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IMAGINE IT BUILD IT LIVE IT

DOWNTOWN PICKERING A Vision for Intensification and Framework for Investment

Prepared by Urban Strategies, Inc. - June 2013


This document was endorsed in principle by the Council of the City of Pickering on July 8, 2013.

Prepared for the City of Pickering by:


Table of Contents

Executive Summary

ii 4. Public Realm

1. Background & Context

1

1.1 Introduction 1.2 Document Structure 1.3 The Study Area 1.4 The Downtown in Context 1.5 Downtown Pickering Today 1.6 The Planning Context

2 4 6 8 12 20

2. The Vision

25

2.1 Vision Statement 2.2 Guiding Principles 2.3 The Physical Vision

26 28 30

3. Placemaking & Sustainability 3.1 Placemaking 3.2 Sustainability

41 7. Precincts

4.1 Public Realm Network 4.2 Design Considerations

42 48

5. Mobility

51

5.1 Mobility Network 5.2 Street Network 5.3 Street Types 5.4 Transit Network 5.5 Pedestrian Network 5.6 Cycling Network 5.7 Parking

52 54 57 76 80 84 88

6. Land Use & Built Form 91 6.1 Land Use

94

34 6.2 Built Form 6.2.1 Appropriate Building Types 36

100

33

6.1.1. Land Use Categories 6.1.2. Ground Floor Uses

6.2.2 Building Heights 6.2.3 Transition & Massing 6.2.4 Street Edge 6.2.5 Demonstration Blocks 6.2.6 Materiality & Green Design

94 98

100 102 104 108 110 113

7.1 The Avenues 7.2 Valley Farm Neighbourhoods 7.3 Civic Precinct 7.4 South Downtown 7.5 Pickering Town Centre 7.6 West Downtown

115 118 126 132 138 146 152

8. Growth to 2031

159

8.1 Growth to 2031

160

9. Implementation

165

9.1 Implementation 9.2 Future Studies 8.4 Strategic Capital Projects

166 168 169

Appendices

173

Zoning Strategy

174


Executive Summary Study Intent & Process

Document Overview

The Downtown Pickering Vision & Redevelopment Framework provides a framework for intensification, investment and growth management in Downtown Pickering to 2031 and over the longer term. Providing a vision for Downtown Pickering, it consists of computer modeling and illustrative imagery, policies and guidelines regarding land use, mobility, public realm, and built form, recommendations on phasing and priorities for capital projects.

Downtown Pickering: A Vision for Intensification and Framework for Investment is divided into nine chapters containing descriptive text, diagrams and precedent images to explain and visualize the intent of the vision for downtown as well as policy & guideline recommendations that will be the basis for an Official Plan Amendment, new Zoning By-law, and design guidelines. The following explains the contents of each chapter:

The study responds to and conforms with a number of recent policy directions, initiatives and development interest in the downtown including the designation of Downtown Pickering as an Urban Growth Centre in the Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe and as an Anchor Hub in Metrolinx’s Big Move. Since the project inception, the study team, consisting of a team of consultants led by Urban Strategies Inc., has engaged stakeholders and the general public through a consultation program consisting of four open houses, a day-long stakeholder charette, and ongoing consultation with stakeholders.

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DOWNTOWN PICKERING

1. Background & Context

Provides the context for this study and an analysis of existing conditions that provides the “starting point” for the vision.

2. The Vision

The vision for downtown, as expressed in a community vision statement, guiding principles, and a physical vision of what the downtown may look like over the longer term.

3. Placemaking & Sustainability 4. Public Realm 5. Mobility 6. Land Use & Built Form 7. Precincts

Downtown-wide systems, or urban structure components, containing plans and policy recommendations that apply across the downtown. Detailed directions for six Precincts within downtown. These demonstrate the integration of downtown systems in a place specific manner to enhance the distinct nature of urban places and provide additional precinct-specific policy recommendations where necessary.

8. Growth to 2031

An illustration of the potential growth in downtown to reach 2031 targets, as well as priorities for getting there.

9. Implementation

This contains the necessary steps to ensure the vision and policies of this document are realized.

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT


The Study Area & Context Today Downtown Pickering is the civic heart of the City, containing many services and hosting major events, as well as a local and regional transportation hub. There is a wide variety of types of places to live in Downtown as well as places to work, shop, study and attend great events. There are also many opportunities to improve and enhance the downtown through redevelopment opportunities as well as mobility and public realm improvements.

Glendale Park

David Farr Park

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DE N ANA ESPL THE Esplanade Pickering Park Civic DE S Complex ANA ESPL THE

3

GLENANNA

Pickering Town Centre

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“Downtown Pickering will be a vibrant, sustainable, accessible and distinct city centre for all people and all seasons. It will be a place to inspire, a place to gather, a place to work, and a place to live, all in a compact and walkable environment.�

6 Pine Creek

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Precincts

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This Vision Statement describes in words what the Downtown Pickering of the future will be like. It was developed during the series of workshops and public consultation events.

VALLEY

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Diana Princess of Wales Park

Vision Statement

Six precincts have been identified within Downtown Pickering, each with distinct land use and built form characteristics. A number of key placemaking opportunities are planned within each precinct, which together ensure distinct destinations and amenities can be enjoyed across the downtown.

Denmar Park

Glengrove Park

BAYLY STREET

Downtown Pickering Precincts

1

The Avenues

4 South Downtown

2

Valley Farm Neighbourhoods

5 Pickering Town Centre

3

The Civic District

6 West Downtown

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The Built Form Vision The built form vision for Downtown Pickering creates a foundation for urbanization of the Downtown to 2031 and beyond, laying out an enhanced street network, new public spaces, destinations, and a range of opportunities for intensification and new development. The vision forms the basis for downtown mobility, public realm, built form, land use, placemaking and sustainability systems as well as precinct-specific policies, each detailed in individual chapters within the framework. The following are key features of the built form vision: 1 The Civic Precinct is the downtown’s cultural and

institutional hub with destinations and distinct public realm treatment. ROAD VALLEY FARM

2 An extraordinary public realm is formed through

new public spaces that populate the downtown. A variety of small and large gathering places are within a five minute walk anywhere in the downtown.

GLENGROVE PUBLIC SCHOOL

GLENGROVE PARK

3 A gateway at Kingston & Liverpool Road is

characterized by distinct buildings and public plazas at each of the four corners.

2 GLENANNA

ROAD

4 The Transit Hub at the heart of an enhanced transit system is a waiting area, meeting place and entryway to the downtown. It is integrated with the rest of downtown through streets and pedestrian-ways, and surrounded by exceptional buildings.

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THE ESPLANADE PARK

PICKERING CIVIC COMPLEX

1 PICKERING TOWN CENTRE

ROAD LIVERPOOL

5

7 2

6 Distinct tall buildings line Highway 401,

signalling that Downtown is the core of Pickering to surrounding areas of the City.

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4 AY HW

HIG

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and street connections.

range of activities, amenities and economic vitality of the downtown.

01

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7 Enhanced connectivity is achieved by new bridges 8 New Destinations are supported to enhance the

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PICKERING PUBLIC LIBRARY

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5 Pickering Parkway is extended west of Liverpool Road. It is a key transit way, connecting Downtown from east to west.

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PICKERING STATION GO TRANSIT

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The long-term built form vision for Downtown Pickering

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT


Growth to 2031 The built form vision illustrates what a long term build-out of Downtown Pickering may look like, and goes far beyond what is envisioned to occur by 2031. To retain a balance of opportunities for people living and working and achieve the Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe target of 200 combined people and jobs per hectare, Downtown Pickering will require an additional population of approximately 8300 people and 8,700 jobs by 2031, with the aim of planning for a 1:1 resident to job ratio. The places to accommodate the growth associated with these targets are directed to places close to existing and planned higher order transit service and that will enhance the vibrancy and vitality of the downtown by introducing more people working and living. These include portions of South Downtown that are closest to the GO station, the intersection of Kingston & Liverpool Road, infill adjacent to Esplanade Park and areas around the new Transit Hub.

ROAD VALLEY FARM

GLENGROVE PUBLIC SCHOOL

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PICKERING CIVIC COMPLEX

PICKERING PUBLIC LIBRARY PICKERING TOWN CENTRE

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PICKERING STATION GO TRANSIT

Preferred areas for growth to 2031 June 2013

v


The path forward for Downtown Pickering considers the downtown’s past, its position as a Regional & City Centre and a rapidly growing City. As Downtown Pickering evolves, it must fulfill its role in all these settings, providing appropriate uses, places, and connections and enhance its important role as the heart of Pickering. In this chapter you will find: Section 1.1 “Introduction” Section 1.2 “Document Structure” Section 1.3 “The Study Area” Section 1.4 “The Downtown in Context” Section 1.5 “Downtown Pickering Today” Section 1.6 “The Planning Context”

DOWNTOWN PICKERING

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT


INTRODUCTION + BACKGROUND

1

June 2013

1


1.1 Introduction Purpose

Study Process & Consultation

The purpose of the Downtown Pickering Vision & Redevelopment Framework is to provide a framework for intensification, investment and growth management in Downtown Pickering to 2031 and over the longer term. Providing a vision for Downtown Pickering, it consists of computer modelling and illustrative imagery, policies and guidelines regarding land use, mobility, public realm, and built form, recommendations on phasing and priorities for capital projects. The study responds to and conforms with a number of recent policy directions, initiatives and development interest in the downtown. These include: • T he designation of Downtown Pickering as an Urban Growth Centre in the Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe;

But the Downtown Pickering Vision & Redevelopment Framework is much more than a policy exercise. In addition to ensuring an appropriate land use framework is in place, this study was conducted to ensure future growth in Downtown Pickering reflects the objectives of the rapidly growing City and downtown community. A clear and compelling Downtown Vision ensures that new development and investment can be coordinated and directed to fully realize the economic vitality, sustainability and placeenhancing potential within the downtown. The Framework provides a comprehensive vision that will guide growth, inform investment, and that clearly illustrates a long-term vision of the downtown as a distinct and vital centre of Pickering.

• T he designation as an Anchor Hub in Metrolinx’s Big Move; •P  olicy directions in the ROPA 128, and •O  ngoing development interest in the study area.

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DOWNTOWN PICKERING

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT

Urban Strategies, HDR | iTRANS, and Halsall Associates were retained by the City of Pickering to undertake what was first referred to as the Downtown Pickering Intensification Study. Since January 2012, the study team has been engaging stakeholders and the public throughout the process. The following is a summary of the key elements of public engagement. Stakeholder Interviews were conducted in February 2012, the start of the study process. Meetings with City and Regional Staff, provincial agencies, landowners and residents groups were conducted in order to understand the complexities of the study area, and inform the objectives and directions for the vision. A Project Kick-Off and Visioning Workshop was held in March of 2012 to confirm the assessment of current conditions and to develop guiding principles and a vision statement for the future of downtown.


A day-long Stakeholder Charette was held in May of 2012, followed by a Second Community Open House in the evening. During the day-long event, invited stakeholders began to advance the physical design direction of the study, working over a 3D foam model to test ideas, and ultimately create a preliminary model that would act as the basis for the final vision. The doors were opened to the broader community in the evening, where the 3D model and notes from the days discussions were posted. Community members were able to meet with the City staff and consultants, and provide their input for what they like and didn’t like about the physical directions determined earlier in the day. In February of 2013, a third Community Open House was held to present the key policy directions and summary of content for the draft vision. The event consisted of a presentation on these directions, followed by a workshop event where the community could comment on the directions, and provide what they would like to see added or changed. These comments were considered in drafting this final document. In July 2013 a fourth Community Open House is scheduled to present this document to the public and the Council of the City of Pickering.

June 2013

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1.2 The Document What is in the Document Each chapter of the Downtown Framework provides details on specific elements of the downtown at the study area-wide or precinctspecific scale. The following provides an outline of the document and intent of each chapter:

1. Background & Context

Provides the context for this study and an analysis of existing conditions that provides the “starting point� for the vision.

2. The Vision

The vision for downtown, as expressed in a community vision statement, guiding principles, and a physical vision of what the downtown may look like over the longer term.

3. Placemaking & Sustainability 4. Public Realm 5. Mobility 6. Land Use & Built Form 7. Precincts

4

DOWNTOWN PICKERING

Downtown-wide systems, or urban structure components, containing plans and policy recommendations that apply across the downtown. Detailed directions for six Precincts within downtown. These demonstrate the integration of downtown systems in a place specific manner to enhance the distinct nature of urban places and provide additional precinct-specific policy recommendations where necessary.

8. Growth to 2031

An illustration of the potential growth in downtown to reach 2031 targets, as well as priorities for getting there.

9. Implementation

This contains the necessary steps to ensure the vision and policies of this document are realized.

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT


How to Read This Document Within each chapter, there is text and images to assist the reader in understanding the vision, as well as policies and guidelines that will provide a statutory basis to implement the vision. Each chapter contains: •D  escriptive text, explaining the vision and intent of each chapter. •D  iagrams, to help visualize the intent description.

Precedents

•P  recedent imagery, to illustrate places elsewhere that demonstrate the type of recommendations suggested. •P  olicy Recommendations, contained in a green box, which will be used or altered to become an official plan amendment. •G  uideline Recommendations for built form and public realm design, contained in a purple box that provide design directions to which public and private investment and development should adhere.

POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS GUIDELINE RECOMMENDATIONS

June 2013

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1.3 The Study Area The boundaries of the Study Area, outlined in red to the right, are the Pine Creek corridor to the west, Diana Princess of Wales Park to the East, Bayly Street to the South, and north parcels facing Kingston Road to the north. They are generally consistent with the Urban Growth Centre designation in the Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe, with minor changes to include additional contingent properties recognized as appropriate for growth. These boundaries capture, at the core, the civic centre, regional shopping centre and existing urban neighbourhoods while embracing the Kingston Road, Liverpool and Bayly corridors and the Go Transit station to optimize the transit integration to the downtown. A total of 134 hectares, it is the combination of uses, diversity of development form, public spaces and higher order transit service that make the downtown distinct in Pickering.

DAVID F

Figure 1.1: Aerial view of the study area 6

DOWNTOWN PICKERING

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT


DENMAR PARK

VALLEY PLENTIFUL COMMUNITY GARDEN

GLENDALE PARK

GLENGROVE PUBLIC SCHOOL DIANA PRINCESS OF WALES PARK

GLENGROVE PARK

PICKERING RECREATION COMPLEX THE ESPLANADE PICKERING PARK CIVIC COMPLEX

FARR PARK

VILLAGE EAST PARK

PICKERING PUBLIC LIBRARY

PICKERING TOWN CENTRE

LOBLAWS

PICKERING STATION GO TRANSIT

June 2013

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1.4 The Downtown in Context An Evolving Place Unlike many traditional city centres, the study area was not always the central civic gathering place in Pickering. Downtown Pickering is a planned centre that will continue to evolve over the next 20 years and more.

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Prior to the 1960s, the area was primarily agricultural. Pickering’s downtown was located to the east, in Pickering Village, now a part of Ajax. However, the newly-built Highway 401 created better connections to surrounding urban areas and change was imminent.

In the 1960s and 1970s, substantial development in the area occurred. Subdivisions sprung up to the north, GO Transit opened its doors at its current location, and Sheridan Mall (now Pickering Town Centre) was built.

Since 1980, the area has urbanized significantly, with the addition of a number of medium to high-density housing developments as well as new additions to the mall. The current civic centre status was achieved with the completion of City Hall in 1992. .

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DOWNTOWN PICKERING

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT


Downtown Places Through the Years While Downtown Pickering hasn’t always had the intensity of uses it has today, it has always been host to a number of significant destinations within Pickering.

Liverpool Arms Inn Liverpool Arms Inn (now a bar & restaurant) in the 1920s.

Black’s Service Station Black’s Service Station at the south/west corner of Liverpool Road and Kingston Road, directly opposite the Liverpool Arms Inn, in the late 1920’s.

1900

Aerial view of Liverpool Intersection Circa 1976

1950

1850

2000

Pickering Township Hall Built in 1854

GO Station Circa 1976: Looking south/east from the Liverpool Road bridge towards the Pickering GO Station.

Sheridan Mall Aerial view of the early Pickering Town Centre (formerly Sheridan Mall) looking slightly south/east. June 2013

9


Downtown in the Urban Region

Downtown within Pickering

Downtown to the Waterfront

Downtown is the “Gateway” to the Region of Durham as the first major commercial and employment centre east of Toronto as well as a significant mobility centre with major GO Transit & Durham Region Transit hubs.

Downtown serves as the civic, shopping, and recreational centre for the City of Pickering. As Durham Region Transit service evolves over time, Downtown Pickering will become increasingly better connected to the surrounding communities to the north and the emerging Seaton Community and potential long term development of the Federal Airport Lands.

 owntown is a short walking/biking distance D from both the Waterfront Trail and the Trans Canada Trail, as well as several regional trails, which provide potential for local recreation as well as connections to the greater region. The Lake Ontario waterfront is 2.5 km to the south of Downtown, directly connected by Liverpool Road and Sandy Beach Road.

As Pickering continues to evolve, Downtown Pickering’s role in the City as an important hub for culture, jobs, shopping, entertainment will increase in significance.

A number of open space and natural heritage systems pass through and around Downtown, including the hydro corridor, Pine Creek, and Krosno Creek. Downtown is adjacent to several employment areas and many stable neighbourhoods , including Dunbarton, Bay Ridges, Liverpool, Village East, and West Shore.

As a major retail and entertainment anchor, Pickering Town Centre makes downtown a significant regional shopping and gathering destination. Downtown’s position in the region, along with recent transit planning and investments, make it an ideal place to accommodate growth in the form of higher density residential and employment development.

As Downtown grows, there is opportunity to strengthen the connection to the waterfront and ensure connectivity to adjacent neighbourhoods and employment areas.

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DOWNTOWN PICKERING

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT


Webb Rd

STOUFFVILLE

Webb Rd

Shirley Rd Stouffville Rd

Stouffville Rd Pickering Uxbridge Townline Rd

Townline Rd

Pickering Uxbridge Townline Rd

Coates Rd W

Townline Rd

Altona

Trans Canada Trail

Concession Rd 9

York Durham Line

Major Mackenzie Dr E

MARKHAM

Reesor Rd

Markham Rd

Ninth Line

Simcoe St N

Harmony Rd N

Thickson Rd N

Whitevale Whitevale Rd

401

Rossland Rd

Finch Ave

Sheppard Ave

Bayly St

Lawrence Ave E

Don Mills

Urban Growth Centres Eglinton Town Centre

Eglinton Ave E

Future 407 Extension

Trails

Future 407 Transit Station

LEGEND

Universities / Colleges

Queen St E

Airports

d

Regional Shopping Centres

HWY

n Roa

Danforth Ave

Kingston Rd

X

Major Roads

Downtown in the City

Cherrywood Transformer Station

Lawrence Ave E

Notio

Future Transit Terminal

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Future GO Station

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Downtown in the Urban Region Rail

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Pickering Study Area

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Harwood Ave S

University of Toronto Scarborough

Future Planned Bus Rapid Transit

Port Union Rd

York University Glendon Campus

il

nt

Westney Rd S

Future Planned Light Rail Transit

GO Station Town Centre

Port Whitby

Dreyon Drive E

d

GO Rail Scarborough

Other Municipal Boundary

Victoria St

Roa

Ellesmere Rd

Pickering Municipal Boundary

St Clair Ave E

Frenchman’s Bay

Scarborough Centre

Farm

Eglinton Town Eglinton Ave E Centre

401

401

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LEGEND

Sandy Beach Rd

Tra

Va Brock Rd

Liverpool Rd

il

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Downto Whitby

Durham Hwy 2

401

Lawrence Ave E

ate W

Durham Centre

Kingston Rd

Downtown Pickering

Strouds Ln

Sheppard Ave E

AJAX

Dixie Rd

Fairport Rd

South Pickering

Oshawa Harbour

Trail

Lakeridge Rd

Concession Rd 3

Toronto Zoo

Malvern Waterfront Town Centre

Salem Rd

Cherrywood

TORONTO Oshawa East GO

Fairview Mall

Westny Rd N

Downtown Oshawa

Woodside Square

Finch Ave E

Seaton GO

401

Port Whitby

Church St N

Oshawa Centre

Brock Taunt

Taunton Rd

Taunton Rd

Whites Rd

Victoria St

Durham Hwy 2

Duffins Rouge Agricultural Reserve Altona Rd

Big Plaza

Brock Rd

Seaton Scarborough Pickering Townline

Frenchman’s Bay 404

Stevenson Rd N

Downtown Whitby

401 Bayly St

North York Centre

407

407

Steeles Ave E

Centre

Ajax South Downtown

Brougham

Hwy 7

Oshawa Airport

Brock St

TORONTO

Don Mills

Baldwin St

Kingston Rd

Pacific Mall

Duffins South

York University Glendon Campus

Scarborough Town Centre

McCowan Rd

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University of Toronto Rd on Scarborough gst Kin

Ashburn Rd

Tra

Sheppard Ave

Scarborough Centre

Ellesmere Rd

Warden Ave

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Taunton Rd E

AJAX

Downtown Pickering

Pa

Hwy 7

Brock / Taunton

Markham Centre

Ajax North Downtown Durham

Seneca College

401

Lakeridge Rd

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Salem Rd

Duffins North

Toronto Zoo

Kinsale

Green River

Greenwood

UOIT/ Durham College

Rossland Rd E

Finch Ave

Ro

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Sheppard Ave E

Concession Rd 3

Trans Canada Trail

Malvern Town Centre

Winchester Rd

Conlin Rd

Seaton GO

Bayview Ave

401

First Markham Place

407

Taunton Rd

Whites Rd

404 Fairview Mall

nT rail

Columbus Rd W

16th Ave

Seaton

ato

WHITBY

Concession Rd 7

Markville Shopping Centre

Se

Scarborough Pickering Townline

North York Centre

Buttonville Airport

Richmond Hill / Langstaff Gateway

Big Plaza

Woodside Square

Finch Ave E

Brock Rd

Yonge St

Bayview Ave

Seneca College

407 Whitevale Rd

Rouge Park Trails

407

Pacific Steeles Ave E Mall

404

Hwy 7 Hillcrest Mall

Hwy 7

Federal Airport Lands

Columbus Rd Major Mackenzie Dr E

Westny Rd N

Reesor Rd

Markham Centre

Ninth Line

Markville Shopping Centre

Rural Area

MARKHAM OSHAWA

WHITBY

Concession Rd 7

Markham Rd

First Markham Place

407

McCowan Rd

Warden Ave

Yonge St

Richmond Hill / Langstaff Gateway

Myrtle Rd W

Claremont

PICKERING

16th Ave

Buttonville Airport

Balsam

Concession Rd 9

Elgin Mills Rd E

404

Hillcrest Mall

Raglan Rd E

York Durham Line

RICHMOND HILL

Myrtle Rd

Lakeridge Rd

Elgin Mills Rd E

Downtown to the Waterfront

Pickering Municipal Boundary

GO Rail

Future Planned Light Rail Transit

Other Municipal Boundary

GO Station

Future Planned Bus Rapid Transit

Pickering Study Area

Rail

Future GO Station

Highways

Future Transit Terminal

Urban Growth Centres

Major Roads

Future 407 Extension

Major Green Spaces

Trails

Future 407 Transit Station

401

Ajax GO

Duffins Creek

St Clair Ave E

Downtown Pickering

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1.5 Downtown Pickering Today A place to gather, live, and work Downtown Pickering is distinct from the rest of Pickering. It is the civic heart of the City, containing many services and hosting major events, as well as a local and regional transportation hub. There is a wide variety of types of places to live in Downtown, such as townhomes, apartment buildings, and seniors complexes. In addition to living, there are a number of other reasons to go downtown: there are places to work, shop, study and great events to attend-- Rib Fest, the Pickering Town Centre Farmers’ Market, and Theatre in the Park.

Pickering Civic Complex

Pickering Town Centre

Mid-block Connection at The Esplanade North

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DOWNTOWN PICKERING

The Esplanade Park

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT

Pickering GO Station

Diana Princess of Wales Park


A place with opportunity Even with all these attractions, there’s still a lot of opportunity to enhance the downtown. There are many surface parking lots, unfriendly road crossings, limited public spaces and pedestrian routes. In addition to a number of underutilized sites and obsolete buildings, a number of recent initiatives support the downtown as a suitable place for growth and improvement, including recent transit improvements, new employers and educational institutions, and recent interest in new residential development.

Poor Sidewalk Conditions

Underutilized Space

Surface Parking

Downtown Pickering Transit Hub

Poor access Pine Creek

to natural features such as

Wide road crossings

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Downtown Pickering in Numbers

Municipalities across North America are realizing the importance of creating vital centres where people can live, work, and recreate in a short distance with high levels of mobility options. In Pickering, as a recognition of the importance of integration of land use and transit, the Downtown boundaries have been expanded beyond those utilized in past planning exercises to capture the transit and redevelopment opportunities south of Highway 401. The recent completion of the GO Pedestrian bridge and the relocation of the Durham Rapid Transit terminal provides a vital connection linking the two areas.

People:

As illustrated in Figure 1.2, Downtown Pickering today hosts a range of land uses, building forms and several important public spaces.

• Around 5,000 people live and around 5,000 people work in the downtown

Land: • 134 Hectares • 3% Office • 6% Civic and recreation space • 16% Residential • 42% Retail, commercial, and light industrial • 12% Stand-alone surface parking or undeveloped • 20% Road surface and right-of-way

Attractions: • 1,000,000 square feet of retail, office, and commercial space • 12 – 15 Million annual visitors to Pickering Town Centre • Ribfest, Farmers’ Market, Theatre in the Park, Artfest on the Esplanade, and more!

Figure 1.2: Downtown Pickering Land uses Today 14

DOWNTOWN PICKERING

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT

David Farr Memorial Park

Pine Creek Water Course

Downtown Today


PARKS AND OPEN SPACE

Glendale Park

RECREATION

Study Area Boundary

Municipal Park

on

gst

Kin

Hydro Corridor H Indoor recreation PARKS AND OPEN SPACE Other Open Space Outdoor recreation

Rd

Municipal Park Stream Corridor

Glengrove Public School

Gas sta RECREATION Restau

Municipal ParkSpaces Other Public

Hydro Corridor

H

Ou SHOPPING PLAC

Stream Corridor RECREATION PLACES

PARKS AND OPEN SPACE

Brock Rd

Glengrove Park

Valley Farm Rd

Liverpool Rd

Liverpool

Ind

PARKS AND OPEN SPACE Stream Corridor

Other Open Space

H

Other Public Spaces Diana Princess of Wales Park

Indo Strip re RECREATION Outd Food m

Hydro Corridor Municipal Park

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June 2013

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Roads and Transit Network

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Nearly all of the Durham Region Transit bus routes in Pickering run through the downtown and GO Transit provides both rail and regional bus service. The GO station and recently relocated transit hub on Pickering Parkway, connected by the new pedestrian bridge, serve as transfer points for transit in the downtown.

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Existing Transit Network GO Transit Route Durham Regional Transit Route 16

DOWNTOWN PICKERING

Numerous transit improvements are on the horizon for Downtown Pickering. • Increased GO service •H  igher order transit along Kingston Rd, Brock Rd, and Bayly St •S  hifting DRT routes to supplement the new rapid transit •N  ew transit hubs at the GO station and on Pickering Parkway • Upgrades to Pickering Parkway •A  new parking structure at the GO station

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Downtown today is served by a network of roads of various sizes, from a federal highway (401), to major regional roads to smaller local residential streets. Traditionally, the road network has been focussed on moving cars and impeded by limited crossings of Highway 401 and the railway corridor. In particular, the existing challenge with traffic flow congestion in the south part of Downtown is an issue to consider and address when planning for future growth.

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT

GO Transit


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While there are numerous pedestrian and cycling paths in the downtown today, they are disjointed and do not provide a continuous route across the downtown. Very large blocks and a lack of infrastructure make walking and cycling in the downtown unattractive. The new pedestrian bridge will help connect neighbourhoods across the 401 and will open new opportunities for connectivity in the downtown.

A more comprehensive cycling and pedestrian system is planned for the downtown and the region including: •N  ew cycling lanes on Glenanna Road and Pickering Parkway •R  egional cycling spines including a multiuse path on Liverpool and cycling lanes on Kingston Road

Bayly Street

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Existing Sidewalks to be Enhanced Existing Cycling Path Open Spaces Existing Street Network

Existing Pedestrian Connection

New Pickering Pedestrian Bridge

June 2013

17


Sustainability in the Downtown The City of Pickering remains a leader in sustainability and the downtown is an excellent area to advance sustainable city building objectives and demonstrate sustainability initiatives. Many projects and initiatives have already been completed in the downtown today to promote sustainability. As growth and investment continues in the downtown, the City will seek to build on the following ongoing sustainability opportunities.

Stormwater/Water Initiatives

Smart Commute

A number of small-scale stormwater initiatives have been implemented in the downtown including the implementation of permeable pavers in public spaces and the utilization of raised planters along Valley Farm Road that contain drought tolerant plants to minimize the need for irrigation.

The Pickering Smart Commute program strives to reduce traffic congestion to improve air quality and reduce carbon emissions. It promotes more efficient modes of transportation such as carpooling, transit and cycling.

Recreation Complex Green Roof System A green roof was one of the many sustainable features implemented in the 2009 expansion of the Pickering Recreation Complex. The green roof provides additional insulation to the building, retains stormwater, and helps reduce the urban heat island effect.

Valley Plentiful Community Garden The Valley Plentiful Community Garden, located in Diana Princess of Wales Park, attracts

residents of all ages and gardening skill levels, and gives them the opportunity to grow their own fruits and vegetables while sharing their knowledge and resources. Downtown Urban Forest Development

The City of Pickering’s Tree Protection By-law and future Urban Forest Management Plan will

provide a means of protecting the existing trees within the downtown. Tree planting programs to further enhance the urban forest within city parks and street boulevards will continue to be encouraged.

18

DOWNTOWN PICKERING

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT


Sustainable Pickering The Sustainable Pickering program’s key objectives are a healthy environment, society and economy, as well as responsible development and consumption. It works towards making Pickering a more sustainable city through numerous environmental awareness programs and city initiatives.

Valley Plentiful Community Garden

Recreation Complex Green Roof

Sustainable Neighbourhood Design Guidelines The 2007 Sustainable Development Guidelines for urban Pickering establish a framework for new developments to follow. Creating transitsupportive neighbourhoods, linked open space systems, pedestrian and bicycle routes and natural/cultural heritage preservation are some of the issues it addresses.

Sustainable Pickering

Celebrating Sustainable Neighbourhoods Program The City’s Celebrating Sustainable Neighbourhoods Program, launched in 2013, gives community members an opportunity to explore and implement creative activities that support one or more of the 55 indicators of sustainability outlined in Pickering’s Measuring Sustainability Report.

June 2013

19


1.6 The Planning Context

The Downtown Pickering Vision and Redevelopment Framework is being prepared within the context of a range of planning policies at the Provincial, Regional and City level. This Framework conforms to and implements these Plans at the scale of the Downtown. These Plans include:

Provincial Policy Statement, 2005 Section 3 of the Planning Act requires that decisions affecting planning matters shall be consistent with the Provincial Policy Statement , 2005 (PPS). The PPS provides policy directions on matters of provincial interest related to land use planning and development. The policies of the PPS focus on wisely managing change and promoting efficient land use and development patterns, which in turn support strong, liveable and healthy communities, protect the environment and public health and safety, and facilitate economic growth.

20

DOWNTOWN PICKERING

Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe

The Big Move

The Places to Grow Act, enacted in 2005, puts in force the Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe (Growth Plan), a provincial plan, and contains physical directions and policies regarding growth management in the Greater Golden Horseshoe (including the urbanized region wrapping around the western edge of Lake Ontario). In addition to population and employment targets provided for all Single-Tier and Upper-Tier municipalities in the region, the Plan designates 25 Urban Growth Centres which are positioned as strategic focal points for investment, growth, and intensification. The plan assigns Urban Growth Centres to achieve a target of 200 people and jobs per hectare by 2031. Downtown Pickering, is one of two Urban Growth Centres in the Region of Durham. As of 2006, Downtown Pickering was achieving a density of approximately 74 people and jobs per hectare.

Metrolinx, the agency of the Ontario Government with the objective of improving the coordination and integration of all modes of transportation in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area, released the Big Move, its Regional Transportation Plan in 2008. Complementary to the Growth Plan’s designation of Downtown Pickering as an Urban Growth Centre, the Big Move designates the area as an Anchor Hub. Anchor Hubs are to be the anchors of the regional transportation network and developed as Transit-Supportive communities. Anchor Hubs are to achieve a density of 200 - 400 people and units per hectare.

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RD ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! !! ! !! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! HYDRO ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! !! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !! ! ! ! KINGSTON ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

!

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CON VII

FEDERAL AIRPORT LANDS

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YORK-DURHAM LI

The Region of Durham commenced its Growth Plan conformity study in 2008, which resulted in Regional Official Plan Amendment 128 (ROPA 128). Approved by the Ontario Municipal Board in January, 2013, ROPA 128 carries forward the Growth Plan’s designation of Downtown Pickering as an Urban Growth Centre. In addition to achieving a minimum density target of 200 people and jobs combined per hectare by 2031, policies under 8A.2 of the plan direct that the Urban Growth Centres shall have a minimum Floor Space Index of 3.0 and consist of predominantly high-rise development, with some mid-rise as determined by the municipality. Urban Growth Centres are to be planned as focal areas for region wide institutional uses, public services, employment, recreational, cultural and entertainment centres and be the primary location of public investment.

( ! ! ( 17

19

C.P .R

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! ^ LAKE ONTARIO

SPECIAL A

NOTES: 1) THIS MAP FORMS PART OF THE OFFICIAL PLAN OF THE REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF DURHAM AND MUST BE READ IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE TEXT. 2) THE DESIGNATIONS FOR THE DEFERRED AREA REFLECT THE POSITION OF REGIONAL COUNCIL, PLEASE REFER TO POLICY 15.13.

2

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3) OFFICE CONSOLIDATION - JUNE 5, 2008. SOURCES: 1) OAK RIDGES MORAINE: BOUNDARY, MINISTRY OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS & HOUSING, 2002, 1:100,000. 2) GREENBELT PLAN: © QUEEN'S PRINTER FOR ONTARIO, 2005. REPRODUCED WITH PERMISSION.

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!

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The Study Area

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DOWNTOWN PICKERING

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT


City of Pickering Official Plan, 6th Consolidation The City of Pickering`s Official Plan provides policy direction for long-term growth and development in Pickering. In addition to city-wide policies regarding land use, transportation, and resource management, the official plan divides the urban area of Pickering into 15 urban neighbourhoods. Downtown Pickering contains the majority of the Town Centre Neighbourhood and northern portion of the Bay Ridges Neighbourhood.

Under the Planning Act, municipalities are required to conduct official plan reviews every 5 years, and may make amendments at any time. The policies contained in this document will be the basis for an official plan amendment and will be one of two official plan amendments required to bring the document into conformity with ROPA 128.

In addition to neighbourhood policies, the Plan contains a compendium document that consists of development guidelines providing directions for new built form and design of the public realm. The Pickering Downtown Core Development Guidelines cover most of study area north of Highway 401, while the undeveloped MTO parcel on the northwest corner of Liverpool Road and Highway 401 is subject to the development guidelines of Town Centre West. The study area south of Highway 401 is not currently subject to any design guidelines.

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This section provides the long-term vision for Downtown Pickering. It articulates the type of place Downtown Pickering will become. The vision consists of three components: A Community Vision for Downtown Pickering, Guiding Principles, and the Long Term Vision for Downtown.

In this chapter you will find: Section 2.1 “ A Community Vision for Downtown Pickering” which includes a vision statement, a high-level description of what Downtown Pickering of the future will look like. Section 2.2 “ Guiding Principles,” that detail the objectives for development and future investment in the Downtown. Section 2.3 “ The Long Term Vision for Downtown,” containing a built form vision, a demonstrative 3D model that illustrates new buildings, roads, public spaces and landmarks over the long term.

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DOWNTOWN PICKERING

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT


THE VISION

2

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2.1 A Community Vision for Downtown Pickering This Vision Statement describes in words what the Downtown Pickering of the future will be like. It was first developed based on community input following the Project Kick-off and Visioning Workshop and refined throughout subsequent Community Open Houses. The Vision Statement was the starting point for the physical vision as well as the basis for the guiding principles.

“Downtown Pickering will be a vibrant, sustainable, accessible and distinct city centre for all people and all seasons. It will be a place to inspire, a place to gather, a place to work, and a place to live, all in a compact and walkable environment.”

A place to inspire: Downtown Pickering

will contain remarkable public spaces and great places for the citizens of Pickering to enjoy. These spaces will be green, comfortable and beautiful, enhancing both the urban fabric, the natural environment, and experience of place.

A place to gather: As the city’s centre,

Downtown Pickering will be a destination for people of Pickering to gather, celebrate and play: to shop, be active, experience culture, dine, and attend outdoor events and festivals. The variety and quality of these options will help define Downtown as Pickering’s heart & soul.

26

DOWNTOWN PICKERING

A place to work: The Downtown will be the epicentre of employment in Pickering, hosting a range of jobs in a diversity of settings. A place to live: People of different ages and incomes will enjoy housing choices and a high quality of life. Downtown residents will be able to enjoy close proximity to transit, their place of work, and the services that Downtown Pickering has to offer.

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT

…All in a compact and walkable environment: The development pattern and streets in Downtown Pickering will evolve in a sustainable, compact manner that supports all modes of transportation and encourages healthy lifestyles.


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2.2 Guiding Principles The guiding principles provide the foundation to direct new development and investment in the downtown. They guide the urban structure components and precinct chapters of this document and inform the built form vision.

1. Reinforce Downtown as the heart & soul of Pickering, through the continued location of services and cultural facilities, community expression and public art, and as the location for civic events.

2. Make Downtown Pickering highly walkable, with new streets and pathways, a compact block pattern, traffic calming measures, and visually interesting streetscapes.

3. Encourage a mix of land uses to create vitality at all times of the day, by enhancing the range of activities, amenities and uses that will attract and serve all ages for all seasons.

4. Develop an exceptional public realm by creating a diverse network of open spaces for different types of activity, all within a five minute walking distance of every home and workplace.

5. Offer distinct living options, urban in format, and in close proximity to shopping, entertainment, culture, and work.

6. Leverage transit investment by directing development to major transit stops and transfer points, and transforming transit waiting areas into exceptional places.

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DOWNTOWN PICKERING

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT


7. Create bold entry-points to downtown, through design excellence in architecture, public art and public plazas at key gateway locations and areas of high visibility to passers-by.

8. Demonstrate Pickering`s commitment to sustainability through active transportation infrastructure, green design, pilot projects, and environmental education opportunities.

9. Make Pickering a great place to work, learn and shop through a diverse array of retail, office and work-at-home opportunities, businessrelated facilities, and amenities.

10. Position Downtown Pickering to evolve over time by directing bolder, shorter term change to select locations, and ensuring new development respects existing communities.

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2.3 Long Term Vision for Downtown Key Features of the Built Form Vision The built form vision for Downtown Pickering creates a foundation for urbanization of the Downtown to 2031 and beyond, laying out a new street network, public spaces, destinations, and new building types. Physically advancing the Vision Statement and Guiding Principles, it envisions new investment and growth throughout the downtown, while enhancing connectivity between the Downtown Precincts.

1

The Civic Precinct is the downtown’s cultural

2

New public spaces populate the downtown.

As the recommended concept for the Downtown, the vision forms the basis for mobility, public realm, built form, land use, placemaking and sustainability systems as well as precinct-specific policies.

3

The vision illustrates what a final build-out of Downtown Pickering may look like, and goes far beyond what is envisioned to occur by 2031. The Phasing chapter of this document illustrates which areas are to be the near term priorities for redevelopment, and which may take place over the longer term.

4

and institutional hub with a new arts centre, seniors complex, and distinct treatment of the public realm.

A variety of gathering places — squares, parks, and plazas — are within a five minute walk anywhere in the downtown.

The intersection of Kingston & Liverpool Road is the “Gateway” to the downtown,

featuring distinct buildings and enhanced with public plazas at each of the four corners.

The transit hub, connecting both sides of

Highway 401 through the new pedestrian bridge, is a transit-related access point, meeting place and entry-way to the downtown. It is connected to all parts of downtown through new streets and pedestrian-ways, and surrounded by exceptional buildings.

5

Pickering Parkway is extended west

6

Distinct tall buildings line Highway 401, signalling that Downtown is the core of Pickering.

7

Enhanced connectivity is achieved by new bridges crossing Highway 401 and street connections to Bayly, Brock, Liverpool, and Kingston Road.

8

New Destinations are supported to enhance

of Liverpool Road. It is a key transit way, connecting Downtown from east to west.

the range of activities, amenities and economic vitality of the downtown. In particular, a new performing arts centre, seniors centre and convention centre are contemplated in the vision.

Figure 2.1: The Long-term Vision for Downtown Pickering 30

DOWNTOWN PICKERING

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT


ROAD VALLEY FARM

VALLEY PLENTIFUL COMMUNITY GARDEN

GLENGROVE PUBLIC SCHOOL

GLENGROVE PARK

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PICKERING RECREATION COMPLEX

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DIANA PRINCESS OF WALES PARK

THE ESPLANADE PARK

PICKERING CIVIC COMPLEX

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VILLAGE EAST PARK

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PICKERING PUBLIC LIBRARY

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PICKERING TOWN CENTRE

LIVERPOOL

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ROAD

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PICKERING STATION GO TRANSIT

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Developing an urban form that decreases dependability on the automobile positions Downtown Pickering to be a key component of the City’s broader commitment to sustainability. However, to activate the core, Downtown Pickering must be a place where people want to be, which means developing a distinct sense of place that sets it apart from other parts of Pickering, Durham, and the GTA. This section identifies the key places that will contribute to Pickering’s “sense of place” including recommendations for new attractions and establishments, public spaces, and sustainability initiatives.

This chapter contains Section 3.1: “ Placemaking,” indicating downtown-wide moves that together ensure Downtown Pickering becomes a distinct destination. Section 3.2: “ Sustainability,” indicating the many ways -- including downtown projects, initiatives, and infrastructure by which sustainable development will be embedded into Downtown Pickering’s redevelopment.

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DOWNTOWN PICKERING

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT


PLACEMAKING + SUSTAINABILITY

3

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3.1 Placemaking

LIVERPOOL ROAD

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BAYLY STREET

Figure 3.1: The proposed placemaking opportunities 34

DOWNTOWN PICKERING

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT

As the civic heart of Pickering, all public realm improvements and new development in the downtown will be created with the intent of creating a distinct place. However, Figure 3.1 illustrates priority placemaking opportunities. These are catalytic projects that will greatly contribute to creating a sense of place in Downtown Pickering, and are envisioned to spur adjacent development. These opportunities include new destinations, landmark parks, enhanced and new facilities, and streetscape improvements. These opportunities are distributed throughout the downtown, so that each Precinct consists of destinations and attractions. Certain landmarks, such as the Arts Centre and Hotel & Convention Centre are show in multiple optimal locations for each purpose due to their visibility and compatibility with adjacent uses. A network of “places” ensures all of the study area is recognized as Pickering’s true downtown. The design recommendations for these placemaking opportunities are described in more detail within each Precinct’s section.


POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS

The main placemaking opportunities include: 1. The Durham Arts Centre, a new civic and regional cultural hub that contributes to Downtown Pickering as Pickering’s primary cultural district. 2. A Kingston & Liverpool Road Gateway featuring new public spaces and landmark architecture. 3. An attractive and integrated Transit Hub (comprised of “Transit Hub North” & “Transit Hub South” -- the lands on either side of the GO Pedestrian bridge) that welcomes residents and visitors to downtown, supports transit users and creates a safe, vital and interesting public space or plaza. 4. A Pickering Multi-Season Civic Square adjacent to the new Arts Centre with features adapted for use during all seasons and distinctive public realm design. 5. An enhanced, flexible Festival Market Plaza event and market space, located at the east end of the Pickering Town Centre site, proximate to the civic precinct.

6. A new hotel and convention centre that will be a key economic driver and destination in the Downtown. 7. Distinct streetscape character along Kingston Road that signifies to travellers that they are in Downtown Pickering. 8. Krosno Creek and Pine Creek Parks, “Green Parks” with their respective watercourses as their defining attractions. 9. 401 fronting landmark developments featuring tall gateway buildings which demonstrate design excellence. 10. Creative design in bridge crossings, by building on the newly constructed pedestrian bridge, and understanding proposed 401 bridge crossings will be significant infrastructure elements.

a) The City of Pickering will prioritize placemaking opportunities for capital funding, and seek all opportunities to partner with the private sector to incorporate designs that advance the placemaking opportunities in development plans. b) The City will continue to work with the Durham West Arts Council to advance development of an Arts Centre in the downtown. c) The City will continue to seek partners to develop a hotel and convention centre in the downtown. d) The City’s Culture & Recreation Department will prioritize downtown as a preferred location for a new Senior Citizen’s Recreation Centre to meet the needs of an aging population. e) All new development and infrastructure in the Downtown will demonstrate design excellence in urban design and engineering. f) New development in or proximate to the main placemaking areas shall integrate, where feasible, public art elements that contribute to the placemaking potential of the area. June 2013

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3.2 Sustainability

In the downtown, sustainability principles are supported by the transit-oriented development potential of this area and are embedded in other sections, such as built form, that recommend low-impact development and green design. In addition to these sections, the City will continue to treat Downtown Pickering as a sustainability demonstration area through specific capital projects in co-operation with the City’s Office of Sustainability. These capital projects include:

Krosno Creek Stream Rehabilitation With the redevelopment of the area between Bayly Street and Highway 401, Krosno Creek will be re-naturalized and enhanced. Renaturalizing the creek will contribute to the storm management function and provide a natural amenity for the downtown community living and working south of Highway 401. It will also advance environmental awareness by allowing residents to observe and understand the creek’s function in the context of the larger natural systems.

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The creek will also be the focal point of a new downtown park, Krosno Creek Park, distinctly different than other places within the Downtown. It will enhance natural habitat functions and should feature interpretive signage that conveys this. To the north of the 401, “green” street design treatments and interpretive signage along Glenanna Road will serve to illustrate the north reaches of the creek system. A wayfinding and signage program can help to celebrate the historical alignment of the creek system.


Pine Creek Enhancements An enhanced Pine Creek will be de-channelized and re-naturalized. It will feature better public access and a connection with the trail north of Kingston Road. The City will work with TRCA and surrounding land owners to implement these objectives and ensure any re-design complies with agency requirements.

A Downtown Stormwater Management Strategy

Encouragement of Low Impact Development and Integrated Green Features

T he Downtown Pickering study area is within the Krosno Creek watershed and adjacent to the Pine Creek watershed. In addition, ongoing City-led initiatives related to storm water management in the area including the Pickering Stormwater Management Guidelines, Krosno Creek Diversion Study and the Downtown Pickering Storm Water Management Study are underway and, when complete, will inform the implementation of storm water management policies for the Downtown.

All new development in the downtown is encouraged to incorporate green elements to its design such as: • L EED certification •O  pportunities to maximise water conservation •E  xploration of renewable energy sources • Incorporation of cycling storage • Creation of g reen roofs • Incorporation of other provisions of low impact design

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Green retrofits to existing civic buildings

Local Food/Food accessibility

Urban Forest Management

The City will continue to explore opportunities in civic buildings and infrastructure to increase energy efficiency and provide sustainable site designs. These features may include green roofs, renewable energy systems, permeable paving, and building retrofits to achieve LEED standards.

Opportunities will be sought to incorporate places to advance access to locally grown or produced food, education and accessibility, building on momentum of existing community gardens in the Hydro Corridor. These will include spaces for farmers’ markets, community gardens, roof-top gardens and learning gardens in conjunctions with schools.

The City will initiate an Urban Forest Management Plan for the downtown, for the protection and enhancement of the urban forest cover, focusing on planting native species and increasing biodiversity. The benefit of tree cover includes the reduction of air pollution, heat island effect, and stormwater runoff to provide a more sustainable and liveable downtown area.

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POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS a) The City shall explore an incentives strategy to encourage green design in any new development in the downtown. Such incentives may include density bonuses or an expedited development application review process. b) The City will work with the Toronto Region Conservation Authority to implement the projects, programs and policies identified in the Frenchmen’s Bay Stormwater Management Master Plan.

e) On site or within an urban block, the following standards shall be achieved:  Minimum on-site retention of 5 mm; • •On-site water quantity targets of 2 - 100 year post to pre-control; •Pre-development flows to be based on a run-off coefficient of 0.5.

c) Educational and wayfinding opportunities shall be explored in new streetscape design or public art procurement. An Educational Hydro Corridor The City will explore opportunities to enhance the Diana Princess of Wales Park / Hydro Corridor open space system as an environmentally sustainable demonstration site and education centre. This area already contains the Valley Plentiful Community Garden, which should be expanded and integrated with new community and school facilities. The area will host additional features such as small-scale renewable energy demonstrations, or a learning garden consisting of native species.

d) New development, infrastructure and public realm improvements will seek to optimize opportunities for water conservation, on-site infiltration and stormwater control through low impact development approaches including: green roofs, rain gardens, greywater reuse in buildings and for on-site irrigation, swales, soak-ways, underground retention/ infiltration, infiltration trenches, urban bioswales, permeable paving and native landscaping.

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The public realm – consisting of streets, parks, and publicly accessible open spaces – contribute to what people remember about a place. A diverse and beautiful public realm network that offers a range of places and activities contributes to the liveliness and attractiveness of the Downtown. This section outlines the envisioned public realm network for Downtown Pickering, and provides policies that direct the design and programming objectives for each component of the network. This chapter contains Section 4.1: “ Public Realm Network” including objectives for and a description of the different types of open space in the downtown, including details regarding the role and character of each type. Section 4.2: “ Design Considerations,” indicating the physical characteristics new components of the public realm should abide by.

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PUBLIC REALM

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4.1 Public Realm Network

Public realm objectives The intent of the public realm policies is to ensure: • T he public realm indicates to visitors that Downtown Pickering is the City’s civic heart, gathering place and core for culture & arts; • The public realm contributes to the beauty and vitality of the Downtown, creating a distinct setting for Pickering’s residents and visitors; •D  owntown Pickering provides a high quality and generous public realm with a diversity of public realm amenities; •P  ublic realm considerations are integrated into new development, such as the creation of semi-public open spaces and the provision of pedestrian linkages; •P  ublic realm design is integrated into the design and implementation of public infrastructure such as streetscape design, transit infrastructure, and stormwater management;

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•A  variety of both passive and active recreational opportunities are offered within the downtown;

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•O  pportunities are sought to enhance the natural heritage and environmental performance through public space design;

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•P  ublic art is located throughout the downtown in multiple mediums and as a form of community expression;

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•P  ublic spaces are designed in a manner that responds to the place specific opportunities in each Precinct and contributes to the quality of life for people living and working in the Downtown. The planned public realm network, illustrated in Figure 4.1, provides a greater amount and diversity of public spaces in the downtown. This will be increasingly important to support people and jobs growth but also to reinforce Downtown as a place of civic pride and a key destination for all of Pickering.

Transit Plazas  10 Downtown Pickering Transit Plaza 11 GO Station Transit Plaza 12 Liverpool & Kingston Square Urban and Neighbourhood Parks Major Green Parks Gateway Landscape Transit Plazas Festival Plaza Schools Sites

Figure 4.1: The proposed public realm network Gateway 42

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Public Space Types The public realm network includes a variety of park and open space types or components. Each component is intended to perform a distinct role as places to sit, rest, play, celebrate, gather and experience the natural environment. This subsection describes the components of the public realm network and their role within the downtown-wide network, while the precinctspecific policies provide more detailed directions regarding use and design. The components of the public realm are described over the following pages. Esplanade Park is the downtown’s core civic park, a key component to the sense of place in Downtown, and will continue to be the focus of civic & recreational programming and community gathering.

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Neighbourhood Parks are locally-scaled parks that generally serve the immediate living and working community. They include The Piazza, Glenanna Park, Valley Farm Park and West Downtown Park. Neighbourhood parks will contain a mix of hardscaped, canopied and landscaped areas, and be places for programmed uses such as play structures and water features.


Green Parks are large-scale open spaces that integrate natural heritage and gathering space. Major Green Parks include Krosno Creek Park and Pine Creek Park. The planning and design of these parks should consider an educational component, and may be planned in conjunction with the City. The City will work in partnership with the TRCA to ensure natural heritage and storm water management objectives are achieved in park design.

Squares and Plazas are places to gather and rest for people moving throughout the downtown and key opportunities to make Downtown Pickering a distinctly urban place. Squares and Plazas include a new Civic/Arts Square and Festival Plaza. They are generally hard-scaped and are appropriate places for public art, water, and ornamental features, though they are also places for generous landscaping.

Transit Plazas are welcoming points to the downtown, as well as waiting areas for transit riders. They include Downtown Pickering Transit Plaza, GO Station Transit Plaza, and Liverpool & Kingston Square. Transit Plazas will be comfortable and inviting, located conveniently to facilitate both movement and waiting. They will be generously landscaped with options for weather protected seating. Designs will incorporate and encourage ancillary uses such as kiosks and vendors to provide amenities to animate these spaces.

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Publicly Accessible Open Spaces are privatelyowned open spaces or connections that may be accessible to the public. The location, design and entry points to these spaces should be well integrated with streets and other public open spaces. For example, fields and playgrounds on new School Sites will be an additional component to the open spaces in Downtown Pickering. These areas are encouraged to be open to the public during non-operating hours and, accordingly, will be designed to accommodate public uses.

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Gateways are key locations within the downtown that signify entry. These areas will contain special landscaping, street furniture, special lighting, or public art. In particular, new adjacent development must face and activate these spaces. Deeper setbacks or chamfered corners will be permitted in new development located at gateways.

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In addition to moving people and vehicular traffic to and through the downtown, streets are also the spines of the public space network. The design of streets and adjacent development must be planned first and foremost with how design decisions contribute to and affect the public realm.


POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS a) The creation of new parks shall be guided by Figure 4.1 and in accordance with the descriptive text contained in the preceding sections. The exact location and size of these spaces are conceptual, and the size, location, and shape of the places may be modified so long as they satisfy the general intent of these spaces as described in this document. b) Downtown Pickering will be planned so that either a park, square, or plaza is within 5 minutes of walking distance of all residences and places to work.

d) Development in the downtown should identify and explore opportunities for public art and/or public art contributions. Public art components should be integrated with development and infrastructure within place making priority areas and gateways. e) The design of new parks shall have regard for the design considerations contained in Section 4.2 of this document.

c) The design and development of any new Urban Park, Green Park, Neighbourhood Park and plaza as part of any new development will be subject to design review by the City.

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4.2 Design Considerations GUIDELINE RECOMMENDATIONS The difference between a well and less-used public space is dependent on a number of factors including location, design, and maintenance. The previous subsection developed a network for the locations of parks, while this subsection provides policies regarding the design elements within public spaces. Generally, all parks should be places with ample places to sit and rest, as well as provide visual amenity, such as natural heritage features, public art, gardens, or programmed activities.

Seating & Furniture

Sustainability

a) The placement of street furniture, including benches, chairs, tables, garbage & recycling bins, and bicycle parking shall be well organized to ensure pedestrian routes are free of obstacles.

a) The City will develop an Urban Forest Management Plan to increase total tree coverage within the downtown.

b) Public parks and streetscapes should include a range of places to sit, including welldesigned and durable benches, picnic tables, and barrier-free ledges. c) Pedestrian-level lighting shall illuminate parks, squares, and streetscapes to increase the comfort and safety of users.

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b) Trees shall generally be planted in a continuous trench and/or cantilevered sidewalk. Isolated tree pits should not be permitted. c) The selection of trees shall consist of native species and seek to enhance the biodiversity within the tree canopy.


d) The materials chosen for new public spaces shall be pervious materials that absorb and remediate stormwater run-off. e) Opportunities will be sought to utilize locallysourced and/or recycled materials for infrastructure. f) Opportunities for community gardens should be explored in new park design and/or in the form of vertical gardens within development or infrastructure sites.

Public Art a) Public art shall be considered an important element to public space design, adding beauty and visual interest to these spaces. Consideration will be given to community expression and local history when planning and selecting public art.

d) The location of public art shall not conflict with pedestrian movement. e) The design of outdoor furniture and infrastructure such as benches, utility covers, lighting, sidewalks, shelters and bicycle racks are encouraged to be co-ordinated to develop a distinct sense of place in Downtown.

b) The City will develop a public art strategy for Downtown Pickering that includes mechanisms to secure funding for public art from public & private development. c) Public art shall generally be located at high profile locations, such as Gateways, parks and view termini. June 2013

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A vibrant downtown is highly walkable, offering different opportunities to get to and around downtown for people living, working, and visiting. This section provides directions and policies to re-balance conditions for all modes of transportation on existing streets, identify design directions for new streets as Downtown redevelops overtime, and create an integrated pedestrian, cycling and transit network. Together these individual systems will create a connected transportation system for pedestrians, drivers, and cyclists that is safe, comfortable, and intuitive. This chapter contains: Section 5.1: “ Mobility Network”, containing objectives and an integrated “snapshot” of all Downtown mobility components. Section 5.2: “Street Network,” illustrating and describing new streets. Section 5.3: “ Street Types,” providing a description of the different roles, functions, and characteristics of the Downtown street network and cross-sections for new streets. Section 5.4: “ Transit Network,” illustrating planned and proposed transit routes and related public realm enhancements. Section 5.5: “Pedestrian Network,” a hierarchy of pedestrian routes and priority pedestrian areas. Section 5.6: “Cycling Network,” illustrating planned cycling routes and cycling infrastructure priority areas. Section 5.7: “Parking,” providing policies and guidelines for parking in Downtown.

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MOBILITY

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5.1 Mobility Network

Figure 5.1 illustrates the mobility network for Downtown Pickering. It consists of existing and proposed streets, mid-block connections, internal pathways, existing and proposed signalized crossings, new bridges and enhanced transit areas that together create a multitude of ways to get around downtown. The Mobility Network distills and integrates into one “snapshot” more detailed layers of mobility including streets, transit and pedestrian and cycling. The layers are addressed individually in sections 5.2 - 5.6.

Mobility network objectives The new mobility network will: •C  onsist of a hierarchy of streets, with each type of street designed to serve its own mobility function and character objectives; •C  reate a safe, convenient, and enjoyable environment for pedestrians and cyclists; •C  reate a finer grain network of streets and blocks that support urban development and accommodate balanced movements through and to Downtown; •R  ecognize the importance of Regional Roads as major carriers of local and regional vehicular traffic while ensuring their design responds to context in the downtown; •B  e supportive of phased implementation of rapid transit through design, street treatments, and consideration of future alignments;

Legend Existing Street Existing Lane or Drive Proposed Street Pine Creek Bridge Crossing Proposed Lane or Drive Pedestrian Street Pedestrian Path Existing Pedestrian Bridge Proposed Pedestrian Bridge Existing Signalized Intersection Proposed Signalized Intersection Transit Hub

•R  educe the amount of land consumed and provision of parking overtime as other mobility options are enhanced.

Figure 5.1: The proposed mobility network 52

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Glendale Park

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5.2 Street Network

Existing Street Network

As population and employment growth occurs in the study area, an enhanced and expanded mobility network will be necessary to manage traffic, support a full range of transportation choices, and create a walkable and transitsupportive environment.

New Streets

The planned street and road network builds on the existing street grid and plans for the introduction of a finer grain of urban blocks that, over time, will improve connections and access to and within the downtown. The urban street and block pattern will contribute to a walkable environment and support compact, mixed use forms of development.

The new mobility network proposes the following new streets:

Several future streets that connect beyond the downtown area are proposed that will be integral to accommodating the planned growth in the Downtown.

• The Kingston-Bayly Connector, a north-south street along the western edge of the hydrocorridor including a vehicular, pedestrian, and cycling overpass over Highway 401. This new road will provide relief to Liverpool Road as another connector between South and North Downtown. • South Downtown Main Street, an east-west street extending from the middle of the South Downtown, connecting eastward to Brock Road. This new road will provide relief to Bayly Street as South Downtown develops overtime.

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•P  ickering Parkway Transit Priority Street, an extension of Pickering Parkway westward through West Downtown, eventually crossing Pine Creek to Walnut Lane. This will provide as a mid-downtown connection, and will provide for the future alignment of LRT (see Section 5.4). ON ST

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•A  pedestrian overpass across Highway 401, connecting Sandy Beach Road and Valley Farm Road, discussed in section 5.5 of this framework.

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•A  number of new Local Streets and Service lanes. These streets will be as local-serving routes and contribute to a compact, finer grid block network.

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Figure 5.2: Future Street Network

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POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS a) New streets shall generally be designed and extended as illustrated in Figure 5.1 to provide enhanced pedestrian and cyclist connectivity, and manage vehicular congestion. b) If a proposed new street does not align with Figure 5.1, they must comply with the general objectives of the proposed network, connect with existing streets, and will form block lengths no longer than 150 metres and block depths of minimum 60 metres (to ensure for full urban development potential over time).

e) All new lanes or drives will be public or publicly accessible. All new lanes or drives will be constructed to public street design standards. f) New culs-de-sac shall not be permitted within the downtown. g) All new or redesigned streets must contain a pedestrian zone no less than 2.0 metres on both sides of the street, with minimum 2.5 metres on both sides required on Major Streets and Pedestrian Streets.

c) New streets will be identified in all approved plans within Downtown, and will be conveyed to the municipality through the development approvals process at no cost of the City. d) Notwithstanding the above policies, recognizing that redevelopment and new infrastructure will be phased over time, the City may require the completion of a transportation or mobility analysis as a condition of development approval to demonstrate the development thresholds which may not be exceeded until supporting infrastructure is in place or planned.

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5.3 Street Types

In addition to carrying people and traffic, streets in Downtown Pickering must be understood as places themselves. This means that in addition to serving different functions, streets also will have a different character. Each street type’s function and character informs how many traffic lanes they carry, width of sidewalks and plantings, design character, and the scale of buildings adjacent to them. The planned street network comprises of four street categories: •M  ajor Streets • Pedestrian Streets • Local Streets & Service Lanes • Special Streets Each street type and corresponding crosssections are described in more detail in the following pages.

POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS Enhancing modal split within the Region’s road network Major Streets are also Regional Corridors within the Regional Official Plan’s Transportation Network. This Framework strives to re-balance these streets for pedestrians, cyclists and transit with minimal impact on their function. As the urban core of Pickering, the character of streets within Downtown Pickering will require special consideration in terms of signalized crossing frequency, speed limits, and design treatments.

a) As streets are realigned, extended, or undergo capital improvements, their design shall be guided by Figures 5.3 – 5.16. If future cross-sections/rights-of-way do not comply with these figures, they must demonstrate how they achieve the form, function and character as described in this document. b) The City’s Planning Staff and Transportation Department will work with Regional Transportation Staff to implement new signalized crossings as illustrated in Figure 5.1, as well as work towards a strategy for street cross sections that marry the objectives for Regional Corridors in the Regional Official Plan and this Framework.

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Major Streets

Major Streets are the primary streets to and through the downtown and will facilitate higher volume of vehicular and transit movement. They will feature wider roadways but still provide safe and comfortable rights-of-ways for pedestrians and cyclists. These include Kingston Road, Liverpool Road, Bayly Street, and the KingstonBayly Connector. Major Streets are Type A & B Arterial Roads in the Regional Official Plan.

Major Streets: •K  ingston Road • L iverpool Road •B  ayly Street •K  ingston-Bayly Connector

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To define the street, thereby creating a pedestrian friendly environment on the ground level, development along Major Streets will be taller in height than other streets in the downtown and buildings should be located close to the right-of-way. More specifically, buildings will generally be built to the lot line, with larger setbacks permitted (or required) at required active frontage zones. Specific setback requirements are discussed in the Built Form & Land Use sections of this Framework. Along rapid transit routes, street and building design considerations will sensitively integrate transit waiting areas with the streetscape. Transit plaza waiting areas will be located around transit stops and given prominence through landscaping and special pavement treatments. These areas should include design features such as weather protection, bus shelters, seating, public art, and landscaping. A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT


Liverpool Road Liverpool Road will be a gateway avenue to the downtown -- a mixed-use street connecting to the waterfront and North Pickering. A multi-use path for cyclists and pedestrians ensures it is an active street and key part of the City’s wider trail network. The right-of-way will be increased to 31.5 metres with four travel lanes, a centre median/turning lane, right turning lanes and a multi-use path for cycling on the east side of the Road, and a sidewalk on the west side. Figure 5.3: Liverpool Road (Between Kingston Road and Highway 401)

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Kingston Road Kingston Road is envisioned as a distinct urban avenue. In downtown, it will have an exceptional and generous public realm, punctuated by transit plazas, squares, and active at-grade retail. Pedestrian areas will be buffered from vehicular and transit traffic through the use of planting strips, street trees, boulevards or other treatments.

As a complete street, in the near term it will carry Bus Rapid Transit, contain dedicated cycling lanes, and remain a significant carrier of regional traffic. A centre landscaped area will provide visual amenity in the near term, featuring landscape features that signify Downtown’s civic character.

Figure 5.4: Kingston Road with BRT 42.8m ROW (varies)

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Over time, Kingston Road’s curb-to-curb components will evolve, with the centre median replaced with a transit platform and dedicated transit lane. It will continue to contain a generous protected, and distinct public realm.

Figure 5.5: Kingston Road with LRT 42.8m ROW (varies)

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Other Major Streets Other major streets, such as the Bayly-Kingston connector will be major avenues carrying pedestrians, vehicles and transit. Bayly Street, while also considered a Major Street, is subject to further study to determine the right-of-way and functional cross-section. The public realm policies associated with it are addressed in the precinct section for South Downtown (Section 7.4). Figure 5.6: Bayly-Kingston Connector

min. 24.4m ROW

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Pedestrian Streets

Pedestrian Streets are pedestrian- and cyclingpriority streets that also function as important carriers of transit and vehicular traffic within the downtown. Some Pedestrian Streets (Glenanna Road and Valley Farm Road) are Type C Arterial Roads in the Regional Official Plan while others will be local roads.

Pedestrian Streets: •G  lenanna Road •V  alley Farm Road •S  outh Downtown Main Street •S  andy Beach Road

.Pedestrian Streets contain the most generous public realm of all street types, including furnishing zones in addition to pedestrian rightsof-ways. These furnishing zones may include public seating, landscaping, sustainability features such as swales, and bicycle parking. Adjacent buildings will be situated at or near the lot-line, and consist of street-oriented retail and services. Setbacks will generally be 1 metres, with 3 – 5 metres permitted at areas for residential purposes. Pedestrian Streets may also provide for a “spill-out zone” of 3 – 5 metres at areas required for active frontages to allow for sidewalk patios, street displays, or public seating.

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Glenanna Road Glenanna Road will become an urban village main street, consisting of an exceptional public realm, ample places to sit and rest, and an active “spill out zone� containing restaurant patios and store displays. A lively street to explore any time of day, it will contain dedicated cycling lanes, parking lanes and a landscaped zone that buffers vehicular traffic. Recognizing

the street carries truck traffic servicing the Pickering Town Centre, travel lanes are planned to a width of 3.5 metres. The portion of Glenanna Road located in front of the Civic Centre, between Esplanade St. North and South will feature a 4.3 metre hardscaped pedestrian walkway.

Figure 5.7: Glenanna Road 27m ROW

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South Downtown Main Street South Downtown Main Street will be a significant pedestrian promenade and alleviate vehicular congestion from Bayly Street, carrying the residents of South Downtown to the GO Station and Krosno Creek Park in the west to new residential development, school, community and Brock Road to the east. As the existing pedestrian path to the GO Train Station is developed, South Downtown’s role as an important travel route for pedestrians and cyclists will be strengthened through active retail, and a distinctly landscaped public realm.

Connection to Brock Rd

Figure 5.8: The South Downtown Main Street

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Valley Farm Road - Near Term Valley Farm Road will become a neighbourhood promenade, edged by a variety of housing types and small-scale live-work spaces. The pedestrian environment will be enhanced through widened sidewalks, tree plantings, and on-street parking. As a route option for a future LRT, a widened right-of-way should be protected for, which will act as a landscaped zone in the near term.

Figure 5.9: Valley Farm Road in the Near Term

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Optional Spill out zone 3m

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4.75m

2.5m

3.5m

Parking

Travel Lane

7m Landscaped zone

3.5m

2.5m

Travel Lane

Parking

19m Curb-to-Curb

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Proposed Condition

2.25m

2.5m

4.75m

4m

4m Setback Typical


Valley Farm Road - Transit Street If determined as an LRT route, the centre landscape zone will become a transit platform and transit lane, with parking lanes removed and the enhanced pedestrian realm left in tact.

Figure 5.10: Valley Farm Road with LRT

28.5m ROW

3.0m

2.5m

2.25m

Optional Spill out zone

3m

3.5m

3.5m

5.0m

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Local Streets & Service Lanes

Local Streets & Service Lanes will be smaller scale streets and primarily serve the local neighbourhoods and businesses. They will be designed to accommodate pedestrians, cyclists, and private vehicles.

Local Streets & Service Lanes: • Pickering Town Centre Ring Road • The Esplanade North • New roads in South Downtown • New roads in West Downtown • Service lanes throughout downtown

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Local Streets Figure 5.11 illustrates a typical local street consisting of a mixed landscape pedestrian realm and on-street parking. Local streets will be designed such that cyclists can safely share the road with vehicles, but will not consist of designated cycling lanes.

Figure 5.11: Typical Local Street

18m ROW

P

1m

3.0m Mixed Landscape and pedestrian

2.5m

P

3.5m

3.5m

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Travel Lane

2.5m

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Downtown Street

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Service Lanes Service Lanes are pedestrian-accessible, narrow rights-of-way intended to permit access and loading from the rear or sides of developments and provide alternate pedestrian routes. As service lanes contain narrower right-of-ways, Rear- and Side- yard setbacks will be a minimum of 1 metres to allow for sunlight and visual relief.

Figure 5.12: Typical service lane

11m ROW

Varies Landscaped zone

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2.0m

3.5m

3.5m

Travel Lane

Travel Lane

2.0m

1.0m

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Special Streets

Special Streets: • Pickering Parkway Transit Priority Street • The Esplanade South

Special Streets are distinct streets that serve a specific function such as transit movement or placemaking functions. These will require specialized cross-sections that function primarily for their place-specific function and character. Special Streets include the Esplanade South, a ceremonial street that may be closed to traffic for special events, Pickering Parkway Transit Priority Street, a street that may eventually primarily accommodate transit, and Sandy Beach Road which will lead to the Pedestrian Bridge that connects with Valley Farm Road north of Highway 401. As select areas for sustainability demonstration , Green infrastructure design, such as pervious pavements, bio-swales, and rain-water collection trenches will be incorporated into the design and reconstruction of special streets.

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The Esplanade South The Esplanade South will be a pedestrian focussed street featuring design that signifies its importance as the spine of the Civic Precinct. Containing a rolled-curb which facilitates public events during street closures, other special design features may include distinct paving treatments, landscaping, and furnishing zones to include street furniture and public art.

The Esplanade South will feature the same special pavement treatment as the portion of Glenanna Road in front of the Civic Complex, but consistent with the street dimensions as illustrated below.

Figure 5.13: The Esplanade South

20.5m ROW

P

3.0m Esplanade Park

2.0m

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5m

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3.5m

3.5m

2.5m

Travel Lane

Travel Lane

Parking

9.5m Curb-to-Curb

2.0m

4.0m

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6m

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3.0m Optional spill out zone


Pickering Parkway Transit Priority Street - Near Term As a significant mid-downtown east-west route, Pickering Parkway’s public realm will be enhanced with a mixed pedestrian and landscape zone. This cross-section illustrates the location of Pickering Parkway beneath the GO Transit Pedestrian Bridge. This street will eventually cross Pine Creek to connect Liverpool Road to Walnut Lane.

Figure 5.14: Pickering Parkway Transit Priority Street Near Term without Transit GO Transit Pedestrian Bridge 26m ROW 20.1m Bridge Pylon to ROW

11.5m Mixed Landscape and Pedestrian Zone 11.5m Varies

1.5m

3.5m

3.5m

Travel Lane

Travel Lane

10m Curb-to-Curb

Pickering Parkway Transit Hub

1.5m 2.0m

2.5m

4.5m MIN (Varies)

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Pickering Parkway Transit Priority Street The cross-section below illustrates what Pickering Parkway could look like if it is determined as an LRT route. In constrained areas only, such as at the pedestrian bridge, as shown below, sidewalks will be located on the North Side of street, with dedicated transit lanes and pedestrian zones to the South.

Figure 5.15: Pickering parkway with Transit Pickering Pedestrian Bridge 26m ROW

20.1m Bridge Pylon to ROW

2.5m

6.3m Plaza and Sidewalk

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1.8m

3.6m

3.5m

3.5m

Travel Lane

Travel Lane

Transit Lane

3.6m

Pedestrian zone

Transit Lane

12m Transit

7m Curb-to-Curb

Pickering Parkway Transit Hub

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4.8m

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Figure 3.17: Cross-section of Pickering Parkway


Pickering Parkway East of Valley Farm Road there will be no dedicated transit right-of-way. This segment of Pickering Parkway will be a complete street with equal priority for pedestrians, cyclists, and vehicles, and a generous landscaped realm to be 2.5 metres on both sides.

Figure 5.16: Pickering parkway east of Valley Farm Road

27.5m ROW

P

P

3.0m

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3.65m

Spill out Zone or residential yard (typ) 6.25

2.5m

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Travel Lane

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5.4 Transit Network

As an Anchor Hub in the Metrolinx’s Big Move, Downtown Pickering holds an important role as a central transit hub in Pickering and the Region of Durham. This document ensures investments in transit are leveraged to their fullest potential through land use, built form, and mobility networks that complement existing and proposed transit routes and transfer points. Figure 5.17 identifies existing, planned, and potential transit routes. The existing routes consist of DRT local bus service and GO train services. Planned routes consist of the planned first phase BRT along Kingston Road, which will be operated by Durham Transit. Potential routes are rapid transit routes that should be considered in future transit planning. Potential routes consist of:

a. A re-routing of the proposed Kingston Road LRT that would detour along an extended Pickering Parkway, diverting at Walnut Lane and re-aligning with Kingston Road at Glenanna Road. This route is envisioned as the optimal routing for LRT with city-building benefits as it will bring higher order transit to the downtown core where the highest concentration of people and jobs are planned. Further, it will allow for a direct pedestrian transfer to the 401 pedestrian bridge connecting to the GO Station. When planning commences for this phase of rapid transit, this route shall be subject to a feasibility study.

Legend Planned Rapid Transit Potential Rapid Transit Route Durham Region Transit Route GO Transit Lakeshore East line Pickering Town Centre Pedestrian Way Primary Transfer Point Transfer Point Transit Hub

b. Light rail transit along Bayly Street that will provide rapid transit to the new population living and working in South Downtown and travelling to and from the Pickering GO Transit station.

Figure 5.17: future transit network 76

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Glendale Park

Denmar Park

Glengrove Park

David Farr Park

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Figure 5.17 also identifies priority transit pedestrian areas. These are plazas, stops, and pathways, to be areas of public realm improvements, including high quality landscaping, street furniture, bus shelters, cycling parking facilities and additional street trees to provide shade. These areas include:

Transit Hubs, including The Transit Hub Plaza, located at the north end of the Highway 401 Pedestrian Bridge, and the GO Station Transit Hub, located at the southern tip. Detailed recommendations for the design of the transit hub are detailed in the Pickering Town Centre Precinct section of this plan. Pickering Town Centre Pedestrian Way, a protected right of way connecting the transit stop at the southeast corner of Kingston & Liverpool Road with the Transit Hub Plaza. As a future LRT stop, this is an important pedestrian connection ensuring safe, efficient, and intuitive connections between key transfer points. General Transit Waiting Areas, BRT and future LRT transit stops along Kingston Road.

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POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS a) The City of Pickering will work with Durham Transit, GO Transit, and Metrolinx to ensure the alignment and location of future transit routes considers access to greatest concentration of people and jobs and minimizes the distance between transit connections within the downtown. b) The potential transit routes illustrated in 5.16 will be considered in future Environmental Assessments as preferred routes for future rapid transit alignments. c) Key transfer points, the pedestrian priority area, and planned Transit Hub illustrated on Figure 5.17 will be priority areas for design excellence and capital improvements including landscaping, public seating, weather protection, and public art. Development adjacent to these areas shall be oriented to these areas, with active uses at grade.

e) The City will plan for safe pedestrian connections between key transfer points consisting of protected, wide walkways buffered with landscaping and clear wayfinding. f) All pedestrian waiting zones will be designed as safe and comfortable environments with provision of street furniture and weather protection. g) Transit stops and key transit transfer points will be priority areas for bicycle parking and other facilities to promote an integrated and connected active transportation network.

d) When a new development is proposed adjacent to a transit stop or priority transfer point, opportunities will be sought to integrate public realm improvements around this area into site design.

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5.5 Pedestrian Network Existing Pedestrian Network

Downtowns are compact, vital places where pedestrians should be able to walk between destinations in a comfortable, safe, and visually interesting environment. This section contains policies to develop a co-ordinated and continuous pedestrian network within the downtown, illustrated in Figure 5.18.

Legend Primary Pedestrian Routes Secondary Pedestrian Routes Mid-block connection Pickering Town Centre Paths and Trails Existing Sidewalks to be Enhanced Priority Pedestrian Crossing Transit Hub

Figure 5.18: The proposed pedestrian network 80

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Glendale Park

Denmar Park

Glengrove Park

BROCK ROAD

Diana Princess of Wales Park David Farr Park

Esplanade Park

LANE

Pickering Civic Complex

WALNUT

Pickering Town Centre

Future Bridge Connection

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Future Bridge Connection

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The proposed pedestrian network consists of:

Paths, Trails, and Mid-block connections

Pedestrian Crossings

Primary & Secondary Pedestrian Routes

Mid-block connections, trails, or pathways are another key part of the pedestrian network providing additional routes between Primary and Secondary Streets. Paths, trails, and mid-block connections should be physically separated from vehicular rights of way with adjacent development oriented towards them with glazing or active uses at grade.

Safely crossing the street is a key component of the walkability of an area. A series of pedestrian crossings are identified, in particular across Major Streets, as well as the potential for new bridges across the 401 corridor.

While all streets within the downtown will be designed for the safety of pedestrians, certain streets will be designed with a primary focus on the pedestrian environment. Primary pedestrian routes are mostly Pedestrian Streets in the Street Types section of this document (Glenanna Road, Valley Farm Road, and the proposed South Downtown Main Street) but also contain the central portion of Pickering Parkway Transit Priority Street and Sandy Beach Road. In addition to the minimum 2.5 metres sidewalks, they consist of larger furnishing areas and spillout zones, providing additional places to sit and rest. Secondary Pedestrian Routes are all within the public right of way of other streets in the downtown and will contain generous sidewalks, minimum of 2.5 metres. 82

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Design considerations for mid-blocks connections/trails will include: •A  n inviting landscaping & streetscaping design that facilitates wayfinding •S  treet trees running the length of the trail/right-of-way •C  ontinuous, identifiable paving •R  egard for Design for Crime Prevention

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT

Pedestrian crossings should be designed with clearly delineated pedestrian marking which balance the movement needs of pedestrians, cyclists and automobiles. A range of crossing infrastructure from pedestrian activated cross walks to street lights should be considered. In addition to the recently completed pedestrian bridge connecting to the GO station, a Future Pedestrian/Cycling Bridge Crossing the 401 is proposed which would link neighbourhoods north and south of the downtown, the new South Downtown neighbourhood to the core downtown along Valley Farm Road.


POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS a) The pedestrian network will be designed in accordance with Figure 5.18 to create a safe and visually interesting environment for pedestrians. b) The pedestrian network will be integrated with the public space network including squares, parks, transit hubs, and key transit transfer points.

Pickering Town Centre Pedestrian connections across the Pickering Town Centre lands will be improved over time with the introduction of new streets. In the interim, the City will work with Pickering Town Centre (PTC) to implement pathways and appropriate infrastructure to improve conditions along the illustrated routes. The pathways within the PTC itself are recognized as an interior pedestrian zone. The City will work with the PTC to maintain access to the Centre before and after operating hours to ensure it remains an integrated part of the downtown pedestrian network.

c) If a development approval is proposed in an area where mid-block connections, trails, or pathways are illustrated in Figure 5.18, the trail should be incorporated in the site plan. These connections shall be designed to be publicly accessible. If a proposed development plan does not comply with a pedestrian trail or mid-block connection in Figure 5.18, the applicant must demonstrate a connection on their site.

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5.6 Cycling Network Existing Cycling Network

Essential to the sustainability principles of this Framework is a complete active transportation network, including a safe and inviting environment for cyclists within but also to and from the downtown. The planned cycling network envisions a connected network of dedicated onstreet lanes, multi-use paths and sharrows. The cycling network is consistent with the Region’s Cycling Master Plan.

Legend Planned regional cycling spine On-street bike lane Multi-use path Sharrow/signed route

B

Enhanced bicycle parking facilities at pedestrian priority areas

Figure 5.19: The planned cycling network 84

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Glendale Park

Denmar Park

Glengrove Park

David Farr Park

LIVERPOOL ROAD

AD RO

N TO S G

ROAD

KIN

VALLEY

FARM

EN NAD SPLA E E TH Esplanade Pickering Park Civic S ADE Complex PLAN S E THE

GLENANNA

AD RO Pickering Town Centre

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Pine Creek

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The cycling network consists of:

Regional Spines, dedicated lanes on Kingston Road and a multi-use path on Bayly Road, connecting with dedicated lanes elsewhere in the region. Multi-Use Path, a separated right-of-way shared with pedestrians on the east side of Liverpool Road and Kingston-Bayly Connector. Local On-Street Routes, separated cycling lanes that carry vehicular traffic within the downtown. These include Pickering Transit-Way, the eastern portion of South Downtown Main Street, and Glenanna Road. Sharrows, areas with indicated cycling space, but not separated lanes. These include The Esplanade North, Valley Farm Road and the western portion of South Downtown Main Street.

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In addition to cycling lanes, an important component of the cycling network will be bicycle parking facilities, which provide safe and secure locations for cyclists to store their bikes and signify cycling as a priority mobility choice in downtown. Less space-consuming variations such as bike posts, bike rings, and bike racks will be located throughout the downtown, while enhanced bicycle parking facilities, such as bike lockers and bike shower facilities will be located at priority pedestrian waiting areas, (primary transfer points and transfer points as indicated on Figure 5.17).


POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS a) The reconfiguration of downtown streets shall facilitate safe and inviting dedicated routes for cyclists. b) As street improvements occur, cycling routes and bicycle parking facilities shall be installed as indicated on Figure 5.19. c) All new office, retail and residential buildings shall provide on-site bicycle parking and are encouraged to incorporate other amenities such as enclosed lockers and shower/change room facilities.

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5.7 Parking

As population and employment increases, new strategies will be needed to accommodate parking demand in Downtown. Parking must be consolidated and located so that it minimally impacts the public realm, reduces pedestrian/ vehicular conflict, and supports the guiding principles of this Framework. Growth in the downtown will require a shift in thinking regarding parking standards and practices such as reduced standards, shared facilities and City or privately-owned structured or below grade parking. Accordingly, it is recommended that the City prepare a Downtown Parking Strategy to locate appropriate locations for such structures and determine new downtown standards for parking.

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POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS a) All parking in new development will be situated to the rear or side of buildings. b) Structured and below-grade parking shall be the preferred parking format in new development. c) In phased development, surface parking may be permitted if the proponent has demonstrated how parking will be accommodated in structures at full build out. d) Where active uses at grade are required (as indicated on Figure 6.1), parking structures will be required to feature active uses atgrade to contribute to an animated street environment. e) Access driveways to side and rear parking areas should be consolidated, and shall be accessible by a public laneway or drive aisle. No private drive aisles should intersect with Major Streets, Pedestrian Streets, and Local Streets. f) Loading, garbage and recycling areas should be located behind buildings and integrated into the building or screened from view. g) Opportunities for facilities and businesses to share parking on-site or within a city block are encouraged. h) Laneways, drive-aisles and side parking shall generally not exceed 20% of the width of the lot frontage, up to a maximum of 28 metres. June 2013

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Integral to a vibrant urban centre is a critical mass of people and activity at all times of day. This critical mass activates street life, supports businesses, and creates thriving downtown communities. In Downtown Pickering a range of land uses are encouraged which are integrated in a compact urban form that demonstrates design excellence. This section provides policies and guidelines for built form and land use including land use designations, maximum heights, and guidelines for the new site and building development.

This chapter contains Section 6.1: “Land Use” Section 6.2: “Built Form”

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LAND USE AND BUILT FORM

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Downtown Pickering will consist of high quality, urban development contributing to a pedestrian-scaled public realm

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Land Use & Built Form Objectives

The combination of broad land use permissions and built form guidelines that focus on the pedestrian experience will together contribute to lively streets, and an urban character that distinguishes Downtown Pickering from other parts of the City and the Region. The policies in this section intend to:

•P  romote sustainability through recycled, highperformance, and low impact materials that contribute to energy efficiency and on-site stormwater management;

•A  llow for a wide variety and encourage integration of land uses and activities within the downtown;

•E  nsure new built form addresses adjacent neighbourhoods through compatible land use and design, and appropriate height transitions.

•P  romote high-quality, urban developments;

•E  nsure built form contributes to an active, pedestrian-scaled streetscape;

•C  apitalize on transit investments by concentrating higher intensity uses to areas within walking distance of transit stops, transfer points, and the Transit Hub;

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6.1 Land Use 6.1.1 Land Use Categories A range of land uses are permitted across the downtown, however certain areas are identified as appropriate for more specific uses, such as civic, residential or employment.

Legend Land Uses Downtown Residential

Land uses that detract from walkability and a lively public realm, such as drive-through facilities, gas stations, and vehicle sales are not considered appropriate uses in the downtown.

Downtown Mixed Use Downtown Open Space Civic Centre Special Policy Area TRCA Floodplain

S

Potential Future School Site

Active/ Retail Uses at Grade Required Permitted

Figure 6.1: Proposed Land Uses 94

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Glendale Park

Diana Princess of Wales Park

David Farr Park

ROAD EN NAD SPLA E E TH Pickering Esplanade Civic Park Complex S ADE PLAN S E THE

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POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS a) Figure 6.1 shall be regarded as a land use framework for the downtown and will be used to consider future uses in the downtown. b) The land use categories and corresponding permitted uses are: Downtown Mixed Use – Areas that permit a broad range of uses, where possible integrated within blocks or buildings. The following uses shall be permitted: Retail & services, office, medium & high density residential, institutional, small –scale open space, cultural, entertainment, hotel, health services, financial institutions, civic, government, community centres, and parking.

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Downtown Residential – Areas that are primarily residential, with smaller scale retail and service uses. The following uses shall be permitted: Apartment dwellings of varying heights, townhouses, live-work units, parking structures. A maximum of 10% of the gross floor area of a building may be used for retail, office, government, cultural or institutional uses. Downtown Open Space – Areas designated for parks and public open spaces. The following uses are permitted: parks and open space; public squares, accessory uses, such as kiosks, cafes, and community centres.

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT

Civic Centre - Areas for civic and institutional uses. The following uses shall be permitted: Institutional, civic, government, cultural, and community centres. c) In areas of significant new development, neighbourhood-supportive services that contribute to complete communities, such as grocery stores, shall be located within a five minute walking distance of all residences in the downtown.


d) Certain land uses are not consistent with the objectives of this Framework and generally be discouraged: •N  ew Drive-through facilities; •N  ew Vehicle Sales; •N  ew vehicle related service uses, such as gas stations; • L ow density employment uses such as logistics, warehousing, and industrial; •S  ingle or semi-detached, low density residential.

e) The development or redevelopment of a site within a floodplain shall only be considered upon the completion of a favourable Floodplain Rationalization Study in support of the development proposal.

At the time of the adoption of the related Official Plan and Zoning By-Law Amendments, any existing uses of the above type shall be considered a legal nonconforming use.

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6.1.2 Ground Floor Uses

POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS

To reinforce lively streets, certain streets or portions of streets are required or permitted to have active uses at grade. This means ground uses that animate the public realm. This can be achieved either by incorporating streetoriented retail, cafes, restaurants and offices or enhanced design treatment at ground level that allows transparency between the public and private realm (generally achieved through glazing or design features).

a) On sites where active frontages are indicated with a solid red line on Figure 6.1, generally minimum 70% of the ground floor frontage of buildings shall consist of street-oriented retail, restaurants and/or services. In addition, these ground floor frontages generally require minimum 70% transparent glazing. b) On sites where active frontages are indicated with a dashed red line on Figure 6.1, ground floors are encouraged to included street-oriented retail, restaurants and/or services. Where a residential use is developed in this area, the ground level will have a minimum ceiling heights of 5 metres to allow for transition to active uses over time. c) Grade-related residential units are not permitted on Major Streets with a dashed red line frontage on Figure 6.1.

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6.2 Built Form 6.2.1 Appropriate Building Types Downtowns tend to be places where higher density development is located. However, the location, mix, and physical form of this higherdensity development must be managed to ensure the downtown remains a walkable, comfortable, and inviting place. This sub-section provides general policies and guidelines for the heights, placement, massing and design features to which new development in downtown should generally adhere. The precinct-specific policies contain area-specific policies and should be read in tandem with the general built form policies. The illustrations and guidelines are followed by axonometric drawings that illustrate how the guidelines work together to develop a pedestrian-friendly public realm and visually interesting development.

A more dense downtown does not mean every building will be a tall building. A range of buildings will be permitted in the downtown as illustrated in Figure 6.2. The precinct-specific policies indicate the appropriate building types by precinct, and the heights and massing policies will inform the physical character of these building types. Appropriate building types in the downtown are:

•L  ow-Rise Buildings – Generally 3 – 5 storey buildings with active uses or lobbies at grade with apartment, condominium, or office uses above. •M  id-Rise Buildings - Generally 6 – 12 storey buildings with active uses or lobbies at grade with apartment, condominium, or office uses above. These buildings will have stepbacks at 3 – 6 storeys.

Figure 6.2: Downtown Building Types

Stacked Towns: 100 DOWNTOWN PICKERING

•S  tacked Towns – Generally 3 – 4 storey buildings, with two or three units on top of another with each unit containing direct access from unit to street level.

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Low Rise

Mid-Rise


•P  oint Towers - Buildings with 13 or more storeys with active uses or lobbies at grade with apartment, condominium, or office uses above. These buildings will have a base, middle, and top portion and will be subject to the heights and massing policies.

Mid-Rise

•L  andmark buildings – Buildings with significant heights and massing, dependent on function and location. These are generally taller buildings and should be located at key gateways to and intersections within the downtown. These may also be purpose-built cultural or institutional buildings in the civic precinct that contribute to the downtown’s sense of place.

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6.2.2 Building Heights The planned building heights in Figure 6.3 illustrate the maximum allowable building heights across the downtown. In addition to these height maximums, individual development will be guided by the design guidelines contained in the rest of this document. Tall buildings are generally to be located at key intersections, along major transit routes, along Major Streets, and adjacent to the Highway 401 corridor. Greater building height at key corners and along the 401 will help create a sense of arrival to the downtown and a sense of place.

POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS Legend a) New buildings shall adhere to the minimum and maximum heights as illustrated in Figure 6.3 and will be implemented through the new Zoning By-Law. b) No building in downtown, except for institutional uses in the Civic Centre and Open Space land use category shall be less than three storeys.

3-5 Storeys 6-12 Storeys 13-19 Storeys 20+ Storeys Building heights subject to sensitive Transition

Figure 6.3: Proposed Building Heights 102 DOWNTOWN PICKERING

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Glendale Park

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6.2.3 Transition & Massing

GO Rail Corridor

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New Residential Neighbourhood

New Commercial Neighbourhood

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Bayly Street

In addition to maximum building heights, massing provisions such as setbacks, tower floor plates and tower separation ,ensure that the form of development has minimal shadowing and wind impact, and that pedestrian scaled development is created.

The image below illustrates the transition in heights and massing that built form should follow, using South Downtown as an example. The guidelines on the following page provide direction on the form of new development so that buildings contribute positively to the surroundings.

South Downtown Main Street

The Building Heights plan ensures that development appropriately transitions from denser areas to existing low-rise residential neighbourhoods.

Existing Residential Neighbourhood


New

development should appropriately transition from

denser areas to existing low rise neighbourhoods

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GUIDELINE RECOMMENDATIONS

a) Taller Buildings shall be designed to consider view of all sides of the building. Buildings taller than 10 storeys shall be designed to contain three components of the building: base (podium), middle and top. b) Generally, buildings shall have a podium of at least 3 storeys before any building stepbacks are introduced. c) The first stepback for any building, shall not occur higher than the sixth floor of a building (with the exception of Major Streets where the first stepback shall not occur higher than 8 storeys). 106 DOWNTOWN PICKERING

d) Building stepbacks should be a minimum of 3 metres, unless otherwise prescribed. e) The floorplate for a residential tower, the portion of the building above the podium, shall generally not exceed 750 square metres. f) The floorplate of an office tower, the portion above the podium, shall generally not exceed 1,000 square metres. g) Tower separation, measured to include balconies, will be minimum 25 metres in any direction.

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT

h) For buildings located on corner sites or at gateways, towers should be located at or near the street corner of the site. i) The top of towers should be attractively designed using setbacks, articulation and other means.


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6.2.4 Street Edge

GUIDELINE POLICIES GUIDELINERECOMMENDATIONS RECOMMENDATIONS

In tandem with the ground floor use policies in the Land Use section of this document, the physical form of buildings as they relate to the street edge are a critical factor in creating a lively public realm. Street-oriented buildings with windows and special design treatments allow for people to engage with the activity within buildings. Conversely, windows, glazing, restaurant patios and storefronts that spill out on to the street provide street activity and “eyes on the street.”

a) Except for precinct-specific policies in The Avenues Precinct, buildings will generally be located at the street edge along a general build-to zone of 0 – 1 metres from the edge of the property line with the exception of Laneways/Service Lanes and Downtown Residential areas as described in the following guidelines. b) In Downtown Residential areas, up to 3 metres setback will be required for semiprivate open space, such as yards or landscaped area, acting as amenity and/or a privacy buffer for at-grade residential units.

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c) Development fronting Service Lanes shall have a minimum 3 metre setback. d) Buildings shall contribute to a consistent street wall with minimal gaps or courts between buildings. e) Throughout the downtown, no building face along a public street shall generally be longer than 70 metres. f) Lateral separation between buildings should be a minimum 11 metres, or 5.5 metre setback from the side property line, to allow for pedestrian access to the block, internal lanes, as well as windows on these sideyards.


g) Along Kingston Rd, building faces may expand beyond the 70 metres length as indicated in the previous guideline, provided that the street facade of a building be articulated through recessions and/or projections at a minimum of every 30 metres. h) In order to create grade level street animation, along Major Street and Pedestrian Streets with required retail at grade, entrances will be provided at a minimum of every 18 metres. i) Primary entrances of buildings and active retail-commercial uses should face and activate streets, parks, and squares.

j) Residential pick-up and drop-off areas, as well as servicing entrances are not permitted on Major Streets, Pedestrian Streets, and Special Character Streets. These will be located at the side or rear of buildings. k) Weather protection will be incorporated into new development, with particular attention along Pedestrian Streets. Such features may include: deep set lobbies, architectural projections, canopies, and awnings. Recessed frontages such as arcades & colonnades, are generally discouraged.

l) Ground floors throughout the downtown will have a minimum floor-to-ceiling height of 4.5m to allow for changes in use over time. Where residential uses are located at grade, in order to assure privacy and security, units will be raised slightly from the sidewalk.

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6.2.5 Demonstration Blocks Maximum floorplate of 750 m² for residential towers and 1,000 m² for employment towers above podium height

The following demonstration blocks use sections of the built form vision to illustrate the guideline recommendations of this section, with exception to parking policies contained in subsection 5.7.

Gateway Mixed-use Development

Blocks should transition in height and massing down to lower-rise neighbourhoods

Minimum 4.5m ground floor height

MAJOR STREET

Generous plaza/open space at gateway intersections

m 70 ge um nta xim fro Ma lding i bu

J MA

EET

S OR

TR LS A C LO

T

EE

TR

Minimum 11m lateral separation between podium buildings

Maximum 10 storeys

Figure 6.4: Proposed gateway mixed-use development 110 DOWNTOWN PICKERING

3m step-back above streetwall

4-8 storey streetwall

. Max 3m

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT

Consolidated parking and servicing access

Above grade structured parking should be fronted with active uses or integrated into the back of the block (See section 5.7)


Mid-Rise Residential Infill

LOC

STR

Locate entrances and active uses to face and animate public spaces

EET

L

O

C

A

L

S

T

R E

E

T

AL

Internal courtyard

L

B U

O

C A

11m

PE

Provide a generous pedestrian realm and room for cafes and spill-out zones

P

L

S

T

R

E

E T

L IC

P

A

R

K

3m

TR

S DE

Minimum 6 storeys

Consolidated parking and servicing

IAN RE

ST

3-5 storeys

ET Figure 6.5: Proposed mid-rise residential infill development June 2013

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The tops of towers should be sculpted to provide visual interest and minimize shading

Residential landmark towers Mi betw nimum 2 een t 0 ower m separ ation s

HWY 4

01

Towers facing HWY 401 wil be designed to be visually interesting from all sides

RAIL C

ORRID

Structured parking should be consolidated to the rear of the block

DOWN

TOWN

Figure 6.6: Proposed gateway mixed-use development 112 DOWNTOWN PICKERING

Open spaces should be animated

STREE

T

Active uses including commercial and community uses or residential entrances - will be encouraged at grade

Long building faces will have vertical articulation every 30m

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Consolidated parking and servicing access

OR


6.2.4 Materiality and Green Design

GUIDELINE RECOMMENDATIONS

In addition to a compact built form which supports a cycling and pedestrian-friendly environment, the quality of new development in Downtown Pickering will contribute to the Downtown’s sustainability objectives. Highquality and energy-efficient materials will be encouraged as part of all new development.

a) All buildings will be built with high-quality, enduring materials such as brick, stone, and glass. Materials that do not age well, such as stucco, vinyl, and highly reflective glass will be discouraged.

c) At least 25% of parking area surfaces shall be permeable. Parking lots, driveways, and other vehicular surfaces are encouraged to use porous paving treatments to absorb stormwater run-off.

b) Development within the downtown shall be encouraged to incorporate sustainable development practices such as optimizing energy efficiency of buildings, pursuing LEED certification for new private and public buildings and low impact development practices.

d) The review of development plans shall have regard for the City’s adopted draft Sustainable Development Guidelines.

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Downtown Pickering is comprised of many places that are distinct in character and have their own role within the downtown. Accordingly, each place or Precinct requires place-specific policies and guidelines that respond to their context and future character. The following sections contains images, descriptions, and specific policies which help ensure each precinct fulfills these functions and character. In this chapter you will find: Section 7.1 “The Avenues” Section 7.2 “Valley Farm Neighbourhoods” Section 7.3 “Civic District” Section 7.4 “South Downtown” Section 7.5 “Pickering Town Centre” Section 7.6 “West Downtown”

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PRECINCTS

7

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Six precincts have been identified within Downtown Pickering. The Precincts respond to the existing and planned land use, built form and distinct characteristics of these places. The boundaries of the six downtown precincts are outlined in Figure 7.1.

Table 7.1 provides residential densities and floorspace index (FSI) ranges for each Precinct. These ranges, read together with the height maximums illustrated in Figure 6.3 and guidelines contained in Section 6.2., will ensure higher density built form is directed towards appropriate locations with minimal impact on existing neighbourhoods.

Table 7.1: Residential Density & Floorspace Index by Precinct Maximum and Minimum Floorspace Index (total building floorspace divided by total lot area)

Maximum and Minimum Residential Density (in dwellings per net hectare)

The Avenues

Over 2.0 and up to and including 5.5

Over 80 and up to and including 410

Valley Farm Neighbourhoods

Over 1.5 and up to and including 4.5

Over 80 and up to and including 340

Civic Precinct

Over 0.75 and up to and including 3.0

Over 80 and up to and including 200

South Downtown

Over 1.75 and up to and including 5.75

Over 100 and up to and including 570

Pickering Town Centre

Over 1.5 and up to and including 5.5

Over 80 and up to and including 340

West Downtown

Over 2.75 and up to and including 4.5

Over 80 and up to and including 270

1

The Avenues

2

Valley Farm Neighbourhoods

3

The Civic District

4

South Downtown

5

Pickering Town Centre

6

West Downtown

Figure 7.1: downtown precincts 116 DOWNTOWN PICKERING

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT


Glendale Park

Denmar Park

Glengrove Park

David Farr Park

G

ROAD

KIN

1

FARM

EN NAD SPLA E E TH Esplanade Pickering Park Civic S ADE Complex PLAN S E THE

3

GLENANNA

Pickering Town Centre

5 Pine Creek

NG

ERI PICK

Y

PKW

1

Y 40 HWA HIG

4

SANDY BEACH ROAD

6

VALLEY

AD RO

LIVERPOOL ROAD

2

AD RO

ON ST

BROCK ROAD

Diana Princess of Wales Park

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7.1 The Avenues

The Avenues are vibrant corridors that define the downtown’s edges and gateways, consisting of both Kingston Road and Liverpool Road and the properties adjacent to them. As major transit rights of way, these corridors are accessible by and comfortable for pedestrians, without compromising their transporation role as major carriers of vehicular traffic. Along their downtown segments, these streets will have a built form and streetscape character distinct from other segments in the Region.

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LAND USE DESIGNATION Enhanced Streetscape

Downtown Mixed-Use

New LandBuild-

mark

ings

Pickering Town Centre

Low-rise Residential Infill BRT Stop

Liverpool Multi-use Path

BRT Stop

BUILDING HEIGHTS 3-20 + Storeys

Gateway Transit Plaza

Liverpool Road

n sto

King

BUILDING TYPES

Road

Low-Rise Mid-Rise Point Towers Landmark

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Figure 7.2: The Avenues precinct

Mid-block pathways provide linkages to existing

Kingston & Liverpool Road Gateway i

Enhanced Liverpool House Site

neighbourhoods

Glenanna Neighbourhood Park

Residential and commercial infill along Kingston Road

Distinctive tall buildings located at major intersections Kingston Roa

d

Pickering P

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d

Roa Val

ley

Far

m

Liverpool Road Streetscape Enhancements Including a MultiUse Path

edge

d

priority area

waiting areas

defines the street

Roa

pedestrian

and enhanced transit

infill development

a

and entry to

Office and retail

nan n

transit plaza

New corner squares

Gle

Live

rpo

ol

Roa

d

Kingston Road is a Complete Street

arkway

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT

Eastern Downtown Gateway development


Key Places in The Avenues

With future rapid transit plans in place and as a key entryway into the downtown, Kingston Road will be transformed into a complete street. The street accommodates transit supportive forms of development, in the form of medium and high density buildings, with particular attention to a pedestrian-scaled public realm. It will feature an animated street edge with street trees, comfortable pedestrian realm, and enhanced pedestrian crossings.

New corner squares located at the intersections of Glenanna Road, Valley Farm Road, and the Kingston-Bayly Connector, provide open space relief along are places for residents, workers, and visitors to the downtown to sit, relax, meet and wait for transit.

The intersection of Kingston & Liverpool Road Gateway is envisioned as an iconic intersection, consisting of distinct architecture, public plazas, and integrated transit waiting areas: • On the northwest Corner, Liverpool House will be enhanced with sympathetic new development wrapped around an enhanced open space. • The southeast corner includes a transit plaza and entry way to the Pedestrian Priority Path, which provides a vital connection to the transit hub. • The northeast and southwest corners will be the sites of carefully massed towers, with pedestrian-scaled podiums and setbacks to frame urban squares. June 2013

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Glenanna Neighbourhood Park is a community open space, enhancing quality of life for residents and employees in the Liverpool Neighbourhood to the north, and residents of new development along Kingston Road. Consisting of small-scale active and passive uses, this new open space is a place to gather and play.

122 DOWNTOWN PICKERING

Liverpool Road contains an enhanced streetscape and new multi-use trail and is framed by mid- and high- rise buildings. This treatment transforms Liverpool Road into an urban gateway to Downtown from the south and provides vital connections to South Downtown and Frenchman’s Bay.

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT

The Eastern Downtown Gateway, located at the intersection of Kingston Road and Valley Farm Road, is the location of taller buildings, signalling a sense of arrival to those entering from the East. New urban plazas integrated with rapid transit stops provide amenity to pedestrians and transit users.


A mid-rise mixed use block framing an avenue

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PRECINCT-SPECIFIC POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS a) Floorspace Index and residential densities shall be consistent with the ranges specified in Table 7.1 of this document. b) The minimum aggregate target for park or public open space in The Avenues is 0.6 hectares. c) As redevelopment occurs, a new neighbourhood park shall be integrated within this precinct. The location for this park, illustrated in Figure 7.2, is conceptual. The park shall be publicly accessible, fronting a public street, and will feature small-scale active and passive uses. d) The intersection of Kingston & Liverpool Road shall be recognized as a gateway intersection to the downtown, with cityowned rights-of-way considered priority areas for capital investment and beautification efforts. Suitable uses and features for lands fronting the Liverpool and Kingston Road gateway are: •P  ublic Squares or urban plazas with ample seating, generous landscaping, public art, and wayfinding signage; • T aller buildings exemplifying high quality design, materials, and distinctive architectural features; and •E  nhanced transit waiting areas.

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e) Notwithstanding the previous policy, efforts shall be made to retain the Liverpool House, located at the northwest corner of Kingston & Liverpool Road, with adjacent landscaping and urban design treatments reinforcing the building’s landmark significance. Intensification of the site in the form of building alterations or additional development is permitted so long as siting, size, massing, scale, and materials of the new development complements or enhances the heritage attributes of this property.

h) New development adjacent to the planned rapid transit stops located on Kingston Road at Liverpool Road shall be designed with the objectives of creating an exceptional public realm with specific attention to maintaining connections and pedestrian linkages elsewhere in the downtown. Weather protection features shall be integrated into adjacent development. Setbacks up to 5 metres shall be permitted in these locations so long as they consist of landscaping and seating areas.

f) A dedicated entry-way to the Pickering Town Centre Pedestrian Way, illustrated in Figure 5.17, shall be protected for and incorporated into the site plan of any new development at the southeast corner of the Liverpool Road and Kingston Road intersection. This pathway shall be designed in an efficient and direct configuration and shall retain a 6 metre rightof-way.

i) Squares and Plazas, no less than 100 square metres and subject to the design consideration in subsection 4.2 and shall be required at the intersections of Kingston & Glenanna Roads, Kingston & Valley Farm Roads, and Liverpool Road & Pickering Parkway. Adjacent development shall be oriented towards these spaces with 70% of the ground floor facade of a building containing transparent glazing.

g) New development located at the Kingston & Liverpool gateway shall be oriented towards the street. Setbacks up to 5 metres from the front property line along Kingston or Liverpool road shall be permitted so long as this area contains landscaping, seating, restaurant patios, or other features contributing to streetlevel animation of this corner.

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT


j) On frontages specified with a solid red line on Figure 6.1 along Kingston & Liverpool Road, a maximum 3 metre setback for residential uses-at-grade and 5 metre setback for retail/ commercial at-grade is permitted to allow for patios, seating, and other at-grade animating uses over time. Where buildings are setback more than one metre, the area between the buildings and front property line will feature landscaping and/or seating of some form to be designed and maintained by the property owner. k) Notwithstanding the above policy, to allow for a generous public realm in the case of future road widening, buildings frontages on Liverpool Road shall be setback a minimum of 2 metres from the front property line. l) Structured parking facilities shall generally not front along Kingston or Liverpool Road. If constructed, the design of such facilities shall be required to feature active uses at grade as defined in the policy recommendation in Section 5.7 of this document. m) To reduce vehicle-pedestrian conflicts and promote an attractive pedestrian environment along Kingston Road, the City will work with Regional Transportation staff to reduce speed limits and install new signalized crossings.

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7.2 Valley Farm Neighbourhoods

The Valley Farm Neighbourhoods will be a predominant residential district, enhancing existing housing opportunities, centred around significant public spaces and community amenities and flanked by office buildings along the south side of Pickering Parkway. With the Civic Precinct in the core, flanked by Kingston Road to the North, and with enhanced connections within and throughout the downtown, residents of the Valley Farm neighborhoods are offered a vibrant urban lifestyle within walking distance to a variety of amenities, civic and cultural institutions, and transportation choices. The Valley Farm Neighbourhoods will offer a variety of housing choices in the form of Stacked Townhouses, Low-Rise, Mid-Rise, and High Rise apartment buildings.

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LAND USE DESIGNATION

Pickering Town Centre

Downtown Residential

Enhanced Streetscape

New Landmark Buildings

BUILDING HEIGHTS 3-19 Storeys

Gl

en

an

na

Ro

ad

Transition to Existing Neighbourhood

Valley Farm Road

Esplanade Park

Neighbourhood Park New Gateway Landscape

Enhanced Streetscape Mixed-use residential

BUILDING TYPES Stacked Towns kway

g Par

Pickerin

Low-Rise Mid-Rise

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Figure 7.3: The Valley Farm Neighbourhoods precinct

Protect and enhance existing pedestrian routes Kingston-Bayly Conn

AD RO

ector

KINGSTON

New development transitions in scale to meet adjacent

GLEN

THE

L ESP

DE ANA

low-rise housing

N

ANN AD A RO

street-oriented

THE

ADE LAN ESP

S

mixed use

Glenanna Road Streetscape

AY PARKW

enhancements

PICKERING

Valley Farm Neighbourhood Park

Enhanced Expanded street network

128 DOWNTOWN PICKERING

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT

New office development

pedestrian realm

with integrated

and defined street

structured parking

crossings along valley farm road


Key Places in The Valley Farm Neighbourhoods

An expanded street network consisting of new streets and enhanced pedestrian crossings provides a safer pedestrian realm for existing and new residents of the Valley Farm Neighbourhoods. The new street network will provide a finer grid of road connections between Glenanna and Valley Farm Road, and lay the foundation for new medium density redevelopment consisting of stacked townhouses and mid-rise development.

The centre-piece of this new residential development is the Valley Farm Neighbourhood Park, providing a playground and small-scale amenities for downtown residents. In companion with Esplanade Park in the Civic Precinct and Diana Princess of Wales Park, residents of the Valley Farm Neighbourhoods are offered many different types of open spaces.

Glenanna Road is envisioned as Downtown Pickering’s “Main Street” consisting of pedestrian-scaled built form with shops, restaurants and offices at grade. These amenities, in combination with wide sidewalks, boulevards, public seating and distinct landscaping will transform Glenanna Road into a lively, great street.

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Valley Farm Road will be more characteristic of a neighbourhood street with widened sidewalks, defined pedestrian crossings, street trees, and potential for new active uses at ground level. While primarily residential, small-scale retail may be located at key street corners and live-work units may be permitted in the ground floor of buildings.

130 DOWNTOWN PICKERING

As a potential rapid transit route, Pickering Parkway will carry Light Rail Transit to Valley Farm Road. The intersection of Glenanna Road and Pickering Parkway is a gateway to the Glenanna Road Pedestrian Street. The northwest and northeast corners feature landmark, taller buildings (consisting of offices or apartment units) that gently transition to the adjacent mid-rise neighbourhoods.

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT

South of Pickering Parkway, office towers with integrated structured parking line Highway 401. They provide visually interest from all angles and contribute daytime activity to the precinct.


PRECINCT-SPECIFIC POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS a) Floorspace Index and residential densities shall be consistent with the ranges specified in Table 7.1 of this document. b) The minimum aggregate target for park or public open space in the Valley Farm Neighbourhoods is 0.4 hectares. c) As redevelopment occurs, a new neighbourhood park shall be integrated within this precinct. The location for this park, illustrated in Figure 7.3, is conceptual. The park shall be publicly accessible, fronting a public street, and will feature small-scale active uses, such as a playground, interactive public art, or splash pad.

f) Development located at the intersection of Glenanna Road and Pickering Parkway shall be encouraged to incorporate hardscaped plazas fronting Pickering Parkway including plantings, public seating, and public art. Setbacks greater than 5 metres from the property line fronting Pickering Parkway shall be permitted so long as this area consists of publicly accessible open space with features such as public seating, landscaping, or public art. g) New buildings on lots along the future Kingston-Bayly Connector shall ensure buildings address this street edge. No back lotting or surface parking will be permitted along this street edge.

d) Buildings fronting the new neighbourhood park will be oriented towards the park. e) Glenanna Road shall be considered a priority area for streetscape improvements consistent with the Figure 5.7 of this document.

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7.3 The Civic District

The Civic District will be a destination of choice, interest, and celebration for all of the City. It is Downtown’s hub for civic & institutional uses, punctuated by distinct public open spaces. The Esplanade South is its core spine, connecting new festival and gathering spaces in the west to the Diana Princess of Wales Park in the East, with Esplanade Park as its centrepiece.

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LAND USE DESIGNATION New Seniors Centre

an

ad

e

N

y

Esplanade Park

New Mixed-use Development

Enhanced Streetscape

Esp The

Pickering Civic Com-

Glenanna Roa

3-5 Storeys

New Arts & Culture Facility

BUILDING TYPES

plex

Extension of the Plaza Feel

BUILDING HEIGHTS

lan

Th

e

Streetscape

Road

ad e

Es

pl

Enhanced

Farm

Civic Centre

S

Valle

Pickering Recreation Complex

Pickering Library

Low-Rise New Public Square

Institutional

d

Market Plaza

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Figure 7.4: The Civic District precinct

Shared structured

ad

on st ng

Public Realm Enhancements

Esplanade Park Remains the Precinct CentrePiece

en

Road

Ro

Ki

Gl

parking

Valley Farm

Potential site for seniors’ centre

The

de

ana

Espl

N

Pickering Recreation Complex

Esplanade Park

an

na

Ro

ad

Pickering Civic Complex The

Pickering MultiSeason Square

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de

ana

Espl

S

Mixed-Use South Block Redevelopment & Structured Parking Potential Durham West Arts Centre Site

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT

Potential site for New Urban Format School


Key Places in The Civic District

An enhanced civic campus consisting of an exemplary public realm, green infrastructure and demonstration areas is the setting for a number of new destination within the district. As Downtown Pickering grows to be an epicentre for culture and entertainment, the proposed Durham West Arts Centre could be an important cultural hub and draw for Downtown Pickering and the region. With such importance, this facility will demonstrate design excellence and feature an exceptional outdoor component consisting of street furniture, landscaping, and public art.

Pickering Multi-Season Square, a multi-season urban square, is envisioned beside the proposed Arts Centre and is a more formal component of downtown’s public realm network, located east of Glenanna Road and across from the proposed Festival Market Plaza. The Pickering MultiSeason Square will be an iconic public space, incorporating design elements that activate the space four seasons of the year. Such uses may include a water feature (such as a fountain or splash pad) that is converted into a skating rink in the winter. The plaza will be hardscaped, contain public seating and landscaping.

Both the Durham West Arts Centre and Pickering Multi-Season Square are envisioned as suitable uses that may contribute to the redevelopment of the South Block, a lot partially used for public parking, south of the Civic Centre. While these are recommended uses for this site, this area is appropriate for many uses, and is envisioned as a mixed-use block that combines residential and institutional uses with active uses or design at grade to activate Esplanade Park.

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Another priority redevelopment site is the Pickering Recreation Centre block. This is a suitable site for new destinations, such as an arts centre or a new Seniors Centre, proposed adjacent to the Recreation Centre on the lands fronting Valley Farm Road. Such a facility will serve an aging population, providing relief to existing facilities as well as creating opportunity for more robust programming. With intensified uses in this facility, public realm enhancements should occur in front of the recreation centre, with a new extension of The Esplanade North to the Kingston-Bayly Connector, and parking consolidated into some form of structured parking.

136 DOWNTOWN PICKERING

The lands east of the current recreation centre are envisioned to be the location of a new school which could serve the increasing population in the downtown. Opportunities will be sought to integrate the new school with existing amenities, such as the Pickering Recreation Complex and Princess of Wales Park. The portion of Diana Princess of Wales Park north of the Skate Park will be an expanded Food & Learning Garden, and is a key component of Downtown’s sustainability strategy.

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT

Tying all these destinations together is The Esplanade South, a flexible space and street, designed so that it may be temporarily closed to vehicular traffic for special events, yet functionally used during regular periods. In accordance with the street section and mobility policies of this Framework, the street will demonstrate an exceptional public realm and will be extended to the Kingston-Bayly Connector and the Princess of Wales Park.


PRECINCT-SPECIFIC POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS a) Floorspace Index and residential densities shall be consistent with the ranges specified in Table 7.1 of this document. b) The minimum aggregate target for park or public open space in the Civic Precinct is 2.4 hectares. c) The City will continue to work with the Durham West Arts Centre to locate and develop a multi-purpose arts centre containing a theatre facility and offices for arts organizations. The centre will be situated in a prominent location, in proximity to other civic and institutional facilities.

e) The City will work to locate a new Senior Citizens Community Centre in the Civic District. The centre will be situated in a location that can share facilities, such as parking, with other civic institutions. f) The planned public library expansion will be designed to create a stronger relationship with Esplanade Park, the Civic Centre and the public realm along The Esplanade South and Glenanna Road through the use of transparent glazing, street related entrances, and accessory uses where practical.

d) An urban public square shall be integrated into the site design of a new Arts Centre or major cultural facility. The square will be functionally different than Esplanade Park, consisting of hardscaped landscaping, and interactive and active multi-season features, such as a splash pad, ice rink, or fountain.

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7.4 South Downtown

South Downtown will be a transitoriented mixed-use neighbourhood. The new neighbourhood, which captures the GO Transit Station and higher-density development, will consist of an integrated network of new streets, pedestrian connections, community facilities and public spaces. To capitalize on its proximity to the Pickering GO Station, South Downtown will be predominantly mid- and high- density office and residential buildings, with commercial and retail at grade providing a complete community to live, shop, and play. The precinct’s tallest buildings will be located along the Highway 401 corridor and adjacent to the GO station, with heights reduced southward to sensitively transition to adjacent neighbourhoods to the south.

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LAND USE DESIGNATION Downtown Mixed-Use Downtown Residential Downtown Open Space

BUILDING HEIGHTS 3-20 + Storeys

Landmark Towers

HWY 401 New Community Centre

Pickering GO Station

BUILDING TYPES Low-Rise Mid-Rise Point Towers Landmark

Krosno Creek Park

Bayly S

treet

Transition to Residential Neighbourhood

Sa

nd y

Be

ac h

Ro

ad

Neighbourhood Retail

New Urban Piazza

Enhanced Pedestrian Crossings

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Figure 7.5: The South Downtown precinct

network of new streets

g

in ker

Pic

Taller buildings HWY 401

along

way

Park

HWY

401

South Downtown Main Street

Connection to Brock Road

Potential Community Centre

Transit Hub South Urban Piazza

Landmark Office Building

Potential new school site

GO parking structure

Enhanced Pedestrian

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Creek Park

buildings sensitively transition to existing neighbourhoods

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT

Krosno

oad

Crossings to better connect Neighbourhoods south of Bayly Street

Low-rise mixed use

re-naturalized

Sandy Beach R

oad

Liverpool R

Bayly Street

Low-rise mixed use development transitions down to existing neighbourhood


Key Places in South Downtown

The vision for South Downtown contains a number of both neighbourhood- and city- scaled attractions, amenities and features: Transit Hub South is a contemporary transit plaza consisting of comfortable and safe waiting places, amenities and gateway features such as public art, street trees and landscaping. Pedestrian rights-of-way will be clearly demarcated from parking areas.

The South Downtown Main Street will be both a vital vehicular connection to Brock Street, but also as the spine of the community, with an active street edge consisting of cafes and services and wide, comfortable sidewalks, carrying the majority of pedestrian traffic throughout South Downtown and towards the GO Transit Hub.

Krosno Creek Park will be South Downtown’s centre-piece, consisting of a natural and informal component adjacent to the banks of the day-lighted creek, with an urban piazza located directly east. The naturalized area will act as a community and city-wide meeting place as well as an environmental education opportunity, and be the largest component of the precinct’s public realm system. The urban plaza will consist of small scale active uses, such as a play area or splash pad, providing amenity to new residents of South Downtown.

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The GO Lands Office Tower located at the corner of Bayly St & Liverpool Road will be a landmark employment opportunity, and office buildings located near the GO Station, will take advantage of the area’s close proximity to regional and local transit and provide a critical mass of employees to South Downtown.

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As South Downtown develops overtime, it is imperative that lands are dedicated for new community facilities. It is anticipated that in addition to new parks, both a new community centre in proximity of Krosno Creek and a school will be required. As a higher-density, urban neighbourhood, the form and function of these facilities will consist of a smaller building and open space footprint. Joint use of facilities and playgrounds will be considered to optimize space.

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While South Downtown is envisioned as a complete community, consisting of housing, employment uses, services, and community facilities, it will also be connected to the northern portion of downtown through two new bridges across Highway 401. Figure 5.1 of this Framework provides preferred alignments for these connections – a multi-modal bridge, part of the Kingston-Bayly Connector, and a pedestrian bridge linking Sandy Beach Road to Valley Farm Road.


Bayly Street Figure 7.6: Bayly Street Public Realm Cross Section - Typical

Figure 7.7: Bayly Street Public Realm Cross Section - GO Parking Station & Westward

Zone

Landscape Zone (typ)

8m Curb-to-Building (minium)

5.0m

TBD Curb-to-Curb

Given that the future right-of-way of Bayly Street is subject to further Bayly Street study, the cross-section above illustrates the typical design for the street’s curb to building front. As a mixed-use street carrying pedestrians, vehicles, and cyclists, and due to its proximity to the Pickering GO Transit Station, a generous public realm on the north side of Bayly Street should be planned for. The minimum distance from curb to building front should be 8 metres, consisting of a minimum 3.5 metre multi-use path. Where possible, building frontages should be set back to create a consistent street wall and provide a buffer between buildings and the multi-use path.

2.0m

4.0m

4.0m Landscape Zone

1m

2.5m Landscape

Landscape Zone

or

3.5m Multi-Use Path

Pedestrian Promenade / Spill-out Zone

2.0m Spill out

TBD ROW

Pedestrian Promenade

TBD ROW

15m Curb-to-Building (maximum)

TBD Curb-to-Curb

New development west of the Pickering GO Station Parking StrucBayly Street ture will be setback 15 metres from the curb to create a consistent streetwall matching the parking structure. This large setback should be used for special streetscaping and plaza space, consisting of visual and pedestrian amenities including an additional rows of trees, benches and planters cafes and spill-out areas. Exact dimensions may be modified according to future road and development plans.

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PRECINCT-SPECIFIC POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS a) Floorspace Index and residential densities shall be consistent with the ranges specified in Table 7.1 of this document. b) Notwithstanding the above policy, new development shall gradually transition in height to meet a 3 -4 storey maximum on Bayly Street. New development will be subject to maximum heights as illustrated in Figure 6.3 and shall have regard for the Transition & Massing Guidelines as outlined in subsection 6.2.3 of this document. c) Development in South Downtown will be subject to the population target maximums and phasing requirements as outlined in the Implementation section of this document. d) The City, in consultation with the TRCA and landowners, will prepare a park plan for the rehabilitation of Krosno Creek and adjacent parkland. The parkland within the floodplain will provide passive green space for the residents and include features such as seating and walking paths. Accessory uses, such as a community centre are permitted as long as they are situated outside the floodplain boundaries.

f) As redevelopment occurs, a new urban square shall be integrated within this precinct. The location for this square, illustrated as “The Piazza” in Figure 7.5, is conceptual. The square shall be publicly accessible, fronting a public street, and will feature small-scale active and passive uses, including public art, seating areas or a water feature. g) In accordance with the Durham District School Board requirements, space will be reserved to accommodate a new public school to serve new residents in South Downtown. Efforts will be made to develop the school as a compact, urban school with shared facilities where possible. h) A new community or recreation centre will be developed to serve new South Downtown residents. This will be located on or adjacent to other public amenities, such as Krosno Creek Park. Shared accommodation with an adjacent residential building will be explored. i) In determining parking amounts for new development, alternate parking standards shall be considered for parcels in proximity to the GO Station and future Bayly LRT route.

e) The minimum aggregate target for park or public open space in South Downtown is 1.4 hectares.

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j) The development of South Downtown including new streets, park design and Creek crossings will be subject to the following: • T ransportation Studies that assess and demonstrate the transportation and mobility improvements required to support development, the phasing of these improvements in order that the longer term potential for the urbanization of the Precinct is not precluded, the costing and proposal for cost sharing of capital costs, and the location of signalized crossings and other traffic calming measures to support a safe environment for pedestrians. • A  Functional Flood Plain Analysis Study that identifies existing flood risk for the property for all events up to the Regional Storm Event, based on TRCA`s hydrologic and hydraulic information, and the preparation of a conceptual flood mitigation plan to manipulate the valley system and/or flood line in order to contain the Regional Flood.


k) Given the importance of pedestrian and cycling access to the GO Train Station, the redevelopment of any properties fronting Bayly Street shall require the dedication of land for future road widening which shall accommodate a safe, dedicated pedestrian and cycling pathway, the exact dimensions of which shall be determined in future road realignment cross-sections. l) C  onsistent with Figure 6.3 buildings fronting Bayly shall not exceed 5 storeys in height. Where taller portions of buildings are located away from Bayly Street to respect this height maximum, the taller portion of buildings will consider their shadowing impact on parks and open spaces. m) The City will work with the Regional Transportation Staff to increase pedestrian safety to the Pickering GO Station across Bayly Street from adjacent neighbourhoods. This may include additional signalized crossings, crosswalks, reduced speed limits, and other traffic calming measures. n) The setbacks of new development along Bayly Street and public realm improvements (to be guided by the cross-sections presented in Figures 7.6 & 7.7) are intended to ensure the north side of Bayly Street is a pedestrianfriendly environment.

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7.5 Pickering Town Centre

Pickering Town Centre will be the commercial, entertainment, and employment centre of the Downtown, connected by a system of streets and pedestrian walkways, and anchored by a new transit hub at the entryway to the Highway 401 pedestrian bridge. New restaurants, offices, and retail will frame existing and new streets, with Pickering Parkway transformed from a downtown relief street to a complete street for all modes of transportation. New development along the 401 corridor will consist of landmark buildings displaying design excellence in order to create a truly remarkable gateway to the downtown.

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LAND USE DESIGNATION Downtown Mixed-Use Enhanced Pedestrian Connection

ool

p Liver

Road

Enhanced Pedestrian Connection

Pickering Town Centre Expanded Retail

BUILDING HEIGHTS 3-19 Storeys

Structured Parking

New

Pedestrian Bridge Transit Plaza

Landmark Building

BUILDING TYPES Mid-Rise Point Towers

New Office

Development Pickerin

g

Parkwa

y

HWY 4 01

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Figure 7.8: The Pickering Town Centre precinct

ad

on st ng

Ro

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Festival Market Plaza Pickering Town Centre

Retail expansion Defines Glenanna Road Glenanna Road

Pedestrian promenade through the Pickering Town Centre property

th

Sou

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Str de

Retail and parking expansion of the mall

New open spaces at

New mixed-use development

Liverpool Road

mall entrances

Pickering Town Centre Way

GO Parking Structure

Transit Hub North 148 DOWNTOWN PICKERING

P

ing

er ick

Landmark Office, Institutional or Civic Centre Buildings

ay kw

Par

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Pickering Parkway Transit Way


Key Places in Pickering Town Centre

Pickering Town Centre will remain the focus for retail and employment in the downtown, expanding outward over time to infill sites along Kingston Road and Pickering Parkway. Over time, the Centre’s drive aisles will be designed and serve as publicly accessible streets fronted by buildings and structures. An internal pathway system will align with adjacent public and publicly accessible streets, serving as an “indoor”extension of the Downtown’s mobility network.

In addition to dedicated pathways and sidewalks, landscaping, greening, and pervious pavement treatments will transform the Pickering Town Centre’s periphery into an inviting and comfortable place for pedestrians. At mall entry-ways, landscaped squares and plazas with places to sit will contribute to the downtown’s public realm network. Pickering Parkway is transformed into the Pickering Transit Priority Street, with the potential to carry the future Durham LRT line through downtown, passing by the transit hub. Though primarily designed to carry LRTs, the transit-way is a complete street providing a generous right-of-way for pedestrians and limited lanes for vehicular transit.

When Pickering Parkway transitions into a transit-priority street, the southern portion of the Pickering Town Centre road system will become Pickering Town Centre Way, a complete street, similar in character to the portion of Pickering Parkway east of Glenanna Road, as illustrated in Figure 5.16. Overtime, the introduction of new landmark office & institutional uses will be located between Pickering Parkway Transit Way and Pickering Town Centre Road. Visible from Highway 401, these developments will create a striking sky-line for those travelling to or through the downtown. Given proximity to transit, civic amenities and a walkable environment to retail and restaurants, this is also a desirable location for a new downtown Hotel & Convention Centre. June 2013

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The Festival Market Plaza, located in the Northeast quadrant of the Precinct, will be a unique, flexible, multi-season space. Landscaped with linear trees, the space will provide parking during mall hours, but provide a functional space for the Pickering Farmers’ Market and other civic events. Transit Hub North, located at the interchange of Pickering Parkway and the Highway 401 Pedestrian bridge, will be a safe, inviting and interesting open space. Bus bays and transit infrastructure will be integrated into a larger square that provides amenities for commuters and the community. Adjacent development will be oriented toward this space with ground floor uses that activate the space. 150 DOWNTOWN PICKERING

In the near term, before the build out of the Town Centre and construction of the publicly accessible ring-road, a continuous, Pedestrian Promenade will connect pedestrians between the intersection of Kingston and Liverpool and the Transit Hub. The pedestrian-way will be clearly delineated and protected on one or two sides with plantings or swales and distinct pavement treatments. The western edge of Glenanna Road will be filled to create a western street wall that corresponds with the vision described in the Valley Farm Neighbourhoods Precinct plan. This

A VISION FOR INTENSIFICATION AND FRAMEWORK FOR INVESTMENT

will be a pedestrian promenade with a generous public realm, including parkettes, sidewalk patios, and ample public furniture.


PRECINCT-SPECIFIC POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS a) Floorspace Index and residential densities shall be consistent with the ranges specified in Table 7.1 of this document. b) The minimum aggregate target for publicly accessible squares and/or plazas in Pickering Town Centre precinct is 0.8 hectares. c) The City will work with Durham Regional Transit, GO, and Metrolinx to formulate a design for the Transit Hub. The transit hub area should be planned and designed to be approximately 0.5 hectares in size. The site design will consider seating, landscaping, public art, kiosks, and amenities. Adjacent architecture should be designed to frame the hub, with entrances oriented towards it. d) For the area indicated in Figure 4.1 as the Festival Plaza, the City will work with the operators of Pickering Town Centre to implement special paving treatments and landscaping. This treatment shall not impede upon parking uses for the mall, and will serve as a space for outdoor events. It will consist of electrical outlets and other infrastructure to support public gatherings. The Parking Strategy will consider this use and protect for the multiple uses of this site.

e) The City shall work with the operators of Pickering Town Centre to enact public realm improvements in the current parking lots. These will include: dedicated areas for pedestrian pathways (as illustrated in Figure 7.8 of this Framework), and the activation of mall edges through artwork and murals. f) The City will work with the operators of Pickering Town Centre to reduce surface parking and parking ratios on-site and consider opportunities for shared parking facilities. Parking minimums shall have regard for the proximity of these lands to the Transit Hub.

i) Interim strategies to implement proposed new streets as drive aisles will be considered, but as part of major redevelopment occurs, drive aisles will not be permitted. j) Development shall address ongoing challenges with stormwater management on the site and implement measures to increase on-site infiltration while recognizing that flood protection, including flood protection measures on ground and lower levels may be required on south side of the site.

g) The siting and placement of retail pad development shall be permitted so long as buildings are situated to edge of existing streets, sited to not preclude future redevelopment and to not obstruct designated pedestrian pathways as indicated on Figure 7.8. New pad development shall be designed with two functional storeys. h) Development situated adjacent to a pedestrian pathway shall address this right-ofway, consist of 70% glazing and feature active uses at grade, consistent with the policies of this Framework.

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7.6 West Downtown

As the western edge of the downtown, nestled between Pine Creek and the core, West Downtown will become a highly desirable mixed use community. With significant redevelopment potential at both the north and south end of the Precinct, West Downtown provides opportunities for landmark developments, such as a convention centre, hotel, or prestige office space. The Precinct will be primarily commercial and retail, with opportunities for mixed-use and residential developments as well as new public spaces and improved public realm along Liverpool Road and Kingston Road. The introduction of finer grain street network will allow easier flow into the downtown, as well as opportunities for new public transit connections.

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LAND USE DESIGNATION Downtown Mixed-Use Downtown Open Space Liverpool Multi-use Path

New Landmark Building

New Convention Space Pine Creek

Neighbourhood Park

Re-developed Large Format Retail

Pedestrian Promenade

BUILDING HEIGHTS 6 - 20+ Storeys

BUILDING TYPES Stacked Towns

Low-Rise Residential

Low-Rise Mid-Rise Point Towers

rpo

ol Roa d

Mixed-use Block

Live

Landmark

ton Kings

Road

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Figure 7.9: the West Downtown precinct

AD RO KINGSTON

Mid-Rise Residential

ROAD LIVERPOOL

Street-oriented urban format Grocery Store

AY RKW A P

West Downtown Park

PICKERING

Pickering Parkway Transit-Way Extension

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Potential Hotel & Convention Centre

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Key Places in West Downtown

As the current Loblaws site transitions over time, retail will be re-located to front Kingston Road, with new mid-rise residential buildings located on other development parcels. West Downtown will be home to a new residential community consisting of a variety of housing types, in close proximity to transit and services. Pickering Parkway Transit-Way will extend across Liverpool Road and across a new bridge over Krosno Creek to link with Maple Street. This new east-west connection will contribute to relieving traffic on Kingston Road and provide a vital connection to the rest of the downtown.

A green, complete street, the Pickering Parkway Transit-Way will be the northern edge of a new West Downtown Park a neighbourhood park with small-scale active uses, such as a community playground, splash pad and waterfeature, and consist of a mix of hard and softscaping, providing West Downtown employees residents and visitors places to gather, rest, and play.

A hotel & convention centre will potentially be located on the south portion of the Precinct’s lands. It will be a new destination in the downtown and a focal point of this Precinct. As a gateway building to the downtown, it will be a distinct design, equally as striking as viewed from Highway 401 and from within West Downtown. The hotel & convention centre will front a new local street, connected with other new components of Downtown’s street and block network. The hotel & convention centre will be urban in character, situated at the street’s edge and integrating a visually interesting public realm into its site plan.

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A rehabilitated Pine Creek will be a natural amenity, with enhanced views from adjacent development and public trails and access points.

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PRECINCT-SPECIFIC POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS a) Floorspace Index and residential densities shall be consistent with the ranges specified in Table 7.1 of this document. b) The minimum aggregate target for park or public open space in West Downtown precinct is 0.4 hectares. c) The City shall continue to seek opportunities to locate a Hotel & Convention Centre in Downtown Pickering. The Centre shall front a Local Street, or publicly-accessible private lane, and be situated at the streets edge. Structured parking will be encouraged, and be located along with loading facilities to the rear of the building. d) The City in consultation with the land owners and Toronto and Region Conservation Authority, will prepare a plan to rehabilitate Pine Creek and enhance the open space. The design, alignment, and construction of a transit, pedestrian, or vehicular bridge across Pine Creek shall be consistent with the regulations and design review process as outlined by the Municipal Class EA process.

e) As redevelopment occurs, a new urban park shall be integrated within this precinct. It shall front the Pickering Transit-Way or a Downtown Street and be buffered from Liverpool or Kingston Road by adjacent development. The new park shall consist of small-scale active uses and its design and function will respond to the character of surrounding built form and land uses. f) The development of West Downtown, including new streets, park design and Creek crossings will be subject to the Transportation Stud(ies) that assesses and demonstrates the transportation and mobility improvements required to support development, the phasing of these improvements in order that the longer term potential for the urbanization of the Precinct is not precluded, the costing and proposal for cost sharing of capital costs.

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The vision for the downtown illustrated in Section 3 of this Framework is bold and vastly different than what exists in Downtown Pickering today. Achieving this transformation will be a gradual process and beyond the 2031 time frame to be planned for under the Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe. This chapter identifies the areas recognized as appropriate for growth and investment in the next 10-20 years, and policies to achieve conformity with the Growth Plan. In this chapter you will find: Section 8.1 “Growth to 2031”

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Growth to 2031

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8.1 Growth to 2031

As indicated in Section 1 of this Framework, a key objective of this study is to achieve the City of Pickering’s Growth Plan conformity to accommodate a population and employment target of a minimum of 200 people and jobs combined per hectare. To retain a balance of opportunities for people living and working in Downtown Pickering and achieve this growth target will require an additional population of approximately 8,300 people and 8,700 jobs by 2031.

order transit service and that will enhance the vibrancy and vitality of the downtown by introducing more people working and living.

Within the downtown, there are logical places to focus growth over the next 20 years. Figure 8.1, potential areas for growth by 2031, illustrates anticipated and preferred growth to 2031 that will meet the minimum growth targets in the Plan. These include places where there is active interest in comprehensive redevelopment, that are close to existing and planned higher

1) They place people and jobs in close proximity to higher order transit.

Figure 8.1 illustrates preferred locations for new growth by 2031. These include portions of South Downtown that are closest to the GO station, the intersection of Kingston & Liverpool Road, infill adjacent to Esplanade Park and areas around the new Transit Hub. These have been selected for the following reasons:

2) They are largely vacant or underutilized areas, consisting of non-residential uses, that are appropriate for major redevelopment. 3) They provide opportunities to distribute growth across the downtown and the potential to act as catalysts for the redevelopment and intensification of the rest of the downtown.

Figure 8.1: Potential areas for Growth by 2031 160 DOWNTOWN PICKERING

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ROAD VALLEY FARM

VALLEY PLENTIFUL COMMUNITY GARDEN

GLENGROVE PUBLIC SCHOOL

GLENGROVE PARK

DIANA PRINCESS OF WALES PARK

A ROAD

GLENANN

N

O ST

AD RO

PICKERING RECREATION COMPLEX

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THE ESPLANADE PARK

PICKERING CIVIC COMPLEX

VILLAGE EAST PARK PICKERING PUBLIC LIBRARY PICKERING TOWN CENTRE

LIVERPOOL ROAD

01

Y4 WA

H HIG

PICKERING STATION GO TRANSIT

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POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS a) In order to achieve a balance of opportunities to live and work in the downtown, the City will plan to achieve a resident/job ratio of 1:1. b)The population and employment growth target for Downtown Pickering to 2031 will be a minimum of: Population 8,300 Jobs

8,700

c) To ensure growth supports, enlivens and enhances all portions of the downtown, new residential development in South Downtown shall not be permitted beyond 6,300 people or 3,400 units by 2031 until at least 2,000 people or 1,100 units have been accommodated through development in the North Downtown (as measured through approved development applications). Notwithstanding these growth targets, development in the South Downtown will be subject to transportation and storm water management studies that identify any infrastructure improvements necessary to accommodate growth.

e) Figure 8.1 indicates the preferred areas for development to accommodate growth in the downtown by 2031. They shall be regarded for the purposes of infrastructure and capital planning as the City’s preferred areas for growth to 2031 but shall not preclude new development elsewhere in the downtown. f) Consistent with the Policy Recommendation e), strategic capital projects listed in subsection 9.3 of this Framework shall be considered priority areas for investment. g) Recognizing the downtown as the urban core of the City with excellent access to higher order transit, the City will work with partners and consider strategies and tools to advance employment growth in the Downtown.

d) City planning staff will monitor residential units and population in the downtown against these targets on an annual basis.

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This document is the next step in creating an exceptional downtown. The City will work in collaboration with residents, developers, the Region of Durham, the Province, and other agencies to implement the vision in this Framework. This section outlines the necessary next steps, follow-up studies to be conducted, and a list of strategic capital projects that will be catalysts for downtown development. This chapter contains: Section 9.1 Implementation, outlining a number of mechanisms with which the content of this document will be realized.  uture Studies, specific projects and documents required to explore this document’s Section 9.2 F vision and recommendations in more detail. Section 9.3 S  trategic Capital Projects, priority capital and public realm enhancements that should be considered as a priority for public and private investment and acquisition efforts.

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IMPLEMENTATION

9

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9.1 Implementation

Promoting Downtown The City will work with the Region of Durham, Ministries at the Province, and Ajax/Pickering Board of Trade to promote Downtown Pickering as a City and Regional population and employment centre. The City’s marketing & business development section and Office of the Mayor will continue to actively seek anchors for new landmark developments such as a Hotel & Convention Centre, Arts Centre, and Major Employers.

Downtown Pickering Zoning By-Law An amended zoning by-law will be an essential component to implementing the vision of this Framework. As a distinct, urban place, a new approach to zoning will be required consisting of elements of form-based or performancebased zoning. However, the City is encouraged to utilize components of these alternate zoning types in a way that fits easily within the existing City’s parent by-law, and that strikes the correct balance between co-ordinated implementation and flexibility. The new zoning by-law should: • Emphasise design excellence; •P  ermit a wide range of urban land uses and encourage vertical and horizontal mix of uses;

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•C  ontain built form regulations with a focus on the ground level of buildings and effects of development on the public realm (including build-to lines, frontage & glazing provisions, and building envelopes); • Introduce alternative parking standards; •C  onsider a distinct approach for Pickering Town Centre, introducing performance standards rather than overly-prescriptive regulations.

Holding By-Laws The City may enact a By-Law to apply a Holding Symbol on lands where the intended use as designated in this document or future Zoning Bylaw is considered premature until one or more of the following services or facilities have been provided: • t he necessary sanitary water and stormwater services; • t he necessary transportation facilities; • t he necessary community facilities and public infrastructure; • c ertain studies as indicated in the PrecinctSpecific Policy Recommendations in this document.

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Design Review Urban development of the complexity and scale anticipated in the downtown requires a commitment to design excellence. To this end, the City of Pickering should consider establishing a design review panel for all new development proposals within the downtown, or for indicated landmark development sites such as lands in the Civic Precinct, MTO Lands located at the northwest corner of Liverpool Road and the Highway 401 off-ramp, and Kingston-Liverpool Gateway. Many municipalities in the GTA and Canada including the City of Toronto and City of Vaughan have begun implementing panels that consist of a number of invited experts in architecture and urban design to provide an independent view on design proposals and recommendations on design revisions to plans.


Stormwater Management

Bonusing

Opportunities for on-site stormwater management best practices shall be pursued. Should on-site solutions not be feasible the City may consider in-lieu payment. These funds should be utilized for storm management improvements within the Precinct or within Downtown Pickering, at the discretion of the City.

Where proposed heights or densities are above the permitted maximums outlined in the Official Plan Amendment, the City may pass a zoning by-law amendment to allow for the receipt of community benefits in exchange for the higher building or increased residential density as outlined under Section 37 of the Planning Act and in accordance with the provisions of the Official Plan. Priority will be given to projects listed as Strategic Capital Projects outlines in Subsection 9.3 of this document.

Community Improvement Plan The City, may consider designating Downtown Pickering or sections within a Community Improvement Area under Section 28 of the Planning Act or as part of the Region’s Community Improvement Plan (CIP) program instated under ROPA 125. As a CIP area, the City could be granted permissions regarding the acquisition, selling, and upgrading of lands to expedite development in Downtown.

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9.2 Future Studies

Parking Strategy The City will conduct a parking strategy with the objective to explore options to transition from predominantly surface parking to more urban development standards. Objectives of this strategy will include: • Increasing the opportunity for on-street parking; •A  plan to introduce structured and/or shared parking in a phased manner; •O  ver time, reducing parking standards in general, and in particular for development in close proximity to transit routes;

South Downtown Transportation Study A South Downtown Transportation Study will be conducted to identify the necessary transportation system required to accommodate the significant new residential and employment population. The study will identify capacity of the existing transportation network, the impacts of proposed development, identify benchmarks for new road infrastructure, and the location and alignment of these roads. The study will use the proposed roads illustrated in Figure 5.1 of this Framework when determining future alignments.

• T he consideration of transitioning from parking minimums to parking maximums; • L imiting the maximum surface area coverage of parking (i.e. 20% of site) either in all of the downtown or transit-heavy areas such as stations or the transit hub; • T he incorporation of Stormwater & Sustainability standards into parking design; •A  development levy or cash-in-lieu policy to help finance parking structures.

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Downtown Streetscape Strategy The City will develop a detailed streetscape strategy for Major Streets, Pedestrian Streets and Special Character Streets. These will consider: •A  reas appropriate for outdoor patios; •O  ptimal location of expanded furnishing zones and other enhanced public areas; • T he locating of utility structures to areas that do not compromise pedestrian rights-of-way and that are the least obtrusive to the public realm; • T he installation of public art; •A  ttractive and coordinated lighting.


9.3 Strategic Capital Projects Street Improvements

Parks and Open Spaces

The Avenues

West Downtown

The Avenues

Kingston Road pedestrian realm improvements including a continuous sidewalk system and relocation of utility corridor.

Pickering Parkway extension across Pine Creek including pedestrian and landscaping improvements.

Liverpool-Kingston Gateway Public Realm Improvements including special paving treatment, plantings, and welcome signage.

Liverpool Road Re-Alignment including multi-use trail and pedestrian realm improvements.

Rapid Transit Stop Waiting Area Enhancements. Pickering Town Centre

Valley Farm Neighbourhoods

Pickering Parkway Streetscape Enhancements including widened pedestrian realm.

Glenanna Road pedestrian realm improvements including widened sidewalk and improved furnishing zone.

Construction of Pickering Town Centre Way including dedicated pedestrian zone and landscaped buffer.

Valley Farm Road pedestrian realm improvements including wider sidewalk and landscaped boulevard.

Civic Centre

South Downtown

Esplanade Street South Streetscape Enhancements and roadway extension to meet Princess of Wales Park.

South Downtown Main Street Pedestrian Realm & Beautification Plan including wide sidewalks and furnishing zones to include parkettes and public seating.

South Downtown Krosno Creek Park Rehabilitation & Trail Network. A 1.1 hectare park including a pedestrian trail on the eastern edge of the park.

West Downtown Pine Creek Environmental Improvements including pedestrian access points.

Pickering Town Centre Transit Hub Public Realm Improvements including landscaping, public seating and cycling infrastructure. Pedestrian Promenade installation including landscaping, buffer zone, and seating.

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Festival Market Plaza special surface treatments including installation of electricity outlets and plantings.

Downtown Landmarks

New Streets

Two new junior, middle, or senior schools to accommodate new Downtown population.

South Downtown Main Street, a continuous eastwest street providing vehicular, pedestrian, and cycling connections from Krosno Creek to Brock Road.

Civic Centre

A new hotel and convention centre, to be located in a prominent location.

Multi-Season Public Square design and installation, including a major four- season water feature.

A Regional Arts Centre containing a 500 - 1,000 seat auditorium, arts offices, event space, and multi-purpose rooms.

Enhanced Diana Princess of Wales Educational Food & Learning Garden.

A Seniors’ Centre, capable of hosting athletic and cultural programming, meeting space, and community events.

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Kingston-Bayly Connector, a northwest street including an overpass atop Highway 401 connecting Bayly Street to Kingston Road, preferably aligned along the western edge of the Hydro Corridor. Pedestrian & cycling bridge across Highway 401 connecting Sandy Beach Road to Valley Farm Road.


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This chapter contains: Appendix A Z  oning Strategy, a review and analysis of different types of Zoning By-Laws, and recommendations for how the City can best implement the vision and framework presented in this document.

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APPENDICES

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Zoning Strategy In their original form, Zoning By-Laws—the regulatory tool that transforms planning goals and objectives into site-specific land use permissions and regulations—were a response to the issues of early city-building. They ensured incompatible uses were separated from one another, and meant to mitigate negative impacts of new development, such as shadowing, separation distance, and over-crowding. Traditional (or Euclidean) Zoning By-Laws have been the dominant form of zoning in Canada and the US in the 20 and 21st centuries. Today, municipal governments are re-thinking the way they regulate development. It is widely recognized that traditional zoning’s focus on use and density rather than form and performance are not sufficient enough in design direction to advance contemporary planning goals in complex urban environments such as compact, transit-oriented, mixed-use communities. To understand how to best implement the vision of this document, different types of Zoning By-Laws were reviewed in order to provide recommendations to the City of Pickering regarding what to consider when developing a new Zoning By-Law to implement the downtown vision.

Key Components of a new Zoning By-Law

Pickering’s Existing Zoning By-Law

This framework envisions Downtown Pickering as a vibrant, predominantly high density mixed use centre, providing a variety of mobility options through a pedestrian-oriented street and block network. Of the utmost importance is creating an exceptional public realm and pedestrian experience. The design and orientation of buildings must accommodate significant growth and achieve design excellence while contributing to creating safe, interesting, and lively streets. The following outlines the components the new Zoning By-Law must address.

Downtown Pickering is currently subject to two Zoning By-laws: The lands north of Highway 401 are subject to Zoning By-Law 2511, approved by Council in 1965, and the lands south of Highway 401 are subject to Zoning By-Law 3036, approved by council in 1960. Both have been consolidated with amendments and are several volumes large, consisting mostly of freestanding, text, and schedule amendments following a traditional Euclidean model, with newer By-law amendments containing Build-to zones which are assigned on an amendment-by-amendment basis – but not co-ordinated at a district wide level.

Built form and Urban Design including the massing of new, medium and high density development with a pedestrian-friendly street wall including animated ground floors. Land Use, indicating the type of land use appropriate for different areas of the downtown. Parking , including regulations to ensure parking placement will be managed to have as little impact on the public realm. Mobility concerns, ensuring the siting of new development facilitate mobility with a hierarchy of pedestrian, cycling, and vehicular movement. Open Space, ensuring the correct balance of compact development and open space relief is achieved.

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Types of Zoning The following is a summary of four predominant types of Zoning By-Laws including a brief summary of their strengths and weaknesses, as well as where they have been used. Traditional (Euclidian) Zoning The Euclidian Zoning By-law was the first standardized, widely used Zoning By-Law model. Its structure is what most municipalities’ ByLaws are based upon, including the City of Pickering’s. Traditional/Euclidian zoning by-laws were created with the objective of separating incompatible uses and therefore designed with a focus on land use permissions and separation distances. Zones are divided by use, and can include a maximum height or Floor Space Index (FSI) assigned by use category or as a separate overlay. Each zone contains a list of specific permitted uses, as well as metrics regarding the building form, such as FSI, maximum heights, minimum parcel size, minimum lot frontage, maximum gross floor areas, and front, rear, and side setbacks. Euclidean zoning by-laws traditionally contain minimum parking standards, assigned per unit in residential zones, and by floor area in non-residential zones. Traditional Zoning By-Laws continue to be used by the majority of municipalities because they are the most familiar to City Planning

departments. However, critics of traditional zoning by-laws state that although they regulate use and density, they do not provide appropriate design direction. Additionally, in areas where mixed-uses are desired, a system designed around land use categories can be counterproductive. Form-Based Codes Form-based Codes have emerged over the past decades in response to the perceived shortcomings of traditional Zoning By-Laws. Form-based codes, as the name indicates, are focused on form rather than use, providing much more detail in regard to design performance, including building envelopes, build-to zones, and at-grade requirements including materiality, glazing, and design detail. Form-based codes permit a wide variety of uses – often under more general categories than a traditional zoning bylaw, or may only provide uses not permitted. Form-based codes tend to “zone” by place-type, rather than land use. At the district scale this can be by street-type (i.e. Avenue, Local Street, Laneway) or by character areas that are meant to consist of a common design language. Form-based codes have been implemented in urbanizing areas similar to Downtown Pickering. Downtown Kendall in Miami-Dade County, a suburb of Miami, was focused around a regional shopping centre much like Downtown Pickering, and received two new

higher-order transit stations in the mid-90s. To support higher-density development to leverage investment in the transit areas, high density zoning permissions were granted as-of-right surrounding these stations. To co-ordinate new high density development, the local government initiated a district-plan and new zoning code, entitled the Downtown Kendall Urban Centre District Zoning Ordinance1 . With existing high density allowances, the intent of the new plan and code was to co-ordinate development so it creates new vehicular and pedestrian ways, new open spaces, and urban form development that addressed these open spaces. The zoning code purposefully avoided using FSIs, instead regulating massing by number of stories. The ordinance has been considered a great success by the county, and by 2004, more than 3,000 residential units had been constructed in the study area.2 Performance-Based Performance-Based Zoning is similar to FormBased Zoning in that it is not organized centrally around use permissions, however rather than leading by design and character, it is led by performance standards such as requirements for traffic flow, density, noise, and access to light or air. Performance-based zoning is most 1 The Zoning Code can be viewed online here: http://library.municode.com/HTML/10620/level3/PTIIICOOR_CH33ZO_ARTXXXIII_I_ DOKEURCEDI.html#TOPTITLE 2 Dunham Jones, E. & June Williamosn. Retrofitting Suburbia: Urban Design Solutions for Redesigning Suburbs. Updated Edition, 2011. John Wiley & Sons. P. 193 June 2013

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typically used in areas where the objective is regeneration. It is the most flexible type of zoning-code and can take on many variations. One of the most well-known and successful instances of performance based zoning is “The Kings” in Downtown Toronto, referring to two former manufacturing areas in Downtown Toronto—the areas around the King & Spadina and King & Parliament intersections—which by the late 80s had experienced major decline. In the late 1990s, the existing Zoning By-Law for the area which permitted Industrial and Manufacturing uses was repealed and in place was a “Regeneration Area” designation that permitted almost all uses (except for heavy industry, and development with negative impacts on the public realm, such as auto dealerships and restaurant drive-thrus). The King’s Regeneration Area designation is widely understood as a success in relaxing regulation to permit development activity, with great development activity in these areas since the implementation of the new zoning by-law.

To Zone requirements (not typical of traditional by-laws), while Mississauga’s new zoning by-law amendment to implement Downtown21 employs much more detailed development standards and regulations such as build-to zones, and ground floor glazing requirements, than in a traditional Euclidean by-law. Using elements of different zoning code types means that a municipality’s zoning by-law can best respond to the needs of the specific district, but work within their existing system should they wish to not completely “overhaul” their existing by-law.

Hybrid Many municipalities do not adhere to a single zoning model as outlined in this document, but borrow elements from traditional, form-based, and performance based codes. The City of Pickering has already done this by utilizing Build-

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Considerations Some local circumstances should be considered when determining the best approach to regulating development in Pickering: The Local Planning Environment The planning framework within Ontario is different than in the United States and rest of Canada. Most importantly, it needs to be considered that we have an Ontario Municipal Board. This dictates a planning approvals process which is collaborative in process, often consisting of many meetings, rather than a single stamp of approval. When developing a By-Law with increased performance standards, it must facilitate this process, be clear and defensible, as well as provide flexibility to ensure development meets urban design objectives but also meets development-specific needs and functions. Different approaches for different ownership parcels Elements of the form-based code in Florida, such as exact location and placement of streets and designated zones for open spaces might only be appropriate for smaller, individual lots, whereas a large parcel of land might require looser permissions to be master planned. In this case, performance criteria might be better suited.


The zoning by-law should not prescribe a particular architectural style or vernacular Many form-based codes are developed in heritage district or areas trying to maintain a certain character. Pickering does not have these constraints, and while the code should inform placement, it should not promote an inauthentic neo-classical building form and should promote innovative, contemporary and excellence in design.

Final Recommendations The following recommendations for a zoning structure are based on our analysis of zoning bylaw models, review of Pickering’s current Zoning By-Laws, and our experience working in the GTA, Canada and the United States. It is recommended that the City produces a Schedule Amendment and a Freestanding Amendment, providing a comprehensive bylaw regulating development in North & South Downtown. The By-Law Amendment should be a “Hybrid” Zoning By-Law, consisting of traditional zoning elements and form-based elements. The By-Law should build on Precincts and their character objectives to derive distinct form-based language and direction, utilizing the precincts as zoning categories instead of land use districts. Specific controls the zoning by-law should feature include removing as-of-right density metrics such as FSI and in place, providing controls regarding building envelopes, setbacks and stepbacks, mandatory heights, sensitive transition (angular planes, etc), build-to lines, and pedestrian infrastructure. The zoning bylaw should allow for integrated uses and list restricted uses.

The New Zoning By-Law must be flexible, while ensuring design objectives are met to ensure overly prescriptive design direction does not prohibit short term investment on existing parcels, even when the proposed development meets downtown objectives. The zoning by-law should allow for change over time through provisions for applicants to demonstrate alternative means of achieving objectives overtime, such as phased development to reduce parking overtime. The New Zoning Code should recognize Downtown Pickering’s role as a mobility hub and introduce alternative parking standards such as parking maximums rather than minimums, car sharing equivalents in lieu of private parking spots, shared parking (off site and between uses), bicycle parking and infrastructure, and conditions to require structured or underground parking.

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