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Terrance J. Brown, FAIA 2016 AIA Edward C. Kemper Award Submittal


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August 14, 2015

Drew White, FAIA Chair, AIA Edward C. Kemper Award Jury Dear Chairman White: It is my honor to nominate Terrance (Terry) Brown, FAIA for the 2016 Kemper Award. Terry is best known throughout the architectural profession for the unique way he has contributed to the profession and our organization. These contributions are exemplified through his leadership in defining, developing and implementing a professional approach to disaster assistance and disaster assistance training and qualification. In addition, Terry's service to his country, to his community, and as an international volunteer present an ongoing model of the profession's value, influence and impact. From the earliest days of Terry's career, he brought a culturally sensitive blend of architecture, building construction and community service to assist people suffering from natural and manmade disasters, particularly in poor and underdeveloped populations. He carried these experiences to a post-9/11 movement to improve the profession's approach to disaster assistance by training thousands of architects and bringing teams of professionals to the communities impacted by catastrophic events. Terry's efforts are the foundation for the profession's work in disaster assistance and mitigation today. Terry's AIA service spans over four decades in numerous local, regional, national and international chapters and forums. This service has resulted in countless improvements to the profession and still continues via his publications, model practices, international leadership and engagement in disaster assistance. He served as AIA National Vice President during unprecedented times, as the organization shifted to address the events of 9/11. He was selected to serve as AIA liaison to the Federation of Pan American Architectural Associations for two 3-year terms, where he brought his remarkable sensitivity, insight and leadership to represent 85,000 AIA members as the AIA's liaison to the 95-year-old organization. AIA New Mexico has benefited from Terry's leadership as its Secretary, Director and President, and as AIA Western Mountain Region Director. He designed the AIA New Mexico Silver Medal for Lifetime Achievement—an award AIA New Mexico ultimately bestowed on him. Terry went from being an architectural graduate at Texas Tech University (named a Distinguished Alumnus in 2001) to serving in the Viet Nam War. He was recognized with numerous military honors including the Bronze Star and the Vietnam Cross of Gallantry. His work with the Mayan people of Central America and his designs for medical and educational facilities throughout the Southwest United States have been instrumental in improving the quality of life for his fellow man. As a long-time Boy Scouts of America leader, he has brought design sensibility and awareness of the profession to multiple generations. Terry's leadership and service have been essential to reshaping the profession to answer the call of disaster mitigation, aid and rebuilding, and to bringing international perspective to the global community of architects. He is a true and unfailing professional ambassador. I am therefore honored and pleased to nominate Terrance J. Brown, FAIA, for the Edward C. Kemper Award in recognition of his significant and lasting contribution to the profession, our communities, and the American Institute of Architects. Sincerely yours,

Robert A. Williams, AIA 2015 President, AIA New Mexico P. 0. Box 16148 Albuquerque, NM 87191-6148 505.328.3969 FAX 505.856.0104

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TERRANCE J. BROWN, FAIA

BIOGRAPHY Terrance Brown, FAIA, has transformed the profession’s response to natural and manmade disasters. With a background in international advocacy, outreach, disaster recovery and disaster mitigation, he has created, promoted and led the development of international cooperation and educational programs. His work has helped the AIA, the profession and the public prevent, survive and withstand catastrophe. His efforts have also irrevocably reshaped the Institute’s capacity and capabilities to assist, serve, protect and aid national and international communities. Brown has served at all levels of the Institute and, throughout his career, has contributed to professional practice, education and outreach globally.

Service Profile

A History of International Service + Leadership in Adversity Terrance Brown received his Bachelor of Architecture from Texas Tech University and went into the US Army. A Viet Nam War veteran, he spent the years immediately after his military service exploring Aztec, Mayan and Inca ruins in Central and South America. In 1976, Brown marshaled his architectural skills to evacuate a municipal hospital in Antigua, Guatemala after a devastating earthquake, marking the beginning of his involvement in international disaster recovery. He established his first architecture design and construction company in Antigua in 1977. He also created two Mayan Linguistic Training Centers and trained several hundred US Peace Corps, United Nations, US Embassy and Canadian Embassy volunteers and personnel for work in Latin America. Brown’s vision and leadership for the Linguistic Center enabled the preservation and development of over 20 Mayan languages. Brown’s history in Latin America was recognized by President Ron Skaggs, FAIA, who appointed him to represent 85,000 AIA members as AIA’s liaison to the 95-year-old Federation of Pan American Architect Associations (FPAA). This organization represents architects from 31 countries. Over 6 years, Brown represented the AIA in Panama, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Brazil, Puerto Rico, Mexico, Honduras, Caribbean Island of Guadalupe, Canada and Columbia. Brown’s international leadership brought clarification to the AIA’s international proceedings and guidance on issues that benefit architects in the Americas and Caribbean. Brown was elected North American Secretary of FPAA. Brown and his twin brother are the only identical twin Fellows in the AIA. After the September 11 attacks, while serving as national Vice President under AIA President John Anderson, FAIA, Brown’s specialized expertise provided impetus and framework for the development of an AIA training program to equip professionals with the knowledge, skills and resources for more effective leadership and engagement before and in the immediate aftermath of any disaster. These efforts culminated in 2005, when Brown led a shift that added Emergency Response training services to the profession’s previous focus on Relief and Recovery. Among the direct results are:

Houses leveled in Tennessee

Leadership Profile

• The Disaster Assistance Program, a Comprehensive Response System for Professionals • AIA Disaster Coordinator Program & System of Regional Program Coordinators • Professional Training, Techniques & Credentialing in Disaster Assistance • Community Outreach to Expand AIA’s Assistance in Disaster Mitigation & Recovery • An Expanded & Enhanced AIA Mission for Public Health & Safety In the aftermath of the recent devastating earthquake in Nepal, the AIA made the Disaster Committee’s materials, which Brown played an enormous part in creating, available to ARCASIA and the Society of Nepalese Architects via a newly revamped website. Thus Brown’s work remains valued and relevant for international communities to this day. Brown’s efforts also continue with his membership in the US Resiliency Council (USRC)and a Sub-Committee Member for Building Professionals, where he brings architectural expertise to advance the organization’s mission to increase disaster resilience through measurable building performance, education and training. The American Institute of Architects Earlier in Brown’s Vice Presidency, the Institute faced tremendous financial crisis. With the collapse of AEC Direct, the Institute went from $1.5 million in reserve to $5 million in debt and placed Brown at the center of another realm of disaster assessment and recovery planning. Brown and the

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TERRANCE J. BROWN, FAIA

BIOGRAPHY Leadership Profile (continued)

Executive Committee developed a fiscal plan that returned the AIA to financial health within three years and strategically positioned the AIA and the profession for the future. Brown has served as guest lecturer at the University of New Mexico, Universidad de Guatemala, Colegio de Arquitectos de Honduras, la Universidad de Puerto Rico and the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada including lectures on Native American culture, Critical Regionalism and Design. In 1999 he was selected for the National Architectural Accreditation Board (NAAB) review of Escuelade Arquitectura de la Universidad de Puerto Rico; his work was instrumental in helping the University gain accreditation. His practice includes many years at Native American firms creating culturally sensitive housing, award winning health care, civic and educational facilities that have improved living conditions for Native Americans from Montana and South Dakota to New Mexico and Arizona. He worked 10 years with Louis L. Weller, FAIA, the 2000 Whitney Young Jr. Award recipient. Brown’s most recent project is a Native American Cultural Center for New Mexico State University, where Native American students gather, learn and celebrate their cultures. Positions Held in the Institute • NM State Representative, AIA College of Fellows (2013-present • Chair, AIA New Mexico Fellows Advisory Task Force (2011-present) • AIA Liaison to FPAA, Panama, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Brazil (3 trips), Mexico, Honduras, Guadalupe, Canada, Puerto Rico and Columbia (2001-2007) • North American Secretary, FPAA (Canada, USA, Mexico and Caribbean Islands) (2004-2006) • Advisory Member, Center for Communities for Design (AIA President Doug Steidl, FAIA) (2005) • Chair, AIA Disaster Assistance Committee (2005-2007) • Member, AIA Disaster Assistance Committee (2004-2012) • Appointed Member, AIA International Committee (2001-2006) • Member, AIA International Strategies Task Group (2001-2006 • President, New Mexico Architectural Foundation (2001-2003) • AIA Representative, 22nd Congress of Pan American Architects, Guadeloupe, West Indies (2004) • Chair & Member, College of Fellows, Jury of Honorary Fellows (2001-2002) • National AIA Vice President (2001) • Chancellor, College of Drawers (1999, 2001) • Member, NAAB Accreditation Team, University of Miami (2000) • Director, AIA Western Mountain Region (1996-1999) • Member National Architectural Accreditation Board, Escuela de Arquitectura de la Universidad de Puerto Rico (1999) • Chair, AIA National Continuing Education System Resolution Task Force (1997) • Member, AIA National Library Task Force (1997) • Member, Advertising/Public Awareness Task Force, (1997) • Member, AIA National Secretary Advisory Group (1996-1999) • Chancellor, College of Drawers (1999) • President, AIA New Mexico (1996) • President, AIA Albuquerque (1991)

Whitney Young Jr. Medal

Professional Awards • Silver Medal for Lifetime Achievement, AIA New Mexico’s highest award (2013) • AIA Whitney Young Jr. Award (2004) • Lancing B. Bloom Award, Historical Society of New Mexico (2003) • Richard Upjohn Fellow (2001) • Distinguished Architectural Alumni Medal, Texas Tech University (2001) • Silver Medal, AIA Western Mountain Region’s highest award (2000) • Fellow, Service to the Institute, AIA College of Fellows (2000) • Richard Upjohn Fellow (1999)

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TERRANCE J. BROWN, FAIA

STATEMENT OF CONTRIBUTIONS Redefined Professional Role + Approach

Disaster Crisis Training Program + Regional Response Teams During Brown’s term as AIA National Vice President, the September 11 terror attacks shifted the Institute’s focus from financial survival to providing urgently needed disaster assistance. Having devoted much of his career to design for communities in crisis, Brown led a redefinition of the AIA’s response to disaster relief and, ultimately, a proactive shift in the profession. Brown’s vision for an AIA disaster response network redefined the profession’s approach to disaster assistance and hazard mitigation. He created resources and programs for architectural training in disaster preparedness and mitigation, sharing his expertise and knowledge for generations to come. He co-authored the AIA “Handbook for Disaster Assistance Programs” and created the AIA national “Component Response System,” which together strengthened the AIA Livable Communities Knowledge Community and facilitated basic training and education for members. Brown developed the structure of the AIA’s Regional Response Teams, an element essential to expanding our professional capacity to integrate and function effectively within existing state and federal structures. To date, over 10,000 architects and building officials from 43 states, the Virgin Islands, Canada and New Zealand have been trained. Brown has personally trained over 1,000 architects and building officials during AIA National Conventions from 2004 to 2013 and provided disaster assistance training sessions for two Royal Architectural Institute of Canada’s national conventions and 10 regional conferences nationwide. His plan is the foundation of the AIA Disaster Assistance program. He continues to educate fellow design and construction professionals through his work with the USRC. Brown advocates for and leads groups of volunteer architects, engineers, planners, and landscape architects to disaster-stricken areas as far away as Sri Lanka, responding to fires, floods, hurricanes, and earthquakes. Hundreds of individuals have been involved. Brown has led response teams or organized training and disaster relief for these events, including:

• 2015 Earthquake in Nepal, Advisor to Boy Scouts of American on Donation Strategies • 2013-14 Fires and Floods in Colorado Springs, CO • 2012 Hurricane Sandy across Eastern US • 2012 Wild Fire in Waldo Canyon, Colorado Springs, CO • 2011 Earthquake & Tsunami in Japan • 2011 Tornadoes in Springfield, MA; Joplin, MO; & Tuscaloosa, AL • 2011 Floods along the Missouri & Mississippi Rivers • 2011 Earthquake in Haiti

Advanced Multicultural + Global Profession

• 2008 Hurricane Ike in Miami, FL • 2006 Tornado in Gallatin, TN • 2005 Hurricane Katrina in Louisiana & Mississippi • 2005 Tsunami in Sri Lanka • 2000 Wildfire in Los Alamos, NM • 1992 Hurricane Andrew in Miami-Dade County & Florida City, FL • 1980 Hurricane Allen in St. Lucia, The Caribbean • 1976 Earthquake in Antigua & Huehuetenango, Guatemala

An International Perspective for Practice Brown personifies the role of architect as community activist through his outreach to communities in crisis worldwide with teams of volunteer design professionals. He engages colleagues and neighbors in the creation of safe and vibrant communities for all. Brown has established AIA policy in support of international practice, encouraged representative coordination in various countries in the Americas, developed programs for professional practice, and led the support of international chapters in the AIA. He has played an active role in mounting numerous hurricane, flood, tornado, fire, and earthquake-related building-assessment endeavors in communities throughout the United States and Central America, Haiti, and Sri Lanka. In 2012, Brown helped organize the first agreement between the AIA and Architecture for Humanity. Brown expanded the role of the AIA International Committee from a small group of appointed members to an open committee with the intent of facilitating international practice in the Americas for all American Architects. Terrance Brown’s commitment at the national, international, regional, and local levels redefines, exemplifies, fosters, and furthers fundamental civic values toward and contributions of the profession, while continuing as a proponent of design excellence in every aspect of practice.

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TERRANCE J. BROWN, FAIA

EXHIBITS Redefined DISASTER ASSISTANCE INITIATIVES Professional Founded in International Design Service Role + Approach As an advocate for life safety, reconstruction

and redevelopment programs that envision positive and imaginative recovery of damaged communities, Brown has served as both emissary and model practitioner. His knowledge of how the destructive power of disasters can provide communities the opportunity to remedy under-performing aspects of a city or region has become the philosophical foundation for many of the Institute’s Disaster Assistance initiatives today. Through ambassadorship, training programs and service, Brown actively teaches local and state officials and communities to work together to create lasting and significant change for safer buildings and building programs that can withstand the destructive forces. These encompass comprehensive housing redesign, resilient building design, neighborhood redesign, urban redesign, landscape redesign, preservation, appreciation of little known assets, and utility relocation.

In 1976, Brown began his disaster assistance work when he marshaled his leadership and architectural skills to evacuate a municipal hospital in Antigua, Guatemala, which was heavily damaged during an earthquake and was in danger of collapsing. Brown took command when decision-making was needed most and was responsible for safely evacuating and reorganizing the hospital of several hundred patients in an open soccer field. Due to the shortage of hospital assistants and nurses, Brown assisted volunteer Mexican military doctors with many surgeries in a field tent hospital. During the aftermath and rebuilding phase of this earthquake, Brown worked closely with disaster relief organizations to create simple, self-explanatory booklets for native farmers to guide them in rebuilding stronger and safer homes using local materials. In the 40 years since the earthquake in Antigua, Brown has been at the forefront of disaster assistance and relief work.

Examples of easy to understand booklets that demonstrate how to build safe houses for campesinos (farmers) rebuilding their homes after an earthquake.

“While we can’t clone extraordinary human beings like Terry, as a role model he is responsible for having created a committee of dedicated, passionate architects and friends who now also serve the profession and communities in times of disasters.” Rachel Minnery, FAIA, Former Chair AIA Disaster Assistance Committee Former Architecture for Humanity Regional Program Manager,

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TERRANCE J. BROWN, FAIA

EXHIBITS Redefined DISASTER ASSISTANCE INITIATIVES Professional Role + Approach 2015 Nepal Earthquake: Valued and Relevant

International Resources The AIA is limited its ability to work overseas, but supports the efforts of an affected country’s regional and local architects associations. For Nepal, the AIA made the resources created by Brown and his Disaster Committee colleagues available to ARCASIA and the Society of Nepalese Architects via a newly revamped website. Thus Brown’s work remains valued and relevant to disaster assistance efforts today. Brown also advised the Boy Scouts on relief donation strategies to ensure the goods and medicines sent to Nepal are needed and usable. Too often, relief efforts burden stressed communities with services and resources that they cannot and will not use. Architectural and Engineering services to this country will begin after the Red Cross is finished with their work. 2011 Haiti Earthquake: AIA Haiti Rebuilding Summit Brown served as the AIA Disaster Assistance Facilitator exploring disaster assistance processes with limited building materials

available to Haiti. It was crucial for architects,engineers, and other design professionals to identify structures that could be salvaged, repaired and brought to an acceptable level of safety and habitability. Brown effectively created new public relations tools, reached out to volunteer agencies, and promoted a better understanding of the role and value of the architect and the Institute in the redesign and construction process. 2004 Sri Lanka Tsunami: AIA Post-Tsunami Reconnaissance Team A hallmark of Brown’s 12-year tenure with the AIA Disaster Assistance Committee was leading a team of architects, engineers, planners and landscape architects to Sri Lanka after the December 2004 tsunami which killed thousands of Sri Lankans and left a country devastated. Brown served as the spokesperson and leader for a collaborative AIA Post-Tsunami Reconnaissance Team to investigate the damages along the coastal area of the country. He and his team provided an inter-organizational, long-term reconstruction report in 2006 on the effects of the disaster and how to mitigate tsunami damage in the future. This report serves as a guide for the country of Sri Lanka and for all of Asia and developing countries along coastal areas around the world. The report provided: • Post-Tsunami reconstruction recommendations • Aid in development of reconstruction planning • How to reduce future risks through improved building standards and design considerations • Enlargement of AIA’s base of knowledge to better prepare for events in the US and around the world.

Brown with team in Sri Lanka.

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TERRANCE J. BROWN, FAIA

EXHIBITS Redefined Professional Role + Approach

DISASTER ASSISTANCE INITIATIVES Hurricane Katrina 2005: Chair of AIA Disaster Assistance Committee In 2005 Hurricane Katrina hit Louisiana and Mississippi. In early 2006, Brown organized a broad coalition of architects, planners, engineers and building officials to form a committee to study and make recommendation on the damages of Katrina and how to mitigate hurricane efforts in the future. At The Louisiana Recovery & Rebuilding Conference that Brown and his team put in place two months after Katrina landed, the AIA presented opportunities to gather consensus for the planning and rebuilding of damaged parts of the state that fell victim to the devastation. The conference audience was comprised of more than 650 citizens, community leaders, architects, planners, engineers and business people. Other notable disaster recovery efforts: In each event, Brown placed the profession and the Institute at the forefront of national and international response and recovery efforts: • 2013 Colorado Floods: recovery after at least 8 were killed, 1,500 homes were destroyed, and nearly 19,000 damaged. Brown created training programs responsible for building a strong, credible Disaster Assistance Task Force in Colorado for comprehensive disaster related design – preparedness, mitigation, resilient design, rebuilding/repair, recovery, planning and response. This team of professionals continue to provide trained assistance to homeowners with damaged property. • 2012 Hurricane Sandy: recovery after over 100 killed, tens of thousands left homeless, and mass transit and utilities were crippled in coastal areas of New York and New Jersey. Brown helped coordinate AIA’s disaster assistance efforts after the flooding. This mission also helped secure architects and the Institute a place at the community design roundtable. Brown also provided design ideas during a planning session on how to protect the coastal areas around New York City in order to protect people, homes and businesses from future flooding.

2016 EDWARD C. KEMPER AWARD

• 2012 Habitat for Humanity: As former chair and member of the AIA Disaster Assistance Committee, Brown was in the forefront in the creation of a new strategic partnership between the AIA and Architecture for Humanity “to coordinate advocacy, education, and training that helps architects make effective contributions to communities preparing for, responding to, and rebuilding after disaster.” • 2012 Waldo Canyon Wild Fire: recovery after the destruction of 350 homes in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Brown communicated directly with Michael Lingerfelt, FAIA, Chair of the AIA Disaster Assistance Committee regarding the flooding and fire damage and organized actions required to support Colorado’s disaster assistance efforts. Brown and his teammate, Stan Peterson, FAIA, provided disaster assistance training for 65 architects and military personnel to help evaluate fire damaged homes and enable people to return to their homes and get their lives back. • 2011 Japan, Tōhoku Coast: recovery teams prepared after the 9.0 Earthquake and subsequent Tsunami devastated the region. Brown assisted in drafting the AIA’s letter of condolence to the President of the Japanese Architect Association and offered the Institute’s assistance in evaluating damaged homes and structures. He also promoted a volunteer coordination effort and disaster resource networks, providing information and training recommendations on better ways to incentivize, encourage and mandate Japanese preparedness and disaster response. • 2011 Missouri and Mississippi River flooding: recovery efforts aided flooded cities and millions of acres of devastated land. Brown and his team communicated directly with the AIA Mississippi President and provided support, disaster response personnel, and disaster assistance training to architects and building officials resulting in a stronger and highly respected association with Mississippi’s State Emergency Management Director.

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TERRANCE J. BROWN, FAIA

EXHIBITS Redefined Professional Role + Approach

Simplified, earthquake resistant building techniques illustrated for Central and South American farmers.

DISASTER ASSISTANCE INITIATIVES • 2011 Alabama Tornado Outbreak: multiple recovery efforts after the largest and one of the deadliest tornado seasons ever recorded hit large regions of the US, killing 747. Brown and a team of colleagues provided volunteer leadership, spotlighting the profession and placing it at the forefront of the recovery process for the public and in support of legislative changes. His efforts elevated the public perception of architects by demonstrating a skill set that could help save lives and improve rebuilding efforts. Brown’s team was involved in recovery efforts in Springfield, Massachusetts as well as Joplin, Missouri and Tuscaloosa, Alabama, where 337 were killed. • 2008 Florida Hurricane Ike: 112 people killed and 23 are still missing. Due to its immense size, Ike caused devastation from Florida to Texas. Brown worked closely with Michael Lingerfelt, FAIA, and the Florida State Emergency Management Director to provide training for architects and building officials in disaster assistance and response. • 2006 Gallatin, Tennessee Tornado: Brown led a team of disaster trained architects to evaluate over 100 heavily damaged and totally destroyed homes created by a series of tornadoes and made recommendations to AIA Tennessee on how to set up a disaster response team. Brown, Charles Harper, FAIA and Rachael Minnery, AIA, trained Tennessee architects in disaster assistance and encouraged them to set up a state-focused disaster assistance organization so that there would be a single point of contact at the highest possible level in the state.

• 2000 Los Alamos Wildfire: Brown and Charles Harper, FAIA, coordinated an evaluation of damaged homes and mounted a professional disaster assistance effort to help residents rebuild their homes and their lives. They trained 30 architects and building officials in disaster assistance training and provided a focus for the AIA to evaluate their homes and facilitate rebuilding. • 1992 Florida Hurricane Andrew: Brown and Charles Harper, FAIA ,provided disaster assistance training to 42 architects to help in the evaluation of damaged homes in one of the first disaster assistance training programs developed to help architects in Florida recover from hurricane damage. • 1980 St. Lucia Hurricane: Brown and his colleague Bob Gersony were contracted by the US Agency for International Development to observe and evaluate all damaged and destroyed public buildings on the island. They provided recommendations on improving and strengthening structural systems for Caribbean Island communities. • 1976 Guatemala Earthquake: Brown cared for injured people in the Department of Sacatepequez hospital. When the building was in danger of collapse from aftershocks, he volunteered to set up a field hospital in a soccer field to house hundreds of injured Guatemalans and assisted in numerous surgeries. He worked with Oxford Famine Relief personnel to create step-by-step instructions for poor illiterate farmers to rebuild their houses using local material and to be more earthquake resistant. These pamphlets provide simple-to-build, safe building techniques and have had a profound effect on subsistent farmers in earthquake zones across Central and South America.

“Terry Brown, FAIA, and Charles Harper, FAIA, have pioneered raising public awareness of the role of architects in society though disaster assistance and improved the quality of life in communities around the world.” Michael Lingerfelt, FAIA, Chair of the AIA Disaster Assistance Committee

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TERRANCE J. BROWN, FAIA

EXHIBITS Redefined Professional Role + Approach

“In recent months, natural disasters have brought pain and destruction to every continent of the world. While the initial outpouring of aid is admirable, the longterm impacts and recovery often fade from the front pages of our newspapers… The destruction of shelters, hospitals, and homes often requires a much more dedicated and professional recovery effort. It is within this realm that architects and structural engineers must expertly assess the safety of buildings and begin reconstruction efforts as soon as possible.” Terry Brown, FAIA AIA National Convention 2011

DISASTER ASSISTANCE INITIATIVES Disaster Assistance Training Brown has promoted the health, safety and welfare of citizens and for architects around the world. Because of his background in international disaster assistance and recovery, he was selected by the AIA to provide full day disaster assistance training for architects, building officials, engineers and intern architects for the past ten AIA National Conventions. In 2005 Brown teamed with the AIA’s first disaster assistance trainer, Charles Harper, FAIA, to provide his first national AIA National Convention training. Brown has trained over 1,000 professionals across the USA and Canada to serve after disasters. Brown and Harper visited tornado damage in Gallatin, Tennessee and provided disaster assistance training to 42 architects in Tennessee. In those early years the team of Brown and Harper were also invited to Florida and New Mexico to provide disaster evaluations and disaster assistance training for the states’ AIA members. These training sessions were the genesis of Brown’s work in developing the AIA’s disaster assistance training programs. Brown continues to support education and outreach as a Building Professionals subcommittee member for the US Resiliency Council.

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Seminars: Architects: Post-Disaster Safety Response Program - Natural Disasters; Terry Brown, FAIA & Stan Peterson, FAIA; AIA Colorado, Colorado Springs, CO; March 13, 2014 (65 Participants, 5.0 Overall Session Rating) AIA Disaster Assistance Program: A Comprehensive Training; Terry Brown, FAIA; AIA Medical Design Forum, Seattle, WA; February 8, 2013 (98 Participants) Architects: A Resource Before and After a Disaster; Terry Brown, FAIA, Stan Peterson, FAIA & Michael Lingerfelt, FAIA; AIA National Convention, Denver, CO; June 18, 2013 (36 Participants) Architects: A Resource Before & After a Disaster; Terry Brown, FAIA, Rachel Minnery, AIA & Michael Lingerfelt, FAIA; AIA National Convention, Washington, DC; May 16, 2012 (42 Participants) AIA Disaster Assistance Program: A Comprehensive Training; Terry Brown, FAIA, Stan Peterson, FAIA & Michael Lingerfelt, FAIA; AIA National Convention, New Orleans, LA; May 11, 2011 (29 Participants, 3.6 Session Rating, a top 7 percent of seminars offered) Architects: A Resource Before and After a Disaster; Terry Brown, FAIA, Stan Peterson, FAIA & Michael Lingerfelt, FAIA; AIA National Convention, Miami, FL; June 9, 2010 (28 Participants, 5.0 Overall Rating)

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EXHIBITS Redefined Professional Role + Approach

DISASTER ASSISTANCE INITIATIVES

Sidebar body text.

Related Publications: “Developing AIAVT’s Disaster Assistance Program: Latest Update”; Steven Clark, AIA; www.aiavt.org; December 2013 “The New Jersey Chapter of the American Institute of Architects Offers Disaster Assistance Training,” Mel Fabrikant, The Paramus Post, February 17, 2009 “Face of the AIA - Terrance J. Brown,” AIA Architect Doer’s Profile, Heather Livingston, July 13, 2007 “Architects Get Involved in AIA’s Disaster Assistance Program,” Russell Boniface, AIA Architect, April 2005 “The Changing Role of Architects in Disaster Response”; Terrance Brown, FAIA and David Downey, CAE, Assoc. AIA; The AIA Journal of Architecture; December 2005 “Training Architects to Help Communities Recover from Disasters”; Charles Harper, FAIA and Terrance Brown, FAIA; AIA 2005

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TERRANCE J. BROWN, FAIA

EXHIBITS Redefined Professional Role + Approach

DISASTER ASSISTANCE INITIATIVES Architects in Long Term Recovery, Reconstruction & Redevelopment Brown has been an advocate for building resiliency, reconstruction and redevelopment programs which envision positive and imaginative recovery of damaged communities. He teaches that since local and state officials need to make long-term decisions that will affect and significantly alter the built environment, it is important that they all work together creating opportunities for change. These will encompass comprehensive neighborhood redesign, urban redesign, landscape redesign, preservation, appreciation of little known assets, and utility relocation. Though destructive to communities, disasters provide the opportunity to remedy underperforming aspects of a city.

Disaster Assistance Publications Long-Term Reconstruction After the December 26, 2004, Tsunami in the Indian Ocean: Report of Interorganizational Reconnaissance Team to the Sri Lankan Institute of Architects; Terrance Brown, FAIA; Janice Olshesky, AIA; Thomas Schmidt, AIA; David Downey, CAE, Assoc. AIA; Alan Fujimori, RLA; Katrin Moore, AICP; James Schwab, AICP; and Kwok Fai Cheung, PhD; February 15, 2006 “Buildings-and Protecting-Houses in Sri Lanka,” Jacki Lyden, National Public Radio, People and Places, May 2005 “Corrales Architect Terry Brown Leads Team of Architects for Post-Disaster Rebuilding,” Jeff Radford, Corrales Comment, June 11, 2005 “Tsunami Aftermath,” Terrance Brown, Alaska Planning Journal, Spring 2005 “Tsunami Aid Isn’t Simple,” Harry Moskos, Albuquerque Journal, July 10, 2005 “Architects and Planners Weigh In On How To Rebuild Mississippi Coast,” Architectural Record, November 2005 “Architects and Planners Weigh in on Rebuilding New Orleans,” Architectural Record, October 2005 “The Changing Role of Architects in Disaster Response,” Terrance Brown, FAIA and David Downey, CAE, Assoc. AIA, The AIA Journal of Architecture, December 2005 “American Architects comment on the development opportunities offered by tsunami,” Edward Arambawala, dailynews.lk, May 2005

“There’s a massive amount that will have to be rebuilt. It may be that many neighborhoods won’t come back. Haste will create a tendency to build back below current building codes. That’s a disaster waiting to happen. There will have to be planning to get easy access in and out of town. There will be political pressure to rebuild right, and I think there’ll be money for planning. Nobody’s going to want to go through this agony again. Hurricanes are two, three times as frequent as in the ’70s.” Terrance Brown, FAIA, ASCG Incorporated, Albuquerque, NM; Cochair, AIA Disaster Assistance Program From Architectural Record’s “Special Coverage: After the Hurricanes”

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Advocating Building Performance standards

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US Resiliency Council Improving the Built Environment and Promoting Community Resilience

The USRC improves societal resilience with the establishment and implementation of a building rating system, education about the vulnerability of our built environment, certification of engineers, and delivery of credible evaluations of building performance in natural and man-made disasters. The USRC is modeled after the US Green Buildings Council (USGBC®), which through its LEED® rating system, has successfully engrained environmental sustainability into the public consciousness. The USRC rating system delivers information on the expected safety, damage and recovery of the buildings we use and occupy.

Who Uses the Rating System? Building owners, brokers, buyers, lenders, insurers and tenants all benefit from the USRC rating system. The USRC rating system is based on national building standards and audited to prevent the manipulation of results. Properties that receive high USRC ratings will benefit from an increase in perceived value, potentially increasing leasing rates and transaction efficiency—the same kind of benefits associated with LEED® accredited properties. Market awareness results in price differentiation. In Tokyo, office buildings with seismic performance on par with a USRC five-star rating receive 40% higher lease rates compared to otherwise equivalent buildings that would have a USRC three-star rating. Lenders and Insurers use USRC ratings to inform real estate transactions associated with lending decisions and defining insurance products. Tenants value the USRC rating as it relates to both safety and recovery time following a major event. Governments and Institutions use USRC ratings to identify safe buildings and make long-term strategic plans for reducing reconstruction costs and recovery time following a major disaster. As a comparison, over 40 jurisdictions in California require “Green” or LEED® certification of new public and private developments to improve long term sustainability.

What Does a USRC Rating Deliver? The USRC system provides rating users with greater confidence in a building performance evaluation by delivering: • Consistency – Only certified engineers are able to submit applications for a USRC rating. • Credibility – Rating submissions undergo a technical audit by certified reviewers.

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• Value – Users receive actionable information about building safety, repair cost, and time to regain function.

TEN MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT BUILDINGS AND EARTHQUAKES Are any of these myths putting your people, your business or your investments at undue risk?

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Cities would not allow unsafe buildings to be occupied or sold. UNTRUE!

Building codes evolve dramatically over time, as technologies improve and engineers learn from each new disaster. This knowledge reveals previously hidden hazards in existing buildings. Most communities do not require these dangerous buildings be demolished or even retrofitted.

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Photo: CA EQ Clearinghouse / Pooya Sarabandi

Newer buildings are essentially earthquake proof. UNTRUE!

Building codes are minimum standards set to prevent deadly collapse, not to eliminate damage or make sure buildings stay usable. When two major earthquakes hit Christchurch, New Zealand in 2011, most modern structures performed as expected to the code—only two buildings collapsed. However, 70% of the buildings in the downtown area were eventually demolished due to extensive damage.

3

The most dangerous buildings rent for less or are located only in poorer neighborhoods. UNTRUE!

In many US cities, the most desirable areas were built decades ago. Older structures there can command premium rents owing to location and historic charm. As long as these older buildings in prime locations remain desirable, owners have little incentive to investigate their risk or invest in voluntary seismic improvements.

4

Damage to the building’s structure is the most costly type of damage in earthquakes. UNTRUE!

Photo: Russell Berkowitz

5

Dramatic structural failures gets press coverage but past earthquakes show that the most expensive repair costs are typically non-structural elements like partitions, ceilings, fire sprinkler systems, mechanical and electrical components, and replacement of highvalue contents. Lost revenue and other business interruption costs can even exceed the value of the building itself.

A typical retrofit brings an existing building up to current code. UNTRUE!

In a voluntary or mandated retrofit, most cities do not require an existing building be brought into full compliance with the current building code. For retrofits, the performance goals of various owners vary widely and remain essentially hidden, leading to uncertainties about the actual value of mitigation efforts.

10

“Value Engineering” does not diminish a building’s level of seismic performance. UNTRUE!

With the aid of computer modeling, value engineering can optimize building design by removing redundancies from the structural system and thereby reducing costs usually with the goal of meeting the minimum standards of the building code. Developers are often unaware of the tradeoff—value engineering reduces upfront costs while ensuring safety, but it can also result in a building that will need to be demolished and replaced following a major earthquake.

7

Designing for better seismic performance will significantly increase construction costs. UNTRUE!

For a new building, a seismic design that results in a four or five star USRC rating may add 1% to 10% to total up front construction costs, or about as much as a typical contingency budget. FEMA P58 and other computerized seismic models are now available to test design solutions in the early stages of a building’s creation when it is cost effective to explore various approaches to earthquake resilience. Once a structure is built, retrofitting to a higher level of seismic performance can become far more expensive.

8

Seismic structural engineering is a precise science. UNTRUE!

Seismic engineering relies on equations that can be calculated to the nth decimal place. But those equations are based upon current best estimates for an imprecise phenomenon earthquakes. The Great East Japan-Tohoku Earthquake was ten times stronger than scientists predicted, meaning buildings were designed using the wrong inputs to these equations. Many faults are still undiscovered. Further, our ability to predict building response to earthquakes is imprecise but improving. Given the degree of uncertainty in current knowledge, relying on code minimums is more risky than people think.

9

Distance from the epicenter is the most important factor in how much a building will be damaged. UNTRUE!

Although distance from the epicenter is important, soil and rock types at a specific location affect the degree of hazard. For example during the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake the muddy ground in San Francisco’s Fisherman’s Wharf area shook like Jello while half a mile away the bedrock in Chinatown experienced ground shaking one fifth as strong.

Earthquakes are only a West Coast problem. UNTRUE!

DISASTER ASSISTANCE INITIATIVES US Resiliency Council Brown joined the USRC in 2015 as one of four architects selected nationally to serve as a member of the Stakeholders Advisory Committee. As a natural outgrowth of Brown’s disaster assistance work, the USRC seeks to establish and advocate a seismic rating system that offers building owners and users the opportunity to set desired levels of building performance on three dimensions of seismic resilience—safety, damage and recovery. The organization and individual members like Brown also educate industry professionals on the performance-based rating system and ensure understanding of its ease of use in defining project requirements. The program allows the design and construction team the freedom to explore various design solutions to achieve the client’s desired level of seismic performance. There are 43 stakeholders representing organizations such as University of Wisconsin; Apartment Association Managers; Urban Land Institute of Los Angeles; The City and County of San Francisco; The City of Los Angeles; Clark County Building Department, Nevada; John Hopkins University, U. S. Geological Survey; Boeing; Apartment Association of California Southern Cities; and the California Earthquake Authority. Brown’s connection to and knowledge of the AIA was an important factor for his acceptance on this committee.

Member, Sub-Committee for Building Professionals Brown and his fellow sub-committee members advise the USRC Board on matters pertaining to governance, the rating system format and implementation. In addition, they seek to build strategic alliances with allied organizations and institutions. Education and Outreach Committee Brown and fellow subcommittee members actively support the USCR’s education and outreach efforts to expand awareness of the USRC rating system’s tools, such as the “FEMA P58 Seismic Performance Assessment of Buildings,” which allows buildings to be evaluated using a multidimensional rating system including both structural and nonstructural components. Since the rating system is performance based, the metrics correspond to what building users and building owners understand and seek -- maximizing safety, minimizing damage and insuring business continuity.

Highest Hazard 64+ 48-64 32-48

Over 50% of the US population lives in an area where earthquakes are a threat. It’s true that earthquakes are more frequent on the West Coast, Alaska and Hawaii, but in our nation’s history, significantly damaging quakes occurred in Massachusetts, Missouri, Kansas, South Carolina, Indiana, Texas, New Hampshire, Montana, Illinois, Idaho, Texas, Pennsylvania, Florida, Illinois, Virginia, and Oklahoma.

16-32 8-16 4-8

%g

0-4

Lowest Hazard

The Midwest and East Coast do not have California’s level of codes and standards so the damage from a 6.0 quake can be more severe. For instance, the 2011 5.8 Magnitude event in Virginia caused roughly $300 million in damage. Repairing the Washington Monument cost $15 million alone.

Source: USGS

About the USRC The US Resiliency Council is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization that helps communities understand the vulnerability of our built environment. It does this through education, certification of engineers, and evaluation of building performance in disasters. The USRC’s initial focus is on increasing seismic awareness on the West Coast but the rating system can be adopted anywhere. The USRC hopes to eventually develop similar rating systems for severe storm events such as hurricane, tornado, and flood.

SAFETY DAMAGE RECOVERY Through its building rating system for earthquakes, the USRC aims to raise public consciousness and demand for disaster resilience. USRC ratings deliver consistent, credible information on expected safety, damage, and recovery for the buildings we use and occupy every day. We also work with public and private sector partners to support broader resilience efforts. For more information, please visit:

SI

N L I E CY C

UN O

USRC

CI L

U. S . R E

www.usrc.org TEN MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT BUILDINGS AND EARTHQUAKES Are any of these myths putting your people, your business or your investments at undue risk?

TM

2016 EDWARD C. KEMPER AWARD

“We involved in the USRC believe that building owners should have an incentive to design and construct buildings strong enough to withstand earthquakes so they not only protect the public, but remain strong enough to withstand an earthquake and don’t have to be torn down. Tearing down and replacing buildings requires space in landfills and rebuilding results in a huge carbon footprint. This is not sustainable.” Terry Brown, FAIA

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TERRANCE J. BROWN, FAIA

EXHIBITS INTERNATIONAL PROFESSIONAL ADVOCACY Practice & Education: Multicultural and Global Reach

AIA International Committee.

International Service Brown is an international ambassador for the AIA and for the profession. His early work in Latin America advanced understanding of cultural norms and practices across the western hemisphere, forging enduring cross-border relationships with countries often on the fringe of established professional organizations. He has steered ongoing efforts to engage and link international professionals to the AIA, NCARB and the Union of International Architects (UIA). AIA International Committee Brown has led and participated in numerous international activities representing the AIA. One of the events was a round table held in New York City to examine the “who, what, where and how” of offshore outsourcing. The intent of this successful study was to evaluate offshore business as a model for work in the global marketplace. It was recognized that the AIA must be in the forefront of shaping this international opportunity. Brown and this committee advanced the global architect’s agenda with professional/collateral organizations, to advocate for greater mobility and higher standards in education, experience/ internship and licensure. Brown also promoted international development by urging the opening and expansion of markets for AIA members by leveraging U.S. government services (U.S. Trade Representative, Executive Office of the President) and facilitated access to international legal expertise by sharing position of the profession on trade with Department of Commerce.

Brown was instrumental in a 2004 International Working Group’s response to Japan’s request for assistance in the creation of a local AIA Chapter. Most importantly, Brown established diplomatic relations with international, regional and national architects’ associations and increased hospitality to international guests by organizing convention activities for international guests and international attendees. AIA International Advisory Group With marketplace globalization and liberalized trade among nations, Brown has been at the forefront of facilitating market awareness and access for AIA members and for US and international architects. His leadership across the Americas on peer recognition and credential portability has helped build awareness and connection between international professionals and societies. He has also helped validate degree-granting programs to foster academic transportability. Through these international forums, Terry has developed AIA expertise on international policy and trade issues and fostered higher practice standards for practice globally.

Brown with Jaime Lerner President UIA in Brazil. “I observed with admiration as Terry assisted thousands of men and women of all ages, national origins, linguistic capabilities and professional backgrounds to make a successful and comfortable linguistic and cultural adjustment to Latin America”. Robert Gersony, Director of Proyecto Linguistico Francisco Marroquin Antigua, Guatemala

2016 EDWARD C. KEMPER AWARD

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TERRANCE J. BROWN, FAIA

EXHIBITS INTERNATIONAL PROFESSIONAL SERVICE Practice & Education: Multicultural and Global Reach

Federation of Pan American Architect Associations (FPAA) Brown served on the Executive Committee of the Federation of Pan American Architects Association (FPAA), where he represented all 85,000 members of the AIA from 20012007. During his 6-year term with FPAA, he traveled twice a year to multiple Latin America countries for the AIA to promote excellence in international practice. He served on a Professional Practice Committee and was instrumental in encouraging each country’s architectural organization to follow practice guidelines and standards established by the Union of International Architects (UIA). Brown worked with each country to strengthen their minimum registration requirements. These efforts advanced AIA objectives, promoted excellence internationally, raised international standards of practice, and provided an information resource for diverse communities. He exchanged, analyzed and disseminated AIA’s international practice information, facilitating and enhancing AIA members’ international practice and advocating AIA positions on international trade policy. Brown’s handson approach and in-depth understanding of diverse cultures strengthened and solidified AIA and FPAA connections. Brown worked jointly with FPAA members to develop a document to solidify their connection with the UIA “Professional Practice” paper, clarifying the meaning of the title ‘Architect,’ and defining its professional qualifications.

Mayan Linguistic Program (Proyecto Linguistico Francisco Marroquin Antigua, Guatemala, Central America) In 1973, Terry, who is fluent in Spanish, volunteered to lead a team of Guatemalan educators to several remote villages in Guatemala. The purpose of this four-year mission was to create three training schools for the Proyecto Linguistico Francisco Marroquin. These schools were established to meet two primary objectives; first, to teach Cultural Sensitivity Training and the Spanish language to international development specialists assigned to work in Latin America, second and most import to develop Mayan linguistics program to train rural Mayan natives to work as linguists in their own languages. Terry’s vision and leadership enabled the design and creation of the schools, and their educational programs, which continue today to provide the linguistic preservation and development of over 20 Mayan languages. These centers facilitate the training of Mayan translators from mountain villages and have trained hundreds of volunteers to work in Central America. Brown lived and worked in Guatemala for 8 years (1973 to 1981).

“Terry’s work as AIA Liaison to the Federation of Pan American Architect Associations has helped unite disparate ideas and engender a spirit of collaboration among participants. He has brought a keen understanding of programs, communication, economics and building consensus for vital programs that have benefited our members across this hemisphere.” Gabriel Duran-Hollis, FAIA, President FPAA 2004-2008

2016 EDWARD C. KEMPER AWARD

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TERRANCE J. BROWN, FAIA

EXHIBITS MULTICULTURAL PRACTICE Practice & Education: Multicultural and Global Reach

Design for Native American Communities Brown’s career focused on working with Native people in the Americas. Beyond his work with the Mayans, Brown provided hundreds of quality homes for Native Americans and, working with Tribal Administration members, designed culturally sensitive health centers and educational facilities for Taos and Picuris Pueblos, Yankton and Santee Sioux, the Navajo at Pinon and Tohatchi, and the Jicarilla Apache of New Mexico. Brown has reached out to the Sioux on the Pine Ridge and Cheyenne River Indian Reservations in South Dakota and the Navajo Dine people of the desert southwest as well as the Hualapai’s on the rim of the Grand Canyon. His designs have made a lasting difference for Native American people. Projects include: • Taos–Picuris Pueblos Indian Health Center, Taos, New Mexico • Navajo Tohatchi Indian Health Center, Tohatchi, New Mexico • Navajo Jeehdeez’a Academy, Low Mountain, Arizona (Brown’s drawings used to instill cultural awareness for entry design of school) • Pinõn Health Center, Pinõn, Arizona • Yankton-Santee Sioux Indian Health Service Hospital, Wagner, SD • Pierre Indian Learning Center, Pierre, South Dakota • New Mexico State University, Native American Cultural Center, Las Cruces, New Mexico Awards: • Best Building Design Award, Tohatchi Health Center, American Concrete Institute 1995 • Best Interiors, Dulce Health Center, Southwest Contractor 2005 • Signature Project of the Year, Best Buildings Award, Best Interior Award and Best Lighting, Farmington Public Library-NM, Associated General Contractors 2004

Dulce Health Center, Jicarilla Apache Tribe

2016 EDWARD C. KEMPER AWARD

Institute of American Indian Arts Museum, Santa Fe, NM Originally completed in 1921, this beautiful edifice is an application of Santa Fe Pueblo revival style architecture to a government building. It is the only post office in the USA built using this style. The project was a Joint venture renovation project with Antoine Predock, FAIA and Weller Architects with Brown as Project Manager. Related Publications “WHPacific Designs NMSU Cultural Center,” Southwest Contractor, August 2008 “Remote Navajo School Poses Unique Challenges,” Neil Singer, Southwest Contractor, November 2007 “Let the Sun Shine In,” Terrance Brown, Modern Steel Construction, September 2006 “Mother Earth, Father Sky: Lighting represents nature, comforts patients at tribal health center,” Craig DiLouie, Archi-Tech, Nov/Dec 2006 “Honor Award-Dulce Health Center,” Contract Lighting, Sept/Oct 2006 “Best of 2005 Southwest Award Winners, Dulce Health Center,” Southwest Contractor, December 2005 “Wingate School Reflects Navajo Circle of Life,” Kathie Schroeder, New Mexico Business Weekly, February 2003 “Native Americans Rededicate to Cultural Values,” Melissa Worden, AIA Architect, August 1998 “Indian Art Through Indian Eyes,” Journal Correspondent, The Albuquerque Journal, 1992 “Mission Impossible, Museum Hopes to Teach Depth Through Indian Art,” Kay Bird, The New Mexican, June 1992

“Terry Brown’s projects always project an impression of grace and dignity that can only come from the heart and soul of a designer who understands the impact of tribal traditions.” Gil Lucero, Governor of Zia Pueblo, NM 2003

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TERRANCE J. BROWN, FAIA

EXHIBITS ADVANCING FELLOW PRACTITIONERS Awards, Honors, Profession Recognition Juries + Publications Brown has contributed to the creation and

design of national and regional awards that recognize and celebrate professionals who contribute significantly to the community of architecture: • AIA New Mexico Silver Medal for Lifetime Achievement 2005 • National Presidents Medal, Society for Design Administration 2000 • AIA New Mexico Architects Medal 1999 Sponsorship & Support He has sponsored or nominated 79 architects for numerous professional awards including: • AIA Gold Medal: »» Antoine Predock, FAIA • AIA College of Fellows: »» Katherine Schwennsen, FAIA »» Helene Dreiling, FAIA »» Gabriel Durrand Hollis, FAIA »» Edward A. Vance, FAIA • The Kemper Award: »» Ronald Altoon, FAIA • The Whitney Young Jr. Award: »» Louis Weller, FAIA • Honorary FAIA: »» Nela de Zoysa, Hon FAIA • Western Mountain Region Silver Medal »» Curtis Fentress, FAIA »» Marvin Sparn, FAIA • Texas Tech University Distinguished Architectural Alumni Award »» Les Shepard, FAIA »» Morris Brown, FAIA • Honorary AIA »» B. Carole Steadham, Hon. AIA »» Cheri Melillo, Hon. AIA

Juries • Chair, Arizona Chapter American Concrete Institute Design Awards Jury 2014 • Juror, AIA Nevada Design/Honor Awards 2011 • Juror, Kemper Award 2009 • Juror, Whitney Young Jr. Award 2009 • Juror, Thomas Jefferson Award 2009 • Juror, Collaborative Achievement Awards 2009 • Juror, University of NM Native American Cultural Center 2006 • Juror, Habitat for Humanity Design Competition 2006 • Chair, Arizona Masonry Guild Design Awards Jury 2005 • Chair, AIA College of Fellows Honorary Fellows Jury 2004 • Juror, AIA College of Fellows Honorary Fellows Jury 2003 • Chair, AIA Nevada Distinguished Service Awards 2002 • Juror, AIA Nevada Distinguished Service Awards 2001 • Juror, AIA Colorado North Design Awards 1998 • Juror, National “Canstruction” Design Awards 1997 • Juror, AIA Colorado Design Awards 1996 • Juror, AIA New Mexico Firm of the Year 1996 • Juror, Great Homes of Albuquerque Awards 1996 Related Publications: “Block Party, The Arizona Masonry Guild Celebrates Excellence in Masonry Architectural Awards,” Sources+Design, Jan/Feb 2006 “The Power of Architecture: Imagine, Create, Transform,” Whitney Young winner honored, AIArchitect, May 2005 “Horse Sense,” T. Brown, FAIA, Architectural Record, McGraw-Hill, June 1999 “Look to the North,” Jennifer Thiele Busch, Contract Design 1996 “Architectural Preservation,” Terrance Brown, The Construction Mailer, May 1996

2016 EDWARD C. KEMPER AWARD

“As a supporter of our Affiliate relationship with AIA, Terrance Brown was commissioned to design a President’s Medal for National Presidents of SDA, which is still proudly worn by our National SDA Presidents. We recognize Terry’s medal creations as a testament to his unique design ability.” B. Carole Steadham, SDA/C, Hon. AIA Past SDA National President

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TERRANCE J. BROWN, FAIA

EXHIBITS ADVANCING FELLOW PRACTITIONERS Chancellor of College of Drawers

Sidebar body text.

As Chancellor of the College of Drawers, Brown produced the highest quality drawings possible for the benefit of the Institute by illustrating the minutes of the national AIA Board of Directors meetings. The AIA President reviews the history of each city where the board meets and Brown’s illustrations provide the Institute with a visual history of the location of the board meetings, which would otherwise be only recorded in meeting minutes. Brown’s drawings of Washington D.C. were selected by AIA President Thompson Penney to Brown illustrate his Grassroots Handbook. (2002) Brown’s illustrations are an important element in his cross-cultural work including Liaison activities with the FPAA. Architectural Record Editor, Robert Ivey, FAIA, created a special monthly page to highlight architects’ drawings. Ivey wrote the article for Brown’s illustrations titled “The Architect’s Hand,” published in Architectural Record November 2007. Service-Oriented Illustrations • AIA Board of Directors December 2, 1999 • AIA Board of Directors September 17-19, 1999 • AIA Board of Directors May 4-5, 1999 • AIA Board of Directors March 19-20, 1999 • The Alamo, College of Fellows Investiture 2000 • Mayan Dancer, Proyecto Linguistico 2000 • FPAA Meeting, Brazil 2000 • AIA National Executive Committee, April, May July 2001 • New Mexico Architecture; July, Aug., Oct. 1989 • New Mexico Architecture, July, August 1988

Field Sketching Academy Brown’s illustrations have been published in numerous books and magazines. His pen and ink drawing skills propelled him to create a highly successful training program, “Field Drawing Academy,” that is held weekly in an outdoor environment. Published Illustrations “Guide to Albuquerque,” Terry Brown & Committee, New Mexico Architectural Foundation 2012 2010 Blog Collection, Jim Leggett, FAIA, Blurb Books 2011 Drawing Shortcuts, 2nd Edition; Jim Leggitt, FAIA; T. Brown Guest Contributor; Wiley & Sons 2009 “The Architect’s Hand,” Robert Ivy, FAIA, Architectural Record, November 2007 “Life By Design for Terry Brown: Architecture Involves More Than Blueprints and Drafting Tools,” Jean Ann Cantore, Texas Techsan Magazine, Sept/Oct 2005 America by Design, Leadership by Design; illustrated by T. Brown, AIA, 2002 Corrales Village Center Design Guidelines; Corrales Main Street, Inc.; June 2001 “Recording a Vanishing Legacy: The Historic American Building Survey in New Mexico, 1933-Today,” Terry Brown and committee, Museum of New Mexico Press 2001

DRAWING FOR LIFE by Architect Terrance J. Brown, FAIA

2016 EDWARD C. KEMPER AWARD

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TERRANCE J. BROWN, FAIA

EXHIBITS ADDITIONAL SERVICE Service to the Nation & Community

Sidebar body text.

At the core of Brown’s advocacy and involvement with the Institute is a personal devotion to service for his country and community. From the US Army and ROTC to the Boy Scouts and local planning commissions, in a variety of capacities, he represents the AIA, its members, the profession and architecture to communities, organizations and individuals. Community • President, Corrales Horse & Mule People (CHAMP) 2015 • Animal Evacuation Plan for Disasters, Village of Corrales, New Mexico Plan 2012 »» Plan used by other New Mexico villages. • Member & Chair, Corrales Planning & Zoning Commission 2005-2013 • Surgeon General, Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 5432 2002-present • Member, Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 5432 2001-present • Member, Corrales Bosque Advisory Commission 1998-2001 • President, Corrales MainStreet 1999 • Chair, MainStreet Design Committee, Design Guidelines for the Village of Corrales 2001 Related Publications: “Terry Brown-Eight Years on the Planning and Zoning Commission,” Stephanie Hainsfurther, Corrales Comment, April 20, 2013 “Pathways Plan Almost Axed; 45 Day Reprieve,” Jeff Radford, Corrales Comment, April 2003 Grassroots Leadership Handbook, AIA Corrales Village Center Design Guidelines, T. Brown Design Committee Chair, June 2001 Boy Scouts of America Brown is an Eagle Scout (1962) who earned 39 merit badges. He was selected by the Council as Program Chair to plan and support all activities in the Great Southwest Council and its 9 district activity chairs. Brown earned the Community Organization Award, the highest award of the Veterans of Foreign

Wars for service to youth through the Boy Scouts of America. This honor is presented for extraordinary service and leadership in and support of youth outreach programs. His career as an architect has inspired and informed hundreds of scouts. Boy Scout Adult Leader Awards: • Silver Beaver Award 2015 • Doctorate of Commissioner Science 2015 • Commissioner Award of Excellence in Unit Service 2014 • VFW Community Organization Award 2014 • William D. Boyce Unit Organizer Award 2013 • Powder Horn Award 2013 • District Award of Merit 2013 • Alumni Award 2013 • Volcano Award 2013 • James E. West Fellow 2011 & 2012 • Pack Trainer Award 2012 • Den Leader Award 2012 • Arrowhead Award 2012 • Webelos Den Leader Award 2012 • Brotherhood-Order of the Arrow 2012 • Wood Badge Course Director 2012 • Master of Commissioner Science Degree 2012 Positions Held: • National Team Chair, New Mexico Scouting, Veterans of Foreign Wars 2012-present • Chapter Advisor, Cherokee Chapter, Order of the Arrow 2015 • Powderhorn Staff 2015 • Brownsea Staff 2014-2015 • Assistant Scoutmaster 2014 • Webelos Den Leader 2013-2014 • Wood Badge Staff 2012-2014 • Pack Trainer & Co-chair 2012 • Unit Commissioner & Council Activities Chair 2011-present • Co-chair, Annual Eagle Scout Banquet & Scholarship 2011-present • Councilor, Merit Badge for Architecture, Art, Horsemanship and Shooting Sports • Eagle Scout 1962

“Without persons like you in this organization we would not be raising the future leaders that we are. You have making a huge difference in one of the most noble of causes.” Michael F. Gardiner Jr., Assistant Special Agent in Charge, Southwestern Region, U.S. Forest Service

2016 EDWARD C. KEMPER AWARD

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TERRANCE J. BROWN, FAIA

EXHIBITS ADDITIONAL SERVICE Service to the Nation & Community

United States Army Upon graduation from Texas Tech University’s Architectural program, Brown was commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant in the Army Engineers and served in the Viet Nam War where he flew on daily helicopter reconnaissance missions. He received significant honors, during his time as an architectural student in ROTC and throughout his war service. Brown used his architectural planning skills to design a tank movement through the jungle to relieve a remote fire support base under siege. He received the Bronze Star for his plan.

Viet Nam War Journals Brown carried the drawing skill garnered during his architectural education to his Viet Nam War experience. In a series of illustrated war journals, he chronicled day by day events of the iconic war that was the cultural upheaval for his generation. This graphically stunning, plainly written and illustrated legacy reveals the perils of life in war.

Awards: • Distinguished Military Student, Army ROTC 1965 • Distinguished Military Graduate, Army ROTC 1969 • Bronze Star 1971 • Air Medal 1971 • Army Commendation Medal 1971 • Viet Nam Cross of Gallantry 1971 • Viet Nam Service Medal 1971 • Viet Nam Campaign Medal 1971 • National Defense service Medal 1970

“Terry has been a servant to others his whole professional career beginning with his meritorious military service to our nation.” Ronald L. Skaggs, FAIA 2000 AIA President, 2013 Chancellor AIA College of Fellows

2016 EDWARD C. KEMPER AWARD

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July 15, 2015 Mr. Drew White, FAIA Chair - AIA Kemper Award Jury The American Institute of Architects 1735 New York Ave, NW Washington, DC 20006 Reference: Terrance Brown, FAIA Letter of support for the AIA Edward C. Kemper Award The success of any volunteer organization is dependent on the dedication, initiative and commitment of the people who take charge as leaders. Terrance Brown, FAIA is one of those leaders who through his professional expertise, experience in serving his community and desire to make a difference in everything he does, has contributed significantly to the profession through service to all levels of the American Institute of Architects. Pioneering nationwide efforts for Architect - led post disaster recovery... While serving as AIA National Vice President in 2001, Terry was thrust into action in the wake of the September 11th attacks that horrifically re-envisioned architecture and the built environment. He led the disaster assistance team in playing a critical role in the Institute’s response in determining how architects could best help a shattered and horrified city and nation. He, along with Kemper Award Recipient Charles Harper, FAIA, have pioneered raising the public awareness about the role of architects in society though disaster assistance. I served as the AIA Disaster Assistance Committee Chair for the past two years and relied on his wisdom, passion and experience in preparing architects to be of service in evaluating damaged structures after a disaster. Last year, I discussed the AIA’s Sustainability Leadership Scan with Terry. It highlights Resiliency as an emerging priority for the Institute and he has been at the forefront of the issues of mitigation, sustainability and resiliency and their interrelationship for many years. Having served on the Committee and Co-presented the California Office of Emergency Management Safety Assessment Program at the 2009 - 2013 AIA National Conventions with Terry, I can say that he is without equal. We continue to serve together on the US Resiliency Council as Stakeholder Advisory Members working to develop meaningful criteria and training for architects to learn how to create more resilient facilities. Significant Service to the architectural profession and the Institute … One only needs to review the various offices held and the breadth of his involvement to realize that Terry is a visionary leader who has had a tremendous influence as President of AIA Albuquerque, AIA New Mexico, AIA Western Mountain Region Regional Director, AIA National Vice President and an International Leader for over for 30 years. Empowering the next generation and the community ... As a fellow Eagle Scout, I share the belief that leadership begins at home and is taught early in one’s life. In fact, Terry and his younger brother Morris are the only identical twins in the College of Fellows. Terry works tirelessly with the Boy Scouts developing leadership in boys who are the future of America. It is interesting that one of the Merit Badges required to become an Eagle Scout is “Citizenship in the Community” and his “citizenship” is in public service to his community of Corrales, New Mexico where he, as the Chair of the Planning and Zoning Commission, has been instrumental and has empowered its leadership in developing cohesive ordinances that maintains the rural character of their village. With an enthusiastic spirit of collaboration and the ability to reach out to address the needs of the community, Terry is an inspiration to architects who respond to help those in need in times of crisis, has affected the lives of countless people within the American Institute of Architects, instilled excellence in our next generation and improved the quality of communities across the country. These are some of the reasons why I am in support of the AIA National Board of Directors conferring the AIA Edward C. Kemper Award on this talented and dedicated architect who has given so much of himself, Terrance Brown, FAIA. Respectfully, Michael D Lingerfelt, FAIA AIA Disaster Assistance Committee 2007 - 2015; Chair, 2013 - 2014. 2011 AIA Florida President 7896 St Andrews Circle USA ∼ Orlando, Florida 32835 ∼ Phone: 407.701.5115 ∼ mlingerfelt@Lingerfelt-Int.com ∼ AR 0014881 (FL) ∼ C26727 (CA)


CHARLES HARPER FAIA EMERITUS 2501 Amherst Drive Wichita Falls, Texas 76308 Voice: 940-767-1421 Cellular: 940-781-2015 e-mail: charper@harperperkins.com

10August 2015

Re: Terrance Brown FAIA, Support for the AIA Edward C. Kemper Award 2016 This letter is in support of the nomination of Terrance Brown FAIA to be the next Kemper Award recipient. It is with the greatest of pleasure that I write this letter for Terry. I could write about any of the items that I am sure is in Terry's nomination materials. Terry has been able to "keep busy" doing so many things. I will not do that here except for the very important activities that I am most aware and most interested. You may know about my work during the recovery process of urban areas after a disaster. I want you to know about Terry's disaster work. That alone makes the Award a must for our fellow Architect. Very soon after serving his Country in Vietnam, Terry Brown went to work in Guatemala for eight years. He worked on many things while there, but his work mainly dealt with Mayan linguistics. Being the person Terry is, he got himself involved in many other aspects of the Guatemalan (Mayan) life. While there, one of the largest and most powerful earthquakes in recent years hit Central America. Because of the mountains and other geographic conditions, the damage was extreme. Terry took his God given leadership abilities and got the Antigua public hospital moved to a safe location on a soccer field, preventing the loss of life of many in the destroyed former location. His works in other parts of that recovery are exemplary actions for all. He worked with the US Government after a hurricane wrecked the island of St. Lucia. Terry's work during his stay Guatemala set an example for all of us. When he returned home and started his practice, our paths crossed quickly as we talked many times about disaster recovery. In the summer of 2000, a forest fire burned out the West Side of Los Alamos, New Mexico. The New Mexico AIA Chapter asked me to come to Los Alamos and help the New Mexico Architects do what they could to help the disaster victims recover. Sure enough, there was Terry at the meeting. His influence and leadership got the Chapter membership to help more than I thought they could. Terry's leadership in developing disaster recovery programs across the USA and the globe sets a high mark for the AIA. His long history of serving the needs of others in preparation for and after disaster is a good example of how AIA members can serve others. Charles Harper FAIA Emeritus Founding Chair, AIA Disaster Response Committee (1970-2004) Edward C. Kemper Award (2001 Personal-AIA:A1:CFH


THOMAS VONIER FAIA RIBA VICE PRESIDENT

3 August 2015 Drew White FAIA, Chair, Honors and Awards Jury The American Institute of Architects 1735 New York Avenue NW Washington, DC 20006-5292 USA Reference: Letter Supporting Kemper Award for Terrance J Brown FAIA Dear Drew and Members of the Jury: Terry Brown FAIA is among the Institute’s hardest working and most widely admired advocates for looking to our neighbors in Central and South America. His dedication and drive have greatly benefited our profession and the AIA. Terry’s exceptional, unstinting service has earned great respect and admiration for the American Institute of Architects, and for the architects of the United States. We could have no better ambassador, volunteer and envoy. Terry has served with great distinction, over a sustained period, in efforts to alleviate poverty and to provide disaster relief throughout Latin America, notably in Guatemala. He also represented the AIA for nearly a decade in the Federation of Pan-American Architect Associations (FPAA), touching architects in all countries of the Americas, from Chile in the south to Canada in the north. With FPAA and its member countries, Terry has consistently been at the forefront of the AIA’s global presence and our efforts to lead the architecture profession internationally. He exemplifies the selflessness and public-spirited dedication for which US architects want to be known. He has led constructive engagement with our foreign architecture counterparts, yielding not only cordial relations, but genuine and lasting partnership. Terrance J Brown FAIA has given long and outstanding service to the Institute and our profession, leading beyond our borders. Please grant him your highest consideration for the 2016 Kemper Award. Respectfully,

Thomas Vonier FAIA RIBA VICE PRESIDENT

52, RUE DU DOCTEUR BLANCHE F-75016 PARIS FRANCE E-MAIL: TVONIER@AOL.COM


Ronald L. Skaggs FAIA, CHAIRMAN EMERITUS

July 29, 2015

Drew White, FAIA, Chair, Kemper Award Jury The American Institute of Architects 1735 New York, Avenue, NW Washington DC 20006 Re: Terrance J. Brown, FAIA, Edward C. Kemper Award Dear Distinguished Colleagues: It is a special privilege to write a letter in support of Terry Brown’s nomination for the Edward C. Kemper Award. Beyond the opportunity of having served on the national AIA Board, and when president appointing him as the AIA representative to the Federation of Pan American Architects, I have had the true fortune of working with him on Native American projects in New Mexico and Arizona. When I consider the significant contributions to AIA and society made by Terry one word comes to mind, and the word in capital letters is SERVICE. Terry has been a servant to others his whole professional career beginning with his meritorious military service to our nation over forty years ago. Following that service has been his work with creating a Mayan linguistic center and training Peace Corps volunteers touching nations across the globe, his devoted commitments to improving living conditions for Native Americans in the United States and poor villages in South and Central America and more recently his leadership in international disaster recovery efforts. Terry has become an international ambassador of the AIA through his formative efforts in the Institute’s disaster assistance activities, particularly in providing professional training and credentialing to hundreds of other practitioners. His efforts for the AIA and many other organizations to include young architects and interns has greatly advanced the stature of the AIA in the eyes of countries worldwide. As an Eagle Scout myself I am also highly impressed with Terry’s service to the youth of our country through his tireless guidance in activities of the Boy Scouts of America. Due to his distinguished service to this longtime youth leadership organization Terry has been awarded the highly coveted Silver Beaver Award and Doctorate of Commissioner Science Degree. Terry is the embodiment of the Edward C. Kemper Award, and I respectfully encourage your affirmative consideration of his nomination for this prestigious award. Sincerely,

Ronald L. Skaggs, FAIA, FACHA, FHFI, LEED AP 2000 AIA President, 2013 Chancellor COF

HK S, I NC.

350 N S AI NT PA UL S T, S UI TE 1 00 , DA LL AS, TX 75 20 1- 42 4 0

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July 9, 2015

Drew White, FAIA, Chair - AIA Honor Awards Jury The American Institute of Architects 1735 New York Ave, NW Washington, DC 20006 Re:

Terrance John Brown, FAIA The AIA Edward C. Kemper Award

Dear Drew and Members of the Jury, The American institute of Architects has produced a remarkably well qualified group of recipients of the Kemper Award since its inception. The prestige and honor of this award has done much to call attention to the extraordinary work being done here in the west. To add Terry to this list would do AIA New Mexico and the WMR proud and will bring even more national attention to this ever more important part of the country. Terry and I have known each other for many years, certainly more than 14 of them and I am fortunate to call him my dear friend. Through that time, I have come to realize how greatly his talents and his work have benefited our profession, the institute and even humanity. His work transcends local, regional, national and especially international levels. Terry’s impact is truly global and through that work he has brought a deep and comprehensive understanding of the meaning of architecture and its importance to our society and the world at large. He is an empathetic thinker relative to all matters architectural, particularly those that involve disaster assistance. One only has to mention the topic and Terry’s name comes to mind. Terry is a prolific and gifted artist and drawer, inspiring all that view his ever present sketchbook to keep the art of sketching alive. But more importantly, of all the architects I have come to know throughout my life, I know of no one that has served this profession, this institute and this country to the extent that Terry has. I am simply amazed by what he has done in his lifetime and the simple fact of the matter is, he’s still accomplishing more every day. The Edward C. Kemper Award recognizes an individual who has contributed significantly to the profession through service to the American Institute of Architects. Terry and his immense body of work and extraordinary service embodies the meaning and purpose of this award and therefore I strongly encourage your serious consideration of my good friend and colleague, Terrance J. Brown, FAIA for this Award of Distinction.

Respectfully,

Edward A. Vance, FAIA, NCARB Founder & CEO Richard Upjohn Fellow The American Institute of Architects, National Board of Directors | 2010-2012 AIA College of Fellows, Secretary-Elect


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Terrance J. Brown, FAIA 2016 AIA Edward C. Kemper Award Submittal

2016 AIA Kemper Award Submittal - Terrance Brown, FAIA  
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