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WINTER FLAVOR 2018-2019

SAN ANTONIO’S ULTIMATE FOOD LOVER’S GUIDE

SACURRENT.COM


TheBigBib.com BigBibBBQ #THEBIGBIB

THE BEST BRISKET, RIBS, CHICKEN & PULLED PORK

DINE-IN | CATERING | CARRY-OUT

104 Lanark Dr. San Antonio, Tx 78218 | (210) 654-8400 Tues. - Sat. 11 AM to 8 PM | Sun. 12 to 6 PM | Closed Mon. 8535 Mission Rd. San Antonio, Tx 78214 | (210) 272-0525 Mon. - Sat. 11AM to 6PM


get off the road & come on in! WWW.ARMADILLOBU

RGER.COM

Burgers, Brews & More!

texas style burgers at 2 locations 1423 MCCULLOUGH AVE | 210-226-7556 | HOURS: MON-THURS: 10:30AM-9PM | FRI: 10:30AM-10PM | SAT: 11AM-9PM

sacurrent.com W I10:30AM–10PM N T E R | FTHUR-SAT: L A V 10:30AM–11PM O R 3 2619 SE MILITARY DRIVE | 210-617-7797 | HOURS: MON-• WED:


Your Hometown

Spice Store Since 1985. Flavor Editor: Jessica Elizarraras Publisher: Michael Wagner Senior Editor: Bryan Rindfuss Art Director: Carlos Aguilar EDITORIAL Contributors Writers: Ron Bechtol, Lea Thopmson Contributors Photographers: Bryan Rindfuss, Dan Payton, Amanda Spencer Digital Content Editor: Sarah Martinez ADVERTISING Account Manager: Mallory Jochen Senior Multimedia Account Executive: Sarah Estrada Account Executives: April Miller, Roger Macias MARKETING & EVENTS Marketing and Events Director: Cassandra Yardeni Events Manager: Chelsea Bourque Events Coordinator: Mallory Jochen Marketing and Events Interns: Alec Salazar CREATIVE SERVICES Creative Services Manager: Tina Corbeil Graphic Designer: Samantha Serna Graphic Design Interns: Elyse Andrews, Michelle Moreno, Shelby Pinto, Noemi Solis CIRCULATION Circulation Manager: Justin Giles Distribution: Gabriella Gutierrez, John Miller, Joe Dominguez, Alfredo Gutierrez, Scott Copper, David Garza BUSINESS Operations Manager: Sarah Estrada Business Support Specialist: Samantha Lopez San Antonio Current 915 Dallas St. San Antonio, Texas 78215 Editorial: (210) 227-0044 / Fax: (210) 227-7755 Advertising: (210) 227-0044 Fax: (210) 227-7733

SOUTH TEXAS SPICE CO. Retail - Institutional - Specialty Blends 8oz. - 300lbs. or more

210.436.2280 • 2106 Castroville Rd • 78237 4

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Copyright 2018, San Antonio Current Co., all rights reserved. San Antonio Current Co. is a wholly owned subsidiary of Euclid Media Group LLC. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission of the publisher is prohibited. Publisher does not assume any liability for unsolicited manuscripts, materials, or other content. Any submission include a stamped, self-addressed envelope. All editorial, advertising and business correspondence should be mailed to 915 Dallas St., San Antonio, TX 78215.

This magazine is made with recycled materials and is 100% recyclable.

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HELLO

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HOT RESTAURANTS

TRENDS

You need to visit right now

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DINE

LISTINGS

SOUTHERN GRIT Fresh take on classic beignets

COTTAGE CO. Homebakers on the rise in San Antonio

TESTIN’ TORTILLAS

RESTAURANT INDEX’

From Moctezuma to mass production

From alternative diets to steahouses, we share some of San Antonio’s can’t-miss restaurants

COFEE SHOP CULTURE

San Antonio’s buzzing with local shops

WHERE TO BRUNCH RIGHT NOW A brunch for every occasion

CHAINS WE LOVE Shake Shack, anyone?

S I H IN T

E U S S I 2018-20

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FOOD LOVER’S CALENDAR 11 culinary events to pencil in this season

80 ETC.

SEASONAL SUDS Wintry offerings from our local breweries

77 LIBATIONS

On The Cover Brunch doesn’t get any more British than at one of San Antonio’s longest-running pubs. Find a full English breakfast Sundays at The Lion & Rose British Pub. Photography // Dan Payton Art direction // Carlos Aguilar

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HELLO

un

he f t p a r w un

WELCOME TO

saturday

dec. 8 12PM - 6PM

the

greenline 2532 SIDNEY BROOKS

festive music family-friendly fun tamales deliciosos PRESENTED BY:

JESSICA ELIZARRARAS

t was a steady year for the San Antonio dining community. For this season’s Flavor: San Antonio’s Ultimate Food Lover’s Guide, we take a look at 11 restaurants and shops we love such as the addition of Clementine, The Jerk Shack and a brick-and-mortar for Singhs Vietnamese. We highlight essential places to visit in each genre, spotlight cottage baking and drool over a new twist on beignets. Feel free to use Flavor as a guide to help you explore the city and its endless flavors. From Ethiopian fare, to new barbecue joints and more ceviche than ever, there’s plenty to explore in ol’ San Antone and we hope you use Flavor as your travel guide across the city.

ree

is f e c n a d atten

Happy Holidays

from Sandy Oaks Olive Orchard

- Trees - Olive Oil - Cullinary Delights - Skin Care Products

JESSICA ELIZARRARAS [ FOOD + NIGHTLIFE EDITOR ]

25195 Mathis Road, Elmendorf, TX 78112 | 210-621-0044 | sandyoaks.com sacurrent.com • W I N T E R

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11 NEW RESTAURANTS

WE LOVE

JESS ELIZARRARAS

Clementine

2195 NW Military Hwy., (210) 503-5121, clementine-sa.com From our review: From the looks and tastes of the Clementine menu, John [Russ] spent the last year fine-tuning the restaurant’s concept of “seasonal Southern and American eats.” Don’t visit Clementine expecting fried chicken or a burger or collard greens. Visit for some of the city’s best vegetable dishes (Fun fact: Elise is vegetarian, so John has had some practice). Start with the white mushroom salad with extra virgin olive oil, Valley Citrus, parsley, pecorino and pomegranate seeds. It’s rich, textured, and a new way to convert mushroom-averse eaters.  Then pivot to the buttered turnips — yes, turnips — tossed with greens, red pepper flakes for some heat, fish sauce and a sassy sesame streusel. Again, there’s texture, there’s playfulness and there’s flavor. Try the green cabbage and spring garlic, which is served with lots of butter, and the thinnest, crispiest garlic chips (kudos to kitchen for their knife skills). Definitely don’t miss the ricotta cavatelli, pillowy one-inch pasta twirls with broccoli pesto, Sichuan pepper and toasted pecans.  This is where I implore you to spring for the “Feed Me” option, which asks the diner to “entrust Chef Russ with your dining experience, he and his team will create a menu especially for you highlighting the flavors of the season. Starting at $54 per guest (based on entire table participation).”

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’Tis the Season for Artful Holiday Shopping (that you can feel good about!). Museum Store Sunday Sunday, November 25 Museum Shop Holiday Fair + San Antonio Potters Guild Clay & Art Festival Saturday, December 1 | 10:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. And don’t forget... You can giftwrap four seasons of art with a Museum membership! Available online or at the Museum. Stop by for breakfast, lunch, or dinner at Tre Trattoria while there. For more information visit samuseum.org.

200 West Jones Avenue | samuseum.org sacurrent.com • W I N T E R

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Made From Scratch LOCALLY SOURCED • CHEF DRIVEN

BREAKFAST - BRUNCH - LUNCH - HAPPY HOUR - DINNER - CATERING

521 E GRAYSON ST. SA, TX 78215 | 210.481.8776 | GRAYZEONGRAYSON.COM 10

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DINE

African Village Eritrian

10918 Wurzbach Road, Suite 131, (210) 467-5102, ethiopianrestaurantsat.com

JESS ELIZARRARAS

From our review: African Village is located in a commercially and culturally diverse shopping center at Vance Jackson and Wurzbach. Its neighbors include a donut shop, a bagel outlet, a tamal tienda, a pizza joint and a halal “fashion” store and grocery, among others. I swear that I have reviewed at least two different restaurants in the same location over the years. There is nothing about African Village’s marigold-hued décor that will especially set it apart from any of those; the excitement here is in the food and in the manner of its presentation. Almost everything is served either on or with teffbased injera bread. It’s springy in texture, lacy, slightly sour — and it serves as a kind of spongy spork. Yes, aided by injera, you eat with your fingers. Curry will linger there. Just saying. By all means order the sambuusa. These tiny dough-encased triangles are similar to Indian samosas, the veggie-stuffed version was jalapeño accented, and the serving of six came with a warm lentil salad that was just as good as the flaky packets. At $2.99, this is the deal of the decade — and it is presented with spoons. Save at least one for later. Another must-order is the tibis/tibs in its rendition with awazie/awaze, a spice mix using “false” cardamom. The warmly spiced sauce (we asked for it “spicy”) was anything but imitation, however, and the tender cubes of beef it bathed were excellent. We kept going back to this as the metal platter, lined with a full, flat injera, spun round and round. All other entrées were served atop the injera on that same platter. The lightly curried alicha wot/wat, a beef stew with onion, ginger and garlic, utilized a slightly different cut of less-tender beef. Problematic at first, the dish grew on us as the subtle curry spicing began to more than make up for the chewy beef. Also of the challengingly chewy genre, the drumsticks forming the core of the traditional doro wot at first created a how-toeat-it dilemma for diners unused to the subtleties of employing injera as a utensil. Problem solved by using that saved spoon to prize the meat from the bone in pieces. The easy-to-eat boiled egg that shared sauce with the chicken prompted one diner to speculate on which came first … In fact, the robust sauce with red onion, black pepper and more of the cardamom came first; it was different enough from the first two to be its own thing, yet similar enough to be family.

JESS ELIZARRARAS

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AMANDA SPENCER/@SA FOODIE

DINE

Dos Quality & Flavor

6511 Ingram Road, Suite 101, (210) 267-5143, dos-satx.com From our review: If you want an example of how to be baller on a budget, look no further than Dos, a tiny but tight new burger joint that has its act together. Launched by two brothers (hence, ahem … ), Israel and Raul Armando Cepeda, the space has all of about 20 seats (and a drive-through window). Unless one of them is a graphic designer, in addition to being budding burger barons, the two bros hired somebody to do a simple but effective logo, the colors and style of which carry through into the restrained décor and a nifty little takeaway menu. But these are just the visuals. Los hermanos have also developed a short but well-curated menu of burgers (quatro), one chicken sandwich, one taco plate, and empanadas (dos sabores). None of this would be especially distinctive if it weren’t for one unique factor. Common to Northern and Northwestern Mexico, discada finds itself in the tacos and on the most opulent of the burgers. A blend of meats that, traditionally at least, is griddled on an agricultural implement, the chopped mix is named for the disc that’s pulled in series behind a tractor to till the soil. There being no signs of agricultural activity at Dos, we can assume that a more standard flattop is used to cook their custom, chopped and marinated blend of bacon, beef, pork, smoked sausage and chorizo. With that much flavor power, you might think that any beef patty would be overwhelmed. But no. Maybe “always fresh meat” accounts for part of it. Bracketed by a just-crusty-enough potato bun from 4 Kings Bakery in Universal City, the Discada Burger’s equally crusty beef patty maintains a pink interior and holds its own with the assertive topping; chopped lettuce, a mantle of melty Monterey jack and a veil of creamy Ipanema sauce (mayo, cilantro and a hint of jalapeño) round out the presentation. An accompanying order of skinny fries didn’t rise to the same heights, but neither did it profane the package.

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JESS ELIZARRARAS

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The Jerk Shack

117 Matyear St., (210) 776-7780, thejerkshacksatx.com Lattoia Massey misses the proximity to water, but that desire to recapture the magic of island life has driven her and husband Cornelius to open her own Caribbean restaurant in the city’s West Side. The couple’s story started in 2010 when they met while deployed in Iraq. After ending up in Hawaii, the now-veteran Lattoia decided to follow her passion for the culinary arts and apply to the Culinary Institute of America-San Antonio. Billed as “San Antonio’s first artisan Caribbean restaurant,” The Jerk Shack is a quaint and polished open-air restaurant similar to Dignowity Meats. The menu features meats by the pound, starters, Chef’s Specials, and sides. The jerk chicken and pork aren’t to be missed, and if you need amore conventional vessel, try the jerk tacos, jerk shrimp and grits with maque choux, or jerk wings and mac. For those wanting a taste of the big island, try the steamed fish, braised oxtails and curry goat. The shack will be BYOB (it neighbors a KIPP Academy campus), but Jamaican sodas and set up mixers will be available for purchase.

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DINE

ERIN WINCH

Meadow Neighborhood Eatery + Bar 555 W. Bitters Road, Suite 110, (210) 481-4214, meadowsanantonio.com

From our review: Chef couple John and Elise Russ gifted us Clementine (“seasonal Southern and American eats”) late last year, with a menu that tweaked Southern standards and introduced new classics such as heretical hush puppies. And now we have Meadow, bought to us by another culinary couple, San Antonio natives PJ and Lindsey Edwards, she formerly with the Jason Dady Restaurant Group, he most recently culinary director of Austin’s Contigo. “Seasonal, Texas, Southern” is their mantra. There are references to Texas products on the menu — pecans, apples and beef among them, but plates seem to suggest more “I Suwanee” than “boy howdy.” Wood oven cornbread with jalapeño pimento cheese and honey lard butter both reinforced that impression and started us out with a bang. OK, the cornbread was a tad crumbly, but its smoky-savory flavor played beautifully against both irresistible honey-lard butter (you could slather this stuff on almost anything) and exemplary pimento cheese that had the sort of snakebite heart that is often masked by Southern politesse. ‘Nduja, a spiky/spreadable Calabrian sausage, enlivened the savory marmalade that gave a nestful of crusty creamed corn fritters a needed boost; they were good, but the pudding-like filling needed a little more textural push-back. Individually house-pickled green tomatoes, green beans and cucumbers, or their seasonal counterparts, are a must-order, no matter what else you’re having.

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A 4 GENERATION TX COMPANY • MON-FRI 8A-5P | 1715 W COMMERCE ST • (210) 223-6131 sacurrent.com • W I N T E R

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NOT JUST A PLACE TO LIVE, BUT A PLACE TO LIVE WELL. 210.320.1209 120NinthSt@scbodner.com www.120NinthSt.com 120 NINTH STREET SAN ANTONIO, TX 78215

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SAN ANTONIO’S PREMIER RIVERWALK APARTMENT COMMUNITY.

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JESS ELIZARRARAS

DINE

Singhs Vietnamese

2805 N. St. Mary’s St., facebook.com/singhsvietnamesetrailer Singhs is the story of Louis Singh’s mother, the Fall of Saigon, a family seprated by revolution and a Texas-born first generation American teaming up with a few friends to spread the flavors he grew up eating. Louis Singh was born in the ’80s, and he’s wanted to share his family recipes since he was 15. He teamed up with high-school friend Eric Treviño after dabbling in bands and sound-editing and catering, and Singhs was born. Don’t go expecting to find your favorite pho – you won’t find it at Singhs. But do go to find great, 10-hour braised brisket atop vermicelli noodles or bún, paired with fresh cucumbers and lightly pickled daikon and carrots to help cut through that unctuous meatiness. There’s also fried chili-oil ribs if you’re feeling particularly ravenous, and Saigon egg rolls, rolled by hand — at times by Mama Singh as she shares her story. They’re the most labor-intensive menu item, but worth the cost for its crisp and delicate casing. You’ll also enjoy Singh’s take on bánh mì, served on a buttery roll instead of a crusty baguette but just as good, with each protein somehow more tender than the next. Opening a brick-and-mortar location (they sold the original trailer) on a new side of town means favorites have shifted. Those now include noodles and goi, a shaved cabbage salad, nearly perfect with shrimp or chicken, dressed with a light drizzle of aioli. And then there’s the Mama’s jasmine rice, a fragrant number with turmeric, ginger and coconut topped with your choice of meat or seasonal veggies. It’s Singhs’ answer to arroz con pollo. It’s the result of Singh growing up in the heart of Texas, and sharing his Vietnamese mother’s recipes – and it’s a welcome addition to the St. Mary’s Strip fare.

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TOP SHELF SPIRITS, TEQUILA, IMPORTED BEER, WINE, CHAMPAGNE AND MORE! 5 1 9 S P R E SA | ( 2 1 0 ) 2 2 6 - O I N K | H O U R S 1 2 P M - 9 P M

always fresh. never frozen.

TEMPTING THE TASTE OF THOSE WILLING TO TRY.

HAPPY HOUR MONDAY-FRIDAY

MADPECKERBREWING.COM 6025 TEZEL RD #12 SAN ANTONIO, TX 78250 | 210.562.3059 | VISIT MAD PECKER BREWING COMPANY, LOCATED ON THE FAR WEST SIDE OF SAN ANTONIO, TX. FULL MENU & CRAFT BEER. 20

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JESS ELIZARRARAS

DINE

South BBQ & Kitchen

2011 Mission Road, (210) 437-0070, southbbqkitchen.com From our review: Green beans at a ‘Q joint, though they may taste just fine, are normally cooked to military mush in color and consistency. But South has presented a perky salad of crisp beans with halved cherry tomatoes, crumbled cotija and slivered almonds; it’s worthy of a white tablecloth establishment. The garlic butter roasted green onions also stray notably from the norm. Try them, too. The “loaded” tater tot casserole, seemingly tarted up with tiny bits of meat and other seasonings, comes across almost like orthodoxy — at least in comparison to the above. Here’s where I confess to an unnatural fondness for tater tots, and accordingly would like to see a few crunchier bits in this mashup. But otherwise, aces. Same goes for the deeply satisfying borracho beans; they are among the best in town. A scattering of sliced scallion is about the only unexpected component in the otherwise catholic South Texas potato salad; it’s mustardy, yet mild, and might serve as a perfect foil for some of the house’s pickled, roasted jalapeño with carrot. And it also serves as an appropriate introduction to the barbecue itself. There are no canonic deviations to be expected in South’s chapter-and-verse renditions. Starting, where one must, with brisket-by-the-quarter-pound (there are no combo plates), South’s Angus is sourced from Colorado, and it’s supremely tender. There’s not a lot of difference between the lean and the fatty, and some folks might prefer cuts with a little more tooth to ‘em. But there’s no faulting the simple salt-and-pepper prep, the just-smoky-enough flavor, and the classic bark-with-a-bite. sacurrent.com • W I N T E R

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HOURS 22

MON-SUN 4PM-2AM

LATE NIGHT MENU | DAILY HAPPY HOUR

LIVE MUSIC EVERY SATURDAY

210.369.9192 | FRANCISBOGSIDE.COM | 803 S ST. STREET | W I N T E R F L A V O R • sacurrent.com


GIANT NOISE

DINE

Southerleigh Oyster Bar 136 E. Grayson St., (210) 455-5701, southerleigh.com

While not a new restaurant by any means (Southerleigh first opened in 2014), the addition of the oyster bar this September makes this Pearl restaurant that much more enticing. Suddenly, you can enjoy the afternoon propped up on one of their comfy stools, reaching down to pet the Pearl pups that cruise on by. Designed by Clayton & Little, the 100-foot bar was a long time coming, and will make for fun afternoons as next spring comes around. Definitely try the house punch that grows boozier and brighter as the recipe is tinkered with by the staff, or explore the line up of Southerleigh brews made on site. Bubbles also work for an afternoon sip. Whatever you’re drinking, make sure to get a snack or two. There’s pressure fried wings and fried biscuits for 75 cents and $1, respectively. Or spring for platters of fresh seafood from oysters to caviar as a mid-market snack. It’s all our favorite things in one: people watching, tasty snacks and fabulous drinks. What are you waiting for?

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simple and honest food + drinks in the historic monte vista neighborhood. we’re the ideal spot for your next meal. book your next date night, special occasion, or private party today. inquire about our catering services for off-site events.

LEA THOMPSON

BOOKING HOLIDAY PARTIES NOW 24

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2512 N Main Ave, San Antonio, TX 78212 (210) 966-0404 | peripherysa.com |


JESS ELIZARRARAS

DINE

Tre Trattoria at the Museum 200 W. Jones Ave., (210) 805-0333, tretrattoria.com

From our review: The new space takes the Hops building and pushes its boundaries unlike the other pop-ups ever truly did. There’s certainly a lot more capital being funneled into Tre at the Museum — it looks like an actual restaurant. The interior now features a dining bar (or an Aperol spritz bar if you’re feeling sassy), and plenty of indoor seating which serves as refuge from the hot Texas summers. But once the sun sets, the patio also offers up a casual and bucolic option with views of the San Antonio Riverwalk Museum Reach and all its flora/fauna. It’s comfortable enough to luxuriate in and while away an afternoon over tapas with their Summer in Spain museum menu, or an Italian cheese and salumi board. On the eats side of things, Tre’s former menu is reflected, which means you can still score a variation on gnocchi and the golden beets aren’t going anywhere. During a lunchtime visit this week, we ordered the aforementioned Aperol Spritz, and ordered the tomato Caprese with fresh mozzarella and basil oil as well as the “deviled eggs” to start. The kitchen (yes, there’s a full blown kitchen) delivered with a sweet, slow-roasted tomato and plenty of basil and sent out a Tuscan farro salad with fresh mint, a fluffy topping of Parmigiano-Reggiano and walnut vinaigrette. The Parmigiano-Reggiano rained over the softboiled eggs topped with kewpie mayo (a Dady staple), fresh cracked pepper and white truffle oil. Decadent, fun, and extremely flavorful. The crispy-skin rainbow trout, topped with a zesty salsa verde, made its way to the museum and for good reason. The smoked gouda radiatore, which get their name because they resemble radiators (but also resemble cute, springy squat Koosh balls), featured all the the best ingredients (smoked gouda, white truffle, brown butter cauliflower, charred lemon and hazelnuts) in one comforting dish full of texture and depth of flavor.

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JAPANESE STYLE GASTROPUB

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hanzobar.com | MONDAY - SUNDAY: 4PM-2AM

HWA IP NP YT HE ORU RF SL UANVD OA YR •&sacurrent.com MONDAY All DAY | TUESDAY- FRIDAY: 4-7PM | REVERSE HAPPY HOUR EVERYDAY:11PM-2AM


JESS ELIZARRARAS

DINE

Villa Rica

403 Blue Star, (210) 635-0036, chefjohnnyhernandez.com From our review: Despite some missteps, what’s coming out of Villa Rica’s side of the kitchen shared with Burgerteca is an honest enough reflection of the cooking of both Mexican coasts to merit our attention, albeit at prices that don’t allow for taking random pot shots. But that’s what we’re here for. Try the ceviche Veracruzano. It’s not a fancy rendition, but it’s absolutely true, clean and fresh — a good introduction to the genre. Among Villa Rica’s small plates, you might well be tempted, as I was, by the fish minilla (hash) empanadas; they sound way better than they are. On two occasions, the masa packets came away as seeming both pasty and under-seasoned. The eager-to-please chef came by a second time, asking how everything was, so I told him. His response was to bring out a ramekin of crunchy/punchy chileajo salsa. Don’t waste his or your time — just ask for this automatically at the beginning of every meal. It does wonders for almost everything and is much more interesting than the table’s merely fiery habanero salsa. A jot of it wouldn’t have hurt even the appealingly inventive soft shell crab tacos with their guacamole and crisp serrano ham. Fish enchiladas rojas are the most substantial option among the small plates, and you should absolutely try them. Here, the spicing is just right, the fish holds up texturally, and the plate satisfies at every level, with crema and queso fresco adding welcome grace notes. Speaking of texture, it’s a quality that weighs heavily in any dish featuring octopus—and Villa Rica’s pulpo chielajo is no exception. Fortunately, it’s an exception in the positive direction. The formidable loop of cephalopod, its suckery apparatus all-too-apparent, would be daunting to most. But though the chileajo cloaking is a little one-note in this context, its heat does tame a beast whose texture offers some resistance but not resilience. The refried black beans on this plate came mixed with white rice in a kind of unfortunate mash-up of the Caribbean’s classic Moros y Cristianos. But then there were those fried plantains…

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Breathe I Nourish I Connect

606 W Cypress St 210.227.2683 thecove.us

1017 N. Flores 210-267-2652 5pointslocal.com

THANK YOU SAN ANTONIO

R E S TA U R A N T COFFEE SHOP YO G A S T U D I O

FOR 18 GREAT YEARS!

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EMBARK MARKETING

DINE

Ceviche Ceviche

KO D

18360 Blanco Road, Suite 120, (210) 538-5016, cevichecevichesatx.com.

EL TO N

sacurrent.com • W I N T E R

YM

The latest eatery by restaurateur Raul Correa (who also owns the Tiny Cantina at The Shops at La Cantera) features a menu curated by chef Ceasar Zepeda of Sangria on the Burg. The bright seafood spot opened this mid-October with DIY ceviche bowls in the city’s Stone Oak area with fresh fish delivered daily to create house ceviches, ceviche flights, poke ceviche and more. Freshness is key here, and it’s found across the board, from the just-chopped veggies and fruits and citrus used to cure each creation. The toppings are plentiful, and vegetarians won’t have to shy away from Ceviche Ceviche — tofu is available as a protein for all to enjoy. The freshness extends to the michelada bar where you can act like your own chef and/or mad scientist. It’s not quite Tulum, but it gets the job done and you don’t need a passport to visit.

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fresh from scratch V e g a n G l u t e n F r e e + T e x- M e x R e s ta u r a n t food trays to go for your holidays & special occasion including vegan tamales

VOTED BEST VEGAN FOOD VEGAN + GLUTEN FREE TEX-MEX RESTAURANT FRESH FROM SCRATCH

1422 nogalitos san antonio tx 78204 | 210-465-9233 | check our facebook page

MINGSTHING.COM | 5253 MCCULLOUGH (210) 564-9349 30

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LISTINGS

Zedric’s Sometimes you just want to leave the cooking to the pros. Let chef Zac Lutton and his staff-prepared meals (more than 80 at any given time) help you stick to your eating plan. Multiple locations, zedrics.com.

American & Barbecue 2M Smokehouse A national barbecue darling with chingos of ganas. With a nod from Texas Monthly and seriously line-up-at-8am-brisket, sausage and sides, the future looks bright for this Southeast side joint. 2731 S. W. W. White Road, (210) 885-9352, 2msmokehouse.com. Augie’s Barbed Wire Grill Slow-roasted, never rushed, Augie’s packs on the meat by the pound at this little smoke shack. Take a peek of their beer garden for some brews with your ‘cue. Multiple locations, augiesbs.com.

Restaurant Listings

DAN PAYTON

Bok Choy Green Vegetarian Cuisine With locations at The Pearl and Alon Market, folks have more ways to eat green. Entrées can instantly be made into a vegan dishes with the substitution of regular cheese to Daiya cheese for a buck more. Multiple locations, greensanantonio.com. La Botanica Helmed by chef Rebel Mariposa, this restaurant/community center feeds your strongest vegan cravings with can’t-believe-it’s-vegan menu board. 2911 N. St. Mary’s St., (210) 716-0702, vivalabotanica.com. Pharm Table Ayurveda diet or not, diners will find plenty to nosh on in this vegetable-forward oasis by chef Elizabeth Johnson. Expect bountiful salads, and worldly techniques. 106 Auditorium Circle, (210) 802-1860, pharmtable.com.

Alternative Diets Bok Choy The third joint from the minds behind Green brings Asian flavors to the Broadway corridor. From vegan ramen to pad thai to fried rice to fresh summer rolls — tofu — there’s a bit of the whole continent here. 5130 Broadway, (210) 437-2200, eatbokchoy.com. Earth Burger Try the original Earth Burger (veggie patty on a whole-wheat bun with lettuce, onions, pickles, tomatoes, mayo, mustard and secret sauce spread) or choose the tofu “fish” sandwich. Don’t skip the coconut soft serve. Multiple locations, eatatearthburger.com. Evergreen With vegan pizzas winning over diners, this Stone Oak shop is gaining popularity beyond its confines. 523 Med Ct., (210) 437-1057, evergreenclover.com.

Powerhouse Bakery Eating on plan doesn’t mean missing out on all of the goodies. The dietitian-led shop is 100 percent gluten free. 4902 Golden Quail, (210) 722-8464, powerhousebakery.com. Señor Veggie Southtown gets its share of greens from this joint that takes vegan fare from across the globe. Find hearty dishes like the Good Karma Bowl of quinoa, kale, tempeh, sautéed mushrooms and sprouts. 620 S. Presa St., (210) 228-0073, senorveggie.us. Sweet Yams The first restaurant to offer vegan options to the eastside — and oh how sweet it is. Chef Gus brings organic southern food and juices. 218 N. Cherry St., (210) 229-9267. Viva Vegeria Viva Vegeria is still making the hits. Go for the vegan nachos, mole poblano or the “chicken” flautas. 1422 Nogalitos St., (210) 465-9233, myvegeria.com.

B & B Smokehouse The Southside knows good ’cue. Since 1984, the juicy chicken, and sweet ribs have kept folks coming back for more inside their updated new location. 2627 Pleasanton Road, (210) 921-2745, bbsmokehouse.com. The Barbecue Station For more than 20 years, the crew has stood behind their promise for fresh, quality meats. Tender, succulent entrees dominate their menu as well as meats sold by the pound. 1610 NE Loop 410, (210) 824-9191, barbecuestation.com. Big Bob’s Burgers This place doesn’t hold back on its Spurs spirit, often known for its specialty burgers inspired by SA’s favorite players during the regular season. 447 Hildebrand Ave., bigbobsburgers.com. The Big Bib BBQ Located off Austin Highway, The Big Bib boasts the best brisket and baby back ribs in town. Their smoky, tangy sauce is irresistible, but don’t miss the amazing cobbler. 104 Lanark Drive, (210) 654-8400, thebigbib.com. Blanco BBQ Sandwiches and po’boys make the cut, so to speak, and most meats can be turned into a combo. Plus the space offers plenty of seating for groups of all sizes. 13259 Blanco Road, (210) 2512602, blancobbbq.com. Bolner’s Meat Market Great meats come from great butchers and the staff at this cafeteria-style butcher shop knows how to smoke some mean brisket. 2900 S. Flores St., (210) 533-5112, bolnersmeatmarket.com. Burger Boy This rotund little chef keeps those in the know happy with home-style burgers made to order, crinkle-cut fries and fresh milkshakes. Look for a new location in the coming months. Multiple locations, burgerboysa.com. Chatman’s Chicken Chicken done right is the main priority at this Southside joint. There are only two options for chicken, lemon-pepper and spicy, your fate lies in which flavor you pick. Load up on the sides with the creamy mac ‘n’ cheese or perhaps the corn fritters. 1747 S. W.W. White Road, (210) 359-0245. sacurrent.com • W I N T E R

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LISTINGS

Chris Madrid’s Another favorite (what can we say, San Anto loves burgers), Chris Madrid’s has made plenty of halfpound Macho-sized tostada burgers since its launch in 1977. Though a fire put them out of commission in 2017, the restaurant currently operates as a pop-up. 1900 Blanco Road, (210) 735-3552, chrismadrids.com. Conger’s Smoke Shack Chris Conger, barbecue connoisseur, turned a sleepy spot across the Witte into barbecue church that was recently featured on Diners, Drive-ins and Dives. 3714 Broadway, (210) 8298448, smokeshacksa.com. Fattboy Burgers & Dogs Autonomy to choose your destiny is nice. You can do just that at Fattboy with either your burger or dog, so go nuts. 2345 Vance Jackson Road, (210) 3773288, fattboyburgers.com. Fletcher’s Hamburgers No frills, just delicious burgers with fresh ingredients. The chicken sandwich is worth your time, as is any of their creamy milkshakes. 312 Pearl Pkwy., Building 6, Suite 6107. Hawx Burger Bar We can’t decide what’s more impressive — the overthe-top burgers like the Norteño with

grilled jalapeños and Oaxaca cheese, or the addictive Asiago truffle fries? There’s no need to decide. Multiple locations, hawxburgerbar.com.

cream. 9840 W. Loop 1604 N., (210) 688-2686, twosteprestaurant.com. The Well Bring a crowd to this 20,000-square-foot barbecue haven that also offers cocktails, a dance floor and yes, a dog park. 5539 UTSA Blvd., (210) 877-9099, thewellsanantonio.com.

Mr. & Mrs. G’s Home Cooking A classic meat-and-three sits in SA’s Southeast side. Go say hello! 2222 S. W.W. White Road, (210) 359-0002, facebook.com/mrmrsgs.

Wrigleyville Grill Hot dogs, the Chi-Town way. If the buns don’t have poppy seeds, you’re in the wrong spot. It’s not Chicago, but it’s as close as you’ll get without leaving the city. 602 NW Loop 410, Suite 146, (210) 369-9833, wrigleyvillegrill.com.

TJ’s Hamburgers The Southside’s crowning jewel in burger form. TJ’s is the spot for shakes and have-it-your-way burgers on the cheap for more than 40 years. Family-friendly and delicious, TJ’s Hamburgers has lasting power. 2323 W. Southcross Blvd., (210) 927-7331.

ASIAN

Two Bros. BBQ Market The outside patio makes a great outing for family dinners while the inside has the rustic charm of a farmhouse outside of the Texas Hill Country at this Dady brother-created joint. 12656 West Ave., (210) 496-0222, twobrosbbqmarket.com.

Chinese

Golden Wok Sometimes you want tiny pockets of deliciousness in your mouth. Enter Golden Wok’s extensive dim sum menu, which helped propel it as Best Chinese in several of our Best of San Antonio readers polls. Visit the Wurzbach location on Saturdays and Sundays from 11 a.m.-2:3o p.m. for a dim sum house feel. Multiple locations, goldenwoksa.com.

Two Step Restaurant & Cantina From the one-step burger to the “Texas-sized” two-step salad–everything on the menu is sure to put some pep in your step. Wash it all down with a frozen margarita and have yourself a serving of their whiskey custard

Kim Wah Chinese Barbecue Don’t be fooled by a long line of fan-drying ducks: You must order ahead. The duck is divine, wrapped in a puffy, dimsum-like bun. 7080 Bandera Road, (210) 520-2200, kimwah.com. Kungfu Noodle The noodles, available in both stretched and thick ribbons, are hand-pulled by a pair of Chinese transplants, hailing from the Anhui province. 6733 Bandera Road, (210) 451-5586. Lucky Noodle When compared to its predecessor off Bandera Road, Lucky Noodle features more than 1,500 square feet of seating and an open kitchen area (so you can watch the noodles being pulled and stretched. 8525 Blanco Road, (210) 267-9717.

SAN ANTONIO CURRENT FILE

Fujiya Japanese Garden

Sichuan Garden The OG Sichuan spot in SA is still going strong. Try the challenging sliced pig’s ear or duck tongues with jalapeño before retreating to the likes of the (also very good) stir-fried lamb with cumin. 2347 NW Military Hwy., (210) 525-8118, sichuansa.com. Sichuan House Sichuan House delivers regional favorites hailing from Sichuan, found in the southwest of China. Go for the handmade dumplings, smashed cucumber salad, tea-smoked duck, or eggplant. Remember to

BYOB. 3505 Wurzbach Road, Suite 102, (210) 509-9999, facebook.com/ sichuaneats. Tang Street This outpost serves unique northeastern Chinese fare, executed simply but exceptionally. Adventurous diners should look out for sauerkraut braised pork intestine and a cucumber needle mushroom dish. 16111 San Pedro Ave., (210) 490-1788, tangst.com.

Filipino

Lily’s Philippine Restaurant From whole-cooked fish to fragrant stews to chicken adobo to biko and cassava cake, Lily’s is your go-to for life on the island. 8210 Glider Ave., (210) 674-7007. My ChockDee Oriental Market Dive into fried pork belly, kare kare stew, longanisa or lumpia all found at this buffet. 115 E. Lindbergh Blvd., Universal City, (210) 566-2210. Sari-Sari Filipino Restaurant Likely one of the few spots in town to offer halo-halo, or Filipino shaved ice, Sari-Sari also offers an extensive list of soups, starters, entrees, all-day breakfast and baked goods. 5700 Wurzbach Road, (210) 647-7274, sari-sari-satx.com. Susie’s Lumpia House This buffetstyle restaurant in the city’s far west side offers freshness and a rotating list of dishes. 8923 Culebra Road, Suite 106, (210) 616-4354, facebook.com/ susieslumpiahouse.

Indian

Biryani Pot Find food from Hyderabad, a former princely state on India’s Southeast coast. Specialties include rice dishes, fish and goat curries. 9386 Huebner Road, Suite 109, (210) 561-8874, biriyanipotusa.com. India Oven Naan bread, vegetable pakoras, tandoori specialties, and a wide buffet have earned India Oven many longtime fans. 1031 Patricia St., (210) 366-1030, indiaoven.com. India Palace Buffet chafing dishes are changed regularly, and nothing seems really tired. Saag paneer and dal makhani are reliable staples. 8747 Fredericksburg Road, Suite 100, (210) 692-5262, indiapalacesa.com. Tarka Indian Kitchen This Austinbased franchise is making Indian fare fast casual with a list of curries, kabobs and biryanis that still pack some heat. 427 N. Loop 1604 W., (210) 499-0982, tarkaindiankitchen.com.

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LISTINGS

Taste of India This tiny hole-in-the-wall isn’t much to look at but the friendly service, pillowy naan available in several varieties and the vegetarian paneer beg a second, third or fourth visit. 5999 De Zavala, (210) 561-4409.

Japanese

Fujiya Japanese Garden Servers in traditional attire, a long list of sushi rolls to choose from, and a collection of Japanese bites have made this a favorite in the city since 1972. 9030 Wurzbach Road, (210) 615-7553, fujiyajapanesegarden.com. Godai Sushi Bar and Restaurant Fusion sushi with a Western flair is the vibe at Godai. Classic sushi rolls, sashimi and yakisoba are all on the menu. Always take a look at the specials board. 11203 West Ave., (210) 348-6781 godaisushi.com. Kai Japanese & Asian Cuisine Colorful plates with matching taste, this authentic Japanese restaurant serves affordable lunch specials and bento boxes. 2535 NW Loop 410, (210) 340-8888, kaisushisa.com.

Koi Kawa Japanese Restaurant A bright dining space near the San Antonio river is the setting for creative sushi, tasty sashimi and warm katsu don. Noteworthy menu items include the ice green tea and tempura ice cream. 4051 Broadway, (210) 805-8111.

Rock San Thai + Sushi Bar Rock San brings something different to the San Antonio sushi scene with “appethaizers,” Thai dishes and a very local USAA roll. 5238 DeZavala, Suite 124, (210) 561-0011, rocksanrestaurant.com.

Nama Ramen If you are extra hungry or with a group, like I was during this visit, the okonomiyaki fries are a crowd favorite. Topped with kewpie mayo, okonomiyaki sauce and bonito furikake, they’re truly a must-have. 6565 Babcock Road, (210) 641-2888, namaramen.com.

Sumo Steakhouse & Sushi Bar Dinner and a show is done well here with a variety of dinner options, house butchered beef, a pleasing sushi menu at reasonable prices and stellar cocktails. 8342 I-10 W., (210) 541-8100, sumosanantonio.com.

Niki’s Tokyo Inn Don’t let the outside fool you. Inside is masterful sushi, fresh and simple. Sit at the sushi bar and watch your sushi being delicately formed, Western-style or choose Japanese-style seating. 819 W. Hildebrand Ave., (210) 736-5471.

Sushihana Appetizers are as simple as edamame or as elegant as seared scallops, but sushi is the real standout here. Don’t forget to check out the sake list. 1810 NW Military Hwy., (210) 340-7808, sushihanasan.com. Tenko Ramen Quealy Watson flew the coop and opened up his own ramen shop inside the Bottling Department Food Hall. The karaage is an early hit, as is the chicken katsu atop a bowl of tonkotsu. Slurp! 312 Pearl Pkwy., Building 6, tenkoramen.com.

Osaka Japanese Steak & Sushi The bright red sign begs a visit to the Broadway or Bandera location. Warm kitchen dinners vary in flavor and price for any diner and sashimi is served fresh. Multiple locations, osakasteaknsushi.com.

Uni’ko Sushi Uni’Ko is a modern Japanese restaurant betraying Mexican influences and featuring elaborate rolls and presentation. 17803 La Cantera Terrace, Suite 1101, (210) 2396610, unikojapanesehouse.co. Yellowfish Sushi With three locations, SA has made it perfectly clear they love Japamex. Temaki rolls are tacos, and yes, you can enjoy a spicy sushirrito here. Multiple locations, yellowfishsushi.com. Yummi Sushi Nigiri, sashimi, and a list of special rolls like the Black Tiger, with shrimp tempura, cucumber, eel and spicy may keep diners happy. Multiple locations, yummisushisa.com.

Korean

Arirang Korean Restaurant Get ready to try some Korean snacks, or pan chan, at this spot — there’s at least 50 items on the bilingual menu and traditional soju, a rice-based distilled liquor, on offer. 2154 Austin Hwy,, (210) 650-3845, arirangkoreanrestaurant.net.

Nama Ramen

TAYLOR ALLEN

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Ilsong Garden This café introduced many San Antonians to Korean cuisine, and has been rewarded with the top spot in the Best Korean category of our annual Best of San Antonio readers poll for many years. 6905 Blanco Road, (210) 366-4508, ilsonggarden.com.

Kim’s Galbi Go interactive with Kiku Garden’s unique cook-it-yourself Korean BBQ experience. Start off with a platter of bulgogi and wang kalbi and let the good times roll. 4527 Goldfield, (210) 662-6699, kiku.com.

Thai

Bangkok 54 Try the soft-shell crab with basil, and very capable favorites like yum talay and Massaman curry. 2515 Nacogdoches Road, (210) 822-5454, bangkok54restaurant.com. Jasmin Thai Begin your meal with spring or summer rolls, then move on to Jasmin’s specialties: green papaya salad with dried shrimp and a bowl of noodle soup. 4065 Medical Drive, (210) 615-6622, jasminthai.org. Mon Thai Bistro and Sushi Mon Thai offers sushi and Thai cuisine, including spicy drunken noodles and signature dishes like Devil’s Chicken and Angel Shrimp (get it?), but don’t overlook the sushi. 4901 Broadway, (210) 822-3253, monsthai.com. Thai Esan The Pad King or the Pad Thai are safe bets, but don’t be afraid to try Thai classics. 9820 Huebner Road, Suite 109, (210) 877-0888. Thai Dee Always a contender of Best Thai in our Best of San Antonio readers poll, Thai Dee serves up what we once described as “ridiculously good, huge dishes at rock-bottom prices.” BYOB. 5307 Blanco Road, (210) 342-3622, thaideesa.com . Thai Chili Curries, fish and noodle dishes in over 30 authentic varieties make this Thai spot with locations off Thousand Oaks and Stone Oak, is the ultimate in healthy pan-Asian cooking. Try the Phad Prik Khing, or Tod Mun Pla. Multiple locations, thaichili.net Tong’s Thai Restaurant Tong’s Thai offers several vegetarian dishes, a critically acclaimed lemongrass curry, a large beer and wine selection, and a funky bubble tea room. 1146 Austin Hwy., (210) 829-7345, tongsthai.com. Yaya’s Thai Restaurant and Sushi Bar The Thai pantheon stands out by virtue of its Panang curry with New York strip, the veggie-packed pad woon sen and fresh, well-seasoned apps like the lemongrass-packed fish cakes and the crisp, carefully fried spring rolls. Multiple locations, yayasthai.com.

Vietnamese

4 Star Vietnamese and Chinese Known for their large portion sizes,

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LISTINGS

macarons are just some of the reasons to check out this Castle Hills staple. 8055 West, (210) 259-8359, cestlaviebakingco.com.

4 Star’s kitchen serves up heaping helpings of fragrant pho and lemon chicken. The restaurant isn’t afraid to cross borders, as evidenced by Chinese and Thai dishes—particularly their popular pad Thai option. Multiple locations, pho4star.com.

Chocollazo With a second location opening next year in Hemifair, Chocollazo is definitely a hit with San Antonians who love chocolate in all shapes and forms. 4013 Broadway, (210) 776-3963, chocollazo.com.

Berni Vietnamese Service is speedy, and servings are massive at this spotless Vietnamese joint off Wurzbach that ends your meal with a warm bowl of taro tapioca. 8742 Wurzbach Road, (210) 485-5982.

Kuma More is more at this dessert shop that fills bubbly Hong Kong waffles with ice cream, mocha, Pocky, toppings and yes, even buñuelos. 6565 Babcock Road, Suite 17, (210) 641-2888, facebook.com/kuma.satx.

French Sandwiches Tucked away in the same shopping center that houses India Palace is French Sandwiches with its hearty, leafy French Vietnamese sandwiches and excellent soups and salads. Don’t miss the grilled pork sandwich or the French onion soup. 8448 Fredericksburg Road, (210) 692-7019.

Pho Cong Ly Adventurers who dare rub lips with a little “soft tendon” in their bath of noodle soup (found under “fortifying combos” on the menu) will be rewarded with a tongue tingle worth remembering. 300 W. Bitters Road, (210) 499-5572. Pho Ha Long It seems that Pho Ha Long’s found a secret formula for keeping Alamo City slurpers happy. We’re particularly partial to the No. 10 with round eye steak, lean flank and chewy tendon. 6424 NW Loop 410, (210) 521-4507, phohalong. webs.com. Pho Kim Long Get the giggles out of the way before you head to Pho Kim Long. The joint carries pho favorites in massive bowls, vermicelli bun and Vietnamese sandwiches on soft bollilos. 4230 McCullough Ave., (210) 829-8021. Viet Nam Restaurant Albeit a name change in recent years, Viet Nam went back to the original moniker and continues to offer clay pots and banh xeo for the purist, and decadent spring rolls and richly accessorized pho for mainstream Asian dabblers. 3244 Broadway, (210) 822-7461. Suck It The Restaurant Vietnamese, Japanese, Chinese, and a dash of puro San Anto make up this Medi-

JESS ELIZARRARAS

Heavenly Pho Big appetites should go for the No. 1 with beef noodle soup with eye round steak, brisket, rare flank, tendon, tripe and meatball. Settle in for a bit of cloud 9. 19178 Blanco Road, Suite 305, (210) 5453553, heavenlypho.com.

Lily’s Cookies Cookies with Chihuahuas, mermaids, dinosaurs–you name it, Lily’s can make it. Since 2002, Lily’s Cookies has been baking SA sweetness in all forms. 2716 McCullough Ave., (210) 832-0886, lilyscookies.com.

Bubble Waffle Bar cal Center eatery that wows guests with fusion plates and over-the-top. 7220 Louis Pasteur Drive, Suite 125, (210) 560-2113, facebook.com/ suckittherestaurant. Viva Pho Vietnamese Cuisine and Teabo Lounge In the way of pho, Viva presents 10 variations of the much-loved comfort food. Hearty portions of the civilly priced soups come with filet mignon, brisket, tendon, tripe, meatballs, flank steak, or eye round, plus a few combinations of these. 2114 NW Military Hwy., (210) 5258388, vivapho.com.

Bakeries/Desserts The Art of Donut Miguel Aja and Andrea Aguirre opened their quaint shop off St. Mary’s St. with over-thetop doughnuts and coffee-based drinks. 3428 N. St. Mary’s St., artofdonut.com. Bakery Lorraine Chefs Anne Ng and Jeremy Mandrell expanded their empire with a flagship location at the Pearl, the Medical Center and The Rim. Known for their homemade French macarons, fruit tarts, and croissants, Bakery Lorraine serves goodness with fresh ingredients and style. Multiple locations, bakerylorraine.com. Bird Bakery San Anto celebrity Elizabeth Chambers continues to

bring decadent sweets to her bakery that combines rustic flair with small town charm. 5912 Broadway, (210) 804-2473, birdbakery.com. Brindles Awesome Ice Creams Five words: waffle taco ice cream sundae. Load it up with any of the house-made flavors for a delectable treat. 12255 Huebner Road, (210) 641-5222. Broadway Daily Bread One whiff of this bakery and you’re hooked. Stop in for full-size and mini loaves, scones, muffins and more in this Alamo Heights fave. 5001 Broadway, (210) 822-1621, broadwaydailybread.net. Bubble Waffle Bar Hong Kong waffles have taken SA by storm, and at BWB, the combinations dip into savory territory. Order the fried chicken and waffles or waffle sandwiches stuffed with deli meats for yourself. 7755 Eckhert Road, (210) 425-9813, facebook.com/bubblewafflebar. Brews Lee Tea Freshly brewed teas and tapioca are just part of the charm behind this bubble tea shop that’s perfect for a mid-afternoon pick-meup, chill hang with friends or laidback date. 4009 Broadway, (210) 5980068, brewsleetea.com. C’est La Vie Bakery Flaky croissants, spicy kolaches, and chocolaty

Paleteria San Antonio Hemisfair’s Yanaguana Garden needed a little sweetness. The first shop to open in the area features 50-plus varieties of fruit and dairy-filled paletas. 510 S. Alamo St., Suite 104, (210) 9546753, paleteriasanantonio.com. SA Pops It doesn’t stop at homemade popsicles here. Chef Andrew Gutierrez cranks out gelato, soft serve and other tasty creations in innovative flavors like prickly pear lemonade, cucumber, peach and corn. 3420 N. St. Mary’s St., (210) 736-2526. Snopioca Taiwanese shaved ice hit SA last spring and it brought some friends. Stop in for several varieties of snow, bubble tea and smoothies. 6423 Babcock Road, Suite 104, (210) 455-8638, snopioca.com. Steel City Pops San Anto knows paletas, but this Birmingham-transplant is winning over fans with its chocolatedipped, caramel-drizzled offerings. 812 S. Alamo St., (210) 963-6540, steelcitypops.com.

CONTEMPORARY 20 Nine Restaurant & Wine Bar Dimly lit, and filled with just about all the wine your heart desires, this Alamo Quarry Market restaurant is a refuge from chains. 255 E. Basse Road, Suite 940, (210) 798-9463, 20ninewine.com Biga on the Banks Bruce Auden’s menu includes such Southwest-Continental dishes as chicken-fried oysters with squid-ink linguini and pancetta,

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LISTINGS

Bite Bite’s interior, with its horseshoeshaped marble counter, glossy orange accent wall, and aubergine swivel chairs, has a retro-modern look that’s only reinforced by Astorga-Watel’s husband Damien’s riffs on pop-art paintings. 1012 S. Presa St., (210) 532-2551, biterestaurantsa.com. Bliss Chef Mark Bliss (see what they did there?) opened his namesake dining room with evident attention to detail. From the elaborate charcuterie boards to the iconic chicken fried oysters and expert service, Bliss is is one of Southtown’s dining jewels. 926 S. Presa St., (210) 225-2547, foodisbliss.com. Boiler House Texas Grill & Wine Garden A true Texas original, the menu includes small plates, individual main dishes and numerous items designed for sharing – all perfectly complemented by the extensive list of wines from around the world. 312 Pearl Pkwy., Building 3, (210) 3544644, boilerhousesa.com. Bourbon Street Seafood Kitchen Creole and Cajun flavors meet a boozy happy hour filled with Bellinis and martinis. The Redland location is the most picturesque, but you can’t beat the appeal of the Riverwalk adjacent spot. Multiple locations, bourbonstreetseafoodkitchens.com. Cappycino’s/Cappy’s Both staples of Alamo Heights, both for a good reason. Though a fire threatened to shut down the beloved eateries a few years back, the staff used it as a reason to rebuild their kitchen. Cappycino’s packs in solid lunch options, and the adjacent Cappy’s lets you indulge in fine dining the SA-way with chicken and duck liver pâté, rack of lamb and PEI mussels. 5011 Broadway, (210) 828-9669, cappysrestaurant.com. The Cookhouse Chef Pieter Sypesteyn keeps Tobin Hill happy with this Nawlins-inspired kitchen. From po’boys at lunch filled with blackened catfish and barbecue shrimp to dinner with pan-roasted trout, smoked duck breast and a redfish on the half shell, Cookhouse has wow diners since 2014. 720 E. Mistletoe Ave., (210) 320-8211, cookhouserestaurant.com. Cured Since 2013, Cured has helped cement the Pearl as a dining destination. The charcuterie is made

in-house, produce is sourced from local farms and Cured’s dinner service means chef Steve McHugh and his staff can really stretch their legs with a collection of plates that earned them a James Beard nomination. 306 Pearl Pkwy., Suite 101, (210) 314-3929, curedatpearl.com. Feast A contemporary gem on the Southtown corridor, the Feast here is for all of the senses. The modern and glamorous décor sets the scene for cocktails and a fun twist on familiar classics, like lettuce-wrapped barbacoa, sought-after macaroni and cheese and goat cheese-stuffed grape leaves. 1024 S. Alamo St., (210) 354-1024, feastsa.com. The Granary ’Cue & Brew Sure, we could have listed this restaurant under barbecue, but that would be selling it short. With quality Texas ’cue served up for lunch and gastronomy-influenced dishes for dinner such as the 44 Farms beef clod with coffee quinoa crunch or grilled veal breast and crispy sweetbreads, The Granary is more dress up than down. 602 Avenue A, (210) 228-0124, thegranarysa.com. Grayze on Grayson Grayze keeps surprising us with new flavors and a solid list of vegetable-forward items. Don’t miss this patio come happy hour. 521 E. Grayson St., (210) 481-8776, grayzeongrayson.com. Liberty Bar The tilted building is but a faint memory. This salmon-tinged Southtown eatery is rich in history and locally sourced menu items, from the hefty bread and creative appetizers to the lightly charred quail in piquant green mole and Virginia Green’s chocolate cake. Stop by on Monday’s for half-off bottles of wine. 1111 S. Alamo St., (210) 227-1187, liberty-bar.com. Max’s Wine Dive MWD is keeping things fresh within its American comfort food-centered menu. Get there early for brunch when the chicken and waffles (and bubbles) are flowing. 340 E. Basse Road, Suite 101, (210) 4449547, maxswinedive.com. Mixtli Opened in 2013, Mixtli (or Nahuatl for cloud) ups the ante on multicourse dinners. Led by James Beard semifinalists Diego Galicia and Rico Torres, this progressive restaurant shares beautiful dishes, all telling the story of Mexico one region at a time, for 12 guests at a time, inside a renovated train boxcar. 5251 McCullough Ave., (210) 338-0746, restaurantmixtli.com.

@S.A.VORTOOTH

and grilled Texas quail, all of which can be paired to appropriate wines by the glass from Biga’s ample list. 203 S. St. Mary’s St., (210) 225-0722, biga.com.

Signature Periphery Led by Jason Dady alum, Mark Weaver, Periphery packs big, bold flavors and fun techniques into a casual neighborhood eatery that keeps Monte Vista dwellers more than happy. 2512 N. Main Ave., (210) 966-0404, peripherysa.com. Rebelle Before Battalion, there was Rebelle. The restaurant focused on French techniques and flavors established by Feast inside a hotel setting. The seafood fare is an all-time favorite. Don’ t miss their take on char-grilled Spanish octopus. 300 E. Travis St., (210) 352-3171, rebellesa.com. Restaurant Gwendolyn Old is new again. SA’s pristine locavore has added a la carte options to their prix-fixe offerings making it that much more accessible for diners to check

out this award-winning fare. 152 E. Pecan, Suite 100, (210) 222-1849, restaurantswendolyn.com. Silo Elevated Cuisine An elegant update on shrimp and grits and signature chicken-fried oysters are among the favored dishes at this restaurant and bar. The Dominion area is home to the latest iteration, Silo Terrace Oyster Bar and it’s as delicious as it sounds. Multiple locations, siloelevatedcuisine.com. Signature Start with the five-piece house-made charcuterie selection. Presented on an antique wooden paddle, it’s a marvel of composition and a textbook example of varying tastes and textures from salty to sweet and plush to rustic. 16401 La Cantera Pkwy., (210) 247-0176, destinationhotels.com.

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Supper Hotel Emma’s resident restaurant is led by chef John Brand. The Midwesterner is packing in new American flavors from breakfast through dinner. A visit requires a taste of the cinnamon toast waffle topped with goat cheese, or a bite of the English muffin French toast. Lunch means vegetable-forward plates and sandwiches, while dinner continues that trend in resplendent fashion. 136 E. Grayson St., (210) 448-8351, supperatemma.com.

Chicago Bagel and Deli Chicago Bagel and Deli takes pride in its product with fresh, never-frozen bagels that are made on site. Hot and cold sandwiches are paired with your choice of chip, potato salad, cole slaw or pasta salad. 10918 Wurzbach Road, (210) 691-2245, chicagobagelanddeli.com. DeWese’s Tip Top Café Stepping into this petite café will have you feeling like you’ve gone back to the times of poodle skirts and big hair. The fried chicken platter is as big as the Lone Star State. 2814 Fredericksburg Road, (210) 732-0191, tiptopcafe.com. Dignowity Meats The sandwiches are meaty and the options keep expanding at this mostly outdoor East Side joint. Try the pastrami, smoked bologna or The Pop, with smoked turkey, provolone, greens and a spicy habanero aioli and get there soon — Dignowity Meats was one of Guy Fieri’s stops during his last San Antonio visit. 1701 E. Houston St., (210) 598-8049, dignowitymeats.com

LIZZY FLOWERS

DELI & DINERS

smothered roasted pork, tacos al pastor, pollo asado and the El Bandito Burger. 21 Spurs, (210)5410447, herbnpickle.com. Jim’s Restaurants A San Antonio staple since 1947, this diner if your go-to for late night fare to fuel a night out or study session. Multiple locations, jimsrestaurants.com. Lulu’s Bakery & Café Big-as-yourface cinnamon buns, plate-sized chicken fried steak and more at this traditional greasy spoon spot. 918 N. Main Ave., (210) 222-9422, lulusbakeryandcafe.com.

Earl Abel’s Since 1933, Earl’s has satisfied the appetites of SA locals with its vast menu of burgers, sandwiches, chicken and dumplings, fried chicken, steaks and more. Grab a slice of Chocolate Ice Box Pie or bread pudding — we won’t tell. 1639 Broadway, (210) 822-3358, earlabelssa.com.

Magnolia Pancake Haus Breakfast lovers can feast on a variety of pancake flavors, waffles, fresh eggs, perfectly browned hash and Canadian bacon. The joint is known to be one of Guy Fieri’s favorites and that guy knows a thing or two about food. Multiple locations, magnoliapancakehaus.com.

Hearthstone Bakery Café Panini, sandwiches, soups and salads make up the menu at this family-owned café. Cozy up to a warm coffee and enjoy their free wifi or stop by for a quick eat, Hearthstone will do all the work while you play. Multiple locations, hearthstonebakerycafe.com.

Mary Ann’s Pig Stand A staple in Texas since the 1920s, Mary Ann’s Pig Stand has stood the test of time. This vintage diner is full of kitsch and worth a visit for their pies alone. 1508 Broadway, (210) 222-9923.

Herb & Pickle Don’t be fooled by its simple name, Herb & Pickle’s menu is far from so. Specials have included

Max & Louie’s New York Diner You don’t have to travel to the Big Apple to get that same big city diner feel. The new expanded dining

Dignowity Meats room means more room for all to enjoy matzo ball soup, bagel and lox and overstuffed New York deli-style sandwiches. 226 W. Bitters Road, (210) 483-7600, maxandlouiesdiner.com. Panchos & Gringos Deli The Eastside joint is home to stick-to-your-gut American breakfast classics, but come lunchtime, you’ll want to order any of their loaded sandwiches. 900 Nolan St., (210) 227-6700. Schilo’s This delicatessen is the real deal. House-made sausages are great, but don’t miss the split pea soup and pumpernickel bread. 424 E. Commerce St., (210) 223-6692, schilos.com. The Station Café Fresh homemade buns; Chocolate chip cookies as big as your face; pizza? What more could you ask more? For a scrumptious sandwich try the pesto turkey while brave souls should aim for the turkey Chupacabra with its spicy Serrano sauce. 701 S. St. Mary’s St., (210) 444-2200, thestationsa.com. W.D. Deli At W.D. Deli it’s all about serving love in a bun. Go for the roast beef, but stay for the spinach chicken salad and don’t forget to grab a cookie. W.D. Deli’s 11 different cookie choices or the raspberry pecan bars also make great additions to your meal. 3123 Broadway, (210) 828-2322, wddeli.com.

Zito’s Deli Sometimes you just need a great sandwich. Let the staff at Zito’s — established in 1974 — take care of your with one of their massive Serious Sandwiches. Filled with salami, two types of ham, provolone, cheddar, black olives, LTO and on fluffy homemade Italian flatbread, this sando means business. Multiple locations, zitosdeli.net.

FOOD TRUCKS Cullum’s Attaboy Not only are the burgers at Attaboy juicy, but they have character. Defined by their big homemade buns and selection of toppings, each is unlike anything you’ve had before. Grab and burger and let it all sink in with a classic Big Red. Very mobile, attaboyburgers.com. Palm Frites This food truck proves that fries are more than just a side. In fact, they’re the main attraction at Palm Frites, where hand-cut fries are served up with an assortment of toppings, from chili and cheese to tomato and jalapeño. (210) 7482335, facebook.com/palmfritessa. La Maceta Tapatios These rolled taquitos are NOT flautas, but they are plenty delicious. Get your fix of tacos Tapatios and fresh Mexican street food like corn in a cup and tortas at this truck. Various locations, (210) 4193845, facebook.com/lamaceta.52.

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S o G N

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LISTINGS

SAbores Treat yourself to a twist on Mexican cuisine, like the Carne Guisada Fries or a classic eloté. 2710 N. St. Mary’s St., (210) 415-6951. Chela’s Taco Truck Delicious, vibrant, classic tacos. What more is there to say? Various locations, (210) 535-7340, chelas-tacos.com. Berbere Ethiopian Cuisine Legit Ethiopian cuisine on wheels, with vegetarian options available made its way to SA. (210) 310-9264, berbereethiopian.com. The Frosty Frog Cool off with a fresh mangonada or your choice of ice cream at this northwest side truck. 11619 Bandera Road, (210) 8355978, facebook.com/thefrostyfrog.ceo. The Box Street Social Great pulled pork and legit burgers can be found at this popular truck manned by chef Edward Garcia III. Various locations, (210) 920-1602, theboxstreetsocial.com. WingIt Try various flavors of wings at this wing-centric food truck. Various locations, (210) 900-3097, orderwingit.com.

Global Latin American

Azuca Nuevo Latino After relocating two spaces over to its new digs, Azuca is still packing in crowds looking for a refreshing mojito, tostones with mojo and a dance floor to merengue the night away. 709 S. Alamo St., (210) 225-5550, azuca.net.

8523 Blanco Road, (210) 896-4719, brasachickentx.com. Cocina El Jibarazo Latin Cuisine It’s a trek, sure, but don’t skip the sandwiches from this beloved spot. Plates all come bearing yellow rice, salad, plantains and your choice of pernil, pollo a la plancha or chuletas. 1790 Austin Hwy., (210) 204-5908, cocinaeljibarazo.com. Ceviche de Waldito Chef’s been slanging buffet-style Peruvian fare since 2010. Stop in for an inexpensive lunch of roasted chicken and tamales served by Waldito himself. 5526 Evers Road, (210) 681-8100. Chilito’s Express Housed inside the tiniest of shops, Chilito’s adds tamales plates, loaded quesadillas, street tacos, and tortas served with your choice of chicken fajita, Peruvian roasted pork, brisket or arrachera skirt steak. 8802 Huebner Road, (210) 468-2400, chilitosexpress.com. Fonda Latina Fonda Latina successfully captures the flavors of authentic Colombian cuisine, serving traditional dishes like bistek a caballo — steak with a fried egg on top — banana-leafwrapped tamales, and arepas con pollo and aji. 6714 San Pedro Ave., (210) 824-2544. Luna Rosa Puerto Rican Grill The understated locale focuses on its cuisine, combining Spanish tapas

and Puerto Rican favorites. Start the night with a helping of patatas bravas, smothered in red spicy sauce and garlicky mayoketchup, the Luna Rosa house sauce and follow it with paella. 2603 SE Military Drive, Suite 107, (210) 314-3111 lunarosatapas.com.

achiote-roasted pork shoulder, griddled ham, Swiss cheese, pickles and Dijon mustard, and savory papas bravas. Hotel Havana, 1015 Navarro St., (210) 222-2008, havanasanantonio.com.

Jamaica Jamaica All entrees come with a generous serving of rice and peas, steamed cabbage, and plantains. The roast pork, several gray slabs doused in a thick mahogany sheet, pull apart as delicately as spiderwebs, and work with the rice and peas to create a balanced, dense-asbone kind of bite. 2026 Austin Hwy., (210) 590-0515, facebook.com/ jamaicajamaicacuisine1.

Demo’s Greek Food With locations off Blanco, the Vineyard and St. Mary’s, this 19-year-old, local fast-casual chain isn’t going anywhere anytime soon. Go for the tender beef souvlaki, but stay for the charming décor and belly dancing. Multiple locations, demosgreekfood.com.

La Marginal The rice with pinto beans here is savory and on point in terms of flavor thanks to a decent sofrito with olives and ham. The buffet offering is affordable and workable, as long as you stick with the tender roast pork, pernil, and salty, sweet plantains. 2447 Nacogdoches Road, (210) 804-2242, lamarginal.com. NAO NAO restaurant is dedicated to the exploration, preservation and celebration of the authentic cuisines, cultures, and bounty of Latin America. 312 Pearl Pkwy., Suite 2104, (210) 554-6484, ciarestaurants.com. Ocho Pair your Hemingway Daiquiri with aspirational lunch and dinner fare, including the Havana Cubano torta with

Greek

John the Greek The flavors of Athens, which have been served in this Greek home-style eatery since 1988, make John The Greek so compelling. Avgolemono soup, gyros, souvlaki and mousaka. 16602 San Pedro Ave., (210) 403-0565, johnthegreek.com. Mina and Dimi’s Greek House Although the pita is perfectly soft and savory, the flavorful gyro can stand on its own, perhaps accompanied by flaky spanakopita or a tangy Greek salad. Sweeten the deal with homemade flaky baklava. Opa! 7159 Hwy. 90 W., (210) 674-3464, agreekhouse.com. Papouli’s Greek Grill The SA-based chain has four locations throughout the city, each dishing up traditional and contemporary cuisine made with fresh ingredients. Multiple locations, papoulis.com.

Beto’s Alt-Mex Known for it’s empanadas and epicurean fare, Beto’s features a veggie taco that comes stuffed with well-seasoned squash and caramelized onions. It’s almost as good as the savory potato-andspinach empanada. 8142 Broadway, (210) 930-9393, betosinfo.com.

Brasa Chicken Peruvian Rotisserie With hearty sandwiches, and loaded entrees such as arroz chaufa de carne or especial, Peruvian-roasted birds could replace your H-E-B runs soon.

JESS ELIZARRARAS

Botika Nikkei and chifa cuisines were introduced to San Antonio inside this posh Pearl spot helmed by chef Geronimo Lopez. Lomo saltado, empanadas, ceviches and tiraditos all share a space on the menu, but make sure to save room for a few sips of sake. 303 Pearl Pkwy., Suite 111, (210) 670-7684.

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LISTINGS

sides, and plain delicious desserts. Did we mention the extensive list of cocktails and quaint Monte Vista setting make this the perfect spot for late night ‘za? 2720 McCullough Ave., (210) 320-2261, barbarosanantonio.com. Capparelli’s on Main Smack dab in the center of Monte Vista, this charming neighborhood nook serves up traditional Italian fare with hearty pizzas and an unbeatable house salad. 2524 N. Main Ave., (210) 735-5757, capparellisonmain.com. Fratello’s Deli With two locations (Broadway and Plaza de Armas), Fratello’s is keeping bellies full and happy with fresh red-sauce fare, valuedriven sandwiches like the Napoli stuffed with copocolla and ham, and house-made desserts. Multiple locations, fratellosdeli.com. JESS ELIZARRARAS

Dough

Hawaiian

Ali’i Cove The owners of Big Aloha Food Truck ditched their wheels for a brick-and-mortar outpost in Universal City that opened this past November. Stop in for their legendary Spam musubi, classic Hawaii dishes and ramen. 1210 Pat Booker Road, (210) 412-8101. The Aloha Kitchen The Aloha Kitchen does Hawaiian best when sticking to the basics – and basic does not mean simple. Lau lau and loco moco are attention grabbers. 1151 Harry Wurzbach, (210) 826-7426.

Mediterranean

Azro Moroccan & Mediterranean Bistro Azro engineer-turned-chef Khalid Said whips up Moroccan faves such as the vibrant and warm harira soup, a beautiful tabouli and seafood bastilla made of baked layers of thin pastry filled with salmon and shrimp inside this Castle Hills nook. 2211 NW Military, Suite 131, (210) 3420011, azro-bistro.com. Jerusalem Grill Long skewers of lamb and chicken beckon, but try the Syrian-style kibbeh instead, with sides of both hummus and baba ghanoush. Multiple locations, jerusalemgrill.net. Mediterranean Turkish Grill Dolmas, hummus and fresh bread are signatures of this authentic Mediter-

ranean grill. 8507 McCullough, Suite B13, (210) 399-1645, kmturkishgrill.com. Moroccan Bites Tucked away in a shopping center off Evers, Moroccan Bites is all about family and fresh ingredients. Skip the soups and go straight for the chicken or lamb tagine. 5714 Evers Road, (210) 706-9700, moroccanbitescuisine.com. Pasha Mediterranean Grill It’s hard not to fill up on the hot, fresh flatbread and zaatar spice mix, but you have to save room for Pasha’s delicious Mid-east fare. Standouts include the tender kabobs and the saffron-marinated Cornish hens. Multiple locations, gopasha.com. Shisha’s Café A hotspot for hookah-loving college students, Shisha has plenty to offer. Try the garlicky hummus, the giant falafel or the perfectly seasoned chicken shawarma sandwich wrapped in warm pita bread and filled with garlic sauce, pickles, lettuce and tomatoes. 5500 Babcock Road, Suite 101, (210) 694-4800. Turquoise Grill Open for lunch and dinner, Turquoise Grille is a welcome setting for a variety of Turkish foods– including excellent Doner kebab, mixed grill, chicken tava, baklava, rice pudding — with affordable prices. 3720 NW Loop 410, (210) 736-2887, turquoisegrill.com.

Pakistani

Kohinoor Restaurant & Grill The spices and service are warm and intoxicating at this family-run restaurant that uses 100 percent Zabiha Halal meat. Although the menu is a list of possibilities, take a chance on the special of the day. 9425 Fredericksburg Road, (210) 314-8692, kohinoorsa.com.

Spanish

Carmens de La Calle After relocating to the Milam Building, relaunched its global menu with paella, ceviche, empanadas and more. 320 N. Flores St., (210) 281-4349, carmensdelacalle.com. Toro Kitchen + Bar If you’re in the mood for paella, there’s two Toros to visit these days. The Stone Oak location now has a downtown sibling at St. Paul Square where the wine keeps flowing as do the tapas. Multiple locations, torokitchenandbar.com.

ITALIAN Aldino Cucina Italiana The original “kids on the block” at the popular intersection of 1604 and Blanco, this premiere Italian restaurant, offers Tuscan tastes reminiscent of the countryside of northern Italy. 1203 N. Loop 1604 W., (210) 340-0000. Barbaro Barbaro is staying consistent with playful pies, technique-driven

Julian’s Italian Pizzeria Recent visits meant digging into the balanced lasagna, fluffy gnocchi and delicious Caesar salads. An awesome addition to Alamo Heights, this locally owned one-stop-shop for Italian has two locations. Multiple locations, julianspizzeria.com. Luciano’s From full restaurants at area malls to casual neighborhood pizzerias, Luciano’s scores points for giant pizzas at ridiculously cheap prices. Multiple locations, facebook. com/lucianorestaurantssa. Luce Ristorante e Enoteca Authentic Italian cuisine and wine is the passion of Neapolitan owner and chef Joe Buonincontri, who brings family recipes and tastes from his travels to Italy back to his winecentric restaurant. 11255 Huebner Road, (210) 561-9700, lucesanantonio.com. Nosh With cheesy pastas, delicately topped flatbread pizzas, and cheeseboards, Silo’s sister (and adjacent) eatery can hold its own. Don’t forget about the awesome selection of craft beers. 1133 Austin Hwy., (210) 824-8686. Paesanos Joe Cosniac’s original Lincoln Heights heir serves the signature breaded, garlicky Shrimp Paesano, a meaty eggplant parmigiana, and if the devotees are to be believed, one of the best steaks in town. Multiple locations, paesanos.com. Tre Trattoria Jason Dady reimagined the old Tre and gave us rustic chic with plentiful Italian relocated to the San Antonio Museum of Art. Favorites

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remained true with authentic salumi, gnocchi and cast-iron griddled pizzas. 200 W. Jones St., Suite 501, (210) 805-0333, tretrattoria.com. Tribeca 212 It’s all about service and good ingredients at Tribeca 212, which serves burgers, pizza, pasta, steak, drinks and more. 4331 McCullough Ave., (210) 320-0698, tribeca212.com.

Pizza

Big Lou’s Pizza You’re not a true San Antonian unless you take seven of your closest friends to Big Lou’s and try to take down their 42-inch pies. 2048 S. W.W. White Road, (210) 337-0707, biglouspizza-satx.com. Capo’s Pizza Get your pizza fix prepared by one of San Antonio’s longtime pizza markers Rick Perno. 8522 Broadway, Suite 105, (210) 362-1901, capospizzasa.com. Deco Pizzeria Savory meatballs, wings and weekend lunch (and brunch!) specials expand the options just across the way from the Woodlawn Theater and now the Medical Center. Multiple locations, decopizza.com. Florio’s Pizza Italy? Fuhgeddaboudit — this is the real stuff, from New Jersey since 1980. The foldable pizza spread to Helotes in 2017 with a new location off Bandera. 7701 Broadway, (210) 805-8646. Il Forno Chef Michael Sohocki’s turn at Neapolitan-style pies is a hit with South Flores residents. The shop has a handmade pizza oven, a sprawling garden filled with fresh veggies for the kitchen to use and seasonal specials galore. 122 Nogalitos St., (210) 6162198, ilfornosa.com.

Rome’s Pizza Founded in 1986, now with several locations, Rome’s cozy atmosphere and gourmet Italian cuisine have satisfied two generations. Multiple locations. romespizza.com. Sorrento Ristorante e Pizzeria Since 2001, the Ciccone family has prepared tasty pizza, seafood and pasta out of their Alamo Heights Kitchen. 5146 Broadway, (210) 8240055, sorrentopizzeria.com. Stella Public House Farm-to-table pies, a stellar ingredient-driven brunch and a great location at Blue Star make Stella a must for farm fans who a hearty pizza. Stop in for happy hour beer flights! 1414 S. Alamo St., (210) 2777047, stellapublichouse.com. Tiu Steppi’s Osteria Loop 1604 has two great options for Italian fare. Locally owned by the family behind Two Step, these Italian outposts deliver great pizzas, pastas and delectable desserts. Multiple locations, tiusteppis.com.

MEXICAN/TEX-MEX Ácenar Rosario’s owner Lisa Wong paired vivid décor and haute Tex-Mex paired with romantic riverside seating and the bar’s dance floor sizzles on weekends. 146 E. Houston St., (210) 222-2362, acenar.com. Alamo Café The addition of Patio 81 to the San Pedro location means you can enjoy vats of queso and wash it down in a cool bar setting. Multiple locations, alamocafe.com.

Aldaco’s Mexican Cuisine Blanca Aldaco took her zesty restaurant north to convert the Loopland masses with crema al cilantro and signature avocado margaritas. 20079 Stone Oak Pkwy., (210) 494-0561, aldacosrestaurants.com.

less you’ve enjoyed a brisket and guacamole taco from Garcia’s. Helmed by the Garcia family since 1962, this tiny nook on Fredericksburg is a piece of heaven in a plump tortilla. 842 Fredericksburg Road, (210) 735-4525.

Blanco Café This anchor of the homegrown chain serves massive Tex-Mex portions to happy weekend crowds. The just-right-greasy enchiladas are a fave of Current readers. Multiple locations, blancocafe.net.

Guajillo’s Billed as “SA’s only Mexico City kitchen,” the entrees here are healthier and less Tex than Mex by any standards. Try the calabaza con mole verde, a sauce made with pumpkin seeds, cilantro and Serrano peppers. 1001 NW Loop 410, (210) 3444119, guajillos.com.

Cascabel Mexican Patio The tiny South St. Mary’s spot offers an intriguing alternative to taqueria fare, with recipes from southern. 1000 S. St. Mary’s St., (210) 212-6456. Chacho’s The Monster Kong Nachos are loaded with four different types of meat: chicken and beef fajitas, shredded chicken and picadillo. Don’t say we didn’t warn you. Multiple locations, chachos.com. El Milagrito Their cheese enchiladas are titans of Tex-Mex, topped with good, chunky gravy that indicates Milagrito’s guisada is also a cut above. The breakfast menu merits a try, too. 521 E. Woodlawn Ave., (210) 7378646, elmilagritocafe.com. El Mirasol Interiors that help you escape to Cancun, food that satiates that itch for something sabroso, and drinks that keep the convo flowing are in store at either the Alon or Blanco location. Multiple locations, elmirasolsa.com. Garcia’s Mexican Food You can’t call yourself a true San Antonian un-

Jacala Mexican Restaurant With a kitschy interior that screams Tex-Mex, Jacala has been a Westside fave since 1949. The great puffy tacos don’t hurt either. 606 West Ave., (210) 732-5222. La Fonda on Main Monte Vista residents still flock to this institution for both traditional and forward-thinking Mexican fare. The duck or fish tacos or mole enchiladas are deliciously dependable. 2415 Main Ave., (210) 733-0621, lafondaonmain.com. La Fogata There are several reasons to visit La Fogata: the arboreal wonderland of a patio, the tequila-laden margaritas, the friendly staff, the light starters, the hearty enchiladas … should we go on? 2427 Vance Jackson Road, (210) 340-1337, lafogata.com. La Gloria Still a favorite for tourists and locals hoping to taste a little of Mexico, chef Johnny Hernandez’s first restaurant scores points with its tacos

Pizza Classics Near Trinity U and the Strip, Pizza Classics has retained its late-night audience. The buy-one, getone carry out deals make PC a valuefriendly option. 3440 N. St. Mary’s St., (210) 225-3356, pizzaclassics.com.

Ray’s Pizzaria Check the daily lunch and dinner specials at this authentic New York-style pizzeria. Calzones, stromboli and Italian entrees like baked ziti, served with cheesy garlic bread, satisfy even the hungriest diner. Multiple locations, rayspizzaria.com.

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Playland Andrew Goodman and Stefan Bowers are trying their hand at sourdough pizza and it’s definitely worth a trip downtown. 400 E. Houston St., (210) 908-9362, playlandsa.com.

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210-413-3203

Work Lunches | Holidays | Block Parties | Quinceneras 48

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DAN PAYTON

2218 Broadway San Antonio TX 78215 | 210-224-5540


as

DAN PAYTON

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Mi Tierra Restaurant & Bakery de alambre and tortas. Enjoy a house margarita on the icehouse’s airy patio at The Pearl, Dominion or newly added AT&T Center. Multiple locations, lagloriaicehouse.com. La Hacienda de los Barrios A Barrios Family creation, there’s much to be said about La Hacienda’s food. Try the time-tested standbys such as the cabrito en salsa and the Cortadillo Zuazua style, a semi-stew of tenderloin. 18747 Redland, (210) 497-8000, lhdlb.com. La Margarita Restaurant & Oyster Bar Part of the Mi Tierra family of restaurants, La Margarita is billed as the first American restaurant to serve sizzling fajitas. 120 Produce Road, (210) 227-7140, lamargarita.com. La Michoacana #5 This location on North Flores boasts a carniceria, panaderia, fruteria and more. The taqueria may be the chain’s strong suit; the tacos can be spectacular, especially creations like chicharrón en salsa verde and calabacita con puerco. 1224 N. Flores St., (210) 223-3802, lamichoacanameatmarket.com.

Lisa’s Mexican Restaurant Lisa’s aced the basics with a hearty, rich pozole, a tasty lengua guisada and solid refrieds. Finish up with a cocktail at Bar Mosaico. 815 Bandera Road, (210) 433-2531, lisasmexican.com. Los Barrios One of San Antonio’s most beloved Mexican restaurants (yes, that is saying a lot), Los Barrios’ exhaustive menu includes items like “the world’s only gourmet sour nachos,” 16 different Mexican dinner plates. 4223 Blanco Road, (210) 732-6017, losbarrios1.com. Mary Lou’s Café Expect robust and fresh down-home dishes from this neighborhood joint. The enchiladas verdes and beans and rice are well above average, but ask for the salsa verde over the house dip. 4405 McCullough Ave., (210) 396-7909. Mi Tierra Restaurant & Bakery For those in the know, Mi Tierra is truly a wonder. The panaderia at the entrance alerts that this is the real deal. An institution since its 1941 founding, Mi Tierra is one of the few places still

open 24/7, holidays included. 218 Produce Row, (210) 225-1262, mitierracafe.com. Original Donut Shop This Fredericksburg Road institution is known for good breakfast tacos and outstanding doughnuts, that now accepts credit cards! 3307 Fredericksburg Road, (210) 734-5661, facebook. com/theoriginaldonutshop. Paloma Blanca Mexican Cuisine A perennial favorite in our Best of polls for enchiladas and guacamole, Paloma Blanca showcases hacienda-inspired architecture and interior Mexican eats for an elevated dining experience. 5800 Broadway, (210) 822-6151, palomablanca.net. Palenque Grill From the makers of Pollo Loco and Taco Palenque, Palenque Grill’s dishing up traditional dishes to the La Cantera set. Try the lengua and coastal creations inspired by the Pacific Mexican coast that are worth a try. 15900 La Cantera Pkwy., palenquegrill.com.

Patty’s Taco House Taco fans make pilgrimages to Patty’s on a weekly basis for breakfast and lunch. The migas plate will keep you sated way past lunchtime. 2422 S. Hackberry St., (210) 534-3395. Perico’s Mexican Cuisine The hacienda-style chain has locations off Bandera and Sonterra, but you’ll find standard Tex-Mex at any stop. Make sure to wash it down with a Parrot Tail, a concoction of vodka, coconut rum, Triple Sec, Hypnotiq, cranberry juice and sour mix. Multiple locations, pericosgrill.com. Ray’s Drive Inn Puffy tacos and a certain San Antonio je ne sais quoi are the draws at this Westside establishment. Portions are large (bring the whole family), but remember to bring cash; our critics recommend the brisket and guacamole puffy tacos. 822 SW 19th, (210) 432-7171, raysdriveinn.net. Rosario’s Restaurant y Cantina Lisa Wong’s other baby is a staple with the Castros and other power lunch-goers. The bright lights, big city

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cantina concept — aided by lots of concrete and a neon-lit faux palapa — and Tex-Mex add a certain buzzy feel to Southtown and the aesthetic reaches the northside location. Multiple locations, rosariossa.com. Soluna Home of the Chispa, this Alamo Heights restaurant comes alive on weekends. Pour over the entire menu and work your way through it with several visits. We won’t judge. 7959 Broadway, (210) 930-8070, solunasa.com.

Taco Taco A plethora of choices here but the best thing to order is of course, the namesake: tacos of all kinds, served on piping hot, homemade corn or flour tortillas. 145 E. Hildebrand Ave., (210) 822-9533, tacotacosa.com. Tacos y Burritos Metro Basilica 2 Taco truck fare inspired more by DF than SA. Branch out to less familiar menu items like mulita (meat and cheese sandwiched between two thick masa tortillas), lengua and tripas, or stick with tried-and-true chicken quesadillas and asada tacos. 7627 Culebra Road, Suite 105, (210) 680-1412. Taqueria Datapoint The food hasn’t lost its late-night street charms at this taco-truck-turned-restaurants. Current readers say you must try the gorditas, and our critics recommend the mini asada taquitos and chicken torta. Multiple locations, (210) 615-3644. Taqueria El Chilaquil Our secret late-night spot, we come here for al pastor and carnitas mini tacos and giant schooners of Dos Equis after evenings out downtown. 1821 W. Commerce St., (210) 226-5410. Taqueria Los Arcos Homey and authentic Mex-Texican fare, Los Arcos scores with especially good sopes and outstanding tortas, at prices low enough to treat your entire work crew. 13777 Nacogdoches Road, Suite. 103, (210) 599-1822. Taqueria Vallarta Seafood is far from the emphasis at the Broadway location; carnes asadas and fajitas abound. 8234 Broadway 78209, (210) 829-0180. Taquitos West Ave. With choice of cabeza, lengua, suadero, carnitas and

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Taco Haven A Southtown staple for more than 30 years, the menu has expanded to include a few TexAmerican dishes such as chickenfried steak and burgers. Multiple locations, tacohaven.info.

Big Hops trompo (only on weekends), Taquitos has built a legion of followers that keep spreading the word. The Nacogdoches spot also features a panaderia next door. Multiple locations, taquitoswestavenue.com. Teka Molino The puffy tacos are a must, but don’t sleep on the guacamole cups and bean rolls. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner, Teka has been serving San Antonio for more than 60 years. Multiple locations, tekamolino.com. Tito’s Restaurant The art-lined walls are the perfect background for a variety of breakfast options and an express lunch for those who work in the King William area. 955 S. Alamo St., (210) 212-8226, titosrestaurant.com. Vida Mia Don’t miss out on breakfast of chilaquiles like the Piporro with machacado and red salsa or Cantinflas with chorizo and green salsa, at Stone Oak and Huebner or Bulverde Road. Multiple locations, vidamiacuisine.com. Viola’s Ventanas The third effort from the Barrios family pays tribute to mother Viola, who started the Los Barrios legend in 1979. 9660 Westover Hills, (210) 684-9660, violasventanas.com. Viva Villa The legacy of Mi Tierra is in safe hands as chef Cariño Cortez and staff share interior Mexican fare as prepared with local flair. 905 Dolorosa St., (210) 987-8482, vivavillatacos.com.

Cocktails/Pubs/ Wine 1919 Expertly made cocktails, a speakeasy setting and monthly spirit tastings complete with bites are found at this Blue Star Art Complex nook. 1420 S. Alamo St., Suite 001, (210) 227-1420, facebook.com/1919sa. Bar America This Southtown favorite is serving up bar snacks these days. Their happy hour specials vary by day and are perfect for those on a budget. 723 S. Alamo St., (210) 223-1285, baramericasatx.com. Big Hops Offering a long list of local beer on tap at any of their three locations, including Bitters, Huebner and the Hays Street Bridge, Big Hops is a must-stop for craft beer lovers. Multiple locations, bighops.com. Blue Box Tasty cocktails meet a great happy hour. Come game time, the staff sets you up with free snacks made by some of the city’s best chefs. 312 Pearl Pkwy., (210) 227-2583. The Broadway 5050 San Antonio’s original, swanky good times bar has been an Alamo Heights favorite since opening its doors in 1927. 5050 Broadway, (210) 826-0069, broadway5050.com. The Brooklynite With antique décor, good music and a tasty food

truck fare, The Brooklynite serves up award-winning craft cocktails. Stop in before they close this February. 516 Brooklyn Ave., (210) 444-0707, thebrooklynitesa.com. Burleson Yard Beer Garden This pet and kid-friendly bar near the Hays Street Bridge is a traditional beer garden with indoor and outdoor seating. Pick from their long list of beers or opt for wine or liquor, and grab snacks at one of the food trucks. 430 Austin St., (210) 354-3001, facebook.com/burlesonyard. Cellar Mixology Toro Kitchen + Bar’s newest outpost in downtown also brought with it a new cocktail bar with classics and new twists on your faves. 1142 E. Commerce St., (210) 592-1075, cellarmixology.com. Cherrity Bar Philanthropic tipples can be found at this massive bar that also holds a ramen bar! Every month, three charities are picked as recipients of nearly all of the bar’s proceeds so drink up! 302 Montana St., (210) 598-0496, facebook.com/ cherritybar. Con Safos Cocina & Bar A West Side cantina in the heart of downtown with a polished modern twist is what you’ll find inside Con Safos Cantina & Bar, the home of San Antonio’s pan dulce burger. 607 Hemisfair Blvd., (210) 514-5006, consafos-sa.com.

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Copa Wine Bar Voted best wine bar in 2014’s Current Best Of readers poll, Copa is worth a trip to the city’s North Side with their wine and tapas. 19141 Stone Oak Pkwy., (210) 4952672, thecopawinebar.com. Cullum’s Attagirl Just off the N. St. Mary’s strip, Attagirl’s ever-evolving list of craft beers alongside their famous chicken wings, fried bologna pimento sandwiches and more. 726 E. Mistletoe Ave., (210) 437-4263, facebook. com/cullumsattagirl.

Dorcol Distilling + Brewing Co. You’ll find Kinsman rakia (an unaged apricot brandy) and a sizeable lineup of expertly made beers to quench your thirst. 1902 S. Flores St., (210) 2290607, dorcolspirits.com. The Esquire Tavern A San Antonio original, Esquire Tavern serves up crafted cocktails, wine and craft beers alongside some serious eats like their signature bison burger and charcuterie at Downstairs. 155 E. Commerce St., (210) 222-2521, esquiretavern-sa.com.

DAN PAYTON

The Dakota East Side Ice House Chill vibes meet casual comfort food vibes at this former grocery storeturned-neighborhood-bar. 433 S. Hackberry St., (210) 375-6009, thedakotasa.com.

The Lion & Rose

El Luchador The newly opened luchalibre themed bar off Roosevelt has a cantina vibe with a bar, dance floor, lounge area and patio. 622 Roosevelt, (210) 272-0016, facebook.com/ luchadorbarsa. Haunt Sleek and spooky, this Downtown joint makes it easy to get in a happy hour before dinner at sister restaurant Rebelle. Hold your séance here while sipping on cocktails inspired by the specters that haunt the St. Anthony Hotel. 300 E. Travis St., (210) 227-4392, facebook.com/hauntsa.

Flying Saucer Draught Emporium Back before San Antonio turned into a craft town (well, we’re working on it), there was the Saucer. Excellent for pups on patios, great sandwiches, expert service and, yes, hundreds of beers to choose from, the Saucer isn’t going anywhere any time soon. 11255 Huebner Road, Suite 212, (210) 696-5080, beerknurd.com. Francis Bogside This Southtown fave made a serious comeback in 2017 with an all-new stage, and more bar space! 803 S. St. Mary’s St., (210) 988-3093.

High Street Wine Co. Wine lovers of all levels will enjoy a visit (or two or three, we’re not judging) to this Pearlbased wine bar. The only thing better than the selection of reds, whites, rosés and bubbles? High Streets awe-inspiring charcuterie boards. 302 Pearl Pkwy., Suite 104, (210) 9089144, highstreetwine.com. Hoppy Monk This Northside bar features over 50 beers on tap, as well as delicious cuisine and cocktails made from fresh ingredients and local products. Stop in for mezcal! 1010

N Loop 1604 E., (210) 545-3330, thehoppymonk.com/sanantonio. Knockout The newest addition to the Main Strip includes daily inexpensive happy hours and is split into two rooms for variety. Grab a slice from their attached Pup’s Pizza as early as 11am or late night. 1420 N. Main Ave., (210) 227-7678, knockoutsa.com. The Modernist Olaf Harmel and Gerry Shirley are taking bespoke cocktails to another level with this post-modernist drinker that features a small tiki trailer slinging boozy faves on weekends. 516 E. Grayson St., (210) 446-8699, facebook.com/ themodernistsa.

Lion & Rose British Restaurant Pub Don’t let its Rim location confuse you, this puro pub is great for grabbing a pint, watching a football game (or soccer, to most of y’all) and chowing down on a full English breakfast at brunch, fish and chips or Scotch eggs. 17627 La Cantera Pkwy., (210) 7985466, thelionandrose.com.

Luther’s Cafe After relocating a few times, Luther’s remains a staple on the Main strip. Stop in early or late and select from their varied menu of food and drinks inside or on the patio. Stay for karaoke on Friday or dinner and a show on Saturdays. 1503 N. Main Ave., (210) 2237727, lutherscafe.com.

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Freetail Brewing Beers on tap change regularly and food comes by way of fantastic brick oven pizzas. 4035 N. Loop 1604 W., Suite 105, (210) 625-6000, freetailbrewing.com.

Lowcountry There’s a whole lot to love about this bar that blends country vibes with Southern charm inside a historic home. Bar snacks include lovely pickles and boiled peanuts. Grab a cold one and enjoy live music on the back patio. 318 Martinez St., (210) 560-2224, lowcountrysa.com.

The Esquire

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8517 Blanco Rd. | M-F 9am-6:30pm | SAT 9am-5:30pm | Closed Sunday | (210) 562-3222

Blanco Road and West Avenue

912 N. Storts St. POTH, TX 78147 | M-F 8am-5:30pm | SAT 8am-4:30pm | (830)484-2838 54

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New San Antonio Location Open!


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Oak Hills Tavern This Medical Center dive bar features 14 taps of local and Texas beers, bar games like pool and darts, and a varied menu with pizza, tacos, burgers and more. 7920 Fredericksburg Road, (210) 614-8855, facebook.com/oakhillstavern. Paramour Perfect for all your selfies and party pics, Paramour elevated the bar scene literally. As Downtown’s first rooftop bar, the sprawling location brings in tourists and locals alike for classic cocktails and cheeky house concoctions. 109 9th St., Suite 400, (210) 307-8740, paramourbar.com.

Zinc local and regional craft beer we can get our hands and growlers on. 1221 Broadway, Suite 116, theroostsa.com.

of America alum Chris Durkin and Phil Carden. 1338 E. Houston St., (210) 474-0031, tuckerskozykorner.info.

The Squeezebox With the Sulla Strada Pizza truck on the patio and a puro vibe that combines Tejano, cumbias, and dance hits, there’s something for everyone at this popular joint. 2806 N. St. Mary’s St., (210) 314-8845, facebook.com/thesqueezebox.

Zinc Bistro & Wine Bar The prickly pear margaritas aren’t just ’gramworthy, they’re strong and delicious. Pair them with the Crack Burger, or peruse the wine selection — your call. 207 N. Presa St., (210) 224-2900, zincwine.com.

Still Golden Social House Back from its brief hiatus after being torn down, Still Golden is back with more swag, cocktails and more. 1900 Broadway, (210) 616-2212, stillgoldensa.com.

The Pigpen The neighborhood bar features wine, beer on draft or in cans and bottles, and specialty drinks like the brisket bloody mary and frozen Moscow mule. Feeling hungry? Pair your drink with some nachos or a grilled cheese. 106 Pershing Ave., (210) 267-9136, thepigpensa.com.

TBA This St. Mary’s Strip secret serves up handcrafted drinks and tasty bites. A serious happy hour packs inexpensive house cocktails, beers, grilled cheese and charcuterie. 2801 N. St. Mary’s St., (210) 320-1753, tbasatx.com.

The Roost Sometimes we wish we lived at 1221 Broadway so we too could have a downstairs bar/community space. Alas, we don’t. But that doesn’t stop us from going for all the

Tucker’s Kozy Korner The Kozy Korner has seen lots of changes this year. With new owners, Andrew Lake and Nathan Azar, you’ll find more events and food by Culinary Institute

SEAFOOD 210 Ceviche The place to watch futbol while noshing on seafood and drinking a cold one, 210 Ceviche offers a refuge from the heat. Try a ceviche sampler to start. Stick with the satisfying cooked dishes such as the Arroz 210 with seafood bits or the sautéed salmon. 9502 IH-10, Suite 101, (210) 593-9300, 210ceviche.com. Camaron Pelado Seafood Grill What Camaron Pelado lacks in atmosphere is made up for in coastal dishes that warrant praise. Classic ceviche, mounds of shrimp and a piled-high tostada all at fair prices

make for a superb lunch or dinner. Don’t miss the seafood caldos with shrimp, oyster, crab and octopus. 2918 W. Commerce St., (210) 4346700, camaronpelado.info. Costa Pacifica Known for innovative, fresh dishes, one-of-a-kind specialty Drinks and ambiance reminiscent of the Pacific Coast of Mexico, Costa Pacifica is all about freshness. Visit for the fish “al pastor” costras, tuna capaccio or the whole red snapper. Multiple locations, costacruise.com. Eddie V’s Prime Seafood Immediately upon opening in 2008, Wildfish became the go-to destination for seafood in North San Antonio. Featuring dishes such as North Atlantic lemon sole and crispy cashew calamari, Wildfish added fresh ideas to the seafood market. It may not be the new thing anymore, but it’s still a fresh catch. 1834 N. Loop 1604 W., (210) 4931600, wildfishseafoodgrille.com. Hula Poke Various locations of this poke salad spot have earned it a special place in the heart of San An-

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LISTINGS

tonians looking to try something new and fresh. Visit them off I-10 and DeZavala, San Pedro and near 1604 and Bandera. Multiple locations, facebook.com/hulapokesa. Koi Fin Poke Ramen, poke salads and sushirritos are all in store at this UTSA-adjacent spot that offers 10 percent off on Tuesday and Wednesdays with student ID! 7211 Green Glen Drive, Suite 102, (210) 451-0050. Laguna Madre Seafood Company Bill Miller’s isn’t all chicken and brisket. The San Anto fave also deals — deliciously — in fish. Fried plates include choice of shrimp, fried cods, catfish or oysters. Multiple locations, lagunamadreseafood.com. Las Islas Marias A colorful Sinaloan seafood restaurant specializing in shrimp in several guises with winners such as the empanadas de camaron, ceviche ejecutivo, camarones zarandeados, charola de mejillones, camarones aguachiles en salsa roja. 522 SW Military, (210) 922-7777. Mariscos El Bucanero Mariscos may be in the name, but first-rate Mexican from the asada plate, chile rellenos and enchiladas are on the menu. Of course, seafood lovers may also enjoy the molcajete de ceviche, camarones a la diabla or the fried fish. And don’t forget to try the fried shrimp. Many consider it the best in town. Multiple locations, bucanerosanantonio.com. Mariscos El Marinero Familiar, yes, but still tasty. Order the tostada known as the Torre Imperial for an awe-inspiring stack of seafood that perfectly layers several ceviches, chopped scallops, octopus and peel-and-eat shrimp, and yep, red onion into a colorful tower. 1819 McCullough Ave., (210) 465-9178. Neptune’s Seafood House Neighborhood seafood comes affordable, friendly and delectable at Neptune’s. Crispy fried okra, catfish po’boys and family dinner under $20 are all aboard this seafood boat. Fried specialties include a fried frog leg plate. 1922 Goliad, (210) 337-7294, neptunesseafoodhouse.com. Poke Central Billed as sushi in a bowl, this poke shop opened on the city’s northside feeding Looplanders fresh creations and savory soups. 1130 N. Loop 1604 W. Suite 101, (210) 479-7653, facebook.com/pokecentralsa. Poke Planet Opened by the folks behind Copa Wine Bar, Poke Planet has helped poke fans in the Medical Center area get their fix of this Hawaii-based dish. 7302 Louis Pasteur Drive, Suite 103, (210) 627-6060, pokeplanetsa.com.

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Rudy’s Seafood For over 40 years, Rudy’s Seafood has drawn in Southside residents for large platters of fried fish served the Rudy’s way with fries, lemon bread and a serrano pepper. Also on the menu: grilled fish tacos, fried mushrooms, burgers and sweet potato fries. 4122 S. Flores St., (210) 532-1315, rudysseafood.com.


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CAPOS PIZZA

LISTINGS

IS THE “CAPO DI TUTTI PIZZE”, THE BOSS OF ALL PIZZAS!

NEW YORK STYLE PIZZA, SUBS & WINGS!

SAN ANTONIO CURRENT FILE

Shuck Shack

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Sea Island Shrimp House After celebrating 50 years as San Antonio’s go-to Lenten spot, Sea Island is still cranking out hits. It’s not Port A, but it’ll do especially when you order the “world famous” charbroiled shrimp plate, of fifteen lightly breaded, skewered and citrusy shrimp arrived alongside your choice of sides. Multiple locations, shrimphouse.com.

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Smashin’ Crab You know it’s going to be a fun time when the server drapes a bib across your chest. Seafood boils are available drenched in different sauces but our favorite is the tangy Trinity! Multiple locations, smashincrab.com. Shuck Shack Consider Jason Dady your boat captain on this seafaring adventure. Try the fish and chips, which can’t be missed — the batter is crisp and dreamy and consistently so. The shrimp roll employs an alluring mixture of brown butter, sofrito and horseradish aioli to delectable results. Or just throw back a few oyster shooters? Not into deliciously briny bivalves? Stick with piña coladas, rosé and tasty hushpups and let the kiddos take up residence on the playground. 520 E. Grayson St., (210) 236-7422, shuckshack.com. Tiago’s Cabo Grille Inspired by the flavors of Cabo San Lucas, the food here is light, fresh and flavorful. A spin on the traditional Mexican, this coastal cuisine includes such fare as fire-grilled skewers and street vendor-style tacos. Daily lunch specials and signature drinks, like the San Lucas Breeze, put Tiago’s a notch above the rest. Multiple locations, tiagoscabogrille.com.

STEAKHOUSE Barn Door A San Antonio institution, the Historic Barn Door offers down-home fare with Texas hospitality. Steaks can be ordered blackened, rolled in black peppercorn or smothered in jalapeños. 8400 N. New Braunfels Ave., (210) 824-0116, thebarndoorrestaurant.com.

catering & takeout available

13920 I-35 Live Oak, Texas sun-thur 11-11pm | fri-sat 11-1am

(210) 243-0555 58

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Chama Gaucha Locally headquartered, this Brazilian steakhouse has outposts in Atlanta, Chicago and Houston. Head here for big celebrations and make sure to bring your appetite. Choose from 12 meats — bacon-wrapped filet, anyone? — and more than 30 salad bar items. 18318 Sonterra Pl., (210) 564-9400, chamagaucha.com. Galpao Gaucho Stone Oak holds a delicious secret: a locally owned Brazilian steakhouse with an extensive wine selection,


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LISTINGS

eat. drink. chill. Little Rhein Steakhouse

happy hour, and all the meats your heart desires. It’s laid-back and great for date night. 2318 N. Loop 1604 W., (210) 497-2500. Josephine Street Café Since 1979, Josephine’s has always been a downtown gem with its signature steak and whiskey offerings. Stop by Josephine’s for a 16-ounce Texas t-bone and feel enriched in a downtown tradition. 400 E. Josephine St., (210) 224-6169, josephinestcafe.com. J-Prime Steakhouse Texans love steaks. They also love charcuterie boards, badass brunch buffets complete with made-to-order omelets and a meat carving station, and excellent happy hours, and you can find them all at J-Prime. 1401 N. Loop 1604 W., (210) 764-1604, jprimesteakhouse.com. Kirby’s Steakhouse This Dallas-based specialty steakhouse originated in 1954 and is known for its aged Midwestern prime beef. The San Antonio location has been a local favorite since opening its doors in 2007. 123 Loop 1604 NE, (210) 404-2221, kirbyssteakhouse.com. Little Red Barn This little red chophouse isn’t so little and its iconic red building is visible from the highway. For over 50 years, Little Red Barn has catered to hungry SA diners in a folksy dining hall. Don’t mind the faux-pistol-clad servers, it’s just part of the aesthetic. 1902 S. Hackberry St., (210) 5324235, littleredbarnsteakhouse.com. Little Rhein Steakhouse With a wide wine list and rustic charm, Little Rhein impresses in the historic Bombach house from 1847. The dining experience is elevated with a River Walk patio making it ideal for a romantic, dimly lit dinner. 231 S. Alamo St., (210) 225-2111, littlerheinsteakhouse.com. Myron’s Prime Steak House Steaks take center stage but also memorable is the jalapeño mac and cheese, stuffed tomatoes and bread pudding with Maker’s Mark sauce. Be sure to check out the extensive wine list. 10003 NW Military, Suite 2101, (210) 493-3031, myronsprime.com. Tejas Rodeo Company Eat in cowboy fashion with a wooden dining room, country dancing and Go Texan top sirloin in the Hill Country. Now under new management — chef Johnny Hernandez and his True Flavors company — the menu retains favorites like KC Steaks but new menu items celebrate Texas cuisine. Saturday through March still means you can catch professional rodeo on Saturday nights. 401 Obst Road, Bulverde, tejassteakhouse.com. Texas de Brazil Influenced by the flavors Porto Alegre, Brazil, Texas de Brazil takes the cuisine of Brazil and combines the hospitality of Texas for a meal unique to this churrascaria. Brazilian sausages, picanha, prosciutto and leg of loin are reliable staples. Hit the salad bar for a lighter choice. 313 E. Houston St., (210) 299-1600, texasdebrazil.com.

live music | karaoke | patio happy hour tue-fri 3-7pm not brunch sun 3-11 kitchen open late

Open Sun - Thur 3 -11pm | Fri - Sat 3-12pm | Closed Mon 433 S Hackberry, San Antonio, TX 78203 | (210) 375-6009 sacurrent.com • W I N T E R

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Southern Grit

Fresh Take on Classic Beignets

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ou’ll find San Antonio’s best beignets — the golden brown, pillowy doughnuts synonymous with New Orleans — at Southern Grit, a popup dedicated to great taste and unique flavors, served with hot coffee. Michael Grimes and his wife, Elisa Treviño, established Southern Grit as a creative sauces and condiments business in 2016, but their time as a small business in an oversaturated market led them to pair their passion for sauces with beignets. Grimes drew from his experiences — from making beignets in St. Louis restaurants to his culinary training at St. Philip’s College and working for chef Bruce Auden at Biga on the Banks — while Treviño helped manage the business side and develop relationships with customers. The couple began hosting pop-up events at coffee shops throughout San Antonio in early 2017, growing their team with employees Janel Ortega and Gizzelle Mena-Fernandez, before finding a weekend home at the Pearl Farmers Market. 60

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Photos & Text By: Lea Thompson

“I’ve never really liked to repeat recipes because I always have new ideas,” Grimes said. Customers look for traditional and “churro” beignets, as well as new flavors like cilantro pesto and cotija cheese or pomegranate lavender, each weekend. Thanks to a new mobile trailer, they can expect to see Southern Grit set up shop at spots throughout the city. Aside from the beignets themselves, the most exciting thing about Southern Grit is how well the staff works in unison. While Grimes rolls and cuts the dough, Ortega oversees the frying process, Mena-Fernandez finishes the beignets with powdered sugar or the weekly sauce while Treviño takes orders from the long lines until a “Sold Out” sign appears. Southern Grit goes through nearly 200 pounds of dough a day,


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MICHAEL GRIMES TAKES OUT PORTIONS OF THE DOUGH, ALLOWING IT TO COME TO ROOM TEMPERATURE, BEFORE IT CAN BE SENT TO THE FRYER.

GRIMES ADDS FLOUR TO THE DOUGH BEFORE IT HAS BEEN PROOFED.

GRIMES CUTS THE DOUGH INTO SQUARES BEFORE HANDING THEM OFF TO THE FRYER.

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GRIMES ROLLS OUT THE BEIGNET DOUGH TO A LARGE RECTANGLE, BEFORE CUTTING. and up to 800 to 1,000 orders each weekend. The four-person team moves quickly — perfecting and frying each batch, topping off the beignets with creative sauces and mixes, but they take time to perfect the dough and its flavors. “We mix our dough on Thursday and slowly proof it to allow the dough to develop flavor,” Grimes said. Southern Grit uses a French recipe that relies on fermentation and yeast to create its pillowy, soft beignets. Once it’s prepared, the dough is stored in the cooler for at least 48 hours until Saturday or Sunday.

The team allows the dough to come to room temperature before Grimes begins rolling out the dough, about 1/3 inch thick. He cuts the dough into uniform 2.5-by2.5-inch squares before passing them off to Ortega at the fryer. The fryers, which are filled with cottonseed oil and heated to 380 degrees, help give the beignets an even, golden brown exterior. “I love cottonseed oil because it has a very high smoke point, and I love the flavor it adds. It really highlights the floral notes in our dough,” Grimes said.

ORTEGA REMOVES THE BEIGNETS FROM THE FRYER WHILE THE PASTRY FINISHES COOKING.

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THE DOUGH IS ADDED TO A HOT OIL FRYER AND COOKED FOR TWO TO THREE MINUTES, UNTIL GOLDEN-BROWN. After two to three minutes, the goldenbrown beignets are removed from the oil and set aside to rest and finish cooking. The cooking time always depends on the weather and number of beignets, but the team works hard to create soft, flavorful treats each weekend. When Southern Grit participated in Beignet Fest in New Orleans earlier this year, they realized they were the smallest team among the event’s major restaurants and businesses. “The team makes this possible,” Grimes said. “The team is made of these super strong women who are the driving force

ELSA TREVIÑO WARMLY GREETS AND EXPLAINS THE SOUTHERN GRIT MENU TO CUSTOMERS, AND ENSURES THAT EVERY ORDER OF BEIGNETS IS DELIVERED HOT AND FRESH.


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2 Awesome Locations!

GIZZELLE MENA-FERNANDEZ INTERACTS WITH SOUTHERN GRIT CUSTOMERS AND PREPS THE CHURRO MIX FOR BEIGNET ORDERS. behind Southern Grit and its success.” The beignets are covered with powdered sugar, sauce or special mixes, and served in paper bags or small boats. The entire process from the customer order to the final product takes minutes, almost as long as it takes customers to devour the order. “One of the best things we ever chose to do was to keep what’s special about us — the new flavor profiles,” Grimes said. “We’re excited to grow, but at the end of the day, we want to enjoy what we do and want people to enjoy the experience.”

THE SOUTHERN GRIT TEAM (L TO R): GIZZELLE MENA-FERNANDEZ, JANEL ORTEGA, ELISA GRIMES AND MICHAEL GRIMES TAKES A MOMENT TO POSE DURING THE SUNDAY FARMERS MARKET AT THE PEARL.

5231 BROADWAY ST. • 7211 GREEN GLEN DR #101 HOURS: MON-THURS 11–10 • FRI-SAT 11–11 SUN 12–10

PAN DULCE, PASTRIES, & CAKES

Made To Order.

602 NW 24th St. SATX 78207 | 210.434.9290 | www.panifico.com sacurrent.com • W I N T E R

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has expanded to include cake balls, custom pies, galettes and cookies made with fresh, flavorful and local ingredients. Today, Vu works in a small studio behind her home, which allows her to take on private orders and spend quality time with her husband and young daughter. Her colorful and fun desserts have garnered a strong following on Instagram and Facebook, and she plans to expand the Annie’s brand with new products and collaborations in the coming months. “[What] I really love about San Antonio is it’s such a close knit community — even though it’s competitive, we all have a niche market,” she said. “I’m not great at everything so I’ll work with other moms and outsource certain things like fondant designs or sugar cookies.” Locals can order seasonal sweets from Annie’s Petite Treats via Facebook, or check out holiday popups with Feliz Modern and Open House events in Alamo Heights. Expect to see mini pecan bites, apple pie cookies, fresh galettes and holiday toffee. Need a quick dessert fix? Head to Press Coffee on Fridays for Vu’s signature cake pops and treats, freshly delivered by Vu herself. | anniespetitetreats.com.

Cottage Co. HOME BAKERS ON THE RISE IN SAN ANTONIO PHOTOS & TEXT BY LEA THOMPSON

ANNIE VU, OWNER OF ANNIE’S PETITE TREATS, IS AMONG THE GROWING NUMBER OF COTTAGE BAKERS WHO HAVE FOUND SMALL BUSINESS SUCCESS IN SAN ANTONIO.

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growing number of San Antonio bakers are looking to work from the comfort of their home rather than open traditional brick-and-mortars. Since 2011, Texas’ cottage food law has inspired local food entrepreneurs like Annie Vu, owner of Annie’s Petite Treats, to start and grow their business without stepping into a commercial kitchen space. Vu grew up cooking dinner with her family in Houston, and she continued developing new recipes as a student at Trinity University. After graduation, Vu began her career with Rackspace, where she helped build the company’s communications and outreach efforts. When her job required her to take on increasingly demanding workload, she turned to baking as a creative outlet. “For me, baking is a meditation. Baking allowed me to knead out the negative energy of the day,” she said. “I began making cake balls each night, just for fun, and shared them with the office the next day.” Orders from Rackspace colleagues, mutual friends and Trinity University helped to cement her place as a specialty baker in the San Antonio community, and state cottage laws allowed her to run Annie’s Petite Treats while working a 9-to-5 job. She left Rackspace for a job with a nonprofit in 2013, but soon realized that she couldn’t juggle two careers forever.

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“I didn’t know how to pump the brakes on my growth,” she said. “I knew I could always go back to a traditional career, but I decided to follow the momentum of Annie’s Petite Treats instead and pursue the business full-time [in 2014].” Since its inception, Annie’s Petite Treats

BAKERS TO WATCH Baked Goodness Jessica Hall was working as a Marketing Director for the RK Group when she began creating beautiful, customized cookies as a side project in 2008. Within the following decade, she became a mother to two chil-

ANNIE’S PETITE TREATS IS BEST KNOWN FOR ITS CHARACTER AND HOLIDAY-THEMED CAKE POPS LIKE THE FALL PUMPKIN POPS.


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ANNIE VU, OWNER OF ANNIE’S PETITE TREATS, SOURCES FRESH AND LOCAL FRUIT LIKE APRICOTS FOR HER SEASONAL COOKIES, PIES AND GALETTES.

dren and left her job to focus on her business, Baked Goodness, full-time. Hall often collaborates with Annie Vu of Annie’s Petite Treats to fulfill and outsource specialty orders, and cookie fanatics can expect to see some incredible holiday desserts this season. "I always try do something that is out of the norm — there will be fun and special cookies for Thanksgiving and Christmas this year.” Hall will host popups and cookie decorating classes at Feliz Modern and Belle & Union at the Quarry this December. Email Hall to order cookies or cookie cakes this season. | baked-goodness.com. Cakes by Jandy Taste, color and design are essential to Jandy Garcia’s unique cakes, cupcakes and conchas. Garcia fell in love with baking as a teen before making it his career, earning his culinary degree at the Art Institute of San Antonio in 2014. Garcia has found loyal customers since he opened his baking business from home in 2016. “I like to use shapes and [elements] that form unique cakes — from sushi and concha cakes — and use a lot of colors, edible glitter and gold. There will always be something that pops out.” Locals can follow or submit special dessert orders via his Instagram profile. | instagram.com/cakesbyjandy. Macarons by Andrew Andrew Gonzales’ business began with a passion for macarons. “I never [had] any professional culinary training,” he said. “My wife and I used to enjoy them together, so I thought I’d try making them at home.” After a year of perfecting his recipes, he launched the company in February of 2017. “It took a lot of adjusting the temperatures and recipes, and working all night after my toddler went to sleep, but they eventually became easy to make,” he added. The company has since expanded to include unique macaron designs, flavors and cakes. Fans can expect to see holiday-themed desserts available for orders, new Fiesta medals and special popup events in the coming months. | macaronsbyandrew.com.

pan dulce so good, you’ll want more! Athentic Mexican Pastries & Reposteria

803 W. Hildebrand Ave. 210-736-2253

2714 Hillcrest Dr. 210-361-2253

HOLIDAY HEIGHTS I N

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FREE, FAMILY-FRIENDLY EVENT THURSDAY, DECEMBER 20TH | 6 – 9 PM The Shops at Lincoln Heights are decked out for the holidays. And you and your family are invited to enjoy a free evening of fun and festivities brought to you by the merchants of Lincoln Heights. Basse & Broadway

Complimentary Santa Photo with Canned Food Donation, benefiting San Antonio Food Bank sacurrent.com • W I N T E R

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TESTIN’ TORTILLAS: FROM MOCTEZUMA TO MASS PRODUCTION Tortilla Shops to Visit Adelita’s Tamales & Tortilla Factory 1130 Fresno Drive, (210) 733-5352, adelitatamales.com Opened in 1938, this operation is family-owned and offers fresh white and yellow corn tortillas in various sizes along with fresh flour tortillas. Take in the show at the window. Bandera Molino 2619 N. Zarzamora St., (210) 434-0131 Fresh flour tortillas are definitely worth the wait at this shop which is stuffed to the brim with Mexican ingredients, cookware and more.

SHUTTERSTOCK

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dmit it: Texans take tortillas for granted. We expect our breakfast taco of papa con huevo to come cradled in a warm, flaky, just slightly chewy flour tortilla. Tacos callejeros should, by birthright, appear on fragrant disks of corn masa, fresh off the griddle — a tradition that survives from preColumbian times. How did we get so lucky? (Eat your hearts out, yanquis.) As recently as the last century, Mexican women, especially in the countryside, struggled to supply their families with the expected, daily supply. According to “Que Vivan Los Tamales,” a treatise on “food and the making of Mexican identity,” ”…a woman cooking for a large family typically spent the entire morning, five or six hours, making tortillas. Work began the night before, when she simmered the corn in a solution of mineral lime to make nixtamal. [She] arose before dawn to grind the corn on the metate…patting tortillas into shape required as much finesse as grinding required strength.” Cooking the tortillas on a comal required equal dexterity — along with toughened fingers. Meanwhile, in the larger cities, tortilla technology advanced slowly. “Numerous inventors attempted to mechanize the entire process … and build fully automatic factories in the late

nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.” Several patents were issued, one of which promised to “redeem the women of our nation from the slavery of the metate.” But as late as the early 1900s, tortillas were still emerging from conveyor belts “in a desiccated, inedible state.” Finally, in 1919, a system that flipped the tortilla to “imitate the turns given on a traditional comal” was perfected — but popular acceptance was far from immediate. It wasn’t until 1946 that the invention of masa harina made industrialization of the corn tortilla truly almost routine (and profitable), finally constituting “a genuine revolution in the lives of Mexican women.” That takes care of corn, but in central and northern “New Spain,” Spaniards accustomed to bread (and needing fine white flour for communion wafers) had planted wheat. Cultivation of wheat and milling of the grain was “a costly process [compared to corn],” and “in the colony’s early years, before Spaniards established sufficient mills and bakeries, native women prepared wheat in the only manner they knew — as tortillas.” It helped that Spaniards had also brought pigs, which supplied the lard necessary in the production of this, “one of the first examples of Mexico’s hybrid cuisine.” The flour tortillas that come rolling off the conveyor belts at many a local HEB can trace their lineage straight back to Sonora, the birthplace of the current-day staple.

Bedoy’s Bakery Multiple locations, bedoysbakery.com White corn tortillas and pita-like tortillas de harina are what’s in store at this San Antonio staple that’s delighted with their pan dulces for more than 50 years. H-E-B Multiple locations, heb.com Flour tortillas lurk in the corners of most of the bakeries at your local H-E-B, and convenience can’t be beat. Neither can their selection of corn tortillas (and the elusive nopal!). La Michoacana Meat Market Multiple locations, lamichoacanameatmarket.com La Michoacana Meat Market carries yellow and white corn tortillas made in their Houston plant that retain all their freshness after being delivered. Sanitary Tortilla Company 623 Urban Loop, (210) 226-9209, sanitarytortillacompany.com Legendary tortillas come from legendary places, the most rustic and corn-tasting of the bunch during our haphazard taste-test, Sanitary’s tortillas can’t be beat. Los Angeles Tortilleria & Restaurant 300 N. Zarzamora St., (210) 435-2400 A favorite that brings in fans from across San Anto with their tortillas, tamales and tacos, Los Angeles won us over with their white and red corn tortillas and their flaky and flavorful flour renditions.

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Coffee Shop Culture

San Antonio’s buzzing with coffee shops JESS ELIZARRARAS

Barrio Barista // Part-community center, part-café and part-java emporium, tahis self-proclaimed coffee house is bringing San Antonio Coffee Roasters’ beans to the West Side. Owned by father and son team Gilbert De Hoyos (Jr. and Sr.), the former meat market is a haven for poetry nights, healthful lunches by Ruben Jimenez and Mexican-American studies. Don’t miss the horchata iced latte or the barbacoa grilled cheese sandwich. 3735 Culebra Road, (210) 519-5403, barriobarista.coffee.

Southtown spot) and you will immediately understand that this place is serious about its beans. The minimalist design is sleek and clean, providing few distractions from the main point of focus. What’s even more minimalistic than the décor is the actual coffee menu itself. Brown’s knowledgeable baristas craft coffee and espresso beverages from their in-house roasted beans. Walk in a coffee novice and leave a neophyte connoisseur. Multiple locations, browncoffeeco.com.

Berry to Bean Coffee House // The Broadway corridor gained another coffeehouse with the opening of Berry to Bean, which packs in both caffeine and smoothies late into the evening. Stop in for latte art, vegan pastries or a fresh smoothie on your way to or from the Witte. 3900 Broadway, (210) 549-222, berrytobean.com.

Café Martinez // Hailing all the way from Argentina, this franchise location adds a chic comfortable space, full café menu and of course, coffee to the Medical Center area. Stop in to co-work, or for a first date. 7302 Louis Pasteur Drive, (210) 231-0095, cafemartinez.com.

Brown Coffee // Calling all coffee snobs: Walk into Brown Coffee Co. (either their 1800 Broadway location, outpost inside Methodist Stone Oak Hospital or their upcoming 68

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Candlelight Coffee House // Looking for a little romance? Not ready for your perfect date night to come to an end? Pop into Candlelight with your honey for post-dinner espresso and pie. Located in an old house with soft lighting, plenty of comfy corners and mismatched,

old furniture, Candlelight packs just enough quirky touches to make you feel right at home. 3011 N. Saint Mary’s St., (210) 738-0099, candlelightsa.com. CommonWealth Coffee // Tucked right off Broadway, Commonwealth Coffee, and now found dotted throughout San Antonio’s downtown. With King Louis and crooner standards on the stereo, a delightful shaded patio and iced coffee served in Mason jars, Commonwealth favors the cute without ever going overboard. France is an inspiration, with a pâtisserie and Francophile lunch menu. But fear not, they know they’re in SA — they serve breakfast tacos until 11 a.m. Multiple locations, commonwealthcoffeehouse.com. The Cracked Mug // For a charming and quaint coffee shop, visit The Cracked Mug in Helotes, which carries Brown Coffee Co. beans, and features a full menu of breakfast and lunch. 14743 Old Bandera Road, Suite 1, Helotes, (210) 635-0829, facebook.com/ thecrackedmugcoffeehouse.


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Cuppencake // Pay this place a visit for some great service and even better bean juice. Try the affogato with vanilla ice cream for a fantastic mixture that will wake you up and keep you cool on a hot Texas day. Don’t forget to try a giant cookie or cinnamon roll from the bakery. 22211 W. I-10, Suite 1111, (210) 892-3010, cuppencake.com. Don Martin’s Coffee // Southtown gained another coffee shop with the opening of Don Martin’s Coffee behind Bar America. Opened by the same team behind the San Anto-institution, Don Martin’s adds puro vibes to the coffee scene with a warm and inviting space, pan dulce and more. 540 S. Presa St., (210) 781-4204, donmartinscoffee.com.

local art, and over-the-top coffee creations to power you through your morning meeting. 5007 S. Flores St., (210) 455-7829, facebook.com/southsidecoffeehouse.

a while with your latte and don’t forget to order food from the rotating lineup of mobile kitchens. 24188 Boerne Stage Road, (210) 687-7827.

Halcyon // Located in the Blue Star District, Halcyon features a hip, industrial loft-style interior adorned with local art and modern décor. With plenty of tables to work and lounge areas to hang, Halcyon functions as a study space during the day. This café transforms into a hopping bar scene come 10 p.m. with full bar and spiked espresso beverages. 1414 S. Alamo St., Suite 101, (210) 277-7045, halcyonsouthtown.com.

Kings Cross Coffee // Harry Potter fanatics will want to get their fill of espresso patronum at Kings Cross, a roving food truck that serves up magical creations, and delicious coffee throughout Cibolo, Schertz, San Antonio, Joint Base San Antonio, and the surrounding areas. Locations vary, kingscrosscoffee.com.

Estate Coffee Co. // The folks at Estate source the best coffee and ingredients for its beverages by working with family-owned importers. They also promote transparency by displaying their roasting and brewing methods front and center for everyone to observe. Try the coffee cocktails and don’t pass on trying oatmilk in your latte. 1320 E. Houston St., (210) 667-4347, estatecoffeecompany.com.

Indy Coffee Co. // SA’s first mobile espresso provider moved away from its semi-permanent parking spot at Huebner and Vance Jackson and into a space of its own that caters to discerning college taste buds. They’ll expand to the city’s East Side with their newest location near Burleson Yard Beer Garden this spring. 7114 UTSA Blvd., Suite 103, (210) 233-9203, indycoffeeco.com.

Folklores Coffee Shop // The Southside has its first coffee shop in Folklores opened by the husband-and-wife team Joel “Tatu” and Emilie Herrera. The space is spunky and bright, filled with comfortable couches and

Just the Drip Coffeehouse // The Point Park & Eats is now its own fabulous compound of local retail and recently coffee with the addition of the Just the Drip Coffeehouse. Stop in for your morning drip coffee or stay

La Taza Coffee House // There is no place better to enjoy a nice cup of coffee than at home, but La Taza Coffee House sure comes close. The coffeehouse, under new ownership, comes complete with puzzles, a new monthly artist, and, of course, plenty of Katz Coffee out of Houston. 15060 San Pedro Ave., (210) 639-1426, facebook.com/latazajava. Local Coffee // A “local” favorite and winner of the San Antonio Current’s “Best of SA” coffee category for several years in a row, Local Coffee is serious about its craft. With several locations around the city (and Austin), San Antonians have made Local their favorite go-to café — for good reason. Multiple locations, meritcoffee.com. Mila Coffee // Marco Lastra has been slinging espresso-based goodness out of Mila Coffee since 2015 and has watched the corner of Broadway and Appler Street change around him. But coffee has remained. Try the house-made horchata, or any of the Texan coffees available. 2202 Broadway, (210) 929-3678, facebook.com/milacoffeesat. Mildfire Coffee Roasters // This “little shop that could” opened in 2005 as one of two joints in town roasting its own beans. Now, 13 years later, Mildfire is still kicking and thriving. Stop by the original location for pour overs and more. 15502 Huebner Road, (210) 492-9544, mildfirecoffee.com.

JESS ELIZARRARAS

JESS ELIZARRARAS

Ethos Coffee Café // Ethos offers fair trade, eco-friendly coffee on the site of Bandera Road City Church. They’ll make you any espresso drink and even a smoothie if you’re caffeine-averse, whether you’re staying for the service or not. 9439 Bandera Road, (210) 523-9089, ethoscoffeeco.com.

Hinee Gourmet Coffee // Opened in 2011, this wee shop is in on the joke: “Funny Name, Serious Coffee — No Butt’s About It” just so happens to be its slogan. The neighborhood joint in Helotes packs in the wild flavors and Frapp-like creations along with panini, soups and baked goods. 11881 Bandera Road, Suite 107, Helotes, (210) 695-2000, hineegourmetcoffee.com.

The Koffee Kup // Marisol De La Cruz opened The Koffee Kup with quality beans and a line of tasty beverages for all. Stop in on weekends of vegan baked goods by Miss Chickpeas Vegan Treats such as the flaky pop tarts and kolaches. 1025 Donaldson Ave., (210) 6350400, facebook.com/thekoffeekupco.

Olmos Perk // Something about Olmos Perk just seems to promote productivity. The classy but relaxed atmosphere encourages work and socialization. Olmos Perk makes a a perfect study destination to bring a group or go solo. Claim your territory at one of the modern but comfortable couches or plant yourself in one of the four individual study cubicles, complete with cozy chairs, power sacurrent.com • W I N T E R

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Where to

Brunch

like the classic Southern-fried wings atop crisp waffles. Or keep the cocktails flowing at Barbaro (2720 McCullough Ave., 210-320-2261), where Italian favorites meet innovative tipples on Saturdays and Sundays. You could always keep things proper with a visit to The Lion & Rose British Pub at The Rim (17627 La Cantera Pkwy., 210-7985466) which serves a full English breakfast on Sunday.

BRYAN RINDFUSS

Right Now

A brunch for every occasion

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hank goodness for brunch. The weekend’s most important meal has a solid grip on San Antonians and here’s where we’re brunching right now. For Sunday After Pay Day If you’re feeling bad and bougie, there are a handful of brunches to check out this summer. The Maverick (710 S. St. Mary’s St., 210-973-6050), which opened earlier this year in Southtown, packs a punch with brioche donuts fried fresh-to-order as created by chef Misa Holmes, who’s also tasked with the playful bread baskets and biscuits. Head north to Signature (16401 La Cantera Pkwy., 210-247-0176), where chef Andrew Weissman and his team dole out a Signature breakfast burger, steak and eggs, and seared sea scallops. When you’re a James Beard nominated restaurant, you have to wow at all times of the day, and Cured (306 Pearl Pkwy., Suite 101, 210-314-3929) at the Pearl delivers with The Chef’s Breakfast, a combination of biscuits, crabmeat, eggs, boudin noir, praline bacon, fried green tomatoes and a Miller High Life Michelada. Battalion (604 S. Alamo St., 210-816-0088) recently launched brunch inside the former Firehouse No. 7. with a menu of hits including ricotta funnel cakes, savory plates,

sweet cannoli crepes and bucatini alla carbonara, essentially the brunchiest of all pastas. For An Audience You’ll want to make your way to the ever-popular Southtown staple Feast (1024 S. Alamo St., 210-354-1024) for weekly donut specials on Sundays. Or wade through the Pearl’s weekend farmers markets for Southerleigh’s Fine Food & Brewery (136 E. Grayson St., 210-4555701) brunch menu, and don’t miss the michelada. All the influencers are dining at Tuckers Kozy Korner (1338 E. Houston St., tuckerskozykorner.info), which reopened this December. For A Buffet There’s no such thing as too many biscuits. Tony G’s Soul Food (915 S. Hackberry St., 210451-1234) makes your dreams come true with an all-you-can-eat brunch that features Southern favorites paired with a live band. The Pigpen (106 Pershing Ave., 210-267-9136) off Broadway should be in the buffet category for its Soul Food Sunday brunch, but the playground makes it the perfect spot for parents to enjoy a frozen Moscow mule while keeping an eye on the little ones. For the Kiddos Over at The Quarry, Stone Oak and Huebner Road, Snooze,

an A.M. Eatery (multiple locations, snoozeeatery. com) keeps the kids happy with pancake flight, savory hash and a casual setting. CommonWealth Coffee House & Bakery (multiple locations, commonwealthcoffeehouse.com) has expanded rapidly in the last few years, but two locations serve as the most kid-friendly. Stop by the original location on Davis Court for a fun patio and garden, or visit the Yanaguana location where parents can enjoy coffee and crepes while watching the kids enjoy the splash pad. For Boozing Bars and brunch should go hand in hand. Cure your hangover at Francis Bogside (803 S. St. Mary’s St., 210-369-9192) in Southtown with a Bogside burger. Craft beer aficionados should check out The Hoppy Monk (1010 N. Loop 1604 E., 210-545-3330) for savory bites and a solid list of cocktails, or visit The Roost (1221 Broadway, Suite 116, 210-251-3184), the rebranded spot first known as GS 1221. The craft beer focus is still there, but your favorite suds are joined by mimosas, bloodies and a full brunch menu. Cullum’s Attagirl (726 E. Mistletoe Ave., 210-437-4263) makes up for not having a full liquor license with an ever-rotating beer curated tap list and hearty breakfast plates

For When You’re Not Trying to Wreck Your Diet Brunch doesn’t always mean going hard in the paint. Enjoy a chill and healthful morning at Pharm Table (106 Auditorium Cir., 210-802-1860), where you’ll find vegan and dairy-free options (there’s a small corking fee for your own bubbles). Or visit 5 Points Local (1017 N. Flores St., 210-267-2652) for their fresh juices, golden milk lattes and classic breakfast options alongside vegan tacos. Stay on-plan at Revolución Coffee + Juice (multiple locations, revolucionsa.com), which just opened a location downtown, and offers a similar menu of plant-based breakfast items with cage-free eggs and locally sourced meats. BYOB Particular about your bubbles or have a penchant for Cooks? You can drink whatever you please at NOLA Brunch & Beignets (111 Kings Ct., 210-320-1572), which pairs Cajun breakfast staples with a BYOB attitude. The same goes for The Bread Box (555 W. Bitters Road, Suite 115, 210277-8612), where brunch means Croque Madame sandwiches with fresh-baked bread, kolaches, market quiche and more paired with whatever bottle you pick up the night before. For Some Mex Chicken and churros are a thing at Chisme (2403 N. St. Mary’s St., 210-530-4236), and you’ll want to pair the sweet with a salty michelada. Or check out Sabor Cocina Bar (5313 McCullough Ave., 210-314-7760), a small but delightful restaurant in Olmos Park that knows how a thing or two about traditional chilaquiles.

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Ruth’s Chris Steak House With locations at Concord Plaza, La Cantera and Riverwalk Grand Hyatt, you’re never too far away from a Ruth’s Chris steak. Broiled at 1800 degrees for that perfect sear, these steaks win meat-eaters over daily. Get them Oscar style with jumbo lump crab cake, asparagus and homemade béarnaise sauce. Multiple locations, ruthschris.com.

Not your daddy’s Applebee’s

COURTESY OF IN 'N OUT

Shake Shack These New York natives were a big hit with San Antonians when the chain’s first store opened near Park North. Expect another one location spring coming to Mulberry and Broadway. 7427 San Pedro Ave., (210) 277-4770, shakeshack.com. In ‘N Out Burger California natives can’t get enough of the stuff. Whataburger forever, but In N’ Out, sometimes. Multiple locations, in-n-out.com. The County Line If your relatives insist on going to the Riverwalk and eating barbecue, you could do far worse than this river-adjacent joint. Multiple locations, countyline.com. Hopdoddy Burger Bar This Austin-based company packs it all in: fresh ingredients, delicious burgers, huge milk shakes, and several adult beverages to boot. Hopdoddy is also the San Antonio home of the Impossible Burger, a meatless patty that “bleeds,” but is sustainable and plant-based. 17623 La Cantera Pkwy., Suite 101, (210) 434-2337, hopdoddy.com.

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Chester’s Hamburgers Homestyle burgers sandwiched between poppy seed buns pair have won over SA as this chain often tops of Best of San Antonio polls. Multiple locations, chestershamburgers.com. Babe’s Old Fashioned Food From pizza to burgers that require both hands and several napkins, Babe’s has a bit of everything, and most pair well with crisp fried onion rings. With three locations in on the city’s Northwest side, Babe’s is not too far away. Multiple locations, babeshamburgers.com. Bob’s Steak & Chop House This Dallas-based steakhouse with locations across Texas, Florida, Tennessee, New York, California and Arizona packs in the classics, but expect a few surprises like the onion rings and tenderloin carpaccio with Parmesan cheese, olive oil, sea salt and pepper. 5815 Rim Pass Drive, (210) 222-2627, bobs-steakandchop.com. Perry’s Steakhouse & Grille Texas-bred Perry’s got its start as a small butcher shop in 1979 and has grown with loca-

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tions in Austin, Dallas, Denver, Chicago and San Antonio. Steaks are butchered in-house and Perry’s famous pork chop is carved tableside for a signature experience. Keep an eye out for Flashback Fridays, when the chain turns back time and serves up that same chop for less than a dollar. Get there early — this is a deal you can’t pass up. 15900 La Cantera Pkwy., Suite 22200, (210) 558-6161.

Texas de Brazil Influenced by the flavors Porto Alegre, Brazil, Texas de Brazil takes the cuisine of Brazil and combines the hospitality of Texas for a meal unique to this churrascaria. Brazilian sausages, picanha, prosciutto and leg of loin are reliable staples. Hit the salad bar for a lighter choice. 313 E. Houston St., (210) 299-1600, texasdebrazil.com. Snooze, an AM Eatery Benny duos made their way to SA via this Denver-based chain that’s perfect for parents and kiddos. 255 E. Basse Road, Suite 160, (210) 937-1063, snoozeeatery.com. Steel City Pops San Anto knows paletas, but this Birmingham-transplant is winning


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over fans with its chocolate-dipped, caramel-drizzled offerings. Multiple locations, steelcitypops.com. Lick Honest Ice Creams The Austin-based ice cream chain keeps Pearl-goers happy with natural flavors and non-dairy options. 312 Pearl Pkwy., Suite 2101, (210) 314-8166, ilikelick.com. Farenheit 32 Embassy Oaks Shopping Center got a little sweeter with Thai-rolled ice cream out of El Paso. 226 W. Bitters Road, Suite 119, (210) 627-6232. Piatti Although it’s a chain, Piatti’s gives local ingredients a strong role in its menu. Try the Pollo alla Mattone, succulent and fat with flavor, and the baked Texas goat cheese served with Kalamata olives, a veritable hymn to the humble cabra. Multiple locations, piatti.com. Los Balitos Taco Shop Whether you’re picking up for breakfast or stumbling in after a barhop, this popular 24-hour destination adds California influence to SA with killer burritos. Try the yummy over-the-top chile-relleno version, and at least six salsas at the restaurants formerly known as Los Robertos. The tortas are also delicious, especially the carnitas deshebradas. Multiple locations, losrobertostacoshop.com. Sushi Zushi With four locations around the city and a usual winner during our annual Best Of SA readers poll, Sushi Zushi is a San Antonio favorite. Texas flavors influence this menu with the spicy LIR roll and spicy tuna roll. The warm katsu curry comforts the sushi averse. Pair it with a strawberry gingertini or blackberry smash from the bar. Multiple locations, sushizushi.com. Bowl & Barrel/General Public Bowling doesn’t have to be drab. At this Dallas-based eatery-meetsbowling alley, the bites are modern, fresh and tasty. The shared kitchen with General Public mean you can enjoy the same fare without all the lanes. 17619 La Cantera Pkwy., Suite 102, (210) 920-1102, bowlandbarrel.com. sacurrent.com • W I N T E R

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SAN ANTONIO RESTAURANT WEEKS Monday, January 21 - Saturday, February 2: Restaurants in San Antonio, Boerne & New Braunfels

More than 100 restaurants come together for the biggest celebration of dining in San Antonio. Guests can enjoy prixfixe breakfasts, lunches and dinners: $25 Breakfast/Brunch, $15 Lunch, $35/$45 Dinner, with $1 from each lunch and $2 from each dinner supporting the programs of Culinaria.

5K WINE & BEER RUN Saturday, March 16 • 8am The Shops at La Cantera

The Culinaria 5k Wine & Beer Run, set in the beautiful Hill Country at The Shops at La Cantera, is full of health, food, beverages and fun! This race is certainly not a sprint (unless you’re into that – awards will be given!) – and works for all fitness levels! The reward is the best post-race reception in town with food from San Antonio chefs to be enjoyed with tasty wine and beer.

CULINARIA WINE & FOOD FESTIVAL May 2019: Date TBA La Cantera Resort & Spa

Culinaria’s Wine + Food Festival delivers on a truly authentic experience celebrating the confluence of culture found in San Antonio’s diverse culinary landscape. Experience the Culinaria Village where Modern meets Texas Glam. Offering multiple activations and a full schedule of indulging through the sights, sounds and flavors of San Antonio.

VISIT CULINARIASA.ORG FOR ALL EVENT DETAILS OR CULINARIASA ON FACEBOOK, INSTAGRAM AND TWITTER. 76

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golden hops. This is a beer with definite attitude; there’s no denying it wasn’t going for Christmas in the Caribbean. 202 Lamar St., (210) 872-5589, alamobeer.com.

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ingredients and time to brew.” For a time, brewers in Germany were expressly forbidden to make beer in summer due in part to the unpredictability of hotweather fermentation. What does this all mean to the beer-curious of today? With the rise of small-batch craft brewers able to move more flexibly between styles, the appearance of fall and winter beers, specific to the brisker days, can once again be anticipated. Roaring fire not required. Alamo Brewing made its mark with Golden Ale, and even its designated seasonal offerings are on the lighter side — not that the TricenteniALE, with its “rich English malts” couldn’t work on a crisp fall’s day in SA. The Holiday IPA gave me mostly hops, however. But if you want to experience Alamo at its deepest darkest, and wintriest, head instead to The Basement Series and Horchata Porter. The name suggests rice and cinnamon, and there are certainly whiffs of both cinnamon bark spiciness and pine wreath on the nose. On the palate, chocolate stands off against floral notes, among them lavender, that are likely a result of the East Kent

Dorcol Distilling + Brewing Co. ‘s HighWheel beer line, available at the distillery/brewery and at outlets such as The Hoppy Monk, Still Golden and 1919, is currently being fleshed out to 10 selections in anticipation of the distillery’s fifth anniversary on December 15. Brewer Randy Ward has produced some seasonal suds from the get-go, however. Though his deep mahogany porter is balanced enough between malts and hops to drink year ‘round, it does speak of tailgates, touchdowns and freshly cracked walnuts. Roasting chestnuts are more the thing with the chewy, malty Irish Red that offers up molasses, raisins, toast and a hint of coffee bean. Ward’s Dunkelweizen is a Bavarian wheat ale, dark on the density scale and perfumed with prune, gingerbread and blackstrap molasses — what pumpkin spice wants to be but never achieves. His Black Kolsch plays sexy Veronica to the blonde Betty, the company’s first, and still most popular, beer. It somehow manages to be both dark and bright. And the barrel-aged oatmeal stout, being released on that fifth anniversary, RON

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artial to pale pink rosé in winter? Go for it. Find yourself jonesing for bruiserbig cabernets in July? Bottoms up! Feel free, for that matter, to ignore seasons altogether — with the possible exception of tasteless tomatoes in December; next-day global shipping, for all its problematic carbon footprint, has made it possible for us to have what we want whenever we want it. But there are also times when seasonality is to be celebrated — those first strawberries of spring, for example. Fall pumpkins apart (please), brewers have long conformed to seasonal strictures. According to craftbeer.com, “Prior to the advent of electricity, necessity dictated that brewing be relegated to certain times of the year. Access to ingredients and the need for nature to provide adequate brewing and lagering temperatures demanded that brewing was done in either the spring — where beers could be aged, or lagered [for release Oat Oktoberfest and beyond], often in caves allowing for temperature control despite the weather above ground — or fall, when the cooling weather and the end of the harvest brought ample

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The ‘tender at Blue Star Brewing, the city’s longest-operating craft brewery, suggested I try Spire Stout, Doppelbock and Wheathead. I managed two out of three. The Spire is a nitro-delivered stout, and the creaminess that results doesn’t quite get to eggnog consistency, but does suggest celebration. Otherwise, the deep color might lead you to expect a denser beer than this is; it’s toasty but far from heavy and the final impression is of a lingering bitterness. The Doppelbock is a bit of a bludgeon, though a gentlemanly one, in comparison. (At 7.5 percent, it’s also more aggressive in alcohol.) The malts are big and boast of molasses, there’s a slightly sour component, and the mouthfeel is dense and almost chewy. The whole thing suggests peaty fires, damp dogs and cashmere throws all in one. 1414 S. Alamo St., Suite 105, (210) 2125506, bluestarbrewing.com.

has spent three months in five year-old sherry barrels from Cruz de Comal that subsequently housed Kinsman rakia for two years. The barrels fortify an already complex flavor profile, including chocolate and coffee that was only amplified with an additional nine months cellaring after leaving the barrel. Ward says the added oatmeal contributes to enhanced mouthfeel, and indeed it does. 1902 S. Flores St., (210) 229-0607, dorcolspirits.com. At Freetail Brewing Co.’s S. Presa location, the on-tap count is an impressive 13 offerings, many of which fall neatly into the seasonal slot. My server suggested a flight of four. Wanting the darker two selections to warm up a bit over tap temp, I started with, and lingered over, the Inbox Zero Is A Myth That Makes You A Prisoner To Your Desk: the name is more complex than the beer — which doesn’t mean I didn’t like it. It gets multiple dosings of hops at different stages, including dry-hopping, shows some of that influence on the nose, along with citrus peel, and comes across slightly bitter on the tongue with a little floral influence. I could see this with sage-scented turkey dressing. The Texicali Brown Ale had just been released the first week of November, and a little warming didn’t hurt it either, only emphasizing a malty nose with chocolate, coffee and toffee. Good with, and in, chili, claimed said server. If seriously, sensationally big beers are your thing, do not pass up both this year’s La Muerta and last year’s (2017) matured in whiskey and port barrels. They both suggest pairing with roast beef, peppery sausages and deeply glazed ham — or just contemplating their similarities and differences with a good cigar. The 2018 Muerta, an Imperial Stout, boasts 8.5 ABV (alcohol by volume), and though it’s more of a boxing glove than a hammer, it flaunts bigness in everything but bitterness — though there is some of that to balance out the pomegranate molasses. Death is only improved by aging; the 2017 may be higher in alcohol at 9.9 ABV, but the sweetness of the port and the slight vanilla of the whiskey barrels combine to offer a more complex brew. Think fruitcake (no, really), chocolate mousse, dried figs and Dickens. 2000 S. Presa

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St., (210) 395-4974, freetailbrewing.com. Oktoberfest is the classic release time for both inhibitions and German fall beers, and it’s only logical that it should have been celebrated in style at Künstler Brewing, one of the city’s newer craft operations. Vera Deckard, brewer and co-owner, has German roots but is hardly a stickler when it comes to the famous 1516 German beer purity law (only water, barley hops and later, yeast, were allowed to be used): she flouts it at every turn. She suggested four of her beers to taste with the season in mind. Saint Chapelle, a Belgian Triple with both wheat and oats, conjured the kickingthrough-dry-leaves spice of a bright fall day. Candy apple tastes appeared, but the finish was dry. I wasn’t initially a fan of the Dieter Dunkel; it looked way more intense than it showed. But a little warming allowed bread, pumpkin pie spice and a whiff of mocha to emerge. The actual Mokka, a milk stout, revealed its hand of coffee and cacao right upfront. Toss a little leafy tobacco into the mix, and you have a brew to keep winter winds at bay. I didn’t expect to be impressed by the farmhouse ale that is Deckard’s The Northman, but it had me at aromas of citrus peel, yeast and hops. The body, too, was more voluptuous than the hazy golden straw color implied. This one would carry you through an entire turkey dinner — up to, but maybe not including, dessert. Deckard says she’ll have a barleywine (despite the name, it’s actually a beer, one that’s typically thick, intense and alcoholic) ready for Christmas. This one should be worth returning for. 302 E. Lachapelle St., (210) 688-4519, kuenstlerbrewing.com. TO

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100% of the bar profits go to 4 charities each month

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CHERRITY BAR + KURIYA BAR AT CHERRITY BAR

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Where to drink for a good cause

Ranger Creek’s TJ Miller took some time out to take me through a trio of his seasonals before hosting a group tour of the brewstillery on a blustery Saturday afternoon, the weather a perfect showcase for his just-released Sunday Morning Coming Down. Based on a British brown ale, Sunday Morning “took six months to R&D,” according to Miller. Its subtle coffee notes come from remarkably small amounts of cold-brewed coffee added toward the end of the production process, a touch of dried lactose adds “creamy” components, and the result is the best expression of a coffee brew currently on tap (and in cans) locally. It will be around until mid-February. Have one now for breakfast, “one more for dessert” and thank Kris and Johnny for the inspiration. Ranger Creek’s Imperial Red will appear sometime after Thanksgiving. Part of the barrel-aged series, and based on their Red Headed Stranger, no longer in retail distribution, it sees three months mostly in RC’s own bourbon barrels. The initial hit is of sweet and roasty caramel with molasses coming along for the ride later. There’s a certain appealing “thickness” to the mouthfeel, but at 11.9 percent even Miller says, “I might drink one glass.” Maybe before moving on to the only slightly less lethal Russian Imperial Stout, another brew betraying its time in bourbon barrels with aromas of toasty wood, vanilla and raisin. It weighs in at a regal 10.64 percent, is almost dauntingly opaque, and yet it’s far from heavy seeming, maybe due to a nicely balanced hoppiness. Yes, let both of these warm up before chugging down. “At least 10 minutes out of the fridge,” says Miller. Even more doesn’t hurt. 4834 Whirlwind Drive, (210) 339-2282, drinkrangercreek.com.

302 Montana St. San Antonio, Texas 78203 | 210.598.0496

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Not only is Roadmap Brewing Co. the newest game in town, but its brewer and part owner is likely the youngest. “I’m the only brewer who still gets carded,” has said 27 year-old (and 17-looking) Dustin Baker — this according to a usually reliable source. Baker isn’t doing any releases specifisacurrent.com • W I N T E R

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cally for the season, though he does rotate taps regularly because, as he admitted, “I get bored.” But there’s more than enough in the 12-beer lineup to fit falling temperatures, and apparently patrons agree: the promising Ja-Lop-Ah-No jalapeño milk stout was sold out the early November evening I appeared. Nothing to do but start with the Smucker’s Night Out Raspberry Saison. And, in the Belgian tradition of brewing strongly fruit-flavored beers in early fall, it’s a mouthful. Fans of smothering toast (or biscuits — this is the south) in jam will appreciate the full-bore fruit flavor; maybe think of it as, not with, dessert. Blackberry is up next. Roadmap’s Wake Up Call coffee milk stout is equally uncompromising. Baker says he’d serve it with Sunday brunch if that were legal. There’s a little toasty malt in this one, but coffee otherwise dominates. The Craven Cottage English Pub ale gets its coffee and chocolate notes more naturally from the malts, I’d venture. It’s a pretty toffee color suggestive of fall foliage — if we had that sort of thing hereabouts, and it finishes with just the merest touch of bitterness to send you out into the nippiness of November. 723 N. Alamo St., (210) 254-9962, roadmapbrewing.com.

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Southerleigh Fine Food & Brewery’s brewing apparatus is the most atmospheric of Suds City’s setups — arguably steampunk in style, but certainly high design no matter what you call it. Brewmaster Les Locke presides over an impressive battery of taps with evocative names and equally expressive profiles. The bar’s brewtender picked four for me to sample on another of those nippy nights. First up was the lament for a lost cause, the Beeto 4 TX. Yes, there were beets — actual purée, I was told. And, perhaps like Texas, the color was faintly purple. There was a touch of understandable bitterness at the finish. But in between, it was a bright, bracing, upbeat brew — moderately hopped up and with a touch of minerality. Locke’s Fresh to Death Marzen was enveloping in the manner of a fur throw (faux fur, of course): warming, malt-forward without being chocolatey, and exhibiting a hint of wildflower honey with time. Et Tu Brut, in contrast, was almost Champagne-like in style as the brut, in this case, refers to the beer’s “complete attenuation,” or brewing until all sugars have been converted to alcohol for a creamy dry finish. A whisper of grapefruit peel sealed the deal. Oso Bay Oyster Stout, I was surprised to learn, does contain actual oysters — or at least the shells. This makes total sense at Southerleigh, especially with the opening of the new oyster bar. And it works in the beer — not that any oyster brininess actually makes its way into the final product. As a parting shot, let me mention this mantra one more time: let your dark beers warm a little to get the full picture. In Oso’s case, chocolate and coffee get more cortado-like with time, without losing that essential cacao-nib bite. The beer is now warming you, a great case of give a little, get a lot. 136 E. Grayson St., (210) 455-5701, southerleigh.com. Weathered Souls Fans of wild card brews should pay attention to Marcus Baskerville's creations at WS. A recent visit welcomed a variety of limited releases including the I'm In Love with the Coco, a barrel-aged imperial stout that packed a punch of flavors and the season appropriate Sweet Ginger Brown, an imperial oatmeal stout laden with allspice, cinnamon, nutmeg, molasses, and vanilla beans. Make it your beer of choice when building that gingerbread house this season. 606 Embassy Oaks, Suite 500, (210) 313-8796, weatheredsouls.beer.

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ETC.

San Antonio Cocktail Conference Do you ever wish you knew how to make badass cocktails? Or maybe you just want to sip on them. Either way, the San Antonio Cocktail Conference is right up your alley. With classes, tastings, seminars and, of course, parties, the annual Conference has it all. The 2019 schedule is still being mapped out, but plan to learn and sip your way through everything cocktail. It all starts on January 14 with 100 percent of the profits ben-

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10 Ways to Get Your Drink/Grub This Spring

efiting Houston Street Charities. Prices vary, January 14-20, sanantoniococktailconference.com.

Culinaria’s Spring Restaurant Week This is your opportunity to dine at some of the top restaurants in the city, from newly opened restaurants to San Antonio staples. With tier one restaurant entrées ranging from $25 breakfast/brunch, $15 lunch and $35 to $45 for dinner, you can taste some of the best dishes of San Antonio while your bank account recuperates from your holiday expenses. Reservations are not required, but expect tables to go fast. Multiple locations, January 21-February 2, culinariasa.org.

FEB

Asian Festival It’s the Year of the Boar and the Institute of Texan Cultures’ Asian Festival invites guests to come

out and experience Asian culture. Enjoy music, traditional Asian dances, fashion, crafts and Asian-American food from 15 different vendors. From Japanese cuisine to Laotian cuisine, pad Thai to chicken tikka masala, we are sure your taste buds will thank you. $10-$12, 10am-5pm, February 9, texancultures.com. Flavor: The Event M Come out to the San Antonio Museum of Art to celebrate the city’s growing culinary community. Enjoy delicious food from some of the top restaurants and chefs in San Antonio as well as live music, craft beer, wine and cocktails. This event will have you basking in culinary heaven. Prices vary, San Antonio Museum of Art, Late March, sacurrent.com.

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Wings & Beer Fest Things get a little saucy at this now-second annual event that brings together wing connoisseurs and wing makers for one finger-lickin’ day. Prices vary, March 30, St. Paul Square, egcollaborations.com.


ETC. 303 N. Frio SA, TX 78207

ANDREW LOPEZ

210.688.5792 M–F 8A – 4:30P

Culinaria 5K Wine and Beer Run If there is one run you are going to participate in, this is the one. When the destination features wine, beer and food, you will want to make it to the finish line. Taking place at the beautiful Shops at La Cantera, this event will have all of the sights and tastes for a great day, albeit maybe a little sweaty. $20-$35, 8am, March 16, culinariasa.org.

APR

Fiesta San Antonio Nothing brings people together like a big-ass party. Now in its 127th year, Fiesta celebrates San Antonio arts and culture. There is an event for everyone, whether you want to grab a few (maybe more than a few) beers at Night Out in Old San Antonio, watch the Battle of the Flowers parade with the family or enjoy some live music and oysters at St. Mary’s Oyster Bake. Get ready San Antonio, festivities are from April 18-28. Prices vary, multiple locations, check fiesta-sa. org for a full schedule of events. Culinaria Festival Week This four-day foodie experience features multiple events around the city that you won’t want to miss. From burgers and fries to haute cuisine, Festival week offers it all. It’s the perfect opportunity to gather up all your friends and enjoy some seriously good food. Prices vary, dates TBA, culinariasa.org.

May

Twisted Taco Truck Throwdown Al pastor tacos as far as the eye can see. No, it’s not a dream. The Twisted Taco Throwdown makes it a reality. With SA’s best taco trucks out to prove that they make the best al pastor taco, guests can’t really go wrong. Grab a cold beer and use that taco emojii to your heart’s desire. Tentatively set for May. United We Brunch M Tiny pancakes, all the waffles you can eat, MIMOSAS? United We Brunch heads back downtown with more breakfast fare. Micheladas and bloody marys all around! June, Jack Guenther Pavilion at the Briscoe Western Art Museum, sacurrent.com.

JUN

Frozen Treats Fest During the early summer days, eG Collaborations gathers ice cream, gelato and paleta vendors from across the city for a cool day of sweet treats. June 15, St. Paul Square, egcollaborations.com.

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WINTER FLAVOR 2018-2019

holidays

Pearl is San Antonio’s destination for this year’s holiday season. Unique retail. Exceptional dining. Festive celebrations. Award-winning accommodations.

SAN ANTONIO’S ULTIMATE FOOD LOVER’S GUIDE SACURRENT.COM

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Flavor Winter 2018  

Flavor Winter 2018