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RBT TECHNOLOGY

THE LIVING WING CONCEPT * XL PERFORMANCE *

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AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 DAYS PROTOTYPES SISTERS OF SURF INTERVIEW WITH

THE MORENO TWINS GOING INTO

OVERDRIVE FORMULA EXPERIENCE

RIDER : BJOERN DUNKERBECK

PHOTO : JOHN CARTER

ISSN 1002-2010

9 7 7 0 8 5 9 3 2 5 0 0 5 PRICE : 2010 RACE SAILS ISSUE

THE LIVING WING CONCEPT A COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE 2010 RACE PROGRAM


Rider : Jaeger Stone Sail : S-1 LOCATION : FREDDIE’s AUSTRALIA Photo : John Carter

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THE BACKBONE OF PERFORMANCE


Contributors BEN SEVERNE

Based in Western Australia, Ben Severne has been building, designing and testing sails for a lifetime. A perfectionist by heart, he constantly strives to improve even the smallest details. His work hard – play hard approach means he’s prone to disappearing for a few days on the premise of a good forecast, only to come back reinvigorated and motivated to build better sails. Recently he claimed 2 wave sailing titles in Western Australia against international competition, proving that luck conquers skill.

BJOERN DUNKERBECK

With 12 consecutive World Championship titles, 36 separate discipline world titles and over 100 single PWA event wins in wave, racing and slalom, Bjoern is the most successful windsurfer ever. Together with Ben Severne and Steve Allen, he has developed the REFLEX range to suit his needs – to deliver unbeatable performance. Thanks to Bjoern logging many miles on the plane, the team has combined riders and prototypes in various conditions and world locations during the course of the Reflex R&D period.

STEVE ALLEN

Steve’s long experience and success in FW windsurfing (10 world championship titles) have enabled him to contribute extensively to the 2010 race program. In close co-operation with the design team he has spent countless hours on and off the water in order to pursue his dream to push sail design to another level. With amazing insight into new theories and design features, Steve has contributed to all aspects of the Severne Sails design direction. When not on tour or working with the R&D team in WA; he lives, trains and waltzes in Poland.

KARIN JAGGI 27 times world champion and the most successful female windsurfer, Karin’s enthusiasm seems to increase exponentially. She posseses an impressive list of accomplishments in both professional windsurfing and mansion building. Together with Patrik Diethelm they have recently founded their own board company. Based in WA, Karin is able to maintian close ties to the Severne R&D team. Always professional, always hands on.

VICTOR COUTO Nobody rigs a sail as fast as Victor. Having spent the last 7 years on tour, he is the key to Bjoern’s racing success. Besides making sure that the right gear is at the right place at the right time, Victor has talent behind the camera which he puts to good use chasing shots of Bjoern in action. According to his boss he is 100% reliable and always maintains his calm nature even when kit throwing anger starts in the rider’s tent.

CHRIS PRESSLER Pro-rider and Journalist/Travel Writer Chris Pressler has his finger on the pulse. His homepage continentseven.com is testament to this with the most up to date news and videos. His feedback and contribution as a longtime teamrider for Severne is of great value for the brand. There have been plenty of dedicated figures in this industry but few make it their mission in life to spread the stoke like Chris.

SIMON HURREY Former PWA and European Freestyle Pro Tour competitor, Simon’s working background in management and passion for the sport are an excellent combination. In his role as Severne Product Manager he spends his summer months in Australia, working with Ben and the Perth design team, crafting the latest range. He has the cleanest desk in the company, losing him some respect with his Australian peers.

no 2 March 2010 Editor BEN SEVERNE iwillnotreply@ r3volution-mag.com Deputy Editor TINA SAHL lifesnotabeach@ r3volution-mag.com Graphic Design LALITA (LEW) lew@ r3volution-mag.com Wandering Contributors CLINTON FILEN, JAMES BROOMHEAD Contributing Writers SIMON HURREY, CHRIS PRESSLER, KARIN JAGGI Illustrator Team: Molly Mata Proof: IAN MacKINNON Contributing Photographers John Carter (JC), Toby Bromwich Photo Credits: Pascal Lefevre, Martin Haglev, Kerstin Reiger, Philippe Bru, Cote Miranda, Mark, Mario Entero (Roxy), Clinton Filen, Tiesda YOU Cover RIDER : BJOERN DUNKERBECK PHOTO : John Carter Circulation Management PETER OLARIC Design TEAM Severne Advertising & Sales Tina Sahl Product/R&D BEN SEVERNE, Simon Hurrey, BJOERN DUNKERBECK, STEVE ALLEN Group Circulation & Advertisement

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tina@r3volution-mag.com


Features

ISSUE #2 RACE

Global R&D article (testing in GC, Fuerte, Sylt, DEN, Pol, Perth) p58

AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 DAYS PROTOTYPES

Follow Ben Severne, Bjoern Dunkerbeck and Steve Allen on their year-long globetrotting R&D mission p36

10 Must Do Racing Events in 2010

Chris Pressler’s selection of events worth a trip, and not only for the racp6

THE LIVING WING CONCEPT

The idea behind this revolutionary concept and its application in the 2010 race sail range p12

HOW TO BURN YOUR MATE

Pro tips on how to get the jump on your mates in any race p42

News on the

Stuff

Win a

Product side

SEVERNE Backpack

p58

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10

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must-do 10 racing events

By CHRIS Pressler

Racing is the purest form of competition. From the earliest days of windsurfing, people have been lining up against each other trying to be fastest around the course. The winner takes the glory, but there are many other rewards for each and every one of the competitors: 10

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Free drugs – Well, not quite. But the adrenalin rush of competition releases endorphins faster than any chemical on the planet.

Self improvement – Nothing beats racing to improve your skills. Jibing, straight-line speed and equipment tuning; they all get a work out. Make friends – Everyone competes fiercely on the race course, but afterwards it is all about catching up with old friends and making new ones. Here is a list of some of the most fun racing events on the planet. Do yourself a favor and get along to any or all of them to enjoy your windsurfing even more this year.

1. German Windsurf Cup (Slalom and Formula) The German Windsurf Cup is actually six events spread from May to August at different locations around Germany. All the event results get ranked over the year, but it´s no problem just to compete at a single tour stop. The conditions can be anything from flat water with light wind, choppy water with strong wind, or big waves with gusty winds of 15 to 20 knots. The events are extremely well organized, and if you are a rookie, you pay €60 entry for the first event and can participate in the two successive events free. 8

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8 – 10 May 2010: 13 – 16 May 2010: 21 – 24 May 2010: 02 – 04 June 2010: 21 – 25 July 2010: 30 August 2010:

Dranske, Rügen, GERMANY Fehmarn, GERMANY White Sands Festival Norderney, GERMANY Boltenhagen, Weiße Wiek, GERMANY Flens Surf Cup 2010, Westerland/Sylt, GERMANY Schönberger Strand / Kiel, GERMANY

COST

It takes place during Finland’s warmest and windiest time of the year. Days are long and conditions are calm round-the-clock. Classes are divided into Youth, Master, Ladies and Overall. 27 – 29 August 2010: Kalajoki, FINLAND

info@choppywater.de http://www.windsurfcup.de

DIFFICULTY

3. Formula Windsurfing Finnish Championships 2010

jarno.rautio@rautio.fi

WIND

DIFFICULTY

COST

WIND

2. Defi Wind

4. Circolo Surf Events, Italy

The world’s largest long distance race. One thousand competitors, pros and amateurs, fight for the title. It´s an extreme challenge and you should be well prepared mentally and physically. One race has an overall distance of about 25kms, with winds that can be more than 30 knots.

The focus at Lake Garda is on Slalom. All events take place in the wonderful little village of Torbole. On average the wind is not too strong, but some days can get stormy. Normally you are on 7.5m to 9.5m sails, but when the wind blows you can rig your 6m. During the day you will never tire of the backdrop of gorgeous landscapes, while at night great pizza, ice-cream and hot parties beckon.

This year the event also celebrates its 10th anniversary. Gruissan, the base for the racing, has an extraordinary atmosphere. Surrounded by stunning mountains and a wonderful shoreline, this beautiful village always extends a hearty welcome for all the visiting racers. Many of them have a reputation of being windsurfing-mad. 13 – 16 May 2010: Gruissan, FRANCE www.defiwind.com

DIFFICULTY

8 –9 May 2010: XV° Trofeo Paolo Neirotti (Slalom) 27 – 30 May 2010: SHAKA (Slalom, Speed, Freestyle, SUP) 19 – 20 June 2010: One Hour Classic Slalom 26 – 27 June 2010: Winds Bar Slalom GPS Speed 14 – 15 August 2010: Trofeo Michele Nogler Slalom 4 – 5 September 2010: CST CUP info@circolosurftorbole.com http://www.circolosurftorbole.com

COST

WIND

DIFFICULTY

COST

WIND


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5. Austrian Nationals

7. Supercup 2010

9. Lancelin Ocean Classic

Racing on a shallow lake in the eastern part of Austria is fun. You will meet competitors from Austria and neighboring Slovakia, Hungary, Slovenia, Croatia or the Czech Republic. And if there is no wind you will make new friends over a glass of the excellent local wine. Hundreds of wine cellars crowd northern Burgenland.

This is the perfect period to race at these south-east European spots. The wind can be anything from 7 knots to 50 knots. In Croatia, for instance, you can get the light thermal Maestrale, the warm unsteady Yugo or the gusty but super-strong Bora. You sail lakes, inlets or the open sea. The Supercup offers a vast variety of conditions and racing formats. You will definitely forge new friendships. But don´t always expect the best organization.

Australia’s premier windsurfing event attracts many pro athletes in one of world’s best windsurfing spots. Celebrating its 25th anniversary this year, it’s the longestrunning wave, slalom and marathon event on the globe. Bring your own gear and be ready for winds of more than 20 knots. In true Australian spirit, much effort also goes into the event party, which is definitely not to be missed.

October 2010:

Lake Neusiedl, AUSTRIA (Slalom, Formula)

www.windsurfingaustria.at

Between April and early November 2010: Formula & Slalom in Novo Mlyny (CZECH REPUBLIC). Peljesac (CROATIA), Lake Balaton (HUNGARY), Jadrija Hallowind (CROATIA), Rijeka/Preluk (CROATIA)

7 – 10 January 2010: Lancelin, WA, AUSTRALIA www.lancelinoceanclassic.com.au

windsurfingsupercup@hotmail.com

DIFFICULTY

COST

wind

DIFFICULTY

COST

wind

DIFFICULTY

COST

wind

6. Surf Challenge

8. Simuni Slalom One Hour Classic

10. Vietnam Fun Cup

Simple rules: a figure-eight slalom is sailed with the goal of getting in as many rounds as possible in one hour. Expect flat water at Pelzerhaken. It is a remote spot, but all the top windsurfing brands will present their latest gear to the hundreds of windsurfing addicts who always show up. Bring a wetsuit and some warm clothes as it can still be cold at this time of year.

The island of Pag boasts few trees. Invariably the fierce Bora wind blows down from the high Velebit Mountains and hits the flat island, where the long-distance race is staged on the second weekend of September. Besides great sailing action, steel yourself for intense parties. Pag is well known party hotspot. Just get yourself to Croatia and don´t forget your small racing kit. There, you can prepare for the Defi Wind.

For the first time this year, a pro division was included in the Fun Cup that takes place in one of Asia’s windiest spots. Expect strong winds, choppy but warm water, excellent organization and great prizes.

13 – 16 May 2010: Pelzerhaken, GERMANY (Slalom)

10 - 12 September 2010: Pag Island, CROATIA

www.surf-challenge.de www.surffestival.de

http://camping-simuni.hr/windsurf-en146.html info@camping-simuni.hr, attn: Lana Bozovic

DIFFICULTY

COST

wind

DIFFICULTY

COST

wind

29 – 30 January 2010:

Mui Ne Beach, VIETNAM

jibe@windsurf-vietnam.com http://www.windsurf-vietnam

DIFFICULTY

COST

wind

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THE INSIDER WITH

How many years have you worked with Bjoern? I’ve worked with Bjoern full time since July 2003.

Travelling so much for competitions is occasionally not a lot of fun.

I was helping a bit at the world speed sailing event in Fuerte, 2002. That year I also went to Ireland with Bjoern for the wave competition.

Are you under a lot of pressure to perform? During the first years, yes, I felt a lot of pressure. Today, I’m very confident and I think Bjoern trusts me.

The following year Bjoern asked me to do the local organisation for the World Speed Sailing Challenge where I ended up doing all kinds of different jobs. The installation of the Wave Reduction system was the hardest one.

Bjoern describes you as very reliable and calm. Do you ever get stressed?

It was a very hard month with many steps and obstacles in the way, but the event was a great success. It actually opened the door for the Speed Sailing tour and the Slalom event.

The truth is that during competition I get very stressed, especially in semi-finals and finals. Do you windsurf privately? I have windsurfed since I was 13-years-old, but I also like to take out my mountain bike and SUP.

“The best is that our office is the beach. I really enjoy making video clips or taking pictures on the water with Bjoern. I must say I love what I do.” How would you best describe the scope of your work? There are two different sides to the work. One is the side that everyone sees at the competitions, where we work like an F1 team with driver and engineer. This way Bjoern can really focus on the competition, and I concentrate on getting the rigs and boards set up for him to win.

During your time on the PWA tour, has the atmosphere has changed a lot? I have had the good fortune to meet all the windsurf stars from the 1990s. I’m sure the atmosphere has changed. Before, all the sailors competed in all disciplines. Today just a few do more than one.

Then there is the rest of the year when there are only a few competitions. During this time we are training, testing, taking pictures for sponsors, writing articles for magazines, filming and doing general promotion. I spend more time at home during this period.

You spend a lot of time on the road, how does this work with your personal life? This is the hardest part of the job. Sometimes we spend longer than a month on the road. Bjoern and I are very good friends. We love what we do and enjoy it every time. This makes it all easy.

What are the best and the worst aspects of your unique job? The best is that our office is the beach. I really enjoy making video clips or taking pictures on the water with Bjoern. I must say I love what I do.

Is going on tour with a multiple world champion like Bjoern the best way to learn the ins and outs of professional windsurfing? I don’t know if it’s the best way. But I think with Bjoern you can learn much more than just windsurfing.

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Photo

Martin Haglev

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COOL STUFF

A.

B.

C.

D.

E.

F.

G.

H.

I.

J.

K.

L.

THE BUZZ A. KEY LINE {MAN}

E. FULL MOON

Classic fit front and back screen printed tee Snug-fit tee with large front woven label with woven label sleeve badging. badge and woven label sleeve badge.

B. KEY LINE {WOMAN}

Fitted cotton tee with keyline print and woven F. MAST-HIGH BOARDIES label badge detail on sleeve. Windsurfing-specific boardies with concealed side buttons to attach to loops on SEVERNE water tops. Two pockets and laser-cut drainC. SOFT SHELL JACKET Weatherproof jacket with fleece interior, Sub- age holes at back leg. Back, front and side tle badging details and weatherproof zips. branding.

C. REVOLUTION HOOD

QUICK-DRY TEE Printed fleece hood with zip front and pouch G. Printed UV resistant short-sleeved surf shirt pocket. with front chest panel, internal elastic butD. REVOLUTION FIVE-PANEL TRUCKER CAP ton loops (to attach to SEVERNE boardies) Trucker-style cap with printed front panel and and front loop (to attach to boardies’ drawstring). embroidered detail.

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H. QUICK-DRY HOOD

Printed UV resistant hooded surf shirt with front chest panel, internal elastic button loops (to attach to SEVERNE boardies) and front loop (to attach to boardies’ draw-string).

I. HOTSKIN

Classic 0.5mm neoprene hotskin top with heat reflective lining.

J.MILITARY

Classic fit, front and back screen-printed tee with woven label sleeve badging.

K. WALLET

PU single-fold wallet with front metal badge, external and internal laser-cut hole detail and SEVERNE embossing inside.


COMING SOON

At the Weymouth & Portland National Sailing Academy For More Information T: +44 (0)121 288 9965 E: info@otc-windsurf.com W: www.otc-windsurf.com

The Official Test Centre Windsurf Holidays. With Purpose


With Bjoern Dunkerbeck and Steve Allen joining the SEVERNE racing team in 2009, designer Ben Severne signalled a significant change in his approach to the SEVERNE Race Program. The result of a year’s intensive R&D is now evident in the new Reflex and Reflex Formula. We look deep inside to uncover the thinking of the team.

B

Being obsessive is not necessarily a bad thing, and is the first clear characteristic you notice with all three developers. Ben Severne is reputedly one of the most demanding perfectionists around, managing to combine an incredible sailing ability with an extremely scientific approach to design. This duality means you either find him running around testing, vigorously debating direction of a product with the design team or hiding behind his monitor, deep in the design process. “With the Reflex Program, Bjoern and Steve both came with clear ideas on what they wanted. This made it easier for me to define a few completely new approaches, which we worked through intensively to reach the final range.�

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Rider : Bjoern Dunkerbeck

Photo : Toby Bromwitch

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Ben Severne’s view on the fundamentals are: “We have taken the windsurfing sail another step closer to the living wing by isolating the batten tension in from the perimeter of the sail to allow the leech to automatically flex under load (reflex). This allows the centre of effort to remain in position instead of the batten becoming more rounded and the draft moving back.”

In testing the concept Bjoern and Steve were able to evolve the prototypes to integrate the positive effects of the Tensioner on overall sail design. Bjoern highlights the key benefits he felt: “The Reflex system releases the pressure on the leech in overpowered conditions, which results in a more comfortable rig handling and increases in wind range.”

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A closer look at the Reflex Tensioner spotlights the unique system that tensions the forward section of the batten independently to the trailing edge of the rig. The mechanism can be adjusted through multiple tension options without the need for overly complicated working parts.


A standard sail iWhen affected by an increase in wind strength, the draft will move backwards. This will increase backhand pressure, back foot pressure and result in a lack of control and lost speed. The Reflex System inhibits the draft moving backwards in the sail by allowing the leech to twist and flex behind the Reflex Batten Tensioners. The rider is able to accelerate through the gust without a loss of control. centre of effort movement in low and high winds

Multiple Tension options with a snap closure.

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The Interface enables the interconnection between the cam panel and the mast; promoting stability and correct entry profiles between batten and cam.

The spacer system provides an

extra adjustment in balancing the pressure against the mast for correct foil entry profiles and efficient rotation.

A solid side wall balance the need for flex and rigidity along the length of the cam. The XL size balances tensions and distributes them evenly over the surface of the cam onto the mast limiting point loading and reducing friction whilst increasing stability.

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“The XL cam increases the foil stability at the leading edge of the sail and creates a new entry profile which the whole sleeve philosophy is built around.� In reviewing this innovative addition, the smooth rotation even with the higher skin tension in the new Reflex is evident. The larger contact surface leads to improved stability in the mast with eight rollers reducing cam wear. Simon Hurrey (Product Manager)

8 rollers per cam and sizes perfectly matched to the diameter of the mast ensure the perfect ratio between effortless rotation and foil stability.

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Rider : Bjoern Dunkerbeck

Photo : John Carter

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Photo : Toby Bromwitch

REFLEX SLALOM

At 105kgs and 192cms Bjoern Dunkerbeck needs no introduction. With 12 World Championships highlighting his obsession with racing, he brings exactly what Ben needed to the program.

“Ben and I are both driven by the sport and have been doing this for some time. It is exactly the partnership that I felt would bring us to the pinnacle of the race program. Steve is the perfect test partner and his success in Formula ensured a complete perspective.�

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SPECIFICATION Size

Luff

Boom

Cams

Battens

Recommended Mast

5.1

403

171

4

7

400

5.6

411

180

4

7

400

6.2

432

190

4

7

430

7.0

463

197

4

8

460

7.8

486

208

4

8

460

8.6

504

224

4

8

490

9.6

533

238

4

8

490 + BE 40/530


4. Large Dropped Clew to enhance boom stiffness and increase lo wer leech efficiency with better twist and flex

1. The XL Cam further increases the foil stability at the leading edge of the sail. It creates a new foil entry profile which the whole sleeve philosophy is built around. It encourages smooth rotation and spreads the higher skin tension out over a larger surface area increasing the stability on the mast and reducing any cam wear.

5. Stabilizer Panel Technology designed to hold the 3D shaping in this critical area, reducing the vertical stretch of the sail and producing a more stable foil shape when the sail is under load

2. In the past, twist has always been confined to the upper leech. For 2010, twist and flex has been engineered for a more active exhaust. This has been achieved using the new Reflex Batten Tensioner which isolates where the sail demands depth and encourages a unique twist and flex pattern where the sail breathes as one cohesive foil in a variety of conditions.

2 3

5 1 2

1

6

6. Phase 3 batten technology

2

8

with size specific batten tapers 1

7

4

1

7. Integrated Looped Outhaul

3. Reduced aspect ratios • Reduced down force in larger sizes for lighter feeling and superior speed • Decreased batten spread for better foil stability • Bringing the power down closer to the rider for more control

for ease of rigging with or without an adjustable outhaul system

8. Neoprene boom FAIRING increases aerodynamics and helps to limit water entering the luff for easier uphauling and waterstarting

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Photo : Toby Bromwitch

REFLEX FORMULA Ten-time Formula World Champion Steve Allen brought the initial conceptof the living wing to Ben. “In most cases mother nature has the smartest solution long before mankind is able to catch up. By considering the structure and functioning of bird feathers, I came to the belief that the feather becomes softer, lighter and more flexible towards the outer edge, creating a reflex when engaged.� 26 race issue I revolution magazine


5. Neoprene boom FAIRING increases aerodynamics and helps to limit water entering the luff for easier uphauling and waterstarting

1. Large Dropped Clew to enhance boom stiffness and increase lower leech efficiency with better twist and flex

2. In the past, twist has always been confined to the upper leech. For 2010, twist and flex has been engineered for a more active exhaust. This has been achieved using the new Reflex Batten Tensioner which isolates where the sail demands depth and encourages a unique twist and flex pattern where the sail breathes as one cohesive foil in a variety of conditions.

6. Stabilizer Panel Technology

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3. Reduced aspect ratios • Reduced down force in larger sizes for lighter feeling and superior speed • Decreased batten spread for better foil stability • Bringing the power down closer to the rider for more control

3

2

6

2

designed to hold the 3D shaping in this critical area, reducing the vertical stretch of the sail and producing a more stable foil shape when the sail is under load

2

5

4

1

7. Phase 3 batten technology with size specific batten tapers

4. Integrated Looped Outhaul for ease of rigging with or without an adjustable outhaul system

With Ben so focused on combining skin tension and the structural response of the rig components, the aligned thinking took development a significant step further. The result is the unique Reflex Tensioner, signalling a massive shift in the way the tension runs through the battens and is translated into the rig.

SPECIFICATION Size

Luff

Boom

Cams

Battens

Recommended Mast

9.7

533

240

5

8

530

11.0

566

265

5

8

550

12.0

582

278

5

8

550

“The Reflex Formula is the result of my personal racing requirements. We have developed the sails to be focussed on foil stability with sufficient back hand pressure, power locked forward in the sail for increased drive and acceleration, reduced X-ply reinforcement to keep the sail as light as possible in the hands and the new leech twist pattern for better wind range, stability and handling.”

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Rider : Steve Allen

Photo : Toby Bromwitch

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Photo : Toby Bromwitch

OVERDRIVE

THE NEW Experience

“The equipment is built to comply with the FE class rules and the reductions in cost are passed on to the customer to ultimately make racing more accessible. Everybody should have the ability to enjoy racing without breaking the bank”.

A A

Remi Vila, President FE Class

ccording to the Formula Experience class president, Remi Vila, FE is the fastest-growing class due to its simplicity, high performance and low entry cost. “The equipment is built to comply with the FE class rules and the reductions in cost are passed on to the customer to ultimately make racing more accessible. Everybody should have the ability to enjoy racing without breaking the bank”.

• Board must retail for no more than $1000 (incl. fins and straps). Weight must be no less than 10kgs. Maximum width must be no more 1005mm. No centre-board. • Sails are allowed a maximum of three cams and seven battens. • Boom must be 100 percent alloy. No carbon allowed. • Masts need to be 75 percent carbon or less. • Fins must not be more than 70cms, and must be the stock fins supplied with the board.

For the more ambitious racers, Formula Experience is a feeder class where they can hone their skills before stepping up to race in the Formula class. But for many the attraction of low cost racing means they have no desire or need ever to switch to another class. The wide, Formula-style boards mean that racing starts at seven knots, so there’s not a lot of chance of not having enough wind to race.

Each person can register one board, two sails and two fins per season. Maximum sail sizes are: Open class 11.0m; Women 10.0m; Youth (under 21) 11.0m; Junior (under 17) 8.5m. Besides keeping the overall costs down, these rules mean that everyone is racing on very similar levels of equipment. It’s not at all an equipment race!

Formula Experience equipment restrictions

Marcello Morrone, FE class committee: “My first attempt at the FE class was with the OverDrive sail back in 2005. Sailing with a FW board, I had the opportunity to try the first OverDrive model, in the 11.0m size. “Immediately I liked the feeling.

With the goal of reducing the cost of racing as much as possible all the components must meet the FE Class Rules: 30 race issue I revolution magazine


1. Lower Aspect Ratios • • •

5. Neoprene Boom

Reducing down force in larger sizes for a lighter feeling and superior speed. Decreasing batten spread for better foil stability and control. Bringing the power down closer to the rider for more control.

opening increases aerodynamics and helps to limit water entering the luff for easier uphauling and waterstarting.

2. Larger Dropped Clew

1

allows for better lower leech flex and twist and more rigidity from aluminium booms

6. Stabilizer Panel Technology

4

designed to hold the 3D shaping in this critical area, reducing the vertical stretch of the sail and producing a more stable foil shape when the sail is under load.

6

5

3. Removal of the Bottom Cam improves rotation, ease of rigging and user friendly performance.

7

2

3

7. Integrated Looped Outhaul for ease of rigging with or without an adjustable outhaul system.

4. Additional Cam above the boom holds a deeper draft which encourages a more upright comfortable stance, increases drive through lulls and promotes stability higher in the sail.

The performance of the sail really impressed me even when tested on a race course with my club mates on full racing sails.

on the OverDrive than they would with a full racing sail, because the sail virtually ‘talks’ to them in an ‘easy to understand language’.

“The great merit of this sail is that the OverDrive makes the free-race sailors progress

“My reaction after the first sailing sessions was to offer the sail to my friends to test.

Most of the freerace sailors achieve more performance on the OverDrive than they would with full racing sail... their technique fast with sail trimming and performance. It’s a high-performance sail, but it’s easy to rig, trim and sail. Most of the free-race sailors achieve more performance

The feedback was great at all times. The sail travelled to all major sailing spots in Brazil and a few months after, the first Brazilian FE fleets started competing with it.

“I have sailed with all OverDrive models and the evolution oฟf consistent improvement always meets the needs of the FE sailors. We look for a competitive, easy, fast, quick and uncomplicated to rig; light but durable sail. “The FE board is heavier than the FW board, the maximum sail size is 11.0m and the wind minimum is seven knots. Thus, we need powerful sails. On the other hand, racing in national and international events, we see most of the sailors travelling with only one board, one fin and, yes, one rig for all conditions. “In other words, we FE sailors need a highly versatile and competitive rig and not just a big free-race sail.

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“The SEVERNE R&D team is always in touch with team riders, dealers and customers, and the communication is clear and easy. When I see all the innovations and improvements in the new OverDrive I simply see all requests we`ve asked for being considered. Positively, we from the Formula Experience class are as demanding as Bjoern or Steve. By the way, it would be great to have them racing OverDrives with us at the next FE World Championships here in Brazil in October!”

Photo : Cote Miranda

2010 Formula Experience Championship calendar The calendar of international championship for the Formula Experience class has expanded in 2010, with three continental championships confirmed so far, and the FE worlds in Brazil. “Miami Windsurfing” North American Championship Miami, Florida, USA 12 - 14 March 2010 European Championship & Formula European Festival Cagliari, Sardinia, Italy 5 - 10 July 2010 South American Championship Paracas, Peru 23 - 28 July 2010 World Championship & Formula World Festival Araruama, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 11 - 16 October 2010

SPECIFICATION Size

Luff

Boom

Cams

Battens

Recommended Mast

4.8

412

165

3

7

400

5.4

434

180

3

7

430

6.0

441

185

3

7

430

6.7

463

190

3

7

460

7.5

486

204

3

7

460

8.5

499

222

3

7

490

9.7

534

250

XL 3

7

530

11.0

555

258

XL 3

7

530

32 race issue I revolution magazine


Rider : Karin Jaggi Photo : Toby Bromwitch revolution magazine I race issue 33


Solid SDM extensions with a 2mm wall thickness for maximum strength Sizes: 36 cm. 24 cm. 16 cm.

Dual pin adjustor clips

Optimized for an adjustable outhaul system. 29mm diameter

34 race issue I revolution magazine


Rubberized lever Sizes: 180-230 210-260

Reduced length of bottom section has reduced swing weight by up to 20% and increased curve consistency in the upper section of the mast. Sizes : Enigma 400 Enigma 430 Enigma 460 Enigma 490 Enigma 530 Enigma 550

Double carbon layer for increased durability

New for ’10:

Reduced weight up to

15%

revolution magazine I race issue 35


They look

ALIKEDon’t think 36 race issue I revolution magazine

EKILA

Photo : Mario Entero : Roxy


REVOLUTION Mag has put the Spanish Wave World Champions Daida (E- 64) and Iballa (E-63) Moreno on the spot to see how they really tick. We can verify that it’s a myth that twins think alike. Personal

The biggest cliché of being a twin is? Iballa: I guess when you’re younger, people think that it must be weird being a twin. But for us, we were born like this and it’s the most natural and nicest experience in life. Daida is part of me even though we have different personalities. Daida: There are many advantages to being twins. People sometimes ask us: “How does it feel being a twin?” Hard question. It’s like if I were to ask: “How does it feel to have a nose?” We’re part of each other; we don’t know anything different; it’s hard to explain. Also, people can get really frustrated if they can’t tell us apart (or really ashamed). We sometimes play stupid so they’re not frustrated or ashamed. So many times I’m actually “Iballa”.

Did you ever sing in a choir? Iballa: The only time I sing is in the shower, where no one can hear me. I’m a better at dancing than singing. Daida: The most I have ever sung in my live was with “sing star” from PlayStation (and I have to admit I really suck). Who was the last person that pissed you off? Iballa: Hmmm. I don’t remember. Nowadays I don’t get pissed off so easily. I try to enjoy life. Daida: What a question! Iballa, of course.

What’s your daily routine when you are not touring? Iballa: Wake up early, stretching, emails, and search for wind. If there’s no wind, I try to go surfing. Then more emails and bed. Daida: My daily routine is: wake up, take my dog for a walk, buy breakfast and a newspaper, eat and respond my emails and phone calls (this can take me sometimes up to four hours a day), paper work (apartment rent, bank, taxes . . . ). Normally I work office time, around four to six hours, and spend the rest doing sports. Obviously, if there’s wind I leave the paperwork and emails for the night time or next day as sailing is my priority. I also love to surf, play basketball, tennis, etc. And I love giving massages (I studied this). That’s what I do in my free time. People say I’ve good hands. ;-) Growing up, what rider changed your life? Iballa: I guess seeing Bjoern in my home spot. It was something big. He was a great guy to watch on the water because he was always sailing in the strongest and hardest conditions in Pozo. Daida: I don’t have a specific “idol”, but I always loved seeing Francisco and Robby in all the magazines.

What would you be doing if you weren’t windsurfing? Iballa: Sports teacher, a surfer, who knows? It’s hard to think about another life without windsurfing. Daida: Not really sure. For sure I would certainly finish my university studies (business administration) and I think I’d be working with my own company, after doing some practise in another company. It’s hard to think what you would be doing without your actual life. It’s also tough to think what you will be doing after your actual life. How do your friends describe you? Iballa: I don’t know. We can ask them. Funny and always joking around. And a good friend to my friends. Daida: Ironic (always trying to find the fun part of each situation), active, responsible, funny – brunette.

Travel

Photo : John Carter

Give us your worst trip / tour experience that you can remember from all your years of being a professional? Iballa: I think the first time I went to Ireland. Lots of $$$ in excess luggage and very cold. Finally a long trip back, driving over night after paying an astronomical amount of money to get home. I guess it was just an experience. But now that I think of it, Ireland was really good conditions, just too cold for me in October. Daida: The worst is always when it comes down to paying excess baggage. I remember a year when I went from Gran Canaria to Maui and then Australia non-stop. Then from Australia to Maui, and after a week in Maui to South Africa. I ended up dealing with different air companies and paying many

“We sometimes play stupid so they’re not frustrated or ashamed. So many times I’m actually “Iballa”.” $$$ in excess baggage. The worst was British Airways and Iberia. I don’t recommend them. Things I guarantee I’ll never do again are? Iballa: Not to get injured on my first heat of a contest. But I don’t usually regret things I do. If they are negative, I take them as a positive experience somehow or at least try. to. Daida: Go from Australia to South Africa. So many hours in the plane, and at the end I didn’t know which country I was in or which language I had to speak.

Riding

Rider : Iballa Moreno Photo : John Carter

What’s your point of reference when you get on the water? Do you target specific moves before you go out, or just ride and get inspired to try stuff? revolution magazine I race issue 37


Iballa: Depending on the day, I normally go and try to have fun and after I get a few days of “free sailing” I go in the water aiming for some goals, specific moves and so on. Always I set myself short and long term goals, but sometimes they’re hard to follow because we are depending so much on the weather conditions. Daida: At the beginning I go out for half-anhour trying bits of all the moves I already know for a “warm up”. Afterwards, I go for specific moves I’m struggling with, but it all depends on the conditions (side/on shore, waves, choppy). Do you have a favourite move? Iballa: Wave riding and jumping. Love them all. Daida: Jumping! I love push loops, table tops, and wave riding. I love takas and goyter’s. What kind of moves in windsurfing could be taken further? Any “old school” tricks that could be explored or advanced? Iballa: I think in a way windsurfing is still a young sport and there are a lots of new moves to do and moves to improve. So, for sure there are. We just need to spend more time in the water and be part of the evolution of the sport. Daida: Uff, it’s really hard to say. It’s already really hard to follow the kids doing freestyle on tour. I think we are going to leave the “creativity” to them. What is true is that nowadays, if you want to do well in wave sailing you need to have a strong freestyle base.

Photo : Mario Entero : Roxy It’s rather unique to have a competitive family member. When you’re competing, do you guys give each other feedback on performance? Iballa: For sure. When one of us goes first in a heat and tests the water, wind direction, etc, we advise the other. Also, strategies for the heat. Daida: We give each other feedback, watch videos and train together. But in competitions each of us knows what to do in the water. It all comes down to the water conditions and luck, and we both have really similar level.

Do you have a favourite move that your sister does? Iballa: I love how Daida does the tweaked push loop table-top. She is the only one so far that can make them. Daida: Iballa has a really strong repertoire; jumping and surfing, and does most of the moves I do in a different style. In lighter wind she somehow gets more power in her sailing and is more fluid in the waves, so it’s a good example for me to follow.

{WHAT’S NEW?}

Sneak Preview Still being put through the wear & tear test, this xx ltr Quiver Bag might soon hit the market.

Send us a picture of your most decrypt Backpack. The winner will get a new Revolution Backpack. Deadline: xxx, E-mail: info@severnesails.com 38 race issue I revolution magazine

NEW

Now available for order • Adjustable length harness lines • Metal cleat for reliable adjustment and maximum grip • PVC handle for ease of adjustment whilst sailing • Easy fix system for attachment with out removing the end of your boom • Low stretch polyester rope • Anti-wear PVC tubing

SEVERNE RAVEBOARD SAIL

Two time World Champion (FE class) Remi Vila has put his year long experience towards the design of a RACEBOARD sail. “The FE class needed a sail that has even more low end power than the GLIDE, and increased stability in the upper wind range to be fully compatible on a race course. After many modifications, I am very happy with the outcome “


revolution magazine I race issue 39


is a rip-roaring tale of

adventure on a global scale. A challenge to re-invent the SEVERNE racing programme takes our heroes, Bjoern, Steve and Ben on a journey against the calendar to arrive at a pre-set date when cutting-edge designs must be locked in. The goal? To design and test prototypes in all corners of the world, creating the fastest sails on the planet in time for the PWA submission deadline of 15 December 15, 2009. The design team find themselves in one scrape after another with massive crashes and huge excess baggage bills, all while easily sailing past deadlines. Can the team finalise the programme in time for the PWA Slalom submission? Or will a world of trouble prevent them from completing their ambitious quest? No journey would be complete without its triumphs and failures. As with Phileas Fogg in Jules Verne’s classic adventure, the team are racing against time while trying to keep details of new technologies safe from the competing industry research teams.

40 race issue I revolution magazine


revolution magazine I race issue 41


Perth: March

Maui: April

The challenge

Ben and Bjoern hit Maui

Bjoern goes it alone

The design team go back to the drawing board by pushing all the CODE Red development to one side: re-evaluating philosophies, redesigning the software to cope with a totally new sail and working back from the deadline, placing markers and sub-deadline dates for each section of development.

Ben and Bjoern conduct benchmark testing against the toughest competitors and decide on a course of action. The challenge is to increase wind range, skin tension and rig stability while reducing drag to dramatically improve the sail’s top speed.

Bjoern continues his testing and development, despite the loneliness of doing it by himself. The PWA show arrives in town and he reluctantly puts down his prototypes and picks up his CODE Reds to compete in the PWA. This further highlights the rapid development of the sails so far.

42 race issue I revolution magazine

Gran Canaria: June


Perth:

Fuerteventura: August – September

Steve Allen joins the programme Steve Allen climbs aboard the R&D boat and tries his best to sink it. Steve’s philosophies bring a whole new direction to the development process: innovative batten systems, living wings and the human downhaul machine force us to once again review established sail design standards.

Moulds that were supposed to be finalised in October are not even cut yet, prompting a massive panic and many September – December extra trips to China to get all the parts Bjoern and Steve make multiple trips working cohesively together. to Western Australia, testing in varied conditions. The number of prototypes At this point crisis management takes pushes through the 100 barrier with over. The moulds are cut with suppliease (partly endangering the title of this ers also working machines 24 hours-astory). Mid-November and the sails are day to cope with our quick turnaround getting faster. The only problem is that time. Changes are made and implewith every prototype tested the previ- mented during a constant cycle of testous one becomes obsolete; such is the ing and reporting, day and night. pace of development. December 14 and Bjoern, Steve and What? We need Cams? Parts are also Ben are discussing which version numbeing developed so fast and the sails bers are measured and (Ian: suggest demands (Ian: I don’t understand “which prototype versions are put for“sails demands”, is this “demands of ward”) put forward as the best sails we the sails”?) are constantly changing. have created during this epic journey. revolution magazine I race issue 43


RACE RIGGING SIMPLICITY 1

4

With Karin Jaggi

Downhaul the sail until the boom can be positioned onto the mast.

Always roll out your sail with the cam pockets facing upwards.

2

Set your extension to the recommended setting printed on the sail.

5

Outhaul the sail to the recommended setting.

6

Set your boom to the recommended setting printed on the sail.

Locate the cams onto the mast. Use the boom opening to locate the cams above and below the boom.

Tension the tack strap: tighter for low-end power, looser for high-end speed.

Open the cam pockets and apply downward pressure directly to the interface whilst applying upward pressure on the underside of the mast to locate the cams.

7

If the cams are difficult to locate on the mast, release more downhaul.

10

Always store excess rope in the stash pocket inside the moulded tack fairing.

Apply the remaining downhaul. Ensure cams are aligned correctly on the mast.

9

8 Troubleshooting

Admire your handy work.

44 race issue I revolution magazine

3

11

Sail feels underpowered: • Too much outhaul: Let out outhaul 2-3cms • Mast is too stiff: Use recommended or compatible mast • Sail is too small: Rig a bigger sail Sail feels overpowered: • Not enough downhaul: Increase downhaul 2-3cms • Not enough outhaul: Increase outhaul 1-2cms • Sail is too big: Rig a smaller sail Sail feels twitchy: • Too much outhaul: Let out outhaul 2-3cms Sail feels heavy, lifeless: • Not enough outhaul: Increase outhaul 1-2cms • Mast is too stiff: Use recommended or compatible mast


graphic creation : stuki-san

revolution magazine I race issue 45


Riders : Ben Severne, Karin Jaggi

Words Karin Jaggi Picture Toby Bromwitch

46 race issue I revolution magazine


Set up your gear so that you’re comfortable with it. That’s the number one rule for professionals. This means equal weight on both legs, each slightly bent (otherwise you can’t react). Most of the sail pressure is held by the harness and the hands just feel and steer the sail lightly. Line yourself up so you’re upwind of your mate. If they won’t let you and you find yourself downwind, you need to be at least a board length ahead otherwise you will be in their dirty wind. If you’re being passed upwind, try to stay clear. All is not lost. Don’t sail in their wake and wind shadow. Let them pass, turn slightly upwind so you pass their wake and then accelerate downwind on top of them again. When behind, if your mate is looking at you, bear away to increase your speed, when they turn away, head up to gain an upwind advantage. Let your equipment do the work and don’t force it. When a gust hits, don’t force the sail back into the sailing position. Re-adjust slowly. No hasty moves. Ride the board flat. To avoid dropping windward rail, ride it a little bit on the leeward rail. Never push sideways on the board and fin. This can happen when a gust hits, opening your sailing position. Don’t force it back.

That will automatically give pressure sideways on the board and fin. This will always slow you down and, in the worst-case, cause spin out. Instead, sheet in slowly. The sail will always adjust to the apparent wind once the gust has passed. Or, if the wind stays stronger you can accelerate and with more speed the sail will also move back automatically to your sailing position. Tension your body from your toes to your little finger. This transfers the sail pressure on to the board and fin. Watch ahead and check the water surface. Even a 10cms wave will slow you down. Surf down the face of the wave on a broad downwind course. But when you hit the bottom you need to head more upwind to keep speed to make it up the back of the next wave. Choose your course. Downwind is faster. When the gust hits turn slightly downwind to accelerate to maximum speed then in the lull use your higher speed to gain some ground upwind again. Never look back! Over 50 percent of your performance is your determination to burn your mate! It’s all a mind game! Remember, the loser buys the beers . . .

revolution magazine I race issue 47


Photo : Tiesda You

Rider & Co-Designer : Remi Vila Sail : RACEBOARD

Guaranteed to dominate in light air.

The legendary GLIDE Raceboard cousin.

www.severnesails.com

SAILS FOR THE REVOLUTION


Severne 2010