__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

CINCINNATI’S NEWS AND ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY | OCT. 3-9, 2018 | FREE

A WIDE-OPEN ARCHIVE FOTOFOCUS EXPLORES THE MYRIAD WAYS VISUAL COLLECTIONS INSPIRE ARTISTS, BUILD COMMUNITIES AND SHAPE MEMORIES

BY KATHY SCHWARTZ S T. PA U L & T H E B R O K E N B O N E S 2/21

ON SALE FRIDAY!

TAFTTH EATRE.O RG


CCM’S MAINSTAGE ACTING SERIES PROUDLY PRESENTS

VOL. 24 | ISSUE 45 ON THE COVER: “NE WSSTAND,” 1935 PHOTO: BERENICE A BBOT T, COURTESY OF MUSEUM OF THE CIT Y OF NE W YORK. GIF T OF THE ME TROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF A RT,

PUBLISHER

TONY FR ANK EDITOR IN CHIEF

M AIJA ZUMMO

MANAGING EDITOR / MUSIC EDITOR

MIK E BREEN

ARTS & CULTURE EDITOR

M ACK ENZIE M ANLE Y

NE WS EDITOR

NICK SWA RT SELL

DESIGNER

TAYLOR SPEED

Adapted by Jeffrey Hatcher From the original by Nikolai Gogol

DIGITAL MEDIA EDITOR / STAFF PHOTOGR APHER

H AILE Y BOLLINGER

COPY EDITOR /CALENDAR EDITOR

MORGAN ZUMBIEL

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

THE ATER: RICK PENDER

FILM: T T STERN-ENZI VISUAL ARTS: K ATHY SCHWA RT Z DINING CRITIC: PA M A MITCHELL CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

OCT. 3 (PREVIEW)-7, 2018 PATRICIA CORBETT THEATER

TICKET PRICES START AT $28.

“ One part farce, one part slapstick … and wholly entertaining” -Star Tribune CCM Mainstage Season Production Sponsor

Photo by Mark Lyons. THE GOVERNMENT INSPECTOR is presented by special arrangement with Dramatic Play Service, Inc., New York.

Discounts are available for UC and non-UC students. Preview performance tickets start at $15. Service charges may apply for online orders.

513-556-4183 boxoff@uc.edu ccm.uc.edu

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

|

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

WORK AT

2

WE’RE HIRING! Advertising Sales Executive

If the following sounds like you, we’d love to speak with you: You are energetic, outgoing and passionate You are fearless and welcome challenges You conduct yourself with professionalism in person, in writing and over the phone Compensation: Base salary + commission + Bonus Paid Vacation/PTO Insurance + 401(k) Spiffs and prizes around special events Visit CityBeat.com/Work-Here to learn more and submit your resume. *Online submissions including resumes only. No other inquiries will be considered*

VOICES 04 NEWS 06 COVER STORY 09 STUFF TO DO 17 ARTS & CULTURE 31 FOOD & DRINK 37 MUSIC 41 CLASSIFIEDS 47 CIT Y BE AT | 811 R ACE ST., FIF TH FLOOR, CINCINNATI, OH 4 5202 PHONE: 513-665- 4700 | FA X: 513-665- 4 368 | CIT Y BE AT.COM PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER WITH SOY-BASED INKS PLE ASE RECYCLE THIS NE WSPAPER! THANKS :)

ANNE A RENSTEIN, CASE Y A RNOLD, BRIAN BAK ER, JEFF BE Y ER, JACK BRENNAN, STEPHEN NOVOTNI, BRIAN CROSS, H AYLE Y DAY, JANE DURRELL, JASON GA RGANO, AUSTIN GAYLE, MCK ENZIE GR AH A M, K ATIE HOLOCHER, BEN L. K AUFM AN, DEIRDRE K AY E, JOHN J. K ELLY, JOHN L ASK ER, H A RPER LEE, M ADGE M A RIL, ANNE MITCHELL, TA MER A LENZ MUENTE, JUDE NOEL, M A RK PAINTER, SE AN PE TERS, RODGER PILLE, GA RIN PIRNIA, SELENA REDER, ILENE ROSS, M A RIA SEDA-REEDER, LE YL A SHOKOOHE, BRENNA SMITH, ISA AC THORN, K ATHY VALIN, K ATHY Y. WILSON, P.F. WILSON EDITORIAL INTERNS

M A RLENA TOEBBEN

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGR APHERS

SCOT T DIT TGEN, JESSE FOX, PHIL HEIDENREICH, KHOI NGUYEN, BRIT TANY THORNTON, CATIE VIOX PHOTOGR APHY INTERNS

EMERSON SWOGER, DE VIN LUGINBILL

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

JOSH SCHULER

OFFICE ADMINISTR ATOR

SA M ANTH A JOHNSTON E VENT DIRECTOR

SA MI NOWLIN

CIRCUL ATION MANAGER

STE VE FERGUSON

DISTRIBUTION TE AM

TOM SAND, JOAN POWERS, JERRY ENNIS, DOUG DRENNAN, RICK CA RROL, MIK E SWANGO, ASHLE Y DAVIS, ROWDY WALK ER, CHRIS LOWSTUTER, DAN FERGUSON, DOUG ANNIS EUCLID MEDIA GROUP

CHIEF E XECUTIVE OFFICER

ANDRE W ZELM AN

CHIEF OPER ATING OFFICERS

CHRIS K E ATING, MICH A EL WAGNER VP OF DIGITAL SERVICES

STACY VOLHEIN

CRE ATIVE DIRECTOR

TOM CA RLSON

DIGITAL OPER ATIONS COORDINATOR

© 2018 | CityBeat is a registered trademark of CityBeat Communications, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission. CityBeat covers news, public issues, arts and entertainment of interest to readers in Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky. The views expressed in these pages do not necessarily represent those of the publishers. One copy per person of the current issue is free; additional copies, including back issues up to one year, are available at our offices for $1 each. Subscriptions: $70 for six months, $130 for one year (delivered via first–class mail). Advertising Deadline: Display advertising, 12 p.m. Wednesday before publication; Classified advertising, 5 p.m. Thursday before publication. Warehousing Services: Harris Motor Express, 4261 Crawford Street, Cincinnati, OH 45223.

JAIME MONZON

W W W.EUCLIDMEDIAGROUP.COM


O FR N S A IDA LE Y!

The Ultimate, Intimate, Entertainment Experience!

AN EVENING WITH

RAY LAMONTAGNE

ST. PAUL & THE BROKEN BONES

GILLIAN WELCH OCTOBER 8

OCTOBER 17

moe.

GORDON LIGHTFOOT

THE MAVERICKS

KANSAS

DAWES

JOHN HIATT

FEBRUARY 21

OCTOBER 25

w/ LIZA ANNE

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9

OCTOBER 28

NOVEMBER 13

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10

BRIAN SETZER ORCHESTRA

GENERATION AXE

w/ LARA HOPE & THE ARK-TONES

NOVEMBER 19

NOVEMBER 20

GARY OWEN

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 15

NOVEMBER 8

HOUNDMOUTH

NOVEMBER 15

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16

JOHN BUTLER TRIO+ w/ DUSTIN THOMAS

GAELIC STORM

PAULA POUNDSTONE

FEBRUARY 20

SATURDAY, MARCH 2

SATURDAY, MARCH 16

DEAFHEAVEN / DIIV w/ CHASTITY

DECEMBER 10

PATTON OSWALT

SATURDAY, APRIL 27

THE MAGPIE SALUTE JANUARY 27

Get tickets at TAFTTHEATRE.org, the Taft Theatre box office, Ticketmaster.com or charge by phone at 1.800.745.3000 All tickets subject to applicable fees and day of show increase. Dates, times and artists subject to change without notice.

TAFTTHEATRE.org

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

NOVEMBER 7

SLEEP

w/ WEATHER WARLOCK

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30

KURT VILE & THE VIOLATORS w/ THE SADIES

NOVEMBER 6

NOVEMBER 1

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23

NICKI BLUHM

OCTOBER 18

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20

|

PETE YORN

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

AN EVENING WITH

PEPPA PIG LIVE!

GEORGE LOPEZ

CELTIC THUNDER X

3


LETTERS Surfin’ Birds Lisa Elena: Having lived in San Diego for a long time, I can understand...

CONTACT US

Comment posted on twitter.com/CityBeatCincy in response to the Sept. 25 post, “ ‘My dawg JT even says I express my emotions more freely after a ride, which is pretty tight.’ Watch two righteous dudes defend Bird scooters at a Californian city council meeting and try not to tear up.”

ONLINE CityBeat.com FACEBOOK

French Clique Sends Love

@CincinnatiCityBeat

Vanessa ||-//: Wishing all our lucky banditos attending Clique Night tonight a fabulous time! Celebrate being alive, share love and enjoy yourselves. Love from a Frenchie across the pond.

TWITTER @CityBeatCincy @CityBeatMusic

Comment re-posted on twitter.com/CityBeatCincy in response to Sept. 25 post, “The Skeleton Clique will be out in full force tonight @BogartsShows, as (Twenty One Pilots’) Trench countdown clock is now at a mere six days.”

INSTAGRAM @CityBeatCincy SNAPCHAT

Yada Yada Yada

@CityBeatCincy

Jeanne Aronoff: Great article @CityBeatCincy. Can not wait to hear the stories live from @seinfeldmusic, who created the music for 75 different TV series and is best known for his iconic Seinfeld theme @ WoodwardTheater Comment re-posted on twitter.com/CityBeatCincy in response to the Sept. 28 post, “Some Seinfeld theme song ‘fun facts’ in anticipation of composer Jonathan Wolff’s appearance next week @WoodwardTheater for a Sweet Cheeks Diaper Bank benefit.”

VOICEMAIL 513-665-4700 SNAIL MAIL Twenty One Pilots

811 Race St., Fifth Floor Cincinnati, OH 45202

P H O T O : B R A D H E AT O N

EMAIL

For the Children…

Feedback/Letters/ Info/Questions: letters@citybeat.com

Devin Burgess: BEAUTIFUL. HIP HOP IS FOR THE KIDS

News tips: nswartsell@citybeat.com

Comment re-posted on twitter.com/CityBeatCincy in response to the Sept. 29 post, “There is ‘grown’ Hip Hop that has kid-appeal, but for Hip Hop designed FOR children, The Corner — made by a trio of Cincy artists — should be your 1st choice. For parents, it’s an opportunity to knock The Wiggles and Barney out of the playtime playlist.”

Music Listings: mbreen@citybeat.com Event Listings: calendar@citybeat.com

Bigger Bunbury?

Dining News/Events: eats@citybeat.com

Nick Moscato: AEG works on Coachella, Firefly, Electric Forest, New Orleans Jazz, Hangout, Rock on the Range, among others. It’ll be interesting to see what they do with PW’s venues and festivals with Forecastle and Bonnaroo (AC Entertainment/Superfly) right down the road.

Advertise: sales@citybeat.com Billing: billing@citybeat.com

Comment re-posted on twitter.com/CityBeatCincy in response to the Sept. 30 post, “The Bunbury Music Festival should have access to a lot of additional resources next year, as huge promoters AEG announce the acquisition of the Cincy fest’s owners, PromoWest.” O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

Oct. 08-14 Cincinnati Taco Week

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

UPCOMING EVENTS

|

Staff: first initial of first name followed by last name@citybeat.com

4

Oct. 03 HopScotch

The Corner album PHOTO: PROVIDED

Nov. 02 Mac & Cheese Throwndown


Amazon s Cincinnati & Kentucky We’re hiring! Earn up to $17.55/hr Full-time jobs with benefits on your first day or choose part-time jobs with flexible hours. Start now - you could have an Amazon job offer today! AN IRISH WHISKEY, SCOTCH ANd cRAFT BEER TASTING EVENT

october 3rd, 2018 5:30-8:30 Pm New Riff Distillery

|

Newport, Ky

Learn more or apply now at amazon.com/CVGjobs or text CVGNOW to 77088

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

Save the date

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

hopscotchcincy.com Amazon is an Equal Opportunity-Affirmative Action Employer — Minority / Female / Disability / Veteran / Gender Identity / Sexual Orientation

5


NEWS Pureval Needs Warren County to Win. How’s He Doing? The fresh-faced Democrat will need to win over more than one third of deep-red Warren County to unseat U.S. Rep. Steve Chabot. Here’s how he’s trying to do it. BY T I M M Y B R O D ER I C K

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

|

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

H

6

eather Rose looks like a typical Mason mom, but she talks like a soothsayer. “No one’s coming to save us,” says Rose, talking about President Trump and the current political climate. “We have to save ourselves. One day my grandkids are going to look back on this and say, what did you do?” So, for the first time in her life, Rose is a political campaign volunteer — knocking on doors and phone banking for Aftab Pureval, the rising 36-year-old Democratic Party hopeful battling Republican U.S. Rep. Steve Chabot for Ohio’s 1st Congressional District. Pureval is betting on voters like Rose this November. Pureval has been Hamilton County Clerk of Courts since a surprise win against longtime Republican clerk Tracy Winkler in 2016. Now, he’s trying to amplify that upset by unseating Chabot in a district that spans all of Warren County and the western swath of Hamilton County. Though Chabot has held the seat for more than two decades — minus one losing bid in 2008, when the blue wave around President Barack Obama swept Democrat Steve Driehaus into office — prognosticators see it as vulnerable and also crucial to the Democrats’ bid to regain control of the House. Winning this election will be difficult. Local politicos have pegged the race’s

Aftab Pureval visiting voters in Warren County PHOTO: PROVIDED

outcome on the turnout in Warren County, which has elected Chabot by 20-point margins in the last three elections. But it is this same bastion of conservatism where Democrats have seen a surge in enthusiasm — enough to trouble local Republicans and turn the race into a toss-up. “We’re turning out the Democrats in record numbers,” says Bethe Goldenfield, the longtime chair of the Warren County Democratic Party. “I have not seen this kind of energy since 2008, and at the local level I didn’t even see this much energy for (President) Obama.” Much of this energy stems from, as Pureval calls them, “pissed-off Mason moms” — women like Heather Rose. Trump’s win in 2016 left her and many other women very dismayed, so they all got together to commiserate. Kvetching turned into brainstorming which turned into political organizing. “We had no idea what we were doing,” Rose says, whose involvement mostly started at her daughter’s urging. “In one

of our early meetings, we brought in somebody from the Ohio Democratic Party and were like, alright, tell us what to do. We were really disorganized.” Goldenfield and other longtime Democrats in Warren County helped prop up this and other grassroots groups that have sprung up in the wake of the last presidential election. “If there’s anything good that’s come out of 2016, it’s that there are a lot of folks that feel the same way,” Rose says. “Maybe there were a lot of us that were just going along and not causing waves, but at a certain point you can’t just keep quiet and let things go.” Liberal enthusiasm can only do so much in Warren County, which hasn’t elected a Democrat for four decades. The region is a hotbed of conservatism that loved the Tea Party — almost 66 percent of voters there checked the box for Trump in 2016. “If you support the issues that are conservative in ideology, then people support you,” says Warren County GOP Chair Jeff Monroe. “It works very simply

here: if you are pro small or limited government and if you are pro-life and if you are pro-gun, Warren County will vote for you.” Warren County resident Rusty Holman agrees, pointing to tax levies in particular. “Pick the wildest thing you could ever think of, that people would normally vote for, and you’re going to have a solid block of people in Warren County saying, ‘Not one single dollar of additional taxes will I pay,’ ” says Holman, a self-described fiscal hawk. This overwhelmingly conservative reality is starting to change, however, as more and more immigrants settle in the southern part of the county. It is already home to one of the region’s largest Muslim communities, and students of color comprise nearly 40 percent of the Mason school district. The school has been rocked by several racist incidents in the past few years. Even the school board race got ugly. When Noha Eyada, a former physician and Muslim immigrant, ran for an open seat, people threatened her, questioned her citizenship


and derided her on a WLW talk show. She lost but plans to run again. “Kids need to find somebody who looks like them, who represents them, who speaks on their behalf, based on their experiences,” she says. Similar reasons have motivated Eyada to volunteer for Pureval’s campaign. “There are a lot of immigrants in Warren County, so when people find somebody who is the child of immigrants and came this far, they will support him,” she says. “That’s not the one and only reason, but I mean, my kids look up to him as their ideal. It gives you hope.” For Faiz Sherman, a longtime Procter & Gamble engineer who immigrated from Kenya decades ago, his support of Pureval has less to do with the Democrat being the son of immigrants and more to do with how he has engaged Sherman’s community. “If you’re reaching out to me and my communities and worried about my issues, I’m going to care about you more,” he says. “(Chabot) didn’t even send a representative; I don’t think he has engaged the Muslim community.” Chabot’s campaign did not return calls or emails from CityBeat requesting comment for this story.

Immigrants alone will not win Pureval the election. If he wants to win 35 percent of the vote in Warren County — a margin the campaign believes should be enough to win overall — Pureval will have to court conservatives. There are whispers of a “Republicans for Aftab” group forming, but most Republicans voting for Pureval already switched sides in the 2016 election. For David Niven, a political science professor at the University of Cincinnati, this tracks: the midterms are typically a referendum on the president. “Trump is the reason why there is a race, the reason why the Dems could field a top-level candidate is because of Trump,” Niven says. “Voters could very well say they aren’t making their decision based off Trump but the fact that they have a decision to make is because of Trump.” Warren County resident and former Republican Konrad Kircher thinks antiTrump backlash explains only part of the equation. “There’s a lot about Aftab himself that’s been responsible for a lot of the enthusiasm,” says Kircher, now vice chair for the Warren County Democrats. “Aftab has been everywhere, he’ll go from person to person and make sure that everybody feels like he is listening to them.”

Some Republicans say Chabot hasn’t matched Pureval’s energy in the contest. “Unfortunately not,” says Ray Warrick, the former chair of the county GOP. “I think some of the officials in the Warren County Republican Party are a little frustrated with Chabot’s efforts.” Warren County voters already know Chabot — he has represented them since 2013, when his district was redrawn to include the staunchly-Republican county — so his incumbency means he does not have to canvass as hard as Pureval. Still, the Democrat’s campaign is impressing some Republicans. “He’s been up here a lot, there’s more signage, they’re enthused,” Warrick says. “Historic numbers would say the numbers just aren’t there for (Pureval) but if there’s a lack of turnout of those grassroots folks, I think that’s what makes this race a toss-up.” Currently, die-hard conservatives don’t seem to be mobilizing. “I don’t think Steve Chabot is the kind of guy who gets people fired up,” Niven says. “He is that kind of stock character, this longtime politician who survived in a district that was drawn to keep him safe. He’s in effect punching the clock in this politics game, and that’s well and good except in a bad political year.”

Alternatively, Warren County GOP Chair Monroe is not worried about Chabot’s chances. “It’s an easy campaign to run in my mind,” Monroe says. “Stand on who you are; you don’t have to pretend you’re different, just state those values and Warren County is on your side. The Congressman has been serving in the Congress. He simply needs to state what he’s been doing.” According to Niven, “Ultimately this is a question of how big is the (Democratic Party’s) enthusiasm advantage. If it’s sizable, the 1st District gets a new congressman. If it’s minimal, Steve Chabot gets another two years.” For Warren County resident Holman, a vote for Chabot is a vote to continue the Republican majority. “To my way of thinking, probably the best thing (Chabot) can do is support the Trump agenda and vicariously do that,” he says. “Trump carried Warren County, he is quite popular.” Meanwhile, Rose sees Pureval as the best hope for the district. “It doesn’t matter what side you’re on, you have to demand more out of your elected leaders,” she says. “You have to. But if Aftab can’t do it, nobody can do it.”

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

| C I T Y B E AT. C O M

CONTINUES ON PAGE 10

7


FOTOFOCUS BIENNIAL 2018: OPEN ARCHIVE Now in its fourth iteration, the 2018 FotoFocus Biennial encompasses more than 90 projects at museums, galleries, and universities across Greater Cincinnati; Northern Kentucky; Dayton and Columbus, Ohio; and features more than 400 artists, curators, and educators—the largest of its kind in America.

FOTOFOCUS BIENNIAL PROGRAM WEEK Oct 4, Thursday at Taft Museum of Art 5pm: Opening Reception for Paris to New York: Photographs by Eugène Atget and Berenice Abbott 7pm: Keynote Lecture with Clément Chéroux

Oct 5, Friday at Contemporary Arts Center 7pm: Opening Celebrations for The Fold: Space, time and the image; Memory Banks; and No Two Alike Conversation with Akram Zaatari and Eva Respini

Oct 6, Saturday at Memorial Hall 10:30am: FotoFocus Daytime Symposium 5pm: Teju Cole and Vijay Iyer: Blind Spot Performance

Oct 6, Saturday at FotoFocus ArtHub in Washington Park 1pm: Mid-Day Ghost Performance by INTERMEDIO

Oct 6, Saturday at The Mini Microcinema Noon: All Day Screenings at The Mini Microcinema

Oct 7, Sunday at The Mercantile Library Mamma Andersson, Lore, 2014. Oil on panel, 37⅜ x 26 inches. © Mamma Andersson. Photo by Adam Reich. Courtesy of the McEvoy Family Collection

Noon: Conversation with Artist Teju Cole and Drew Klein

Oct 7, Sunday at The Mini Microcinema

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

|

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

Noon: All Day Screenings at The Mini Microcinema

8

FotoFocusBiennial.org FotoFocusCincinnati FotoFocus2018

Oct 7, Sunday at FotoFocus ArtHub in Washington Park 3:30pm Mid-Day Ghost Performance by INTERMEDIO

Oct 7, Sunday at The Woodward Theater 6pm: Conversation with Miranda July and Kelly Gallagher

OpenArchive

FOTOFOCUS BIENNIAL 2018 PASSPORT The FotoFocus Biennial 2018 Program Week is free with a FotoFocus Passport: FotoFocusBiennial.org


“ N E W S S TA N D ” | P H O T O : B E R E N I C E A B B O T T, C O U R T E S Y O F M U S E U M O F T H E C I T Y O F N E W Y O R K . G I F T O F T H E M E T R O P O L I TA N M U S E U M O F A R T

A WIDE-OPEN ARCHIVE FOTOFOCUS EXPLORES THE MYRIAD WAYS VISUAL COLLECTIONS INSPIRE ARTISTS, BUILD COMMUNITIES AND SHAPE MEMORIES

B Y K AT H Y S C H W A R T Z O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

| C I T Y B E AT. C O M

“DF” | PHOTO: MICHAEL WILSON, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

“ C I N C I N N AT I PA N O R A M A O F 18 4 8 ” | P H O T O : C H A R L E S F O N TAY N E A N D W I L L I A M S . P O R T E R , C O U R T E S Y O F T H E P U B L I C L I B R A RY O F C I N C I N N AT I A N D H A M I LT O N C O U N T Y

9


“ S N A P S H O T ” ( I N S TA L L AT I O N V I E W, TA N YA B O N A K D A R G A L L E R Y, N E W Y O R K , M AY 5 -J U N E 2 , 2 0 11 ) | P H O T O : G I L L I A N W E A R I N G ; TA N YA B O N A K D A R G A L L E R Y ; M A U R E E N P A L E Y, L O N D O N ; R E G E N P R O J E C T S , L O S A N G E L E S

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

|

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

T

10

he 2018 FotoFocus Biennial theme of “Open Archive” speaks to the desire to organize and make sense of a growing visual catalog, but artistic director Kevin Moore appreciates some fluidity, too. “In photography, I always like subjects that are a little bit messy,” he says. “I like a subject that kind of wants to fall apart and won’t behave as a proper art history subject.” In choosing this year’s theme, he wasn’t concentrating on photographs stashed in boxes, but the free-use images that we access every day on the internet and keep on our smartphones.  “We’ve all become archivists,” he says. A prompt like “open archive” conveniently opens up infinite questions. Who decides what is worth documenting and preserving? How do artists draw upon the past? Are the memories that we hold in our hearts truer than the pictures we hold in our hands? Can we trust everything we see, particularly in the digital age? With more than 90 exhibits and events across Greater Cincinnati, Dayton and Columbus, the fourth FotoFocus Biennial explores photography’s historical and contemporary archives from multiple angles. Though some shows opened weeks ago, programming this weekend officially kicks off a packed month, and some exhibits continue into 2019. The lineup’s biggest names include fi lmmaker/artist/writer Miranda July, late photographers Berenice Abbott and Eugène Atget, and British artist and Turner Prize winner Gillian Wearing, who speaks at the Cincinnati Art Museum Wednesday, Oct. 3. This is Moore’s third FotoFocus. The New York-based art historian and curator says he appreciates that the biennial’s democratic structure gives organizers freedom to create programming that will attract diverse audiences.


Guest curator C. Jacqueline Wood of the Mini Microcinema is hosting a month of screenings tied to the archive theme. Some are dedicated to the influence of fi lmmaker July’s Joanie 4 Jackie project, a video chain letter of work by women fi lmmakers from 1995 to 2003. There’s also a series of fi lms that use found footage as a visual source. Another presentation highlights the relationship between still photos and moving images. Other fi lms archive the stories of makers. In Through the Lens of Time, for example, local photographer Ann Segal turns the camera on herself. At the Contemporary Arts Center, all floors are devoted to FotoFocus for the fi rst time. No Two Alike: Karl Blossfeldt, Francis Bruguière and Thomas Ruff opened Sept. 21 and juxtaposes modernist photographs from the 1920s with abstractions by the contemporary artist Ruff. Moore says the show, arranged by guest curator Ulrike Meyer Stump of Zurich, Switzerland will appeal to those who are studious about photography. Two more shows open at the center Friday. CAC curator Steven Matijcio has brought in Lebanese artist Akram Zaatari, who collects and protects images from the Arab world and makes new art from them in The Fold — Space, time and the image. Moore, meanwhile, introduces a painter into the lensbased biennial with Memory Banks by Mamma Andersson, a Swedish artist who uses books and photographs as inspiration and subject matter. And for the rest of October the CAC’s lower level will remain covered with photographs from Raquel André’s A Collection of Lovers. André, a Portuguese-born artist who performed early last month in the CAC’s Black Box series, uses a camera to document one-on-one meetings with strangers (a total of

167 as of August). But in an email she says she also considers her body to be “an archive of experiments bigger and more complex than what my memory can keep.” That description also could apply to the near-impossibility of seeing everything FotoFocus is offering in more than 80 locations. Besides museums and galleries, installations are also in places like downtown storefronts, libraries, Ruth’s Parkside Café, Washington Park and the Academy of World Languages’ REFUGE/Health Hub in Evanston, where ArtWorks apprentices created an archive about the center’s multicultural families and neighborhood residents. “We get to do two things at opposite ends of the spectrum,” Moore says. “One is to do really high-quality photography shows that could be shown in New York or San Francisco or anywhere — they’re of that level. And then we get to encourage things like schoolchildren going out in the community and doing photography. I like that it can be that high and that low at the same time. For me, photography is the breadth of all those things. It’s not an either/or thing.” He chuckles during a phone interview over the ambiguity within the exhibit he has curated at the Taft Museum of Art; Paris to New York: Photographs by Eugène Atget and Berenice Abbott opens to the public Saturday. Were these two, who each became known for taking pictures of a city’s architecture during a period of transformation, art photographers or something else? The Ohio-born Abbott was just starting out in the mid-1920s when she met the aged Atget in Paris while working as an assistant to Man Ray. Atget’s dreamy images of the old city’s streets, buildings and window mannequins were popular

“ S E V E N T H AV E N U E L O O K I N G S O U T H F R O M 3 5 T H S T R E E T ” | P H O T O : B E R E N I C E A B B O T T, C O U R T E S Y O F M U S E U M O F T H E C I T Y O F N E W Y O R K . G I F T O F T H E M E T R O P O L I TA N M U S E U M O F A R T

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

| C I T Y B E AT. C O M

11


with painters, particularly surrealists, but he did not achieve wide recognition before his death in 1927. It was Abbott who brought attention to his work after she purchased his archive and returned to New York, where she printed his negatives and began photographing the city’s streets in his mode before turning her camera up at skyscrapers and establishing her own style. Moore calls Abbott, who died in 1991, a heroine in “a very interesting human story” about two people recognizing the importance of systematically creating a record of a place and its people. “It’s OK to think of them as art photographers, and also as something else, as historians — as architectural historians, urban historians or social historians. They could be all of those things at once,” Moore says. “It’s OK to think of them that way — it’s also more correct to think of them that way. Photography was a tool, they happened to be very good at it, and I’m glad they’re recognized for being art photographers. But I think both of them always felt a little bit uncomfortable with that terminology.” We see current examples of social scientists and urban historians with cameras in FotoFocus shows like Michael Wilson’s They Knew Not My Name, and I Knew Not Their Faces, at the Main Library. The local photographer known for album covers of Lyle Lovett, Jason Isbell and others set up a portable studio on city sidewalks and humbly asked strangers for the gift of sitting for a portrait.

“ TA” | P H O T O : M I C H A E L W I L S O N, C O U R T E SY O F T H E A R T I S T

BEHIND THE MASK WITH GILLIAN WEARING British artist Gillian Wearing, who is known for taking self-portraits while donning masks of artists, relatives and her younger self, visits the Cincinnati Art Museum on Wednesday, Oct. 3 for a talk with Nathaniel M. Stein, associate curator of photography. She will receive the museum’s Schiele Prize, honoring the legacy of Cincinnati artist Marjorie Schiele.

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

|

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

Before Friday’s official opening of Life: Gillian Wearing, which includes four world-premiere works, the artist agreed to answer CityBeat’s questions via email. The exchange has been edited for space and clarity.

12

CITYBEAT: The video work you’ll be debuting, “Wearing,

Gillian,” employs artificial intelligence software. Where do you see fine art going with AI technology?

GILLIAN WEARING: It is interesting and strange and

connects to my work with masks of other people. I think any technology where you can explore the notion of identity is going to be fascinating, and can be used as a tool for empathy, understanding, etc. The flipside is that technologies can be used recklessly and inappropriately, and we won’t be able to avoid it being in all our lives for better or worse. My work isn’t about the tech aspects, but how I can explore ideas of who we are and use this as a really interesting tool.

CB: Have you found that women more often are wear-

think of me in that equation of what they did or didn’t do for me, and realize their own vulnerabilities, hopes and what were their needs from their parents. It gets complicated, as it should be.

GW: Women have been more historically associated with masks through makeup, clothes, etc. But essentially everyone presents different faces in different circumstances. I think social media has made people realize the power of editing their own lives, but when you look at a lot of this en masse, you can see a lot of similar shapes in people’s online narratives. It becomes like a social mask, it hides some of the harsh realities of life. If we see something that works, we copy it. I would say reality TV is different, as it tries to expose some of those things people try to hide about themselves, and the popularity of watching this is that we do seek truth in others but want to show a better side of ourselves to the world. We have many selves. It’s trying to accept these complex opposites in us which is the hardest part of life.

CB: Which do you trust as a more accurate archive: personal memories or photos?

ing a daily mask they’d like to shed? Is contemporary media, including reality television, affecting how all of us — women and men — present ourselves?

CB: What did you learn when “inhabiting” archival images of your relatives? GW: It was seeing them as individuals not there for my needs. It’s hard to separate yourself from that. So becoming them before I was born, I was able to not

GW: All memory is selective and biased to how we are feeling, our emotions, our relationship to the object or person we are recalling. Photographs help anchor a certain moment in time, but it is fleeting. I cannot remember moments that happen before or after a photograph is taken, but I can get a sense of location, of what the environment I lived in was like. Without a photograph, people I have met in the past can disappear from my memory. Life: Gillian Wearing is open for a preview 5-9 p.m. Oct. 3 at the Cincinnati Art Museum (953 Eden Park Drive, Mount Adams) featuring a conversation with the artist at 7 p.m. Reservations required; $10, free members, students and holders of $25 FotoFocus passport. Life opens to public Oct. 5 and is on view through Dec. 30. More info: cincinnatiartmuseum.org/wearing.


Kids, senior citizens, people of various racial and ethnic backgrounds, a person with a disability — all are treated equally as part of the fabric of Cincinnati. The library is also hosting Panorama of Progress: 170 years of Cincinnati’s Skyline and Photographic Technology, in which contemporary photographers revisit a scene captured in 1848. At Wave Pool, the group show Social Medium is subtitled Photography as a Tool for Community Collaboration, with projects that engage the gallery’s home neighborhood of Camp Washington. The Mini Microcinema’s Wood is one of the Wave Pool artists. She’s also embracing the independent spirit on a bigger scale at her experimental cinema and by inviting fi lmmaker July to speak Sunday at the Woodward Theater. This is the first time FotoFocus has added guest curators. Wood says helping produce the Open Archive biennial aligns with her own art practice, “where fi lm and video and lens-based work kind of clashes between the cinema and the white cube of the art world.” The Mini, which she started in 2015 through a People’s Liberty grant, has always been about helping others find their voice, she says. Though Wood has not yet met July, she’s felt a kinship ever since learning about her project Joanie 4 Jackie in grad school, a collection of video work by women across the U.S. “It was this wonderful distribution system for women fi lmmakers to find a voice and find a way to show their work, in a time when the internet wasn’t

“ M E A S A N A R T I S T I N 1 9 8 4 ” | P H O T O : G I L L I A N W E A R I N G , C O U R T E S Y O F T H E A R T I S T; TA N YA B O N A K D A R G A L L E R Y, N E W Y O R K ; M A U R E E N P A L E Y, L O N D O N ; R E G E N P R O J E C T S , L O S A N G E L E S

influential yet in that way,” Wood says. July turned the Joanie 4 Jackie collection of some 300 videos over to the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles in 2017. Speaking by phone from L.A. last month while editing her latest fi lm, July said creating an archive of female-made short fi lms and newsletters was on her mind from the start. “I had a theory: Whatever is archived is remembered and therefore can be part of history,” she says. The things left out of history are marginalized. July accepted all videos, and returned a compilation of 10 movies to senders, including their own. “The idea was that I couldn’t judge why any woman had made a movie,” she says. “I thought, ‘Well, what if a woman was making this just to save her life in that particular moment? She was very depressed and she just needed to make something.’ Wouldn’t that expression, even if it wasn’t quote/unquote ‘good,’ be valuable?” July, whose 2005 debut feature Me and You and Everyone We Know took the Caméra d’Or at Cannes and was a winner at Sundance, considers the Joanie 4 Jackie project her fi lm school. “I wouldn’t have been able to make that feature if I hadn’t created that context for myself,” she says. In the world of Joanie 4 Jackie, July didn’t feel obscure or like a minority. More than 20 years after starting the archive, she wishes things would be radically different in the mainstream. “Young people are always still looking for a way forward,” she says. “They are on their own path, and this is hopefully some clue.” Artist Wearing is another creative who uses an archive to feel connected to other makers, though in a more transcendental way; she uses elaborate masks and costumes for self-portraits in which she inhabits the personas of artists she considers to be members of her spiritual family. She’ll debut three such works at the Cincinnati Art Museum in Life: Gillian Wearing, which opens to the public Friday.

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

| C I T Y B E AT. C O M

13


of her face. Wearing created the installation with the ad firm Wieden+Kennedy, and Stein calls its use of artificial intelligence technology groundbreaking. Wearing’s art stays with the viewer, Stein says, and meanings unfold over time. “It’s like a little wedge that she drives into whatever it is you think you know about how you perceive other people and how you understand yourself,” he says. Photography is the medium of contemporary life, Stein says, even if people don’t always respect it as an art medium because they’re overwhelmed by the images on various screens. FotoFocus, he says, sorts through the clutter of the open archive and says, “Let’s stop, let’s think about this, because there is something important here.” The FotoFocus Biennial 2018 begins this weekend. Passports for admission to fee-charging venues during FotoFocus are $25. More info: fotofocusbiennial.org.

“BESIDE ME (ANOTHER SUCCULENT PAINTING)” | PHOTO: JIMMY BAKER

New pictures of Wearing as Albrecht Dürer, Marcel Duchamp (and his female alter ego Rrose Sélavy) and Georgia O’Keeffe are hung with a 2014 work, “Me as an Artist in 1984.” The latter is based on a family photo from a moment when she started to consider the real possibility of an art career. Nathaniel M. Stein, the museum’s associate curator of photography and organizer of this exhibit, considers Wearing an anthropologist in search of secrets as she explores tensions between public and private life. “She will look at herself with as much scrutiny as she does others,” he says. Unlike the artist Cindy Sherman, who also photographs herself in various guises, Wearing is not saying, “There is no there there,” according to Stein. “She’s more interested in what makes you tick,” he says. “How does being you work for you? How do you shape who you are in relationship to the world?” A fourth new piece, titled “Wearing, Gillian,” is a five-minute video featuring actors speaking about identity as if they were the artist, each wearing a version “WHO IS SLEEPING ON MY PILLOW” | PHOTO: MAMMA ANDERSSON

10 MORE SHOWS TO CHECK OUT

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

|

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

The dozens of events at focusfocusbiennial.org may seem overwhelming. In addition to the marquee exhibits at the Cincinnati Art Museum, Taft Museum of Art and Contemporary Arts Center, here are suggestions for your archive:

14

FOREALISM TRIBE: THE FOREALISM FILES — “Interdimensional travelers” document their time on Earth. Large-format portraits bring smiles as these performance artists survey everything from beaches to traffic barrels. Now open; closing date TBD. The Carnegie, 1028 Scott Blvd., Covington. FINDING KENYON BARR: EXPLORING PHOTOGRAPHS OF CINCINNATI’S LOST LOWER WEST END — Here’s a second chance if you missed this exhibit’s debut in 2017. Rediscovered photos document vibrant street life in an AfricanAmerican neighborhood that was razed for

redevelopment in the late 1950s. Through Oct. 23. DAAP Galleries: Meyers Gallery, 2624 Clifton Ave., University of Cincinnati, Clifton.

MELVIN GRIER: CLOTHES ENCOUNTER — The Cincinnati Post photojournalist covered news and sports worldwide. Lesser known is his fascination with fashion photography, which he calls an opportunity to create a picture, not just take one. Through Nov. 4. BehringerCrawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Covington. WING YOUNG HUIE: WE ARE THE OTHER — Pictures reflect the cultural complexities of America and provide a collective portrait of the “them” that is really “us.” Through Nov. 10. Kennedy Heights Arts Center, 6546 Montgomery Road, Kennedy Heights.

WIDE ANGLE: PHOTOGRAPHY OUT OF BOUNDS — FotoFocus Deputy Director Carissa Barnard brings together 20 multimedia artists who

test the boundaries of photography through collage. Names include Jimmy Baker, Harry Callahan, Sol LeWitt, Rick Mallette, Marilyn Minter, Robert Rauschenberg and Sheida Soleimani. Through Nov. 18. Weston Art Gallery, 650 Walnut St., Downtown.

for a performance addressing moments when humanity has failed to respond to injustice. 5-6:30 p.m. Oct. 6. Memorial Hall, 1225 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine.

ARBUS, FRANK, PENN: MASTERS OF POST-WAR AMERICAN PHOTOGRAPHY —When Diane Arbus,

documented a pivotal period when music, dance and visual art intersected in radical ways. Yoko Ono, Nam June Paik and cellist Charlotte Moorman are part of his archive. Oct. 12-Dec. 22. Carl Solway Gallery, 424 Findlay St., West End.

Robert Frank and Irving Penn turned their cameras on the overlooked and ostracized. Through Nov. 30. Pyramid Hill Sculpture Park & Museum, 1763 Hamilton-Cleves Road, Hamilton.

NEW AMERICAN STORIES — Refugees from Bhutan, the Dominican Republic and elsewhere create family albums and narratives about their new homes. Through Nov. 30. Prairie, 4035 Hamilton Ave., Northside.

TEJU COLE AND VIJAY IYER: BLIND SPOT — Writer/ photographer Cole and composer Iyer join

PETER MOORE: THE NEW YORK AVANT-GARDE 1960S AND ’70S — Moore, who died in 1993,

MUSE: MICKALENE THOMAS PHOTOGRAPHS — The contemporary multimedia artist draws inspiration from 1970s black-is-beautiful imagery as well as traditional Western paintings to create works addressing femininity, race and beauty in the context of personal histories. Oct. 20-Jan. 13, 2019. Dayton Art Institute, 456 Belmont Park N., Dayton.


MAIN ST in OTR

PINSBAR.COM

SAVE 50% ON CINCINNATI

EAT. SHOP. PL AY! Now featuring deals from:

T ICKLE PICKLE NORTHSIDE $20 voucher for $!0

SMALL-BALL & QUALITY LI BATIONS served DAI LY

|

Log into our website for the full list:

COMING THIS FALL

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

CAROL ANN’S CAROUSEL 13 ride pass for only $10

C NCY JUST GOT way COOLER

FACEBOOK/ T WIT TER:

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

@ P E R KO P O L IS

15

CINCINNATI. ALTPERKS.COM


16 C I T Y B E AT. C O M

| O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18


STUFF TO DO

Ongoing Shows

VISUAL ART FotoFocus Biennial 2018 Various venues in Cincinnati and nearby (Oct. 1-31)

WEDNESDAY 03

VISUAL ART: The FotoFocus Biennial 2018 officially kicks off this week. Learn more about the lens-based art event and associated shows in the cover story on page 09. ONSTAGE: The Playhouse in the Park presents The Roommate, an Odd Couple meets Bonnie and Clyde tale. See review on page 33. ONSTAGE: University of Cincinnati’s CollegeConservatory of Music presents a staging of Nikolai Gogol’s raucous satire The Government Inspector, still as relevant today as it was in 1834. See review on page 34.

THURSDAY 04

MUSIC: Country star Chris Stapleton takes over Riverbend Music Center for a sold-out show. See Sound Advice on page 44.

PHOTO: BRIANA PURSER

professionals. Celebrity guests include chef Michael Symon, nutritionist Joy Bauer and musicians Gavin Degraw (who performs 8 p.m. Thursday), Nick Lachey (who performs 8 p.m. Friday) and Jewel (who performs 8 p.m. Saturday). 1-10 p.m. Thursday; 9 a.m.-10 p.m. Friday and Saturday; 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Sunday. $15-$125. Duke Energy Convention Center, 525 Elm St., Downtown, wellnessyourwayfestival. com. — MARLENA TOEBBEN

FRIDAY 05

CLASSICAL: The Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra plays The Dharma at Big Sur at Music Hall. See feature on page 32.

EVENT: Rhythm Brew Art and Music Festival Wooden Cask Brewing Company is coming at you with the beer-filled, live-musicbursting festival Rhythm Brew Art and Music Festival. Spend your weekend with more than 30 local and touring bands along with a selection of over 30 craft beers. Local art vendors will be there to fulfill the other half of the festival title. And,

of course, there will also be lots of food. Despite it being at a brewery, all ages are welcome and kids under 12 are free. With two stages set up for the performances, expect non-stop entertainment all weekend. Read more about the fest in Spill It on page 43. 5 p.m.-midnight Friday; noon-midnight Saturday; noon-11 p.m. Sunday. $15-$30. Wooden Cask Brewing Company, 629 York St., Newport, Ky., woodencask.com. — MARLENA TOEBBEN LITERARY: Tom LeClair University of Cincinnati Professor Emeritus Tom LeClair has dedicated his life to the written word. Now, 48 years after he first started teaching literature at UC and several years after he relocated to Brooklyn, N.Y., LeClair says he is dropping his final novel, Passing Away. The fourth in a series following Passing Off, Passing On and Passing Through, the meta-licious narrative again centers on the

writings of Michael Keever, a truth-bending memoirist who this time relays stories from the perspective of his long-estranged older brother Patrick; former U.S. President Calvin Coolidge; and Frederic Tudor, the “Ice King” of 19th-century America. The three are tied together via one theme: all are near death. Reading: 4 p.m. Friday at the Elliston Poetry Room, 646 Langsam Library, University of Cincinnati campus, Clifton. Book release party: 7 p.m. Friday at Northside Yacht Club, 4231 Spring Grove Ave., Northside. Free. More info at waxingpress.com. — JASON GARGANO EVENT: Christian Moerlein Haunted Brewery Tour The Christian Moerlein Malt House Taproom has more than one kind of spirit. And we’re not talking craft brews. We mean ghosts. No, seriously. This new “Can you solve the mystery” CONTINUES ON PAGE 18

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

ONSTAGE: Next to Normal This 2009 Tony Awardwinning musical portrays a suburban family coping with crisis and mental illness. Dad’s an architect; Mom packs lunches and pours cereal; the daughter and son are angsty, wisecracking teens. But Mom has fought manic depression for 16 years, and their lives are anything but normal. This powerful show about

profound grief, devastating loss, bewildering psychiatry and the challenges of modern life is an audacious choice for the West Side theater. Through Oct. 21. $29 adults; $26 seniors/ students. Warsaw Federal Incline Theater, 801 Matson Place, Price Hill, cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com. — RICK PENDER

|

EVENT: Wellness Your Way Festival A new wave of wellness is taking over the Duke Energy Convention Center. With three days covering everything fitness- and wellness-related, the festival aims to be everything your inner wellness warrior needs. With an emphasis on the “your way,” this festival is meant to inspire guests to seek out their own definition of wellness. You can workout with celebrity fitness experts, learn new ways of healthy cooking from worldrenowned chefs, get inspired from guest speakers and learn new tips and tricks from a variety of other health

Erika Wennerstrom

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

EVENT: HopScotch Casual Scotch fans and snifter aficionados: CityBeat’s HopScotch event is taking over Newport’s New Riff Distillery for an evening dedicated to non-bourbon whiskey. There will be plenty of smoky, peaty Scotch from distilleries including anCnoc, Balblair, Balvenie, Macallan, Tullamore Dew, Glenfiddich and more, as well as Irish whiskey, IPA pairings and light bites from area eateries (i.e. the Chart House, Nicholson’s, Crown Republic Gastropub and more). The party takes place in New Riff’s event space and includes tastings, live music and basically unlimited samples. General admission gets you food and alcohol and an opportunity to talk to Scotch experts; opt for VIP tickets for early entry and a tour (and tasting) of New Riff. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesday. $40 general admission; $55 VIP. New Riff Distilling, 24 Distillery Way, Newport, Ky., hopscotchcincy.com. — MAIJA ZUMMO

FILM: Fright Night: Hocus Pocus It’s not a true Halloween season unless you’ve watched Hocus Pocus at least once. Salem, Massachusetts’ infamous Sanderson sisters are back from the dead and ready to suck the souls of naïve trick-or-treaters to gain everlasting life before the end of All Hallows Eve. They died in 1693, were raised from the dead on 1993 and now they’re celebrating the 25th-anniversary of this Disney cinematic classic. Starring Bette Midler, Kathy Najimy, Thora Birch and Cincinnati’s own Sarah Jessica Parker, this free film screening in Washington Park kicks of the “Fright Night” series of spooky movies taking place every Wednesday through Oct. 24. Next up is E.T. (Oct. 10), followed by Ghost Busters (Oct. 17) and Nightmare Before Christmas (Oct. 24). 8-10 p.m. Wednesday. Free. Washington Park, 1230 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, washingtonpark.org. — MAIJA ZUMMO

17


FROM PAGE 17

SAV E T H E DAT E!

Bourbon & Bacon Wednesday, December 5th New Riff Distilling 5:30-8:30 P.M.

t i c k e t s ava i l a b l e at c i t y b e at. c o m

haunted brewery tour will turn back time to explore the melancholy lives of doomed characters that met ill fates; an interactive puzzle will be at each stop — it’s up to the group to solve which story out of five is fiction. After, guests can grapple with the supernatural over a beer — new suds will be featured each weekend in October. 7-11 p.m. Friday. Every Friday and Saturday in October. $25. Christian Moerlein Malt House Taproom, 1621 Moore St., Over-the-Rhine, hauntedbrewerytour.com. — MACKENZIE MANLEY

SATURDAY 06

MUSIC: Erika Wennerstrom Though she moved her critically acclaimed Rock band Heartless Bastards from Cincinnati to Austin, Texas years ago, Erika Wennerstrom has continued to bring her music projects back to the Queen City on a regular basis. That

has included tour dates in support of her fantastic debut solo album, Sweet Unknown, which was released this spring on Partisan Records and showcased a different side of the singer/songwriter’s musical personality. The solo effort is simultaneously rootsier and more expansive and textural than Wennerstrom’s work with the Bastards, reminiscent of the unique ethereality Daniel Lanois helps conjure when working with Americana-oriented artists (a Wennerstrom/Lanois collaboration would be beyond spellbinding). Sweet Unknown has received a wide array of great press since its release, including from Rolling Stone, which called it “a spacious, starlit collection that showcases her wail over sprawling Americana.” Pre- and postrelease, Wennerstrom has performed at area venues from the Woodward Theater to The Lodge to The Listing Loon, and this weekend she returns to play

the Ludlow Garage for the first time, backed by the excellent band she appeared with at the inaugural Bellwether Music Festival back in August. Cincinnati Indie Rock supergroup Static Falls (featuring members of bands like The Sweep, The Tigerlilies, Culture Queer and Ohio Knife) opens Wennerstrom’s latest homecoming gig. 8:30 p.m. Saturday. $15. Ludlow Garage, 342 Ludlow Ave., Clifton, ludlowgaragecincinnati.com. — MIKE BREEN EVENT: HallZOOween Get spooky with some wild animals at the Cincinnati Zoo’s HallZOOween event. Promised to be “so much fun, it’s scary,” the event will offer family-friendly events all day long like trick-or-treat stations and special animal encounters. Families will also have a chance to attend the Beauty Shop of Horrors or Phil Dalton’s Theater of Illusion Shows. For an additional charge, the kids can dare to ride the Hogwarts Express Train Ride or a

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

|

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

SATURDAY 06

EVENT: Gorman Heritage Farm Sunflower Festival If you follow ‘hip’ folks on Instagram, they probably post an annual #candid of themselves in a field of sunflowers. And most likely, it was taken at Gorman Heritage Farm’s Sunflower Festival. Honestly: totally worth it for the cute pics alone. This autumnal celebration will put you in the seasonal spirit — crisp, early October weather; harvest hues of red, orange and yellow; cozy hayrides (bonus: snag some hot cocoa beforehand); and, duh, sunflowers. As the sweet fall ruffles your sweater, sway to live music or munch on grub from a selection of food trucks and vendors. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. $1 per sunflower stem or 12 for $10. $8 admission; $5 kids 3-17 and seniors; free 3 and under. Gorman Heritage Farm, 10052 Reading Road, Evandale, gormanfarm.org. — MACKENZIE MANLEY

18 P H O T O : G O R M A N H E R I TA G E F A R M


PHOTO: PROVIDED

FRIDAY 05

Scare-ousel. Noon-5 p.m. Saturday and Sundays in October. Event is included with zoo admission ($19 adult; $12 children/seniors). Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden, 3400 Vine St., Avondale, cincinnatizoo.org. — MARLENA TOEBBEN

MONDAY 08

MUSIC: Gillian Welch and David Rawlings bring raw and excellent Americana to the Taft Theatre. See interview on page 41.

MUSIC: Pop Punk band Dreamers plays the 20th Century Theater. See Sound Advice on page 44.

YOUR WEEKEND TO DO LIST: LOCAL.CITYBEAT.COM

OPENING RECEPTION

Thursday, October 11, 6–8 p.m. Taft Museum of Art

ARTIST TALK

Sunday, October 14, 2 p.m. Taft Museum of Art

PERFORMANCE

Thursday, October 18, 7:30 p.m. Woodward Theater

CELEBR ATE COMMUNITY

Sunday, October 21, 11:15 a.m.–4 p.m. Taft Museum of Art

For more information and a complete list of events, please visit www.taftmuseum.org. Duncanson Artist-in-Residence Sponsor

Special exhibition running with freedom on view through October 21, 2018. IMAGE: Vanessa German, I Am Reaching For The New Day, 2017, found-object and mixed-media assemblage. Image courtesy of the artist; Pavel Zoubok Gallery, New York; and Concept Art Gallery, Pittsburgh.

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

FILM: Women in Film: Road to Resources One of the hardest parts of making a movie is securing the funding, and on Tuesday, locally-based panelists and filmmakers will tell you how to navigate those waters in Cincinnati. The international nonprofit Women in Film started their Cincinnati

Join us for these free events!

|

EVENT: Cincinnati Taco Week Taco Tuesday is taking over the whole dang week during CityBeat’s Cincinnati Taco Week, seven days of $2 tacos from area eateries and taquerias including B&A Street Kitchen, Injoy, Lalo, Lucius Q, Slatts Pub, Taqueria Mercado, Tin Man Grill Food Truck and Veracruz Mexican Grill.

TUESDAY 09

chapter in 2016 as a means to create networking opportunities and equality for women in media (men are welcome to join, too). “Road to Resources” brings WIF members together with an audience of hungry filmmakers who want to shoot their films locally. People like Kristen Schlotman of Film Cincinnati and Kara Shibiya of ArtsWave will explain how these filmmakers and students can access funds from Cincy foundations; local filmmakers and WIF board members Laure Quinlivan and Allyson West — among six other women in media — will discuss funding from an artist’s perspective. 6 p.m. doors; 7 p.m. program Tuesday. $15 at the door; $10 advance. Woodward Theater, 1404 Main St., Over-the-Rhine, woodwardtheater.com. — GARIN PIRNIA

Vanessa German

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

MUSIC: Metalcore and Thrash Metal group Trivium heads to Bogart’s. See Sound Advice on page 45.

Each location will be serving a special (or several special) Taco Week tacos like Injoy’s Chicken Tikka Taco or Lucius Q’s Smokin’ Taco with pork shoulder. These creative and/or classic options (some are even available To Go) will frequently be complemented by a Hornitos tequila special. Check with each restaurant and make sure to print out a Taco Week passport; get your passport stamped at three or more restaurants and you’ll be entered to win a gift card. Oct. 8-14. Get more info at cincytacoweek. com or citybeat.com. — MAIJA ZUMMO

COMEDY: Steve-O As a comedian, activist, TV host and stunt performer, Steve-O (aka Stephen Gilchrist Glover) wears many hats. Indeed, he once wore a jellyfish sombrero for bit on his YouTube channel that has since captured over 25 million views. “I was just such an attention whore by the time I was born,” he says, “I had little recourse other than to pursue a career in show business.” He cites spending his formative years in England as an influence. “When I was 9, I had the freedoms (there) that a 16-year-old would have here. I was cruising all over London on the Tube and the busses; even on my bike I’d go all over the city. I’m really grateful for that.” He was always a prankster as well. “I’d unscrew salt shakers and consume all the salt. It was pretty impressive, but it didn’t make people like me any better.” 7:30 and 10 p.m. Friday; 7 and 10 p.m. Saturday. $25-$50. Funny Bone Liberty, 7518 Bales St., Liberty Township, liberty.funnybone.com. — P.F. WILSON

The Taft Museum of Art’s 32nd Duncanson Artist-in-Residence

19


C I T Y B E AT. C O M

|

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

Thursday, October 18, 2018 • 9PM

20

Aronoff Center • Procter & Gamble Hall

· CincinnatiArts.org · (513) 621-ARTS (2787)

· Aronoff Center Ticket Office · Group Sales (10+): (513) 977-4157 PRESENTING SPONSOR


OCTOBER 8-14, 2018 We’re brin ging you $2 Tacos f r o m so m e of Cincinnati’s most popular taqueros! Acupulco

sammy’s craft burgers & beer

b&a Street Kitchen

slatts pub

Christine’s Casual Dining

Taqueria El Monarca

injoy street food

taqueria mercado

lalo

tin man grill

lucius q

veracruz mexican grill

a n d mor e to b e an n oun ced ! O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

Every day is Taco Tuesday during Taco Week.

| C I T Y B E AT. C O M

21


C I T Y B E AT. C O M

|

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

3108 Price Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45205 M-Th: 11A-10P Fri-Sat: 11A-11P Sun: 11A-9P

22

14TH AND REPUBLIC, OTR // TAKE-OUT AND CATERING


4 3/4 in

4 7/8 in

TACOS BARBACOA Mouth-watering Barbacoa Mixta (beef cheeks and pork shoulder) slow cooked in a savory broth topped with a tradditional garnish of onion, cilantro, cotija cheese and a wedge of lime. Enjoy three barbacoa mixta tacos each served in a different style tortilla; one in a grilled corn tortilla, one in a grilled flour tortilla and one in a crispy deep fried corn tortilla. The perfect taco trio! bastreetkitchen.com 1500 Race St, Cincinnati, OH 45202 513 - 345 - 6670

WE’RE HUNGRY!

100 E 8th St, Cincinnati, OH 45202

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

SEND RESTAURANT TIPS, NEWS AND PRESS RELEASES TO EATS@CITYBEAT.COM

|

F ri - S a t : 1 1 A - 1 1 P S u n - T h : 1 1 A - 9 : 3 0 P

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

t a q u eri a m erc a d o . c o m 513-381-0678

23


O F F I C I A L C I N C I N N AT I TA C O W E E K HORNITOS SPECIAL hornitostequila.com

enjoy a Hornitos special, receive an extra stamp must be 21+ Please drink responsibly

LALO

lalocincinnati.com

709 Main Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 513-381-5256

TEMPURA FISH TACO

Battered white fish, Sriracha mayo, mango cabbage slaw, pico de gallo.

COCHINITA PIBIL TACO

Slow roasted pork, pineapple and arugula. Mild spicy.

B &A STR E ET KITC H E N

bastreetkitchen.com

1500 Race Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 513-345-6670

TACOS BARBACOA

Mouthwatering Barbacoa Mixta (beef cheeks and pork shoulder) slow cooked in a savory broth topped with a traditional garnish of onion, cilantro, cotija cheese and a wedge of lime. Enjoy three barbacoa mixta tacos each served in a different style tortilla; one in a grilled corn tortilla, one in a grilled flour tortilla and one in a crispy deep fried corn tortilla. Includes one salsa. The perfect taco trio. Limit of 1 order per customer, no substitutions. minimum order of 3 tacos per order

I N J OY STR E ET FOO D

CURRY CHICKEN TACO

Grilled chicken with peppers and onions in curry sauce. Topped with queso fresco.

MIXED VEGGIE TACO

Sautéed mixed vegetables and queo fresco. Vegetables may vary. minimum order of 3 tacos per order

LU C I U S Q

luciusq.com

1131 Broadway Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 513-421-2337

SMOKIN’ TACO

Choice of pork shoulder or meatless “Veggie Q” smoked low and slow over cherry and oak wood, topped with smoked tomato corn salsa, and finished with pickled red onion and cotija cheese on a flour tortilla.

injoystreetfood.com

1400 Republic Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 513-580-8590

CHICKEN TIKKA TACO

S LATTS P U B

LAMB TACO

4858 Cooper Road, Blue Ash, Ohio 45242 513-791-2223

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

|

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

Our classic chicken tikka masala sitting in a tasty garlic naan soft taco. Sweet & creamy.

24

minimum order of 3 tacos per order

A new experimental lamb dish, topped with chutney, sitting in a tasty garlic naan soft taco. Bold & tangy.

ALOO GOBI TACO

Sweet potato and cauliflower cutlets, roasted in whole mustard seeds and garlic, sitting in a tasty garlic naan soft taco. Fresh & savory.

slattspub.com

QUE FANTASTICO

Warm flour tortilla, filled with curry slaw and your choice of blackened tilapia, carnitas or pulled chicken. Topped with homemade pico de gallo and spicy aioli. Served with tortilla chips, guacamole and salsa.

minimum order of 3 tacos per order

C INCY TACOWEEK.COM

minimum order of 3 tacos per order

BE SU RE TO GET YOU R

PA SS


E K L O C AT I O N S Taqueriamercado.com

100 East 8th Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 513-381-0678

TAQUERIA MERCADO TACO

Steamed corn tortillas topped with onions, cilantro, lime and your choice of meat.

oC TO

BE R

minimum order of 3 tacos per order

TI N MAN G R I LL FOO D TR U C K tinmangrill.com

Multiple locations: Check cincytacoweek.com for daily location 513-885-7799

STRAWBERRY CHICKEN TACO

Smoked natural Amish chicken topped with strawberry salsa, basil, queso fresco cheese and honey.

PINEAPPLE PORK TACO

Smoked natural pork tenderloin topped with pineapple salsa, queso fresco cheese and our chipotle aioli.

SWEET POTATO TACO

Seasoned sliced crisped sweet potato topped with corn, green onion, queso fresco cheese and our cilantro garlic agave sauce. minimum order of 3 tacos per order

8- 14

, 2 01 8

VE RAC R U Z M EXI CAN G R I LL

facebook.com/VeracruzMexicanGrill 3108 Price Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio 45205 513-244-1757

AUTHENTIC BARBACOA TACO

Authentic barbacoa (marinated beef) served on fresh soft corn taco with lime, onion and cilantro. Two for $4 during Taco Week. Served with an order of fresh hot chips and homemade salsa. Additional sauces available at your table.

CHICKEN TACO

Authentic fresh chicken served on fresh soft corn taco with lime, onion and cilantro. Two for $4 during Taco Week. Served with an order of fresh hot chips and homemade salsa. Vegetarian offerings available.

TACO WEEK KEY G gluten free option

# C I N C Y TA C O W E E K

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

PA SSPORT STA M PE D

|

veggie option

take out available

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

OU R

TAQ U E R IA M E R CADO

25


Thursday, October 18, 2018 • 9PM Aronoff Center • Procter & Gamble Hall

· CincinnatiArts.org · (513) 621-ARTS (2787)

· Aronoff Center Ticket Office · Group Sales (10+): (513) 977-4157 PRESENTING SPONSOR

18_0124_CAM_CityBeat_HalfPage_GillianWearing_926_C01_v03sarah.pdf

1

9/17/18

12:44 PM

310346_4.75_x_4.75.indd 1

C

M

Y

CM

MY

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

CY

CMY

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

|

K

26

10/1/18 9:36 AM


18_0098_CAM_CityBeatFullPage_DotCampaign4_4_VanGogh_B01_v02sarah_OUTLINED.pdf

1

9/7/18

3:54 PM

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

| C I T Y B E AT. C O M

27


AN IRISH WHISKEY, SCOTCH ANd cRAFT BEER TASTING EVENT

Save the date

october 3rd, 2018

5:30-8:30 Pm New Riff Distillery

Newport, Ky

Restaurants Include

chart house, crown republic gastropub, nicholson’s tavern & pub, o’reilly’s irish bar & restaurant, and pompilios

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

|

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

scotch and irish whiskey brands include

28

ARRAN, ANCNOC, BALBLAIR, BALVENIE, BENRIACH, CAORUNN, CELTIC HONEY, CONCANNON, CLONTARF, GLENDRONACH, GLENFARCLAS, GLENFIDDICH, GLENGLASSAUGH, GLENROTHES, GLEN SCOTIA, HIGHLAND PARK, KNAPPOGUE CASTLE, LOCH LOMOND MACALLAN, MONKEY SHOULDER, OLD PULTENEY, PADDY IRISH WHISKEY, SLANE, SPEYBURN, TULLAMORE DEW

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT HOPSCOTCHCINCY.COM


O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

| C I T Y B E AT. C O M

29


18_0124_CAM_CityBeat_FullPage_LifeGillianWearing_C02_v03sarah_OUTLINED.pdf

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

|

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

K

30

1

9/24/18

9:20 PM


ARTS & CULTURE

‘The Devil We Know’ Spotlights Local Lawyer Rob Bilott waged war against one of world’s largest chemical companies — and won BY J U DY G EO R G E

W

Rob Bilott in The Devil We Know PHOTO: PROVIDED

huge problem in Australia,” Bilott says. “It’s in New Zealand, in Italy, in Germany. It’s become an international issue.” How C8 first entered the bloodstream of millions of Americans is unknown. The chemical can make its way into clouds through smokestack emissions, but it’s likely the exposure also came from fastfood wrappers, pizza boxes, fabric treated to repel stains or water, nonstick cookware and other everyday products. Since Bilott’s first meeting with Tennant, C8 has been linked to six diseases, including kidney cancer, testicular cancer, ulcerative colitis, thyroid disease, preeclampsia and high cholesterol. This year, DuPont settled over 3,550 C8 cases for nearly $671 million, but continued to deny any wrongdoing. But even a legal settlement of that size doesn’t offer reassurance, as Soechtig points out in her film: DuPont, and other companies, can change the chemical formula slightly and continue producing it. A corporate spinoff of DuPont called Chemours has done just that, with a chemical known as GenX. Internationally, Bilott has been recognized for his fight. He received the 2017 Right Livelihood Award in Sweden for exposing a decades-long history of chemical pollution and setting a precedent for the effective regulation of hazardous substances. The Devil We Know is available on iTunes Oct. 16. More info: thedevilweknow.com.

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

legal discovery process, he asked DuPont for information about the chemical. After pushback from the company, Bilott began to receive internal records that showed the company had been documenting the chemical’s health effects since the 1950s. Not only was C8 in the West Virginia landfill, it was also being released into the air from manufacturing smokestacks and had been pumped into the Ohio River. It was in those documents that Soechtig found the name for her film: “DuPont knew about the perils of C8,” she says. “They knew there were problems and suggested in one memo that they find a replacement. But they concluded any chemical was going to have problems, and C8 was ‘the devil we know.’ ” In March 2001, Bilott sent a 972-page letter to the United States Environmental Protection Agency that detailed the situation, which triggered them to start investigating C8. By then, the chemical had already been in use and had been emitted into the environment for 50 years. “There was pressure on the EPA to come out with a drinking water guideline, which it did in 2016. And when that guideline came out, it spurred even more testing across the country, including by the Department of Defense,” Bilott says. “Many sites, including military bases and airports, are contaminated.” When his story was featured in The New York Times in January 2016, it sparked a response not just across the country, but also throughout the world. C8 is now “a

|

was the first time I learned that we really rely on chemical-makers to tell us whether or not a product is safe,” she says. “There are 80,000-plus chemicals out there in our everyday products that we know very little about,” Soechtig says. “When I started reading about what was going on in Parkersburg, I saw this Davidversus-Goliath story of a farmer and local people taking on one of the largest chemical corporations in the world.” In The Devil We Know, Soechtig lets the people involved in the case — Bilott and the residents of Parkersburg — tell the story, weaving their narrative through legal depositions, news reports and C8 science. The rough video footage that Tennant shot is in the movie, as well as interviews with local people whose lives have been affected by DuPont for generations. “Chemical contamination is a tricky topic to make appealing to a mass audience,” Soechtig says. “I was really excited to have that challenge. Historically, my films have been informational with character stories in them. But this film is really a characterdriven story that also has information. The characters are so strong, and this is a universal story — and again, this is just one chemical. There are thousands we need to be aware of.” When Bilott took Tennant’s case, few people knew what C8 was. When he found it listed in DuPont’s landfill documents, Bilott researched the chemical in environmental libraries but found nothing. He went straight to the source — through the

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

hen Cincinnati lawyer Rob Bilott first received a call from a cattle farmer in Parkersburg, West Virginia, he almost didn’t pay attention. The farmer, Wilbur Tennant, told him chemical company DuPont had purchased land adjacent to his property to use as a non-hazardous landfill for its local factory, but something wasn’t right: the stream the cows drank from had white foam on its surface, and hundreds of cattle were either sick or dying. It wasn’t the kind of case Bilott, a Cincinnati-based corporate attorney, usually handled. Lawyers and reporters in Parkersburg, a town dominated by DuPont, didn’t take Tennant seriously. But in his phone conversation with Bilott, Tennant mentioned Bilott’s grandmother, who lived in a nearby West Virginia town. Bilott agreed to meet. “He brought his videotapes and photographs to Cincinnati,” Bilott says. “We took a look and we realized something really bad was happening.” What first appeared as a simple case in 1998 became one of the most significant class-action lawsuits in the history of environmental law. In a legal fight that lasted nearly 20 years, Bilott represented 70,000 citizens whose drinking water had been contaminated with perfluorooctanoic acid, or PFOA, also called C8. This battle is the crux of Stephanie Soechtig’s latest film, The Devil We Know, which sheds a spotlight on a DuPont chemical so ubiquitous an estimated 99 percent of Americans have it in their blood. A component of Teflon, C8 and its counterpart PFAS (perfluorooctanesulfonic acid) were used to make waterproof clothing, stain-resistant rugs, microwave popcorn bags and even dental floss. Award-winning documentarian Soechtig is no stranger to controversy: her film Fed Up examined links between processed food and obesity, and her directorial debut Tapped explored the bottled water industry and the effect of BPA (Bisphenol A) on human health. “That

31


C I T Y B E AT. C O M

|

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

CLASSICAL

32

Tracy Silverman Brings Electric Violin to the CSO for ‘The Dharma at Big Sur’ BY A N N E A R EN S T EI N

Tracy Silverman’s nonconforming approach to his music is an integral part of his psyche. He rejected a career as a classical violinist, switched to the electric violin and stopped listening to its two biggest exemplars, Stéphane Grappelli and JeanLuc Ponty — turning to Rock and Soul giants Jimi Hendrix, John Coltrane, Miles Davis and Aretha Franklin for inspiration. Silverman will make his Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra debut this weekend performing The Dharma at Big Sur, a work that he says, “never ceases to affect me.” Although it’s his first performance here, the CSO performed Dharma 10 years ago with composer John Adams on the podium and soloist Leila Josefowicz. But Josefowicz was an acoustic violinist adapting to an electric instrument. Silverman perfected the sound on electric violin for over two decades when Dharma debuted. When Silverman broke with his classical violin rep he figured his days as concert hall performer were over. But in 2002, Adams heard Silverman playing at an Oakland, California Jazz club. At the time, Adams was writing a concerto for the opening of Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles (designed by Frank Gehry); Silverman’s playing inspired what became Dharma, which premiered in 2003 with Silverman as the soloist, and Esa-Pekka Salonen conducting the Los Angeles Philharmonic. A ceaseless explorer of sonic innovation and synthesis, Silverman has brought the electric violin into virtually every genre of music; he’s also designed instruments and pioneered techniques that are standard for today’s electric violinists. His lengthy discography features him as soloist, guest artist, composer, arranger or producer. After 35 years with the electric violin, Silverman understands why the instrument still might be a hard sell. “I spent a lot of years in Rock bands and it’s easy for people to think this is something flashy,” he says, speaking from his home in Nashville. “But my goal is serious and maybe more boring but that’s what I’m trying to do.” What Silverman plays is not an acoustic violin with a pickup. He designed his first violin — a six-string solid-body model resembling a mini-Fender Stratocaster in the early ’80s — while working with fellowviolinist Mark Wood, who Silverman calls “a true visionary.” (Wood Violins just celebrated its 25th anniversary.) Every Silverman instrument is designed for the widest palette of sounds and he provides a vivid rationale in his artist statement: “My demands on the instrument range from Jimi Hendrix’s wailing distortion to Miles Davis’ intimate Jazz, Salif Keita’s emotional Malinese vocal style to Brazilian Samba grooves, Indian classical inflections and ‘just’ (or ‘pure’) intonation.”

Although this statement was written in 2017, it speaks to a commitment spanning three decades that led to Dharma and a return to the concert stage. Silverman was part of an ensemble led by the minimalist composer Terry Riley when Adams first heard him. “Tracy’s unique style was a marvel of expressiveness,” he wrote in the liner notes to the 2003 recording of Dharma. “When I listened to Tracy play I was reminded that in almost all cultures other than the European classical one, the real meaning of the music is in between the notes.” Describing Dharma, Silverman gives a shout-out to Adams’ penchant for taking risks, not only musically, but also on Silverman himself. “He could have had anyone much more famous to play it and he took a chance on me, a virtual unknown,” Silverman says. “But he was true to his artistic vision. He wanted a California synthesis of that’s unafraid to blend all these musical elements and doesn’t care about names.” Dharma was inspired by Adams’ first encounter with the spectacular California coastal landmark and by his friendship with West Coast composers Lou Harrison and the aforementioned Riley. Adams creates a brilliant fusion of Eastern and Western musical forms using the electric violin’s meditations and ecstatic dancing phrases. Silverman points out that Adams also took a risk with the orchestra, originally writing the piece for ‘just’ tuning, meaning different intervals between the notes differently tuned than in the conventional manner. This proved too difficult for an entire orchestra, so adjustments were made for subsequent performances. “Synthesizers and two harps will play in ‘just’ tuning, and as much as possible, so will I,” Silverman says. “It gives me the kind of resonance you hear in Indian music.” The first part entitled “A New Day” begins with a low drone as the violin emerges in the style of the alap, an improvisation that introduces a melody in a raga. “That opening arc to me is a like a Rumi poem, with incredible strength, power and simplicity,” Silverman says. “And the simplicity makes it more profound.” The momentum picks up in the second movement, “Sri Moonshine,” with more dance-like, pulsing rhythms. The solo violin passages are like a seagull’s swoops over the ocean and, as the intensity builds, the orchestra builds to an ecstatic crescendo. The CSO performances will be accompanied by a video created by Adam Larsen. “His work is breathtakingly beautiful and wonderfully supports this sense of being alone with nature,” Silverman says. Dharma remains evergreen for Silverman.

Violinist Tracy Silverman PHOTO: MARTIN CHERRY

“I’ve heard it thousands of times and practiced it tens of thousands of hours and it still affects me,” he says. “The textures of the score are just thrilling” “It’s very personal,” he continues, “There’s this sense of being in touch with your deepest relationship with the universe and how connected we are.” Silverman has several more performances of Dharma throughout the fall. He’s delighted that the work is now considered standard repertoire and he’s even happier that there are more

musicians who perform it. “I used to be the only guy doing it and now I’m not!” he says with a laugh. “If I’ve accomplished anything, I hope it’s to open up this area to future generations. There are so many things it can do that an acoustic violin can’t.” Violinist Tracy Silverman performs The Dharma at Big Sur with the CSO Oct. 5 and 6 at Music Hall. Tickets: cincinnatisymphony.org.


ONSTAGE

An Odd Couple in ‘The Roommate’ BY JAC K I E M U L AY

AKRAM ZAATARI

The Fold: Space, time and the image

OPENING CELEBRATION OCT 5 • 8PM

Info: contemporaryartscenter.org/oct5 Presented in partnership with FotoFocus Biennial 2018 O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

|

Image: Akram Zaatari, Photographic Phenomena, 2018, Based on Hashem el Madani’s accidental double exposure with Flash. Saida, the seaside. 1960s / courtesy of the artist and the Arab Image Foundation.

CONTEMPORARY ARTS CENTER | 6th & Walnut St. Downtown Cincinnati | contemporaryartscenter.org

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

“It’s Iowa!” is a phrase often uttered by Marunlikely timeline of events, The Roommate garet Daly, the actress portraying Sharon fails to produce a deep connection with its in The Playhouse’s production of Jen Silveraudience and ultimately shifts from wickman’s The Roommate, which follows a edly funny to predictably droll. woman who has recently opened her home Highlights of the production include to a new roommate — in the hopes of stavthe set, designed by Anne Mundell, which ing off an aggressive case of empty-nest operates like a perfect window into an syndrome. Sharon is the perfect stereotype early-’90s kitchen. Oak kitchen cabinets of a Midwestern homemaker, even if she with large, white enamel knobs perfectly often insists that she is not from Iowa. Clad compliment a small, white two-door in slacks and sensible shoes, Sharon is a refrigerator and green Formica countertimid but curious woman in her mid-50s tops. Firmly planted in the past, it’s as if searching for new meaning and exciteSharon’s life started and ended with this ment in the wake of her recent divorce. This excitement, she hopes, might be found in her new roommate, Robyn, a provocative and enthralling woman from the Bronx. Played energetically by Mary Jo Mecca, Robyn is an insouciant and mysterious new arrival to Iowa. What begins as a formal and uncertain relationship between the women quickly becomes an unexpected and exhilarating adventure as Sharon adapts to Margaret Daly (left) and Mary Jo Mecca in The Roommate her new roommate’s unconventional lifestyle. PHOTO: MIKKI SCHAFFNER The title might lead one to believe that this is a classic story about a roommate who enters Iowan home. briskly and upends her housemate’s life. The set gives us wonderful insight However, Silverman’s one-act exploration into Sharon and who she was before The of middle-aged adventure focuses more Roommate: a routine, safe and meticulous largely on Sharon than her fascinating new mother who showered her family with roommate. attention in the hopes of receiving even a Ultimately, The Roommate is Sharon’s sliver in return. story. As a timid, sheltered and highHowever, outside of the kitchen itself, strung recent divorcée, the plot follows the set lacks focus and direction — and at Sharon as she interacts with and learns times, it feels superfluous. In order to demfrom edgy New Yorker Robyn, who onstrate the stark contrast of suburban represents everything Sharon is not — but Iowa to the Bronx, small cutouts of houses also everything she wants to be. As she are asymmetrically lined up on the left uncovers less-than-legal activities from and right sides of the set. Between scene Robyn’s past, Robyn tries to hide from changes the houses light up to indicate former indiscretions and move forward. the passage of time as Sharon, and now But Sharon is inextricably drawn in. Robyn’s, neighbors go about their days. Though it begins as a lighthearted story Ultimately, this effect is disjointed and of two older women finding their indecomes off careless, like it was added as an pendence, the story quickly takes a dark afterthought. and comical turn that veers into a world of At one point during the show, Sharon crime in which Sharon becomes entwined. remarks that, “Everybody just wants to The Roommate makes a good effort at burn it down and start over.” And though tackling dark comedy, and it gets off to a that phrase is almost wickedly relatable, strong start. The opening scene that introSilverman’s characters fail to completely duces us to the nervous Sharon during lean into the concept, which leaves the her first interactions with Robyn delivers production feeling incomplete, despite the some genuine laughs. However, as the play obvious talent of the actors on stage. continues, the story ultimately becomes too improbable and settles into a dullness The Roommate runs through Oct. 21 at the that leaves the audience less-than-sympaPlayhouse in the Park. More info/tickets: thetic to the unfolding insanity on stage. cincyplay.com. Combined with slow set changes and an

33


ONSTAGE

OCTOBER 25-28 MUSIC HALL PRODUCTION SPONSORS

JAMES R. BRIDGELAND, JR.

LORETTA MOTZ COOK & DAVID COOK

SEASON SPONSORS MARGARET & MICHAEL VALENTINE

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

|

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

OFFICIAL SPORTS MEDICINE PROVIDER

34

CHECK US OUT ONLINE WWW.CITYBEAT.COM

Bad Behavior = Great Humor at CCM BY R I C K PEN D ER

Richard Hess, who heads the acting its staging, he later regretted his tolerance, program at the University of Cincinnati’s according to Hess, due to its depiction of College-Conservatory of Music (CCM) read bribery, neglect of duty, embezzlement, Nikolai Gogol’s 1836 comedy The Governpetty gossip and vindictiveness. After the ment Inspector in a required theater history performance, the tsar said, “Everyone got class when he was a college freshman. his. And most of all, me.” Though he recalls the class reading 60 The production evoked strong disapplays that semester, it was Gogol’s hilariproval from critics and officials, leading ous script that stuck with him. “I loved it the playwright to relocate to Rome for then, and I love it even more now,” he says. the better part of six years. He continued This weekend at CCM his production of to refine the script there as well as wrote the hilarious show, working with a fresh fiction during that period, including two adaptation by Jeffrey Hatcher, should classics of Russian realism, a short story evoke gales of laughter. The show, which satirizes bad behavior in a 19th-century Russian province, offers not one admirable character; everyone is corrupt. Fundamentally, the story is one of mistaken identity: The self-serving officials of a small town learn that an undercover inspector will soon visit. They are convulsed with panic when Ivan Hlestakov shows up, who is a well-dressed, clueless and foolish visitor from St. Petersburg. Quickly, they become conNikolai Gogol’s The Government Inspector at CCM vinced that he is the official sent to detect what’s PHOTO: PROVIDED going on in the town. Ivan is in desperate straits, both out of money and far from home. He titled “The Overcoat” and a novel, Dead is about to shoot himself (while admiring Souls, both published in 1842. his image in a mirror) when the town’s “A good satire bites when it is written,” mayor shows up with a load of rubles. Ivan Hess says. “A great satire withstands the is so dimwitted that he quickly abandons test of time and continues to bite for future his dire decision and willingly accepts all generations. The Government Inspector is attempts to bribe and banquet him. a classic because it was funny then — and The simple straightforward farce plays it’s funny now. Our production is set in an out as the town’s leaders continue their 1836 that feels uncannily like 2018.” outlandish hospitality while the bewilHess has used dramas as teaching tools dered Ivan fails to grasp why it’s happening for several years, so he decided it was time to him. A reviewer of a 2017 New York profor a change this year. “I chose The Governduction of Hatcher’s adaptation referred ment Inspector so audiences could laugh to the show’s foolish characters as “dumb long and laugh hard.” He says Hatcher’s and dumber.” With wholly entertaining modern adaptation “is guaranteed to proslapstick, this timely adaptation of Gogol’s duce giggles and belly laughs.” play exposes the corruption of a small Student actors in key roles include town with biting hilarity. Carter LaCava as Ivan Hlestakov, GraHess says rehearsals for the show have ham Rogers as the venal mayor, Gabriella been zany, often disintegrating into bedDiVincenzo as his overbearing wife and lam. He has chosen Gogol’s script to teach Zoe Cotzias as Marya, his sullen daughter. his acting students about comedy and timGogol once observed, “You can’t imaging. Hess says the script does not require ine how stupid the whole world has grown comic antics by the performers. Instead, nowadays.” Hess echoes this sentiment he’s urging them to trust the material. and builds on it: “Human stupidity can be “They don’t have to try to be funny. They really funny,” he says, and his production just need to tell the story truthfully and the — reminding us of the terrifying timelessaudience will roar,” he says. ness of bureaucracy and buffoonery — will The Government Inspector has been offer ample evidence. amusing audiences for nearly two centuThe Government Inspector, presented ries. Gogol wrote it in 1834 — he was just by CCM, continues through Sunday. More 25 years old — and produced it on April info: ccm.uc.edu. 13, 1836. While Tsar Nicholas I permitted


TV

‘American Vandal’ Strikes (and Shines) Again BY JAC K ER N

Voted Best Smoke Shop

Hemp, Vape & Smoke H aber d a s her y NORTHSIDE 4179 Hamilton Ave. 513-569-0420

O’BRYON VILLE 2034 Madison Rd. 513-871-HEMP

SHARON VILLE 11353 Lebanon Rd. 513-524-HEMP

DAYTON 548 Wilmington Ave. 937-991-1015

27 Years of Live Stand-Up Comedy in Cincinnati!

Show Times

Wed / Thur / Sun 8:00 - 18+ Friday 7:30 & 10:00 - 18+ Saturday 7:30 & 10:00 - 21+ Just 15 minutes from downtown in Mongtomery! Vic Henley

DC Benny

October 4 - 7

October 11 - 14

Chris Por ter

Good Bye Cam O’Connor

October 26 - 28

November 8

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

|

W W W.GOBANANASCOMEDY.COM 8410 Market Place Ln.

513.984.9288

Like us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

American Vandal (Netflix) was one of my Viewers get to meet a ton of authentic favorite TV surprises of 2017. We all knew characters from St. Bernadine as Peter The Handmaid’s Tale was going to be great, and Sam descend onto the school, set on but who could guess a mockumentary proving Kevin’s innocence — or at least about a high school prankster could be so determining who the “Turd Burglar” is. compelling and hilarious — let alone go on That’s the name used by the unknown to garner an Emmy nomination? Premierassailant, who not only contaminated the ing last September with little fanfare, the cafeteria lemonade, but also arranged for first season delivered a fitting satire of poo to shoot out of T-shirt launchers at a the ubiquitous true crime genre while pep rally and filled a class’ pinata with, showcasing a young cast of characters that you guessed it, more actual crap, which seemed all too real. was promptly whacked and projected Despite its popularity and critical onto students. The Turd Burglar used acclaim, I didn’t expect another season. As a miniseries, it told a very complete story. So I was delighted when Netflix dropped a trailer for a second installment just weeks before its September premiere. (Fictional) teen documentary filmmakers Peter Maldonado and Sam Ecklund (Tyler Alvarez and Griffin Gluck) return to investigate another irreverent high school prank. While Season 1 focused on mysterious penis graffiti defacing teachers’ cars, American Vandal this time the crime is even messier: After drinking PHOTO: COURTESY OF NETFLIX laxative-laced lemonade — and a number of other poop-related pranks — dozens of students social media to take credit for the stunts, got explosive diarrhea across the school. taunt students and share footage of his Before Peter and Sam delve into this new victims. (Funnily enough, these clips from case, they acknowledge the first season, the show have been circulating on social explaining that they’ve seen great success media IRL, sparking some to believe the after their documentary was bought by footage — of several students pooping Netflix and the streaming giant greenlit their pants in school — is real.) The hunt another season after a student from for the Turd Burglar takes some interesting St. Bernardine high school in Bellevue, twists and turns, ultimately leading to a Washington, reached out to the guys in solid whodunnit reveal. an effort to uncover who was behind this Dan Perrault and Tony Yacenda, the series of unsavory events. real creators of American Vandal, know A new case unfortunately means no dicks and poop are inherently funny, but Jimmy Tatro, who starred as the dense but they’re made all the more hilarious when lovable accused vandal Dylan Maxwell given such a serious platform. Peter and in Season 1. And there’s no character that Sam approach their work with the gravitas quite lives up to him, but Kevin McClain of serious true-crime documentaries, (Travis Tope) is pretty great. elevating what could be cheap laughs into Kevin has been nabbed for the gag, genius comedy. expelled from school and is on house But American Vandal doesn’t just set its arrest awaiting his trial (this is some aim on skewering that genre — it’s also a Rajneeshee-level food poisoning, after keen satire of high school. It finds humor all). Never without his newsboy cap in the different types of kids that populate or artisanal hot tea, Kevin isn’t exactly high schools across the country and their the most popular guy. He speaks with a idiosyncratic experiences. It also speaks to vaguely pretentious cadence and takes genuine issues high schoolers — everyone, himself way too seriously, but still comes really — face, like the pressure to fit in off as a really sympathetic guy. Damn it if and fulfill a role prescribed by parents, he doesn’t fully commit to being himself teachers or peers and the need to be loved. even if his interests are guaranteed to be Brace yourself: This literal shit show just ridiculed. Tope nails his portrayal of this might hit you in the feels. hyper-specific type of kid that is somehow Contact Jac Kern: @jackern so universally recognizable.

35


JOIN US IN PAYING HOM AGE TO ALL THINGS ‘Z A WITH $8 PIZZ A S F R O M S O M E O F C I N C I N N AT I ’ S MOST POPUL AR PIZ Z A JOINTS!

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

|

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

PA R T I C I PA N T S:

36

# C I N C Y P I Z Z AW E E K C INC INNATIPIZZ AWEEK.COM

Alto Pizza Kitchen + Bar Blackbird Eatery Brick Oven Loveland Brixx Pizza Brown Dog Cafe Catch-a-Fire City Goat Delicio Coal Fired Pizza D e w e y ’s P i z z a Fireside Pizza G o o d f e l l a ’s P i z z e r i a Harvest Pizza House of Orange Incline Public House Local Post Mackenzie River Pizza, Grill & Pub Mad Monk Pizza MidiCi The Neapolitan Pizza Company M i k e y ’s L a t e N i g h t S l i c e Padrino Palomino Pies and Pints Snappy Tomat o Piz za S t o n g ’s P i z z e r i a Ta f t ’s B r e w p o u r i u m Taglio Two Cities Piz za Company Zablong Peculiar Pizza


FOOD & DRINK

Sip and Savor at OTR’s LouVino More than 60 wines by the glass and flavorful small plates await you at this Louisville-born wine bar BY L AU R EN M O R E T TO

T

A selection of LouVino’s small plates PHOTO: HAILEY BOLLINGER

LouVino 1142 Main St., Overthe-Rhine, louvino. com; Hours: 5-10 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday; 5-11 p.m. Friday; 10 a.m.-2 p.m. and 5-11 p.m. Saturday; 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sunday.

stress the grave mistake you would be making if you passed up the potato tots. You get eight fried balls that are crunchy on the outside and the consistency of cheesy mashed potatoes on the inside. The beef sliders were another favorite of mine. The meat itself was juicy and cooked with just enough pink left in the middle. A generous portion of green peppers, onions and bacon was placed on top of the patty, adding depth of flavor and a touch of something fresh. The OTR location serves brunch on Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. You can expect savory classics like eggs benedict ($12.50) as well as inventive options like pancake tacos ($10.50). Classic mimosas are $2 (need I say more?), though there are spin-offs like the beermosa, a rotating craft beer, sparkling wine and orange juice; and the SBL mimosa, which has a strawberry-basil purée, lemonade and lemonade sparkling wine. LouVino is a place where you can get in and out under $20 or ball out for an extravagant meal of tapas and libations. And if you’re someone who enjoys that pang of happiness when you see the waiter bring out your food, you’ll love having their small plates and fun wine flights delivered again and again throughout your visit.

FIND MORE RESTAURANT NEWS AND REVIEWS AT CITYBEAT.COM/ FOOD-DRINK

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

pages and we’ll keep the stuff that everybody loves on the classics side. And then every store does their own thing,’ ” he says. When I visited LouVino, it was a little past dinnertime and my boyfriend and I were seated by the front overlooking the rest of the restaurant. The interior is very industrial chic with luxurious finishes: think exposed brick and velvet upholstery. Some especially eye-catching details are a purple booth that spans the length of the back wall in a warped C-shape and the swanky gray and white tile at the foot of the bar. There are also two beautifully decorated private dining areas for 14 or 40 people. We settled in and ordered drinks. I had the Italianate red wine flight ($15) and cheese samples, which came in dainty slivers. As someone who has barely dabbled in wine not made by Yellow Tail (I know, please shame me…), I would say I have a beginner’s palate. It was interesting to try the different beverages and see how the cheese brought out their individual notes. My boyfriend, a dedicated fan of Old Fashioneds, got LouVino’s version of the cocktail and thoroughly enjoyed it. For food we shared the Brussels sprouts salad ($10) which came in a cilantro lime vinaigrette, the steak and hoe cakes ($14), the beef sliders ($12) and the loaded baked potato tots ($9). While they’re called small plates, you get very generous portions. Two per person would be more than enough to leave you satisfied. Though everything was delicious, I must

|

savory or vibrant. They also have cocktails, mocktails and beer. If you’re unsure what would pair well with your meal, there are three certified sommeliers on staff to assist you. All of this works toward LouVino’s goal of making wine fun and approachable for patrons, what Chad refers jokingly to as “breaking the pretentious threshold.” While their wine selection is impressive, their elevated comfort food deserves a spotlight of its own, too. There are two menus: classics and seasonal. The former features dishes that are permanently available while the latter is a rotating menu dictated by the chef. At the OTR location, these are imagined by executive chef Sarah Rockwell, a Cincinnati native. They source local ingredients as much as possible, frequently visiting spots like the Covington Farmers Market and Findlay Market. Tavis Rockwell, Sarah’s husband, is LouVino’s culinary director, and he says the classics menu features ideas he always wanted to tackle on small plates. They stayed in demand across all of the LouVino locations. “When we decided to branch out, I said, ‘Well why don’t we make the menu two

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

ake your taste buds on a journey from the marigold-lined pathways of Château Guiraud in France to the Alps-framed Castelfeder winery in northern Italy — all while dining at LouVino in Over-the-Rhine. The concept restaurant opened in late August on Main Street and offers 60 wines by the glass as well as small plates inspired by Southern cuisine. After seeing an opportunity to introduce more wine into Kentucky’s saturated landscape of beer and bourbon, Chad and Lauren Coulter left their jobs as pharmacists to pursue a paint-and-sip business. Then, in 2014, they decided to move on and join the Louisville restaurant industry by opening LouVino. They have four locations today with a fifth debuting in downtown Indianapolis early next year. The fermented-grape beverage is a focal point not just on their extensive menu, but also in the OTR location’s decor. Once you walk in, you’re surrounded on either side by floor-to-ceiling partitions made of wine crates. The hostess station is set up with a similar structure behind it. Then at the bar — bookended between bottles of liquor, wine and glassware that twinkles in backlit shelves — are four silver machines. Their task is to preserve wine (using argon) after it’s been opened, allowing patrons to try high-end libations in small portions rather than having to purchase the entire bottle. “The average lifespan of a red wine is three days, maybe four. In these machines, (it) can last 45 to 60 days,“ says Chad. “It allows you to offer some pretty rare or expensive things without the worry of it going bad.” You’ll see some familiar names on the wine list, too, as flights are named after Ohio and Kentucky celebrities like Carmen Electra and John Legend. They are served in three 2-ounce pours and can be paired with cheese for an additional $2. Individual glasses are 6 ounces and range in price from $8 to $29. If, like me, you have limited experience with wine, they make it easy by organizing their selection by type — white, red, rosé etc. — and their characteristics, whether that be bold,

37


THE DISH

After Success as a Traveling Pop-Up, The Bagelry Opens a Permanent Storefront in OTR BY AU S T I N G AY L E

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

|

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

Richard Huff and Erin Davren, two Cincinnatians who met through college in Dayton, studied law and went to medical school, respectively. Shared time was at a premium when Huff, who had picked up his first law job, followed Davren to Louisville for her residency, but Saturdays were set aside for the duo to connect over bagels at that city’s Nancy’s Bagel Grounds. A bagel or two later, Huff and Davren are now happily married and are opening their brick-and-mortar The Bagelry (formerly known as OTR Bagelry) in their hometown. “The first batch (Richard made), I remember it being like incredibly good,” Davren says with a laugh. “When I think back on it, I’m sure they were ugly and not nearly the product that (we’ve) got now. But, he just got better and better. I’d have him make them for friends, brunches, stuff like that, and it just continued to be a part of our weekends.” Now Huff, with the help of his wife and other family members, is graduating from friends, brunches, farmers markets and a Findlay Market pop-up to open The Bagelry on the corner of Walnut and 14th streets in Over-the-Rhine. The Bagelry is slated to open its doors Friday, Oct. 5. Huff hopes to combine what he calls “New York-style with Cincinnati passion” when producing his bagels and housemade schmear. “What distinguishes our bagels from most bagels is the time,” Huff says. “One of the main things that we do is a 36- to 48-hour rise. Anybody in the bagel industry will say that’s very unique… And in bread, I won’t get into too much of the nitty gritty details, but that’s actually where bread’s flavor comes from.” While time and yeast do most of the heavy lifting, Davren, Huff and Huff’s brother, Kyle Jones, all contributed to the company’s recipes to form a continually evolving menu of eight bagels, ranging from the classics — everything, asiago and plain — to options like chocolate chip, cinnamon raisin and blueberry. And Huff isn’t cutting any corners when

38

it comes to making his cream cheese spreads. Though he doesn’t make the cheese himself, the flavors, including roasted vegetable and jalapeño, are products of high-effort processes. “We actually take a pan of vegetables and roast them to make our roasted vegetable cream cheese,” Huff says. “And that’s by far our best-seller.” In the beginning, while Huff and Davren were occupied with their day jobs, Huff’s brother Jones, a jewelry artist turned bagel-baking professional, picked up a job at a bagel shop where he lived in Colorado after Huff introduced the idea of The Bagelry. He intended to learn as much as he could about the bagel business, from hand-rolling the dough to running the cash register, before relocating to Cincinnati. “I learned a ton in those four months,” he says. “I basically worked non-stop.” Jones has since paired his The team behind The Bagelry knowledge with Huff’s to create a majority of the shop’s current PHOTO: HAILEY BOLLINGER offerings, and the relationship is far from the stereotypical “Richard is not a coffee drinker,” Davren sibling rivalry. In fact, siblings are a focus says. “I am very much, and the other two here: Davren’s sister Colleen Hert also partners are, so Richard didn’t know anycame on board to help with some of the thing when it came to like what is a good, accounting. local coffee. (Urbana Café owner Daniel “Everybody does everything right now,” Noguera) helped him with that and was Jones says. “No one does just one thing, extremely helpful with what equipment and that’s so everyone knows how to do we’d need and will train us on how to use everything from top to bottom.” the equipment.” In addition to bagels, the shop will offer The emphasis at The Bagelry will be on breakfast and lunch sandwiches, lox and a takeout, but the experience — regardless brown-butter-chocolate-chip cookie that of how short or long it may be — is meant Huff is currently fine-tuning as he starts to to be worthwhile. Jones aims to pilot such expand his expertise in baked goods. efforts: he has made building relationships To complement the bagels, The Bagelry and the customer experience his primary is also partnering with local Urbana Café goal. to offer coffee at the shop. (Urbana Café “I’m really excited to develop a will carry The Bagelry’s bagels, too.) relationship with regulars,” Jones says.

NOW REOPENED

Tohi

The Bagelry is located at 1401 Walnut St., Over-the-Rhine. Hours are 7 a.m.-2 p.m. daily. More info: otrbagelry.com.

Dinner 5 OFF 2ndEntree

$ 00

Cincinnati’s Only Hemp Spa, Tea House, and Boutique

$5 Off Carryout Entree. Good Only at Ambar India. Only 2 Coupons Per Party, Per Table. Expires 6/23/19

Massage • Facials • Waxing • detox Sauna Mani/pedi • tea House • Smoothie Bar • Hemp Boutique

942 HatcH St. • Mt adaMS 513-421-8644 • toHiSpa.coM

“That was something that was really fun about working at the shop in Colorado… It makes it a really fun environment. Building those relationships with your guests is just something you can’t do in a market setting.” Though some regulars have already started to follow the shop from market to market, The Bagelry will kick their relationship-building into high gear this weekend — perfect timing for Huff’s and Davren’s first bagel Saturday at their new shop.

Lunch 3 OFF 2ndEntree

$ 00 Voted BEST INDIAN for 17 Years

350 Ludlow Ave • 513-281-7000

$3 Off Carryout Entree. Good Only at Ambar India. Only 2 Coupons Per Party, Per Table. Expires 6/23/19


CLASSES & EVENTS WEDNESDAY 03

HopScotch 2018 — Join CityBeat for its inaugural HopScotch event and imbibe unlimited samples of scotch, craft beer, whiskey, food and more at New Riff Distillery. 5:30-8:30 p.m. $40-$55. New Riff Distilling, 24 Distillery Way, Newport, Ky., citybeat.com.

THURSDAY 04

Cooking with an Abundant Harvest: How to Avoid Food Waste in Your Garden — La Soupe, a local “food rescue” nonprofit, and the Civic Garden Center join forces for this class on how to avoid food waste in your garden. Discover different creative ways to use your vegetables so you don’t get bored or overwhelmed. 6-7:30 p.m. $15. Civic Garden Center, 2715 Reading Road, Avondale, civicgardencenter.org. NKY Bourbon Festival — NKY Magazine hosts this bourbon festival to celebrate the local and growing distillery and dining scene. Sample bourbon from well-known brands like New Riff, Basil Hayden’s, Buffalo Trace, Knob Creek, Maker’s Mark and Woodford Reserve and light bites from NKY restaurants. 5:30-8:30 p.m. $42-$58. Hilton Cincinnati Airport, 7373 Turfway Road, Florence, Ky., cincy.live/ events/nky-bourbon-festivaltasting-18.

Secrets of the Syndicate Murder Mystery Dinner — It’s 1950s Newport and you’re invited to Glenn Schmidt’s Playtorium before going to gamble at the casino. But, surprise, someone ends up dead before the evening ends. You need to figure out who murdered your fellow guest, going through secret passages of the Newport Syndicate and into a vault. Dine and discover whodunit during dessert. 7 p.m. $37.80. Gangsters Dueling Piano Bar, 18 E. Fifth St., Newport, Ky., facebook.com/ gangsterspianobar.

SATURDAY 06

Weekend of Fire — Calling all spice lovers: Weekend of Fire presents all things hot, including, salsas, dry rubs, hot sauces and bloody marys. Bring pals who can take the heat and peruse over 55 vendors. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday; 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday. $8; $14 twoday. Jungle Jim’s, 5440 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, junglejims.com.

SUNDAY 07

Beauty and the Feast at Tillie’s — This brunch comes with a twist: entertainment by the Brunchettes drag

th

EST. 1933

AN

NIVERSARY

MONDAY 08

Cincinnati Taco Week — CityBeat hosts Cincinnati Taco Week, a seven-day fiesta featuring $2 tacos from some of the area’s most popular taquerias and other eateries including B&A Street Kitchen, Injoy, Lucius Q, Taqueria Mercado, Slatt’s and more. Visit citybeat. com for more info and participating eateries. Oct. 8-14. citybeat.com. Snail of Approval 2018 Celebration — Slow Food Cincinnati’s snail of approval awards area bars, restaurants, food and beverage artisans, stores and markets recognition for their contributions to quality, authenticity and sustainability in the food supply. This awards celebration recognizes 2018’s additions to the list with dinner-bythe-bite. 6:30-9:30 p.m. $35 member; $45 non-member. Rhinegeist, 1910 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, facebook. com/slowfoodcincy. Ulypgso Black Restaurant Week — The Urban League Young Professionals of Greater Southwestern Ohio have planned a Black Restaurant Week to highlight and empower black-owned restaurants. Participating restaurants including Conscious Kitchen, Just Q’in, Park Place, Sweet Petit Desserts and more will offer discounted pricing on menu items. Oct. 8-14. More info at ulypgso.org.

UPCOMING LIVE PERFORMANCES Oct. 5 Oct. 6

Lynn Holland Three Chord Dream

FINE BOURBONS • LOCAL BEERS CRAFT COCKTAILS • LIVE MUSIC

SPACIOUS OUTDOOR SEATING HAPPY HOUR 4PM-7PM WEEKDAYS POMPILIOS.COM | 859.581.3065 600 Washington Ave. Newport, KY

TUESDAY 09

Weeknight Italian — In this hands-on cooking class, learn to make fast Italian dishes for weeknight dinner. Enjoy a glass of wine while you cook pancetta-wrapped pork tenderloin, parmesan orzo with peas and lemon cornmeal cake. 6-8:30 p.m. $75. Jungle Jim’s, 5440 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, junglejims.com.

SEND RESTAURANT TIPS, NEWS AND PRESS RELEASES TO

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

Haunted Brewery Tour — Take this haunted brewery tour through Christian Moerlein’s OTR taproom.

26th-Annual Donauschwaben Oktoberfest —The Donauschwaben Oktoberfest features more than 25 beers on tap, homemade food, live German-style entertainment, a car show and more. 6 p.m.12:30 a.m. Oct. 5; 1 p.m.12:30 a.m. Oct. 6; noon-8 p.m. Oct. 7. $3 adults; free for children 12 and younger. 4290 Dry Ridge Road, Colerain, cincydonau.com.

queens and a buffet from A Catered Affair. Noon-3 p.m. $25. Tillie’s Lounge, 4042 Hamilton Ave., Northside, facebook.com/tillieslounge.

|

FRIDAY 05

Hear five haunted tales and use clues to figure out which story is made up and isn’t based on history. The production is a collaboration between Christian Moerlein, the Brewing Heritage Trail, Cincinnati Escape Room and Cincinnati Landmark Productions. 7 p.m. every Friday and Saturday in October. $25. Christian Moerlein Brewing Co., 1621 Moore St., Over-the-Rhine, hauntedbrewerytour.com.

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

Apples: A Fall Classic — In this demonstration cooking class, watch chef James Trent prepare apples in a variety of ways. Learn how to make fall dishes including a baby greens salad with granny smith apples; masalabrined pork tenderloin with hard cider jus; a gala apple, almond and carrot stoemp; and brown sugar tart with apple butter sorbet. 6-8:30 p.m. $55. Jungle Jim’s, 5440 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, junglejims.com.

Most classes and events require registration and classes frequently sell out.

39


CLEARANCE EVENT SAVE ON FOOTWEAR, APPAREL & ACCESSORIES.

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

|

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

UP TO

40

75

Turfway Park 7500 Turfway Rd Florence, KY 41042 Thursday–Monday 10a–7p

% OFF October 4–8, 2018


MUSIC Vinyl Solution Sticklers for the “air” of analog recording, Americana duo Gillian Welch and David Rawlings now press their own records BY G R EG O RY G AS TO N

W

David Rawlings (left) and Gillian Welch P H O T O : H E N R Y D I LT Z

guitar for the Dave Rawlings Machine band in the studio and onstage. They recently finished a tour for his Poor David’s Almanack album. But eventually, Welch felt compelled to get directly involved with the vinyl process, so she started shellacking grooves, so to speak, in Woodland Studio, their home recording base in East Nashville. “I’m (a) low man on the totem pole, but I’m in the room and helping, making switches,” Welch says. “Typically, there are four of us in there to cut a side the way we do it with the original master tapes, because we don’t make an EQ duplicate master. We are EQ-ing on the fly, which most vinyl mastering textbooks will tell you is impossible, but we wanted to see if we could do it so as to not lose the generation of tape and so we do it.” “I almost can’t tell you what kind of a profound effect it’s had on David and myself to finally be able to put our music on the record shelf with the records that changed our lives,” she adds. “I feel like we finally arrived and we get to at least be on the playground.” Gillian Welch and David Rawlings perform 8 p.m. Monday (Oct. 8) at the Taft Theatre. Tickets/more info: tafttheatre.org.

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

component of what we do. That’s what always just makes me crazy, when I hear a great vinyl copy of say, Astral Weeks or Kind of Blue — it’s the air. You can hear the air moving around the upright bass, you can hear it between Van Morrison’s face and the microphone.” Welch says she and Rawlings first noticed that void on digital releases when they started listening to vinyl more heavily in the mid-2000s. “It just hit us in the face, that this detail — this vital component of records — had been erased off the digital version,” Welch says. “And not only is it a bummer and doesn’t sound as good, but as a musician, it makes me angry how they’ve broken the chain of being able to hear how the guys were doing it. Our first two records first came out new on cassette, so we used to tell people who were just nutty about analog, like, go find the cassette. Because the cassette of Hell Among the Yearlings is still the best way to listen to it — till the day we cut the vinyl.” Sepia-toned rue, hard fate and whiskey regret flood many Welch/Rawlings songs, and their albums — from the folk-art covers to the concepts — spin their integrity in gold and mercury grooves. The duo takes gracious turns in the spotlight as well. In between Welch releases, she plays

|

Welch’s and Rawlings’ inspirations dig oak deep; their raw, aching songs of gospel grace, morphine addiction, barroom girls and nowhere men, knowing Jesus by the mark of the nails and road trips across Appalachia and America echo masters like The Louvin Brothers and Stanley Brothers, the Harry Smith Anthology of American Folk Music, Bob Dylan and The Band — iconic, pioneer spirits, all. The first song Welch and Rawlings ever played together, while attending Boston’s Berklee College of Music, was The Band’s mournful “Long Black Veil” from Music from Big Pink. (In his later years, The Band’s Levon Helm played occasionally with Welch and Rawlings.) “We knew enough Bluegrass to realize we had a natural blend,” Welch says of her partnership with Rawlings. “There’s something about it — we always refer to that as the buzz, like the vocals buzz. We had that buzz — I like to think it’s gotten better over the years.” A fierce integrity spills from Welch’s slow, measured drawl, as she asserts what she wants in recording. “They just haven’t surpassed analog, even with as many improvements as there are in the digital realm,” she says. “If you’re an acoustic musician, it’s the best way to record. For air especially, which is a vital

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

ith the bracing resurgence of vinyl records this decade, more indie artists are delving into music’s retro golden age with a DIY ethos. The digital virus hasn’t quite infected everyone. Befitting her austere, Folk aesthetic and hardcore passion for analog, Gillian Welch is not only releasing new records these days — she is also actually pressing the vinyl grooves herself. Welch and her partner David Rawlings released their classic debut, Revival, produced by T Bone Burnett, back in 1996. Their stripped-down, dual acoustic sound and keening voices felt like outsider music when contrasted with the mid-’90s Grunge ruling the airwaves then. Yet only four years later, Welch was taking home a Grammy award for her contributions as songwriter and executive producer for the eight-times-platinum-selling soundtrack of Oh Brother, Where Art Thou?, the influential Bluegrass/Roots blueprint that spiked the popularity of AltCountry and its myriad Americana variations. Their last two releases, Soul Journey and Boots No. 1 The Official Revival Bootleg, both archival classics, were released on Welch’s and Rawlings’ own Acony Records. Boots No. 1 was inspired by Bob Dylan’s ongoing Bootleg Series, proof that Faulkner’s adage — “The past isn’t dead. It’s not even past.” — is accurate yet again. “They all bring about a new chapter, don’t they?” Welch says of her canon. “Hell Among the Yearlings (1998) brought along the banjo, Revelator (2001) was a whole lot of things.” She finds her 2003 album Soul Journey to be the most revelatory, though. “When we were remastering it for vinyl and cutting that last groove, I was really struck by its bravery,” she says of her fourth studio LP. “This might sound funny, but to me, I heard its punkness, its sort of outsiderness and its bravery. It’s amazing we weren’t concerned about making a more commercial record after the success of Revelator. It sounds, if you don’t mind my saying, like we just don’t give a damn.” Acoustic doesn’t necessarily mean soft and Folk doesn’t have to mean tame.

41


C I T Y B E AT. C O M

|

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

FEATURING

42

BUFFALO WINGS AND RINGS // BUTCHER AND BARREL // CHICKEN MAC TRUCK // CREWITTS CREEK // COURT STREET LOBSTER BAR // FLIPSIDE // INJOY // LUCIUS Q // EIGHTEEN AT THE RADISSON // ELI’S BBQ // JOELLA’S HOT CHICKEN // KEYSTONE’S MAC SHACK // MAMABEAR’S MAC // NADA // PICKLES & BONES BBQ // PRIME // SWEETS & MEATS BBQ // THE EAGLE // TICKLE PICKLE NORTHSIDE // WICKED HICKORY ...AND MORE TO BE ANNOUNCED!

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT: WWW.MACANDCHEESECINCY.COM


SPILL IT

Dan Karlsberg is Ready for ‘Winter’ BY M I K E B R EEN

111 E 6th St Newport, KY 41071

BY M I K E B R EE N

West Goes South (Again)

Kanye West’s appearance on the season premiere of Saturday Night Live was baffling and controversial, even by the rapper’s own standards. Kicking things off by performing a song dressed as a water bottle (he was Perrier to guest Lil Pump’s Fuji), West returned for a rare third song to close out the show. Though unaired, footage surfaced of West awkwardly ranting at the end of the program to a largely stunnedsilent audience. Among other unclear ramblings, West said he was bullied “backstage” for wearing a MAGA hat and suggested he was running for President in 2020, presumably against the current President, who tweeted that he loved West’s statements. The next day, West took to Twitter to apologize for his erratic appearance. Just kidding — West’s Sunday posts included more MAGA-hat selfies and a call to abolish the slaveryoutlawing 13th amendment.

This is Hardcore?

Brit Pop stars Jarvis Cocker (Pulp) and Bez (Happy Mondays) recently competed on the BBC game show Bargain Hunt, in which contestants shop for antiques to re-sell at auction. The competitor who earns the highest profit is usually the victor, but for the musicthemed edition, Cocker won on multiple levels without meeting that qualification. After refusing to wear the polo shirt/ fleece pullover outfit contestants usually sport, it was later discovered that Bez’s girlfriend was a primary bidder on his lot, so he was disqualified and the ending of the program had to be re-shot, with Cocker declared the new winner.

Homeland Sounds

10/4 - KARAOKE NIGHT!, SCOTT MILLER, BLOSSOM HALL, NORTH BY NORTH, HOT FOR ALICE, THE SMOKE PARADE 10/5 - RED WANTING BLUE, DAN WHITAKER AND THE SHINEBENDERS

10/6 - TWIG, TIGERLILLIES, NEW SINCERITY WORKS, WILDE VIOLET, THE JOSEPHINES

10/8 - MELODIME, THE BREVET 10/9 - TOM MCELVAIN AND JOE AUSTIN

WWW.SOUT H GAT E H OU SE .COM

1345 MAIN ST MOTRPUB.COM

WED 3

BRINK BREWING CO BEER TASTING, DARK HARBOR W/ FERAL FRIENDS

T H U NOAH SMITH’S CROONER CIRCUS 4

MARCUS ALAN WARD (CLEVELAND) W/ CAPTAIN KIDD

S AT 6

YOUR SMITH (FKA CARALINE SMITH) W/ BAUM AND SUPER CITY

SUN 7

LDYCP W/ VIOLENT BLOOM

MON 8

SLOW CAVES (FORT COLLINS, CO) W/ SWEET PABLO

TUE 9

MOTR MOUTH | STAND UP COMEDY, WRITER’S NIGHT

FREE LIVE MUSIC OPEN FOR LUNCH

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

FRI 5

|

Spotify has partnered with the genealogy site Ancestry.com to provide playlists for those purchasing one of the site’s $99 DNA analysis kits. But the playlists of music from your ancestors’ homelands isn’t what they listened to generations ago. Irish and Scottish descendants, for example, get a playlist that features mostly modern Pop — instead of bagpipes and tin whistles, there’s Electronic artist Talos, Sinead O’Connor’s version of Nirvana’s “All Apologies” and hits by Franz Ferdinand and The Cranberries. If you don’t want to share your DNA, Ancestry also has a free site to plug in your ancestral regions and get personalized playlists.

TICKE TS AVAIL ABLE AT THE SOUTHGATE HOUSE LOUNGE OR TICKE TFLY.COM

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

Pianist Dan Karlsberg has been workThis Sunday (Oct. 7), Karlsberg, Allen ing within the Cincinnati Jazz scene and Buckley will perform an afternoon for more than a decade now, living the album release show at Caffè Vivace (975 E. working-musician life with gigs of every McMillan, Walnut Hills, caffevivace.com). stripe in a variety of local venues. Besides Admission for the 2:30 p.m. event is $5. his inscrutable performance chops, the inFind more on Dan Karlsberg at demand player also flashes his abundant dankarlsberg.com. arrangement and composition skills from A Local Music-Palooza time to time on studio recordings by differThis weekend’s three-day Rhythm Brew ent bands he leads. His albums have long Art and Music Festival at Wooden Cask showed a mix of reverence for Jazz (and Brewing Company (629 York St., Newport, Classical music) tradition and form and Ky., woodencask.com) is great way to kick a creative curiosity that helps him reveal new perspectives within them, all tied together with his finely-tuned improvisational instincts. A University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music grad, Karlsberg’s first album as a leader, The Adventures of the Dan Karlsberg Group, came out in 2007, with Mission to Mars & Other Short Stories following three years later. In 2015, he took his discography to the next level with The ’Nati 6, on which he performed wide-ranging material with some of the area’s best veteran musiDan Karlsberg cians. Now, Karlsberg has returned with another PHOTO: PROVIDED brilliant offering, Tales from the Winter Solstice. off autumn with a broad sampling of some The new album finds Karlsberg among of Greater Cincinnati’s finest music makers, his comfortable sphere of influences (like plus some regional/national touring acts, Thelonious Monk and Bud Powell, who like the former drummer for the legendary gets an extra nod on Winter Solstice with Ramones, Richie Ramone, and popular “Chorale for Bud Powell”), but, as always, Indianapolis Grateful Dead tribute band there are new wrinkles. Karlsberg says Hyryder. the music was composed and adapted Locals performing Friday include The specifically for the musicians he worked Last Troubadour, The Grove, Go Go Bufwith on the album — JD Allen (sax) and falo and 500 Miles to Memphis, as well as Tom Buckley (drums). The instrumental Reggae-fueled squads Elementree Livity lineup in itself was a bit of a self-imposed Project and The Cliftones. Saturday’s creative challenge. lineup features Peridoni, Restless Leg “Having no bass player allowed for a String Band, Moonbeau, Arlo McKinley different approach to the performance and the Lonesome Sound, Black Signal, of a composition, where the piano serves Brother Smith, Maria Carrelli, Dark mostly as the accompanying instrument Colour, Freak Mythology and Xzela, and is the bedrock for both drums and among others. Sunday is highlighted saxophone to play around,” Karlsberg says. by Greater Cincinnati favorites like The The trio got together regularly to work Tillers, Emmaline, Strange Mechanics, out the songs, some of which were origiCommon Center, Ernie Johnson From nally written exclusively for piano or other Detroit, Wonky Tonk and the Highlife, instruments, such as Winter Solstice’s Carriers, Sundae Drives and Grassparopening cut, “Movement II for Two Violins.” tame, a project featuring Ben Gourley and The musicians’ instinctual interplay is a Jason Wolf of Rumpke Mountain Boys. big part of what makes Winter Solstice such Music (on two stages) begins at 5:30 an absorbing listen, but understanding p.m. Friday, 12:30 p.m. Saturday and 1 p.m. the way the work they put in to exploit the Sunday. Tickets are $15 per day; $30 gets compositions’ versatility makes it all the you a three-day pass. Advanced tickets are more compelling, available at cincyticket.com. Karlsberg says Tales from the Winter Solstice is the first of four seasonally-themed Contact Mike Breen: albums he is planning to do, with each one mbreen@citybeat.com featured a different collection of musicians.

MINIMUM GAUGE

859.431.2201

43


SOUND ADVICE

MARK YOUR CALENDAR FOR THESE ‘DON’T MISS’ EVENTS

Chris Stapleton PH OTO: A N DY BARRON

OCT. 3

OCT. 8-14

Chris Stapleton with Marty Stuart and Brent Cobb

Thursday • Riverbend Music Center

NOV. 2

NOV. 5-11

Bourbon & Bacon

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

|

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

Wednesday, December 5th New Riff Distilling 5:30-8:30 P.M.

44

t i c k e t s ava i l a b l e at c i t y b e at. c o m

DEC. 5

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT CITYBEAT.COM

For many people, Chris Stapleton’s name might be a new addition to their list of favorite Country artists, but his voice and his résumé tell a different story. Though relatively new to the spotlight, this ain’t his first rodeo. Before Stapleton’s deep, dark Dreamers vocals cracked through speakPHOTO: DANA TRIPPE ers with “Nobody to Blame,” he’d already made a name for himself in Nashville. After spending most to that larger-than-life persona, Stapleton of his life in Kentucky, Stapleton recently performed alongside Willie Neltransplanted to Tennessee in 2001 and, son at Farm Aid. Seems like Stapleton isn’t according to gossip, had a contract in a just the hero we deserve, but the exact hero matter of days. During his first decade we need right now, too. in Music City, Stapleton wrote hits for Now that Farm Aid has passed, Stapleeveryone from Adele to Kenny Chesney. He ton will finish off 2018 with a bang. Last even penned a George Strait song which, year’s From a Room: Volume 2 and the in my estimate, makes him as Country as single “Broken Halos” picked up a total of you can get. Between all that writing, he five Country Music Award nominations, so also had time to spend two years frontit’s likely he’ll be taking take home some ing The SteelDrivers, who have brought trophies at the November ceremony. their brand of Bluegrass through Greater Stapleton is currently on tour with Cincinnati several times. another Country music legend, Marty StuThere’s more to Stapleton than just sheer art; their stop at Riverbend has long been writing talent, though. There’s a mystique sold out (like most Stapleton-headlined that few performers manage to pull off shows are these days), so here’s hoping you these days. With his height, long beard know somebody who knows somebody. and longer hair, he looks, acts and sounds (Deirdre Kaye) like a true modern cowboy in a world of wannabes. He comes off like a man Big Dreamers with Morgxn and Hoss and Little Joe would gladly ride beside. We already know George Strait has Weathers an appreciation for the new star, but there’s Monday • 20th Century Theater no doubt the likes of Chris LeDoux would Dreamers is among the new breed of Pop be equally impressed with him. Adding


Trivium PHOTO: PROVIDED

Trivium with Avatar and Light the Torch

Monday • Bogart’s

10/10

THE ESSEX GREEN // CARRIERS

COULD

1 1 /24

THIS PINE BOX ALBUM RELEASE

1 1 /15

THE RESPONSE PROJECT

1 1 /2 1

DANCE YRSELF CLEAN 2018

BUY TICKETS AT MOTR OR WOODWARDTHEATER.COM

LADD

BE YOUR CALLING? GO TO: LADDINC.ORG/JOBS

“Featuring Grammy Award-winning talent in a perfect-jewel of a theater.”

Stephen Marley

An Evening with

Stephen Marley Acoustic October 30

The Lone Bellow The Lone Bellow PRESENTED BY

TRIIIO///ACOUSTIC TOUR

November 28

Includes pre-concert reception.

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

Tickets: $31.00 to $55.00 memorialhallotr.com 513.977.8838

|

In the early 2000’s, the Heavy Metal music scene was awash in a sea of up-and-coming bands that came to be lumped under the “Metalcore” banner. As per usual, a great deal of these bands disappeared just as quickly as they arose but a few were able to distinguish themselves in new, exciting ways and prove they had staying power, with Trivium being chief among them. Mixing Metalcore mainstays like throatshredding vocals and double-bass driven breakdowns with a healthy dose of oldschool Thrash Metal leads and melodies, Trivium broke through in a big way with its second album, 2005’s Ascendency, and hasn’t looked back. Now on their eighth album (2017’s The Sin and the Sentence) and with almost 20 years of experience behind them, the musicians of Trivium have made a career out of expanding enough on their established sound to never make the same album twice, while also remembering what made their initial hits such monsters. Much of the band’s success falls upon the shoulders of lead vocalist and guitarist Matt Heafy. Heafy’s vicious snarl-and-roar voice has evolved and his range (in both singing and shouting) has broadened in strength and dynamics. Pairing this with his and guitarist Corey Beaulieu’s tight, serpentine riffage gives Trivium’s output an undeniably sharp twin-axe front end. Bassist Paolo Gregoletto and drummer Alex Bent (the latest in a long line of skinsmen) round out the picture with precise blasts of lower-register potency. Trivium is a band that was once defined by its influences. Staples like Metalllica, Pantera and In Flames have all been listed as inspirations for the comparatively young quartet, but Trivium has put in the time, effort and creative output to one day join that list of heavyweights as motivators for the next generation of Heavy Metal prodigies. (Nick Grever)

1404 MAIN ST (513) 345-7981

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

Punk bands that follow in the footsteps of ’90s forebearers like Jimmy Eat World and Taking Back Sunday, but bring a contemporary melodic edge to the table. The New York-based trio — guitarist/ vocalist Nick Wold, bassist Marc Nelson and drummer Jacob Lee Wick — has made a tremendous impact in a relatively short time. Just months after Dreamers’ 2014 formation, Alternative Press magazine cited them as one of their 100 Bands You Need to Know. The group’s journey began when Wold relocated from Seattle to New York after high school to study Jazz saxophone at New York University’s Steinhardt School, along with fellow high school Jazz band pals Chris Bagamery and Andrew McGovern. The trio met New Jersey native David Leondi and formed the Grunge outfit Motive, which got regular video play on MTV’s 120 Minutes with the songs “It’s Illicit” and “What’s So Bad,” but quickly ran its course. In 2014, Wold and Bagamery crossed paths with Nelson and formed Dreamers. The band’s first single, “Wolves (You Got Me),” was released that July and found its way into the playlist of Sirius XM’s Alt Nation channel. Dreamers’ self-titled debut EP dropped in November and the AP/100 Bands write-up followed a month later. Dreamers returned to the West Coast in 2015, relocating to Los Angeles and losing Bagamery in the process; he was replaced by Jacob Lee Wick. In early 2016, the trio released its sophomore EP, You Are Here, which was quickly followed by a new single, “Sweet Disaster,” and the group’s debut full length, This Album Does Not Exist. The bulk of the album’s songs were written by Wold prior to their move to Los Angeles. During this period, Dreamers picked up tours with Stone Temple Pilots, Arkells, Atlas Genius and Airborne Toxic Event, among others, and earned a reputation as an engaging live act.

After a long, rigorous touring cycle, Dreamers released the first two EPs in a proposed trilogy this year; the four-song Launch came out in July and the five-song Fly was released earlier this month. With that kind of turnaround, the third EP could theoretically be released before the end of the year, and some of its songs could well be included in the band’s current set list. For a group of Dreamers, they’ve made a whole lot of reality happen in just four years. (Brian Baker)

45


LISTINGS

CityBeat’s music listings are free. Send info to Mike Breen at mbreen@citybeat.com. Listings are subject to change. See CityBeat.com for full music listings and all club locations. H is CityBeat staff’s stamp of approval.

WEDNESDAY 03

H

CAFFÈ VIVACE - Blue Wisp Big Band. 8 p.m. Big Band Jazz.

HILTON NETHERLAND PALM COURT - Pam Mallory Trio. 6 p.m. Jazz. Free. THE LISTING LOON Anissa Pulcheon and Closest Relative. 9 p.m. Acoustic MANSION HILL TAVERN Losing Lucky. 8 p.m. Roots. Free.

H

MOTR PUB - Dark Harbour with Feral Friends. 10 p.m. Alt/Pop/Rock. Free. SOUTHGATE HOUSE REVIVAL (LOUNGE) Michael Moeller with Jimmy Clepper and Randy Steffen. 8 p.m. Acoustic/Roots. Free. STANLEY’S PUB - Highbeams. 8:30 p.m. Folk/Rock. Free.

THURSDAY 04

H

BOGART’S - Milky Chance with Jeremy Loops. 8 p.m. Pop. $30.

CAFFÈ VIVACE - Down Home Collective. 7:30 p.m. Jazz.

H

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

STANLEY’S PUB Electro Cult Circus and Upright Man. 9 p.m. Burlesque/Rock. Cover.

H

URBAN ARTIFACT Serenity Fisher and the Cardboard Hearts and Beasts of Joy. 8 p.m. Pop/ Rock/Jazz/Various.

H

WOODWARD THEATER - Seinfeld Music Guy Jonathan Wolff Benefit for Sweet Cheeks Diaper Bank. 7 p.m. TV/Various. $25-$45.

FRIDAY 05

BLIND LEMON - Jamonn Zeiler. 8 p.m. Acoustic. Free.

H

BLUE NOTE HARRISON - Smile Empty Soul and Flaw with Code Red Riot. 7 p.m. Rock. Cover.

H

BOGART’S - Frank Turner and The Sleeping Souls. 7:30 p.m. Rock.

COMMON ROOTS - Common Roots Open Mic. 8 p.m. Open Mic. Free.

CAFFÈ VIVACE - Andy Brown Trio. 8:30 p.m. Jazz.

H

|

H

BROMWELL’S HÄRTH LOUNGE - Brian Lovely with The Steve Schmidt Trio. 9 p.m. Jazz. Free.

THE MAD FROG - EDM Thursdays. 9 p.m. DJ/Electronic/Dance. Cover.

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

SOUTHGATE HOUSE REVIVAL (SANCTUARY) Scott Miller. 8:30 p.m. Roots. Cover.

THE COMET - Quin Kirchner with 5th World and Animal Mother. 10 p.m. Progressive Jazz. Free.

HILTON NETHERLAND PALM COURT - James E Smith Quartet. 6 p.m. Jazz. Free.

46

Indie/Alt/Rock. Free.

MADISON THEATER Leftover Salmon with Rumpke Mountain Boys. 8 p.m. Bluegrass/Jam. $20, $25 day of show. MEMORIAL HALL - Ray Wylie Hubbard with Arlo McKinley. 8 p.m. Roots. $30-$45.

H

MOTR PUB - Noah Smith’s Crooner Circus. 10 p.m. Singer/Songwriter/ Various. Free.

H

SOUTHGATE HOUSE REVIVAL (LOUNGE) - Blossom Hall, North By North, Hot for Alice and The Smoke Parade. 9:30 p.m.

H

CINCINNATI MASONIC CENTER Lucero with Brent Cowles. 8 p.m. Rock/Roots. $24.

FIFTY WEST BREWING CO. - Willow Tree Carolers. 7 a.m. Folk/Americana. Free. THE GREENWICH - Sonny Moorman. 8 p.m. Blues. $5. HILTON NETHERLAND PALM COURT - Josh Kline Quartet. 9 p.m. Jazz. Free. JAG’S STEAK AND SEAFOOD - 3 Piece Revival. 9 p.m. Rock. $5. JIM AND JACK’S ON THE RIVER - Amy Sailor Band. 9 p.m. Country. Free. KNOTTY PINE - PrizonWood. 10 p.m. Rock. Cover. LUDLOW GARAGE - Kick: The INXS Experience. 8:30 p.m. INXS tribute. $20-$35.

H

THE MAD FROG - Wet Eyed Liars with Room

for Zero. 9 p.m. AltRock. Cover. MADISON THEATER Twiddle. 8 p.m. Rock/Alt/ Various. $18, $22 day of show. MANSION HILL TAVERN The Heaters. 9 p.m. Blues. Cover.

H

MOTR PUB - Marcus Alan Ward with Captain Kidd. 10 p.m. Alt/R&B/Funk/ Pop/Rock. Free.

OCTAVE - Project 504. 11 p.m. Rock/Jam/Various. PEECOX ERLANGER Saving Stimpy. 9:30 p.m. Rock. $5. PLAIN FOLK CAFE - White Line Fever. 7:30 p.m. Bluegrass/Blues/Roots. Free. RADISSON CINCINNATI RIVERFRONT - Basic Truth. 8 p.m. Funk/R&B/Soul. Free. THE REDMOOR - The 2nd Wind Band. 9 p.m. Jazz/ R&B. $10. RICK’S TAVERN - Second Wind. 10 p.m. Rock/Various. $5. SOUTHGATE HOUSE REVIVAL (LOUNGE) - Dan Whitaker and the Shinebenders. 9:30 p.m. Roots/ Country. Free. SOUTHGATE HOUSE REVIVAL (SANCTUARY) Red Wanting Blue. 8 p.m. Rock/Pop/Roots. $18, $20 day of show. SYMPHONY HOTEL & RESTAURANT - The Philip Paul Trio. 8 p.m. Jazz. Free. URBAN ARTIFACT - Death On Fire, DNR, Bloodgate, Dark Soul and Fuzzmuck. 8:15 p.m. Punk/Metal. $5. WASHINGTON PLATFORM - Brandon Coleman Trio. 9 p.m. Jazz. $10 (food/drink minimum).

H

WOODEN CASK BREWING COMPANY - Rhythm Brew Art and Music Fest 2018 with Richie Ramone, 500 miles to Memphis, Go Go Buffalo, The Last Troubadour, Elementree Livity Project, The Cliftones and more. 5 p.m. Rock/Various. $15.

SATURDAY 06

BLIND LEMON - G Burton. 9 p.m. Acoustic. Free.

BROMWELL’S HÄRTH LOUNGE - The Steve Schmidt Trio. 9 p.m. Jazz. Free. CAFFÈ VIVACE - Andy Brown Quartet. 8:30 p.m. Jazz.

H

DEVOU PARK - DevouGrass Music & Arts Festival with My Brother’s Keeper, Hickory Robot, Misty Mountain String Band and Young Heirlooms. 1 p.m. Bluegrass/Americana.

THE GREENWICH - Greg Abate. 9 p.m. Jazz. $10. HILTON NETHERLAND PALM COURT - Gary Gorrell/Jim Connerley Quartet. 9 p.m. Jazz. Free. JAG’S STEAK AND SEAFOOD - Good Hooks. 9 p.m. Pop/Dance/Various. $5. KNOTTY PINE - Top This Band. 10 p.m. Pop/R&B/ Dance/Various. Cover.

H

LIBERTY EXHIBITION HALL - Liberty Jazz Lab with Noah Preminger. 8:30 p.m. Jazz. $20.

H

LUDLOW GARAGE Erika Wennerstrom with Static Falls. 8:30 p.m. Rock. $15.

THE MAD FROG - Victor Spoils, Jordan Briscoe, Falling Through Time, Take Our Name and Mike Sadler. 8 p.m. Rock. $10.

H

MADISON THEATER The Motet with Mungion. 8 p.m. Funk/Soul/Rock/Jam. $18, $22 day of show.

MANSION HILL TAVERN Jay Jesse Johnson. 9 p.m. Blues. Cover.

H

NORTHSIDE YACHT CLUB - PEARS. 9 p.m. Hardcore. $10, $12 day of show.

H

OLLIE’S SKATEPARK - Frostock 2018 with Afroman with The Cliftones, Smoke Parade and more. 8 p.m. Rap/Rock/Reggae. $20, $25 day of show. PEECOX ERLANGER Saving Stimpy. 9:30 p.m. Rock. $5. SILVERTON CAFE - Soul Quest. 9 p.m. R&B/Dance/ Pop/Roc. Free. SOUTHGATE HOUSE REVIVAL (LOUNGE) - The

Josephines. 9:30 p.m. Rock/ Country. Free.

H

SOUTHGATE HOUSE REVIVAL (REVIVAL ROOM) - Twig, Tigerlillies, New Sincerity Works and Wilde Violet. 9 p.m. Rock. $8.

TALON TAVERN - Sonny Moorman Group. 8 p.m. Blues THOMPSON HOUSE - The Southern Charm. 7 p.m. Country Rock. $10. URBAN ARTIFACT - Captain Careless, The Odds of Being Born and Fast Eddy. 9 p.m. Garage Rock. Free. WASHINGTON PLATFORM - Rusty Burge, Brad Meyers and Mike Sharfe. 9 p.m. Jazz. $10 (food/drink minimum).

H

WOODEN CASK BREWING COMPANY Rhythm Brew Art and Music Fest 2018 with Hyryder, Restless Leg String Band, Arlo McKinley and the Lonesome Sound, Moonbeau, Maria Carelli, Peridoni, Dark Colour and more. Noon. Rock/Roots/Alt/Various. $15.

SUNDAY 07

H

CAFFÈ VIVACE - Dan Karlsberg (album release show). 2:30 p.m. Jazz. $5.

H

DEVOU PARK - Serenity Jam: A Rock and Recovery Review: Dave Short, The Bunker Boys, Just 2 Howlers, Chicken Bone, G. Miles and Dell Zell. 11:30 a.m. Rock/Various. Free. MOTR PUB - LDYCP with Violent Boom. 9 p.m. Indie Pop. Free.

H

URBAN ARTIFACT - Spitwad Angels, Kerchief, Bile Sister and Persons. 8 p.m. Rock/Various. Free.

H

WOODEN CASK BREWING COMPANY Rhythm Brew Art and Music Fest 2018 with Common Center, The Tillers, After Funk, Lost Dog Street Band, Ernie Johnson from Detroit, Strange Mechanics and more. Noon. Rock/Alt/Roots/ Various. $15.

MONDAY 08

H

20TH CENTURY THEATER - Dreamers with Morgxn and Weathers. 8 p.m. AltRock/Pop

H

BOGART’S - Trivium. 7 p.m. Metal. $29.

THE GREENWICH - Baron Von Ohlen & the Flying Circus Big Band. 7:30 p.m. Big Band Jazz. $5. HILTON NETHERLAND PALM COURT - Gemus, Fryer, Allgeyer Trio. 6 p.m. Jazz. Free.

H

MOTR PUB - Slow Caves with Sweet Pablo. 9 p.m. Indie Rock. Free. SOUTHGATE HOUSE REVIVAL (REVIVAL ROOM) - Melodime with The Brevet. 7 p.m. Rock/Country. $10, $12 day of show.

H

TAFT THEATRE Gillian Welch. 8 p.m. Americana. $29.50-$37.50.

TUESDAY 09

H

BOGART’S - Lauv with Charlotte Lawrence. 8 p.m. Pop. $20.

CAFFÈ VIVACE - Emmaline Campbell & Ryan Mondak. 7:30 p.m. Soul/Jazz.

Future Sounds Steven Page – Oct. 14, Southgate House Revival Corey Glover – Oct. 19, Urban Artifact The Ataris – Oct. 22, Northside Yacht Club Bubba Sparxxx – Oct. 26, Blue Note Harrison Mike Jones – Oct. 26, Northside Yacht Club Bad Bad Hats – Nov. 13, Southgate House Revival The Nelsons – Nov. 24, Ludlow Garage Why Don’t We – Dec. 5 Madison Theater


CLASSIFIEDS ADULT

In-Call Body Rub

By luscious ebony. Complete body rub Come to me & relax. Let me make you feel better. $55 1/2hr. $100 1 hr. I am an experience you won’t forget. 513.377.7861

Lung Cancer? And Age 60+? You And Your Family May Be Entitled To Significant Cash Award. Call 844-898-7142 for Information. No Risk. No Money Out Of Pocket. (AAN CAN)

PENIS ENLARGEMENT PUMP. Get Stronger & Harder Erections Immediately. Gain 1-3 Inches Permanently & Safely. Guaranteed Results. FDA Licensed. Free Brochure: 1-800354-3944 www.DrJoelKaplan.com (AAN CAN)

HELP WANTED

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get started by training as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 www.IncomeCentral.net (AAN CAN)

COMPUTER

CBRE, Inc. has an oppty in Cincinnati, OH for a Client Strategy & Cnsltng Anly. Mail resume to Attn: HR, 2100 Ross Ave, Ste 1600, Dallas, TX 75201; Ref# CINKAG. Must be legally auth to work in the U.S. w/o spnsrshp. EOE

Help Wanted!! Make $1000 a week Mailing Brochures From Home. Helping Home Workers Since 2001! No Experience Required. Genuine Opportunity. Start Immediately. www.WorkersNeeded.net (AAN CAN)

INTERIOR CLASSIFIEDS

CHEAP FLIGHTS! Book Your Flight Today on United, Delta, American, Air France, Air Canada. We have the best rates. Call today to learn more 1-855-231-1523 (AAN CAN) DISH TV $59.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Call Now: 1-800-373-6508 (AAN CAN)

HEAR AGAIN! Try our hearing aid for just $75 down and $50 per month! Call 866787-3141 and mention 88271 for a risk free trial! FREE SHIPPING! (AAN CAN)

RENTALS: DOWNTOWN

GORGEOUS MT. ADAMS CONDO 2BD-1.5BA, Parking, 4 Fireplaces, Great Views, Granite & Hardwoods. Pets and Short-Term OK! $2200/mo 513-703-1854

ROOMMATES

Need a roommate? Roommates.com will help you find your Perfect Match™ today! (AAN CAN)

LEGAL NOTICES Extra Space Storage hold a public auction at the location indicated: 2526 Ritchie Ave Crescent Springs, KY 41017, October 16th 2018 at 1:00 pm Unit 401 Unit 219 The auction will be listed and advertised on www. storagetreasures.com. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property. Extra Space Storage hold a public auction at the location indicated: 2900 Crescent Springs Pike Erlanger, KY 41018 October16th 2018 12:45PM Unit 324 Unit 707/730 Unit 631 Unit 117 Unit 580 The auction will be listed and advertised on www. storagetreasures.com. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

attention grabbing ads. FIND OUT MORE. SALES@CITYBEAT.COM

Cincinnati:

1-513-587-6014 18+ MegaMates.com

1 HOUR FREE

1-513-587-6004

18+

More Local Numbers: 800-777-8000 guyspyvoice.com

Chopping Blocks - NEXT WEEK BY B R EN DA N E M M E T T Q U I G L E Y L AST WEEK’S ANSWERS:

$ , 0 6 * / 2 : ( / % 2 5 0 & ( 1 , 5 $ 7 6 2 6 2 + 8 7 $ & ( 3 + 5 $ * / 8 % ( 2 3 , 1 % 2 / 7 2 1 ( 6

: $ 5 (

5 ( = 1 2 5

6 : ( ' (

9 ( 5 %

$ 1 5 2 % & ( 3 & 2 6 ( 8 5 8 0 $ 1 * ( 5 $ ( / 6 3 $

3 5 3 $ 2 / 2 < ( : $ 1 % * ( / 2 ' ( 7 $ & 8 1 + 5 2 8 % , 1 $ 1 1 7

% $ 1 $ 1 $

2 5 $ /

' ( 1 7

( ' ' <

0 2 + 6 $ + , 2 5 3 ) $ 2 : 5 (

9 6 , * 1 6

3 2 7 $ * (

5 7 , ( 1 '

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

Extra Space Storage hold a public auction at the

Notice is hereby given that Extra Space Storage will sell at public auction at the storage facility listed below: 5970 Centennial Circle, Florence, KY 41042, 859-4085219, October 16th, 2018, 12:30 pm Unit 326 Unit 1039 Unit 741 The auction will be listed and advertised on www. storagetreasures.com. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

Playmates and soul mates...

|

Extra Space Storage hold a public auction at the location indicated: 7 Sperti Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017 on October 16, 2018 at 1:15 pm. Unit 1209 The auction will be listed and advertised on www. storagetreasures.com. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

Extra Space Storage will hold a public auction at the location indicated: 525 W 35th St, Covington, KY 41015 on Tuesday October 16, 2018 at 1:00 PM. Unit 04401 Unit 04108 Unit 02431 Unit 04313 Unit 02330 Unit 03206 Unit 04419 Unit 04124 Unit 03265 Unit 02133 Unit 03402 Unit 03122 Unit 03132 Unit 04610 Unit 04215 Unit 04132 Unit 03239 Unit 02408 Unit 05103 Unit 03201 Unit 05141 Unit 02327 The auction will be listed and advertised on storagetreasures.com. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

All adult line ads must contain the exact phrase “Body Rubs” and/or “Adult Entertainment.” Illegal services may not be offered in any ad. CityBeat does not accept, condone or promote advertisements for illegal activity. Every ad purchase includes ONE phone number or e-mail address listing. Additional phone numbers & e-mail addresses can be printed for $10 each. Ad copy & payment must be received by FRIDAY AT NOON. for the Wednesday issue. All ads must be PRE-PAID with a VALID credit card or in cash/money order. If a credit card is declined for any reason, the ad will be pulled from the paper and online.

location indicated: 8080 Steilen Drive, Florence, KY 41042 on October 16, 2018 at 12:15 pm. Unit 220 Unit 408 Unit 711 Unit 2716 Unit 2827 The auction will be listed and advertised on www. storagetreasures.com. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

47


DISSOLVE YOUR MARRIAGE

Dissolution: An amicable end to marriage. Easier on your heart. Easier on your wallet. Starting at $500 plus court costs. 12 Hour Turnaround.

810 Sycamore St. 4th Fl, Cincinnati, OH 45202

513.651.9666

DELIVERY CONTRACTORS NEEDED

CityBeat needs contractors to deliver CityBeat every Wednesday between 9am and 3pm. Qualified candidates must have appropriate vehicle, insurance for that vehicle and understand that they are contracted to deliver that route every Wednesday. CityBeat drivers are paid per stop and make $14.00 to $16.00 per hr. after fuel expense. Please reply by email and leave your day and evening phone numbers. Please reply by email only. Phone calls will not be accepted. sferguson@citybeat.com

NIGHT GARDEN RECORDING STUDIO

Indiana’s Largest “Antiques & Vintage-Only” Market

Seamless integration of the best digital gear and classics from the analog era including 2” 24 track. Wide variety of classic microphones, mic pre-amps, hardware effects and dynamics, many popular plug-ins and accurate synchronization between DAW and 2” 24 track. Large live room and 3 isolation rooms. All for an unbelievable rate. Event/Show sound, lighting and video production services available as well. Call or email Steve for additional info and gear list; (513) 368-7770 or (513) 729-2786 or sferguson. productions@gmail.com.

Season Finale – Sunday, Oct 7 Every First Sunday May - October

Lawrenceburg, Indiana Fairgrounds

US 50, 1 mile west of Exit 16,I-275 (Cincinnati Beltway) 7am - 3pm EDST Rain or Shine (Earlybirds at 6am)

Admission: $3.00

513-353-4135 LawrenceburgAntiqueShow.com

COME LEARN MORE ABOUT OVARIAN CANCER Join us for a live ovarian cancer educational event, where you can: » Hear a patient and caregiver share their experiences with ovarian cancer » Get a healthcare professional’s perspective on living and coping with this disease » Connect with people in your community LOCATION: Cincinnati Marriott North 6189 Muhlhauser Road West Chester, OH 45069

TIME: Wednesday, October 17, 2018 Check-in: 5:30 PM Program Start: 6:00 PM

FEATURING: Kyra Walters MSN, RN, OCN, TESARO Oncology Nurse Educator Jackie G., Living with ovarian cancer

REGISTER for this FREE Educational Program!

CALL 1-844-747-1614

SEND RESTAURANT TIPS, NEWS AND PRESS RELEASES TO

Friends and family are welcome! Complimentary parking and food provided. TESARO, Inc. | 1000 Winter Street | Waltham, MA 02451 TESARO and the logo designs presented in this material are trademarks of TESARO, Inc. ©2018 TESARO, Inc. All rights reserved. PP-DS-US-0005 04/18

WORK AT

WE’RE HIRING! Advertising Sales Executive

C I T Y B E AT. C O M

|

O C T. 3 - 9 , 2 0 18

If the following sounds like you, we’d love to speak with you:

48

You are energetic, outgoing and passionate You live with integrity You are fearless and welcome challenges You have a track record of getting to the decision maker You conduct yourself with professionalism in person, in writing and over the phone Compensation: Base salary + commission + Bonus Paid Vacation/PTO Insurance + 401(k) Spiffs and prizes around special events Visit CityBeat.com/Work-Here to learn more and submit your resume. *Online submissions including resumes only. No other inquiries will be considered*

Profile for Euclid Media Group

CityBeat | Oct. 3, 2018  

CityBeat | Oct. 3, 2018  

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded