Page 1

   

 

THE STATUS OF RURAL TEXAS, 2010      

         

Texas Department of Rural Affairs  Charles S. (Charlie) Stone, Executive Director 


WWW.TDRA.TEXAS.GOV

TDRA GOVERNING BOARD

1700 N. Congress Avenue, Suite 220 Austin, Texas 78701 P: 512-936-6701/800-544-2042 F: 512-936-6776

Dr. Wallace Klussmann, Chair David Alders, Vice Chair Dr. Mackie Bobo White, Secretary Agriculture Commissioner Todd Staples Remelle Farrar Dora G. Alcalà Dr. Charles Graham Woody Anderson Bryan K. Tucker Charles N. Butts Patrick Wallace Charles S. (Charlie) Stone Executive Director

MISSION:

To enhance the quality of life for rural Texans.

GOVERNOR RICK PERRY

December 31, 2010    The Honorable Rick Perry   Governor, State of Texas   

The Honorable Joe Straus  Speaker of the House of Representatives, State of Texas    The Honorable Members  81st Legislature 

The Honorable David Dewhurst   Lieutenant Governor, State of Texas    The Texas Department of Rural Affairs (TDRA) is required by Section 487.051, Government Code, to “compile an  annual report describing and evaluating the condition of rural communities.” The following report is offered in  fulfillment of this requirement. The Status of Rural Texas provides a snapshot of where rural Texas stands today  and  speaks  to  the  broad  spectrum  of  challenges  and  opportunities  being  experienced  by  rural  communities  across Texas.    Rural  Texas  is  important  for  many  reasons,  but  especially  because  of  the  sheer  number  of  Texans  living  and  working in rural areas of the state. Texas’ rural population (which was 3,347,316 persons according to January  1, 2010 estimates) exceeds the population of 22 individual states and is greater than the combined populations  of Alaska, North Dakota, Vermont, Wyoming, and the District of Columbia.    Each  rural  community  contributes  significantly  to  the  people  of  the  state  of  Texas  and  Texas’  economy.  In  addition to offering a vast array of tourism and recreational opportunities, rural Texas is the primary source of  agricultural products, livestock, water, and mineral wealth that enhance the vitality of the Texas economy.    In every sense of the word, rural communities are partners in the past, present, and future successes of Texas.  Indeed, the viability of rural Texas is critical to the viability of Texas as a state. And because rural, suburban, and  urban areas of Texas are inextricably linked, successes in rural Texas are successes for all Texans.    It is our hope that this ninth report on the status of rural Texas will contribute to the ongoing dialogue that is  shaping  Texas’  future.  The  report  highlights  some  of  the  complex  and  diverse  issues  affecting  rural  Texas.  At  TDRA, we will continue to monitor developments with all interested parties to maintain an objective focus on  the status of life in rural communities.    Thank you on behalf of the TDRA Governing Board and the staff of the agency for the opportunity to contribute  to the future of our rural communities.    Respectfully submitted,   

Charles S. (Charlie) Stone  Executive Director       


THE STATUS OF RURAL TEXAS, 2010 This report contains statistics and data relating to rural Texas, including:    Population    • July 1, 2009 and January 1, 2010 estimates of rural Texas’ population  • July 1, 2009 estimates of the age of Texas’ rural population    • 2009 estimates for the race and ethnicity of rural Texas’ population  • Population projections for rural Texas by race/ethnicity (2000‐2040)  • Migration to and from rural Texas (1980‐2000)  • Fast growth areas in rural Texas from 2000 to 2008  • Cities, towns, and villages that have lost population since 2000    • New cities, towns, and villages created since 2000        Healthcare  • Rural and urban distribution of physicians by specialty (2009)    • Rural Texans without health insurance (2008)  • Physicians in rural Texas, 2008 and 2010           Economy  • Updated per capita income and earnings per job (2007‐2008)    • Rural employment change (2008‐2009)          • Updated rural unemployment rates (2009 annual averages)    • Updated poverty rate estimates for 2009        • Entrepreneurship indicators (2006)  • Small businesses in rural Texas (2006 and 2008)        • A focus on the farm: An in‐depth look at agriculture        Housing  • New Census estimates for rural housing units (2009)      • Survey on the local perception of housing needs (2006)  • Public housing authorities in rural Texas (2010)         

   

New New  New 

 

New New 

New

New

     

New New  New  New 

 

New New 

New

New


This page is intentionally left blank.


THE STATUS OF RURAL TEXAS, 2010

Rural and urban counties in Texas In  this  report,  a  “rural  county”  is  a  county  that  is  outside  of  a  Metropolitan  Statistical  Area  (or  nonmetropolitan) under the 1993 U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) classification scheme  for  counties.  An  “urban  county”  is  a  county  that  is  part  of  a  Metropolitan  Statistical  Area  (or  metropolitan) under the 1993 OMB classification scheme for counties.   

Legend     Rural (196 counties)      Urban (58 counties) 

Page | 4


THE STATUS OF RURAL TEXAS, 2010

Population

July 1, 2009 and January 1, 2010 estimates of rural Texas’ population According to January 2010 estimates from the Texas State Data Center Population Estimates Program,  Texas’ rural population reached 3,347,316, which was an increase of 187,376 persons since 2000.  Rural and urban population estimates for July 1, 2009 and January 1, 2010  2000 

July 1, 2009 (Est.) 

Jan. 1, 2010 (Est.) 

Change, 2000‐2009 (Est.) 

Change, 2000‐2010 (Est.) 

Urban

17,691,880

21,445,986

21,662,919

3,754,106

3,971,039

Rural

3,159,940

3,336,316

3,347,316

176,376

187,376

Texas

20,851,820

24,782,302

25,010,235

3,930,482

4,158,415

Source: Texas State Data Center Population Estimates Program 

   

July 1, 2009 estimates of the age of Texas’ rural population According to July 1, 2009 estimates from the Texas State Data Center Population Estimates Program,  rural areas of Texas have a substantially larger elderly population that urban areas of Texas—16 percent  of rural Texans are elderly versus 9 percent of urban Texans.     July 1, 2009 population estimates, By age group  Birth to 5, No. 

%

6 to 18, No. 

%

19 to 45, No. 

%

46 to 64, No. 

%

65+, No. 

%

Total

Urban

2,046,595

10

4,034,790

19

8,767,941

41

4,659,329

22

1,937,331

9

21,445,986

Rural

275,050

8

587,335

18

1,131,019

34

806,454

24

536,458

16

3,336,316

Texas

2,321,645

9

4,622,125

19

9,898,960

40

5,465,783

22

2,473,789

10

24,782,302

Source: Texas State Data Center Population Estimates Program

According to those same estimates, rural Texas also has fewer people between the ages of 19 and 45  than urban areas—34 percent of rural Texans are between the ages of 19 and 45 versus 41 percent of  urban Texans. This may be due to lack of educational or job opportunities in rural areas. 

Page | 5


THE STATUS OF RURAL TEXAS, 2010

July 1, 2009 estimates of race and ethnicity for rural and urban areas According to July 1, 2009 estimates of race, ethnicity, and age from the Texas State Data Center  Population Estimates Program:  • Rural areas of Texas have a considerably higher proportion of both male and female Anglos  compared with urban areas.  • Anglo males represent 59 percent of the rural male population compared with 43 percent in  urban areas.  • Anglo females represent 62 percent of the rural female population compared with 44 percent in  urban areas.  • Hispanics represent the second largest ethnic group in rural Texas.  • Rural areas of Texas have a smaller proportion of Hispanic, African American, and Other  populations when compared with urban areas of Texas.      July 1, 2009 Estimates of Race and Ethnicity in Rural and Urban Texas for Males and Females  Males  Anglo 

Hispanic

African American 

Other

Urban

43.1%

40.4%

11.6%

4.9%

Rural

58.9%

31.5%

8.7%

0.9%

Females Anglo 

Hispanic

African American 

Other

Urban

44.1%

38.3%

12.6%

5.0%

Rural

62.0%

29.5%

7.5%

1.0%

    Rural & Urban Females by Race and Ethnicity

Rural & Urban Males by Race and Ethnicity

Hispanic

Hispanic

Other

Other Rural

African American

Urban Anglo 0%

Page | 6

20%

40%

Rural

African American

Urban

Anglo 0%

60%

80%

20%

40%

60%


THE STATUS OF RURAL TEXAS, 2010

Rural Texas’ projected population by race/ethnicity The chart below is based on population projections 1  made by the Texas State Data Center and the Office  of the State Demographer 2 . According to these projections:  • The Anglo population will continue to decline as a percentage of Texas’ overall population.  • The  Hispanic  population  will  increase  significantly  climbing  from  27  percent  of  rural  Texas’  population in 2000 to 42 percent by 2040.  • As a percentage of Texas’ population, African American and Other populations will remain fairly  constant. 

Projected population of rural Texas, by race/ethnicity,  2000‐2040 70% 60% 50% 40%

Anglo

30%

African American

20%

Hispanic

10%

Other

0%

2000

2010

2020

2030

2040

In 2000, Texas’ overall population was 53 percent Anglo. In comparison, in 2000, rural Texas’ population  was  64  percent  Anglo.  By  2040,  the  percentage  of  Anglos  in  Texas  will  decrease  to  32  percent  of  the  state’s overall population. In rural Texas, by 2040, the percentage of Anglos will decrease to 50 percent  of the rural population.    Hispanics represent rural Texas’ second largest ethnic group. In 2000, rural Texas had five percent fewer  Hispanics than the state overall. By 2040, rural Texas is expected to have 11 percent fewer Hispanics    than the state overall, according to projections. 

1

The One‐Half 1990‐2000 Migration (0.5) Scenario—This scenario has been prepared as an approximate average of the zero (0.0) and 1990‐ 2000  (1.0)  scenarios.  It  assumes  rates  of  net  migration  one‐half  of  those  of  the  1990s.  The  reason  for  including  this  scenario  is  that  many  counties  in  the  State  are  unlikely  to  continue  to  experience  the  overall  levels  of  relative  extensive  growth  of  the  1990s.  A  scenario  which  projects rates of population growth that are approximately an average of the zero and the 1990 2000 scenarios is one that suggests slower than  1990‐2000 but steady growth.   

2

Source: http://txsdc.utsa.edu/tpepp/2008projections/ Page | 7


THE STATUS OF RURAL TEXAS, 2010

Rural Texas has an increase in net migration Between 1990 and 2000, rural areas of Texas (both adjacent and nonadjacent to  urban areas) saw an  increase in net migration 3 . Between 1990 and 2000, rural areas adjacent to urban areas saw the largest  influx  and  achieved  a  net  migration  rate  of  10  percent.  During  the  1980s,  migration  to  rural  areas  adjacent to urban areas had been negligible.    Net migration, net migration rates, and annualized net migration rates 1980‐1990 and  1990‐2000, and the percent of population change due to migration for urban and  rural areas in Texas, 1990‐2000   

Net migration  rate (Percent) 

Annualized net  migration rate  (Percent) 

Percent change due  to net  migration 

1980‐ 1990

1990‐ 2000

1980‐ 1990

1990‐ 2000

1990‐2000

Net migration  1980‐ 1990 

1990‐ 2000

Urban central city 

460,477

835,380

5

7

0.5

0.7

35

Urban suburban 

511,956

879,913

28

35

2.8

3.5

77

4,466

190,692

0

10

0.0

1.0

70

‐35,250

40,044

‐4

5

‐0.4

0.5

59

Area

Rural adjacent  Rural nonadjacent 

Source: Texas State Data Center and the Office of the State Demographer

In the 1990s, nonadjacent rural areas reversed the  population loss experienced during the  1980s. Net  migration  rates  were  lower  in  nonadjacent  rural  areas  compared  to  adjacent  rural  areas.  The  net  migration rate for nonadjacent rural areas was half that of adjacent rural areas during the 1990s. The  higher  net  migration  rates  of  rural  areas  adjacent  to  urban  areas  reflect  ongoing  suburbanization  and  exurbanization 4  in Texas.   

Fastest growth rural areas are adjacent to urban areas In the 1980s, rural areas adjacent to urban areas grew more than three times faster than nonadjacent  rural  areas.  In  the  1990s,  rural  areas  adjacent  to  urban  areas  grew  by  14  percent.  In  the  1990s,  nonadjacent  rural areas showed increased vitality,  gaining  population at a rate four times higher  than  the 1980s.      Population and population change for urban and rural areas in Texas, 1980‐1990 and 1990‐2000   

Population

Numerical change 

Percent change 

1980

1990

2000

1980‐1990

1990‐2000

1980‐ 1990

Urban central city 

9,731,481

11,615,291

13,993,705

1,883,810

2,378,414

19

20

Urban suburban 

1,811,073

2,550,367

3,698,175

739,294

1,147,808

41

45

Rural adjacent 

1,841,723

1,962,353

2,234,027

120,630

271,674

7

14

844,914

858,499

925,913

13,585

67,414

2

8

Area

Rural nonadjacent 

1990‐ 2000

Source: Texas State Data Center and the Office of the State Demographer

3

The net migration rate is the difference of immigrants and emigrants of an area in a period of time. A positive value indicates that more  people are entering an area than leaving it.   Exurbanization describes the growth of a ring of rural communities beyond suburban areas that become dormitory communities for urban  areas.  4

Page | 8


THE STATUS OF RURAL TEXAS, 2010

A focus on fast growth rural counties Between 2000 and 2008, 81 of 196 rural counties gained population, while 115 counties lost population.  In Texas, Burnet County had the highest numerical growth, increasing in population by 10,341 between  2000 and 2008. Compared with rural counties across the nation, Burnet County ranked 55th among US  counties in numerical growth. 

Top 10 fastest growing rural counties, 2000‐2008, number  County name 

2000

2008 (Est.) 

Change, No. 2000‐2008 

Change, % 2000‐2008 

Burnet

34,147

44,488

10,341

30.3%

Wise

48,793

58,506

9,713

19.9%

Kendall

23,743

32,886

9,143

38.5%

Starr

53,597

62,249

8,652

16.1%

Wood

36,752

42,461

5,709

15.5%

Atascosa

38,628

43,877

5,249

13.6%

Polk

41,133

46,144

5,011

12.2%

Maverick

47,297

52,279

4,982

10.5%

Medina

39,304

44,275

4,971

12.6%

Kerr

43,653

48,269

4,616

10.6%

Burnet County  was  the  fastest  growth  rural  county  in  terms  of  numerical  population  increase  between 2000 and 2008. 

    Kendall  County  had  the  highest  percentage  growth,  increasing  its  population  by  38.5  percent.  Kendall  County ranked 69th in numerical growth among US counties between 2000 and 2008.   

Top 10 fastest growing rural counties, 2000‐2008, percent 

Kendall County  was  the  fastest  growth  rural  county  in  terms  of  percentage  population  increase  between 2000 and 2008. 

County name 

2000

2008 (Est.) 

Change, No.  2000‐2008 

Change, %  2000‐2008 

Kendall

23,743

32,886

9,143

38.5%

Burnet

34,147

44,488

10,341

30.3%

Rains

9,139

11,204

2,065

22.6%

Wise

48,793

58,506

9,713

19.9%

Lampasas

17,762

21,197

3,435

19.3%

Somervell

6,809

7,942

1,133

16.6%

Franklin

9,458

11,001

1,543

16.3%

Starr

53,597

62,249

8,652

16.1%

Wood

36,752

42,461

5,709

15.5%

Bandera

17,645

20,303

2,658

15.1%

Page | 9


THE STATUS OF RURAL TEXAS, 2010

Trends in population among Texas’ places between 2000 and 2009 Texas’ population grew from 20,851,820 persons (in 2000) to 24,782,302 (in 2009), according to  estimates from the Texas State Data Center, resulting in an increase of 3,930,482 persons. This growth  was not evenly distributed among places (cities, towns, and villages) in Texas.    The table below looks exclusively at places in Texas that lost population between 2000 and 2009. We  grouped places (cities, towns, and villages) by size. Places that ranged in size from 501‐1,000 persons  and from 1,001 to 2,500 persons lost the largest percentage of their population between 2000 and 2009  (‐8 percent).    Total population change for places that lost population between 2000 to 2009,  by size of place*  Size of place  Year Percent change in population  (city, town, or village)  2000 2009 for places in this range  <500  24,772 23,041 ‐7% 501‐1,000  40,002 36,894 ‐8% 1,001‐2,500  164,875 151,896 ‐8% 2,501‐5,000  201,377 186,396 ‐7% 5,001‐10,000  236,874  223,920  ‐5%  10,000+  755,890 729,401 ‐4% * This table focuses only on places that lost population. We examined all places in Texas that lost  population between 2000 and 2009 and grouped those places by size of place, e.g., less than 500. We  combined the total populations of all places within each range for the years 2000 and 2009. We then  found the difference between those two years and expressed that difference as a percentage.  Source: US Census Bureau, 2009 Estimates of Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions. 

     

Texas places (cities, towns, and villages) that lost  population between 2000‐2009, by place size 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

85

56

155

132

Less than 500

Page | 10

501 ‐ 1000

58

34

191

103

83

1,001 ‐ 2,500

2,501 ‐ 5,000

98

31

156

Lost population Did not lose population

5,001 ‐ 10,000  10,000 or more


THE STATUS OF RURAL TEXAS, 2010 Interestingly, from 2000 to 2009 one‐third of Texas cities with a population under 10,000 lost population  (not shown in the table below). 36 percent of cities (ranging in size from 2,501 to 5000 persons) lost  population (see table below).    Texas places (cities, towns, and villages) that lost population between 2000‐2009, by place size  Less than  501 ‐ 1,001 ‐ 2,501 ‐   500  1000  2,500  5,000  Places in this range  240  188  289  161        Lost population  85  56  98  58        Did not lose population  155  132  191  103  Percent of cities in this range  35%  losing population from 2000 to  30%  34%  36%  2009  Source: US Census Bureau, 2009 Estimates of Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions.

5,001 ‐  10,000  117  34  83 

10,000 or  more  187  31  156 

29%

17%

New places in Texas since 2000 Texas has added 27 new places (four villages, three towns, and 20 cities) since the 2000 Census. These  new places range in size from Brazos Bend with a population of 76 to Meadows Place with a population  of 6,377. The city of Brazos Bend is more populous than Loving County, which had a population of 67  persons in 2000 and had a population of 45 in 2009, according to available estimates. 

New places in Texas since 2000  2009 Population  Brazos Bend city 76 Union Valley city 194 Taylor Landing city 211 DISH town 218 Kurten town 233 Brazos Country city 302 Cashion Community city 328 Volente village 402 Iola city 430 Bedias city 442 Webberville village 454 Point Venture village 506 Scurry town 705 Cresson city 856 Weston Lakes city 1,297 Von Ormy city 1,442 Escobares city 1,459 Jarrell city 1,470 Salado village 2,042 East Bernard city 2,220 Horseshoe Bay city 2,502 Wimberley city 2,846 Hideaway city 3,001 Westworth Village city 3,050 deCordova city 3,365 Spring Valley Village city 3,959 Meadows Place city 6,377 Source: US Census Bureau, 2009 Estimates of  Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions.  Place 

Page | 11


THE STATUS OF RURAL TEXAS, 2010

Healthcare Rural and urban distribution of physicians, by specialty, 2009 The chart below is based on August 24, 2009 data from the Texas Medical Board. The chart shows the rural  and urban distribution of primary care physicians by specialty.    

• • • •

In 2009, 13.5 percent of Texans lived in rural areas.  In 2009, among primary care physicians, only two specialties (Family Practice and General Practice)  had more than 13 percent of their practitioners in rural areas.  In 2009, 8 percent of primary care physicians with a specialization in geriatrics were in rural areas.  In 2009, 22 percent of Texas’ elderly lived in rural areas—Rural Texans accounted for 536,458 of  Texas’ 2,473,789 elderly. 

Rural and Urban Distribution of Primary Care Physicians,  by Specialty, 2009 Geriatrics 8%

Obstetrics & Gynecology

6%

Obstetrics Gynecology

4%

Internal Medicine

3%

Pediatrics

7%

General Practice Family Practice Family Medicine

5%

Urban Rural

18% 16%

0%

11%

20%

40%

60%

80%

100%

120%

        Source: Texas Medical Board ‐ August 24, 2009   

Rural Texans without health insurance, 2008 estimates According to  2008  Census  American  Community  Survey  one  year  estimates,  the  percent  of  uninsured  persons  in  rural  Texas  ranges  from  14.9  percent  to  35  percent.  In  rural  Texas,  the  18  to  64  years  age  group is least likely to have insurance with uninsured rates ranging from 21.4 percent to 47 percent.   

Rural Non‐Institutional Civilian Population Without Health Insurance in Texas  Age group 

Range, % 

Total Population 

14.9 percent 

Birth to 17 Years 

6.4 percent 

18 to 64 Years 

21.4 percent 

65 Years or Over 

(Anderson) (Anderson)  (Austin) 

0 percent  (Coke, Calhoun, Jackson, Cherokee, Panola, Rusk, and Cass) 

to

35 percent  (Brooks, Jim Hogg, Kenedy, Kleberg, Starr, Willacy, and Zapata) 

to

30.1 percent 

to

47 percent 

to

(Coke) (Brooks, Jim Hogg, Kenedy, Kleberg, Starr, Willacy, and Zapata) 

6.7 percent  (Fannin) 

Source: American Community Survey, one year estimates, 2008 Data are estimates from a sample and are estimated with sampling error. Counties with fewer than 65,000 persons are grouped into  PUMAs (Public‐use microdata areas) for estimation, and are assigned the same rate. 

Page | 12


THE STATUS OF RURAL TEXAS, 2010

Physicians in rural Texas, 2008 and 2010 According to September 2008 Texas Medical Board data, 24 Texas counties lacked even one physician.  • Between 2008 and 2010, Duval and Cochran counties each lost the one physician that lived or  worked in the county.  • Presidio County, which lacked a physician in 2008, gained one physician by 2010.  • In 2010, 25 Texas counties (all rural) had no physician living or working in that county.  • In both 2008 and 2010, all counties without a physician were rural.    Year 

Loss or Gain of  Physicians, 2008‐2010 

Number of counties that  lost physicians, 2008‐2010   

2008

2010

Urban

43,574

46,061

+2,487

13

Rural

2,902

2,836

‐66

62

Texas

46,476

48,897

2,421

75

• • • •  

75 Texas counties (almost 30 percent) lost at least one physician between 2008 and 2010.  In both 2008 and 2010, seventeen rural counties had only one physician.  In 2008, 20 rural counties had two physicians; in 2010, 19 had two physicians.  Between 2008 and 2010, rural counties lost 66 physicians overall (a decrease of 2.3 percent). 

Percentage of male and female primary care  physicians in rural and urban areas, 2010

100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

71%

Male Female

29% Urban

80%

20% Rural

  In 2010, 71 percent of urban physicians were male. In 2010, 80 percent of rural physicians in Texas  were male (a decrease of one percent since 2008).   

Page | 13


THE STATUS OF RURAL TEXAS, 2010

Increase in active physicians not in practice In 2008, 156 of Texas’ 46,476 active physicians were not in practice (0.3 percent were not in practice). In  2010, 1,359 of Texas’ 48,897 active physicians were not in practice (2.8 percent were not in practice).   

Active physicians not in practice, 2008 and 2010

1,400 1,200  1,000  800 

Female

600

Male

400 200  ‐ 2008

2010

Page | 14


THE STATUS OF RURAL TEXAS, 2010

Economy In Texas, rural unemployment has closely mirrored urban unemployment since August 2009. 

Unemployment in rural & urban areas of Texas,  Aug. 2009‐Sep. 2010 9.0% 8.8% 8.6% 8.4% 8.2% 8.0% 7.8% 7.6% 7.4% 7.2% 7.0%

Urban Rural

Aug Sep  Oct  Nov  Dec  Jan  Feb  Mar  Apr  May  Jun  Jul  Aug  Sep  09 09 09 09 09 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10

From August 2009 to March 2010, rural unemployment was slightly higher than urban unemployment in  Texas. Since May 2010, rural unemployment has been slightly lower than urban unemployment. 

Page | 15


THE STATUS OF RURAL TEXAS, 2010

Employment change in rural Texas In 2008, rural Texas’ annual average unemployment rate was 4.9 percent, up from 4.5 percent in 2007.  In  2009,  rural  Texas’  annual  average  unemployment  rate  was  7.8  percent.  From  2008  to  2009,  employment increased by 0.3 percent in rural Texas.   

Employment 5

Rural

Urban

Total

2007

1,527,993

12,490,860

14,018,853

2008

1,571,714

12,898,186

14,469,900

2006‐2007

0.9

1.6

1.5

2007‐2008

1.4

1.2

1.3

2008‐2009

0.3

‐0.4

‐0.4

2008

4.9

5

4.9

2009

7.8

7.6

7.6

Total number of jobs 

Percent employment change 

Unemployment rate (percent) 

Prepared by Economic Research Service, USDA, Washington, DC.  

Per capita income According to  the  Economic  Research  Service  at  the  United  States  Department  of  Agriculture,  per  capita  income in rural Texas remained flat between 2007 and 2008. During the same time period, urban per capita  income  decreased  by  1.3  percent.  However,  rural  per  capita  income  continued  to  trail  urban  per  capita  income significantly—by $9,078—in 2008.   

Per‐capita income (2008 dollars) Rural 

Urban

Total

2007

29,849

39,447

38,252

2008

29,843

38,921

37,809

Percent change  0  ‐1.3  ‐1.2  Prepared by Economic Research Service, USDA, Washington, DC.

Earnings per job Between 2007  and  2008,  earnings  per  job  in  rural  areas  of  Texas  decreased  from  $33,707  to  $32,790  (a  decrease  of  2.7  percent).  In  2008,  rural  earnings  per  job  trailed  urban  earnings  per  job  significantly  (by  $20,134).   

Earnings per job (2008 dollars) Rural 

Urban

Total

2007

33,707

54,183

51,951

2008

32,790

52,924

50,737

Percent change ‐2.7 ‐2.3 ‐2.3 Prepared by Economic Research Service, USDA, Washington, DC.

5

For data provided by the USDA Economic Research Service, urban and rural (metro and nonmetro) definitions are based on the Office of  Management and Budget (OMB) June 2003 classification. See Measuring Rurality: New Definitions in 2003 for more information.

Page | 16


THE STATUS OF RURAL TEXAS, 2010

Poverty rate In 2009, the poverty rate in rural Texas was 19.5 percent (more than 3 percent higher than the poverty  rate in urban areas of Texas).    In the United States, rural poverty rose from 2008 to 2009, reaching 16.6 percent, which is the highest  rate since 1992 when it was 16.9 percent.    Poverty rate (percent) Rural Urban 1979  19.1 13.7 1989  23.5 17.1 1999  18.7 14.8 2009 (latest model‐based estimates) 19.5 16.8 Prepared by Economic Research Service, USDA, Washington, DC.

Total 14.7 18.1 15.4 17.1

In 2005:    •  the US poverty rate was 13.3 percent;  •  Texas’ rate was 17.5 percent; and  •  Rural Texas’ rate was 19.7 percent.    In 2007:    •  the US poverty rate was 13 percent;  •  Texas’ rate was 16.3 percent; and  •  Rural Texas’ rate was 18.4 percent.    In 2009:    •  the US poverty rate was 14.3 percent;  •  Texas’ rate was 17.1 percent; and  •  Rural Texas’ rate was 19.5 percent. 

Page | 17


THE STATUS OF RURAL TEXAS, 2010

Entrepreneurship indicators Employment In 2006,  US  non‐farm  proprietor  employment  accounted  for  almost  19  percent  of  total  nonfarm  employment. That same year, the figure for Texas was 20.1 percent. In rural Texas, non‐farm proprietor  employment accounted for 26.1 percent of total nonfarm employment. 

In 2006,  Texas’ average  income  per  non‐farm  proprietor  was  $47,214,  exceeding  the  United  States average of $29,950. 

Income In 2006, at the national level, non‐farm proprietors’ income accounted for 9 percent of total personal  income.  In  Texas,  non‐farm  proprietors  accounted  for  15.2  percent  of  total  personal  income.  In  rural  Texas counties, the percentage ranged from 1.7 percent to 26.5 percent.    In  2006,  the  average  income  per  non‐farm  proprietor  in  the  United  States  was  $29,950.  In  Texas,  the  figure stood at $47,214. The average income per non‐farm proprietor in Texas counties ranged from just  over $5,000 to $112,631. For rural Texas counties, the highest income average was $42,765. 

Small businesses in rural Texas  The Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) indicates that 70,350 business reporting units were operating  in rural Texas in the first quarter of 2006 with an average of 14.35 workers per unit. The Texas average  during that time period was 23.12 workers per unit.    By the first quarter of 2008, 72,549 business reporting units were operating in rural Texas. That marked  an increase of 2,199 business reporting units from 2006‐2008.    In  2008,  the  average  number  of  workers  remained  fairly  constant  with  rural  business  reporting  units,  which  reported  an  average  of  14.17  workers  and  Texas  business  reporting  units  reported  an  overall  average of 22.86 workers per unit.     

Page | 18


THE STATUS OF RURAL TEXAS, 2010

A focus on the farm: An in-depth look at agriculture

Farm characteristics The table below shows data for the last three censuses of agriculture (the most recent was conducted in  2007).    Farm characteristics (1997, 2002 and 2007 Census of Agriculture)  Approximate total land area (acres) Total farmland (acres)  Percent of total land area

1997 167,625,165 133,956,359 79.9

2002 167,550,149 129,877,666 77.5

2007 167,145,209  130,398,753  78 

Cropland (acres)  Percent of total farmland  Percent in pasture  Percent irrigated 

39,051,211 29.2 31.3 13.9

38,657,710 29.8 33.5 11.8

33,667,177 25.8  23.3  13.7 

Harvested Cropland (acres)

20,357,767

17,750,938

19,174,301

Woodland (acres)  Percent of total farmland  Percent in pasture 

5,471,015 4.1 72.4

5,651,181 4.4 74.4

7,099,790 5.4  74.4 

Pastureland (acres)  Percent of total farmland 

86,947,714 64.9

83,402,865 64.2

87,217,416 66.9 

Land in house lots, ponds, 2,165,910  2,486,419  roads, wasteland, etc. (acres) Percent of total farmland  1.9 1.7 Prepared by Economic Research Service, USDA, Washington, DC.

2,414,370 1.9 

Farms by size In 2007, the majority of Texas farms were between 1 and 99 acres in size.    Farms by size (percent)  1997 2002 1 to 99 acres  46.6 48.3 100 to 499 acres  34.8 33.7 500 to 999 acres  8.6 8.1 1000 to 1,999 acres  5.4 5.3 2,000 or more acres  4.6 4.6 Prepared by Economic Research Service, USDA, Washington, DC.

2007 52.5  31.2  7.2  4.6  4.5 

Page | 19


THE STATUS OF RURAL TEXAS, 2010

Farms by sales The vast majority of Texas’ farms (71 percent in 2007) have less than $10,000 in sales.    Farms by sales (percent)  1997 2002 Less than $9,999  70.2 71.5 $10,000 to $49,999  18.4 18.3 $50,000 to $99,999  3.8 3.8 $100,000 to $499,999  5.9 4.9 More than $500,000  1.7 1.5 Prepared by Economic Research Service, USDA, Washington, DC.

2007 71  18.3  3.5  4.7  2.4 

Tenure of farmers In 2007, nearly 72 percent of farms were owned by a full owner.     Tenure of farmers  Full owner (farms)  Percent of total 

1997 143,245 62.8

2002 155,053 67.7

2007 177,147  71.6 

Part owner (farms)  Percent of total 

60,336 26.4

55,703 24.3

54,773 22.1 

Tenant owner (farms)  24,592 18,170 Percent of total  10.8 7.9 Prepared by Economic Research Service, USDA, Washington, DC.

15,517 6.3 

Farm organization In terms of the number of farms in Texas, individuals/family or sole proprietorship is the most common  form of farm organization (88.2 percent in 2007).    Farm organization  Individuals/family, sole proprietorship (farms) Percent of total  Family‐held corporations (farms)  Percent of total  Partnerships (farms) Percent of total  Non‐family corporations (farms) Percent of total 

1997

2002

2007

201,896

210,409

218,126

88.5

91.9

88.2

5,057

3,842

4,956

2.2

1.7

2

18,658 8.2

12,720 5.6

20,657 8.3

688 0.3

456 0.2

750 0.3

Others ‐ cooperative, estate or 1,499  1,874  trust, institutional, etc. (farms) Percent of total  0.8 0.7 Prepared by Economic Research Service, USDA, Washington, DC.

Page | 20

2,948 1.2


THE STATUS OF RURAL TEXAS, 2010

Characteristics of principal farm operators The average age of a principal farm operator in Texas is increasing—up from 56 years of age in 1997 to nearly  59 years of age in 2007. Between 1997 and 2007, the number of female farm operators increased by more  than 36 percent.   

Characteristics of principal farm operators 1997 2002 2007 Average operator age (years) 56 56.9 58.9 Percent with farming as their 53.6  39.9  40.4  primary occupation Men  202,463 201,734 212,426 Women  25,710 27,192 35,011 Prepared by Economic Research Service, USDA, Washington, DC.

Farm financial indicators Between 2007  and  2008,  the  number  of  farms  in  Texas  remained  constant,  according  to  USDA  data.  Final  agricultural sector output decreased by 4.5 percent—services and forestry grew by 15.3 percent; final crop  output fell by 17.8 percent; and final animal output fell slightly by $45 million or 0.4 percent.   

Farm financial indicators Farm income and value added data 2007 2008 Number of farms  247,500 247,500 Thousand $ Final crop output  8,590,838 7,061,726 +     Final animal output 11,077,615 11,032,630 +     Services and forestry 3,456,628 3,985,894 =   Final agricultural sector output 23,125,082 22,080,250 ‐      Intermediate consumption outlays +     Net government transactions =   Gross value added

14,232,975 562,432 9,454,538

14,324,074 273,698 8,029,875

‐     Capital consumption

2,093,945

2,232,644

=   Net value added

7,360,593

5,797,231

‐   Factor payments Employee compensation (total hired labor) Net rent received by nonoperator landlords Real estate and nonreal estate interest

2,608,301 1,286,684 317,084 1,004,533

2,579,941 1,407,685 205,442 966,814

=   Net farm income 4,752,292 3,217,290 Prepared by Economic Research Service, USDA, Washington, DC.

Manufactured inputs From 2007 to 2008, manufactured inputs increased from roughly $2.9 billion to approximately $3.4 billion.   

Manufactured inputs in Texas, 2007 and 2008

2007 2008 ($, thousands) ($, thousands) Manufactured inputs (total) 2,859,169 3,401,261      Fertilizers and lime 920,000 1,080,000      Pesticides  470,000 510,000      Petroleum fuel and oils 1,102,839 1,336,069      Electricity  366,330 475,192 Prepared by Economic Research Service, USDA, Washington, DC.  

Page | 21


THE STATUS OF RURAL TEXAS, 2010

Organic agriculture Between 2006 and 2008, organic agriculture increased in Texas. The number of certified operations increased  by 21 percent and total acreage increased by 36 percent.   

Organic agriculture  Number of certified operations Crops (acres)  Pasture & rangeland (acres)  Total acres 

2006 230 104,474 227,323 331,798

2007 227 130,603 288,050 418,652

2008 279 155,957 294,749 450,706

Change 2006‐2008  21%  49%  30%  36% 

Prepared by Economic Research Service, USDA, Washington, DC. 

Conservation practices Between 1997 and 2007, the number of acres of farmland in conservation or wetlands reserve programs  increased by 12.8 percent in Texas.   

Conservation practices  Farmland in conservation or wetlands reserve programs (acres)  Average farm size (acres) 

1997

2002

2007

3,695,646

3,302,766

4,170,044

587

567

527

Prepared by Economic Research Service, USDA, Washington, DC. 

Top commodities, exports, and counties The table below highlights Texas’ top five agricultural commodities in 2009. Texas produced more than a  third of US cotton and nearly 16 percent of cattle and calves by value.   

Top 5 agriculture commodities, 2009  1. Cattle and calves  2. Broilers  3. Greenhouse/nursery  4. Cotton  5. Dairy products  All commodities 

Value of receipts (Thousand $) 6,938,721 1,650,227 1,284,269 1,188,629 1,172,129 16,573,054

Percent of state total farm receipts 41.9 10 7.7 7.2 7.1

Percent of US value 15.9  7.6  8.1  34.1  4.8  5.8 

Prepared by Economic Research Service, USDA, Washington, DC.   

In 2009, Texas was first in exports for cotton and linters and third for live animals and meat.   

Top 5 agriculture exports, estimates, FY 2009  1. Cotton and linters 2. Live animals and meat 3. Other  4. Feed grains and products 5. Poultry and products Overall rank 

Rank among states 1 3 6 10 6 5

Value (million $) 1,389.80 709.5 441.2 378.8 289.4 4,541.60

Prepared by Economic Research Service, USDA, Washington, DC.   

In 2007, Deaf Smith County was highest in agricultural sales, accounting for 5.5 percent of Texas’ total  receipts.   

Top 5 counties in agricultural sales 2007  1. Deaf Smith County 2. Castro County  3. Parmer County  4. Hartley County  5. Hansford County State total 

Percent of state total receipts 5.5 4.6 4.5 3.4 2.8

Prepared by Economic Research Service, USDA, Washington, DC. 

Page | 22

Thousand $ 1,148,359 973,352 937,664 724,508 589,799 21,001,074


THE STATUS OF RURAL TEXAS, 2010

Housing Census housing unit estimates, 2009 Between 2000 and 2009, the number of housing units in rural Texas increased by more than six percent  (from  1,381,471  to  1,466,445  units),  according  to  2009  Census  estimates.  During  the  same  period,  Texas’ urban housing stock grew by nearly 22 percent.    Rural and urban housing units: 2000, 2008, and 2009  2000 

2008

2009

Change, 2008‐2009 Number 

%

Change, 2000‐2009  Number 

Urban

6,776,104

8,145,598

8,257,775

112,177

1.4%

1,481,671

21.9%

Rural

1,381,471

1,462,445

1,466,445

4,000

0.3%

84,974

6.2%

Texas

8,157,575

9,608,043

9,724,220

116,177

1.2%

1,566,645

19.2%

Between  2008  and  2009,  according  to  Census  estimates,  4,000  homes  were  added  in  rural  Texas  and  112,177  homes  were  added  in  urban  areas.  Overall,  Texas  added  116,177  homes  between  2008  and  2009. 

Housing Units: 2000, 2008, and 2009 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

1,381,471

1,466,445

Rural Urban

2000

1,462,445

2008

2009

Page | 23


THE STATUS OF RURAL TEXAS, 2010

Survey on the local perception of housing needs

From March  to  May  2006,  the  Texas  Department  of  Housing  and  Community  Affairs  (TDHCA)  conducted  a  survey  of  the  housing  and  community  development  needs,  as  well  as  issues  and  problems  at  the  state,  regional, and local levels. The survey was distributed to state representatives, state senators, mayors, county  judges, city managers, housing/planning departments, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) local  offices,  public  housing  authorities,  councils  of  government,  community  action  agencies,  and  Housing  Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) agencies for total of 2,529 individuals and entities. The survey  had a 17.2 percent response rate.   

To assess top housing needs for rural Texas, TDRA reviewed TDHCA’s survey and identified responses from  rural  communities  and  from  entities  representing  rural  Texas.  Approximately  85  percent  of  the  survey  respondents  were  rural  communities  or  represented  rural  communities.  According  to  rural  survey  respondents, housing assistance, development of rental units, and energy assistance were top needs. Survey  respondents gave lowest priority to assistance for homeless persons.   

Survey on the local perception of housing needs    Answer Choice  Housing Assistance  Energy Assistance  Development of Rental Units  Capacity Building  Assistance for Homeless  Persons 

Number of responses per need rank (1 highest, 5 lowest), and percent of total responses within  each activity  1  2 3 4 5 No Opinion  Total Responses 114  62  49  22  1  14  262  43.5%  23.7% 18.7% 8.4% 0.4% 5.3%    66  98 72 37 9 9 291  22.7%  33.7% 24.7% 12.7% 3.1% 3.1%    58  51 72 34 32 23 270  21.5%  18.9% 26.7% 12.6% 11.9% 8.5%    49  35 57 90 70 41 342  14.3%  10.2% 16.7% 26.3% 20.5% 12.0%    14  22 34 61 127 51 309  4.5%  7.1% 11.0% 19.7% 41.1% 16.5%   

Items ranked by highest need Housing Assistance  Over half of respondents identified home repair assistance as the highest need for housing assistance. Almost  a quarter of respondents identified assistance to purchase a home as the highest need for housing assistance.   

Energy Assistance  Both utility payment assistance and weatherization/minor home repairs were identified as the top activities  with the greatest need for energy assistance activities.   

Development of Rental Units  For  the  development  of  rental  units,  over  a  third  of  the  respondents  identified  construction  of  new  rental  units  as  the  greatest  needed  activity.  Also,  a  third  of  respondents  responded  that  the  need  for  both  new  construction and rehabilitation of rental units is the same as the need for the development of rental units.   

Capacity Building Assistance  Over a quarter of the respondents identified assistance with operating costs as the greatest need activity for  capacity  building  assistance.    Nineteen  percent  of  respondents  indicated  that  training  and  technical  assistance was the greatest need activity.    

Assistance for Homeless Persons   Over  half  of  the  respondents  said  that  there  is  minimal  need  for  assistance  for  homeless  persons,  and  18  percent  had  no  opinion  on  the  issue.  Ten  percent  identified  homeless  prevention  services  as  the  greatest  need activity for assistance for homeless persons.

Page | 24


THE STATUS OF RURAL TEXAS, 2010

Public Housing Authorities, 2010 According to  the  2011  State  Low  Income  Housing  Plan,  beginning  in  the  1930s,  local  public  housing  authorities (PHAs) built and managed properties for low‐income residents. This was achieved primarily  through funding provided by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). According  to the plan, most public housing developments were completed during the 1970s.    Public housing authority (PHA) units in rural and urban Texas, 2010 

Rural 36,740  57.9% 

Urban 26,676 42.1%

Texas 63,416

In 2010, according to HUD, Texas had 63,416 PHA units. Nearly 60 percent of those units were located in  rural  areas  (see  table  above).  The  chart  below  shows  the  distribution  of  rural  and  urban  PHAs  by  uniform state service region (see a map of the regions on the next page).   

Rural & Urban Public Housing Authority Units, By Region 13 12 11 10 9 8 Urban

7

Rural

6 5 4 3 2 1 0

1,000

2,000

3,000

4,000

5,000

6,000

7,000

8,000

Page | 25


THE STATUS OF RURAL TEXAS, 2010

Page | 26


Credits and acknowledgements This report is written and researched by Eric Beverly and Kim White  from the Texas Department of Rural Affairs, with the exception of  “Survey on the local perception of housing needs,”  written by Alexandra Gamble in consultation with Brenda Hull  (of the Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs).      Map by:  Eric Beverly      Layout and design by:  Eric Beverly      Special thanks to:  Texas State Data Center and the Office of the State Demographer  SOCRATES, Texas Workforce Commission 

2010 Status of Rural Texas  
2010 Status of Rural Texas  

A demographic report on conditions and trends in rural Texas.

Advertisement