Entertainment Fort Smith Magazine - September 2021

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EDITOR’S NOTES

Still masking for the love of humanity

Editorial Staff LYNN WASSON Editor & Publisher lynnwasson@efortsmith.com DONNA PAYNE Senior Editor donnapayne@efortsmith.com

Contributing Photographers McFARLAND PHOTOGRAPHY GLENN GILLEY Interactive Story Editor JOE WASSON joe@efortsmith.com

Advertising Sales LINDA GILHAM lgilham@efortsmith.com 479-629-0235

We have our own project: to bring Aunt Kathy’s deluxe dollhouse back to life for holiday display This is a happy story but it begins with loss. Earlier this year, a month before her 75th birthday, my aunt Kathy Walker Young’s heart failed, without warning. Suddenly, she was gone. She was mom to her beloved son, Will; she was the greatest great-aunt to our daughters and, to me, Kathy was that special aunt – my idol. Here’s why: She is the first artist I knew and loved. She was talented, majoring in apparel design at Texas Women’s University. But that was just a start. She expressed creativity in every aspect of her life, from sewing her own wardrobe to drawing and painting; to interior design, then architectural design and renovation. I admired the many marvelous things she made. But I loved her for the way she lived.

She modeled an artist’s will to go your own, original way. Kathy didn’t intend to worry her anxious, very proper mother. But my Mimi knew when her daughter’s elegant jawline took a familiar set and her chin lifted, her baby girl wasn’t going to swerve from any wild notion. Encouraging Kathy, which her mother always did, could have unintended consequences. At a preschool age in the early 1950s, Kathy declared “I am an Indian.” Mimi got her a costume and her cattleman daddy threw a blanket on a gentle horse. Then, little Kathy refused, for an entire summer, to dismount or break character. Go to town? Sure, as an Indian. On my horse. Go to Sunday school? Only like an Indian, Mother. This phase faded, but her strong will – never.

CHARLES G. HUBBARD charleshubbard@efortsmith.com 479-831-3995 Bookkeeping JULIE BERCH HAMILTON accounts@efortsmith.com © 2021 eFortSmith.com Media, Inc.

efortsmith.com is the website of Entertainment Fort Smith Magazine, where full current and past issues may be viewed as a replica of the printed magazine.

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Thanks to my U-Haul driver Joe and strong men Will and Cal Young for the heavy lifting.

At left, when our barn took a fatal tilt from a spring storm, we evacuated the dollhouse that had been stored there. Above, little Kathy, in her I Am An Indian summer, at the same barn.


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EDITOR’S NOTES Fast-forward through Kathy’s life of chasing myriad passions, when miniatures lit up her mind. Her obsession escalated through a series of projects, peaking with the big house shown here. As she and her husband, with their young son, Will, had moved back to her late parents’ spacious ranch home, she had room to create this magnum opus, made from two large kits. She was, almost, like a boatbuilder whose yacht got too big to transport to the sea. This mighty big miniature sits on a 4 x 6-foot base. Kathy completed it with furnished, lighted rooms, fabricating much of the tiny decor that enhanced fine, purchased furniture. She added on a sunroom and even landscaped a tiny garden around a copper-roofed gazebo. As I came to understand about many artists, her pleasure was more in making a thing than possessing it in its finished state. One day, after years of it commanding her dining room, she crated the house and moved it out to the barn. Her miniature “phase” had faded. She would spend 20 years renovating her life-sized house, with even more drive and creativity. Due to her, another generation got to enjoy the house where we are all rooted. And despite her distinctive transformation of almost all of it, she was gifted with an ability to preserve the emotions and memories we all have about our shared home and the loved people in it. We’re happy that Will has chosen to homestead there a bit longer. His passions are his love, Taylor, and creating electronic dance music. Will and I agreed his mom would have liked my idea to recruit a team to refresh her biggest little house and then to invite others to see it. I am not a gifted craftsman, but I know one! Foremost, I roped in Sonny and Sue Robison. I’ve written about his creative accomplishments and I knew he was between projects, so I asked quickly. Sue is his resourceful “enabler” and engaging kids is her trademark motive. (Yes, they portray Judge Isaac C. Parker and wife Mary for students visiting the Museum of History). I needed Sue’s superpowers to contrive this goal: to refresh the house, decorate it for Christmas and display it at the Fort Smith Trolley Museum’s annual Polar Express reading. It will amuse children waiting in line. This inspired Sonny to add a 1:12 scale streetcar to the scene. Now he’s churning and it’s happening! Then, I learned yet another dimension of a multi-talented artist and friend, Laura Wattles. Not only does she make outstanding portraits in many mediums, she creates miniatures! Laura will contribute her artistry in some way, too.

This week-old dream team is already active. Do any of you readers have a desire to join? Maybe you, too, have put away miniature furniture or decorations that could live again in this project? Please discuss with me at 479-4941888 or lynnwasson@efortsmith.com. We will not be gathering in Sonny’s snug workshop. We’ll be Covid-safe. But we can have drop-offs, short rendezvous or virtual meet-ups. After its holiday display, a new plan may arise for the house. Its future is unwritten. I feel a bit comforted knowing my Aunt Kathy’s creative essence and artistry will fascinate fresh eyes. I will do as she would: saddle up for a dream and stick with it until the next one charms you. – Lynn Wasson

Opposite page: Sonny Robison slides the dollhouse into his workshop. Above: out of the crate, dusted and with a few repair tasks lined up.The piece with double windows and copper roof belongs on the exterior. Furniture, artwork, dishes and rugs are not shown here but are ready to be installed once more.

Above: placed on a laptop for scale, this wicker chaise lounge belongs in the sunroom or conservatory of the house. Figural elephant plant stands are replicas of a real one Kathy lugged to her homes all over the U.S. Left: Sonny has already begun to create trolley tracks for a 1:12 scale Fort Smith streetcar stop at the front of the house. With detailed plans shared by Bradley Martin as a guide, all the trolley features will be authentic. September 2021

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CONTENTS

September 2021

features

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Our tiny house project

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A big little house comes alive again After writing about hundreds of projects, we have one of our own! Follow as a team we gathered revives a special miniature house to share with kids at holiday time.

A community is growing together at Chaffee Crossing Each September, we check in at the fastest-growing, most-changing part of Fort Smith. While new buildings and homes are plainly evident, we like to ask how community is growing amongst its people. Take a look at campus, commerce, hospitality and recreation in these special focus stories.

River Town is a credit union with deep community roots Perhaps the longest-operated credit union in town, River Town is a place where everybody knows your name and you have a voice in the way banking is operated there.

departments

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A special park emerges

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Discoveries from the finest retail shopping hot spots.

WHAT’S COOKING Outdoor dining ideas for September weather. C’mon, autumn!

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GOODIES

EVENTS FOR KIDS A family fun day planned by RAM and more kid-focused happenings.

MUSIC & PERFORMANCE Congratulating the Fort Smith International Film Festival, particularly our own awarded local film, plus upcoming choices for entertainment.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Remembrance exhibit and talks solemnly observe the 20th anniversary of Sept. 11, 2001.

on the cover Outdoor dining ideas

Entertainment Fort Smith

September 2021

This epic shot from the McClure Amphitheatre shows how what were once separate – Fort Smith and Fort Chaffee – are now together. Chaffee Crossing is the fastest growing neighborhood in Fort Smith. Photo by Brian Weindel


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Creating community together at Chaffee Crossing

Photo by Brian Weindel

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ach September for the past few years, this magazine takes a fresh look at Chaffee Crossing, the fastest-growing and most-changing area of Fort Smith. What does it mean to residents of this area? What is life like ‘out there’? As its residents get to know one another as friends and neighbors, their lifestyle is becoming even more enjoyable.


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A place that once seemed to be frozen as a distant, closed military base now is closely and fully intertwined into Fort Smith life. To think of Chaffee Crossing that way actually gives away one’s age. It’s a young place to so many folks who now call it home. From many points, a vista of rooftops stretches to the horizon, with their green lawns and attractive exteriors in almost 40 different, named residential developments. Even the oldest residences were mostly built under a span of 25 years. A new home seems to be completed every week, going strong in 2020 when other sectors of business slowed. To many people, Chaffee Crossing is a workplace. Hundreds come daily from all over the region to be the workforce of the many, diverse industries, professions and services making up dozens of businesses. Others are running, pedaling or walking through its outdoor beauty on trails or at the wonderful River Valley Nature Center. Most recently, Chaffee Crossing is the site of learning and training for an ever-increasing number of students of the Arkansas Colleges of Health Education. It’s founding program, the Arkansas College of Osteopathic Medicine, has matured such that local patients are now given treatment by some of its D.O. graduates. They now are medically qualified and currently giving care all over the region. ACHE, as a community presence, will next open a beautiful park on its campus that also will be a magnet attracting public use. It will be known as the Celebration Garden and Wellness Park. Its underlying, thoughtful purpose is to celebrate and honor the lives of anatomical donors. Attracting people who enjoy it will fulfill a foundational mission of ACHE, to create an on-campus, healthy living environment and to provide, for everyone, the benefits of exercise for mental and physical wellness. Everyone will be able to visit its walking trails, exercise equipment and children’s playground and a grand, covered pavilion. This gift from ACHE will be a healing destination for an hour or an afternoon.

Celebration and Wellness Park is in an 8-acre wooded area with a small lake, near the Village at Heritage and ACHE campus on Chad Colley Boulevard. It is connected to sections of Chaffee Crossing’s trail system that cross campus. Everyone who walks and bikes has access. The park will have therapeutic benefits for patients of the nearby Mercy Rehabilitation Hospital and be a place of learning for students of the physical therapy program. Everyone can visit to grow healthier in body and mind.

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CREATING COMMUNITY

New Farmers & Artisans Market draws happy crowds

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hey were just waiting to be asked, apparently. From the first Farmers & Artisans Market this spring, long a goal of FCRA marketing director Lorie Robertson, a happy crowd of people with kids and dogs are showing up enthusiastically to enjoy it. The Fort Chaffee Redevelopment Authority is the steward of converting and conveying the former military Fort Chaffee into a viable asset for all citizens. Responsible for overseeing real estate development, the authority is charged with facilitating infrastructure such as roads and utilities, and creating zoning for sustainable uses that deliver tax revenue to the surrounding cities to whom the land was restored. But there’s also a mission to create quality of life at Chaffee Crossing. Working quietly for many years toward that “good life” goal, you will find an imaginative, effective event producer Lorie Robertson. “I never dreamed it would be at this stage in its first year,” Robertson said. “We have about 100 vendors and are seeing larger crowds attend every month. It has taken off so quickly!”

It’s no overnight success. Robertson researched this community event concept, honing it as an academic study during her continuing education at the Community Development Institute at the University of Central Arkansas. She gained confidence and practical wisdom by helping to establish several Chaffee Crossing community events that have been successful, including its excellent Veterans Day Parade, now a beloved regional tradition. It is presented with minimal budget from the FCRA and the large participation of a recruited force of volunteers. She also helped to hold several fun “Elvis Haircut Day” celebrations to boost the Fort Chaffee Barbershop Museum, a popular attraction of the Chaffee Crossing Historic District. Robertson patiently waited through installation of a Veterans Memorial Plaza to visually draw together the barbershop and fort museums and adjacent tenant, the Crea8ive Arts Studio, a nonprofit art collective in renovated barracks. When conditions seemed just right in 2020, the unfortunate pandemic blocked her plans to launch monthly market days.

When large outdoor gatherings were permitted again, the debut Farmers & Artisans Market was held in May. Since then, its original handful of tents of local produce and attractive arts and crafts shot up to more than 70 vendors over the next three markets – and climbing. Each month has a different theme: a reprise of a “My City is a Fort” cardboard fort-building contest for kids was a hit. Another highlighted pickleball, a racquet game so popular that a Chaffee Crossing court is now installed. Every market day has live music, plenty of kids and family activities and community tables for nonprofit causes. There have been yoga sessions and pottery demonstrations, tying in with two Chaffee Crossing-based studios. People bring their dogs on leashes (they’re invited!) and toddlers in strollers. Runners and bikers have tied their activities to the market. The market days, in short, are being embraced in just the way Robertson had hoped – and researched, refined and planned for. She is a prayerful woman but she recruited all the helpers she could before seeking divine intervention. Market Day Discoveries Turn in your glass items for recycling, clockwise from top left. Beautiful, fresh vegetables. Filling up for a squirt gun fight. Kids build cardboard forts. The pie day theme was tasty.

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CREATING COMMUNITY A corps of vendors and volunteers has stepped up to help set up and take down market tables, place signs and plug in water mist stations, Robertson said, gratefully. She will be organizing a group of “marketeers” over time so it can carry on with increasing self-determination. Robertson uses a metaphor of weaving threads together to make a pleasing and strong whole fabric. “The FCRA provides an underlying thread, a foundation for community building,” she explained. “Then we weave in strength through vendors, volunteers and other participants who take a role, as well, creating more beauty.” An open-air market gives a kind of a laboratory for entrepreneurs, she said. “Let them bring new products to market and test them,” she said. “They may become brick-and-mortar shops someday.” “The vendors enjoy it! They tell me how many people smiled and thanked them for being in the market,” which delights Robertson, too, she said. Even a farmers and artisans market can be a part of economic development, she concluded. Existing business owners immediately joined and assisted the market. They understand the intention behind the concept, which is to invite more visitors to become comfortable shopping, playing and hanging out at Chaffee Crossing and expect great experiences there.

Appealing, original wares from art to skin care products to a charcuterie/butcher board made of three different woods are examples of many artisan-made goods found at the market.

Fall Schedule Farmers & Artisans Market Sept. 18

Rocking good time Rock crawler vehicles, ATVs and monster trucks on display

oct. 16

FALL FRENZY Cornhole tournament fall-themed activities

Families have fun browsing while kids are invited to cool off with squirt gun skirmishes – the wettest is the winner. Crea8ive Arts Network members may throw pottery. Bookish set up a story time. Live music and craft beer offer relaxation.

7313 Terry Street Chaffee Crossing historic district fort smith, Ark. 9 am - 2 pM Free admission and parking September 2021

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CREATING COMMUNITY

It’s all about understanding the map FCRA director must stay current on master land-use plan Major commercial and residential developers of Chaffee Crossing can instantly point to their own projects on the colored-coded master land-use plan in the Fort Chaffee Redevelopment Authority offices. Those colored shapes are where their investment is. Daniel Mann, executive director of the FCRA, knows where everything is. He stays current on the intricate ways all those color-coded properties must be developed in relation to each other, to deliver the highest benefit to the public. To him, this map is a constantly changing puzzle that will someday become one unified picture. The FCRA is a board of directors with Mann as its administrator. They oversee the ongoing development of the 7,000+ acres conveyed back to public use when the federal government relinquished it back to the cities and counties surrounding it. The massive redevelopment has matured. Much use has been decided since 1997, when FCRA was formed. To date, more than $1.85 billion in capital investment has resulted in 17

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corporate and regional headquarters and more than 3,800 jobs. There are now 38 residential neighborhoods and a growing college system of health professions. Retail and small commercial business has bloomed. Chaffee Crossing today is a vibrant, mixed-use community set in a lovely natural landscape, much of which is for public recreation. Mann clearly relishes the challenges of his role, keeping FCRA’s mission on course while outside factors arise. For example, the state Transportation Department says it will start on major construction of Interstate 49 from Arkansas 22 in Sebastian County to I-40 in Crawford County, a project critical to Chaffee Crossing’s future. FCRA will be keenly watching out for the public benefit. Inside Chaffee Crossing itself, Mann has been creating public value in a project turning historic barracks into residences and retail space, he said. Rival CRE’s Barracks project is exciting, Mann said. “I haven’t seen anyone convert barracks into living quarters. We met in the middle in some ways” to create strategies that yielded both more

Daniel Mann knows the inter-dependent relationships of all the projects on FCRA’s master plan.

parking and more ideal street plan and utility use. It’s a “win-win,” Mann said. “That’s the goal.” The mission of the FCRA may be closer to its conclusion, but “there is so much more to do,” he said. “We’re at critical mass now, to make the right decisions for the right projects, that create value for developers who have already invested and for those to come. That’s what I think about every time I stare at this map. We have to be stewards – we are a public trust.”


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CREATING COMMUNITY

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CREATING COMMUNITY

Neighbors meet friends while dining and shopping The social energy level amps up when people rub elbows at Chaffee Crossings’ commercial centers, such as the Warehouse District, The Hub at Providence and the Village at Heritage, part of the campus of the Arkansas Colleges of Health Education. The rise in retail and dining choices at Chaffee Crossing offers places for people to meet with the easy familiarity of bumping into one another casually. Naturally, the proprietors of each small business are teaming up to create an inviting atmosphere for all their customers, but especially those who live nearby. At The Hub at Providence, hospitality and relaxation are the connection. Revel, the restaurant opened by chef Jason Haid, welcomes patrons who stop by spontaneously for an after-work drink or with reservations to enjoy his creations for dinner. A lot of friendly traffic is happening at the new Barrels & Brews Bottle Shop, recently opened by Clint and Kristi Kendrick.

CRAFTED QUALITY Barrels & Brews Bottle Shop

offers one of the most curated selections of wine, beer and spirits in Western Arkansas. Specializing in top-shelf, hard-to-find brands and varietals from some of the most well-known producers.

It will put a smile on your face!

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Nathan Ruiz, store manager, said the bottle shop is ready to be a part of the community. There’s already been one store opening social hour, he said, and they’re looking forward to presenting tastings. Also at The Hub at Providence, gorgeous hair is a daily sight, on patrons and the skilled staff of Salon Savvy, opened by Samantha Sims. All of the camaraderie delights Kathy Coleman of the developers of the mixed-use project, ERC Properties. When it was all still on paper, she dreamed of The Hub residents and businesses all getting a kick out of knowing each other. She loves to act as social glue, introducing people to one another. Once a month, she delivers “happy sacks” of small gifts and treats to The Hub’s residents and businesses, with a hyper-local newsletter. Coleman credits Chaffee Crossing’s pleasant, extensive trail system for creating a flow of people and organically sparking friendliness. “I have even seen people on the trail, who live across the street, picking up litter,” Coleman said. “I thanked them so much.” A new gathering spot is planned for The HUB that will attract more friendly conversations, she said. A coffee shop may open in the near future, near the outdoor commons. Many people will be accompanied by their dogs. Dog-walking and dog-watching are a popular pastime all over Chaffee Crossing’s neighborhoods, it seems. “Happy Sacks” filled up and organized for personal delivery at The Hub.

Mon-Sat | 10AM-10PM 479-763-1228 9301 R.A. Young Jr Dr. Suite 101 Fort Smith

BarrelsandBrewsFS.com


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CREATING COMMUNITY

Natural bonds grow among students and community Some of the cyclists and runners that are frequently glimpsed in motion at Chaffee Crossing are students or faculty of the Arkansas Colleges of Health Education. Among them are many parents with young families who make their homes in residential neighborhoods while others live in attractive student apartments at The Residents or apartments upstairs at Heritage Community across Chad Colley Boulevard. It’s widely understood that these are people we’d like to keep here. Everyone extends them warmth. They’re steps away, by design, from eateries such as Heritage Pizza, a gym and other retail shopping and services. Planned from the start with exactly that intention, the walkable campus encourages a healthy lifestyle, walking over driving and daily encounters with nature and fresh air. Public art, pavilions for large and small gatherings and the new Celebration Garden and Wellness Park all reinforce the colleges’ mission to encourage a healthy lifestyle for the entire region.

The next new class of the Arkansas College of Osteopathic Medicine enjoyed a lawn social and cookout when students arrived in late summer for orientation and enrollment. Photo courtesy of ACHE

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Make It Yours Today! The Chaffee Crossing lifestyle is contagious. Outdoor and indoor amenities, excellent employment opportunities, education, and healthcare surround 40 neighborhoods, each with its own unique character. Businesses and people of all ages are attracted to the relaxed atmosphere intertwined with nature. It’s an exciting time and place where new is the norm.

LIVING SPACES Chaffee Crossing has living options to fit every family size from custom single-family homes to apartments, duplexes, townhomes, and cottages. Multiple mixed-use, walkable neighborhoods are interspersed with restaurants, shopping, and commercial spaces. Visit our website for more information and details. • 40 neighborhoods • Single-family • Apartments • Duplexes • Townhomes

• Studio/loft apartments • Air BNB • Rental homes • Affordable housing • Gated communities


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RECREATIONAL AMENITIES The Chaffee Crossing lifestyle provides many opportunities to live, work, play, and explore the outdoors every day of the year. • Pickleball • Miles of hiking, biking, walking trails • Dog Park • Military Museums • Veterans Memorial • Outdoor Amphitheater • Cycling • Golf

• Soccer • Fishing • Kayaking • Canoeing • Nature Center • Art Studio • RV Community • Bird Sanctuary

ChaffeeCrossing.com • 479.452.4554 Property@ChaffeeCrossing.com


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BUSINESS PROFILE

River Town Federal Credit Union is owned by its depositors

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ver think of yourself as a bank owner? Members of River Town Federal Credit Union are its shareholders. “Being a member of a credit union is like owning your own bank,” explains Lindsay Conley, River Town’s chief executive officer. For every $5 on deposit, a share is accorded to credit union members, who can vote for a board of directors and determine policies, such as interest rates. Many customers who don’t opt to participate by voting still enjoy the lower interest rates and higher returns on savings that a depositorowned credit union can offer, Conley said. For its customers, credit union services are the same as a bank’s - checking and savings, credit

cards and consumer credit for personal, vehicle and home equity loans. It offers checking account services with debit cards and ATM cash withdrawals. VISA classic and gold credit cards are offered at low, competitive rates. River Town Federal Credit Union provides full mobile banking amenities such as digital remote depositing and online transfers to external accounts at other banks. These capabilities make it easy for any client to manage their personal finances from their own phone or computer, 24 hours a day and seven days a week. There is even a way to apply for a loan, online, streamlining the process.

River Town president Lindsay Conley, left, with loan officer Elizabeth Wilhite. Andrew Bair staffs the drive-through services window with excellent service and extra personality. 20

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BUSINESS PROFILE

Donna Kay Smith, LPN Aesthetician

Opposite: Lindsey Conley, left, with Trudy Smith at River Town’s service counter. Helping with consumer loans, Rosemary Odom and Tim Bowers. She also assists Spanish speakers.

The human touch at River Town FCU is just as valuable as all its remote and digital services, Conley maintained. “There are only six employees here, so pretty much anyone you reach on the phone is familiar with your needs,” she emphasized. Speaking with a person is very reassuring, Conley said, when doing important personal finance transactions. It gained a state charter in 1958 as the credit union created solely for the employees of Sparks Hospital. It become a federally chartered credit union, serving employee members of such organizations such as the City of Fort Smith and about 80 other local companies. In April, River Town was approved to become a Community Charter Credit Union, opening eligibility to all people or businesses in Sebastian, Crawford or Sequoyah counties. The credit union keeps the same high standards of personal, helpful member service as its foundation, whether face-to-face or by phone. River Town FCU is excited to be able to serve more people who can now benefit from lower loan rates, fewer fees and a voice in what happens at the credit union. “Our car loans and all our loan rates are generally lower than a bank’s,” Conley said. Its rates are available on its website and updated regularly to maintain the lowest percentage available in this market. New and used auto loans and auto refinance loans are especially competitive. Loan rate discounts are available to credit union members who meet requirements such as 10 years with the same employer and other criteria. Any River Town FCU staff member is happy to explain all the benefits of credit union banking.

A perfect complement to exceptional eye care... Please join us in welcoming Donna Kay Smith, LPN to the Stiles EyeGroup family. Donna Kay is a licensed aesthetician with a passion for skincare.

For an appointment, text 479.806.8347

2401 S. Waldron Rd. | Fort Smith, AR 72903 stileseyegroup.com

River Town Federal Credit Union 1001 South 21st Street Fort Smith, Ark. 479-784-5600 rivertownfcu.org September 2021

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goodies White gold fashion diamond and gemstone rings available from Newton's Jewelers.

Designer handbags by Marc Jacobs and others found at Warehouse 64.

Fashion sunglasses by Oliver Peoples available from Dr. Steven B. Stiles.

Biolage ColorBalm conditioner deposits temporary hair color. Found at Vanity Calls.

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goodies

Speed Queen washers and dryers are in stock at Mike’s Furniture.

Interceptor Plus and Credelio for heartworm and parasites in dogs. Available at Petco.

Aveda cherry almond softening hair products found at Metropolis Hair Studio. September 2021

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goodies Seasonal metal art for inside and out available at Neumeier Nursery & Greenhouses.

Lost Trail bottled cream sodas and root beer available at Paul’s Meat Market.

University of Arkansas wine bottle holder, cooler and EIEIO & Co. Swine Pinot Noir from In Good Spirits.

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goodies

Numbered, limited edition, offset lithographs printed on acid free paper, by John Bell Jr. (1937-2013) available at the Fort Smith Regional Art Museum.

Metal pumpkin decor found at A to Z Variety.

Lightweight Altra Paradigm 6 running shoes offer cushion and support. Found at True Grit Running Co.

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WHAT’S COOKING

Outdoor dining There's nothing like the perfect picnic or barbecue to slow down and reconnect with friends and family. Try these delicious new recipes that bring out the flavor of apples – a versatile and healthy year-round fruit.

APPLE TORTELLINI SALAD Dressing 3 tbsp. frozen concentrate apple juice, thawed 3 tbsp. light corn syrup 2 tsp. brown sugar 1 tsp. apple cider vinegar 2 tsp. garlic salt Ground pepper to taste Salad 9 oz. cheese-filled tortellini 2 cups sliced apples 2 cups shredded salad greens 1 cup sliced fresh strawberries 1/2 cup thinly sliced celery 1/2 cup sliced scallions 2 tbsp. toasted pine nuts (optional) To prepare dressing, combine apple juice concentrate, corn syrup, brown sugar, vinegar, garlic salt and pepper. Cover dressing and refrigerate. To prepare salad, cook tortellini, drain and cool by rinsing pasta under cold water. Shake gently to drain thoroughly. In a large bowl, combine tortellini, apples, salad greens, strawberries, celery and scallions. Toss salad gently with chilled dressing. Serve chilled. If desired, sprinkle with pine nuts.

STRAWBERRY BANANA SMOOTHIE ICE POPS 1 1 1 1 6 1

cup apple juice pint strawberries, hulled, sliced and frozen banana, sliced and frozen apple, peeled, cored, sliced and frozen oz. vanilla yogurt tsp. vanilla

Put all ingredients in a blender and process until smooth. Pour into ice pop forms or paper cups. Place ice pop sticks in center and freeze, inverted, for three hours or until solid. Keep frozen until ready to serve. 26

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Designing a Backyard Party Is Easy • Find vintage plates and serving pieces at a local flea market. • Serve beverages in Mason jars, which can also be used as flower vases. • Cover your table with gingham tablecloth. • Fill large wicker baskets with apples to use as centerpieces. • If hosting in the evening, line the table with tea lights and lanterns.

BAKED APPLE PIE L AYER BARS Bars 21⁄2 cups sifted flour 1 tbsp. sugar 1 tsp. salt 1 cup shortening 1 egg Milk 2/3 cup crushed corn flakes 1/2 cup apple sauce 5 cups sliced, peeled apples 1/4 cup sugar 1 tsp. cinnamon Glaze 1 cup confectioners' sugar 2 tbsp. lemon juice Sift together flour, sugar and salt. Cut shortening in with pastry blender or two knives. Put egg yolk into measuring cup and add milk to make 2/3 cup. Add to shortening mixture. Mix just enough until dough shapes into a ball. Roll out half the dough into 15x11inch rectangle. Transfer to baking sheet. Cover with corn flakes. Mix apple sauce together with apple slices, and add mixture on top of corn flakes. Mix sugar and cinnamon. Sprinkle over apple mixture. Roll out other half of dough for top crust. Place over apples. Pinch edges together. Beat egg white until stiff and spread on top crust. Bake in 400-degree oven for 40 minutes. Cut into 16 squares. Combine confectioner’s sugar and lemon juice to make glaze and drizzle glaze over top. September 2021

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SPICED PORK & APPLE BURGER WITH MAPLE DIJON 3 tbsp. maple syrup 2 tbsp. spicy brown mustard 2 pounds ground pork 1/2 cup natural apple sauce 11⁄2 tsp. salt 11⁄2 tsp. chili powder 1 tsp. dry mustard 1/2 tsp. black pepper 1/4 tsp. ground cinnamon 6 hamburger buns Baby spinach leaves Stir maple syrup and mustard together in a small bowl. Set aside. Spray a large non-stick grill pan or griddle with cooking spray and place over medium to medium high heat. Mix pork, apple sauce, salt, chili powder, dry mustard, pepper and cinnamon together in a large mixing bowl. Form mixture into six patties. Place patties in pan and cook for 4 to 5 minutes, turn and cook additional 4 to 5 minutes or until done. To serve, spread bun bottoms with maple mustard mixture. Top each with a patty, spinach leaf and bun top. If desired, toast buns and top with cheddar cheese, grilled onions, pickles, tomatoes or other favorite toppings. Serve with crispy sweet potato fries and steamed beans for an easy but special meal.

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calendar of events

Sept. 1-Nov. 20 Junie B. Jones The Musical Jr. The CSA Children's Theatre Company present this delightful musical adaptation of four of Barbara Park's best-selling books. Performances at the King Opera House Nov. 19 and 20. Limited to 30 students. $350. 4-6 p.m. Community School of the Arts, St. Boniface, 201 North 19th Street, Fort Smith. 479-434-2020 csafortsmith.org/childrens-theatre Sept. 1-30 Adopt a Reading Pal Adopt a tiny stuffed reading pal. The only requirement: They are read to every day. Along with their new friend, children will also receive a certificate of adoption. Free. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Miller Branch Library, 8701 South 28th Street, Fort Smith 479-6463945 fortsmithlibrary.org

RAM Family Day Under the Big Top Tent OCT

Because of safety, free RAM Saturdays in the downstairs community studio are temporarily on hold, but that’s not stopping RAM's free program. Pick up a bag of art projects under a big-top tent on the patio. Enjoy outdoor activities including art demonstrations and a “cake walk” with art kit prizes. Free hot dogs will be served from 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Step inside the museum (masks provided, safety guidelines followed) and explore an exhibit of miniature buildings by David Malcolm Rose, with a related short, visual scavenger hunt. See the UAFS Student Art Exhibition and the delicate porcelain birds and flowers of the W.E. Knight Porcelain Gallery. Free. 11:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Fort Smith Regional Art Museum, 1601 Rogers Avenue, Fort Smith. 479-784-2787 fsram.org

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Sept. 1-29 3D Program Learn what 3D printing is all about. Geared toward teens and tweens, the first program will focus on building a basic understanding of what 3D printers can do, the different kinds of filaments and what 3D model designs look like. You also will learn the limitations and freedoms of 3D designs, do post processing and learn how gear systems work. Snacks available while they last. Free. 3:30-4:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Mountainburg Public Library, 225 U.S. 71, Mountainburg, Ark. 479-369-1600

Sept. 1-29 Cedarville Story Time Ms. Lara will read a story and show you how to do a fun craft. Topics will be Crazy Stories, Sept. 1; Dogs & Cats, Sept. 8; Bad Days, Sept. 15; Knights, Dragons & Underwear, Sept. 22; and Eggs & Potatoes, Sept. 29. Free. 10 a.m. Wednesdays. Facebook – Cedarville Public Library

Sept. 1-30 The After-School Pottery Experience Great creative opportunity for kiddos to work in different applications of clay. They will be creating pinch pots, slab-work, coil and experience the pottery wheel. Use low-fire clay and high-fire clays and color slips, glaze, stamps, texture and more. Ages 7-11 Tuesdays; ages 12-15 Thursdays. A non-refundable deposit of $25 to hold your space and purchase supplies is suggested. $100. 4-6 p.m. Cre8ive Arts Network, 7408 Buckhorn Street, Fort Smith. 479-357-9079 cre8beartsy.com

Sept. 1-30 Bookmark Decorating Craft In observance of National Library Card Sign-up month, select a bookmark pattern and decorate it how you wish. Free. 9 a.m.- 5 p.m. Dallas Branch Library, 8100 Dallas Street, Fort Smith. 479-484-5650

Sept. 1-30 Candy Guessing Jar Children and teens, guess the number of pieces in the candy jar; the person with the closest guess will receive the candy jar and a $25 Amazon gift card. One guess per person, per day. Free. 9 a.m.- 5 p.m. Dallas Branch Library, 8100 Dallas Street, Fort Smith. 479-484-5650 Sept. 2 Biography Break with Ms. Robin Real people are fascinating. Ms. Robin reads online about baseball players, inventors, artists and more for this all-ages story time. Free. Live 10-10:15 a.m. Facebook and YouTube – Fort Smith Public Library

Sept. 2 Day of the Dead Mask In honor of September being Hispanic Heritage Month, make Dias de Los Muertos masks, also known as Day of the Dead masks. All supplies will be provided. Free. 4 p.m. Alma Public Library, 624 Fayetteville Road, Alma, Ark. 479-632-4140 Sept. 2-30 Alma Library Story Time Enjoy a fun story with Miss Allison every week. Sing silly songs, read some books and do a fun craft. Invite a friend. Free. 10:30 a.m. Thursdays. Alma Public Library, 624 Fayetteville Road, Alma, Ark. 479-632-4140

Sept. 3 Youth Warm Up for Dove Season The Old Fort Gun Club offers a warm-up training for dove season. It covers gun safety, pattern shotguns and the chance to shoot clay pigeons. Take a shotgun if you prefer; please no magazine-fed shotguns. The club can provide 20-gauge shotguns and ammo so if you shoot 12 gauge, take your own ammo. Eye and ear protection provided. Register online. Free. For ages 12-15, 5-7 p.m. River Valley Nature Center, 8300 Wells Lake Road, Fort Smith. 479-452-3993 register-ed.com Sept. 4 Youth Dove Hunt Open to youth ages 12 to 15. All equipment will be provided for this mentored hunt that will take place on public land in Crawford and Sebastian counties. Each youth will have an AGFC staff mentor to assist them on this dove hunt. Email karen.westcamp-johnson@agfc.ar.gov to apply. Hosted by the Arkansas River Valley Nature Center. rivervalleynaturecenter.com

Sept. 4, 18 Dungeons and Dragons Use your imagination and ingenuity to fight goblins and monsters in this very exciting role-playing game. Choose what you want to do in a vast world of possibilities. Free. 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Mountainburg Public Library, 225 U.S. 71, Mountainburg, Ark. 479-369-1600 September 2021 Entertainment Fort Smith 29


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KIDS EVENTS

Sept. 4-25 Canoe and Kayak Program Staff members will assist boaters on Wells Lake. A parent or guardian must accompany children. Participants are required to wear a life jacket, which will be provided. This activity is weather and staff availability permitting. Please call ahead. Free. 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Saturdays. River Valley Nature Center, 8300 Wells Lake Road, Fort Smith. 479-452-3993 Sept. 7 Painted Pine Cones Do you have pine cones in your yard? Then it’s time to paint them to make a colorful craft. All supplies will be provided. Free. 4 p.m. Alma Public Library, 624 Fayetteville Road, Alma, Ark. 479-632-4140 Sept. 7 Coding for Homeschoolers Home school students learn the basics of coding. Free. 11 a.m. Facebook – Cedarville Public Library

Sept. 7 Take and Make Crafts: Roald Dahl Celebrate beloved author Roald Dahl's birthday. Pick up a different children's take-and-make craft each week in September. Every craft will be based on a different treasured Dahl children's book. Free. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Miller Branch Library, 8701 South 28th Street, Fort Smith. 479-646-3945 Sept. 8 What’s Up With B? Literacy Day Join B as she leads the fun celebrating this great day. Free. 1:30 p.m. Van Buren Public Library, 1409 Main Street, Van Buren, Ark. 479-474-6045

Sept. 8-29 Free Play Board Games Traditional board games like chess, Monopoly, puzzles and Uno, as well as modern-classics like Settlers of Catan and Labyrinth, will be available. This is a great opportunity to enjoy the library as a public space. Snacks available while they last. Free. 4:30-6:15 p.m. Wednesdays. Mountainburg Public Library, 225 U.S. 71, Mountainburg, Ark. 479-369-1600 Sept. 9 Story Time with Matia! – “Saturdays are for Stella” What is your favorite thing to do on a Saturday? For George, it was spending time with Stella, his grandma who made everything better. Matia reads this wonderful story celebrating a special bond. Free. Live 1010:15 a.m., always available online. Facebook and YouTube – Fort Smith Public Library Sept. 9 Tween Thursday Tweens explore coding or S.T.E.A.M. through fun activities and crafts. September will be a science activity. Free. 3:45 p.m. Facebook – Cedarville Public Library

Sept. 9 Pine Cone Bird Feeders Repurpose pine cones – turn them into a bird feeder. Your feathered friends will appreciate it. Supplies will be provided. Free. 4 p.m. Alma Public Library, 624 Fayetteville Road, Alma, Ark. 479-632-4140 Sept. 9-Nov. 11 Home-School Drama: Improv 101 Learn basic improvisation while gaining confidence 30 Entertainment Fort Smith September 2021

and collaborating as a team. Instructed by Shannon Stoddard. A showcase of student work is Nov. 11. $160. 2-3:30 p.m. Community School of the Arts, St. Boniface, 201 North 19th Street, Fort Smith. 479-434-2020 csafortsmith.org/acting-classes

Sept. 10 Marksmanship: 3D Archery Shoot at 3D targets outside. Safety and shooting techniques will be covered and beginning archery patches for the Outdoor Skills Patch program will be awarded. Register online. Free. 6-8 p.m. River Valley Nature Center, 8300 Wells Lake Road, Fort Smith, Ark. 479-452-3993 rivervalleynaturecenter.com

Sept. 10 Story Break with Mrs. Tiffany Ms. Tiffany is being brave and reading "The Honeybee" by Kirsten Hall to two hives of bees! Free. Live 1010:15 a.m. Always available on Facebook and YouTube – Fort Smith Public Library Sept. 11 Drop-In Kraftivity: Honey Make honey-bee-themed clothespins by wrapping yarn and learning about how honey bees make honey. Celebrate this important polinator by stopping by or pick up a kit to take-and-make at home. Free. 11 a.m.2 p.m. Mountainburg Public Library, 225 U.S. 71, Mountainburg, Ark. 479-369-1600 Facebook – Mountainburg Public Library Sept. 13 Butterfly Clothespins Embrace your inner butterfly with this pretty butterfly craft. Design your wings and create the butterfly of your dreams. Supplies is provided and you get to keep what you make. Free. 4 p.m. Alma Public Library, 624 Fayetteville Road, Alma, Ark. 479-632-4140

Sept. 13-Nov. 8 Cello Ensemble Exploration of harmonious rounds, canons, duets and trios features folk songs and classical pieces, with instructor Alli Chastain. $135. 4-4:45 p.m. Mondays. Community School of the Arts, 201 North 19th Street, Fort Smith. 479-434-2020 csafortsmith.org

Sept.13-Nov. 8 Preschool Drama Classes focus on music, dance, storytelling, imagination and more using the Dance.Laugh.Learn. Showkidz curriculum. Classes are built around a theme and a monthly movement objective that centers on cognitive and physical development. Instructor Shannon Stoddard. $100 semester. 4-4:45 p.m. Mondays. Community School of the Arts, 201 North 19th Street, Fort Smith. 479-434-2020 csafortsmith.org

Sept.13-Dec. 6 Preschool Art Class Designed to bring out the big artists in your little ones while developing problem-solving skills, refining motor skills and building self-confidence. $125 semester. 2:30-3:15 p.m. Mondays. Community School of the Arts, 201 North 19th Street, Fort Smith. 479434-2020 csafortsmith.org/visual-art-classes Sept.13-Dec. 6 Visual Art Class K-3 Explore the fundamentals of two-dimensional design and work with a variety of traditional and new materi-

als. $180 semester. 4-5 p.m. Mondays for grades K3 and 5:15-6:15 p.m. for grades 4-6. Community School of the Arts, 201 North 19th Street, Fort Smith. 479-434-2020 csafortsmith.org/visual-art-classes Sept.13-Dec. 6 Intro to Ballet Students will learn proper technique, terminology and etiquette, as well as one lyrical dance and one jazz dance. $150 semester. 4-5 p.m. Community School of the Arts, 201 North 19th Street, Fort Smith 479-434-2020 csafortsmith.org/dance-classes

Sept.13-Dec. 6 Musical Theatre Choreography From Vaudeville to Hamilton – survey original choreography to upbeat and lyrical musical theater staples. This course is choreography-based, but there also will be a focus on technique. Previous dance experience is not required. $150 semester. 5-6 p.m. Community School of the Arts, 201 North 19th Street, Fort Smith 479-434-2020 csafortsmith.org/dance-classes

Sept.13-Dec. 6 Rhythm Section Workshop Hands-on workshop focuses on developing specialized skills necessary to become effective, stylistically appropriate rhythm section players. Learn to play, as a unit, in multiple styles including rock/pop, country, swing, Latin and bluegrass. Open to keyboardists, guitarists, bassists, drummers, mallets and hand percussionists. $160 semester. 6-7 p.m. Community School of the Arts, 201 North 19th Street, Fort Smith 479434-2020 csafortsmith.org/programs-classes Sept. 13-Dec. 12 Chamber Strings Open to violin, viola, cello, bass and harp students who have previous sight-reading ability. Auditions required. $215 semester. 6-7 p.m. Mondays. Community School of the Arts, 201 North 19th Street, Fort Smith. 479-434-2020 csafortsmith.org/chamber-strings.

Sept. 13-Dec. 5 Teen Show Choir Introducing the CSA Sounds, a show choir for grades 7-12. Create beautiful music, learn different genres, dance and have fun. This show choir will be featured in an All Together Now fundraiser in November, will tour the River Valley and have a showcase performance Dec. 5. $175 semester. 7-9 p.m. Monday and Thursday. Community School of the Arts , 201 North 19th Street, Fort Smith. 479-434-2020 csafortsmith.org/teen-show-choir Sept. 14 Pine Cone Owls Whooooo loves a good pinecone craft? Transform your pinecones into cute and colorful owls. Supplies will be provided. Free. 4 p.m. Alma Public Library, 624 Fayetteville Road, Alma, Ark. 479-632-4140 Sept. 14-Dec. 7 Dip Into Acrylics Grades 7-12 Beginning acrylic classes for junior high and high school ages. Class requires good drawing skills, since it will focus on representational (realistic) painting to master the medium and various painting techniques. Students will draw from life and picture references. Supplies provided in tuition. Limit of 6 students. $275 semester. 4:30-6:30 p.m. Community School of the


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Arts, 201 North 19th Street, Fort Smith. 479-4342020 csafortsmith.org/visual-art-classes

Sept. 14-Dec. 12 The Fiddle Project Open to students studying violin, viola, cello, bass, mandolin, guitar, accordion and banjo. Students make music together in an ensemble of peers. Open to students grades 6-12 with two years of experience. $215 semester. 6-7 p.m. Community School of the Arts, 201 North 19th Street, Fort Smith. 479-434-2020 csafortsmith.org/fiddle-ensemble Sept. 15-Dec. 18 Disney's 101 Dalmatians Kids Enrolling K-2 students in an upcoming production of Disney's “101 Dalmatians Kids.” Limited to the first 25 students who enroll. Performances are Dec. 1819. $250. 4-6 p.m. Community School of the Arts, 201 North 19th Street, Fort Smith. 479-434-2020 csafortsmith.org/kids-theatre. Sept. 16 Button Owls Buttons can be used for all kinds of crafts, including owls. Owls are cute, fun and easy to make. Supplies will be provided. Free. 4 p.m. Alma Public Library, 624 Fayetteville Road, Alma, Ark. 479-632-4140 Sept. 16 Hora del Cuento en Español/Spanish Storytime Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with a great book. Join Monica as she reads this month's special story. ¡Celebra el mes de la herencia hispana con un gran libro! Únete a Monica mientras lee la historia especial de este mes. Free. Live 10-10:15 a.m.; remains available at Facebook or YouTube – Fort Smith Public Library Sept. 16 Teen Time Ms. Lara teaches teens about coding or S.T.E.A.M. through fun activities and crafts. September will be a coding craft. Free. 3:45 p.m. Facebook – Cedarville Public Library

Sept. 16-Dec. 9 Advanced Ballet Technique Learn proper technique, terminology and etiquette, as well as at least one lyrical dance and one jazz dance that encompass the technique learned in class. $150 semester. 6-7 p.m. Community School of the Arts, 201 North 19th Street, Fort Smith. 479-434-2020 csafortsmith.org/dance-classes

Sept. 17 Pirate Laptime Story Time Get ready for Sept. 19 – “Talk Like a Pirate Day.” Mrs. Tiffany hunts for buried treasure and narrowly escapes long-whiskered, not-so-great white sharks! She reads "This Little Pirate" by Philemon Sturges. Learn to make a pirate ship craft. Free. Live 10-10:15 a.m. Facebook and YouTube – Fort Smith Public Library

Sept. 20 DIY Leaf Creatures Gather a variety of leaves and craft your own creature. You can add googly eyes and make creatures of all shapes and sizes. Free. 4 p.m. Alma Public Library, 624 Fayetteville Road, Alma, Ark. 479-632-4140 Sept. 21 Paper Strip Apples Make a paper apple you can keep all year. Supplies will be provided. Free. 4 p.m. Alma Public Library, 624 Fayetteville Road, Alma, Ark. 479-632-4140

Sept. 21-Dec. 14 Music Theory: Indispensable for all Musicians Music theory provides valuable framework for hearing, understanding and creating music. $100. 6-7 p.m. Community School of the Arts, 201 North 19th Street, Fort Smith 479-434-2020 Sept. 23 Google Meet Book Club Join library staff as they discuss a different book each month and have a lively discussion. Call Cedarville Public Library, 479-410-1853, or go by for this month’s selection. Free. 1 p.m. Google Meet – Cedarville Public Library

KIDS EVENTS necklace. Supplies are provided. Free. 4 p.m. Alma Public Library, 624 Fayetteville Road, Alma, Ark. 479-632-4140 Sept. 24 Bingo for Books A great way to have fun and win books. When you win, you get to choose a book from special book cart. Free. 4 p.m. Alma Public Library, 624 Fayetteville Road, Alma, Ark. 479-632-4140

Sept. 25 Drop-In Kraftivity During national Hispanic Heritage Month, make traditional Taino rock carvings and learn about this neat form of rock art, including where to find it. All the supplies will be available as a take-and-make kit or stay and compete it at the library. Free. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Mountainburg Public Library, 225 U.S. 71, Mountainburg, Ark. 479-369-1600 Sept. 28, 30 Monarch Butterfly Peg Dolls In honor of the Monarch butterfly migration, make a Monarch butterfly peg doll. Supplies will be provided. Free. 4 p.m. Alma Public Library, 624 Fayetteville Road, Alma, Ark. 479-632-4140

Sept. 30 Dinosaur Pirates! The dinosaur pirates are in search of buried treasure. Christina reads this rousing dino adventure written and illustrated by Penny Dale. Free. Live 10-10:15 a.m. Always available on Facebook and YouTube – Fort Smith Public Library

Sept. 23 Ms. Robin’s Favorites: “We are the Dinosaurs” Open up the Library Surprise Bag with Ms. Robin to see Fred and which favorite story you'll get to hear. Free. Live 10-10:15 a.m. Always available on Facebook and YouTube – Fort Smith Public Library

Sept. 23 Balloon Puppets Make your balloon puppet into whatever creature you like. Supplies is provided and you get to keep what you make. Free. 4 p.m. Alma Public Library, 624 Fayetteville Road, Alma, Ark. 479-632-4140 Sept. 23 Apple Bell Necklace Apples are colorful and sweet. Make a cute apple bell

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and performance

Michael Pharis’ feature, a film noir, exceeded all our award’s criteria: great use of fine local actors, high production quality, gripping writing and excellent use of regional locations.

“The Rock of Gibraltar” wins the E Fort Smith award at the first Fort Smith International Film Festival The inaugural Fort Smith International Film Festival closed last month with a midnight awards ceremony at the Majestic, where we were pleased to give an award in a category this magazine sponsored: Fort Smith in Film. Our selection was “The Rock of Gibraltar,” produced and directed by native auteur Michael Pharis, whose abilities include writing an original musical score, in addition to the challenge of finding funding, writing and casting the film in what was a six-year effort. He simultaneously earned a doctorate and attained his specialty in neurology in physical therapy. This is his fifth independent film, following other features made mostly in Arkansas. We hope there are more to come. We watched many promising eligible films. We enjoyed and appreciated all of them and are impressed by the talent they reveal. Keep going! Bravo! to all the filmmakers who entered and a standing ovation to entire FSIFF. Readers, find MichaelPharis.com and Rock of Gibraltar’s social media and set up a clamor for another chance to see it! 32

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September 2021

We got one shot, on the run, of our trophy before the award ceremony. Festival leader Brandon Goldsmith held it up, downtown. Pharis, below, on location in Fort Smith.

Sept. 3-5 Dusk ’Til Dawn Blues Fest A line-up of regional artists and headliners perform at the legendary Rentiesville, Okla., home and juke joint of the late D.C. and Selby Minner, which is also the Oklahoma Blues Hall of Fame. The diverse artists perform blues and rock from indigenous, traditional, Chicago, Delta and West Coast flavors. A sampling of the roster names Butch Mudbone of Memphis, regional favorite Wanda Watson, Blues Foundation Band of the Year winner Lil’ Ed and his Blues Imperials of Chicago and Guitar Shorty with his West Coast band. Watermelon Slim plays Clarksdale on Saturday but comes to Rentiesville for a Sunday night show. Host Selby Minner also performs at this 31st annual festival that has the atmosphere of a backyard party. The full line-up is 30 acts on three stages. $18 a day, kids free. The shows are 5 p.m.-5 a.m., dusk until dawn. Near Checotah, Okla., two miles North of I-40 on U.S. 69 at the Down Home Blues Club, 103020 D.C. Winner Street, Rentiesville, Okla. 918-855-0978 Facebook Rentiesville Dusk ’Til Dawn Blues Festival Sept. 11 Orchestral Brilliance Music by Amy Beach, Florence Price and Dvorak featuring violinist, Er-Gene Kahng is the program for the Fort Smith Symphony’s season-opening concert. Season renewals and new season subscriptions are available now. Single tickets may be available. ArcBest Performing Arts Center, 55 South 7th Street, Fort Smith. 479-452-7575 fortsmithsymphony.org

Sept. 17 Shane Bailey Memorial Music Society Bash To sustain the mission of the Shane Bailey Music Society, musicians of the region perform each year in this annual memorial to the well-liked and muchmissed musician. His talented parents, Don and Terri Bailey, make these concerts memorable by showcasing both rising young musicians and the most popular, experienced local acts. After 5 Jazz with the Baileys and young guest players opens the show. Top local acts follow: The Crumbs, Goodluck Slim and Oreo Blue with Gary Hutchison out front. Between bands, Ava Earnhart performs. Food trucks and a full bar are available, with extra entertainment such as cornhole tosses, door prizes and giveaways. Admission is free. 6-10 p.m. The Bakery District, 70 South 7th Street, Fort Smith.


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MUSIC & PERFORMANCE

Documentary interviews are part of U.S. Marshals Museum 9/11 Observance Sept. 23-Oct. 2 Fort Smith Little Theatre presents Clue It’s a dark and stormy night, and the audience has been invited to a very unusual dinner party. Each of the guests has an alias, the butler offers a variety of weapons and the host is, well ... dead. So whodunnit? Join the iconic oddballs known as Scarlet, Plum, White, Green, Peacock and Mustard as they race to find the murderer before the body count stacks up. Based on the popular board game that became a cult classic film, Clue is a madcap comedy with a mystery that will keep you guessing until the final twist. Directed by Rickee and Scott Workman. Curtain times are 7:30 p.m. Sept. 23-25; 2 p.m. matinee Sept. 26; 7:30 p.m. Sept. 29-30 and Oct. 1-2. In accordance with CDC guidelines, attendees, regardless of vaccination status, are required to wear face coverings while inside FSLT. Cast members will not wear masks and are vaccinated. Physically distanced seating not imposed. Policies may change when necessary. FSLT asks audiences for cooperation in presenting safe, live theatre again. Fort Smith Little Theatre, 401 North 6th Street, Fort Smith, Ark. 479-783-2966 fslt.org Sept. 24 Too Tuff vs. Dr. J – DJ Showdown Fort Smith “cornerstone” DJs face off in a friendly show that will also celebrate the 80th anniversary of Washington Cemetery. Familiar to their Northside High School classmates, Joe "TooTuff" Hartgraves and James "Dr J" Jones will be playing the sounds that were the musical playlist from the ’60s, ’70s and ’80s. Hartgraves’ current music is on internet broadcasts linked on his Facebook page. Old school vibes, light finger foods and dancing. Proceeds go to the upkeep of Washington Cemetery. $25. 7 p.m. St. Boniface Parish Hall, 201 North 19th Street, Fort Smith, Ark. 479-769-4813 Oct. 7 Mickey Gilley Concert Opens Alma PAC Season The Original "Urban Cowboy" Mickey Gilley and his band take the stage to share his hits of his longtime musical career and experiences as creator of “the world’s largest honky tonk.” Gilley’s concert is full of stories, music, and tender moments. Audiences are moved to dance in the aisles, sing along and laugh with him through the unforgettable evening of entertainment he presents. $35$25 reserve seats, available online only. 7:30 p.m. Alma Performing Arts Center, 103 East Main, Alma, Ark. 479-632-2129 almapac.org Confirm performances in advance, online, directly at each venue’s site as postponements or cancellations may be unavoidable due to public health conditions.

Voices of eyewitnesses to the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks are captured on video and will be a part of the U.S. Marshal Museum’s monthlong observance of the tragedy’s 20th anniversary. USMM curator David Kennedy recorded spoken accounts of many who were thrust into the catastrophic event, including Carmen Taylor of Fort Smith, who became a citizen journalist when she snapped digital captures of the second airplane just moments before its lethal impact. Taylor immediately sent photos to a Fort Smith TV station. The Associated Press then licensed her images, which have been published and broadcast millions of times in news chronicles of the deadly attack. The stories are a vivid contributions to the exhibit that will be free to the public in September. Kennedy’s documentary and the exhibit focus on the services and actions of the marshals and other law enforcement during that emergency. The full observance schedule is in following Calendar of Event pages.

Curator David Kennedy discusses the 9/11 exhibit with photographer Carmen Taylor.

HEAR, HERE. KUAF September 2021

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CALENDAR of events

Sept. 1 What’s Up With B? Library Card Sign Up Month Make library cardholders. All supplies provided. 1:30 p.m. Van Buren Public Library, 1409 Main Street, Van Buren, Ark. 479-474-6045

Emily Knudten - Creative Commons

Sept. 1-30 Library Card Sign-up Tickets for Sept. 30 Prize Drawing New card sign ups get 10 entries. All patrons get one ticket at check out. Van Buren Public Library, 1409 Main Street, Van Buren, Ark. 479-474-6045

Remembering 9/11 20 Years of Impact The U.S. Marshals Museum marks the anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks with a free, monthlong exhibit, a special event and a slate of lectures. The gallery exhibit may be viewed, free, from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sept. 6-Oct. 4 on Monday, Wednesday and Friday and noon to 5 p.m. Sept. 18 and 25.

SEPT On the 20th anniversary date, from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. is a

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memorial ceremony. Beginning at 7:30 a.m. a reading of the names of the victims will be broadcast live from the 9/11 Memorial and Museum in New York. All present are asked to observe six minutes of silence, along with the nation.

Talks on Tap Lecture Series Schedule Sept. 13 – The Overview Speaker Stacia Hylton, U.S. Marshals Service Incident Commander at Ground Zero and former U.S. Marshals Service director Sept. 24 – Special Event 20 Years of Impact on Government, Law Enforcement and Families Seth DuCharme, former U.S. Marshals Service employee and former U.S District Attorney for the Southern District of New York, and Ken Fechter, current U.S. Marshals Service Critical Incident Response Team member who works with families following line of duty deaths. Special guests will include family members of U.S. Marshals Service employees who have died following 9/11-related illnesses. Oct. 4 – Ground Zero Speakers Deputy U.S. Marshals Dominic Guadignoli (retired), Tim Hogan, Joel Kirch (retired) and John Svinos. Nov. 1 – The Airports Speakers U.S. Marshals Nancy McGillivray, Donald O’Hearn and Lenny DePaul. Dec. 6 – USMS Technical Operations Group Speaker: Deputy U.S. Marshal Scott Samuels (retired), TOG CDC guidelines for large groups will be followed at all events. Tickets, available online, are $30 for the entire series or $10 for single events. K-12 students, free. 6:30-8 p.m. in the museum atrium. U.S. Marshals Museum, 789 Riverfront Drive, Fort Smith, Ark. 479-242-1789 usmmuseum.org

Sept. 1-30 Beginning Pottery Classes Learn on the potter’s wheel to make variety of items. Drying, firing and glazing follow. Fees include all materials and supplies. Afternoon and evening sessions. Discounts to families, seniors and military, 16 and up. $185. Cre8ive Arts Network, 7408 Buckhorn Street, Fort Smith. 479-357-9079 cre8beartsy.com Sept. 2, 24 Needles and Chatter A meet-up for all crafters to bring anything they’re are working on. Meet others and maybe pick up a new hobby. Free. 12:30-2 p.m. Van Buren Public Library, 1409 Main Street, Van Buren, Ark. 479-474-6045 Sept. 3 Warm Up for Dove Season – Ages 16 and Up Old Fort Gun Club’s dove clinic has gun safety, patterns and clay pigeon shooting. Take your own shotgun. (No magazine-fed). Club provides 20-gauge shotguns, ammo, eye and ear protection. Register. Free. 6-8 p.m. Old Fort Gun Club, 4999 Westville Road, Van Buren, Ark. 479-452-3993 register-ed.com Sept. 3 I Love the 1960s Trivia Compete virtually in pop trivia. Free. 7 p.m. Facebook – Fort Smith Public Library Sept. 6, 13, 20 Ballroom Dance Lessons Learn to cha cha. Mike and Lisa Lawrence teach beginner lessons. Couples, singles welcome. $5. 6:30-8 p.m. Senior Activity Center, 2700 Cavanaugh Road, Fort Smith. 479-208-1072 Facebook – Step in Time Dance Class Sept. 7, 14, 21, 28 Sculpting with Samantha Wilson Make a figural bust. Take photos of the front, back and sides of subject. All tools and materials provided. $150. 10 a.m.-noon. Cre8ive Arts Network, 7408 Buckhorn Street, Fort Smith. 479-357-9079 cre8beartsy.com Sept. 8 Literacy Day B’s show will celebrate this special day. 1:30 p.m. Van Buren Public Library, 1409 Main Street, Van Buren, Ark. 479-474-6045 Sept. 8 Take Home Murder Mystery: Murder at the Zoo Pick up this mystery packet to solve yourself or with friends. Limited packets. Free. Fort Smith Public Library, 3201 Rogers Avenue, Fort Smith. 479-783-0229 Sept. 13 Friends of the Mountainburg Library Meeting Become a part of what the library can do for the community. Free. 3:30 p.m. Mountainburg Public Library, 225 U.S. 71, Mountainburg, Ark. 479-369-1600 Sept. 13 Coloring for Adults Relax, color with provided materials, or use your own. Free. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Van Buren Public Library, 1409 Main Street, Van Buren, Ark. 479-474-6045 Sept. 13 Pottery Classes for Adults Choose a one-time session, Ladies Night Out or a six-week course. Create woven coil baskets and items from slabs. Instructors Jeff Simkins and Tammy Fujibayashi. Senior, family and military discounts. $45 and up. Cre8tive Arts Network, 7408 Buckhorn Street, Fort Smith. 47-935-9079 cre8beartsy.com September 2021 Entertainment Fort Smith 35


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CALENDAR OF EVENTS Sept. 13 Book Club Discusses “The Secrets We Keep” By Kate Hewitt. Van Buren Public Library, 1409 Main Street, Van Buren, Ark. 479-474-6045 Sept. 14 Scrapbooking – Autumn Pages Fall layout with 3-5 photos. Take scissors and adhesive. Free. 1:30 p.m. Van Buren Public Library, 1409 Main Street, Van Buren, Ark. 479-474-6045 Sept. 14, 15 Book Talk/Review: Did You Ever Have a Family? June is devastated when disaster takes the lives of her entire family. By author Bill Clegg. Book review 2 p.m. Sept. 15. Talk at 6 p.m. Alma Public Library, 624 Fayetteville Road, Alma, Ark. 479-632-4140

Sept. 15 Painting with Lisa Clay Individual instruction in composition, perspective, color theory and a variety of techniques. Classes meet weekly. $10 non-refundable deposit required at registration. Classes are $25 per session. 3-5 p.m. Cre8tive Arts Network, 7408 Buckhorn Street, Fort Smith. 479-357-9079 cre8beartsy.com Sept. 15 What’s Up with B: Card Sign-up Month Bookmark Make a bookmark celebrating library card sign-ups month. Supplies are provided. A special treat will be given to the audience attending in person. 1:30 p.m. Van Buren Public Library, 1409 Main Street, Van Buren, Ark. 479-474-6045

Sept. 16 Close to Home: Artist Talk by Galen Hunter Galen Hunter, whose exhibition shows through Oct. 2, discusses his focus on ordinary street scenes and structures. An architect who draws and paints en plein air, Hunter will relate experiences that informed his depictions of familiar local buildings. $7 adults; $5 military/veterans. UAFS, museum members free. 6 p.m. Fort Smith Museum of History, 320 Rogers Avenue, Fort Smith. 479-783-7841 Sept. 16 2021 Girls Inc. Fest of Ale This fundraiser will feature beer and food pairings, along with wine samples. Food will be provided by Uncork'd with beer pairings provided by Burford's and Belle Point. Wine samples will be provided by Southern Glazers. There will be six tasting stations. Go online for complete menu and pairings. Only 100 tickets available. 5:30-8 p.m. $80 per person; $150 per couple. Uncork’d, 5501 Phoenix Ave., Fort Smith. 479-782-0375 girlsincfortsmith.org Sept. 17 September Dance DJ Mike plays ballroom, Latin, swing, country and line dances tunes. $5 person. 7-9 p.m. Senior Activity Center, 2700 Cavanaugh Road, Fort Smith. 479-2081072 Facebook - Step in Time Dance Class Sept. 18 The Art of Felting with Fiber Artist Sally Ball Class has access to exquisite fibers from around, many dyed by fiber artist Sally Ball; some from sheep she selected. Make a felted piece with options to learn and try additional embellishments. 16 and up. Register by phone. $75 includes supplies. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Center for Art and Education, 104 North 13th Street, Van Buren, Ark. 479-474-7767 art-ed.org Sept. 18 Season Ticket: Trinidad Curry Powder Pick up free spice blend kit with a sample and recipe. Watch a virtual meeting to discuss. Pickup from Sept. 1. 1-2 p.m. Facebook – Fort Smith Library Sept. 18 Dinner & All That Jazz for Manes & Miracles Enjoy a Creole-inspired dinner by Chef Paul, music by the Don Bailey Jazz Quartet and a silent auction. Nonprofit Manes & Miracles gives therapy to adults, veterans and kids with disabilities and special needs, with the help of horses. $75; $140 couple, $500 table of 8. 6-11 p.m. Bakery District, 70 South 7th Street, Fort Smith. 479-970-8351 manesandmiracles.org Sept. 19 42nd Adult Art Competition Reception and Awards Enjoy refreshments, meet the artists and take in this exceptional exhibit. CAE’s annual competition invites local and regional artists to show their best works. Free. 1-4 p.m. Center for Art and Education, 104 North 13th Street, Van Buren. 479-474-7767 Sept. 21 Virtual Trivia Night! with Ronny Books, popular culture and music are the topics. Free. 7-7:30 p.m. Facebook- Fort Smith Library

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS Sept. 22 What’s Up With B on World Gratitude Day Make a thank you card with supplies provided. Free. 1:30 p.m. Van Buren Public Library, 1409 Main Street, Van Buren, Ark. 479-474-6045 Sept. 23 Knitting Class – A Good Yarn New and experienced knitters invited to knit together. Free. 1:30 p.m. Van Buren Public Library, 1409 Main Street, Van Buren, Ark. 479-474-6045 Sept. 24 Library Game Night Take board games or use those provided. The library is forming a monthly game night. Take a snack to share. 6:30 p.m. Van Buren Public Library, 1409 Main Street, Van Buren, Ark. 479-474-6045 Sept. 24-26 Reaching New Heights Balloon Festival Take a ride up, up and away! The festival also has food, craft and games vendors. Tethered rides available from 5 p.m. to dark on Friday and Saturday evenings. Balloon flights available for private hire on Sunday (fees vary). Tethered rides are $20 adults; $10 children. 5-9 p.m. Soccer Fields by Clarksville Airport, U.S. 64 East, Clarksville 479-754-2340 clarksvillejocochamber.com Sept. 25 Copying Masterpieces Workshop The greatest practice for any painter may be to transcribe the works of great masters. A workshop series by John P. Lasater IV will meet for three classes. Begin copies of three great works. Sept. 25: "Women Combing Their Hair” by Edgar Degas. Oct. 23: “Self Portrait with Black Background” by Helene Schjerfbeck and Nov. 20, “Country Road with Cypresses” by Giuseppe Abbati. Ages 16 and up. Take personal materials, any medium acceptable. Most of the technique instruction is based on opaque mediums such as oil or acrylic. Register by phone. $100 per class. 9 a.m.4 p.m. Center for Art and Education, 104 North 13th Street, Van Buren, Ark. 479-474-7767 art-ed.org Sept. 27 Belle Point Quilt Guild: Sue Anderson from River Valley Stars Quilts of Valor In a very moving evening, River Valley Stars Quilts will present handmade Quilts of Valor to honor local veterans who have been touched by war. Each quilt has a recipient’s name and branch embroidered in its label. Speaker Sue Anderson will tell how volunteers who love to sew are honoring vet- One of many different quilts erans. One veteran handmade by volunteers of will share her ex- the River Valley Stars quilters, perience of receivas gifts of honor to veterans. ing a quilt. Since 2018, this group has presented 166 quilts. In spite of COVID, 39 quilts have been given in 2021 and 16 more will be presented by Sept. 1. Free. 6:30-8:30 p.m. VFW Post 8845, 3005 Tilles Avenue, Fort Smith. 479-221-4040 Facebook – River Valley Stars-QOV September 2021

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS

September 24, 2021 – January 30, 2022

Sponsored by:

HOURS: Tues-Sat 11-6 Sunday 1-5

1 6 0 1 RO G E R S AV E N U E FO RT S M IT H , A R 7 2 9 0 1 479.784.2787 • FSRAM.ORG

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ALWAYS FREE

This unique exhibition will contain miniature scale models and paintings of businesses long forgotten along The Lost Highway, and a retrospective of the artist, David Malcolm Rose.


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CALENDAR OF EVENTS Sept. 28 Author Talk: Jim Warnock Author and hiking expert Jim Warnock will talk about the basics of hiking skills and point out great local trails. Alma resident and author of “Five Star Trails: The Ozarks,” Warnock is a wealth of knowledge about nearby trails and how to best enjoy them. Free. 6 p.m. Alma Public Library, 624 Fayetteville Road, Alma, Ark. 479-632-4140 Sept. 28 Democracy CPR Citizenship, Participation and Representation. Meet with your local elected officials, discuss concerns and ask questions in an up-close, in-depth exchange. City, county, state and federal representatives will attend, in addition to local school board members. Free. 5:307:30 p.m. Van Buren Public Library, 1409 Main Street, Van Buren, Ark. 479-474-6045 Sept. 29 What’s up with B On Confucius Day, learn to make paper and felt fortune cookies. Supplies provided. 1:30 p.m. Van Buren Public Library, 1409 Main Street, Van Buren, Ark. 479-474-6045 Sept. 30 Crafterwork Supplies provided for adults to paint and take home a Halloween canvas. Free. Reservation required. Van Buren Public Library, 1409 Main Street, Van Buren, Ark. 479-474-6045

Dancers of the River City Squares invite all ages to learn to do-si-do with them for fun, exercise and friendship. Oct. 5 Learn to Square Dance Jay King, caller for the River City Squares (formerly Skokos Promenaders), will be the caller/instructor. Learn and enjoy the world of square dancing and see why square dancers have so much fun and enjoy life so much. Proof of vaccination required. $5 per person/week. 6:30-7:45 p.m. Fort Smith Senior Citizens Center, 2700 Cavanaugh Road, Fort Smith. 479-474-8500 Oct. 8 8th Annual Havana Nights Wear your fedoras and flip flops to the tropicalthemed party presented by Fort Smith Children's Shelter and Trinity Multifamily, a "Party With a Purpose.” This Cuban-themed fundraiser benefits the Children's Shelter and its GetReal24 program. $150. 6:30-11:30 p.m. The Bakery District, 70 South 7th Street, Fort Smith. 479-242-5711 Facebook – Fort Smith Children’s Shelter

Give us a call at 479.788.4340 to set up an insurance consultation! September 2021

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