS STRENGTHS Divine Favor; excellent role models; committed staff; strong community relationships; ability to relate to children of all backgrounds; strategic vision

SOURCE

WEAKNESSES

OPPORTUNITIES

Insufficient staffing; aging/deteriorating physical facilities & equipment; computer & software; security; name recognition; community/client awareness Completed By:

Copyright Š2014 Excellence in Giving. All Rights Reserved.

THREATS

Growth/physical presence in statistically viable community; educate key partners on 5-year plan; develop additional financial & program partners

Allen E. Benner, Jr. page 2 of 2

Date:

Funding

08/15/2014 www.excellenceingiving.com


Analytical Overview of Nonprofit Organizations

GENERAL College of Coastal Georgia Foundation HQ Street Address One College Drive City and State Brunswick GA Primary Contact & Title Elizabeth K. Weatherly, VP for Advancement Contact E-mail eweatherly@ccga.edu Organization Name

Nonprofit Accountability Listings

58-6072323

Year Founded HQ Phone

Zip Code

31520

1968 912-279-5704

Country

912-279-5704 Website www.ccga.edu/foundation Communities of Coastal Georgia Foundation, United Way, 14 Partner Black Men of Glynn, Coastal Youth Orchestra, Gathering Place, Organizations Boys and Girls Club, Glynn Co School System, Camden Co Schools

Charting Impact Charity Navigator Charity Watch Ministry Watch

BBB (give.org) Give Well Guidestar ECFA

Tax ID #

Education Other Program Area(s) Community Development

Contact Phone

Valdosta State Foundation, Armstrong Atlantic University People Served College Students

Primary Program Area

Peer Group

GROWTH TRENDS FY 2010

FY 2011

FY 2012

FY 2013

0

0

0

0

Clients Served

3,500

3,500

3,500

3,500

Annual Income

$2,576,508

$3,137,557

$3,507,639

$3,123,731

Donors

553

490

572

580

21 % 2 large gifts constituted rise in 2011-2013 giving 5 % increased emphasis on donor retention

Key Activity

140

204

252

263

88 % Activity Description: student scholarships awarded

Paid Staff

% Change

Explanation (optional)

0 % Investment Manager 0 % students, faculty, staff and community

FINANCIAL Cash Reserves On Hand Donor Retention Rate Largest 2013 Gift Number of Donors by Gift Size Last FY

(Select amount) 72 % $375,000

Gift Size:

929% Government Funding % 0% % of Gift Income from largest gift 21.0% Reserve Coverage %

< $1000

# of Donors: Total Amount:

$1 - 5,000

464 $60,251

82 $143,722

$5 - 25,000

24 $303,732

$14,310,637 Total Current Debt $0 Cost to Raise $1 $ 0.01 Current Net Assets

$25 - 50,000

5 $176,875

$50 - 100,000 $100,000 +

3 $225,156

2 $875,000

IRS 990 Forms Posted on Website

Yes

No

Annual Independent Financial Audits

Yes

No

Written Financial Controls

Yes

No

Annual Report Posted on Website

Yes

No

FISCAL YEAR

FY 2011

FY 2012

FY 2013

Other Revenue

$681,701 $1,894,807 $2,576,508

$219,309 $2,918,248 $3,137,557

$1,000,695 $2,506,944 $3,507,639

$1,338,995 $1,784,736 $3,123,731

$500,000 $1,250,000 $1,750,000

$470,541 91 % $33,916 7 % $14,093 3 % $518,550 $2,057,958

$810,231 86 % $77,661 8 % $48,896 5 % $936,788 $2,200,769

$1,037,637 90 % $89,627 8 % $23,199 2 % $1,150,463 $2,357,176

$1,388,805 90 % $133,852 9 % $17,054 1 % $1,539,711 $1,584,020

$1,475,000 92 % $100,000 6 % $25,000 2 % $1,600,000 $150,000

EXPENSES

INCOME

FY 2010

Cash Donations Total Income Program Services Administrative Fundraising Total Expenses

SURPLUS/DEFICIT

Copyright ©2014 Excellence in Giving. All Rights Reserved.

page 1 of 2

2014

BUDGET 2010-2013 ACTUALS FY TRENDS

01/01 TO 12/31

96 % 6% 21 % 195 295 21 197

% % % %

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LEADERSHIP Dr. Gregory F. Aloia

CEO Name & Tenure

1 yr

Formal CEO Annual Evaluation

Yes

Total Employees (FT & PT)

Full-time:

$ 242,800 Staff Turnover Rate  Total Volunteers 70 # of Board Committees 11 # of Board Meetings Per Year 3 # of Founder/CEO Family Board Members 0 Total CEO Compensation

No Part-time:

4 yrs

Mike Hodges Total Board Members 45 Annual Budget % Funded by Board 4 % Board Chairman & Years on Board

OUR "ELEVATOR SPEECH" (external communication) What problem are you solving?

By 2020, over 60% of the jobs in Georgia are projected to require some form of college education. However, only 42% of the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s young adults meet those requirements. Only 23% of people in Camden and Glynn counties have bachelor's degrees.

What do you do to CCGA is an active participant in the Complete College Georgia initiative designed to support community partnerships. We provide a full range of solve the problem? science, business, education, health, and technical degrees; and have increased student retention to 91% by providing scholarships to 11%. Exemplary Project

The College Foundation identified student scholarships and support as a key investment target in their 2013-2015 strategic plan. They have already doubled their initial target of 5% or more of total enrollment with an average award of more than $1,800.

Big Organizational Goal

Service-learning, Top-talent retention, Honors programming, test-drive Internships, engaged Writing Center, active Office of Student Employment, FASTrack pilot program for freshmen, Center for Academic Success to support 1st-gen students, & SAP 7-week success seminar.

EXPANDED DRUCKER QUESTIONS (internal strategy) 1. What is our mission?

To develop resources to support the college in providing quality education. The Foundation also serves as an advocate within the Coastal Georgia community and beyond to further the goals of the College.

2. Who is our customer?

The students, faculty and staff of the College of Coastal Georgia and donors supporting our philanthropic needs. Our purpose is to serve the private giving needs of the college by raising and managing private gifts.

3. What does the primary customer value?

Access to quality education at an affordable rate.

4. What have been our most significant results? Provide relevant benchmarks that your beneficiaries exceed.

Our most significant results have been demonstrated in Student Support and Scholarship, where scholarship recipients have a 92% retention rate (based upon Fall 2012 and Fall 2013 data) as compared to the overall retention rate of 65%. Additionally, the support for scholar athletes has an outcome of overall student athlete GPA of 3.2.

Measure outcomes against benchmarks? (If yes, describe above)

Yes

No

Completed independent evaluation of program outcomes?

Yes

No

Use internal scorecard to track Key Performance Indicators?

Yes

No

Survey beneficiaries about program quality and impact?

Yes

No

Student Support and Scholarships -funding scholarships to 5% of the student enrollment. Athletic Programming - ensure at least 5. What is our plan for the future? Provide timeline and 10% of budget supports athletics. Campus Programming and Student Life - target 10% of budget for these activities. Academic goals for the next 1-5 years. Support - establish one new named faculty position and support for academic programs to reach at least 20% of the annual budget. * Cite 1 recent & significant program improvement.

Competitive internship programs in partnership with the Monticello Foundation and the Jefferson School of African-American Heritage. (this opportunity did not exist until private support from an individual philanthropist in Fall 2013)

GEOGRAPHIC SCOPE How far do your programs reach?

Local

Regional

National

International (if applicable, list nations served below alphabetically)

Coastal Georgia

S.W.O.T. ANALYSIS STRENGTHS Diversity and experience of trustees Vision and commitment to grow aggressively

SOURCE

WEAKNESSES

OPPORTUNITIES

Lack of access to a large number of high net-worth individuals and foundations

Leverage our momentum locally, state-wide, and regionally

Lack of fundraising capability/expertise

Invest in transformational growth

THREATS Economic pressures escalate Immediate surrounding environment

Completed By:

Copyright Š2014 Excellence in Giving. All Rights Reserved.

Elizabeth K. Weatherly page 2 of 2

Date:

08/26/2014 www.excellenceingiving.com


Analytical Overview of Nonprofit Organizations

GENERAL FAITHBRIDGE HQ Street Address 2655 NORTHWINDS PKWY City and State ALPHARETTA GA Primary Contact & Title SUSAN CRAIN Contact E-mail SCRAIN@FAITHBRIDGEFOSTERCARE.ORG Organization Name

Nonprofit Accountability Listings

Charting Impact Charity Navigator Charity Watch Ministry Watch

BBB (give.org) Give Well Guidestar ECFA

Tax ID #

20-5162251

Year Founded HQ Phone

Zip Code

30009

Country

2006 678-690-7100 USA

678-690-7107 Website FAITHBRIDGEFOSTERCARE.ORG CHRISTIAN ALLIANCE FOR ORPHANS Contact Phone

Partner Organizations

Foster Care Other Program Area(s) Adoption

BETHANY CHRISTIAN SERVICES, 4KIDS OF SOUTH FLORIDA People Served Abused

Primary Program Area

Peer Group

GROWTH TRENDS FY 2010

FY 2011

FY 2012

FY 2013

Paid Staff

20

23

15

16

Clients Served

441

844

783

858

Annual Income

$2,548,510

$3,573,291

$3,002,071

$2,243,723

53

154

210

310

12,331

23,573

21,352

23,253

Donors Key Activity

% Change

Explanation (optional)

20 % Streamlined operations in 2012. 95 % 12 % 485 % 89 % Activity Description: Bed Days

FINANCIAL Cash Reserves On Hand Donor Retention Rate Largest 2013 Gift Number of Donors by Gift Size Last FY

1-3 Months Unknown $100,000

Gift Size:

13% Government Funding % 60 % % of Gift Income from largest gift 12.4% Reserve Coverage %

< $1000

# of Donors: Total Amount:

$1 - 5,000

278 $33,705

9 $25,371

$5 - 25,000

17 $14,300

$328,639 Total Current Debt $19,000 Cost to Raise $1 $ 0.11 Current Net Assets

$25 - 50,000

2 $79,000

$50 - 100,000 $100,000 +

9 $651,225

0

IRS 990 Forms Posted on Website

Yes

No

Annual Independent Financial Audits

Yes

No

Written Financial Controls

Yes

No

Annual Report Posted on Website

Yes

No

FISCAL YEAR

FY 2011

FY 2012

FY 2013

Other Revenue

$1,891,939 $656,571 $2,548,510

$1,531,402 $2,041,889 $3,573,291

$1,557,473 $1,444,598 $3,002,071

$1,440,122 $803,601 $2,243,723

$2,861,669 $776,429 $3,638,098

$2,071,497 84 % $377,551 15 % $25,336 1 % $2,474,384 $74,126

$1,655,328 47 % $1,726,352 50 % $104,596 3 % $3,486,276 $87,015

$1,807,036 57 % $1,178,170 37 % $200,852 6 % $3,186,058 $183,987

$1,877,623 74 % $564,133 22 % $88,483 3 % $2,530,239 $286,516

$2,540,852 77 % $646,975 20 % $116,719 4 % $3,304,546 $333,552

EXPENSES

INCOME

FY 2010

Cash Donations Total Income Program Services Administrative Fundraising Total Expenses

SURPLUS/DEFICIT

Copyright ©2014 Excellence in Giving. All Rights Reserved.

page 1 of 2

2014

BUDGET 2010-2013 ACTUALS FY TRENDS

01/01 TO 12/31

24 % 22 % 12 % 9 49 249 2

% % % %

www.excellenceingiving.com


LEADERSHIP BILL HANCOCK

CEO Name & Tenure

8 yrs

Formal CEO Annual Evaluation

Yes Full-time: 14

Total Employees (FT & PT)

Total CEO Compensation

No

239 # of Board Committees 1 # of Board Meetings Per Year 4 # of Founder/CEO Family Board Members 0

Part-time:

RICK JACKSON Total Board Members 5 Annual Budget % Funded by Board 28 %

Total Volunteers

7 yrs

Board Chairman & Years on Board

10 

Staff Turnover Rate

OUR "ELEVATOR SPEECH" (external communication) What problem are you solving?

Too many foster children in America grow up without a Christian influence in the home.

What do you do to Provide a turn-key foster care ministry management system with a focus on excellence in child welfare and a biblical world view. solve the problem? Served more than 500 children through 200 foster families. Exemplary Project

Big Organizational Goal

To change the way America does foster care.

EXPANDED DRUCKER QUESTIONS (internal strategy) 1. What is our mission?

To recruit, train, and equip churches to solve their community's foster care problem.

2. Who is our customer?

Government child welfare systems, church denominations and individual churches, foster families and volunteers.

3. What does the primary customer value?

Excellent trauma-informed, family-centered foster care practice that integrates paid professionals, professionally managed volunteers and Christian principles.

4. What have been our most significant results? Provide relevant benchmarks that your beneficiaries exceed.

0 cases of maltreatment or abuse, 100% of available children adopted by their foster families, shorter lengths of stay with children unified earlier.

Measure outcomes against benchmarks? (If yes, describe above)

Yes

No

Completed independent evaluation of program outcomes?

Yes

No

Use internal scorecard to track Key Performance Indicators?

Yes

No

Survey beneficiaries about program quality and impact?

Yes

No

Next 12 months: expand into three new states, introduce and pilot new affiliate program, launch new cloud-based volunteer 5. What is our plan for the future? Provide timeline and management system. Next 36 months: Roll out foster care missionary program with national denomination, introduce FaithBridge goals for the next 1-5 years. Foster Care Institute to share our competency-based training curriculum and best practices with other organizations. * Cite 1 recent & significant program improvement.

The addition of FaithBridge Psychological Services which assists FaithBridge Foster Care in providing a wider continuum of services.

GEOGRAPHIC SCOPE How far do your programs reach?

Local

Regional

National

International (if applicable, list nations served below alphabetically)

S.W.O.T. ANALYSIS STRENGTHS

WEAKNESSES

Great ministry outcomes in child safety, Ministry model requires disciplined permanency and well-being as well as implementation on the part of church foster parent recruitment. CEO is partners. well-respected industry leader and brand is an innovator.

SOURCE

Completed By:

Copyright Š2014 Excellence in Giving. All Rights Reserved.

OPPORTUNITIES

THREATS

Pent-up demand for FaithBridge to enter Secular organizations now doing new markets. faith-based recruitment and without sufficient capital, we may lose opportunities to offer a Christ-centered alternative to the government system.

Kelvin Stewart

Date: page 2 of 2

08/20/2014 www.excellenceingiving.com


Analytical Overview of Nonprofit Organizations

GENERAL Year Founded 2005 Golden Isles Technical and Career Learning Inc. Tax ID # 20-3947219 HQ Street Address HQ Phone 4404 Glynco Parkway (912) 280-4000 City and State Zip Code 31525 Country Brunswick USA GA Contact Phone (912) 280-4000 ext 4202 Primary Contact & Title Richard A. Townsend, CEO Contact E-mail Website http://www.gica.us rick.townsend@glynn.k12.ga.us Glynn County Board of Education Charting Impact BBB (give.org) Nonprofit ✔ Charity Navigator Partner Give Well College of Coastal Georgia Accountability Charity Watch Guidestar Organizations Coastal Pines Technical College Listings Organization Name

Ministry Watch

ECFA

Education Other Program Area(s) Vocational Training Primary Program Area

Peer Group

Youth

People Served

GROWTH TRENDS FY 2010

FY 2011

FY 2012

FY 2013

2

2

1

1

Clients Served

718

750

830

900

Annual Income

$49,168

$79,842

$59,218

$86,269

20

35

35

61

Paid Staff

Donors

% Change

Explanation (optional)

50 % School staff is paid by Board of Education (volunteers) 25 % 75 % 205 % Increased donors because of annual event % Activity Description: Annual Event/Candlelight Carnival

Key Activity

FINANCIAL Cash Reserves On Hand Donor Retention Rate Largest 2013 Gift Number of Donors by Gift Size Last FY

3-6 Months 90 % $12,000

Gift Size:

26% Government Funding % 0% % of Gift Income from largest gift 17.7% Reserve Coverage %

< $1000

# of Donors: Total Amount:

$1 - 5,000

44 $15,948

13 $25,000

$5 - 25,000

$29,542 Total Current Debt $0 Cost to Raise $1 $ 0.43 Current Net Assets

$25 - 50,000

$50 - 100,000 $100,000 +

4 $27,000

IRS 990 Forms Posted on Website

Yes

No

Annual Independent Financial Audits

Yes

No

Written Financial Controls

Yes

No

Annual Report Posted on Website

Yes

No

FISCAL YEAR

FY 2010

FY 2011

FY 2012

FY 2013

Other Revenue

$5,764 $43,404 $49,168

$4,888 $74,954 $79,842

$13,365 $45,853 $59,218

$18,321 $67,948 $86,269

$18,504 27 % $45,503 67 % $3,493 5 % $67,500 $12,342

$18,551 22 % $62,766 73 % $4,494 5 % $85,811 $26,593

EXPENSES

INCOME

07/01 TO 06/30 Cash Donations Total Income Program Services Administrative Fundraising Total Expenses

SURPLUS/DEFICIT

$14,977 13 % $93,803 83 % $4,158 4 % $112,938 $63,770

Copyright ©2014 Excellence in Giving. All Rights Reserved.

page 1 of 2

$20,529 18 % $62,995 56 % $29,259 26 % $112,783 $26,514

2014

BUDGET 2010-2013 ACTUALS FY TRENDS

$24,200 $65,500 $89,700

218 % 57 % 75 %

$22,000 25 % $57,000 64 % $10,000 11 % $89,000 $700

37 33 604 0

% % % %

www.excellenceingiving.com


LEADERSHIP Richard A. Townsend

CEO Name & Tenure

Formal CEO Annual Evaluation

5 yrs Yes

Full-time: 1

Total Employees (FT & PT)

$ 38,796 Staff Turnover Rate 0 Total Volunteers 65 # of Board Committees 3 # of Board Meetings Per Year 10 # of Founder/CEO Family Board Members 0 Total CEO Compensation

No Part-time:

Dr. Patrick Ebri Total Board Members 10 Annual Budget % Funded by Board (Select %)

5 yrs

Board Chairman & Years on Board

OUR "ELEVATOR SPEECH" (external communication) What problem are you solving?

The Golden Isles Career Academy Foundation is equipping students with a strong work ethic and skills to be a viable member of the 21st century workforce. Additionally, we are decreasing the high school drop-out rate for Glynn County.

What do you do to The Career Academy Foundation is supporting the Career Academy by supporting service learning projects, supporting regional to national solve the problem? curricular competitions, award scholarships on an annual basis and provide a business-led governance in a charter school environment. Exemplary Project

The students in the graphic arts class and broadcast video class teamed up to help Goodwill of Brunswick. The local director was planning a fund-raiser and didn’t have “seed” money to get the fund-raiser started. The graphic arts students began designing posters, rack cards, and invitations for the event. The broadcast video class began preparing to tape the event. The Foundation paid for all the printing and video expenses.

Big Organizational Goal

Our goal is to offer programs of study to equip Glynn County students for post-secondary education and the workforce. The Foundation will support the Career Academy’s mission of ensuring a viable 21st century workforce and increasing the graduation rate for Glynn County.

EXPANDED DRUCKER QUESTIONS (internal strategy) 1. What is our mission?

Our mission is to ensure a viable 21st-century workforce for Glynn County. The Golden Isles Career Academy Foundation builds resources supporting the Career Academy in providing quality education in a charter school environment.

2. Who is our customer?

The students at the Golden Isles Career Academy are the primary customers. However, the people we serve are our customers as well.

3. What does the primary customer value?

The primary customer values Collaboration, Discipline, Knowledge and service. The students understand and learn the importance of work ethic. 20% of the student's grade is based on work ethic.

4. What have been our most significant results? Provide relevant benchmarks that your beneficiaries exceed.

The most significant results have been our graduation rate compared to the local and state averages: Glynn County Graduation Rate 2009- 71.6% Georgia Graduation Rate 78.9% 2009-2010 100% Career Academy Graduation Rate 2010-2011 94.6% Career Academy Graduation Rate 2011-2012 93.4% Career Academy Graduation Rate 2012-2013 90.0% Career Academy Graduation Rate 2013-2014 To Be Determined (September, 2014)

Measure outcomes against benchmarks? (If yes, describe above)

Yes

No

Completed independent evaluation of program outcomes?

Yes

No

Use internal scorecard to track Key Performance Indicators?

Yes

No

Survey beneficiaries about program quality and impact?

Yes

No

We are revising our strategic plan this fall. Current goals are to log 2,000 service learning hours annually by fall 2015. Additionally, 5. What is our plan for the future? Provide timeline and increase the graduation rate (currently 90%) one percent annually. Also, increase our individual and corporate giving 10 percent goals for the next 1-5 years. annually. Fund a part-time service learning coordinator on-site by fall 2016. * Cite 1 recent & significant program improvement.

The Career Academy Foundation was accepted by the GA Center for Nonprofits to be part of the Momentum initiative. Additionally, Dr. Chris Allers conducted a research-based evaluation of our service-learning program.

GEOGRAPHIC SCOPE How far do your programs reach?

Local

Regional

National

International (if applicable, list nations served below alphabetically)

Our programs mainly reach in Glynn County. However, we have also worked in Mcintosh, Brantley, and Camden counties.

S.W.O.T. ANALYSIS STRENGTHS • Chamber/Business Community Support • Board of Directors and Volunteers • Increased fund-raising capability • Student interest/motivation • United Way Agency

SOURCE

WEAKNESSES

OPPORTUNITIES

• CEO is the only staff member of the foundation • Perception that the foundation is part of the Board of Education Completed By:

Copyright ©2014 Excellence in Giving. All Rights Reserved.

THREATS

•Increase student capacity by allowing home school and private school students to attend the Career Academy •Opportunities to increase partnerships with locally based industries

Rick Townsend

Date: page 2 of 2

• Public perception of the need for continued support once the building was paid off • State mandates regarding charter schools and foundations

08/15/2014 www.excellenceingiving.com


Analytical Overview of Nonprofit Organizations

GENERAL Year Founded 1997 Southern Technological Advocacy Resources Fou Tax ID # 31-1561207 HQ Street Address HQ Phone 1907 Gloucester Street 912-554-0540 City and State Zip Code 31520 Country Brunswick USA GA Contact Phone 912-554-0540 Primary Contact & Title Ellen Murphy, Executive Director Contact E-mail Website www.starfoundation.org ellen@starfoundation.org United Way of Coastal Georgia Charting Impact BBB (give.org) Nonprofit Charity Navigator Partner Give Well St. Marys United Methodist Church Foundation Accountability Charity Watch Guidestar Organizations City of Brunswick Housing Authority Listings Organization Name

Ministry Watch

ECFA

Education Other Program Area(s) Character Development

Goodwill of Southeast GA, Dept. of Labor People Served Single Parents

Primary Program Area

Peer Group

GROWTH TRENDS FY 2010

FY 2011

FY 2012

FY 2013

% Change

Explanation (optional)

Paid Staff

3

3

4

4

Clients Served

55

67

80

75

Annual Income

$249,255

$206,041

$217,139

$209,333

Donors

151

167

176

218

16 % The inflated income in 2010 was due to a large grant. 44 % More Board engagement.

Key Activity

50

58

63

70

40 % Activity Description: Job placement after 12 months

33 % Hired STAR graduate for paid intern position. 36 % Increased marketing & collaboration with other NP.

FINANCIAL Cash Reserves On Hand Donor Retention Rate Largest 2013 Gift Number of Donors by Gift Size Last FY

6+ Months 25 % $2,500

Gift Size:

48% Government Funding % 11 % % of Gift Income from largest gift 1.2% Reserve Coverage %

< $1000

# of Donors: Total Amount:

$1 - 5,000

192 $40,733

$5 - 25,000

$98,292 Total Current Debt $0 Cost to Raise $1 $ 0.05 Current Net Assets

$25 - 50,000

$50 - 100,000 $100,000 +

26 $35,900

IRS 990 Forms Posted on Website

Yes

No

Annual Independent Financial Audits

Yes

No

Written Financial Controls

Yes

No

Annual Report Posted on Website

Yes

No

FISCAL YEAR

FY 2010

FY 2011

Other Revenue

$225 $249,030 $249,255 $137,663 73 % $50,131 27 % $117 0 % $187,911 $61,344

EXPENSES

INCOME

01/01 TO 12/31 Cash Donations Total Income Program Services Administrative Fundraising Total Expenses

SURPLUS/DEFICIT

Copyright Š2014 Excellence in Giving. All Rights Reserved.

FY 2013

$250 $205,791 $206,041

$217,139 $217,139

$795 $208,538 $209,333

$197,300 $197,300

$132,719 70 % $57,666 30 % $160 0 % $190,545 $15,496

$123,942 67 % $58,706 32 % $1,962 1 % $184,610 $32,529

$144,789 70 % $51,972 25 % $10,081 5 % $206,842 $2,491

$111,791 56 % $70,109 35 % $16,100 8 % $198,000 $700

page 1 of 2

2014

BUDGET 2010-2013 ACTUALS FY TRENDS

FY 2012

253 % 16 % 16 % 5 4 8,516 10

% % % %

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LEADERSHIP Ellen Murphy

CEO Name & Tenure

17 yrs

Formal CEO Annual Evaluation

Yes

No

Full-time: 3

Total Employees (FT & PT)

Total CEO Compensation

Part-time:

25 # of Board Committees 4 # of Board Meetings Per Year 6 # of Founder/CEO Family Board Members 3

0

Total Volunteers

5 yrs

Pamela Devenney Total Board Members 16 Annual Budget % Funded by Board 5 % Board Chairman & Years on Board



Staff Turnover Rate

OUR "ELEVATOR SPEECH" (external communication) What problem are you solving?

The average unemployment rate in Glynn County for the past 4 years (2010-2013) was 9.48% compared to 84.95% for incoming STAR students upon enrollment for the same time period.

What do you do to Provide the opportunity for low-income people to learn how to obtain and retain meaningful employment by teaching them the necessary skills solve the problem? such as computer basics, work ethics, conflict resolution, employer expectations, problem solving and cooperating as a team. Exemplary Project

STAR Foundation's program - Employment. Empowerment. Education - is our project. We have been recognized by the Georgia Housing and Redevelopment Authorities for improving the lives of Glynn County families and the US Department of Housing and Urban Development as a top National Best Practices and Technical Assistance Programs. We were also awarded a grant from the Robert W. Woodruff Foundation in Atlanta, GA.

Big Organizational Goal

We would like to expand both the depth and width of the program, i.e.., to create enhanced training and internship opportunities with local businesses for past graduates and to conduct research about opportunities to teach STAR classes in neighboring communities.

EXPANDED DRUCKER QUESTIONS (internal strategy) 1. What is our mission?

To teach people how to become financially self-sufficient through an empowering, holistic program of computer, financial, life management and job readiness education.

2. Who is our customer?

Those who live in poverty and have lost all hope of being able to provide for their families and raise their children in a safe environment.

3. What does the primary customer value?

The 1st and most important thing our students must experience is hope and trust. Then relationships can be formed and transformational change can occur where parents can teach their children the values of education and personal responsibility.

4. What have been our most significant results? Provide relevant benchmarks that your beneficiaries exceed.

Between 2008-2012 with a cohort of 149, 70% of the STAR students obtained employment within 12 months post graduation (compared to 15% at enrollment) as well as a10% average increase in household income, 30% decrease in food stamp allocation and a 28% reduction in public housing residency - all indicators of self-sufficiency. We have recently improved our follow-up questionnaire to include questions which are also indicators of self-sufficiency such as timely bill paying, following a budget, establishing a checking and/or savings account, purchased a home or acquired any other asset.

Measure outcomes against benchmarks? (If yes, describe above)

Yes

No

Completed independent evaluation of program outcomes?

Yes

No

Use internal scorecard to track Key Performance Indicators?

Yes

No

Survey beneficiaries about program quality and impact?

Yes

No

Poverty is an economic as well as social issue. Therefore, it is imperative that we continue creating and strengthening partnerships 5. What is our plan for the future? Provide timeline and with the business community for employment and financial support. When the social ills associated with poverty (domestic goals for the next 1-5 years. violence, high school dropout, etc) will decrease, the number healthy, stable families increases. The time line is continual. "Attire for Hire" is a program enhancement whereby STAR buys an interview outfit for upcoming graduates who then shops (with guidance) from a volunteer. This will attract more volunteers and help establish relationships with local merchants.

* Cite 1 recent & significant program improvement.

GEOGRAPHIC SCOPE How far do your programs reach?

Local

Regional

National

International (if applicable, list nations served below alphabetically)

Glynn County

S.W.O.T. ANALYSIS STRENGTHS

WEAKNESSES

Use of website & social media to tell story Board diversity and commitment Community endorsements Data collection People's lives are transformed

SOURCE

Succession plan for founder driven organization Lack of transportation Need to hire additional staff Difficulty in coordinating resources

Completed By:

Copyright Š2014 Excellence in Giving. All Rights Reserved.

OPPORTUNITIES

THREATS

Program replication Major donor development Expand client services Business partnerships New Board members

Ellen Murphy, Executive Director page 2 of 2

Struggling economy affecting lack of jobs and a decline in philanthropic giving. New non-profit may create additional competition for local donors. Date:

08/01/2014 www.excellenceingiving.com


Analytical Overview of Nonprofit Organizations

GENERAL The Gathering Place HQ Street Address 1002 Gloucester Street City and State Brunswick Primary Contact & Title Lucas Ramirez, Executive Director Contact E-mail Lucas@thegp.org Organization Name

58-2312223

Year Founded HQ Phone

GA

Zip Code

31520

Country

Contact Phone

912-222-6175

1981 912-264-3474 USA

www.thegp.org College of Coastal GA; Glynn County Public Schools; Brunswick Housing Authority; area Churches; area Businesses

Website

Charting Impact Charity Navigator Charity Watch Ministry Watch

BBB (give.org) Give Well Guidestar ECFA

Nonprofit Accountability Listings

Tax ID #

Partner Organizations

Discipleship Other Program Area(s) Leadership Training

Fellowship of Christian Athletes, InterVarsity, YoungLife, People Served Youth

Primary Program Area

Peer Group

GROWTH TRENDS FY 2010

FY 2011

FY 2012

FY 2013

58

59

57

58

Clients Served

11,000

11,659

11,759

12,000

Annual Income

$520,756

$575,671

$552,519

$712,169

835

634

790

872

8

8

8

8

Paid Staff

Donors Key Activity

% Change

Explanation (optional)

0 % 7 FT/PT staff; other are seasonal employees and interns 9% 37 % 4% 0 % Activity Description: Main Event avg attendance 1,000 week

FINANCIAL Cash Reserves On Hand Donor Retention Rate Largest 2013 Gift Number of Donors by Gift Size Last FY

1-3 Months 90 % $40,000

Gift Size:

99% Government Funding % 0% % of Gift Income from largest gift 6.2% Reserve Coverage %

< $1000

# of Donors: Total Amount:

$1 - 5,000

1,239 $228,575

154 $288,555

$5 - 25,000

8 $24,945

$605,000 Total Current Debt $0 Cost to Raise $1 $ 0.13 Current Net Assets

$25 - 50,000

$50 - 100,000 $100,000 +

3 $100,037

0 $0

0 $0

IRS 990 Forms Posted on Website

Yes

No

Annual Independent Financial Audits

Yes

No

Written Financial Controls

Yes

No

Annual Report Posted on Website

Yes

No

FISCAL YEAR

FY 2011

FY 2012

FY 2013

Other Revenue

$50,251 $470,505 $520,756

$12,899 $562,772 $575,671

$54,454 $498,065 $552,519

$70,057 $642,112 $712,169

$0 $644,800 $644,800

$303,422 63 % $137,337 29 % $39,671 8 % $480,430 $40,326

$307,469 61 % $148,193 29 % $47,770 9 % $503,432 $72,239

$361,312 61 % $160,530 27 % $70,262 12 % $592,104 $39,585

$369,178 60 % $164,276 27 % $80,763 13 % $614,217 $97,952

$394,700 61 % $174,100 27 % $76,000 12 % $644,800 $0

EXPENSES

INCOME

FY 2010

Cash Donations Total Income Program Services Administrative Fundraising Total Expenses

SURPLUS/DEFICIT

Copyright Š2014 Excellence in Giving. All Rights Reserved.

page 1 of 2

2014

BUDGET 2010-2013 ACTUALS FY TRENDS

01/01 TO 12/31

39 % 36 % 37 % 22 20 104 28

% % % %

www.excellenceingiving.com


LEADERSHIP Lucas Ramirez

CEO Name & Tenure

4 yrs

Formal CEO Annual Evaluation

Yes Full-time: 4

Total Employees (FT & PT)

$ 67,000 Staff Turnover Rate 37  Total Volunteers 300 # of Board Committees 3 # of Board Meetings Per Year 9 # of Founder/CEO Family Board Members 0 Total CEO Compensation

No Part-time:

3 34 yrs

Bill Walker Total Board Members 14 Annual Budget % Funded by Board 5 % Board Chairman & Years on Board

OUR "ELEVATOR SPEECH" (external communication) What problem are you solving?

The vast majority of students today do not know Christ or have a clear Identity and Purpose. Involvement in spirituality in youth is on a downward trend, according to Barna Research. Out of 9 key forms of spiritual involvement, 6 of the biggest areas resulted in the lowest levels ever recorded.

What do you do to We introduce students to the life changing message of Jesus. Christ alone gives Identity and Purpose and thus improve life choices, educational solve the problem? success, community service, and workforce development/employment for youth. We offer intensive wrap-around programs for youth ages 14-25. Exemplary Project

707 Mentoring Groups (School year: August – May) Over 650 students (10% of local students) engage in weekly mentor and discipleship meetings with over 120 adult volunteers committing to a seven-year mentoring term mentoring students through the middle and high school years. With thousands of graduates from this program, adult graduates from the program are returning to serve as 707 leaders and engaging as donors.

Big Organizational Goal

All youth will encounter God and experience intellectual, physical, spiritual, and social maturation across America and, through their actions, partner with God to spread the love of Christ through the world.

EXPANDED DRUCKER QUESTIONS (internal strategy) 1. What is our mission?

To Reach students with the Gospel of Jesus Christ, Equip them to be effective Christian leaders, and Send them to impact their local schools, churches and communities.

2. Who is our customer?

Youth ages 14-25.

3. What does the primary customer value?

Development of Christian faith, self-advocacy and leadership skills, positive adult and peer mentoring relationships, friendship with peers, and engagement in discipleship as a means to improve their lives and the world around them.

4. What have been our most significant results? Provide relevant benchmarks that your beneficiaries exceed.

The Gathering Place now serves over 12,000 youth and young adults annually. Ten percent (10%) of students in Glynn County public & private schools participate in one of our mentoring programs. We reach 100% of the approximately 6,500 youth in middle and high schools in Glynn County, GA through school assembly programs and campus ministries as well as reaching more than 7,000 youth (on average 1,000 per week) from the region during the summer. Last year, The GP connected and supported students in a cumulative 5,000 hours of community. Over the past three (3) years of programs, over 2,000 students publicly accepted Christ.

Measure outcomes against benchmarks? (If yes, describe above)

Yes

No

Completed independent evaluation of program outcomes?

Yes

No

Use internal scorecard to track Key Performance Indicators?

Yes

No

Survey beneficiaries about program quality and impact?

Yes

No

The Gathering Place is positioning itself for replication in targeted communities across Georgia over the next five years with a 5. What is our plan for the future? Provide timeline and long-term goal of national replication. Timeline: 2014 –completed organizational & staff restructuring, independent consultant to goals for the next 1-5 years. finalize strategic plan. 2015-pilot evaluation tools/community assessments/develop replication guide. 2016/17-pilot first site. Doulos Internship (Jr. and Snr. high school students): June 1 - July 31st: Incorporated expanded curriculum into kick off retreat and bi-weekly Christian leadership training; expanded outcome evaluation tools; expanded/diversified business partner job sites.

* Cite 1 recent & significant program improvement.

GEOGRAPHIC SCOPE How far do your programs reach?

Local

Regional

National

International (if applicable, list nations served below alphabetically)

S.W.O.T. ANALYSIS STRENGTHS

WEAKNESSES

OPPORTUNITIES

Bring youth to Christ; Obvious movement of God; Longevity, reputation & name recognition; High Impact; Dedicated staff/ leaders; No debt; Uniquely able to fill gaps churches cannot (non-denominational).

Need to diversify & attract new funding sources; Uneven staff workload over the year/burnout; Need to better communicate brand & impact; reactive rather than proactive due to understaffing

Growth into other communities/replication; attracting new donors; better use of technology to reach youth; new partnerships with state leaders and elected officials.

SOURCE

Completed By:

Copyright ©2014 Excellence in Giving. All Rights Reserved.

Lucas Ramirez

THREATS

Date: page 2 of 2

High competition in area for limited funding; reduced donor gifts; recovering economy in GA; Request for services exceeds funding and staffing.

10/07/2014 www.excellenceingiving.com


RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

INTERVIEWS + STATS + NEEDS ASSESSMENTS = DATA SOURCES The Excellence in Giving research team identified quantitative indicators of positive and negative community trends in Glynn County, GA using multiple data sources (see Data Sources table on right). The quantitative indicators appear in the KEY DATA TRENDS and Chart sections of each community issue page in the report. The top 5 data points are listed in the Key Data Trends box to support the red, yellow, and green arrow labels indicating negative, mixed, or positive change. The data sources have been cited throughout the report (with hyperlinks where applicable) so facts can be checked and future updates completed efficiently. The facts are visually translated in 3 ways:

NEGATIVE TREND

DATA SOURCES #1 Interviewed 51 community leaders in education, government, business, nonprofit, and faith sector #2 Completed research February – September 2014 #3 Analyzed community data from the U.S. Census, American Community Survey (ACS), GA Department of Education, OASIS Health Information, U.S. Department of Labor, City of Brunswick, and Glynn County departments #4 Reviewed previous community assessments such as the 2007 Glynn County Community Assessment, 2009 Coastal Georgia Community Assessment, and 2013 Glynn County Health Needs Assessment

MIXED TREND

POSITIVE TREND

To determine if the data supported positive, mixed, or negative trends, the research team interviewed 51 community leaders. The interviews established consistent narratives about community trends allowing the research team to affix a red, yellow, or green arrow to the issue. The interviews also exposed causes and contributing factors for each community issue. Those tough judgment calls about “why” issues improve or worsen are summarized in the CAUSES AND CONTRIBUTING FACTORS section of each community issue page in the report. Knowing “why” precedes knowing “what” to do. SOLUTIONS. To be a recommended SOLUTION in this community assessment, a program must: 

Address an Issue’s Causes & Contributing Factors. Recommended programs improve conditions that cause or contribute to the problem.

Demonstrate Clear Outcomes. Clear outcomes from previous work or the program’s implementation in another location are required to create confidence in its future success.

Leverage Private Funding. Private donations rather than primarily government funding, policy changes, or private investment can accelerate the program’s success.

Some past successes that cannot be replicated with confidence have been included in the STORY OF HOPE section rather than the SOLUTION section of a community issue page. If no proven or promising program addressing causes & contributing factors and accelerated by private donations was identified, then the community issue page concludes with the statement NO KNOWN SOLUTION. Prepared by Excellence in Giving ©2014

57


We do not discriminate against faith-based nonprofits in our recommended solutions. We make judgments based on demonstrated outcomes, or program models with demonstrated outcomes, in other organizations and locations. More than one solution could have been included for some community issues but have been limited to create a smaller menu of options for local donors. *Multiple other solutions could be added in future updates.

58

Prepared by Excellence in Giving Š2014

Glynn County Community Solutions Assessment  

Excellence in Giving interpreted community data through interviews with 51 community leaders to identify key community trends and the contri...

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