Page 1

SUMMER 2014

VOLUME 10 / ISSUE 2

OPENROAD


Presenting Sponsor

Concours Club

Chairman/Director

Concours Club

Official Providers

The Place to Race


Major Sponsor Recognition Major Sponsor Recognition

PEBBLE BEACH

Completing the ultimate automotive experience with an international array of exhibitors.

retroauto the inn at spanish bay

tm

august 13 to 16, 2014

• • • • • •

Rare Collectibles Historic Automobilia Books and Literature Original Poster Art Petroliana Pebble Beach Concours Merchandise • Luxury Items for the Motoring Lifestyle

NEW The Pebble Beach Classic Car Forum presented by Credit Suisse Featuring automotive luminaries discussing pertinent topics of the collector car world. To view the entire schedule and reserve a seat visit www.pbclassiccarforum.com.

NEW The Pebble Beach Classic Car EXPO Peruse and purchase authentic and unusual vehicles from highly respected classic car

dealers. All events are open to the public at no charge.

© 2014 Pebble Beach Company. All rights reserved.

celebrating the motoring lifestyle

tm


Major Sponsor Recognition

Re-envision Wealth

Rewards and responsibilities of great wealth Ascent Private Capital Management of U.S. Bank provides services for families of significant wealth who want to preserve and protect their assets while putting their fingerprint on history. Ascent and U.S. Bank are proud to support the LeMay—America’s Car Museum and the Pacific Northwest Concours d’Elegance. Christine Hansen Managing Director, Client Advisory 206.342.7006 ascent.usbank.com NOT A DEPOSIT

NOT FDIC INSURED

MAY LOSE VALUE

Deposit products offered by U.S. Bank National Association. Member FDIC.

NOT BANK GUARANTEED

NOT INSURED BY ANY FEDERAL GOVERNMENT AGENCY


F E A T U R E S

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FEATURE:

ACM: TWO YEARS IN AND COUNTING

David Madeira offers his perspective on how we’ve evolved, what we’ve learned and where we’re headed.

20

AUTOBIOGRAPHY:

GT39 CUSTOM

Cindy Warn’s 1939 Ford Deluxe Convertible Custom joins ACM’s collection by way of donation. The car is spectacular.

D E P A R T M E N T S

5 BEHIND THE WHEEL

24

A report from David Madeira, ACM President & CEO GUEST EDITORIAL:

EUROPE ON A TRIUMPH MOTORCYCLE

Clement Salvadori reflects on lessons learned and experiences savored via Europe on a 1960 Triumph Bonneville.

6 IN THE HEADLIGHTS

Special events you won’t want to miss 7 ALONG FOR THE RIDE

Random musings by the managing editor of OpenRoad 8 SIGNPOST

Late breaking news & items of interest

8 DOWN THE ROAD

Happenings worth saving the date for

13 IMAGES OF CARnivale!

A photo album of this year’s Wheels & Heels Annual Gala 15 ON EXHIBIT

New exhibits gracing our galleries

16 FUEL FOR THE FUTURE

Special friends of ACM

17 FUEL FOR THOUGHT

Financial advice for car enthusiasts 18 ROAD WELL TAKEN

Florida’s Highway 1 to Key West 26 MEMBERSHIP

Exclusive events and activities for ACM members of every level 27 EDUCATION AT ACM

Learning Opportunities for all ages

OPENROAD 3


Major Sponsor Recognition

Recent Work: LeMay– AMERICA’S CAR MUSEUM

60 Years of Corvette & Legends of NASCAR Exhibits

LET’S TALK

425.454.8006 | arscentia.com


LeMay– AMERICAS CAR MUSEUM

President & CEODavid Madeira

BEHIND THE WHEEL I’M KNOWN TO SAY, “WE’RE NOT ABOUT US.” TO ME, THE STATEMENT SUMS UP THE UNIQUE NATURE OF ACM’S MISSION. WE’RE DEDICATED TO BEING MORE THAN JUST “BRICKS AND MORTAR” WITH A LOT OF “STEEL, GLASS AND RUBBER” ON DISPLAY.

YOUR VEHICLE, AND YOUR STORY CAN BE PART OF AMERICA’S CAR MUSEUM. HERE ARE A NUMBER OF WAYS THAT CAN HAPPEN:

AMERICA’S CAR MUSEUM is not just another “vanity project.” It’s not simply about the founders and their collection. The LeMay legacy is really about the everyday experience of Americans with automobiles. For that reason, we stress the fact that what we do as a Museum is “not about us,” it’s about the collective “us,” the experiences and stories we all have and share about cars, trucks and motorcycles—the ones that were important in our lives. That orientation is one reason why ACM exhibits single vehicles and entire collections of countless individuals. Your vehicle, your story can be part of AMERICA’S CAR MUSEUM. Here are a number of ways that can happen:

1

You can loan a vehicle to the Museum for an upcoming exhibition and have it on display for a specified period of time.

If you have a car that you think might merit exhibition—no matter how obscure it may seem— send us an email and we will enter it into a database our Curator refers to when looking for vehicles to display. For example, we’ll soon be doing an exhibition on the F-150 pickup truck’s role in American life. Got a good one we might use?

2

Donate that car or motorcycle to the Museum and help us continue to build a collection that truly presents the breadth of America’s experience with the auto.

This includes foreign cars that became a strong part of our experience—British sports cars and motorcycles especially come to mind. Such donations are

tax deductible and, if your car is accepted into the collection, you’ll be provided with a photograph of it here at ACM. Of course such a donation also provides membership in our Club Auto or Concours Club depending on the vehicle’s market value.

3

If you just can’t bear to part with your ‘baby’ now, but don’t want the kids to sell her when you’re gone, maybe that Mustang, Model A or Duesenberg should come to the Museum by way of your will. We’ll give it a good home and take care of it for others to enjoy for years to come.

4

Perhaps the easiest way for you to be part of the Museum is to support our “Adopt An Auto Program.”

By adopting an auto at ACM, your money will support the collection activities of the Museum. We’ll place a plaque with the car indicating you’ve adopted it and send you a personalized certificate. Cars will be available on a first-come, first-serve basis. For additional information please contact Lauren Humphrey, Annual Giving and Membership Manager at lauren.humphrey@lemaymuseum.org. AMERICA’S CAR MUSEUM is at the center of a movement to preserve America’s automotive heritage and to celebrate the love affair we have with the car. Join the movement. Now, take that baby out and enjoy one of life’s great freedoms… the open road.

To learn more about how you can get involved please visit lemaymuseum.org. OPENROAD 5


BOARD OF DIRECTORS

IN THE HEADLIGHTS

Karl Anderson, Chairman Concrete Technology Corporation Tacoma, Washington Neal Arntson, President Albina Fuel Company Vancouver, Washington John Barline, Attorney Williams, Kastner & Gibbs, PLLC Tacoma, Washington Stephen Boone, Enthusiast and Collector Olympia, Washington Nicola Bulgari, Vice Chairman BVLGARI S.p.A. New York, New York Bob Craves, Chairman/CEO (retired) College Success Foundation Founding Officer (Retired) Costco Redmond, Washington Richard (Rick) B. Davis, President Standard Parts Corporation Tacoma, Washington John C. Dimmer, President FIRS Management, LLC Lakewood, Washington Art Fischer, President & General Manager NAPA Auto Parts Latham, New York Dawn Fisher, CEO MFD Classic Motors Instructor and vintage car driver Traverse City, Michigan Larry Gordon Gordon Trucking Pacific, Washington McKeel Hagerty, CEO Hagerty Traverse City, Michigan Tom Hedges, Co-owner Hedges Family Estate Seattle, Washington George Ingle, President/General Manager The Ingle Company Tacoma, Washington Doug LeMay, Vice President LeMay Investments LLC Tacoma, Washington Nancy LeMay, CEO LeMay Investments LLC Tacoma, Washington Charles Liekweg, Former President/CEO AAA Washington Kirkland, Washington David Lowe Madeira, President/CEO LeMay– AMERICA’S CAR MUSEUM Tacoma, Washington

Don’t miss the exciting finish of the 2014 Motorcycle Cannonball Run. Over 100 riders will leave Daytona Beach on vintage motorcycles and cover 300 miles per day for two weeks on an epic ride across the U.S before the Grand Finish at ACM.

Schedule of Events: September 21, 2014 2 pm - motorcycles cross the finish line 3 pm - the Seattle Cossacks perform motorcycle stunts For complete information about the event, its history and route visit their website

www.motorcyclecannonball.com

Keith Martin, Publisher Sports Car Market Portland, Oregon James Gary May, Owner, President Hopewell Land Partners LLC, Winter Haven, Florida B. Corry McFarland, President Cedar Management Company Fife, Washington Paul E. Miller, Senior VP/COO LeMay– AMERICA’S CAR MUSEUM Tacoma, Washington Michael J. Phillips, Chairman Altaira Wealth Management Geneva, Switzerland Burt Richmond, Executive Vice President FitzRich, Inc. Chicago, Illinois Candida Romanelli, President Romanelli Event Services Frisco, Texas Bill Sterud, Vice Chairman Puyallup Tribal Council Tacoma, Washington William T. Weyerhaeuser, Director/Chairman Columbia Bank Tacoma, Washington James M. Will, President Titus-Will Enterprises, Inc. Olympia, Washington

6 OPENROAD

OPENROAD

PUBLICATION CREDITS Managing Editor & Head Writer Walt Tomsic, Tomsic Sullivan Design

Guest Editor, Clement Salvadori Motorcycle enthusiast & journalist

Professor Emeritus at Pacific Lutheran University, Walt is a confirmed “car nut.” He started with a ‘53 Austin-Healey 100 in high school and continued through a procession of Triumphs, an Alfa Romeo, a Shelby GT-350, three ‘60s vintage ‘Pagoda’ SLs, a Beck 356 and a couple of E-types. His current ride is a 1955 Austin-Healey 100.

Clement had a real job for a number of years, but eventually he got bored, resigned and spent the next two years riding his motorcycle around the world. Returning to the U.S. happy and broke, he began free-lancing articles to various motorcycle magazines. He is still doing it 35 years later.

Art Direction & Graphic Design Denise (Deni) Sullivan, Tomsic Sullivan Design Deni has a BFA in graphic design from Pacific Lutheran University and has operated her own design business for over 30 years. Passionate for sports cars, she has owned several throughout the years including a ‘64 TR4 Sebring, a ‘72 TR6, and a 1979 Porsche. Her current ride is an ‘08 Special Edition Miata.

Michael Craft ACM Official Photographer Special thanks to Advertising Photographer Michael Craft for creating many of the beautiful images printed in OpenRoad. MichaelCraftPhotography.com


STEERING COMMITTEE Rod Alberts, Executive Director North American International Auto Show Troy, Michigan Thomas L. Bryant, VP/Editor-in-Chief Emeritus Road & Track (retired) Bainbridge, Washington

AMERICA’S CAR MUSEUM is like Janus... the mythical Roman deity with a face on both sides of its head. The point of that tortured analogy is the Museum looks both inward and outward. One set of eyes remains firmly fixed on internal operations, the collection, exhibits, member and visitor relations. The other set keeps watch on the ever-evolving— and frankly fascinating—’all things automotive’ landscape... the world outside the Museum. One of the joys of my association with ACM is being an active participant in the Museum’s mission to stay connected with the at-large world of car culture. I consider it part of my job description... “managing editor, communications consultant, extension cord.” It allows me to rationalize (guilt free) what I would be doing anyway... going to car stuff. “Going to car stuff” includes: driving a variety of routes and critiquing them in “Road Well Taken” (see “The Florida Keys” page 18), suffering sensory overload and sleep deprivation at SEMA in Las Vegas and conferring our prestigious “ACMie” awards to the show’s weirdest and wackiest participants (look for that in the fall issue), hitting the auction gorge fest in Arizona so I can spend the following year complaining that I didn’t buy that pristine betterthan-new Fiat 124 Spyder for $3K (it actually went

for $8K but the price drops every time I retell the story)... oh, you say you’ve never done that? Uh huh... riiiight! On top of all the above, there’s the year-round buffet of exhibits, events, cruise-ins, show-n-shines, swap meets, club tours etc, etc.. I suppose I should get a life but I think I may already have one and car stuff appears to be at the heart of it. One thing I do make a point of, wherever I happen to be, is seek out and visit other car museums. Our Road Well Taken Florida Keys drive allowed us to visit the Miami Auto Museum—at the Dezer Collection... 1,900 cars, motorcycles, bicycles and scooters packed nose to tail in a space less than half the size of ACM. It’s well worth a stop. One thing ACM does as well or better than any other museum I’ve visited is hosting and promoting “car stuff”... all the attendant fun and fanfare that infuses car culture and puts smiles on the faces of enthusiasts. As a member of ACM, you have access to a whole toy box full of stuff. See page 26 for a small sample of what I’m talking about. As the thousand-year-old Knight Templar said to Indiana Jones in the third worst movie of the series, “You have chosen wisely.” Have fun this summer and please remember, hands at 9 & 3 not 10 & 2.

Sandra Button, Chairperson Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance Carmel, California Gill Campbell, CEO Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca Monterey, California John J. Carlson, CEO National Association of Automobile Clubs of Canada Corp. Belcarra, British Columbia, Canada Rick Eagen, Partner/Controller AAA Interstate Transportation, LLC Evergreen, Colorado Rod Egan, The Worldwide Group Kirkland, Washington Robert Falleur, Owner and Collector Bob’s Toys, Rods and Restorations Milwaukie, Oregon Mark Gessler, President Historic Vehicle Association Potomac, Maryland Alan Grant, Principal LARGEarchtitecture Los Angeles, California Gerald Greenfield, Chief Judge Pacific Northwest Concours d’Elegance Presented by AMERICA’S CAR MUSEUM Lake Tapps, Washington Ken Gross, Automotive Journalist Guest Curator, AMERICA’S CAR MUSEUM Purceville, Virginia Paul Hageman, Automobile Enthusiast Kirkland, Washington Peter Hageman, Founder Suite 200 Automobile Collection Kirkland, Washington Paul Ianuario, Executive Director BMW Museum Reidville, South Carolina John Lyons, CEO Hartford Land Ventures, LLC West Hartford, Connecticut Al McEwan, Founder Suite 200 Automobile Collection Kirkland, Washington Bruce Meyer, Enthusiastic Collector Beverly Hills, California Glenn Mounger, Former Chairman Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance Bainbridge Island, Washington Michael T. Phillips, Financial Consultant AXA-Advisors Seattle, Washington Richard Rurak, President Inos Inc Plymouth, Michigan

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Peter Brock

Car Designer, Writer and Photographer

Thomas L. Bryant

Editor Emeritus, Road & Track

McKeel Hagerty CEO, Hagerty

Sandra Button

Chairman, Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance

Lyn St. James, President/Founder LSJ Enterprises Phoenix, Arizona

Bill Warner

Chairman, Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance

Keith Martin

Publisher, Sports Car Market

Jay Leno Website Host

Collector & Enthusiast

Lyn St. James Racer, Collector & Enthusiast

Subscription to OpenRoad triannual magazine published by LeMay – AMERICA’S CAR MUSEUM® is a benefit of Bronze Key Driver membership and above. LeMay – AMERICA’S CAR MUSEUM is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. A portion of your gift towards membership and sponsorship are tax deductible. Museum Administration: David Lowe Madeira, President & CEO | Paul Miller, Senior Vice President & COO Deirdre Evans, Vice President for Institutional Advancement | Valerie O’Shea, Executive Assistant to the President & CEO Keith Flickinger, Curator of the Collection | Scot Keller, Exhibition Curator | Diane Fitzgerald, National Director– Hagerty Education Program at AMERICA’S CAR MUSEUM

Tim Van Hoof, Director of Marketing State Farm Insurance Companies Bloomington, Illinois Bill Warner, Chairman Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance Jacksonville, Florida Todd Wells, General Manager Global Marketing Operations, Microsoft Sammamish, Washington John Weymer, Media Relations Puyallup Tribe of Indians Fife, Washington Hans Wurl Vintage Racing Motors, Inc. Sammamish, Washington

Please Address Correspondence to LeMay – AMERICA’S CAR MUSEUM/OpenRoad, 2702 East D Street, Tacoma, WA 98421 Phone: 253.779.8490 Toll Free: 877.902.8490 Fax: 253.779.8499 Website: www.lemaymuseum.org Not all of the automobiles depicted in OpenRoad are part of the ACM Collection. Some of the photographs were chosen in order to illustrate or enliven a featured story while others were selected purely for their artistic merit.

OPENROAD 7


SIGNPOSTS

DOWNTHEROAD August 14, September 11, October 9 Cruise-In at ACM ACM Campus

McKeel Hagerty Latest Recipient of Nicola Bulgari Award Named after business leader and classic car collector Nicola Bulgari, the award is given annually to individuals who make outstanding contributions to preserve America’s automotive heritage through education, car restoration and collecting classic cars. Past recipients include Dr. Frederick Simeone, founder of the Simeone Automotive Museum and Edward Welburn, Vice President of Global Design for General Motors. As he presented the award, David Madeira noted, “McKeel has been one of the most progressive and innovative leaders in the automotive industry. He has demonstrated a deep commitment to the preservation of America’s car history, founding the Historic Vehicle Association and supporting educational institutions and shop programs dedicated to the future of classic cars.” Hagerty took over the family business in 1995 and has grown the company from 30 employees to more than 500. He created the Collectors Foundation, which has awarded $2.75 million in scholarships and grants to prepare young adults for careers in

August 14 Book reading/signing; Lance Lambert ACM Campus August 11 - 15 High Speed Fun Summer Camp ACM Campus August 16 Drive-In Movie: American Graffiti Haub Family Showfield, ACM Campus automotive preservation and restoration. It was renamed the Hagerty Education Program after partnering with AMERICA’S CAR MUSEUM in January 2014. Hagerty has committed another $1.75 million to support collector vehicle education. “I have been fortunate to build much of my life around my love of cars,” said Hagerty, who serves on ACM’s Board of Directors. “They embody so much; freedom, beauty, technology and culture. It is essential we protect our automotive treasures so they can be celebrated and enjoyed by future generations.”

ACM’s Reputation as a Hub of Community Activity Keeps Growing Cruise-Ins, galas, drive-in movies, Art Cars, exhibit openings, club events and the finish line of a cross country vintage motorcycle tour (see page 6)…all these and more are rapidly establishing ACM’s reputation as a “happening place.”

National and Regional Car Clubs Hold Gatherings at ACM We continue to be a preferred venue for events and conventions of marque and type dedicated car clubs. Two recent groups to take advantage of ACM’s unique campus facilities are the Corvair Society of America (CORSA) and diminutive car enthusiasts who held their Great Pacific Northwest Microcar & Minicar Extravaganza (GPNWMME) at the Museum July 11–13. Aficionados of the Corvair, America’s first small air cooled, rear engined car, held their International Convention at ACM July 21–26. The 4,000-member club was founded in 1969. CORSA has held its annual gathering in various cities across America since 1971. For its 10th Anniversary, the GPNWMME moved from Portland, OR to ACM. The event included an “Island Hopping” ride across the Narrows Bridge and Gig Harbor up to Southworth for the ferry ride to Vashon Island. Approximately 150 rare, small, unique and bizarre microcars took part in a show held on the Haub Family Showfield. The show was open to old sports cars and modern petite cars up to 1600cc, a group that includes Smart cars, the new Mini and recently released Fiat 500. 8 OPENROAD

August 17 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance The Lodge at Pebble Beach, CA August 22 - 24 The MEET Vintage Motorcycle Festival ACM Campus September 4 Harold LeMay’s Birthday Member Appreciation Double Discount Day ACM Campus September 5 - 7 Pacific Northwest Concours d’Elegance ACM Campus September 27 Tire Kicking at Club Auto Colorado October 23, November 20, December 15 Movie Night at Club Auto Kirkland November 4 - 7 SEMA Trade Show Las Vegas, NV Member Benefit/Discount Applies

For additional information, visit the ACM website “Events” link at www.lemaymuseum.org.

ROADSIDEASSISTANCE Dominic Dobson National Corporate Relations Director LeAna Reising Sales and Events Manager Jeff Keys Guest Services Manager Debbie Kray Education Manager Ashley Bice Marketing and Communications Manager Lauren Humphrey Annual Giving and Membership Manager Contact ACM Administrative Office 253-779-8490 or info@lemaymuseum.org


ACM STORE GEAR UP FOR “THE GREAT AMERICAN ROADTRIP” Your ACM Store is Route 66 and Ford Mustang gear central! After viewing “Dream of the Mother Road” and “Masters of Mustang” exhibits, stop by the store and pick up some of these great commemorative gifts. Be sure to flash your membership driver’s license to receive your discount.

RECENTLYREAD

C

heck out

these three

recently read auto-themed books

One presents in-depth essays on the development of history-shaping cars while the other two offer personal and photographic insights into one of Hollywood’s most celebrated “car guys.” Two are portable and feature short, easily digested chapters making them perfect for airport layovers and bedtime reading. The other is a handsome ‘coffee table’ style volume with terrific period photos. Engines of Change ~ A History of the American Dream in Fifteen Cars by Paul Ingrassia Rather than the all too typically dry name/date loaded tome on automotive history, Engines of Change presents the developmental backstory of fifteen culturally significant vehicles—from the Corvette and Corvair to the Beetle and Mustang. Placing things in the larger social context is one of the book’s real strengths… exactly what one would expect from a Pulitzer Prize winning author. —2012, Simon & Schuster

Jimmy & Me ~ A Personal Memoir of James Dean by Lew Bracker

“Route 66 Marathon Tour, Chicago to L.A” 5 Disc DVD set Take a trip across the country and back in time to re-discover the America of years gone by on the historic Route 66. Includes bonus collectors edition Route 66 map and post cards. Flat-lid Willow Picnic Basket with Service for Two Made of willow with a fully-lined interior, this basket has a hinged, flat lid design with closure straps and includes lunch service for two. Take this basket on your next picnic and enjoy life’s finer moments.

Limited addition “Mustang 50 Years” Ford Licensed t-shirt S-XXL, Black, 100% pre-shrunk cotton in uni-sex sizes. 1965 Mustang Running Horse hood ornament

If you find the mythic aura of James Dean endlessly fascinating—and you’re not alone—this book is for you. Written with the encouragement of one Denise McCluggage and in first person tense by one of Dean’s closest friends, it offers insights into the life and times of the enigmatic actor. By the way, there is also a smattering of “guilty pleasure” period Hollywood gossip thrown in. —2013, Fulcorte Press

James Dean: at Speed by Lee Raskin A graphically pleasing, chronologically ordered photo essay on the life of James Dean, the book includes substantive captions that do a nice job of explaining what you’re looking at… not always the case with these splashy photo essays. The images take you on a life journey from Jimmy and his grandfather posing beside an Indiana farmyard snowman to that fateful left turn off California Highway 466. —2005, David Bull Publishing

OPENROAD 9


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Year ONE Year TWO Year THREE Get in, Hit Start

Accelerate to Speed

Go Places

10 OPENROAD

Photo By Jim Culp, ACM Volunteer

As we enter our third year of operation, LeMay– AMERICA’S CAR MUSEUM President & CEO David Madeira offers his perspective on how we’ve evolved, what we’ve learned and where we’re going.


?

ONE

Get in, Hit Start

With two full years behind us, how has AMERICA’S CAR MUSEUM evolved as an institution?

I THINK OUR ‘EVOLUTION’ HAS GONE PRETTY MUCH ACCORDING TO PLAN... IF YOU LOOK AT THE ORIGINAL MISSION STATEMENT, IT’S ALL RIGHT THERE… IT WAS BRILLIANT

DM: Surprisingly enough, I think our ‘evolution’ has gone pretty much according to plan. I consider that a testament to the intelligence and forward thinking of the people who drafted the initial vision of ACM. They nailed it right from the start. If you look at the original mission statement, it’s all right there; activity-loaded membership options, a strong commitment to education, an emphasis on community connection and enhancement, the necessity of providing a deeply personal visitor experience… it was brilliant. I’m pleased to say our institutional evolution has succeeded in making those core principles real. Innovation can be risky, you’re off the beaten path. Fortunately, the response we’ve received from our community and visitor base has more than validated the unique vision of ACM.

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Do the numbers support that assessment?

DM: Without question! Since opening, we’ve attracted some 400,000 visitors. They’ve come from all 50 states and more than 40 countries. The initial press coverage was massive and universally positive… and we continue to garner supportive digital and traditional media exposure. We’ve moved well beyond the “flash in the pan” opening day excitement. AMERICA’S CAR MUSEUM is now a stable fixture in contemporary automotive culture and a true destination attraction.

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Accelerate to Speed

In your view, what are some of the elements that have made ACM a “destination attraction?”

DM: Again, it traces back to one of our original core goals… to create a gathering place for enthusiasts and a center of community activity for all people, regardless of their level of interest in automobiles. Our exhibit program is a key component of what makes ACM attractive. By continually revolving and refreshing our exhibits, each visit to the Museum is designed to be equally fresh. Along that same line, true “car nuts” are relatively easy to please. We provide what they value most… interesting cars… and lots of them. But what about people who aren’t necessarily captivated by automobiles? We present our exhibit cars as characters in a story embedded within the context of everyday life. This approach is key to drawing in the non-enthusiast. Once people come to the Museum, they generally ‘get it.’ After all, everyone remembers their first car, those family driving vacations or a sports car they fell in love with as a teenager. Personal experiences with cars are at the very heart of the American experience and at the soul of ACM. 

FRESH EXHIBITS, EXCITING EVENTS AND CONTINUAL ACTIVITY, THAT’S THE FORMULA WE’VE LEARNED WORKS

But being a true destination attraction requires going beyond simply mounting displays. Our Wheels & Heels Annual Gala allows the community to put on the Ritz and party with the cars. The Haub Family Showfield is continually alive with all manner of outdoor activity from a world class concours and nationally recognized vintage motorcycle meet to local and national car club gatherings, cruise-ins and drive-in movies on warm summer evenings under the stars. In 2015 we’ll add a winter event that won’t be a big-ticket item or fundraiser. It will simply be some affordable fun. It’s tentatively called, “Drive Away the Blues” and will be a kind of beach party... in February… in the Northwest.  Fresh exhibits, exciting events and continual activity, that’s the formula we’ve learned works.

continued on page 12 OPENROAD 11


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THREE Go Places

How has ACM’s commitment to education grown within these first two years?

DM: Along with all the activity we promote, this is an area that really distinguishes ACM. We’ve learned that the best, the most substantive educational initiatives, are achieved in cooperation with other likeminded institutions. We’ve been very fortunate to link our efforts with two exceptional entities, Hagerty and McPherson College. The Hagerty Education Program at AMERICA’S CAR MUSEUM (HEP) is a great initiative. It exemplifies how we’re taking a broader approach. Through the Hagerty Education Program, we are ensuring that the skills necessary to preserve and restore vintage autos—and wooden boats—are transmitted to the next generation. HEP provides grants to organizations that train young people in these skills and, importantly, gives scholarships for students to enroll in these programs in order to prepare for careers in the field. Given that public schools no longer provide adequate training in this area, we’ve decided to support institutions such as McPherson College and the International Yacht Restoration School of Technology and Trades. They, and others we support, are equipping young people with the skills that can be applied to preserving our vehicular heritage. Today’s professionals in the field need an influx of well-trained young people to carry on this important work. We understand how important this is and it’s why we’re so involved. Within the ACM campus itself, our varied curricula, Family Zone and Education Studio, which opened last November, have proven to be hugely successful. We’ve had about 30,000 young people visit ACM within the past year. These programs are vibrant and growing and we’re justly proud of what we offer youngsters and their families.

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Time for the ‘elephant in the room’ question. How do you plan to keep all this going?

DM: It’s an important question, one that needs asking and answering. I would approach it this way. Our first objective was to build LeMay– AMERICA’S CAR MUSEUM… mission accomplished. Our second is to do what it takes to make this place thrive and endure. ACM is unique in the world of car museums. We had no easy template to follow. That’s where the learning process comes in and I think we’ve been good students and stewards of our resources so far. We’ve learned how to efficiently run the building and fine-tune our operation. Strong attendance and a stable membership have certainly contributed to keeping us going. Real financial strength, however, will only come when we raise a sustaining endowment. It’s a mistake to think, once the doors are open and everything is running along nicely, no more assistance is needed. The reality is, there’s not a museum in America that thrives without donor support. We need a blend of gate receipts, member dues, regular donations and larger endowment commitments to attain true viability. We recently launched a planned giving program and have already picked up a bit more than $3 million in endowment commitments, but we need to launch a serious endowment campaign in the near future. An endowment literally is the Museum’s “Fuel for the Future.”

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One last question, what sort of response has ACM received from Nancy LeMay, who, along with her late husband, conceived the idea of a car museum in Tacoma?

DM: “Nancy LeMay has told me numerous times that she’s delighted with the new Museum. She fully understands that a project like this out in Tacoma, Washington, has to market itself differently; it has to be a destination attraction by moving beyond car museum norms. Additionally, Nancy continues to serve on our board along with her son Doug. She continues to provide significant financial support and remains committed to making the Museum a success. She’s giving generously to us and is very proud of the Museum that bears the family name.

WE PRESENT OUR EXHIBIT CARS AS CHARACTERS IN A STORY EMBEDDED WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF EVERYDAY LIFE. THIS APPROACH IS KEY TO DRAWING IN THE NON-ENTHUSIAST.

12 OPENROAD


The 2014 Wheels & Heels Annual Gala “CARnivale!” lit up the night—literally and figuratively. Over 300 guests dined on El Gaucho’s delicious fare, enjoyed dazzling entertainment and partied to Samba rhythms. The evening raised more than $425,000 to support ACM’s focus on education. Special thanks go out to our Presenting Sponsor ~ Emerald Queen Casino and Silver Sponsor ~ Hagerty and all who donated items to the live and silent auctions. Your continuing support makes this and all the other exciting ACM events possible. We look forward to the 2015 Wheels & Heels Annual Gala and will be announcing the theme soon!

Photos By - Saga City Media/Phototainment


Sept 5 Tour d’Jour

| Sept 6 Dinner d’Elegance | Sept 7 Pacific Northwest Concours d’Elegance

tacoma, Wa | pnWconcourS.org | 253.779.8490 net proceedS Will benefit the hagerty education program at a merica’S car muSeum.


ON EXHIBIT

Cars cycle in and out of the exhibits. Actual vehicles on display may vary.

FROM AESTHETICALLY STUNNING CLASSICS TO BRUTALLY EFFICIENT TRACK CARS

E

very nation has its mythic imagery. Icons so… well… “iconic” they don’t need an explanatory caption. You see it and you get it… you know the backstory. A galloping chrome horse and the number “66” are part of the image language of the USA. The horse is a “Mustang” and the “66” is the most famous road in America. Both are currently on display at your AMERICA’S CAR MUSEUM.

What better time than now to honor our favorite wild pony—during its 50th Anniversary year. “Masters of Mustang” tells the story of the individuals who designed and built the perfect car at the perfect time… a car that seduced the burgeoning baby boomer generation and continues to win converts within generations X, Y & Z. Henry Ford II told his team, “This had better work!”… And boy, did it work! Route 66—at the very least, it’s about teepee shaped motels and horned ‘jackalopes.’ At its most serious, it was the road taken by millions of Americans fleeing dust and poverty in pursuit of a better life. Our “Dream of the Mother Road”

Route 66: Dream of the Mother Road

exhibit presents both sides of the story… the whimsical and silly and the sobering and poignant. In addition to cars and memorabilia, informative and image-rich wall graphics help make this mythic asphalt.

Masters of Mustang LeMay Shelby GT500

1922 Ford Model T 1931 Plymouth 1932 Ford Sedan delivery 1946 Ford Pick up Truck 1946 Ford Super Deluxe Convertible 1953 Chevrolet Corvette 1954 Pontiac Chieftain Deluxe 8 1954 Chevrolet Bel Air Station Wagon 1955 Mercury Monterey 2 door hardtop 1956 Ford Thunderbird 1961 Chevrolet Impala

Atzbach Shelby GT350H (Hertz) Atzbach Shelby GT350 Convertible – One of only four produced 1964.5 K Code 1964.5 Convertible 1965 Mustang 1965 Shelby GT350 Factory Drag Race Car 1965 Shelby GT350 1966 Convertible

ACM Selects 2014 Master Collector Honorees

Master Collectors protect and enjoy our automotive heritage.These distinguished individuals play a key role in preserving, restoring, and sharing the world’s automotive heritage with the public.

1966 Shelby GT350H 1966 Shelby GT350 Convertible 1967 Fastback 1967 Shelby GT 500 1967 GTA Coupe 1968 “Bullitt” re-creation 1971 Mach 1 1990 WA State Patrol 1992 Convertible Limited Edition 1993 Cobra R Code 2008 “Shelby GT 350 Tribute” 2014 Mustang

On September 6th, ACM will honor three distinguished collectors Peter Hageman, Al McEwan and Glenn Mounger at the opening of the 2014 Master Collector exhibit. They are being recognized for their life-long

contributions at the top tier of the collector car world. Eleven cars from their private collections will be the center pieces of the exhibit celebrating the influence of these master collectors.

Mustang Exhibit photo by - Pettepiece Photography OPENROAD 15


FUEL FOR THE FUTURE Special Friends of the Museum Corry and Donna McFarland

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aised in Sandpoint, Idaho and a Tacoma resident since 1975, Corry McFarland has dedicated his life to hard work and community service. He has held numerous management positions and has served as President or Chairman

of various wood products associations. McFarland was recently honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award presented by the University of Washington Tacoma, Milgard

“MY FATHER AND GRANDFATHER WERE VERY SMART IN INSISTING

School of Business. As a member of the Executive Committee and Chairman of ACM’s Board of Directors, Corry McFarland has been an especially active participant in the growth and success

I DO EVERY DIRTY JOB IN THE COMPANY SO THAT I WOULD HAVE

of LeMay– AMERICA’S CAR MUSEUM. When it comes to cars—and ACM—Corry is clearly an enthusiast. “Beginning with my father’s passion for collecting cars, our family has always had

EMPATHY FOR THOSE WORKERS SHOULD I BE SUCCESSFUL ENOUGH TO RISE THROUGH THE RANKS.

a love affair with the automobile. Donna and I decided to become involved with and support AMERICA’S CAR MUSEUM because it is at the forefront of a movement to promote automotive heritage and, through a serious education program, to transmit the knowledge needed to preserve vintage automobiles for the next generations. An exciting, active and vibrant creation… the Museum continues to expand its presence across America and beyond. Donna and I are pleased to be

I STARTED DURING SUMMERS IN HIGH SCHOOL, WORKING IN THE PLANT, DRILLING HOLES IN POLES, HOOKING

supporters of ACM.” Corry and Donna McFarland have been married for 38 years and have two children, daughter Brie and son Brian. They enjoy getting behind the wheel and on the road in their Mercedes Benz SLS Roadster. When not on

CHOKERS AND LEARNING HOW TO OPERATE A TREATING PLANT.”

the road, the McFarlands’ Mercedes

n B. Corry McFarland Chairman, Board of Directors LeMay– America’s Car Museum President, Cedar Management Company

Benz SLS AMG Roadster resides at Club Auto, Tacoma.

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FUEL FOR THOUGHT Aquiring, Holding and Transferring Collectibles By Thomas P. Ryan, Senior Director, BNY Mellon Wealth Management BNY Mellon Wealth Management, Official Provider of financial services to ACM

IF PUTTING TOGETHER A COLLECTION OF LUXURY AUTOMOBILES IS ONE OF YOUR PASSIONS, THERE ARE SOME IMPORTANT FACTORS, SOME OF THEM SOMEWHAT QUIRKY, THAT SHOULD BE CONSIDERED. n THIS IS PART OF A PERIODIC SERIES ON SOME OF THE TAX CONSIDERATIONS THAT YOU AND YOUR ADVISOR MAY FACE.

TAX TREATMENT This material is provided for illustrative/educational purposes only. This material is not intended to constitute legal, tax, investment or financial advice. Effort has been made to ensure that the material presented herein is accurate at the time of publication. However, this material is not intended to be a full and exhaustive explanation of the law in any area or of all of the tax, investment or financial options available. The information discussed herein may not be applicable to or appropriate for every investor and should be used only after consultation with professionals who have reviewed your specific situation. Pursuant to IRS Circular 230, we inform you that any tax information contained in this communication is not intended as tax advice and is not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used, for the purpose of (i) avoiding penalties under the Internal Revenue Code or (ii) promoting, marketing or recommending to another party any transaction or matter addressed herein. ©2013 The Bank of New York Mellon Corporation. All rights reserved.

What Am I Going to Pay? Long-term capital gains qualify for a favorable tax rate compared to ordinary income. The American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 raised the maximum tax rate on most long-term capital gains from 15% to 20%, a 33% increase. Collectibles in the hands of investors or collectors are deemed to be a capital asset. However, the maximum long-term capital gain rate on collectibles is 28% rather than the maximum 20% rate that applies to most other capital assets. An additional 3.8% surtax applies to gains for certain high income earners. Dealers and creators are treated differently. The collectible in their hands is treated as inventory causing a sale of the collectible to be taxed as ordinary income up to a maximum rate of 39.6%.

You Can’t Take It with You!

n The collectible must be related to the charity’s

exempt function; and

n The donor must obtain a “qualified appraisal” from a

“qualified appraiser.”

A donor can check the qualifying status of a particular charity by using “Exempt Organization Select Check,” an Internal Revenue Service online database that is updated monthly. It is available at http://apps.irs.gov/app/eos. Investors and collectors complying with the four requirements listed above are entitled to an income tax charitable deduction equal to the fair market value of the collectible. Otherwise, an income tax charitable deduction is limited to the collectible’s cost basis. Dealers and creators, in whose hands a collectible is deemed to be ordinary income, may only claim an income tax charitable deduction equal to the collectible’s adjusted cost basis.

A time will come in the wealth planning process when owners will need to address whether or not to transfer their collection to their heirs or to charity. The transfer can be done either during life or at death. If a collector decides to transfer a collectible to charity during his or her lifetime, several rules should be kept in mind. In order to claim a charitable income tax deduction for the fair market value of collectibles that are transferred to charity during a donor’s lifetime:

The estate tax charitable deduction rules are less complicated. Generally, it is only necessary that the collectible be given to a qualifying charity, domestic or foreign.

n The collectible must be contributed to a U.S.

If you have questions regarding how you can make a lasting impact through a planned gift please contact:

public charity;

n The collectible must be considered long-term

capital gain property; i.e. held for over one year;

Lifetime charitable gifts of collectibles are beset with numerous traps for the unwary. Navigating this minefield requires consideration of a number of factors. The BNY Mellon Wealth Management team has a number of experts available to provide private consultation as a complementary service to all AMERICA’S CAR MUSEUM members.

Deirdre Evans, VP for Institutional Advancement of

AMERICA’S CAR MUSEUM Thomas P. Ryan of BNY Mellon Wealth Management OPENROAD 17


ROAD WELL TAKEN

Great American Road Trips

The Florida Keys By Walt Tomsic, Managing Editor, OpenRoad, AMERICA’S CAR MUSEUM Start: Florida City, Florida Finish: Key West, Florida Distance: 125 miles

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Let’s begin our journey with some full disclosure. As with past routes, does this edition of “Road Well Taken” chronicle a driver’s dream... an enthusiast’s delight? In one curse monosyllabic word... No! Okay, is it even mildly entertaining? Zippo! But… is it a memorable experience? Now we’re getting somewhere.

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Start the “experience” in Florida City and head south out of town on Highway 1. You’ll soon discover, much like Florida’s Atlantic coastal highway—the A1A, there’s little to see other than the usual tourist roadside clutter. Thusly cluttered Key Largo seems to go on forever. Where ‘tourist-ville’ ends, wind-breaking rows of vegetation continue to obscure ocean views. To be perfectly honest, other than that giant lobster (7), the first half of the drive is a snooze. I must admit, in my “I drive the Florida Keys” fantasy, I had envisioned more “bridge over turquoise water.” Other than a handful of moderately lengthy spans—the longest of which is seven miles—most water crossings are rather brief. Oh, and did I mention the traffic? There’s a lot of it... and it’s slow. Plan on at least three hours drive time. By now you’re probably thinking, “sounds dreadful, why bother?” But take heart. Once you reach the halfway point things start getting a bit more scenic (8). Conch and Shark Keys are especially appealing and Key West is almost in sight. So, despite what must seem a negative review, is the drive worth it? Absolutely! Why? Because, like bungee jumping and climbing Mt. Everest, it’s there and there’s nothing else like it in all the world. And best of all, Key West is the carrot at the end of that long... long... stick. Speaking of which, book a room for at least one night. I can’t imagine doing a same day down-and-back.

18 OPENROAD

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TRIP TIPS: You’ll see lots of signs along the way advertising $9 t-shirts. All I can say is this, if you can find one for $9, it will be so socially inappropriate as to be unwearable in polite society…. or even totally impolite society. While in Key West make somewhere on or near Duval Street your homebase. Evening into night on Duval is a happening. You’ll see everything from Darth Vader playing a banjo to a guy on an illuminated trike bellowing Michael Jackson tunes. The nightly sunset celebration in Mallory Square is another must-do.

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Be sure to visit the clowder of polydactyl cats at the Hemingway house (3). The place is filled with fascinating period photos of the writer and his various conquests... both animal and female. If you’re feeling spry, you can climb the historic lighthouse across the street (4). Cats aren’t the only things wandering the streets of Key West. Roosters, hens and chicks strut about everywhere (2). According to one loquacious bartender, they predate the cats, having arrived on pirate ships... makes for a good story and might even be true. As for places to stay and eat, there are too many choices to list (1 & 5). Hop on the web and check them out. Key West is parking space challenged so be sure to pick lodging with on-site parking. For getting around, rent a scooter or a bike (6) or just hoof it. If your itinerary puts you in the Miami area, don’t miss the Miami Car Museum, home of the Dezer Collection. Its permanent exhibit of James Bond cars and memorabilia alone is worth the visit.

YOU’LL SEE EVERYTHING FROM DARTH VADER PLAYING A BANJO TO A GUY ON AN ILLUMINATED TRIKE BELLOWING MICHAEL JACKSON SONGS 8 OPENROAD

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A U T O B I O G R A P H Y

The Brits have a word for it, “bespoke”... custom tailored vs. off the rack... Savile Row vs. Men’s Wearhouse. The idea applies equally well to automotive sheet metal as it does to worsted wool.

CustomFit

1939 Ford Deluxe Convertible Custom A m e r i c a’s C a r M u s e u m C o l l e c t i o n

Words by Walt Tomsic | Photography courtesy of Street Rodder Magazine | Photographer Randy Lorentzen | Donated to ACM by Cindy Warn


T

The concept of hand-matching a car’s

appearance to an owner’s unique vision and taste is nothing new. Custom coachbuilders

WHETHER IT’S A “CHIP” OR A “BOB,” BEAUTY AND FUNCTION LIVE IN THE DETAILS

have been doing it for almost as long as

When it comes to the person doing

cars have been around. All it took was

the building, they can be a ‘celebrity’

the afore mentioned vision, a rolling

customizer with his own reality TV show…

chassis from a maker such as Pierce Arrow

a Chip Foose for instance, or just Bob

or Packard and of course money—lots

down the street wrenching all night in his

and lots of money. The coachbuilders

garage. Whether it’s a “Chip” or a “Bob,”

themselves became celebrities of a

beauty and function live in the details.

sort—Brewster, Hibbard, Darrin and LeBaron to cite but a few—their names adding to the perceived status of their client’s chariots. The result, Roscoe “Fatty” Arbuckle’s Pierce Arrow would never be mistaken for Clara “It Girl” Bow’s LaSalle. “Custom” though these car bodies may

In the case of our GT39, the guy in charge was Tim Divers of Divers Street Rods in Startup, Washington. Though perhaps not a media luminary, Divers has cred galore in the world of custom cars. His mantra, “If you’re not living on the edge, you’re taking up too much room” has served him well.

have seemed at the time, they all remained

Divers’ creations—including the Warns’

relatively true to the accepted design

other ACM donation “Ferrambo” and the

parameters of their day. Differing more in

stunning “GT39”—have collected boodles

subtle detail than substantive form, they

of accolades, among them some of the

certainly never approached the sculptural

highest attainable … more on that later.

diversity, and at times sheer whackyness, we see in today’s custom car culture.

Originally customized by Divers Streetrods in the 1980s, this award winning 1939 Ford

So, how does the formula of “owner vision

Deluxe Convertible has been featured in

+ rolling chassis + custom builder + lots of

Rod Action and Street Rodder magazines.

money” apply today? Essentially… pretty

In 2006, Cindy Warn sent the car back to

much ditto but with a lot more wiggle room.

Tim Divers for a “face lift.” At the time,

It still takes someone with a visionary

Divers was hard at work on husband

concept in mind—therein lies the end of

Mike’s “Ferrambo” project and the GT

the strict “ditto.” Customs today can start

had to wait its turn. Once under way, the

life as a traditional stock rolling chassis, a

nipping and tucking would take four years

high-tech CAD/CAM creation or simply

to complete and leave a scant 20% of the

piles of rusted junk in a scrap yard… lots

original sheet metal intact.

of wiggle room here. As for the money… I’ve never met a quick and cheap custom that was either quick or cheap. Maybe another “ditto” here.

continued on page 22 OPENROAD 21


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Under all those elegant curves, GT39 is propelled by a hand built, supercharged aluminum mill pumping out 550 hp. The air suspension allows multiple pre-set ride heights for cruising, spirited driving or just looking gorgeous while at rest. So as not to be upstaged by the exquisite exoskin, the interior sports a custom dash and sumptuous leather upholstery. A removable hardtop allows the car to be enjoyed both buttoned up and ‘open air.’ The Warns’ other custom donated to ACM, this time courtesy of husband Mike, is a 1960 Rambler American Station Wagon that bears no resemblance to a 1960 Rambler American Station Wagon.

A “SLAMMED” RAMBLER WITH A 405 HP FERRARI DRIVETRAIN PLACED BACK WHERE 2.5 KIDS AND THE FAMILY DOG USUALLY RIDE

If a ‘slammed’ Rambler with a 405 hp Ferrari drivetrain—placed back where 2.5 kids and the family dog usually ride—doesn’t qualify as a “visionary concept,” there simply is no such thing. The Ridler Award winning and aptly christened “Ferrambo” certainly lives up to the name. Painted a retinasearing Rosso Corsa Red, the car’s nose follows early Lusso styling cues. A custom tan Scottish leather interior is carried through to the under hood neatly slotted and fitted luggage. All in all, Ferrambo is a mind-bending, edgeliving proposition… ACM level two “Speed Zone”… don’t miss it.

1939 Ford Deluxe Convertible Custom Engine 2006 Ford GT V-8, 5.4L (330ci) Handbuilt, all aluminum, Lysholm supercharger Output

550hp @6,500 rpm 500lb/ft @ 3,750 rpm

Transmission Ford 4R100 Lightning/Compushift electronic shifter Fuel capacity 26-1/2 gallons Brakes

4-wheel disc, drilled & slotted rotors

Steering

Rack & pinion

Dimensions: Rode Tech air / 12 way adjustables QA1 shocks *Specification data can, and often does, vary from source to source. When in doubt, we use those most often cited.

GT39’s SCRUPULOUS ATTENTION TO DETAIL CARRIES OVER TO THE ENGINE & RUNNING GEAR

22 OPENROAD


Y H P A R G O I B O T U A

AUTO TRIVIA

Custom’s Top Awards

Chopped ....

Lowering roofline by removing sections of roof pillers

The most prized and hotly contested awards within the culture of custom cars are the AMBR (America’s Most Beautiful Roadster) and the Ridler. The AMBR is conferred at the annual Grand National Roadster Show (formerly known as the Oakland Roadster Show). The Ridler, named in honor of show promoter Don Ridler, is presented at the Detroit Autorama.

Dagmars ....

Large bullet-shaped chrome bumpers usually from Buicks and Cadillacs

The 8 ft. tall AMBR trophy recognizes the year’s most beautiful two-seat convertible… hence the qualifying term, “Roadster.” The list of AMBR winners include the likes of Chip Foose, Boyd Coddington, George Barris and Chuck Krikorian to name but a few. Cars competing for the Ridler must be ‘first-timers’ having never been shown prior. This restriction prompts many builder/ owners to seek the Ridler first and the AMBR second.

Lead sled ... Customizing vehicle using traditional method of molten lead rather than Bondo

Glossary of Terms

N.O.S. ........... “New Old Stock” – unused original parts

3 Deuces ...

Three 2-barrel carburetors

Nosed .......... Hood trim removed

3 on the tree 3-speed manual transmission with shifter mounted to steering column

Rake ............. Lowered front end

Bondo ..........

Brand name of body putty that has become a generic term

Cherry .........

Like new, perfect

Channeled

Lowering car body by cutting out floor boards and remounting to frame rails

Decked ....... .....Trunk lid trim removed Frenched ...

Recessing antenna, head and tail lights into body or fenders

Jimmy ......... GMC engine, usually a straight 6

Lake pipes Short, straight exhaust pipes with no muffler (non-street legal) Mill ...............

Slang for “engine”

Moons ........ Simple flat hubcaps first used on land speed racers Baby Moons As above but smaller, usually covering only lug nuts

Sectioning

Removing entire sections of body either vertically or horizontally

Skirts ...........

Rear quarter panel wheel covers

Tuck & roll

Upholstery technique to create “pleated” ridges

Tunneled .... To sink deeply into a fender

“IF YOU’RE NOT LIVING ON THE EDGE, YOU’RE TAKING UP TOO MUCH ROOM.” Tim Divers Divers Street Rods

OPENROAD

23


GUEST EDITORIAL

Traveling on a 1960 Bonneville ...When it was new By Clement Salvadori

I HAD TEN WEEKS AHEAD OF ME, WITH A SLEEPING BAG, A YOUTH HOSTEL CARD AND FROMMER’S EUROPE ON $5 A DAY

O

ne of the problems involved in growing older is realizing that most of what are now considered “classic” bikes were new in the era of my misbegotten youth. At age 16, I bought a slightly used NSU Max 250—which turned out to be a sensible purchase as it was not prone to breaking down. At 18, I celebrated my graduation from high school by acquiring a very used Indian Chief 80 for $300—which was not a good buy as it constantly gave me problems. I sold it less than a year later for $200. In 1959, I read about the Triumph Bonneville. “Fastest Production Motorcycle Made” headlined the ad. I had to have one! Scrimping, saving and penny-pinching for a year, I got the money together. My local Massachusetts dealer told me that if I picked the bike up at the factory I could save more than a hundred bucks off the $900 U.S. price—enough to buy a round-trip Icelandic Airlines ticket to London. I took a train to Coventry, a bus out to the Meriden works... and there was my pride and joy. The factory claimed it had 50 brake horsepower, “rated with a straight-through exhaust system.” Maybe a few got lost on their way to the rear wheel, but it was still overwhelmingly powerful compared to the NSU or Indian. I had ten weeks ahead of me, with a sleeping bag, a youth-hostel card, and Frommer’s Europe on $5 a Day.

24 OPENROAD

along at full-throttle, the Smiths speedo needle wobbling at about 110 until there was a sudden decrease in power and smoke poured out of my left exhaust. Dang! Holed a piston. Riding the bike to the nearest railroad station, we trained up to Milano and had a new piston installed.

A loop around the British Isles taught me the basics of maintenance, checking tappets, adjusting chains and making sure all accessible nuts and bolts were tight. Then we went across the Channel and down to Spain for the San Fermin festival at Pamplona. You ride a Bonnie, you run with the bulls... and barely survive. I headed east to Italy to see Granmama and Joe Lucas failed me as I crossed the Pyrennees at dusk. Fortunately, he made good magnetos and I got to my hostel, and then on to Marsailles the next day where the problem was fixed. A little later I was in Italy, headed south along the autostrada between Modena and Bologna, cruising along at maybe 85 mph—and a Ferrari went by me. Ah, let it go. Then another passed and I gave chase—not realizing that Maranello, where Ferraris are made, was just off to the west and this highway was merely a test track. I was going

..HEADED NORTH, OVER THE ALPS, TO SWEDEN. TO SEE IF ALL I HAD HEARD ABOUT SWEDISH WOMEN WAS TRUE...

After a few days with relations, I headed north over the Alps and way north to Sweden to see if all I had heard about Swedish women was true. It was. Now I was running low on money, so better ride back to Italy over more Alps. The family funded my return to England—daytime riding only, as Joe had struck again. Back at the factory they admired the many thousand miles on the odometer and listened to the engine. “Sounds like the bottom end’s a mite noisy. No worries, we’ll fix it before we send it to your dealer in Massachusetts.”And they did and I remained relatively true to Triumph for the next ten years. I now ride a 21st century Bonneville... not nearly as romantic, but a lot more reliable.


MEMBERSHIP

Members Drive AMERICA’S CAR MUSEUM

ACM Members Enjoy a Host of Exclusive Activities & Events By Deirdre Evans, VP for Institutional Advancement Lauren Humphrey, Annual Giving & Membership Manager

For more information, visit lemaymuseum.org and click on “Membership.”

The “Motor West on Route 66” Exclusive Member Preview* was both fun and informative.

Two members test their Route 66 trivia knowledge on one of the exhibit’s interactive wall graphics.

Membership The “Moonshine and Mustangs” Member Preview drew a huge turnout... a testament to the car’s enduring popularity.

We bet this member really knows his ponies... like that the green “Bullitt” car ran a 390 and not a 289 or 427.

*Exclusive Member Previews are a unique benefit of ACM membership levels “Silver Key Driver” and above. Mustang Exhibit photos by - Pettepiece Photography 26 OPENROAD


Club Auto Colorado members enjoy the club’s 5th anniversary party amid some very nice cars. Club Auto Tacoma and Hagerty celebrated Mustang’s 50th birthday with hundreds of owners and their families.

Concours Club member Tom Hedges works on his 1969 Ferrari 365 GT 2+2 in Club Auto Kirkland’s Griot’s Garage detail area.

Club Auto Colorado’s annual “Tour For The Kids” benefiting ACM and a children’s charity.

learning never takes a recess

Educationat ACM Learning never takes recess at LeMay– AMERICA’S CAR MUSEUM. Educational offerings are an important part of the fabric of ACM… and not just for kids. Activities go on year round and cater to all ages. Overnight programs, summer camps and those geared to scout troops and professional educators are part of the mix. Visit the Museum website, lemaymuseum.org and click on “education” for program and registration details. Here’s what’s on tap over the next few months. If Cars Could Talk: Adult Brown Bag Lunch Series Each month, our speaker will pick a particular car and offer a fascinating and informative peek into its history and technology. August 5, September 2, October 7, November 4, December 2

High Speed Fun Summer Camp Campers will experience the world of racing through a variety of exciting activities… all very safe of course. August 11 – 15 Family Workshops Build, tinker, and learn together as you explore the world of cars. You and your child, grandchild or family will spend quality time together designing, creating or exploring cool car concepts. August 23, September 27, October 25, November 22, December 27 Route 66 Educator Workshop Explore the history and social connections of America’s “Mother Road.” September 20 Museum Educator Night Educators are invited to join us for a free and fun evening at America’s Car Museum. It’s an exciting opportunity for educators to relax, mingle and learn more about area educational resources and programs. October 2 ACM Family Zone The Family Zone is always buzzing with fun and engaging hands-on activities designed to capture the imagination and inspire learning. Open during regular Museum hours OPENROAD 27


Major Sponsor Recognition


Thank You to Our 2014 Club Auto Founder Sponsors

“lifestyle on wheels magazine”

www.bellevueporsche.com

Thank You to Our 2014 Club Auto Sponsors

Car, Motorcycle & Scooter Club Sponsors

AAA Colorado

Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance

Classic Car Club of America, Pacific Northwest Region

Porsche Club of America – Pacific Northwest Region

Selden’s Home Furnishings

Emerald City Model A Ford Club

Puget Sound British Automotive Association

Gallopin’ Gerties Model A Club

Western Washington All British Field Meet

Arizona 500, LLC Award Services Concorso Italiano Conover Insurance Dobson Motorsport The Fitzgerald Group Fresh Northwest Design

Silvertone Exhaust Washington State Auto Dealer Association

Mustangs Northwest National Association of Auto Clubs of Canada


Administrative: 2702 East D Street, Tacoma, Washington 98421 Phone: 253.779.8490 Toll Free: 877.902.8490 Fax: 253.779.8499 Website: www.lemaymuseum.org

L EMAY-A MERICA’S C AR M USEUM

C e l e b r a t i n g A m e r i c a’s l o v e affair with the automobile

Standard U.S. Postage PAID Tacoma, WA Permit NO 899

Open Road Summer 2014  

Open Road Summer 2014. Celebrating America's love affair with the automobile.

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