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The in-store tech your customers actually want SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019

Exclusive interview: CFIG’s new chair

 RON WELKE on the virtues of the Co-operative Retailing System and levelling the playing field for independents

INSIDE LONGO’S NEW TORONTO STORE MEET PEACE BY CHOCOLATE’S TAREQ HADHAD HOLIDAY ENTERTAINING GUIDE


s. re also supply chain fanatic fanatics, which means we’ h fres re we’ it— p hel ’t We can s. fanatics. Food safety fanatic lity fanatics. Sustainability qua And s. atic fan tion And innova ours. g your business along with And fanatics about growin

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1-800-950-3683

Del Monte Fresh Produce N.A., Inc

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CONTENTS September/October 2019 COVER STORY

Volume 133 Number 6

Championing co-ops and communities

30

We catch up with Federated Co-op’s Ron Welke, CFIG’s incoming chair

PEOPLE

16 The Buzz

Comings and goings, store openings, awards, events, etc. Peace by Chocolate’s CEO on finding sweet success in Canada

SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

IDEAS

11 Cannabis 2.0

24  Longo’s new Toronto store

Edibles will soon be legal in Canada. Now what?

is modern, stylish and boasts some cool new features

35  How can grocers use

15 Front Desk 18 Shopper Sense 20 Food Bytes 22 Consumer Shifts 54 Checking Out

18 Tareq Hadhad

FEATURES

BEYOND BELLS AND WHISTLES

OPINIONS

14 E-comm’s tough slog

Why are grocers still struggling to make e-commerce work?

15 Where’s the beef?

As the meatless movement takes off, survey finds older consumers are less likely to give plants a try

24

16 Succession planning success

in-store tech to give shoppers the experience they’re really looking for?

When it comes to passing the business leadership torch, planning early is key

AISLES

43 ’Tis the season

Time to make merry—and boost basket size during the holidays!

50 Feeling your oats

45

From fancy oatmeal to oat milk frozen desserts, oat-based innovations are hot

51 Quenching consumers’ thirst

COVER IMAGE: CAREY SHAW

What beverages are Canadians thirsting for? Nielsen reveals the data on drinks

8

50

FOLLOW US ON @CanadianGrocer Canadian Grocer Magazine @CanadianGrocerMagazine September/October 2019 Canadian Grocer

3


NO MATTER HOW YOU SEE IT, THE NUMBERS ARE ALWAYS RIGHT.

TOP SAFETY PICK+

1

Legacy, Crosstrek, Outback, Impreza: on models with EyeSight® & specific headlights. Ascent: on models with specific headlights.

2019 ASCENT

2019 LEGACY

2019 CROSSTREK

SUBARU

BEST RESALE VALUE OF ALL MAINSTREAM BRANDS

2

5 years in a row

2019 IMPREZA

2019 OUTBACK

98.3% of our vehicles sold in Canada over the last 10 years are still on the road today.

3

And for the 5th consecutive year, ALG named Subaru as the Top Mainstream Brand for Residual Value. The numbers speak for themselves. They are proof of Subaru’s reliability.

We know there’s a lot to consider when looking for a fleet vehicle to fit your company’s needs. So add low cost of ownership, responsible engineering, legendary safety and capability features into the equation. You’ll find out that Subaru is always a great solution.

Visit us at subarufleet.ca 1. Safety ratings are awarded by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS). Please visit www.iihs.org for testing methods. 2. ALG named Subaru the Top Mainstream Brand for Residual Value in the 2019 Canadian Residual Value Awards. ALG is the benchmark for residual value projections in North America, publishing residual values for all vehicles in the United States and Canada. For more information, visit www.alg.com. 3. Based on IHS Markit Vehicles in Operation as of June 30, 2018 for Model Years 2009 to 2018 vs Total New Registrations of those vehicles.


EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Shellee Fitzgerald

sfitzgerald@ensembleiq.com

FRONT DESK

MANAGING  EDITOR

Carol Neshevich

cneshevich@ensembleiq.com

ONLINE  EDITOR

Kristin Laird

klaird@ensembleiq.com

ART DIRECTOR

Josephine Woertman

jwoertman@ensembleiq.com

CONSULTING EDITOR

George H. Condon

condug@sympatico.ca

VICE PRESIDENT, PRODUCTION

Derek Estey

destey@ensembleiq.com

DIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION

Michael Kimpton

mkimpton@ensembleiq.com

MARKETING DIRECTOR

Alexandra Voulu

avoulu@ensembleiq.com

AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT MANAGER

Lina Trunina

Building on its burger success, Beyond Meat introduced its plantbased Beyond Beef in the U.S. in June

ltrunina@ensembleiq.com

WEB OPERATIONS MANAGER

Valerie White

vwhite@ensembleiq.com

SALES ASSOCIATE BRAND DIRECTOR

Vanessa Peters

vpeters@ensembleiq.com

SR BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER

Chantal Barlow

cbarlow@ensembleiq.com

NATIONAL ACCOUNT MANAGER

Jacquie Rankin

jrankin@ensembleiq.com

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CORPORATE OFFICERS EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN  Alan Glass CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER  Jennifer Litterick CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER  Dan McCarthy CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER  Joel Hughes CHIEF INNOVATION OFFICER  Tanner Van Dusen CHIEF HUMAN RESOURCES OFFICER  Ann Jadown EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT, EVENTS & CONFERENCES  Ed Several

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ask Canadian Grocer if they may send information about a product or service to some Canadian Grocer subscribers, by mail or email. If you do not wish to receive these messages, contact us in any of the ways listed above. Contents Copyright © 2019 by EnsembleIQ, may not be reprinted without permission. Canadian Grocer receives unsolicited materials (including letters to the editor, press releases, promotional items and images) from time to time. Canadian Grocer, its affiliates and assignees may use, reproduce, publish, republish, distribute, store and archive such submissions in whole or in part in any form or medium whatsoever, without compensation of any sort. ISSN# 0008-3704 PM 42940023 Canadian Grocer is Published by Stagnito Partners Canada Inc., 20 Eglinton Avenue West, Ste. 1800, Toronto, Ontario, M4R 1K8.

BEYOND MEAT

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We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund of the Department of Canadian Heritage.

MEATLESS MANIA

Plant-based protein alternatives have stepped into the spotlight; looks like they’re staying there THE TIMES THEY are a changing. Who could have imagined a scant few years ago that a veggie burger company would see its shares soar 800% following its initial public offering (in May) and boast a valuation akin to a tech startup? But it happened, and Beyond Meat’s rapid-fire growth has spurred competition from food companies looking to grab a bigger bite of the plant-based pie. The result: a slew of announcements recently about new meat alternatives in the form of Happy Little Plants (Hormel), Raised & Rooted (Tyson) and Incogmeato (Kellogg). No question, a shift is occurring. With health and sustainability concerns prompting a growing number of consumers to become “meat reducers,” it looks like plantbased isn’t going away. A recent Angus Reid survey found 55% of Canadians think plant-based proteins are here to stay (read more on page 15). And the analysts at Barclays predict the meat alternatives market could snag 10% of the $1.4-trillion global meat market over the next decade. The meatless movement is certainly creating opportunities for retailers who can seize the moment. In our Holiday Entertaining

Guide (page 43), for example, we learn how this year, Summerhill Market is offering a fully plant-based holiday dinner, in addition to the traditional turkey with all the trimmings it serves up. But with the opportunity comes plenty of complexities, too. Complexities at mealtimes as consumers grapple with catering to the varied dietary demands of their households. And meat alternatives are certainly throwing up challenges for grocers who must figure out how to best manage this category. Where do you put fake meats? And who exactly do you market them to? In his column this issue, Joshua Levi of Environics Analytics looks at how best to nurture the burgeoning plantbased meat alternatives category (page 22). Hint: it starts with better understanding the consumers who buy these products and not relying on a one-size-fits all strategy. Happy reading!

Shellee Fitzgerald Editor-in-Chief

sfitzgerald@ensembleiq.com

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September/October 2019 Canadian Grocer

5


THE BUZZ

The latest news in the grocery biz

Ottawa will soon be home to a new Marché Adonis. Expected to open later this fall, the store will be the fourth Ontario location for the Metro-owned banner. Quebec is home to another 10 Marché Adonis locations.

In late August, Ontario-based grocery chain Longo’s introduced a new convenience format. Called Pronto Eats, the 1,000-sq.-ft. space located in Toronto’s underground PATH system at the Hudson’s Bay Centre at Yonge and Bloor is touted as a “small scale conveniencebased grocery store.” Catering to commuters and workers from the surrounding office towers, the store will focus on ready-to-eat and semi-prepared meal options. Earlier in the summer, Longo’s opened a new 40,000-sq.-ft. grocery store at Toronto’s Yonge Sheppard Centre (read all about it in our Store Profile, starting on page 24). Longo’s has also announced plans to open two more grocery stores this year, one in Toronto’s trendy Liberty Village neighbourhood and one north of the city in the town of East Gwillimbury.

IGA has announced it is opening a 35,000sq.-ft. store at Montreal’s Centre Rockland next spring. The Sobeys-owned store will be located below the mall’s food court, which recently underwent a $10-million renovation.

GIANT TIGER is also continuing its expansion in Ontario with the opening of a new store in Kingston. The 18,000-sq.-ft. store, located at 656 Gardiners Road, opened in late August.

Longo’s new convenience-based Pronto Eats concept in Toronto focuses on ready-to-eat and semi-prepared meal options

 EVENTS 

The Private Label Manufacturers Association is holding its  2019 Private Label Trade Show  from Nov. 17 to 19 at the Donald E. Stephens Convention Center in Chicago. Visit plma.com for details. Canadian Grocer’s­  Thought Leadership CEO Conference  plus the  Golden Pencil Awards  take place on Tuesday Nov. 19 at Toronto’s Fairmont Royal York Hotel. Visit canadiangrocer.com and goldenpencilaward. com to purchase tickets.

6

 ANNOUNCEMENTS 

September/October 2019 Canadian Grocer

LONGO’S

OPENINGS


COMINGS AND GOINGS

Horacio Barbeito

Cheryl Smith

Walmart Canada has appointed a new president and CEO. HORACIO (HAIO) BARBEITO will step into the top role in October. Barbeito joined Walmart nearly 25 years ago, starting as a trainee buyer and later moving up to leadership roles including his appointment as CEO of Walmart Argentina and Chile in 2015. Barbeito takes over from outgoing president and CEO LEE TAPPENDEN, who will be moving on to a global role with the retailer’s International Support Team before his departure at the end of January. CHERYL SMITH is the new CEO at Dairy Farmers of Ontario. Smith previously spent two decades at Parmalat and was general manager of its cheese division when she departed the company last May. Smith is also a 2019 Golden Pencil winner.

Bruno Keller

Kraft Heinz has appointed BRUNO KELLER as president of Kraft Heinz Canada. For the past two years Keller has led the Canadian category team and prior to that he was head of Kraft Heinz for Southern Europe. Keller replaces NINA BARTON, who is returning to Chicago to take on the newly created role of chief growth officer for Kraft Heinz’s global business.

Nina Barton

Kellogg Canada has named TONY CHOW as its new president. Chow has held a number of senior positions in both Canada and the United States since joining the company in 2003. Most recently, he was president of Kashi Company. Chow replaces CAROL STEWART, who retired earlier this year. Tony Chow

Adam Grogan

Casey Richards

Maple Leaf Foods’ subsidiary Greenleaf Foods has named ADAM GROGAN as its new chief operating officer. Previously, Grogan was senior vice-president of marketing, innovation, research and development at Maple Leaf. The company launched U.S.-based Greenleaf Foods last October to add to its plant-based offerings. CASEY RICHARDS will step into the role of senior vice-president of marketing and innovation at Maple Leaf. Richards was previously the company’s vice-president and general manager - pastry. DEBBIE SIMPSON is leaving her role as chief financial officer at Maple Leaf Foods on Nov. 1. Simpson joined Maple Leaf 12 years ago and has been CFO for the last five years. A search is underway for her successor.

Kellogg Canada Inc. is pleased to announce that Tony Chow has assumed the role of President. Mr. Chow is also a key member of the Kellogg North American Leadership Team. Mr. Chow assumes full responsibility for Kellogg Canada’s strategic direction which is focused on growth and building a diversified portfolio of products within the cereal, snacks and frozen food/veggie categories to enrich and delight consumers through foods and brands that matter. This is a homecoming of sorts for Tony. He began his Kellogg career in Canada in 2003, serving in several customer leadership roles of increasing responsibility across the Canadian Sales organization. In 2010, he was promoted to Vice President, Sales, in the U.S. After a very successful period in the U.S., Mr. Chow repatriated to Canada in 2012 as Vice President, Sales and was promoted to Senior Vice President, Marketing and Sales in 2017. Mr. Chow was then promoted to his most recent role as President of the Kashi Company where he delivered strong business results by building a purpose-led culture focused on building great brands, driving innovation, and developing strong talent. He helped build a solid foundation for future growth by leading with vision and strong operational discipline. Mr. Chow received his Honours Bachelor of Business Administration degree from Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ontario and completed the Harvard Business School Executive Leadership Program. To learn more about Kellogg’s responsible business leadership, foods that delight and how we strive to make a difference in our communities, please visit www.kelloggs.ca.


PEOPLE

 Who you need to know  

The Facts Who

Tareq Hadhad Position

CEO and founder of Peace by Chocolate What’s new?

Chocolate-covered pretzels and cookies; plans to export to the U.S. in 2020 and internationally by 2022

PEACE, LOVE AND CHOCOLATE Tareq Hadhad is spreading peace, one delicious confection at a time By Carolyn Cooper Photography by Aaron McKenzie Fraser


30 SECONDS WITH...

H

oping for a high-profile

endorsement of your new product? How about some public praise from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, or U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi? Or maybe the crew of the International Space Station enjoying your treats while they orbit the Earth? That’s just some of the attention premium chocolate maker Tareq Hadhad’s family business Peace by Chocolate has attracted for both its remarkable backstory and the artisan chocolates it produces. After fleeing the war in Syria and living in a refugee camp in Lebanon, Hadhad and his family arrived in Canada in late 2015 as refugees, settling in Antigonish, N.S. His father, Isameddin, had been a chocolatier for more than 30 years in Damascus, and had built the second-­ largest chocolate company in the region; then his factory was destroyed in 2013. After being warmly welcomed into the Antigonish community, the family began considering how to build a new confectionery business with a mission that went beyond economic growth. “We thought that we needed to create something to go with our values and our message,” recalls Hadhad. “It was the desire to create a more peaceful world and celebrate people’s efforts to help newcomers translate their skills and talents in their new communities after surviving unthinkable moments of despair and uncertainty. It was also about making the happiest product on Earth—chocolate!” The local community rallied around the fledgling business to raise startup funds and build a small factory and store. Meanwhile, the company obtained a no-interest loan which, says Hadhad, it paid back within two weeks of opening in February 2016. Early sales were so successful that by May, the Hadhads were able to reinvest in the business, while donating their profits to relief efforts in Fort McMurray, Alta., following the devastating wildfires that struck the city that spring. “I think there’s a social side to every business that entrepreneurs shouldn’t ignore,” says Hadhad,

explaining that giving back was an integral vision for the company from the start. “It’s something that should always be integrated into the business plan.” Before long, Peace by Chocolate’s inspiring story was being told by Prime Minister Trudeau at the United Nations as an example of refugee success in Canada, something Hadhad says was “extremely surprising! We were overwhelmed by the joy that we received and all the emails and messages.” While customers may initially connect with the Hadhads’ story, the chocolate is what keeps them coming back for more. The handcrafted milk, dark, white and gold chocolate (a creamy mix of chocolate and roasted caramel) “combines a blend of Syrian fillings and ingredients, including local fresh organic honey, 100% pure juices, nuts, fruits and spices, creating a little slice of heaven with every sweet,” says Hadhad. The packaging, which features the word Peace in more than eight languages and the company’s slogan “One Peace Won’t Hurt,” is another attempt to connect consumers to their message. Products are sold at more than 1,000 locations across Canada, ranging from smaller independent stores to chains such as Sobeys. The company has grown an incredible 300% since 2016, and Hadhad says it “is on the way to becoming one of the top five chocolate companies in Canada within the next five years.” In 2017, Peace by Chocolate moved into a factory 20 times larger than its original plant—which will remain a retail shop and visitor centre—and the company has committed to hiring 50 refugees by 2022 and mentoring 10 refugee startup businesses. Current charitable efforts include its Peace on Earth society, as well as its Nitap bars, the proceeds of which support First Nations’ initiatives. “This whole thing is out of this world, especially the support of the [Antigonish] community,” says Hadhad. “We felt that this whole thing was meant to be, because the values that the company was built on were certainly inspired by the generosity and the welcome of the community.”  CG

TAREQ HADHAD Why do you enjoy working in the food industry?

Sharing food connects people and gets us closer, and that’s at the heart of our message. It also means you have the chance to nurture others, and that’s very noble.

What’s the secret to success for you?

Success is the summit of the mountain that you can always focus on reaching, but you should never reach, so you have the purpose to keep moving. Success should be the ultimate goal that you think will be the greatest addition that you have [given] the world.

What does peace mean to you?

Peace means living in harmony, understanding and inclusion. It’s about celebrating the best of humanity by shared values and common goals, like raising families in a safe world with a bright future. Peace is also connected to hap­piness because you can’t be happy if you are not safe; and the way we connected them both is by spreading peace and making happiness through each piece of chocolate.

Any advice for other entrepreneurs?

Never be afraid to reach out to experts in the industry, because that’s your most efficient way to be sustainable and competitive.

What’s your favourite chocolate?

My favourite is the dark chocolate with cashews in our Forgiveness Bars. I still eat chocolate almost every three hours, for taste-testing purposes, but I enjoy it!

September/October 2019 Canadian Grocer

9


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IDEAS

Retailers, suppliers, shoppers, insights

EDIBLES

Cannabis 2.0

GETTY IMAGES/SAGEELYSE

Edibles will soon be legal in Canada. Now what? By Danny Kucharsky

C

anada will embark on its

second wave of cannabis legalization on October 17, when Health Canada legalizes the sale of cannabis edibles (food and beverages), extracts and topical products at licensed cannabis retailers. However, it will take until mid-December before only a limited selection of product becomes available, and regulations governing their sale will be strict. Edible products will require child-resistant packaging, plain packaging with limited use of logos

and health warnings, and will have to be manufactured in separate facilities. That’s par for the course, says Mathew Columbro, president and co-founder of Vindica Cannabis Corp, a strategic consulting firm for companies operating in the cannabis industry. “The path for Health Canada has always been [to be] very strict and then to become more lenient over time, once they see there aren’t issues. That’s where we are starting out with edibles,” he says. “But it’s a starting point. Things will get easier.” September/October 2019 Canadian Grocer

11


IDEAS

A Deloitte report published in June, called Nurturing New Growth: Canada Gets Ready for Cannabis 2.0, pegged Canada’s edibles market at $1.6 billion and the cannabis-infused beverage market at $529 million. In a release, Deloitte said its research showed that much of this economic boost would be on top of current cannabis product spending. Rishi Malkani, the lead partner managing the cannabis practice in Canada at Deloitte, notes that in the first wave of cannabis legalization, there was “a lot of the hype and a lot of the folks using it were experienced.” But “with cannabis 2.0, you’re going to get not only folks who’ve used it before, but a whole host of curious consumers and folks who are interested in trying new formats.” There is less stigma and fewer health concerns for edibles compared with combustible products, which are “a turnoff for a lot of people,” Malkani adds.

Enter edibles

Since recreational cannabis was made legal in Canada last October, there has been much hype and great anticipation surrounding the next phase of legalization: edibles. In the past year, there has been a blitz of announcements from players large and small betting big on Canadians’ appetite for edibles. A quick look at the edibles landscape: THREE NEW CATEGORIES

Health Canada’s amendments to Cannabis Regulations, which come into effect on Oct. 17, will allow authorized retailers to sell, as of mid-December, three new classes of cannabis products: edibles, extracts and topicals. THE CANNABIS CURIOUS

According to recent research from Deloitte, the legalization of edibles containing cannabis and cannabis concentrates will create new product 12

mixes that will appeal to consumers who may have been reluctant to try traditional cannabis consumption methods currently available. Many of these novice or “cannabis-curious” consumers will be those who are older, often women, who will prefer familiar formats such as edibles in the form of baked goods, says Deloitte. NO GUMMIES IN QUEBEC

Earlier this year a Dalhousie University study

September/October 2019 Canadian Grocer

revealed that 63.6% of Canadians believe edibles pose a greater risk to children and adults than other forms of cannabis. Canada’s strict new pot rules, released in June, are aimed at keeping edibles out of the hands of kids by requiring edibles be in child-resistant, plain packaging. Quebec, however, has taken an even stricter stance and is banning the sale of cannabis candies, confections and desserts or any product attractive to minors.

CBD CHALLENGE

With so much hype around CBD products, a battle over who gets to sell them is brewing

It would be natural for Canadians to be able to legally purchase cannabidiol (CBD) products in natural health food stores and grocery stores, says Helen Long, president of the Canadian Health Food Association (CHFA). But that won’t be happening under current Health Canada regulations that will limit their sales to provincially-licensed recreational cannabis retailers. CBD, a non-intoxicating compound found in cannabis, “does not give users a high” and is associated with a number of promising health benefits, minimal side effects and no apparent potential for abuse, Long says. A growing body of literature touts the therapeutic benefits of CBD in reducing stress, pain, inflammation and improving sleep, she says. (Although some say more research is needed to back all the claims being made about CBD.) “Since there is nothing recreational about CBD, it doesn’t make sense to only sell it at a recreational cannabis store.” Long says CBD should be regulated under Natural Health Products Regulations, and her organization recently launched a “CBD is Natural” campaign to mobilize Canadians to push the Feds to update the CBD rules. Opening up the CBD market to others outside of licensed cannabis retailers would improve access to the products, and would also create an incentive for businesses to provide evidence that substantiates the products’ therapeutic health claims. Some Canadians, however, are opting to purchase unregulated CBD products online. “If CBD was permitted as an ingredient in natural health products, it would allow Health Canada to protect the health and safety of Canadians while dispelling the illegal market and allowing Canadian industry to thrive,” she says.—Danny Kucharsky

GETTY IMAGES/BORTONIA

Most Canadians will eventually try an edible product, says Sylvain Charlebois, professor in food distribution and policy at Dalhousie University in Halifax. That said, tough regulations may have dampened enthusiasm for edibles. A survey released by Dalhousie last May found nearly 36% of respondents said they would purchase legalized cannabis edibles, down from 45.8% in 2017. When the Liberal Party ran on a platform of cannabis legalization in 2015, “it invited Canadians to a huge party with great music,” he explains. But the strict regulations that ensued were the equivalent of having the party moved to “some dodgy basement with lousy music.” Still, Charlebois predicts that sales of cannabis edibles will surpass sales of cannabis combustibles within the next five years. “Edibles are the way to go,” he says. “The human body was never designed to inhale drugs.”


It’s time to celebrate the care that goes into every Canadian egg.

The new Egg Quality Assurance (EQA) program shows your customers, right on the carton, that their eggs are produced by Canadian farmers dedicated to delivering a top-quality product that meets national food safety and animal care standards. Visit eggquality.ca or come to our booth (#1239) at Grocery Innovations Canada this October to find out more.


E-comm’s tough slog E-commerce will become a $64.6-billion business in Canada this year. So why are grocers still struggling to make it work? By Chris Powell seldom does a week go by without one

of Canada’s major grocers announcing some kind of e-commerce innovation, such as a new delivery partner or technological application. Their efforts assume unbridled consumer adoption of e-commerce, which is poised to become a $64.6-billion business

in Canada this year, according to the research firm eMarketer. That represents a modest (though by no means insignificant) 10% of Canada’s retail industry, and a 21.1% increase from last year. At the same time, all of those excited announcements mask a harsh reality: traditional grocers are still struggling to successfully adapt their business to cater to online shoppers. And even when (or if) they do, they will eventually need to solve for Amazon. E-commerce has become table stakes for 21st-century retailers, yet it’s a logistical (not to mention cost) nightmare for grocery retailers—whose businesses are built around processes that are fundamentally unchanged from when Tennessee’s Piggly Wiggly became the first self-serve grocery store way back in 1916. “Canadian grocers haven’t been hardwired to think of the customer doing their grocery shopping in front of the screen,” says Sylvain Charlebois, a professor of food distribution and policy

at Dalhousie University. “There is progress, but it’s going to take a while.” The major national players are aggressively attempting to update their business, notes Charlebois. “I don’t think anyone is there yet … but we’re seeing signs they’re investing in data management and analytics, because they just don’t have a choice.” There are some bright spots, however. A U.S. report from Bain & Company earlier this year declared grocers have a

GETTYIMAGES/TOLGART

ONLINE GROCERY

Oh my pod! Retailers are always on the hunt for creative new ways to deliver convenience to customers. Two leading U.S. retailers have announced trials of high-tech, freestanding pods that promise to deliver both convenience and comfort. Take a look: DOGSPOT U.S. grocery chain Albertsons is bringing this “state-of-the art pet solution” from DogSpot to two of its stores. No longer will pooch have to stay in the car—via an app, pet parents 14

September/October 2019 Canadian Grocer

can check their dog into this temperaturecontrolled “house.” The unit locks to allow only the customer access to the pod while their dog is inside. Other features: forced-air ventilation and the option for owners to monitor their pet through the app’s puppy-cam feature while they shop. Co-founder and CEO Chelsea Brownridge told Canadian Grocer DogSpot will be coming to Canada later this year. MAMAVA Walmart is testing freestanding lactation

suites at three of its U.S. stores and six of its distribution centres. These privacy pods from Mamava are connected to a smartphone app that allows nursing moms to locate the pods, opt into vacancy alerts and unlock the units. Through the app, moms can adjust the pod’s airflow, lighting and even play a selection of relaxing sounds. While Mamava’s pods can currently be found at airports and stadiums, its partnership with Walmart is its first foray into retail stores.

DOGSPOT; MAMAVA; BURGER: GETTY IMAGES/DENIS08131

Unique, high-tech sanctuaries are being tested by grocers to enhance the shopper experience


IDEAS “rare opportunity” to shape consumers’ digital habits and deliver higher levels of convenience. The study found that traditional grocers were overwhelmingly the first choice among first-time online grocery shoppers (cited by 96% of respondents) and that 75% would stay with the first company they used. But Canadian retail expert Bruce Winder says e-commerce remains a fundamental challenge for brick-and-mortar retailers, many of which (reluctantly) entered the game without the necessary infrastructure to address fundamental challenges such as transportation, packaging and last-mile delivery. “The Canadian grocery industry was caught offguard on all of this,” says Winder. “They were in denial as the bogeyman, Amazon, started building significant infrastructure, and then they scrambled.” “Some have thrown labour at the issue, some have used technology [and] some have delegated some of the process,” he adds, pointing to Loblaw’s recent tie-up

with California-based grocery delivery service Instacart and Empire/Sobeys’ announcement it had partnered with the U.K. firm Ocado to build a massive automated fulfillment centre in the Greater Toronto Area. Sobeys, he says, is addressing one of the fundamental challenges: cost. In a 2017 report, Goldman Sachs suggested delivering from distribution centres is considerably more cost effective than store-based fulfillment. Ocado’s distribution centres rely on robots that can reportedly pick an online order within as little as five minutes. Winder says automation such as this is destined to play an increasingly prominent role in all things retail and grocery. “Wherever a human is involved in the entire process, look for machines to try to replace them,” he states bluntly. “It is 100% about the reduction of labour cost.” But while labour is the most obvious manifestation of the challenges faced by traditional grocers when it comes to

e-commerce, Winder says there are other problems: picking products for online orders takes time and can crowd aisles, for example, and grocers must use higher-cost retail packing compared to the lower-cost warehouse packaging used by Amazon. Plus, he notes, they also lose the benefit of impulse purchases or “basket-building sales” that inevitably occur when consumers walk the aisles in their store. “Overall, when any company runs two separate systems or processes to sell, they by definition reduce efficiency,” he says. The key problem, he says, is it’s difficult for grocers to make money on e-commerce. Most charge for buying online pick-up in-store (known as BOPIS in industry parlance), while grocers like Loblaw have added a premium to groceries purchased and delivered via Instacart. This is not a sustainable model, he cautions, particularly once Amazon becomes fully operational for all grocery—including fresh—in Canada.

AS THE MEATLESS MOVEMENT TAKES OFF, OLDER CONSUMERS ARE ASKING, “WHERE’S THE BEEF?” By Rebecca Harris a new survey from Angus Reid Insti-

tute has revealed that Canadians aged 18 to 34 are considerably more likely than older folks to have tried plant-based proteins: 58% of 18 to 34 year olds have tried them, compared to 36% among those 35 to 54 and 27% of the 55-plus cohort. Among those who haven’t tried plantbased meat substitutes, younger consumers are the most willing: 48% say they’re likely to try them some time in the next three months compared to 34% of those 35 to 54 and 26% of those 55-plus. Nearly all 1,530 respondents say they’re familiar with plant-based meat alternatives (95%), but only around four in 10 (39%) have actually tried them. For those who have tried them, 80% say they liked or loved the taste, including 75% non-vegetarians. Is the meatless movement a fad or is it here to stay? According to the survey, 55% of Canadians think plant-based proteins are here to stay. Again, there is a great divide among generations: 70%

of Canadians aged 18 to 34 say plantbased proteins are here to stay, compared to 51% of those 35 to 54 and 48% of those 55-plus. The study also looked at the economic impact of plant-based protein sales in Canada. The report states that this question “comes amidst considerable anxiety from both producers and industry analysts about the impact that a large-scale consumer shift to plant-based proteins could have on Canada’s lucrative meat and dairy markets.” One in three respondents (35%) believe the impact of consumers buying more plant-based proteins will be positive for the economy—more than those who say it will be negative (21%). The largest group (44%) says they are still unsure what the effect will be. In Alberta, Canada’s beef capital, pessimism about the economic impact of more plant-based proteins (35%) outpaces optimism (21%)—the only region where this is the case. September/October 2019 Canadian Grocer

15


IDEAS “Policies about managing conflict, about how to communicate, setting up actual meetings—not just around the dinner table, but real business meetings—and having policies around decision making neutralizes a lot of the power struggles between generations.”

Look outside the family If you’ve got a family business but nobody in the family is particularly strong at marketing, for example, bring in an outside marketing whiz to act as the chief marketing officer. “The businesses that are successful long term, beyond the current ownership, tend to be more outward looking and less inward looking,” says Noble.

Successful succession planning For independent grocers, there comes a time for the leadership torch to be passed. Planning for the transition early is key By Carol Neshevich while jeff noble says he can’t name

names, he shares the story of a multiunit, family-run grocery chain that came to him for consulting help with its succession-planning troubles. Noble, the director and GTA practice leader, business transition and wealth continuity for BDO Canada, says it was a clash between generations; for whatever reason, the founders weren’t passing on responsibility to the younger generation. “As time went on, conflict between the two generations got to the point where the business actually failed,” he says. Noble got involved too late to be able to fix the key problems in this case, which, he says, is a common pitfall: waiting too long to determine what will happen to a business—in terms of management, leadership, ownership and control—when the owners move on, whether due to retirement, health reasons or death. “It’s never too early,” says Noble. “[Owners] often think, ‘I’ll do it tomorrow.’ This is one of those things that tends to be very important but not really urgent—until one day it is urgent.”

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September/October 2019 Canadian Grocer

Business owners frequently put off tackling succession and bury their heads in the sand, especially when it comes to a family business. Noble says fear is at the heart of many delays—a fear of loss of control, a fear of loss of wealth, and especially a fear of conflict. “It’s often that question of how do I choose a successor? That can create a lot of conflict,” he says. Francine Carlin, a family business advisor with B.C.-based Business Harmonizer Group, agrees that starting early is vital. She stresses the importance of not treating succession as a singular “event,” but more as a journey over time. “A successful transition takes place when people look at it as continuity planning, which is more about looking at always keeping the business healthy,” she says. A few tips from Carlin and Noble for proactive succession planning:

Have policies in place Recalling the failed family business mentioned earlier, Noble said he believes setting up solid policies based on their values as a family would have helped.

Keep the business strong to keep options open You may be thinking the next generation will take over, but that may not work out. The best option may be to sell to an outside buyer, so make sure you’re constantly nurturing the business with that in mind. “If you’ve built up a great management team, good suppliers, and you’ve built an excellent, highly reputable brand, now it’s a great business if your kids want to take over one day, a great business if your employees want to buy it, and also a great business that would be appealing to an outside buyer,” says Noble. Carlin adds that you may want to get your business valued to prepare ahead for a potential sale. “Get your portfolio together, so that if you are approached by another business with similar goals and interests, you can make a move strategically rather than as a reaction,” she says.

Seek advice It can be helpful to seek advice from other businesses that have successfully transitioned ownership or leadership, says Carlin. “Ask them how did you move through transitions, how did you plan for the future, and what are some of the things that you’ve learned?”

Keep the lines of communication open Plans can change over time, so it’s crucial to keep the lines of communication open. “I always say the three most important factors are communication, communication and communication,” says Noble. “Open, honest, positive communication is critical.”  CG

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Carman Allison

BEYOND PAPER VERSUS PLASTIC

Sustainability efforts require a tailored, transparent approach that resonates with consumers HAVE YOU EVER asked yourself, “How much better is a paper grocery bag versus a plastic one?” or, “Which would be better for the environment?” How do consumers evaluate sustainability in a world full of disposable conveniences? We know consumers want to live more sustainable and mindful lives. In fact, 81% of consumers feel strongly that retailers and manufacturers should help improve the environment by implementing programs to this effect. So it makes sense that consumers are drawn to corporate programs that make them feel better about lightening that load.

a wealth of evidence that says sustainability can boost the bottom line. In fact, when sustainability initiatives are integrated thoughtfully into the strategic plan, they can do everything from streamline the supply chain to unlock a new level of consumer loyalty. One of the major challenges we hear companies express is that they know sustainability is important; however, they do not have a strategic plan for incorporating it into their store or brand. The word “sustainability” has increasingly become a catch-all term that can encompass everything from environmental conservation to employee relations, and much more. It can seem daunting to incorporate all of these factors into your overall business strategy, and figure out how it fits into your consumer marketing approach. So, whether you’re well on your way or just starting to incorporate sustainability into your strategy, here are five reasons to double down: 1 Sustainability encourages a culture of innovation, pushing you to embrace new methods, technologies and ideas. 2  Sustainability is a way to build authenticity, creating more transparency in your supply chain. 3 Sustainability is a consumer-centric strategy. It requires you to understand the concerns your customers have, and how your store or brand can be a solution to help make their lives better.

When sustainability initiatives are integrated thoughtfully into the strategic plan, they can do everything from streamline the supply chain to unlock a new level of consumer loyalty Keep in mind, consumers are becoming more sophisticated in their ability to discern between true commitment to sustainability and action taken just for show. And they’re not afraid to call out that authenticity—or lack of—on social media, in conversations with friends, or in any other channel. This has made some retailers and manufacturers hesitant, afraid of consumer backlash for well-intentioned efforts. Others are still sustainability skeptics; however, there is

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4  Sustainability drives greater efficiency; for example, many companies set commitments to move towards processes that reduce waste, requiring investment in research and development and sometimes the overhaul of supply chains. That upfront investment can pay off as your business benefits from a more efficient process and enhanced reputation. 5 The positive effects of sustainability are good for us, and they make us feel good too. That goodwill can cut across your employees, consumers and other stakeholder groups. To do it right, companies need to invest in truly understanding their consumers and embed sustainability into the foundation of their business. Authenticity comes through the end-to-end integration of sustainability into your processes and complete transparency with consumers. That means pushing beyond feel-good marketing to a fully integrated interdepartmental execution. It requires collaboration across many teams, from sourcing and sustainability, to store managers and marketing leaders. Winning requires sustainability be part of your short- and long-term strategic planning from start to finish. Investing in sustainability is undoubtedly an individual journey for retailers that can be impacted by industry, geography, product portfolio, community commitments and other factors. Success comes when companies take a tailored approach consisting of multi-stakeholder engagement, cross-functional accountability and transparency at every step along the way. Given that it’s nearly impossible to predict the next consumer-­ driven sustainability trend, the key is to start taking steps in a sustainable direction and make consumers aware of the steps your company is taking.  CG

Carman Allison is vice-president of consumer insights at Nielsen in Toronto. @CarmAllison.


    


FOOD BYTES

Joel Gregoire

THE FUTURE OF FOOD IN CANADA

As Canada becomes increasingly multicultural, building an international foods strategy is critical IN 2018, CANADA admitted more immigrants than at any point over the past 100 years. As Canada’s population ages, immigration is central to infusing youth and vitality into the economy. This, of course, has a wide-ranging impact—not only in terms of how Canada “looks,” but also in terms of what Canadians buy, which includes food and drink. While new Canadians bring with them varied preferences in terms of the foods they eat, they also have an impact on the broader population. According to new Mintel research on ethnic food, more than half of Canadians say they view themselves as being “more open to eating international foods than (they were) a few years ago,” with three-­quarters (77%) also viewing

international foods as being “more mainstream now than they used to be.” While this demonstrates that Canadians see themselves as being more open to trying a broader range of cuisines, the perceived mainstreaming of international foods also means it’s likely becoming more difficult for grocers to find new products that appeal to those interested in new foods and more adventurous eating experiences. Both these facets rank as the top two reasons why Canadians turn to international foods in the first place. To appeal to Canadians’ desire for new culinary experiences, grocers can look to what’s less commonly eaten by Canadians. While Chinese and Italian foods rank as the most commonly eaten international cuisines, according to Mintel

ATTITUDES TOWARD INTERNATIONALLYINSPIRED FOODS AT GROCERY STORES “How much do you agree or disagree with the following?” % ANY AGREE

70% 45%

61

%

I’m more likely to shop at grocery stores that offer internationallyinspired foods

% 69 61% 56%

Grocery stores that don’t offer internationally-inspired foods are not keeping up with the times

72% 40%

58%

I will go out of my way to travel to stores that offer specific inter­­ nationally-inspired foods/ingredients

  n Overall Population  n South Asians  n Chinese Canadians SOURCE: LIGHTSPEED/MINTEL, JULY 2019 || BASE: 2,000 CANADIAN INTERNET USERS AGED 18+; 81 SOUTH ASIAN INTERNET USERS AGED 18+; 119 CHINESE CANADIAN INTERNET USERS AGED 18+

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September/October 2019 Canadian Grocer

research, a sizeable swath of consumers is showing interest in exploring a diverse range of other cuisines. In this regard, Caribbean, African and Korean fare represent interesting opportunities for development. With the vast majority of Canadians viewing international foods as a bridge to experiencing other cultures, focusing on cuisines that are less commonly eaten yet garner interest can help grocers stand out. Having a concerted international foods strategy is critical for today’s grocers. When asked, more than half (56%) of Canadians agree that “grocery stores that don’t offer internationally-inspired foods are not keeping up with the times,” with nearly half also agreeing that they’re “more likely to shop at grocery stores that offer internationally-inspired foods” and two in five claiming they will “go out of their way to travel to stores that offer specific internationally-inspired foods/ingredients.” Chinese Canadians and South Asians are more likely to hold these views. In terms of product assortments, by their own account South Asians are more likely to want to try internationally-­ inspired versions of desserts, baked goods, snacks and breakfast foods relative to Canadians overall. This points to the importance of looking beyond the core supper and lunch occasion when considering how to develop or expand offerings that are inspired by other countries. With immigration contributing greatly to Canada’s population growth, it’s critical for grocers to have a strategy that considers internationally-inspired offerings throughout their stores to appeal to newer (and even not so new) Canadians. It will set them up for success in an evolving consumer landscape.  CG

Joel Gregoire is associate director, Food & Drink at Mintel, the world’s leading market intelligence agency. Based in Toronto, Joel researches and writes reports on Canada’s food and drink industry. @JoelDGregoire


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CONSUMER SHIFTS

Joshua Levi

CONVERT TRIERS INTO BUYERS

Plant-based is all the rage, but grocers can’t rely on a one-size-fits-all strategy to grow demand GROCERY STORES have experienced their fair share of fads. With the growing interest in plant-based meat alternative products, grocers have to be asking themselves if this category has a real chance of becoming a daily part of consumer diets. For all the marketing, planning and shelf space Canadian grocers are investing in these products, the industry hopes they will—and there are steps they can take now to nurture this burgeoning category. To determine the right course of action, grocers need a better understanding of the types of consumers who are buying these products. Once grocers know who they are trying to reach, they can start to develop marketing strategies and in-store promotions to serve them. By taking a deep dive into the available consumer data on alternative meat products and cross-referencing those findings with the major consumer segments, we find there are two main groups of buyers for these foods. The first one is a highly-dedicated group of consumers (call them “Meat Alternative Advocates”) who have fully bought into the plant-based protein concept. The other group of consumers (we’ll call them “Inquisitive Triers”) are highly intrigued by these products, but haven’t fully committed to making them part of their regular food purchases. The Meat Alternative Advocates segment represents an important set of consumers for this category. While their market penetration isn’t as extensive as the Inquisitive Triers, the consumers who do buy these products buy a lot of

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September/October 2019 Canadian Grocer

them. They tend to be middle-income families based in both urban and suburban areas. Interestingly, they also consume a lot of fresh meat, which suggests they aren’t rejecting meat for meat alternatives—they are eating both. The Inquisitive Triers segment is not easy to pin down. While a large group of consumers, they tend to make small purchases in this category. What sets these consumers apart is their willingness to try new things and a desire to feel different from others. These insights may also help explain why this group is slightly more likely to buy organic products. Given the marketing push for these products has mostly focused on climate-related issues, I anticipated these products would appeal to vegetarians who care deeply about the environment. It turns out neither segment includes an unusually high number of households we would consider to be vegetarian or have a heightened concern for the environment. That’s good news for grocers, because it suggests these products don’t just cater to a niche audience; they have mass appeal. Based on these findings, grocers will want to consider two distinct approaches to appeal to these two consumer types. Stores catering to a large population of Meat Alternative Advocates may consider positioning these products in their fresh meat section. These consumers don’t appear to make a sharp distinction between meats and their plant-based competition. Stores shouldn’t either. Grocers will also want to pursue a promotion plan that makes it easier for

shoppers to enjoy plant-based proteins by offering things like recipe ideas and summer barbecue tips. It will also be important to encourage multiple purchases by promoting a greater variety of plant-based products. The opposite approach is needed to appeal to Inquisitive Triers. Mixing these products in with meat may not be as effective with this segment. Instead, grocers need to create new opportunities to convince more of these consumers to try these plant-based proteins. Carving out space for these products near the organics might be worth considering. Remember, they like to try new products, so it’s essential to make sure they feel they are purchasing something unique. These consumers will also require additional incentives to try the category such as high-value coupons, discount prices in a flyer, or in-store samples. When marketing these products, don’t overemphasize the health or environmental factors. While it may play a role, there is not a lot of data available to suggest these high-value consumer segments are buying these products solely for those reasons. Consumers buy products they enjoy; they don’t seem to care if it’s meat or a plant-based alternative protein. They can and will choose both. Where do we go from here? Knowing which households belong to different segments and where they live will help grocers match their product selection and marketing to the neighbourhoods they serve. It will also help them target messages and promotions directly to these consumers, improving the chances to convert them from triers to buyers. Grocers have a real opportunity to influence usage, so long as they understand the different consumer groups and how to engage them effectively.  CG

Joshua Levi is the leader of the consumer-packaged goods practice at Environics Analytics, including helping grocers effectively reach consumers with data-driven insights.


NEW HORIZONS

A rising tide lifts all boats In a culture of equality, everyone rises

As

I follow the progress the U.S. women’s national soccer team is making for equal pay, I’m reminded of research findings released last year by Accenture, “When She Rises, We All Rise.” Based on survey data from more than 22,000 working men and women across 34 countries, its findings define the characteristics in corporate culture that drive equality. Policies and programs that advance women are key to females advancing, to equal pay, and to the kind of gender diversity that equals good business. But the Accenture report found that beyond those, a culture supporting equality means everyone rises. In those cultures, women are four times more likely to rise to senior management positions. What I love about this study is the science. This is not about broad generalizations; there is a formula that works. Out of more than 200 personal and workplace factors studied, Accenture pinpointed 40 that are statistically shown to influence advancement, including 14 that are the most likely to make positive change.

Businesses can begin to make progress now by creating a culture of equality And here’s the link to what the U.S. women’s soccer team is fighting for: when companies make these factors the most common ones in their culture, it impacts women’s pay. Women’s salaries and wages could increase by 51%, or up to an additional US$30,000 per woman each year. Globally, that boosts women’s earnings by US$2.9 trillion. Using these findings, businesses have a

concrete way to begin to adjust pay gaps in a way sports has yet to do. I read profiles recently on the 30 highest paid tennis players of all time. No. 1 was male tennis player Novak Djokovic, who clocked in at $131M. Female player Serena Williams was the fourth-highest paid player, with $88.7M in winnings. That’s quite a gap. Businesses can begin to make progress now by creating a culture of equality. The Accenture report groups the 40 advancement/equality factors into three categories, and here I’ll quote from the report: “Bold Leadership—A diverse leadership team that sets, shares and measures equality targets openly; Comprehensive Action—Policies and practices that are family-friendly, support both genders and are bias-free in attracting and retaining people; and An Empowering Environment—One that trusts employees, respects individuals and offers freedom to be creative and to train and work flexibly.” These are areas so familiar to the Network of Executive Women (NEW), which I lead. We see concrete actions in these areas of the business lead to concrete results with our member companies—companies like PepsiCo. In its Frito-Lay business, PepsiCo has paired future women leaders with sponsors at the vice-president level or above, in 18-month sprints. In 2018, the program—in its third round—was showing great results. Women in it were being promoted at a 70% higher rate than female employees overall. The important thing to note is that in addition to this program and others to champion women, PepsiCo is making cultural changes to support an environment where all can rise. Both are required to exact real change. I mentioned at the beginning there are 14 cultural drivers, within the three categories, most likely to enable positive change.

You’ll see some of them are specific to women but others are targeted at men. And some apply to both genders, from remote working opportunities to broader diversity targets: Bold Leadership: •Gender diversity is a priority for management •A diversity target or goal is shared outside the organization •The organization clearly states gender pay-gap goals and ambitions. Comprehensive Action: •Progress has been made in attracting, retaining and progressing women •The company has a women’s network •The company’s women’s network is open to men •Men are encouraged to take parental leave. An Empowering Environment: •Employees have never been asked to change their appearance or conform to company culture •Employees have the freedom to be creative and innovative •Virtual/remote working is widely available and is common practice •The organization provides training to keep its employees’ skills relevant •Employees can avoid overseas or long-distance travel via virtual meetings •Employees can work from home on a day when they have a personal commitment •Employees are comfortable reporting sex discrimination/sexual harassment incident(s) to the company. As you can see, the report is aptly titled. When she rises, we really all do rise. As you look at your own company, how many of these factors play a prominent role in shaping your culture? Maybe that’s a conversation to start.

SPECIAL INFORMATION FEATURE IN CANADIAN GROCER — September/October 2019

Sarah Alter is president and CEO of the Network of Executive Women, a learning and leadership community representing 12,400 members in 22 regional groups in the United States and Canada. Learn more at newonline.org.


By Carol Neshevich || Photography by Tobi Asmoucha

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SOMETHING September/October 2019 Canadian Grocer


STORE PROFILE

The Longo’s chain began as a fruit market back in 1956, and more than 60 years later, produce is still one of the major draws at its newest Toronto location

FOR EVERYONE

Longo’s new Yonge Sheppard location appeals to a broad demographic of “food explorers” with its convenient location, innovative offerings and stylish decor AS YOU HEAD UP THE ESCALATOR TO THE NEW LONGO’S store at Toronto’s Yonge Sheppard Centre, you see a small selection of shopping carts dressed up to look like various vehicles: police cars, fire engines, and even a fun pink sports car. Is this an indication that the 40,000-sq.-ft. grocery store is geared to young families? That’s partially the case, says the store’s manager John Visconti. “It’s a very mixed crowd,” he says of the customers who have been coming in since the store opened at the end of July. “We have a lot of families with very young kids, and we also have an elderly crowd.” Then there are the office workers that come in for lunch (“we’ve got a great lunch crowd”) or to pick a few items up on the way home. Located in North York, the area has traditionally been considered suburban, but like many Canadian suburbs today, the neighbourhood is becoming increasingly urban. “We’re between an urban and suburban market. It’s great that we cater to both here,” says Visconti. “So you have that business crowd, that everyday hustle and bustle, going to work, getting lunch, getting some groceries on your way home—which is more like an urban lifestyle—yet we also have a lot of families who live near our store who come shopping every day or do big weekend shops.” The store occupies the third level of the Yonge Sheppard Centre, a mixed-use building that combines residential, commercial and retail spaces. The centre has been around since the 1970s, but the addition of Longo’s was part of a major revitalization project that’s been underway for nearly a decade. It has seen the addition of a new LA Fitness facility on the second level, an expanded food court, the addition of trendy new restaurants, revamped interiors and exteriors, a new 35-story residential tower (still in the works), and more. According to Longo’s spokesperson Rosanne Longo, convenience was what drew the independent retailer to this spot. “There’s access to the TTC [subway station], there’s parking available, and it’s a multi-use complex—so it’s a one-stop shop.” September/October 2019 Canadian Grocer

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STORE PROFILE Near the entrance of the store is a fresh juice bar, something that’s quite new to the Longo’s chain but has quickly become one of the more popular features at the Yonge Sheppard Centre. Guests can have freshsqueezed juices or smoothies made to order here, and Visconti expects this will become increasingly popular with people who have just finished a workout at the fitness centre downstairs as awareness grows. Across from the juice bar is a Starbucks, something that’s become a staple in many Longo’s locations. As you walk past the Starbucks and juice bar into the store, the vast produce section is one of the first things you see. “As much as it’s a basic department—­ it’s in all our stores—that’s the department that all our guests gravitate to,” explains Visconti, who notes that Longo’s has been known for its fresh produce since the business began as a fruit market back in 1956. “More than 60 years later, [produce is] still strong in our stores. Even at a new location and such a different mix of customers, you know, young families are looking for that fresh food.” Next to the produce section is one of the more unique highlights of the store: the Living Well section, a new concept that’s only been tried out in a handful of Longo’s locations at this point. This health-focused section groups together products with health and wellness attributes from a variety of categories. It features everything from freezers stocked with healthy frozen meals and fridges filled with kefirs and kombuchas, to shelves lined with energy bars, organic snacks, and even vitamins, supplements and plant-based protein powders. “It’s a section within a section, a one-stop-shop for people who are looking for healthier alternatives,” says Longo, who notes there’s also a registered dietitian on hand to answer customer questions. As you continue through the store, there are rows

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September/October 2019 Canadian Grocer


upon rows of the usual grocery items, along with a traditional Longo’s bakery, an extensive cheese section, and well-stocked meat and seafood sections. But it’s the unique kitchen offerings, says Visconti, that make this location really stand out. “There’s our pasta bar, our burger bar with carving station, and all these nice offerings we offer our guests that they probably couldn’t get anywhere around here,” he says. He’s particularly proud of the fresh pasta bar, which allows shoppers to enjoy a restaurant-quality pasta dish made right before their eyes featuring the ingredients and sauces of their choosing. Then there’s a build-your-own poke bowl station; a mochi (Japanese-style ice cream) case; homemade gourmet pizzas; an impressive salad bar that features everything from curried couscous salad to pennette pasta salad with feta; and a hot food bar with a broad array of choices, from basa with sundried tomatoes to garlic butter shrimp with peas and mushrooms. Customers can take any of this home, or can sit and eat it in the spacious 150-seat dining area at the far end of the store. Next to the dining area is the Corks Beer & Wine Bar, for customers who want to sit and enjoy an alcoholic beverage while they take a break from shopping; and next to that is The Loft Cooking School, a stylish-looking room where cooking classes take place. Stylish, in fact, is a word that comes to mind when strolling this store. It is the fourth Longo’s location to incorporate this new “look,” which features bright lighting, varied artistic-looking fonts

on all the signage, and a lot of “small touches” that really make the decor special, according to Visconti. “Our target customers are the ‘food explorers’— people who are interested and passionate about food like we are—so I think our interior design is just modernized to reflect that; it’s bright and fresh inside and just appealing to the senses,” says Longo. Another interesting touch Visconti points out is the incorporation of black-and-white historic photos of the Longo family at their stores, blown up on several of the walls, giving the store a link to its historic roots while simultaneously reflecting a modern aesthetic. A 1950s photo of an apron-clad “Grandpa Longo” is featured in the produce section, for instance, while a photo of Gus and Tommy Longo from the same era adorns the wall above the bread section. Longo’s appears to be in a real growth phase, expecting to have a total of 36 stores (all in Ontario) open by the end of 2019. In addition to the Yonge Sheppard location, they opened an innovative new small-format, convenience-based store in Toronto’s Hudson’s Bay Centre called Pronto Eats at the end of the summer; and two new stores are slated to be open in the fall—one in East Gwillimbury (north of Toronto) and one in Toronto’s Liberty Village. Visconti, who has been with the chain for 25 years, says things have been “fantastic” at the Yonge Sheppard store since it opened this summer. “We’ve had great feedback from our guests,” he says. “They’re happy to have us here and are really taking advantage of a lot of our special features.”  CG

(Above): The hot bar offers a broad array of choices, from basa with sundried tomatoes to garlic butter shrimp (Opposite page): The Living Well section groups together products with health and wellness attributes from a variety of categories The fresh juice bar is a relatively new feature for Longo’s The kitchen area features a pasta bar, a build-yourown poke bowl station and more The store’s Corks Beer & Wine Bar provides shoppers with a spot to sit and enjoy an alcoholic beverage

September/October 2019 Canadian Grocer

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category close-up

coffee

culture

In-store coffee options are growing and grocery shoppers are realizing they don’t have to hit a cafe to find that perfect cup of coffee anymore. Quality coffee in the comfort of home These days the majority of people are drinking coffee! According to a national study, at least 63% of people in 2019 have consumed coffee in the past day—even more than tap water. With more and more quality coffee options available in grocery stores these days, we asked Matt Gallub, Associate Brand Manager, North America Retail, at Lavazza Premium Coffees Corp. to weigh in on what’s brewing in the world of coffee.

How has the coffee category grown/ changed over the last five years? We’ve seen significant growth in the singleserve segment and whole bean segment, as well as in espresso. Single-serve coffee now represents nearly half of retail coffee dollar sales in North America, driven primarily by the Keurig® K-Cup® system. It is safe to say the convenience of single-serve coffee is a major part of North American coffee behaviour. Home espresso consumption remains small in comparison but is seeing new momentum as espresso offerings continue to expand on retail store shelves, as well as the launch of new, in-home espresso machines. Across North America, whole bean coffee is approximately 7% of dollar sales and is currently delivering 5% annual growth. Ground coffee has been the dominant form for the last 80 years, but more and more consumers are showing interest in whole bean as they say freshly ground coffee delivers a better-tasting cup of coffee.

What are coffee characteristics that are particularly important to consumers? It’s this growing interest in whole bean coffee that is gaining significant momentum. Many consumers prefer whole beans freshly ground at home over pre-ground coffee. Consumers

are also becoming more interested in organic and sustainably-sourced coffee, which led to the launch of our ¡TIERRA! Organic coffee sub-brand.

What can grocers do to better merchandise products in this category? Grocers are doing a great job merchandising coffee already! As the number of consumers who prefer in-home espresso grows, grocers might be moving toward more espressofocused sets. They’ll also be looking at additional placement for organic coffees and might start thinking about adding more space for espresso product too.

Stop and try the coffee Qualità Oro: Since 1956, this iconic Lavazza blend has been Italy’s favorite brand, evolving over the years into what we have today. Available in 1 kg Whole Bean and 250 g Ground varieties. ¡Tierra! Organic: A level above the standard coffee currently on the marketplace, it was launched in 2002 to improve the living conditions, social development, and economic growth of farming communities. ¡TIERRA! is the result of Lavazza’s ethical commitment to sustainability, in collaboration with the Rainforest Alliance, an NGO which promotes the rights and well-being of workers’ communities, certifying farms which must meet rigorous social and environmental standards. Available in 1 kg Whole Bean and coming soon in 340 g Ground. Caffè Espresso: Created for the true espresso lover yet versatile enough to be prepared as a drip coffee, this blend is a traditional Italian recipe with a smooth and aromatic taste. Available in 1 kg Whole Bean and 250 g Ground tin.

Special promotional feature in Canadian GroCer–September/october 2019


COVER STORY

 Ron Welke has spent his career contributing to Federated Co-op’s success. As incoming chair of CFIG, he’ll be working to ensure the success of other independent grocers, too

CHAMPIONING CO-OPS   By Shellee Fitzgerald || Photography by Carey Shaw

L

ast year , Saskatoon-based Federated

Co-operatives Limited (FCL) reached the impressive milestone of 90 years in business. For the last 28 of those years, Ron Welke has been part of the FCL team and during his tenure he’s had a hand in all parts of the company’s food business, from buyer to grocery operations and marketing. As associate vice-president, food—a role he’s held for nearly seven years now—Welke leads a team responsible for providing support and leadership to FCL’s network of food stores across Western Canada, and also to the Co-op’s

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September/October 2019 Canadian Grocer

convenience, liquor and pharmacy locations. In October, Welke will be adding to his already hefty workload when he steps up and assumes the role of chair of the Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers (CFIG). Taking over from Summerhill Market’s Christy McMullen, Welke will be a voice for some 4,000 independent grocers across Canada. Recently, Canadian Grocer spoke to Welke on subjects ranging from the virtues of the Co-operative Retailing System to the crucial need to level the playing field for Canada’s independent grocers. Here are edited excerpts from the interview.


  AND COMMUNITY


COVER STORY What was your introduction to the grocery business? It’s not a unique path. I started as a clerk/grocery bagger at [the long shuttered] Dominion Stores—I’m dating myself a bit here by saying that—in Saskatoon when I was 15 years old. I worked there for a couple of years then moved on to Safeway, where I worked while I was going to university. That got me some experience and I enjoyed it, and then I joined Co-op after graduating and I’ve been here for 28 years.

In 2018, FCL celebrated its 90th anniversary. How do you account for the company’s staying power? FCL and about 170 Retail Co-operative Associations are part of a federation that we call the Co-operative Retailing System. We work to fulfill those needs of our retail members and owners. Our retail locations have been successful over the years because they’re integral parts of the communities they serve and they have continued to adapt to their customer needs. We have both benefitted from and have supported their success. We also continually invest back into our facilities, technology and people to ensure we’re sustainable for the long term. We’re not a publicly traded company so we’re not as focused on just trying to meet this quarter’s numbers—we’re looking more long term.

What would you say is the advantage of the Co-operative Retailing System? We describe it as “centralize for efficiency, localize for effectiveness.” So, we use our scale, all of our retail network, to leverage efficiencies and build central programs to keep us competitive. Also, each individual Retail Co-op has the autonomy to make decisions locally to best serve their members, so that’s a significant advantage and the leaders of all of our co-ops live, work and play in the communities they serve, so they are very connected with the communities and make decisions that help build sustainable communities where they work. The other advantage, I would say, is our profits that we generate stay in the communities where they were earned. They are reinvested in new facilities for the community and paid back to members in patronage and cash dividends.

What’s the best part of your job? The best part is just having the privilege of leading our team; they’re highly engaged and talented and seeing them excel at what they do is really rewarding.

How do you/FCL go about attracting talent? Our goal is to set clear objectives for people, give them the tools they need to do their jobs and provide opportunities for their personal and professional development. We have been able to recruit seasoned talent from other retailers as well as hire the brightest graduates. It’s not always easy, but we do have a good track record of attracting talented people who share our values and who want a rewarding career.

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September/October 2019 Canadian Grocer

In the larger grocery industry, what are some of the most significant changes that you have noticed over the last few years? There are a few changes that I’ve noticed. The first one that comes to mind is the use of technology and data to help improve decision-making and execution right down to shelf level. Then there’s the consumer’s desire for more ready-made meal solutions and also their willingness to be more culinarily adventurous with their meals. And also, the influence of digital on consumers’ decisions on where they shop and what they’re having for dinner tonight. And then really there’s so much more choice for consumers now and we, as retailers, are really continuing to try to evolve and meet those consumer needs and differentiate.

What is the best piece of advice you’ve been given in this business? I’ve been given lots of advice over the years [laughs] but I’ve found the simplest is often the best. One of my colleagues used to say, “The grocery business doesn’t have to be complicated, just plan your work and work your plan.” I’ve found that to be very useful, especially if things seem to get a bit overwhelming the odd time; just take a step back, take a breath, plan your work and work the plan and everything will work out just fine.

What would you say is the top issue facing independent grocers today? I would say the playing field is tilted in favour of the large national and international giants out there. So this makes it difficult [for independents] to compete when negotiating, for example, with suppliers and with credit card companies.

Will this be your chief focus during your term as chair of CFIG? Yes, I’ll be doing everything I can to ensure that playing field is as level as possible so independents can compete and thrive and continue to make a difference in our communities.

We hear a lot of negative stories regarding the future of traditional grocery retail, but what are you most optimistic about? There is a lot of change going on with significant growth in the online business and increasing competition, and that’s not going to go away. However, I’m very optimistic—I think there is plenty of opportunity for retailers that can provide an outstanding customer experience. The environment we are in right now is driving a need for change and, as the saying goes, necessity is often the mother of invention. We know that retailers are a pretty innovative group and those who act as merchants certainly have a real opportunity to evolve and differentiate their business offering and be successful.  CG


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IN-STORE TECH

ET

K AR

RM

E UP

S

BEYOND BELLS AND WHISTLES SHUTTERSTOCK/MACROVECTOR

By Rebecca Harris

How grocers can use in-store tech to give shoppers the experience they’re really looking for September/October 2019 Canadian Grocer

35


retailers of all stripes are decking out their stores with humanoid robot greeters, virtual reality dressing rooms, augmented reality window displays, and high-tech interactive screens that bring products to life. But if you walk into your average grocery store, you might wonder: where is all that shiny new tech that’s supposedly transforming the customer experience? And why can’t I find the organic chia seeds? As a preamble to our interview for this article, I pose the former question to Eric Matusiak, partner, national retail leader at BDO Canada. To be fair, I note that my decidedly analogue shopping experiences could be because I live in a smaller Ontario market. He responds: “Your polite skepticism is warranted because you read articles all the time about how tech is doing this and that ... And you go into most stores and think, ‘Well, nothing’s changed!’” The trouble is, it’s easy for the media or tech companies to tell businesses they must implement X, Y and Z technologies ... or else. “But it costs money and time to make this stuff happen,” says Matusiak. “[Grocery] is also a tight-margin industry and companies just don’t have millions or tens of millions to turn on a dime, let alone the cultural and people factors involved with a heavier deployment of technology.” Retailers’ tech budgets might not be on the rise, but consumer expectations certainly are. A 2018 study from the Retail Council of Canada (RCC), in collaboration with RCC’s marketing advisory council, Google and WisePlum, found that Canadians expect a more convenient, seamless and integrated shopping experience—whether they shop online or in store. For instance, a significantly larger percentage of grocery consumers surveyed (44% versus 30% for non-grocery) indicated a desire for a faster checkout.

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September/October 2019 Canadian Grocer

PwC’s 2019 Canadian Consumer Insights Survey found that when in store, 52% of Canadians said the ability to quickly and conveniently navigate the store, as well as quick and easy payment methods (32%), including mobile and contactless payment, would significantly improve their current in-store shopping experience. The studies are salient, as they dispel the notion that enhancing the in-store experience is all about amazing, high-tech bells and whistles. “I think where we’re getting confused these days is the term ‘experience’ is now being equated to ‘epic’—that it has be this complete ‘wow’ experience and be Instagrammable,” says Matusiak. “For some people, a great in-store experience is just getting in and out really quickly.” When the right technologies are used in store, and for the right reasons, there are valuable benefits for both consumers and retailers. Robin Sahota, managing director and retail lead at Accenture, notes that in-store tech does three things retailers today are striving for: enhancing the customer experience; building more customer engagement (which includes the perception of value, increasing dwell times and overall engagement); and improving store operational efficiency. “It really is a combination of these three things that come together to enhance the customer experience and engagement,” he says. Here’s a look at some of the in-store technologies being used or tested today. DIGITAL SHELF LABELS: A digital or electronic shelf labels (ESL) system allows retailers to make price adjustments automatically, thereby providing accurate, real-time pricing for customers while saving retailers time and labour. “For retailers, it’s creating efficiency because you no longer have employees who need to spend time doing this very administrative task,” says Sahota. “For customers, it’s helpful because they’re seeing a consistent label across the store. It tends to be quite bright and clear, with the price clearly visible.” There is also the potential for these labels to do more than just display prices. In 2018, for instance, U.S. grocery giant Kroger rolled out its EDGE (Enhanced Display for Grocery Environment) Shelf digital display system, which communicates everything from pricing and promotions to nutritional information as well as advertisements. IN-STORE NAVIGATION: About those hard-to-find chia seeds ... Mobile apps can tell shoppers where every product is in the store, and how to get to them. Last year, Walmart launched a revamped app at its U.S. stores, with new features including maps that help shoppers find where an item is located, down to the aisle and shelf area. As part of a new pilot in two Kroger stores, in partnership with Microsoft, customers can write an in-app shopping list, and

SMART PHONE: GETTY IMAGES/BET_NOIRE

IF YOU READ THE BUSINESS NEWS, CHANCES ARE YOU THINK


IN-STORE TECH

WALMART FASTLANE: WALMART CANADA, DIGITAL SHELF: CHANTALE LECOURS, ROBOT: AHOLD DALHAIZE

Walmart launched its new “Fast Lane” checkout system, which allows shoppers to scan as they shop, at a newly renovated supercentre in Toronto this past spring

as they shop the store, digital shelf labels light up with a personalized icon (for example, a pumpkin) to point out an item on their list. Shoppers can then scan the item and the app tells them where to find the next product on their list. In-store navigation tools like these address shoppers’ need for ease. “One big category of consumer expectations is around ease of shop, which is part of the ‘frictionless’ experience,” says Marty Weintraub, national retail leader at Deloitte in Toronto. “Shoppers are looking to in-store navigation apps to help them find what they need quickly without having to walk up and down every aisle.” SELF-CHECKOUT: While self-checkout systems aren’t new, they have “hugely improved,” says David Marcotte, senior vice-president, cross-border retail at Kantar Consulting. “For over 20 years, my experience has been avoiding self-checkout whenever possible. It’s invariably much slower and much more frustrating [than a traditional checkout]. But in the last five years, self-checkout has gotten to a point where it is a real option ... The information, the interface, everything about that just works.” One new self-checkout technology is scanning

Electronic shelf labels, like the ones from Avril Supermarché Santé pictured above, allow retailers to make price adjustments automatically; (Left) Marty the robot is able to patrol aisles, identify hazards and alert employees

September/October 2019 Canadian Grocer

37


IN-STORE TECH

tunnels that allow products to flow through a conveyor and where bar codes are read at a quick rate. “You don’t see much of this today, but scanning tunnels are the next evolution of self-checkout,” says Accenture’s Sahota. “Obviously, the value of the scanning tunnel versus [traditional] self-checkout is it takes the work away from the customer and shifts it back to the retailer.” AUTOMATIC OR INVISIBLE CHECKOUT: “The big story is that consumers don’t like to shop—it’s too much like work,” says Doug Baker, vice-president of industry relations, private label and technology at Food Marketing Institute (FMI). “So, to create a more conducive, enjoyable experience, a lot of retailers have updated their service departments or put in new types of departments.” But, he adds, when customers get to the front of the store, they have to stand in line. “To complete the full loop, retailers are looking for ways to get shoppers out of the store more quickly.” That can be achieved through quicker-pay technology like mobile tap or Apple Pay. Or, at the extreme end, having no checkouts at all. Amazon’s first-of-itskind concept, Amazon Go, uses in-store cameras, sensors and artificial intelligence to detect what shoppers put in their baskets. Customers can just walk out of

the store, with payment being made via mobile app. Taking a page from Amazon Go, Walmart launched its “Fast Lane” checkout system at a newly renovated supercentre in Toronto this past spring. The technology allows customers to use their My Walmart app to scan products as they shop. When a user is done shopping, they click “checkout” to receive a barcode they scan in order to check out, with payment processed through a card on file. The feature is one aspect of Walmart’s new “Urban Supercentre” concept and the company said a second location will launch in Thornhill, Ont. next year. ROBOTS: The robots are coming ... to aisle three. In the United States this year, Ahold Delhaize deployed “Marty,” a tall, googly-eyed autonomous robot, to 500 Stop & Shop, Giant and Martin’s locations following a pilot. The robot patrols the aisles, identifying hazards such as spills, and then alerts employees. (He doesn’t do cleanups himself.) Walmart also rolled out an army of 1,500 robots at U.S. stores this year, and although they’re not as friendly looking as Marty, they’re arguably more useful. The “Auto-C” robot cleans floors, providing “a cleaner shopping experience” for customers while freeing up associates to serve the store’s customers better, according to Walmart. Three hundred

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additional shelf scanners, named “Auto S,” scan items on store shelves to help ensure availability, correct shelf location and price accuracy. While there is some debate about robots taking over jobs, FMI’s Baker says by using robots, retailers can give employees the opportunity to focus on customers. “Instead of doing more of a mundane job of walking up and down the aisles looking for out-of-stocks or making sure the shelf tags are correct, retailers are looking to robots to do that. And that allows the employee to actually focus on the consumer and provide them that exceptional customer service that they’re looking for.” SO, HOW DO RETAILERS DECIDE WHERE TO BEST PUT THEIR DOLLARS? “You need to start with the business need

and the strategy, and then buy the technology to address that business need, as opposed to just going out and buying the shiny object,” says BDO’s Matusiak. He adds that retailers must ask: “What is the purpose of the technology? What are you trying to achieve with it?” Also keep in mind that—shiny or not—in-store tech might require a lot of work behind the scenes. Take in-store navigation, for example. “A shopper wants tomato sauce and asks the app, ‘where is the tomato sauce?’” says Matusiak. “Depending how

standardized the stores are, there is a lot of work in the background to make sure the system knows that the tomato sauce is mid-way down aisle three, and then have an app tell you that. So, although it’s a digital app, there is an infrastructure component to it, which could take longer to develop.” Accenture’s Sahota says typically the best way to try out technology is to do small pilots and test-and-learns, tracking the business case, and ultimately scaling the technology. “Many retailers in Canada are piloting different technologies, but what they’re not necessarily doing is really understanding the business or the ROI in a sufficient way so they can maximize their investment,” he says. “As a result, they’re testing things for long periods of time and there’s a slow take-up in really scaling these technologies, unfortunately ... Testing it quickly, measuring the ROI and scaling it quickly are quite crucial to get value out of it.” And while retailers are inclined to dot every “i” and cross every “t” in a business case, it wouldn’t hurt to be a bit more flexible. “As we know, grocery margins are extremely tight and there isn’t a lot of room for mistakes,” says Deloitte’s Weintraub. “Unfortunately, though, in the spirit of new retailing ... we’ve got to take some risks. Innovation doesn’t happen if you’re extremely risk-averse.”  CG

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With more and more wines available in grocery stores in Canada, it’s the perfect opportunity to round out meal planning for shoppers—and increase basket size.

Convenience and one-stop shopping The days of making separate trips to your local grocery and liquor stores for that perfect wine and meal pairing are soon to disappear. While some provinces have enjoyed this convenience for a number of years already, recent changes in legislation are paving the way for the universal availability of wine in grocery stores across the country. We asked Fiona Buchan, director of marketing at Diamond Estates Wines & Spirits, to talk about this exciting time for wines in grocery.

There are so many choices in wine, how can grocers make it easy for shoppers to decide? No doubt the wine category can be somewhat overwhelming given the number of countries producing wine. Then there’s all those varietals to choose from (hmm, Cab Sauv or Merlot?), and of course, the option of red, white, rosé or sparkling. The good news is you don’t need a sommelier in the grocery aisles to help confused shoppers. Instead, make it easy for them to find their perfect bottle by grouping wines by flavour or taste profile rather than variety. Most consumers have a preferred palate and a “go-to” selection of wines. Provide information with appropriate food pairing recommendations in aisle and encourage tasting/sampling. Shoppers may not know about the “intricacies” of wine and wine making, but they do know what they like. Make wine accessible, not intimidating.

What are some of the latest trends in wine across Canada? One very exciting trend is consumers’ increased awareness around the quality of wines made in Canada, whether it be in Ontario or British Columbia. Not only do Canadian wines stack up against imports, the fact that they are produced by Canadians with grapes grown by Canadian farmers plays very strongly into the “buy local” movement. We’re also seeing more and more producers catering to the single serve occasion (e.g., recyclable 200 mL PET bottles and wine in cans), and from a “style” standpoint, rose seems to be an option year-round instead of only at summertime. Sparkling wines are not just for celebrations either, and consumers are challenging the “red wine with meat, white wine with fish” tradition, opting instead for matching taste preferences.

How are consumers driving sales of wine in grocery? While it’s hard to predict how things will look when all grocery stores carry wine, two things may foreshadow how successful this concept will be: • grocery stores are the preferred choice for wine in the U.S. • the weekly velocity of wine sales is much higher in grocery stores than that of liquor stores due to the convenience factor.

Wines making a buzz…. 20 Bees—Your perfect “just Beecause wines” Chardonnay: Crisp and refreshing with notes of green apple, pear and grapefruit. A beautiful pairing with a variety of dishes including fresh salads, grilled seafood or light poultry. Available for grocers across Ontario. Cabernet Merlot: This food-friendly red blend provides flavours of cherry and red berry fruits with subtle hints of oak. Makes a great match with grilled beef kebobs, gourmet burgers or hard cheeses. Available for grocers across Ontario. Backyard Vineyards—Nosey Neighbour White Sit back, relax & enjoy this lovely wine crafted in the Fraser Valley, BC. Imagine lush tropical fruit with a hint of crispness that creates a foodfriendly wine to be enjoyed with your favourite meal. Available for grocery retailers in BC.

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AISLES

Products, store ops, customers, trends

HOLIDAY ENTERTAINING GUIDE

’Tis the season Time to make merry—and boost basket size during the holidays! PARTAKE BREWING

By Rosalind Stefanac

I

t’s the most wonderful time of the

year … or at least it will be sooner than we think. While most of us are in denial about the winter weather ahead, some grocers are already in holiday prep mode. And for good reason—whether your customers are celebrating Christmas, Hanukkah or winter solstice, the holidays are considered the busiest time for retail, and grocery, of course, is no exception. According to a 2018 holiday insights report from market research firm Field

Agent Canada, 39% of Canadians expect to spend more on groceries for their holiday meals. If the U.K. is any indicator, only four in 10 consumers set a budget for Christmas groceries, according to a Christmas 2018 market forecast from IGD Retail Analysis. This suggests the majority of shoppers throw caution to the wind to treat themselves during this time. In fact, the IGD report notes that 71% of shoppers said they perceive Christmas as a time to “splash out on food and groceries.” September/October 2019 Canadian Grocer

43


AISLES

•• Appetizers  ••

Move over, charcuterie, and make way for the “grazing” board. “With so many selective eaters out there, a grazing board offers a little bit of everything—beyond just meat and cheeses,” says Jo-Ann McArthur, president of Nourish Food Marketing. “On a grazing board, you can have a vegetarian protein, a keto option, as well as crackers.” Convenience is key, especially during the busy holiday season, so consider offering elaborate pre-made party trays or prepare a customized charcuterie board for them while they shop. This is also a great way to up-sell high-quality product. “We do some experimentation in our deli section over the holidays, offering new seasonal cheeses from both local suppliers and [from] abroad,” says Giancarlo

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September/October 2019 Canadian Grocer

Trimarchi, co-owner of Ontario-based independent grocery chain Vince’s Market. “Then we are sure to promote things that go well with these cheeses, like highend salamis, crackers and jams.” For shoppers who want to do it all themselves, highlight products that help make it easy. “Put things together for the shopper almost like a paint-by-number set so they can entertain easily,” advises McArthur. “You have to think like a shopper and not a category manager.” To that end, Bothwell Cheese has just introduced Snack’Rs, an already-cubed premium-quality sharp cheddar cheese snack for the holidays that is Non-GMO and Kosher-certified. Consider pairing that with good quality crackers such as Mary’s organic crackers, which has a variety of tasty, gluten-free options, including a new line called Real Thin in Sea Salt, Garlic Rosemary, Sweet Onion and Cayenne Pepper flavours. Cate Batson Baril, director of marketing at Mary’s Gone Crackers, says the brand gets tremendous feedback on how people are using their premium crackers on charcuterie boards via Instagram. She suggests grocers further cross-merchandise over the holidays by putting crackers near shelf-stable olive spreads or by the refrigerated regular and nut-free cheeses and hummus. “We had a great promotion one year with [one grocer] where we put our crackers by the wines along with some shelf-stable, high-end salamis,” she says.

•• Dinner items ••

Those grocers who do well on dinner item sales recognize that today’s consumers don’t want to compromise on fresh, quality products for their holiday mains. And value-added/convenience-focused holiday dinner items have been very successful for a number of grocers in recent years. Pete’s Frootique in Halifax offers full turkey dinners for pickup on Christmas Eve, along with a table centrepiece and dessert sourced from a local bakery. Toronto’s Summerhill Market has been doing turkey dinners with all the fixings for almost 20 years, offering all the traditional sides such as squash,

green beans, gravy and cranberry sauce. This year Summerhill is also developing a fully plant-based holiday dinner. “Customers’ palates and knowledge of food has increased and you can’t get away with offering something that doesn’t taste good,” says Summerhill co-owner Christy McMullen. “We probably sell 5,000 turkey meals alone during the holidays.” To satisfy holiday traditionalists, look to suppliers such as Hayter’s, a family-­ run turkey farm in Dashwood, Ont., which offers holiday favourites like a whole turkey with simple preparation and cooking instructions, as well as a smaller seasoned breast roast or turkey fillets in a variety of flavours (Honey Garlic, Teriyaki, etc.). Meanwhile, manufacturers like Gardein offer meat-free products ideal for entertaining, ranging from faux chick’n scallopini to golden fishless fillets.

•• Desserts and confectionery ••

According to the latest figures from Statistics Canada, December is the biggest sales month for candy, confectionery and snack foods for large retailers. But even the smaller grocers are cashing in on “sweet tooths” over the holidays. Trimarchi says Vince’s Market always does well with in-house made holiday cookies and shortbread, as well as the ones imported from Germany and Austria. “People come to us for the European cookies and chocolate they won’t get at their local pharmacy or big chain,” he says. And don’t forget about those guests following special diets, even during the holidays, and even for dessert. Sweets from the Earth, which recently expanded to a state-of-the-art manufacturing facility in Toronto and signed on with its first U.S. grocer, provides a full line of nut-free, gluten-free and 100% plant-based baked goods. The company’s holiday cupcake four-pack and festive dome peppermint cake can be a great addition to the traditional dessert table. Sweets from the Earth is also launching a line of keto, sugar-free products before the holidays, including brownies, blondies, granola clusters and cookies. “Sampling is important with

APPETIZER: GETTY IMAGES/SORENDLS, TURKEY: SHUTTERSTOCK/ELENA TRUKHINA, CUPCAKE: SWEETS FROM THE EARTH

Most shoppers also engage in holiday shopping regardless of their faith, says Nupur Saxena, managing director of Split Second, a U.K.-based consulting firm that specializes in helping brands get listed with retailers. “You need something to look forward to in the dark days of winter, and people are staying in more and entertaining more at home, which is reinforced with good food and drink,” she explains. Saxena says the reason U.K. retailers continue to dominate globally when it comes to holiday innovation and shopper engagement is because they are planning their Christmas campaigns some 18 months out and getting shoppers excited about the holidays. “Successful grocers understand what makes their shoppers tick, and what specific categories they’re buying more of during this time,” says Saxena. She points to retailers like Marks & Spencer who were first to market with a meal deal idea, offering a main, dessert and bottle of wine during the year, but then elevating that over the holidays to include more luxurious ingredients paired with prosecco or champagne. “If you make sure to cater to shopper needs, that will drive spend in your outlets.” Here’s a look at some of the categories where you can entice holiday shoppers and help make your sales sing.


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our products because it allows people to see that the texture and taste is just as good as [traditional] baked goods,” says vice-president Marc Kadonoff.

•• Hot beverages ••

The holiday season coincides with colder temperatures here in Canada; with that comes a hankering for hot beverages. Fortunately, shoppers are realizing the grocery store can be a mecca for quality teas and coffees they can enjoy in the comfort of home. Products like Tierra Organic from Lavazza Premium Coffees are a good option for shoppers concerned about ethical coffee practices. The company partners with the Rainforest

Alliance, which certifies coffee bean farms to ensure they are meeting rigorous environmental and social standards. Try stocking holiday-themed coffees and teas like a limited-edition Christmas tea from Twinings or Holiday Blend from Starbucks, and offer entertaining-related solutions by cross-merchandising hot beverages alongside baked goods or shelf-stable desserts.

•• Wine, beer and non-alcoholic options ••

Holiday toasts are integral to the season, and those grocers able to carry wine and beer can help shoppers plan the perfect party in one stop. All the better if products are locally sourced and tied to an engaging story. Toronto-based Don’t Poke the Bear co-founders Andrew von Teichman and Allan Jackson, for example, were bullied as children and now donate

five cents from each of their craft ciders and 25 cents from each bottle of their red, white and rosé wines to anti-bullying resources. “The holidays can be a high-pressure time for those hosting and you want wines that will appeal to a broad audience,” says von Teichman. “Our label is playful and memorable, but then [shoppers] find out what we are doing on the bully prevention side and it takes it to a whole next level.” With a growing number of people opting not to drink alcohol for a variety of reasons, it’s important to stock up on non-alcoholic options, and to make customers aware of them. Fortunately, some newer innovations have a much more sophisticated flavour profile than traditional alcohol-free offerings. Partake Brewing is one example. Founder Ted Fleming developed his award-winning alcohol-free craft beers after a diagnosis of Crohn’s disease forced him to give up booze. “There is a stigma around what non-alcoholic beer is, and the best way to beat that is to sample products like ours so people see that they taste great,” he says, noting that all Partake craft beers are only 10 to 30 calories each.

•• Hostess gifts ••

There’s a bad rap around gifts that come from the grocery store, so grocers need to up the ante when it comes to hostess options, says Field Agent Canada’s general manager Jeff Doucette. “Have prewrapped, grab-and-go solutions that look really good and trays of food that don’t look like they came out of your HMR department,” he says. “Offer baskets that people can customize with gluten-free items that show the [gift-giver] has put some thought into it.” Simply pairing a few high-quality items together can also make a great hostess gift in a pinch, says Baril of Mary’s Gone Crackers. “We have an herb cracker with fennel that’s a killer with a roll of goat cheese that would make a great gift, especially if you’re not sure if your hosts like to drink.”

LATTE COFFEE: SHUTTERSTOCK/PUKACH, MULLED WINE: SHUTTERSTOCK/AFRICA STUDIO, HOSTESS GIFT: GETTY IMAGES/CCLICKCLICK

AISLES


white gold

Belgian endives from Belgium, the heart of europe

Belgian endive is the white gold and pride of Belgium. This Belgian specialty is a unique product that adds extra value to vegetable departments. It is available all year round, and provides the versatility that Canadian consumers are looking for in their cooking.

B

elgium is one of the largest growers of endives in the world. Belgian endive was discovered in 1830 in Brussels. Most of the Belgian endives come from family businesses which allows the farmers to feel personally involved in their own products resulting in a better crop. Belgian endive inspires with its versatility: in addition to the standard endives, you can find red endives, baby-endives and organic endives.

Why choose Belgian products?

The Belgian quality label for fruit and vegetables — Flandria — guarantees consumers they are buying environmentally friendly products that provide the best in quality and freshness. Only top quality products with a perfect taste and impeccable

appearance earn this label. Each farmer must adhere to very strict rules in terms of quality and size and markings on the box can be used to trace the package back to its origin. The specific quality characteristics of Flandria endives are: • Fresh appearance • No wilting signs, sprouting, top edge and yellow or discoloured leaves • Well-shaped solid leaf rosette and very well developed • Weight of at least 200g/head • Excellent quality • Smooth cut end • Uniform heads • Core has to have a yellow colour over at least 1/3 of the plant • No frostbite • Non-blanched part should have the typical colour of the variety

Healthy and delicious

The Belgian endive is rich in fibre, vitamins A, B1 and B2 and C, calcium and phosphorus and is low in calories. One hundred grams of raw endives contains 12 calories. Canadians can prepare Belgian endives in a variety of ways - steamed, raw in salads or filled as an appetizer. And thanks to its delicate taste, consumers can combine Belgian endives with a number of ingredients like fish, chicken, beef, or fill the leaves with shrimp or blue cheese for an easy and healthy appetizer. Interested in sourcing Belgian endives? Ask your Belgian supplier or find a specialist at: europeanvegetables.ca.


AISLES

MORE TIPS TO HEAT UP HOLIDAY SALES

How to be a festive destination

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September/October 2019 Canadian Grocer

Start planning early

As soon as suppliers start sending over their spring catalogues, sit down with your team and talk about what products you could bring in for the holidays—and how to cross-promote them with existing merchandise and services. “You have to be organized and have the time to train your team on the products you’re bringing in,” says Frank Yunace of Pete’s Frootique, where additional holiday staff is hired in the fall and planning starts as early as May. Yunace also suggests spending time this holiday season really noting what kinds of products and services are selling best so you can adjust your offerings accordingly for next year.

Tailor holiday offerings to your demographic Determining what specialty items to bring in for the holidays depends largely on your customer base. If a significant number of shoppers come from a European background, for example, high-quality crackers, spreads and chocolates from Europe will be appreciated. At Pete’s Frootique’s two Nova Scotia stores, British-­ themed food items have become so popular during the holidays they now take up a central part of the store.

Partner locally

If you don’t have the capacity to make decadent themed desserts in-house, partner with a local bakery to bring in some special holiday sweets. Or collaborate with a florist to provide beautiful centrepieces you can sell at a premium. People will pay for the convenience of a one-stop shop.

Make sampling sensational Part of holiday entertaining is trying a little of this and that, so extend that idea into your store with plenty of sampling during the holiday season. Field Agent’s Jeff Doucette says it’s all about engaging people by providing a story about a product’s origins, as well as a recipe or solution on how to use it over the holidays. “It’s about the customer experience and not just about getting that morsel of food in their hands.”

Create a holiday atmosphere Whether that’s changing your playlist for December, adding a decorated tree, or hiring a musician to play a few hours of tunes, ensure your store feels like the holidays, which will entice shoppers to stay a while and indulge. Encourage your staff to look the part, too, by dressing in holiday colours or donning festive hats or pins.  CG


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AISLES

Feeling your oats

YUMI ORGANICS Yumi Organics offers overnight oats in Blueberry Coconut, Apple Cinnamon, Dark Choco and Matcha Green Apple varieties. Soaking raw oats overnight (as opposed to cooking them) preserves more of the oatmeal’s nutrients and boosts its healthy qualities, according to the Montrealbased company, which also sells a reusable Yumi jar to make the oats in. The jar features measurement and fill lines on the back to help make the process easy.

As a kid, you may not have been too thrilled when mom presented you with a bland bowl of oatmeal for breakfast. Today, however, oatmeal is anything but boring. As Instagram influencers post pics of their latest oatmeal bowl creations and manufacturers use oats as a substitute for dairy in a variety of products, this humble ingredient is undeniably hot right now. Check out these innovative oat-based offerings.

RXBAR Chicago-based RXBar’s brand new line of RX A.M. Oats offers a nutritious and convenient way for consumers to start their day. Each single-serve cup of oats is simple to prepare, either by adding boiling water, microwaving or preparing as overnight oats. The new oatmeal cups feature 12 grams of protein per serving and less than nine ingredients. Varieties include Maple, Chocolate, and Apple Cinnamon.

50

September/October 2019 Canadian Grocer

Made in Vancouver

EARTH’S OWN Earth’s Own, a Vancouver company specializing in plant-based/dairy-free “milks,” now offers several oat beverages that are packed with protein, fibre and calcium. The company launched three new oat products in the past year: Oat Chocolate (a chocolate oat milk); Oat Barista Edition, ideal for making frothy latte beverages; and Oat Single Serves, which are available in Unsweetened Original, Unsweetened Vanilla, and Chocolate varieties.

SO DELICIOUS For consumers who love ice cream but seek an innovative dairy-free alternative, So Delicious Oatmilk Frozen Dessert is now available in appealing flavours such as Oatmeal Cookie, Caramel Apple Crumble and Peanut Butter and Raspberry. Crafted with smooth and creamy oat milk instead of dairy, this new product is available in the United States now and will be rolling out in Canada soon.

SILK Silk’s Oat Yeah Oatmilk Yogurt Alternatives combine glutenfree oats with live and active cultures to create a creamy, dairy-free “yogurt” available in four flavours: Vanilla, Mixed Berry, Strawberry and Mango. This new oat-based product just launched in the United States this summer, with plans for a Canadian launch later in 2020, according to parent company Danone.


AISLES NEW ON SHELF!

QUENCHING CONSUMERS’ THIRST

From the bread aisle to the dairy depart­­­ ment to the freezer section, check out these new products hitting Canadian stores.

While the newest Canada’s Food Guide says Canadians should make water their “drink of choice,” it’s clear from Nielsen sales data that consumers continue to swig an increasingly wide variety of beverages—from flavoured soft drinks and energy drinks to milkshakes, near-beer, ready-to-drink iced teas and more. Check out this recent data to see which beverages Canadians have been thirsty for this past year.

SILVER HILLS BAKERY SPROUTED POWER SOFT WHEAT ENGLISH MUFFINS B.C. bakery brings new sprouted options to the bread aisle

Cold beverages  - 52 weeks, ending July 20, 2019 $ Sales (000s)

$ Vol % Chg

Units (000s)

Units Vol % Chg

1,391,382.3

5

2,989,547.9

0

JUICES & DRINKS - SHELF STABLE

918,797.2

-2

1,280,672.9

-6

FLAT WATER

534,802.1

-1

2,669,447.4

-7

1. CARBONATED WATER

274,012.0

17

400,394.7

23

2. EXTREME ENERGY DRINKS

142,635.9

8

60,530.3

3

FLAVOURED DRINK MIXES

90,608.2

3

27,574.4

5

3. LOW ALCOHOL BEVERAGES (FAUX BEER/WINE, ETC)

77,527.2

11

65,469.3

7

RTD ICED TEA CANS

65,714.9

6

125,842.2

-4

COCONUT WATER

45,494.2

-3

26,828.7

11

DRINK POWDERS & LIQUIDS - COLD

34,644.5

-4

6,581.2

-3

ICED TEA MIXES

29,215.5

-5

4,681.4

-8

CORDIALS & SYRUPS

17,505.5

60

2,627.4

51

FLAVOURED SOFT DRINKS

COCKTAIL MIXES

8,611.4

-2

1,840.1

-10

2,551,667.1

1

655,717.4

-1

JUICES & DRINKS - REFRIGERATED

814,083.7

-1

237,704.0

-3

SOYA & RICE & ALTERNATIVE BEVERAGES

4. MILK

306,632.9

2

97,020.1

-4

MILKSHAKES & EGGNOGS

38,862.7

18

18,386.1

26

COFFEE TYPE DRINKS

27,790.8

23

9,411.2

16

REMAINING DRINKS

11,911.2

18

8,152.7

41

5,629.5

75

1,696.0

148

JUICES & DRINKS - UNSPECIFIED

Silver Hills Bakery has launched Sprouted Power Soft Wheat English Muffins. The Abbotsford, B.C.-based bakery says its English muffins are packed with nutrition thanks to the use of grains that have been sprouted under optimal conditions. They’re also 100% plant based and high in fibre.

GRACE FOODS CANADA JERK CHICKEN WINGS Maker of Caribbean food and beverages spices up the freezer section Grace Foods Canada is launching frozen Jerk Chicken Wings in three flavours: Honey Jerk, Mild Jerk and Hot Jerk. Sold in 750-gram packs, the company says its wings can be cooked in the oven in under 30 minutes or in the microwave in four minutes.

ASTRO KEFIR PROBIOTIC YOGOURT Kefir-based, spoonable brand that’s high in probiotics Parmalat has introduced Astro Kefir Probiotic Yogourt: a naturally thick, spoonable brand that contains twice as much probiotic content as your average yogurt, according to the company. As Astro’s first kefir-based yogurt, it comes in Plain, Vanilla, Strawberry or Blueberry Pomegranate.

JIF DARK ROAST CREAMY PEANUT BUTTER 1 Canadians like it fizzy! While sales

of flat water are down by 1% to nearly $535 million, carbonated water shows strong growth: a 17% dollar sales increase to $274 million in the latest 52 weeks ending July 20, 2019.

2 They may be somewhat controversial,

but that certainly hasn’t been hurting sales: extreme energy drinks rose by 8% in dollar sales to more than $142 million.

3 As the “sober-curious” movement

grows, the “low-alcohol beverages” category (which includes near beer, faux wine and booze-free spirits) saw dollar sales rise by 11% to $77.5 million.

4 Despite all the talk of Canadians

drinking less milk, it’s still the largest beverage category, by far, in terms of sales at $2.5 billion. (By comparison, the second-largest is flavoured soft drinks at nearly $1.4 billion.)

New, bold twist on classic peanut butter Smucker Foods of Canada is giving its classic peanut butter brand a bold twist. As its name suggests, JIF Dark Roast Creamy Peanut Butter is made with dark roasted peanuts, creating what the company calls a “bold” and “rich” flavour.

SOURCE: NIELSEN, NATIONAL, ALL CHANNELS, ALL SALES, EXCLUDING N.L.

September/October 2019 Canadian Grocer

51


WHAT’SNEW NEW PRODUCTS IN GROCERY

Fish With Nothing to Hide Fish from the purest and most plentiful fishing grounds in the world is now available. Green Ocean Seafood has partnered with the Icelandic Seafood industry for a sustainable line of raw, boneless and skinless frozen fish certified by Ocean Wise. Featuring five wild-caught species: Cod, Haddock, Plaice, Saithe, and Wolffish — and one land-based farmed species, Arctic Charr. No additives, no preservatives, and inner vacuum packed to preserve quality.

Craving Coffee Introducing 1850, a bold new premium coffee inspired by the year the Folger Coffee Company began. Made with 100% premium arabica coffee beans that are fire-roasted and steel-cut to help bring out a rich aroma and deliver a bold, yet smooth taste. From bright citrus undertones to sweet dark cocoa notes, 1850 has a roast to satisfy every palate. Available in ground, whole bean, and small and large pack K-Cup.

Taste the Dark Roast Jiference Introducing a new option for consumers to enjoy the bold and rich flavour of dark roasted peanuts. Jif Dark Roast Creamy Peanut Butter is perfect for those looking for a rich peanut butter flavour and can be enjoyed on toast, in sandwiches or eaten by the spoonful. A first-of-its-kind flavour innovation for regular peanut butter in Canada, Jif Dark Roast is available nationally on September 26 in 1kg and 500g jars.

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL FEATURE IN CANADIAN GROCER–SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019


Say Hola to Authentic Mexican Foods Sonora Fire Grill is bringing its authentic Mexican foods to Canada. They include salsas, marinades and frozen/ fully cooked prepared food services products. The official retail and food services products launch will take place at Grocery Innovations Canada held October 22-24 in Toronto. Visit booth #419 to experience the authentic flavours and find out more.

EastDell Innovation An Industry-first! EastDell Wines are now available in shatterproof single serve 200mL plastic PET bottles. Fully recyclable and with a vastly lower carbon footprint than traditional glass bottles, this innovation provides the economic and environmental advantages consumers are looking for. Available for retailers in Ontario.

The Perfect Pizza Winner of the All Canadian award at the 2018 Grand Prix New Product Awards, Oggi has mastered the plant-based pizza crust. Made with premium cauliflower and quality flours, the crusts are full of vegetable nutrients while leaving out the gluten and GMOs. It is modern nutrition with Oggi’s classic Neapolitan tradition.

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL FEATURE IN CANADIAN GROCER–SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019


CHECKING OUT

Halifax youth unveiled Hope Blooms products at the launch event at Loblaw’s Maple Leaf Gardens location in Toronto

SOWING THE SEEDS OF SUCCESS Nova Scotia’s youth-driven, inner-city Hope Blooms is growing its reach to Ontario IF YOU HAVEN’T HEARD of Hope Blooms yet, it’s likely you soon will. On the surface, it’s a supplier of salad dressings and herbal teas—but the real story is the success this youth-run community business has brought to its immediate inner-city Halifax community, and also how it is supporting immigrants and providing scholarships. It is truly a feel-good story. Hope Blooms is based in a neighbourhood of Halifax—the North End—that has long been stigmatized by many of the same issues experienced within inner-city communities across the country. Since its launch in 2008 with seven kids and a small plot of land in Halifax, Hope Blooms has grown to operate an award-winning community garden, greenhouse and community kitchen. The youth involved today grow approximately 4,000 pounds of fresh produce each year, which is used to make their fresh herb dressings and specialty teas, and to feed members of the local community. They also help create a healthier community through nutrition and

54

September/October 2019 Canadian Grocer

experiential education programs. Back in 2015, Loblaw-owned Atlantic Superstore locations in Halifax first provided an opportunity for Hope Blooms to sell its fresh herb dressings in grocery stores—a partnership that’s grown immensely over the past four years to now include things such as professional development and youth mentoring opportunities. A dozen grocery stores in Nova Scotia currently carry the dressings, and, according to a release, “over 50,000 bottles of dressing have been sold, with 100% of sales going back to Hope Blooms to fund a scholarship program that supports the organization’s youth members as they graduate from high school and pursue post-secondary education.” And now, thanks to Loblaw, Hope Blooms is bringing its winning formula to Ontario. This summer, Hope Blooms Fresh Herb Dressings and Possibili-Teas specialty teas were introduced at Loblaw’s Maple Leaf Gardens location in downtown Toronto. Along with supporting the scholarship program and children’s

food garden programs, $1 from each sale of Hope Blooms dressings and teas at the Maple Leaf Gardens store goes to Hope Blooms’ new community partners in Toronto, including Scadding Court Community Centre, to help them establish a gardening-based youth social enterprise modelled after Halifax’s Hope Blooms. “Since Hope Blooms’ humble beginnings more than 10 years ago, we’ve proven that youth-led social entrepreneurship and community involvement can have a huge positive impact,” says the organization’s founder and executive director Jessie Jollymore in a release. “We are thrilled to now be able to connect with youth in Toronto who are growing up in similar circumstances as the kids at Hope Blooms … We hope that Torontonians will embrace the opportunity to support our efforts to help inspire children and youth to be change-makers.” According to Hope Blooms’ website, the organization has a strong food security mandate: over the past seven years alone the youth have grown more than 21,000 pounds of organic vegetables and fruit for community members struggling with food insecurity. Each month it provides (free of charge) 260 healthy meals and 306 healthy snacks to local community members. It has a farm exchange program in Nova Scotia’s Annapolis Valley as well, and the organization worked to bring more than 500 pounds of organic produce that its youth donated to the 110 Syrian refugees that now live in their community. You may recall that in 2013, young people from Hope Blooms made a pitch on the Dragons’ Den TV show, looking for $10,000 to build a greenhouse. Their pitch was so impressive, they received $40,000. It was their first big success, and just proved you should not underestimate the drive and determination of dedicated and motivated young people. Will Hope Blooms products be coming to your store in the future?  CG

George Condon is Canadian Grocer’s consulting editor. He’s based in Toronto. condug@sympatico.ca

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A WORLD OF OPPORTUNITIES MORE TRADE. MORE TASTES. MORE TRENDS. OCTOBER 22 & 23, 2019 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

WELCOME TO GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA A MESSAGE FROM CFIG's PRESIDENT & CEO

With the pace of change in grocery retailing, it’s more important than ever to offer an event such as Grocery Innovations Canada, where all facets of the grocery industry can gather to collaborate and take advantage of the World of Opportunities that are present. This year’s show offers many more business and networking opportunities: MORE TRADE: With some 500+ exhibits and 300+ exhibitors, there is something for everyone at the trade exhibition. Exhibitors are also offering up exclusive show specials – look for the star balloons at booths! Don’t forget to check out the New Product Showcase in the main lobby to see the newest innovations hitting the shelves in grocery. MORE TASTES: Local, global, specialty, health/wellness – GIC has it all under one roof! You will be able to discover global products from around the world - from Egypt, Ghana and Jamaica to name a few. Other notable pavilions include: Small Business Exchange (sponsored by Canadian Grocer), Choose Ontario, Ontario Craft Brewers, Canada Beef, First Timers, and Nova Scotia. MORE TRENDS: Gain industry insights and education over two days. Be sure to catch Tuesday's keynote from Joe Jackman, an expert in looking beyond the “next best thing.” For brands and businesses to mean something to their customers, they need to abandon reactive thinking and instead embrace the transforming nature of retail. On Wednesday, we have the Canadian exclusive from ex-Amazon exec John Rossman who will talk about how to think like Amazon in your business. There’s a full set of concurrent workshops across various subjects disrupting retail scheduled that morning as well, so bring your team! In the afternoons, there are drop-in education sessions on the Interac Insights & Innovations trade show stage – topics from cannabis to sustainable packaging will be discussed. Respected retail expert Harold Lloyd will be providing sessions throughout the two days to get your business, sales and staff on track. Also, NPD Group’s Robert Carter will provide a look into what’s coming down the pipeline when it comes to food trends. What sets our event apart from others is that collaboration across the industry is encouraged and promoted – from programs such as Retailer Connect (think of it as speed dating combined with a pitch competition) to Master Merchandiser (celebrating in-store merchandising displays) and the Independent Grocer of the Year gala honouring the best grocers in Canada. We hope you join us at the various networking events: Monday, Oct. 21 – Opening Reception All Welcome (Room 1020) Tuesday, Oct. 22 – Networking Event & Merchandising Excellence Awards (A. Lassonde Main Stage) Wednesday, Oct. 23 – Independent Grocer of the Year Reception, Dinner and Awards (Ballrooms A, B) Get ready for business by downloading the handy GIC Show App to plan your two days. We hope you enjoy everything at Canada’s premier grocery conference and exhibition!

Thomas Shurrie, President & CEO | Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers | Fédération Canadienne Épiciers Indépendants www.facebook.com/CFIGFCEI/

#GICShow19

@CFIGFCEI

https://ca.linkedin.com/company/canadian-federation-of-independent-grocers

www.instagram.com/gicshow

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2019 | GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

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GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

A WORLD OF OPPORTUNITIES MORE TRADE. MORE TASTES. MORE TRENDS. OCTOBER 22 & 23, 2019 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

GENERAL INFO

SERVICES

TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE (TCC) – NORTH BUILDING | 650 DIXON RD.

FIRST AID OFFICE

REGISTRATION HOURS Sunday, October 20, 2019 ................. 8:00 Monday, October 21, 2019 ............... 8:00 Tuesday, October 22, 2019................. 7:00 Wednesday, October 23, 2019........... 7:00

AM AM AM AM

– – – –

4:00 4:00 4:00 6:00

The First Aid Office is located in the northeast corner of the floor, behind booth #1933. For any emergency, contact Toronto Congress Centre Building Security (Door 4) at 416–688–6469 or 416–891–4768.

PM PM PM PM

WHEELCHAIR SERVICES

CONFERENCE HOURS

There will be wheelchairs available at the First Aid Office, located on the northeast corner of the floor. Wheelchairs are provided on a firstcome, first-served basis. Attendees borrowing a wheelchair will be required to leave their driver’s license with the First Aid service agent until the wheelchair is returned.

Tuesday, October 22, 2019................. 8:00 AM – 11:00 AM ALL EXHIBITORS AND ATTENDEES WELCOME

Wednesday, October 23, 2019........... 7:30 AM – 11:15 AM CONFERENCE/FULL DELEGATE BADGE HOLDERS ONLY

TRADE SHOW HOURS Tuesday, October 22, 2019................. 11:00 AM – 4:30 PM Wednesday, October 23, 2019........... 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM

MEDIA OFFICE

Nancy Kwon is the key media contact for Grocery Innovations Canada 2019. All media must be registered before entrance into the trade show. T: 416–219–0952 E: nkwon@cfig.ca The media office is located beside the trade floor. (meeting room 9)

EVENTS *PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED

MONDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2019 TCC NORTH | ROOM 1020

Opening Reception.............................. 5:30 PM – 7:30 PM ALL EXHIBITORS AND ATTENDEES WELCOME

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2019

RECOMMENDED ATTIRE

TCC NORTH | A. LASSONDE MAIN STAGE (LOBBY)

Merchandising Excellence Awards (Tuesday) ~Smart Casual Conference~Business Casual Trade Show~Business Casual Evening Dinner & Awards (Wednesday) ~Business (Black Tie Optional)

Merchandising Excellence Awards.......... 4:30 PM – 6:30 PM

[Master Merchandiser Winners, Top 10 in Grocery, Best Booth Winners] ALL EXHIBITORS AND ATTENDEES WELCOME

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2019 Independent Grocer of the Year Reception... .5:30 PM – 6:15 PM

Dinner & Awards............................. 6:30 PM – 9:15 PM

TCC NORTH | COLLABORATION CORRIDOR

TCC NORTH | BALLROOMS A, B

FULL DELEGATE BADGE HOLDERS ONLY

DAILY COACH SHUTTLE BUS SERVICE BEST TORONTO TOURS AND LIMOUSINES INC.

DAILY SHUTTLE – EVERY 15-20 MINUTES

Westin Toronto Airport Hotel to/from Toronto Congress Centre Monday, October 21, 2019—4:45 PM – 8:00 PM Tuesday, October 22, 2019—8:00 AM – 7:30 PM Wednesday, October 23, 2019—6:30 AM –11:00 PM

BADGE COLOURS SPEAKER/STAFF ● DISTRIBUTOR/IMPORTER/EXPORTER ● MEDIA ● MANUFACTURER/SUPPLIER/SERVICE ● RETAILER/WHOLESALE ● EXHIBITOR ● SPECIAL EVENT ONLY ●

Sponsored by:

#GICShow19

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2019 | GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

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GROCERY GROCERY INNOVATIONS INNOVATIONS CANADA CANADA

A WORLD OF OPPORTUNITIES MORE TRADE. MORE TASTES. MORE TRENDS. OCTOBER 22 & 23, 2019 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

2019 CFIG BOARD OF DIRECTORS The Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers (CFIG) is governed by a Board of Directors elected from the membership and reflecting a regional distribution. A national office consisting of the President and staff implement the federation’s operations in a manner consistent with the policies established by the Board. The Board and the President also receive ongoing input from advisory committees consisting of members across Canada.

✷JIM

BEXIS Sun Valley Supermarket Inc., Scarborough, ON

✷DAN

BREGG Buy-Low Foods, Surrey, BC

PIERO CARBONE Garden Foods Bolton Ltd., Bolton, ON

BILL COLEMAN Colemans, Corner Brook, NL

ERIN HIGDON Powell’s Supermarket Ltd., Bay Roberts, NL

BROOKE KYNOCH Safety Mart Foods, Chase, BC

CHRISTOPHER LEE Southside Market AG Foods, Revelstoke, BC

MIKE LONGO Longo Bros. Fruit Markets, Vaughan, ON

✷CHRISTY

JEFFREY MIN Korea Food Trading/ Galleria Supermarket, Vaughan, ON

✷ JAMIE

NELSON Save-On-Foods, Langley, BC

JUSTIN SCHLEY Quality Foods, Errington, BC

CRAIG SOLLITT The Bownesian Grocer, Calgary, AB

ISABELLE TASSÉ Marché Tassé (Provigo), Gatineau, QC

✷GIANCARLO

TOM VESELY Westlock Sobeys, Westlock, AB

✷RON

✷ THOMAS

SHURRIE CFIG, Toronto, ON

TRIMARCHI Vince’s Market, Newmarket, ON ✷EXECUTIVE

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MCMULLEN Summerhill Market, Toronto, ON

WELKE Federated Co-operatives Ltd., Saskatoon, SK

COMMITTEE

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2019 | GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM #GICShow19


TRADE SHOW & CONFERENCE TUESDAY, OCT. 22, 2019 CONFERENCE 8:00 AM – 11:00 AM TRADE SHOW 11:00 AM – 4:30 PM

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23, 2019 CONFERENCE 7:30 AM – 11:15 AM TRADE SHOW 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM

#GICSHOW19 | DOWNLOAD SHOW APP

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS’ COUNCIL Co-operation and communication between supplier and retailer have become increasingly important in grocery retail. CFIG’s Associate Members’ Council (AMC) has in turn become more integral to the direction of the federation as a whole. The Associate Members’ Council is a group of senior executives representing a variety of Canadian grocery product companies. The AMC meets quarterly, and provides professional guidance to the Board of Directors on industry news and trends.

DOMINIC BOMBINO Sr. VP, Retail & Foodservice Sales, Saputo Dairy Products Canada

LAURIE COOPER Vice Chair & VP Customer Development, Unilever Canada

STEPHEN KOURI VP, Sales & Trade Marketing, Smucker Foods of Canada Corp.

JIM LEISH VP Sales, Procter & Gamble Inc.

MIKE LUST VP Customer Development, PepsiCo Foods Canada

SAM MAGNACCA VP, GM, Acosta Canada

CHRIS POWELL Chair & Sr. VP Business Development Tree of Life Canada

VP Sales, Customer & Shopper Insights McCormick Canada

#GICShow19

PETER HALL VP Retail Sales, Kraft Heinz Company

TODD JOHNSTON VP Sales Parmalat Canada

SCOTT LINDSAY Sr. VP, National Sales & Marketing, Coca-Cola Refreshments

GARY LOCKE Head of Acceptance, Client Management, Interac

SCOTT LORIMER Sr. VP Retail Sales Maple Leaf Foods Inc.

MICHEL MANSEAU Past Chair, Sr. VP & GM Consumer Business, Kruger Products LP

VINCE MENDES DE FRANCA VP Sales, General Mills Canada

TREVOR OBERLANDER VP Sales, Campbell Company of Canada

STEVE FOX Sr. VP, Customer Development, Nestlé Canada Inc.

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2019 | GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

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WHERE innovative products MEET INNOVATIVE PACKAGING Burnbrae Farms is committed to bringing their customers the best in quality, convenience and innovation.

N SIZE

N PACKAGE

N FLAVOUR

Providing Canadians with the best products for home or on-the-go. We offer a wide variety of premium liquid, frozen and ready to eat eggs.

real eggs.   real easy. BurnbraeFarms.com


GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

A WORLD OF OPPORTUNITIES MORE TRADE. MORE TASTES. MORE TRENDS. OCTOBER 22 & 23, 2019 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

CFIG STAFF THOMAS SHURRIE President & CEO ANDREA ALMARZA Executive Assistant to the President & CEO and to the VP of Finance & Administration GARY SANDS Senior Vice President, Public Policy and Advocacy TODD NEWSTEAD Acting Senior Vice President Commercial Development & Industry Relations FRAN NIELSEN Vice President, Finance & Administration NANCY KWON Vice President, Marketing & Communications JASON AN Account Representative NICOLE FANG Multimedia Designer JESSICA HERDSMAN Registration, Events & Operations Coordinator IRMELI KOSKINEN Coordinator, Member Services JOE SAWAGED Director, National Accounts & Business Development DIANA STEVENSON Director, Conference & Events

WHAT YOU SEE

Food Safety

IT PAYS TO BE A MEMBER OF CFIG Personal & Professional Growth Opportunities

Advocacy

Group Savings

WHAT CFIG SEES

Succession Planning

Training

Benefits include:

JOIN US

• Timely legislative updates on important issues • Networking at two annual conferences & exhibitions • Exclusive group savings on car rental, hotels, insurance and more! • Information/News via enewsletters

Who are members of CFIG?

Business owners like you looking for: • Improvement to their bottom lines • Benefits and resources specifically tailored to the independent supermarket channel • Ways to grow their business and prepare for future shifts in the marketplace • Members’ only login for tailored information

Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers Fédération Canadienne des Épiciers Indépendants The Voice of the Independent - Over 4,000 Members Coast to Coast www.CFIG.ca, email: info@cfig.ca Tel: 1-800-661-2344

ROLSTER TAYLOR Director, Sales

To learn more about the benefits and types of membership (Retail/Associate/Affiliate) contact Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers: 1-800-661-2344 X240 | WWW.CFIG.CA Visit us at CFIG Members' booth beside registration area.

#GICShow19

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GROCERY GROCERY INNOVATIONS INNOVATIONS CANADA CANADA

A WORLD OF OPPORTUNITIES MORE TRADE. MORE TASTES. MORE TRENDS. OCTOBER 22 & 23, 2019 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

APPEARING AT GIC

VJ BALA HeyJute™

An experienced business owner and change agent, HeyJute Founder VJ Bala is a passionate environmentalist with an intention to bring accurate awareness about relevant truths and untruths. His company, HeyJute, offers natural plant alternatives to plastics. For the past 26 years, VJ has used his engineering and business backgrounds to marry ethics with corporate profitability, empowering projects to help companies with sustainable planning and future-friendly branding.

ROBERT CARTER The NPD Group

Robert Graybill, President & CEO of FMS, joined the company in 2000, and has over 20 years of experience in the retail grocery industry. Currently, Robert leads the FMS team in meeting their goal of helping retailers succeed through benchmarking, best practices and decision support. APARNA GULAVANE Cannabis Compliance Inc.

ROBERT GRAYBILL FMS

HAROLD C. LLOYD HLloyd Presents

JOE JACKMAN Jackman Reinvents

Harold C. Lloyd, President at HLloyd Presents, is a graduate of the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and holds an MBA with honors from the University of Chicago. He was the president of a retail company with 1,000 employees and 14 stores and was a franchisee of a three-unit, award-winning family restaurant group. For the last 34 years, Harold has been the featured speaker at the food industry’s most popular events. He has created 30 top-rated seminars and written four books.

WARD HANLON

By profession, Joe Jackman is a reinventionist, a believer in and practitioner of rapid business transformation. As the Founder and CEO of Jackman Reinvents, he’s pioneered an efficient way to get mature businesses back to growth and relevance. The effectiveness of his unique approach, which brings together business and brand strategy with “balanced facts and feelings,” has been proven many times across most B2C and many B2B categories. KERRY LIU Rubikloud

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Robert Carter, Foodservice Industry Analyst at The NPD Group, is a highly respected consumer behaviour industry expert and a dynamic speaker with a passion for tracking trends and consumer activity. Robert is a sought-after and energetic presenter who is regularly recruited to deliver subject matter expertise on consumer behaviour trends, market activity and operator and retailer performance. Robert is frequently quoted in the media, and writes a regular column for Foodservice and Hospitality magazine.

Aparna Gulavane is a Senior Quality and Regulatory Consultant at Cannabis Compliance Inc. She has close to 20 years of experience in auditing, development and implementation of Quality Management Systems and Continuous Improvement using Six Sigma methodologies. Aparna applies her past experience in understanding and interpreting the cannabis regulations to help clients in their licensing process and ongoing compliance for cannabis and edible cannabis products.

Ward Hanlon was involved with many industryrelated organizations throughout his career. In 2005, Ward joined CFIG and became VP Industry Relations. During his tenure, he has developed close ties with manufacturers, suppliers and retailers alike, and is respected for his encyclopedic knowledge of Canada’s grocery industry. Ward helped to create and institute many of the CFIG programs that recognize excellence in retailing. In 2017, he received the Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers’ Spirit of the Independent Award. Kerry Liu is the Co-Founder & CEO at Rubikloud where he has led the company to become one of the world’s largest AI platforms for enterprise retailers. Founded in 2013, Rubikloud has grown to over 100 people, opened offices in four countries, and raised venture funding of $45 million. In his role, Kerry works to manage and maintain a thriving company culture that recruits the best and brightest talent in the industry, while also maintaining relationships with global retailers and investors.

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2019 | GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM #GICShow19


TRADE SHOW & CONFERENCE TUESDAY, OCT. 22, 2019 CONFERENCE 8:00 AM – 11:00 AM TRADE SHOW 11:00 AM – 4:30 PM

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23, 2019 CONFERENCE 7:30 AM – 11:15 AM TRADE SHOW 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM

As National Retail Leader, BDO Canada, Eric Matusiak has a passion for retail and the broader consumer business sector. He has over 20 years of experience consulting consumer-facing businesses in North America on business and technology strategy and operations. ERIC MATUSIAK BDO Canada

JOHN ROSSMAN Rossman Partners

JEREMY SCOTT BDO Canada

John Rossman is most known for launching and scaling the Amazon Marketplace business. John also served as Director of Enterprise Services at Amazon.com, where he managed worldwide services to enterprise clients such as Target.com, Toys R Us and Sears. Since leaving Amazon, John has advised clients across most industry verticals on digital strategy, operations and culture. He is now Managing Partner at Rossman Partners. John is the author of The Amazon Way: 14 Leadership Principles Behind the World’s Most Disruptive Company and The Amazon Way on IoT:10 Lessons Every Leader Should Learn from Amazon’s Internet of Things Strategy. As a Partner in BDO’s Indirect Tax practice, Jeremy Scott advises clients in various sectors in the areas of the Federal Goods and Services Tax/Harmonized Sales Tax, and Provincial Sales Tax, Tobacco Taxes, Fuel Taxes as well as Environmental Stewardship Levies. With over 15 years of indirect tax experience, and a particular focus on the wholesale and retail sectors, as well as mergers and acquisitions, Jeremy proactively advises clients and also assists them with audit defense.

Shenela Tavarayan is the Manager, Retail Commerce at Interac Corp., working on a portfolio that includes Interac Debit, Interac Flash and mobile products in Canada. Her responsibilities include merchant acceptance and usage, growth of new products and interchange pricing controls and process. SHENELA TAVARAYAN Interac Corp.

#GICShow19

ANDREA WYNTER ADP Canada

#GICSHOW19 | DOWNLOAD SHOW APP

As Head of People, ADP Canada, Andrea Wynter’s focus is on developing talent, building the organizational people strategy and driving forward the culture and values that ADP Canada holds dear. During her 13-year tenure at ADP, Andrea has redesigned all aspects of the company’s people agenda and management systems to shape a culture of continuous learning, innovation and agility. She has also begun the journey of digitally transforming the HR function, incorporating AI and automation across several HR offerings.

LIFE MEMBER HONOURS AWARD WINNERS 2019

Each year, CFIG honors the lifetime achievements of individuals who have made a significant contribution to independent grocers, their communities and the food industry.

INDUSTRY BUILDER AWARD WINNER FOR 2019:

Michel Manseau, Kruger Products LP The industry builder award recognizes outstanding suppliers, manufacturers and distributors or those directly involved in the betterment of the independent grocer community.

INDEPENDENT RETAILER AWARD WINNER FOR 2019:

Joey Longo, Longo Brothers Fruit Markets Inc. This designation is given to a retailer who has demonstrated a commitment to the industry through their work, community involvement and CFIG activities.

SPRIT OF THE INDUSTRY AWARD WINNER FOR 2019:

Tom Barlow, Formerly Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers The spirit of the Independent Award is given infrequently to individuals who have made a significant contribution to the growth of the entrepreneurial spirit and provided exceptional inspiration to Canada’s independent grocers.

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2019 | GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

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GROCERY GROCERY INNOVATIONS INNOVATIONS CANADA CANADA

A WORLD OF OPPORTUNITIES MORE TRADE. MORE TASTES. MORE TRENDS. OCTOBER 22 & 23, 2019 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

PROGRAM 8:00 AM – 12:00 PM INDUSTRY TOUR

11:00 AM – 4:30 PM

TRADE SHOW EXHIBITION ▼

*PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED

TCC NORTH | A. LASSONDE MAIN STAGE

OPEN TO FULL DELEGATE TICKET HOLDERS

TCC NORTH | ROOM 1020

Title Sponsor:

Supporting Sponsor:

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2019 TCC NORTH | A. LASSONDE MAIN STAGE (LOBBY)

8:00 AM – 9:00 AM REGISTRATION/CHECK-IN AGM 9:00 AM – 9:30 AM ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING & PRESIDENT'S BRIEFING Stage Sponsor:

9:30 AM – 10:00 AM 2019 FMS-CFIG FINANCIAL SURVEY RESULTS Presented by Robert Graybill, FMS Stage Sponsor:

10:00 AM – 10:45 AM KEYNOTE: JOE JACKMAN Embracing Change: A Reinventionist’s View of the Future of Retail. Joe Jackman of Jackman Reinvents explores consumer behaviour and upcoming industry trends, shares best-in-class examples of companies doing it right, and provides a new model for across-category growth. Sponsored by:

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TCC NORTH | NEW PRODUCT SHOWCASE DISPLAYS – ENTRANCE LOBBY

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

2019

1:00 PM – 2:00 PM BEST BOOTH JUDGING ▼

5:30 PM – 7:30 PM OPENING RECEPTION ALL EXHIBITORS AND ATTENDEES WELCOME

TCC NORTH | HALL I

12:00 PM – 1:00 PM TOP 10 IN GROCERY JUDGING ▼

11:00 AM – 5:00 PM CHINESE CUISINE & HOSPITALITY ASSOC. OF CANADA SUMMIT

TCC NORTH | HALL I

INTERAC INSIGHTS & INNOVATIONS STAGE

INTERAC INSIGHTS & INNOVATIONS STAGE SESSIONS ▼

TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE – NORTH BUILDING

10:55 AM – 11:00 AM OFFICIAL RIBBON-CUTTING CEREMONY ▼

MONDAY, OCTOBER 21, 2019

TCC NORTH BUILDING | TRADE FLOOR

12:00 PM – 12:30 PM VISION 2020 Key flavour trends set to impact food and drink retail in 2020. Presented by McCormick. 1:00 PM – 1:30 PM PASSION: WHAT'S LEFT OF YOURS? Reevaluate what you are doing and redirect your energies to maximize your potential and to make those around you proud to have you on their team. Presented by Retail Expert Harold Lloyd 2:00 PM – 2:30 PM DOING DEBIT RIGHT An Omni-Channel Approach to Grocery Retail Payment. Presented by Shenela Tavarayan, Interac Corp. 3:00 PM – 3:30 PM EMERGING OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE FOOD INDUSTRY IN THE EDIBLES CANNABIS SECTOR A look at the paths to enter the market and details on regulatory requirements for edible cannabis manufacturers and what this means for grocery. Presented by Aparna Gulavane of Cannabis Compliance

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2019 | GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM #GICShow19


TRADE SHOW & CONFERENCE TUESDAY, OCT. 22, 2019 CONFERENCE 8:00 AM – 11:00 AM TRADE SHOW 11:00 AM – 4:30 PM

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23, 2019 CONFERENCE 7:30 AM – 11:15 AM TRADE SHOW 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM

#GICSHOW19 | DOWNLOAD SHOW APP

9:15 AM – 10:00 AM

2019 MERCHANDISING EXCELLENCE AWARDS

KEYNOTE: JOHN ROSSMAN Think Like Amazon About—The Future of Your Industry: What is the future of your industry? It is a question that leaders must ask themselves. But what are the right questions to ask, what metrics should be used, and how is your industry going to be disrupted? Leveraging many of the ideas from his book, Think Like Amazon, John Rossman will leave audiences with strategies, tools and questions to help shape this future.

4:30 PM – 6:30 PM TCC NORTH | A. LASSONDE MAIN STAGE (LOBBY)

ALL EXHIBITORS AND ATTENDEES WELCOME

MERCHANDISING EXCELLENCE AWARDS

Celebrate the best in merchandising together with retailers, suppliers & manufacturers. Emcee Ward Hanlon

4:30 PM – 5:00 PM

MIX AND MINGLE–NETWORKING EVENT ALL EXHIBITORS AND ATTENDEES WELCOME

Complimentary hors d'oeuvres and drinks will be served.

Sponsored by:

10:00 AM – 10:15 AM

5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

TCC NORTH | COLLABORATION CORRIDOR

Sponsored by:

10:15 AM – 10:45 AM

2019

Stage Sponsor:

CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS ▼

AWARD PRESENTATIONS Master Merchandiser, Top 10 in Grocery, and Best Booth Winners announced GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

COFFEE BREAK ▼

Presented by:

TCC NORTH | MCKENNITT ROOMS 1-4

ALL WORKSHOPS REPEATED 10:15 AM—10:45 AM & 10:45 AM — 11:15 AM Sponsored by:

Evening Sponsored by:

ROOM 1

Canadian Grocer presents innovative concepts for delivering meal solutions to consumers in the retail grocery channel.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2019 TCC NORTH | BALLROOMS A, B

7:30 AM – 8:30 AM

BREAKFAST SESSION WITH HAROLD LLOYD Flow & Focus: How to better manage the FLOW of shoppers from entering into the store to the checkout, and how to control their FOCUS on items we want to sell, in the optimum order we would like to sell them. Sponsored by:

8:30 AM – 9:15 AM

SECTOR INSIGHT SESSION: FUTURE OF FOOD People just want to eat—they don’t care if their meals are sourced from a restaurant, a retailer, their pantry, or somewhere else. Winning the Moment requires creativity, innovation, and a deep understanding of when and where you have the most influence. Join Robert Carter of The NPD Group to discover how to make sure your product or brand is prominent in the consumer’s decision set.

ROOM 2

5 Components of a Successful Customer Experience: With a successful customer experience comes new opportunities for consumer loyalty and engagement, which can lead to business growth and enhancement. BDO’s Eric Matusiak and Jeremy Scott will look at the realities of implementing certain strategies to leverage a fully engaged customer. ROOM 3

How to Remain Relevant: A comprehensive strategy with effective tactics (Mission MATRIX) that will rejuvenate your team and keep (maybe even grow) your market share. Presented by Retail Expert Harold Lloyd ROOM 4

Andrea Wynter, Head of People at ADP Canada, will look at the most prominent HR and labour issues facing today’s grocer. Discover solutions to address items like barriers to recruitment, skills shortages and the challenges associated with the engagement and retention of their top performers.

Sponsored by:

#GICShow19

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2019 | GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

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GROCERY GROCERY INNOVATIONS INNOVATIONS CANADA CANADA

A WORLD OF OPPORTUNITIES MORE TRADE. MORE TASTES. MORE TRENDS. OCTOBER 22 & 23, 2019 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

11:00 AM – 4:00 PM TCC NORTH | HALL I

5:30 PM – 9:15 PM

INDEPENDENT GROCER OF THE YEAR GALA ▼

TRADE SHOW EXHIBITION

TCC NORTH | COLLABORATION CORRIDOR | BALLROOMS A, B, C

Emcees Thomas Shurrie and Harold Lloyd

11:00 AM – 4:00 PM ▼

TOP 10 IN GROCERY WINNERS DISPLAYED TCC NORTH | LOBBY ENTRANCE

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

2019

5:30 PM – 6:15 PM AWARDS RECEPTION Sponsored by:

TCC NORTH BUILDING | TRADE FLOOR

12:00 PM – 12:30 PM HR/STAFFING Take the “Employee Loyalty Test” to find out retention probability score with retail expert Harold Lloyd. 1:00 PM – 1:30 PM THE PLASTIC PROBLEM & SOLUTIONS: Sustainable packaging expert VJ Bala of HeyJute will look at innovations and pros and cons when considering alternatives to single-use plastic in bags and other grocery packaging. 2:00 PM – 2:30 PM AI & THE FUTURE OF SUPERMARKETS: Rubikloud’s CEO Kerry Liu will discuss how the blend of AI and machine learning will help grocers predict customer intention and behaviour and improve forecast accuracy, minimize stock-outs and reduce the manual effort required to build promotions.

6:30 PM – 7:30 PM GALA DINNER ▼

INTERAC INSIGHTS & INNOVATIONS STAGE SESSIONS

TCC NORTH | BALLROOMS A, B

Dinner Sponsored by:

Program Sponsored by:

Wine Sponsored by:

7:30 PM – 9:15 PM AWARDS PRESENTATIONS Hosted By: Thomas Shurrie, CFIG and Harold Lloyd, HLloyd Presents. DRAW FOR FINAL FOUR FOR GRAND PRIZE TRIP TO NGA SHOW IN SAN DIEGO! Sponsored by:

2020 SAVE THE DATES!

GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST 2020 APRIL 27 & 28, 2020 VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE, EAST BUILDING www.gsfshow.com GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA 2020 OCTOBER 27 & 28, 2020 TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE, NORTH BUILDING www.GroceryInnovations.com

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SHUTTLE

DAILY COACH SHUTTLE BUS SERVICE BEST TORONTO TOURS AND LIMOUSINES INC.

DAILY SHUTTLE – EVERY 15-20 MINUTES Westin Toronto Airport Hotel to/from Toronto Congress Centre Monday, October 21, 2019—4:45 PM – 8:00 PM Tuesday, October 22, 2019—8:00 AM – 7:30 PM Wednesday, October 23, 2019—6:30 AM –11:00 PM Sponsored by:

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2019 | GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM #GICShow19


TRADE SHOW & CONFERENCE TUESDAY, OCT. 22, 2019 CONFERENCE 8:00 AM – 11:00 AM TRADE SHOW 11:00 AM – 4:30 PM

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23, 2019 CONFERENCE 7:30 AM – 11:15 AM TRADE SHOW 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM

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THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS* Grocery Innovations Canada 2019 thanks the following sponsors for their support.*As of Sept. 9, 2019

OFFICIAL MEDIA SPONSOR

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17


A WORLD OF OPPORTUNITIES

GROCERY GROCERY INNOVATIONS INNOVATIONS CANADA CANADA

MORE TRADE. MORE TASTES. MORE TRENDS. OCTOBER 22 & 23, 2019 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

Independent Grocer of the Year

Small Business Exchange Sponsored by:

First Time Exhibitor

J. Mitchell Lobby

2019

Service Centre

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CANADA BEEF PAVILION

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

Insights & Innovations Stage

Canada Beef Pavillion

CFIG Members’ Lounge

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2019 | GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM #GICShow19


TRADE SHOW & CONFERENCE TUESDAY, OCT. 22, 2019 CONFERENCE 8:00 AM – 11:00 AM TRADE SHOW 11:00 AM – 4:30 PM

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23, 2019 CONFERENCE 7:30 AM – 11:15 AM TRADE SHOW 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM

#GICSHOW19 | DOWNLOAD SHOW APP

Ice Booth 1539 EXIT

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B. Cummings Hall CHOOSE ONTARIO

FIRST TIME EXHIBITOR PAVILION

CANADA BEEF PAVILION

ONTARIO CRAFT BREWERS

A. Lassonde Main Stage

MERCHANDISING AWARDS OF EXCELLENCE

Ice Booth 1203

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19


OCTOBER 22-23, 2019, BOOTH 419, JOIN US FOR OUR PRODUCTS LAUNCH PRODUCTS FOR:

RETAIL CONVENIENCE STORES RESTAURANTS FOOD SERVICES

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN: SALSAS MARINADES SNACKS PREPARED FOODS

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A WORLD OF OPPORTUNITIES

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

MORE TRADE. MORE TASTES. MORE TRENDS. OCTOBER 22 & 23, 2019 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

EXHIBITORS BY COMPANY NAME CFIG MEMBER

✪ SHOW SPECIAL

A. LASSONDE INC. 170 5e Ave. Rougemont, QC J0L 1M0 T: (800) 363-6180 F: (450) 469-0839 E: info@lassonde.com www.lassonde.com A. Lassonde Inc. is a North American leader in the development, manufacture and sale of a wide range of superior quality fruit juices. BOOTH #1102

ACE HILL BEER 10 Alcorn Ave., Unit 304 Toronto, ON M4V 3A9 T: (416) 919-1195 E: luca@acehillbeer.com www.acehillbeer.com A beverage company focused on quality and simplicity. Our mission is to create amazing products and experiences that can captivate people and shape culture. BOOTH #1603

ACOSTA 2700 Matheson Blvd. E. Mississauga, ON L4W 4V9 T: (905) 238-8058 F: (905) 238-1998 E: gcarruthers@acosta.com www.acosta.com Acosta provides trusted brands with integrated sales and retail merchandising solutions to move products off shelves and into shoppers' baskets. BOOTH #1424

✪ ACTIVPOP

4895 Rte.134 Cocagne, NB E4R 2Y4 T: (250) 533-9922 E: angele.miller@activpop.com www.activpop.com Delicious, organic popcorn that has been sprinkled with sun-evaporated sea salt and delicately infused with activated charcoal. BOOTH #509

ADEL CORP 21 Silk Court Richmond Hill, ON L4B 4A4 T: (414) 705-3397 E: alopez@adelcorp.com www.adelcorp.com Adel Corp presents Chefona Foods, a brand offering a premium selection of clean-label bakery and innovative snacks. BOOTH #609

ADP CANADA 3250 Bloor St. W., 16th floor Toronto, ON M8X2X9 T: (416) 569-3766 E: ADPCanada_Events@ADP.com www.adp.ca

ADP is a comprehensive global provider of cloud-based human capital management solutions that unite HR, payroll, talent, time, tax and benefits. BOOTH #1135

ADVANTAGE SOLUTIONS 160 McNabb St., Ste. #330 Markham, ON L3R 4B8 T: (905) 475-9623 F: (905) 475-8361 E: tim.salter@advantagesolutions.net www.advantagesolutions.net Leading business solutions provider, we build brand value for manufacturers and retailers through insight-based, integrated solutions. BOOTH #725

✪ AGM BAKERY

107 Judge Rd. Toronto, ON M8Z 5B5 T: (647) 977-3977 E: order@agmbakery.com www.agmbakery.com Premium French Macarons. BOOTH #1633

✪ ALMAC

INDUSTRIAL SYSTEMS 420 Industrial Parkway S. Aurora, ON L4G 3V7 T: (905) 713-1377 F: (905) 713-0676 E: info@almac.com www.almac.com Almac provides a full range of solutions from standard stainless-steel roller conveyors to automated material handling systems, designed and built to meet customer requirements. BOOTH #629

AMSTERDAM BREWERY 45 Esander Dr. Toronto, ON M4G4C5 T: (416) 504-1040 E: rmulvihill@amsterdambeer.com www.amsterdambeer.com Our combination of fearless innovation, uncompromising focus on quality and pride in our brands has allowed us to create a different type of beer company. BOOTH #1803

✪ ANCIENT NECTARS

47 Donnamora Cres. Thornhill, ON L3T4K6 T: (416) 833-7221 E: laco@kermon.ca www.ancientnectars.ca Providing ancient nutrients in a conveniently modern form, our juices power the body and mind, restoring us to the health and vitality of our ancestors. BOOTH #405

ARNEG CANADA 18 rue Richelieu Lacolle, QC J0J 1J0 T: (450) 246-3837 F: (450) 246-4428 E: sfeere@arnegdml.com www.arneg.ca Canada’s largest manufacturer of refrigerated retail food display cases for grocery, convenience and liquor stores, independent bakeries, butcher shops, delis and grab & go locations.

✪ BAD DAD TEA INC.

ARTERRA WINES CANADA 441 Courtneypark Dr. E. Mississauga, ON L5T2V3 T: (905) 564-6906 F: (905) 564-2160 E: consumer.help@arterracanada.com www.arterracanada.com Award-winning wines and ciders. Favourite brands such as JacksonTriggs, Inniskillin, Woodbridge by Robert Mondavi, Ruffino and Kim Crawford.

Toronto, ON M4P 2W3 T: (647) 539-0969 E: treatme@baldbaker.ca

BOOTH #1419

BOOTH #1528

ARTISAN FARMS DIRECT LTD 6400 Shawson Dr., Unit 3 Mississauga, ON L5T 1L8 T: (905) 670-3450 E: info@artisanfarms.ca www.artisanfarms.ca Producer and supplier of Raised Without Antibiotics Angus, 100% Grass Fed Beef, Certified Organic Beef, Ontario Wagyu, and Grass Fed Ontario Lamb. BOOTH #734

ATLANTIC STAINLESS FABRICATORS LTD 62 Howden Rd. Toronto, ON T: (416) 258-5535 F: (416) 285-6649 E: mrafik@bellnet.ca www.atlanticstainless.ca Manufacturer of stainless steel tables, sinks, cabinets, carts, refrigerated olive/antipasto bar, seafood display tables and cases. Custom design and manufacture. BOOTH #1213

✪ ATRIPCO DELIVERY SERVICE

34 Canmotor Ave. Etobicoke, ON M8Z 4E5 T: vclarke@atripco.net www.atripco.net 50 years delivering rush, same-day and next-day-anything from envelopes to full trailer loads! An e-commerce partner, with temperature-controlled equipment, “Nothing is Impossible!” BOOTH #403

314 Wychwood Ave. Toronto, ON M6C 2T8 T: (416) 427-4293 E: stephen@baddadtea.com www.baddadtea.com This is the coolest tea on the planet! We combine the joy of tea with the power of laughter for something fresh, organic and fun! BOOTH #422

BALD BAKER ✪ 177 Redpath Ave.

www.baldbaker.ca

Toronto-based producer of sugar conscious treats, all baked using only plant-based, gluten-free ingredients and with four grams of sugar or less. BOOTH #1740A

BAYTNA MANAGEMENT INC. 55 Village Centre Place Mississauga, ON L4Z 1V9 T: (647) 975-8109 E: info@baytna.ca www.baytna.ca Import and export, wholesale of food products. BOOTH #410

BDO CANADA LLP 1 City Centre Dr., Ste. 1700 Mississauga, ON L5B 1M2 T: (905) 270-7700 F: (905) 270-7915 E: info@bdo.ca www.bdo.ca BDO Canada is a leading provider of assurance, accounting, tax, and advisory services with deep industry knowledge and exceptional client service. BOOTH #512

BEDESSEE IMPORTS LTD. 2 Golden Gate Crt. Toronto, ON M1P 3A5 T: (416) 292-2400 F: (866) 320-5569 E: rayman@bedessee.com www.bedessee.com An importer that supplies many food items to West Indian, Caribbean, Chinese and Guyanese supermarkets and restaurants. BOOTH #424

BEE MAID HONEY LIMITED 625 Roseberry St. Winnipeg, MN R3H 0T4 T: (204) 786-8977 F: (204) 783-8468 E: sbowden@beemaid.com www.beemaid.com Canadian beekeeper-owned, supplying quality 100% pure Canadian honey for 65 years! True Source, SQF and HACCP certifications equals quality you can trust. BOOTH #1021

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GROCERY GROCERY INNOVATIONS INNOVATIONS CANADA CANADA

A WORLD OF OPPORTUNITIES MORE TRADE. MORE TASTES. MORE TRENDS. OCTOBER 22 & 23, 2019 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

BIMBO CANADA 10 Four Seasons Place Etobicoke, ON M9B 6H7 T: (416) 622-2040 E: CBConsumerEngagement@ grupobimbo.com www.bimbocanada.com Bimbo Canada is the leading producer and distributor of packaged fresh bread and bakery products. BOOTH #1309

✪ BOREAL BERRY FARM

748 Little Brule Rd. Warren, ON P0H 2N0 T: (705) 920-7096 E: borealberryfarmwinery@gmail.com www.borealberryfarm.ca Full range of locally grown organic frozen fruits. Authenticity. Quality. Traceability. Hallmarks of Boreal Berry Farm products, a family farm with quality you can trust. BOOTH #1627

BOSHKUNG BREWING CO. LTD. 9201 Hwy 118 Algonquin Highlands, ON K0M1J0 T: (705) 489-4554 E: orders@boshkungbrewing.com www.boshkungbrewing.com Boshkung Brewing Co. is a small batch brewery focused on cottage living, local fare and great tasting beer. BOOTH #1808B

BRANDT MEATS 1878 Mattawa Ave. Mississauga, ON L4X 1K1 T: (905) 279-4460 F: (905) 279-9155 E: info@brandtmeats.com www.brandtmeats.com Authentic–Quality–Passion. For more than 60 years, Brandt Meats has been proudly creating artisan quality deli meats in the European tradition. BOOTH #1502

BURNBRAE FARMS LTD. 940 Matheson Blvd. E. Mississauga, ON L4W 2R8 T: (905) 624-3600 F: (905) 624-3363 E: imcruvie@burnbraefarms.com www.burnbraefarms.com Burnbrae Farms is excited to present our unique, innovative, ready-to-eat egg products. Real Eggs. Real Easy. BOOTH #918

CAMPBELL COMPANY OF CANADA 2845 Matheson Blvd. E. Mississauga, ON L4W 5J8 T: (800) 410-7687 E: canada_custeam@campbellsoup.com www.campbellsoup.ca Make sure you stop by to sample our NEW Goldfish and Soup Innovation! BOOTH #1008

22

CANADA BEEF 146, 6715-8th St. NE Calgary, AB T2E 7H7 T: (403) 275-5890 F: (403) 275-9288 E: admin@canadabeef.ca www.canadabeef.ca Canada Beef is the cattle producerfunded and run organization responsible for domestic and international beef and veal market development. BOOTH #737

CANADIAN CATTLEMEN'S ASSOCIATION 180, 6815 - 8th Street NE Calgary, AB T2E 7H7 T: (403) 615-9432 E: pecka@cattle.ca www.raisingcdnbeef.ca Representing the 60,000 farms and ranches across Canada that raise world class beef, including new Certified Sustainable beef initiatives. BOOTH #735

CANADIAN FOOD & GROCERY GUIDE 5009 Prospect Lake Rd. Victoria, BC V9E 1J5 T: (888) 502-6666 E: products@contactcanada.com www.contactcanada.com Canada’s leading directory on the grocery industry. Free online database. Produce your own customized directory. Online receives 4,000,0000 views/yr. Free print. BOOTH #506

CANADIAN GROCER EnsembleIQ 20 Eglinton Ave. West; Ste. 1800 Toronto, ON M4R 1K8 T: 437-889-0446 E: vpeters@ensembleiq.com www.canadiangrocer.com Canadian Grocer is the #1 trade publication serving the grocery industry in Canada. With an audited audience of 89,000+ (print & digital), we are the most efficient and effective way to reach Canadian retailers. BOOTH #1529

CANADIAN WISE FOODS 12484 82nd Ave. Surrey, BC V3W 3E9 T: (604) 593-5160 F: (604) 593-5161 E: unmole@canadianwisefoods.com www.canadianwisefoods.com Canadian Wise Foods specializes in dry meat marinades, retail ethnic sauce and spice mixes as well copacking and product development. BOOTH #418

CANDISPRO CORPORATION 1377 Cormorant Rd., Unit 105 Ancaster, ON L9G 4V5 T: (905) 648-5646 F: (905) 648-2752 E: info@candispro.com

www.candispro.com CanDisPro is the largest importer of Spanish fine foods in Canada with more than 300 references including meats, cheeses, seafood, vegetables, EVOO, snacks and drinks. BOOTH #602

CARE BAKERY 3823 29 Street NE Calgary, AB T1Y 6B5 T: (403) 724-1920 F: (403) 264-4098 www.carebakery.com Care Bakery is a Canadian wholesale bakery that produces high-quality, gluten-free breads, buns, and pizza crusts. BOOTH #426

CARLSBERG CANADA 1425 North Service Rd. E. Oakville, ON L6H 1A7 T: (437) 983-8335 E: bruno.peceniski@carlsberg.ca www.carlsbergcanada.ca Carlsberg Canada is pleased to showcase all the innovation SKUs from the brands Somersby, Kronenbourg 1664 and Carlsberg. BOOTH #933

CAVENDISH FARMS 100 Midland Dr. Dieppe, NB E1A 6X4 T: (506) 378-2188 F: (506) 378-2188 E: akerley.shanel@cavendishfarms.com www.cavendishfarms.com We’re a family food company that puts pride, dedication and a whole lot of know-how into everything we grow, and everything we make. BOOTH #1033

CCI 2345 Argentia Rd. Mississauga, ON L5N 8K4 T: (866) 595-2261 E: info@cannabiscomplianceinc.com www.cannabiscomplianceinc.com CCI is a global consulting firm with subject matter expertise in the regulated consumer products industry. BOOTH #836

✪ CEDAR VALLEY SELECTIONS

25 Amy Croft Dr. Lakeshore, ON N9K 1C7 T: (519) 560-1251 E: info@cedarvalleyselections.ca www.cedarvalleyselections.ca All-natural, preservative-free, fresh salad dressings and pita chips. Bold, new and unique flavours for your customers. Plus, Canada’s first and only bottled Fattoush Salad Dressing. BOOTH #1624

CF&R SERVICES INC. 1920 Clements Rd. Pickering, ON L1W 3V6 T: (905) 426-3891 F: (905) 426-3895 E: phrancis@cfrservices.com

www.cfrservices.com Coupon redemption services - retailers and marketers. Direct mail services. Print on demand. Rebates, contests and premiums. BOOTH #1015

CHEP CANADA INC. 7400 East Danbro Cres. Mississauga, ON L5N 8C6 T: (905) 790-2437 E: jason.peattie@chep.com www.chep.com CHEP manages, maintains, transports, and supplies more than 300 million platforms for our customers. CHEP platforms and services play a critical role. BOOTH #926

CEYLON BISCUITS LTD. Makumbura Colombo, 10230 T: (009) 411-5000 F: (011) 285-7202 E: export.cbl@cbllk.com www.muncheelk.com Ceylon Biscuits Limited (CBL) is the largest manufacturer and exporter of many leading brands in biscuits, wafers, cereal, chocolates, chocolate coated products, coconut products and certified organic fruits. BOOTH #603

CLASSIC TOUCH FOODS 75 Addiscott Crt. Markham, ON L6G 1A6 T: (905) 470-1926 E: louie@classicgroup.com www.classictouchfoods.ca Classic is a leading fresh food manufacturing company and in business for over 35 years. We offer ready to eat, HMR, coffee and catering services. BOOTH #1526

COCA-COLA LTD. 335 King St. E. Toronto, ON M5A 1L1 T: (416) 424-6000 E: Sellcoke@cokecanada.com www.coca-cola.ca The Coca-Cola Company (NYSE: KO) is a total beverage company, offering over 500 brands in more than 200 countries and territories. BOOTH #1409

✪ COOKINA INC.

3500 Blvd Matte #236 Brossard, QC J4Y 2Z2 T: (514) 716-8547 E: jonathan@cookina.co www.cookina.co Reusable grilling and baking sheets. Reduces the need for food wrap. Keeps grill marks and oven/grill clean. Cut to size. Amazing Pre-paks available. BOOTH #1714

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MORE TRADE. MORE TASTES. MORE TRENDS. OCTOBER 22 & 23, 2019 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

COLOUR INNOVATIONS/ RAINING COMMUNICATIONS 161 Norfinch Dr. Toronto, ON, M3N 1Y T: (416) 663-6703 F: (416) 663-3918 E: dennis.leggett@colourinnovations.com www.colourinnovations.com Experts at branding, design and folded carton printing. BOOTH #1904

COOLIO NORTH AMERICA 3179 Mainway Dr. Burlington, ON L7M 1A6 T: (905) 331-9497 F: (905) 331-6332 E: Steve@coolionorthamerica.com www.coolionorthamerica.com Coolio is true innovation for the launch and promotion of refrigerated products. Coolio is a marketing revenue generator for retailers. Coolio brings brands to life. BOOTH #1613

COWBELL BREWING CO. 40035 Blyth Rd. Blyth, ON N0M 1H0 T: (519) 523-4724 E: info@cowbellbrewing.com www.cowbellbrewing.com Cowbell Brewing Co. is a 100% accessible brewery that maintains industry-leading environmental standards while proudly supporting communities across Ontario. BOOTH #1805

CRAZY D’S PREBIOTIC SODA LABS Unit 4-120B Barbados Blvd. Scarborough, ON M1J 1L2 T: (416) 414-7661 E: contact@crazydlabs.com www.crazydlabs.com Crazy D’s Prebiotic Soda Labs is a Toronto-based company that makes hand-crafted healthy prebiotic sodas, which are sweetened with prebiotic root vegetables instead of sugar. Perfectly crafted and available in three refreshing flavours – Ginga’ Kick, Twisted Citrus, and Rockin’ Rolla Cherry Cola! – these sodas not only taste great, but they are crazy good for you! BOOTH #445D

✪ CTS FOODS

5025 Rue Francois-Cusson Montreal, QC H8T 3K1 T: (514) 956-0356 E: jessica.h@ctsfoods.ca www.ctsfoods.ca Explore CTS Foods – your one-stop food importer and distributor. From deli to dry goods, we have everything you need. BOOTH #843

24

DANA INDUSTRIES 109 Woodbine Downs Blvd., Unit 1 Toronto, ON M9W 6Y1 T: (416) 798-0880 E: kobrien@danaindustries.com www.danaindustries.com Home of the world’s best engineered Shelf Talkers™. Dana Industries is committed to helping retailers and brands create outstanding shelf signage programs. BOOTH #635

✪ DANIAL’S DISTRIBUTION INC. 4020A Sladeview Cres. Unit #3 Mississauga, ON L5L 6B1 T: (905) 858-0330 F: (905) 858-0332 E: info@danialsdistribution.com www.danialsdistribution.com Supplier of health & beauty aids, household cleaning supplies, school & office supplies, over-the-counter medicine, confectionery, outdoor supplies and general merchandise. BOOTH #407

DAUPHINAIS INC. 6163 Boul. Bourque Sherbrooke, QC J1N 1H2 T: (819) 864-7878 F: (819) 864-7774 E: info@dauphinais.co www.dauphinais.co Display case OEM and specialist. We provide custom made solutions to make the stores of the food retail industry appealing and more performant. BOOTH #1235

DE LUXE PAPER–POLAR PAK/ NOVOLEX 35 Dynamic Dr. Scarborough, ON M1V 2W2 T: (416) 754-4633 F: (416) 291-7566 E: franco.petronio@novolex.com www.novolex.com De Luxe offers: waxing, foil lamination, pinch bottom and shopper bags and paper F-Flute containers. Polar Pak® is a leader in the manufacture of foodservice and food packaging plastic containers. BOOTH #837

DIGI CANADA INC. 87 Moyal Crt. Concord, ON L4K 4R8 T: (905) 879-0833 F: (905) 879-4008 E: sales@ca.digi-group.com www.digisystem.com DIGI - Global leader in food retail equipment offers solutions for linerless auto-cutter printing, weighing and wrapping, advanced printer scales, POS, ESL and consumables. BOOTH #919

DISTRIBUTION CANADA INC. (DCI) 3425 Harvester Rd. Suite 102c Burlington, ON L7N 3N1 T: (905) 681-3933 F: (905) 681-0314 E: admin@distributioncanada.ca

www.distributioncanada.ca DCI is a national organization of retailers and wholesalers that fosters collaborative selling relationships between its shareholders, manufacturers and key stakeholders in the Canadian market. BOOTH #1543

✪ DORFIN INC.

5757 Thimens Blvd. St. Laurent, QC H4R 2H6 T: (514) 335-0333 F: (514) 335-9341 E: orders@dorfin.com www.dorfin.com Major supplier of everyday consumable and green friendly products plus cleaning supplies, general merchandise, foil rolls and pans, health & beauty, household, lighters, and pet supplies. BOOTH #429

DOTS SNACKS 130 Otonabee Dr. Kitchener, ON N2C 1L6 T: (519) 496-7259 E: dotskhadim@hotmail.com www.outoftheboxsnacks.com All natural hot sauces are made with the highest quality, all natural ingredients. Enjoy the combinations of tropical fruits and vegetables with a spicy twist! BOOTH #1631

✪ DTS ADVANCE LOGISTICS INC. 3300 Ridgeway Dr., Unit 12, Mississauga, ON L5L 6A8 T: (877) 204-6592 F: (855) 630-9668 E: sales@dtsadvance.com www.dtsadvance.com DTS is a Licensed customs broker, NVOCC & bond freight forwarder, trucking, 3PL solution with WMS/ fulfillment centre. Your logistics needs is our job. BOOTH #445A

✪ ECO-MAX (PRISM

CARE CORPORATION) 3580 Laird Rd. Mississauga, ON L5L 5Z7 T: (416) 738-7426 E: support@eco-max.ca www.eco-max.com We make powerful plant-based cleaners for healthy cleaning. Come see why our natural laundry liquid is #1 and learn about new products. BOOTH #413

EFLYN 43-6535 Millcreek Dr. Mississauga, ON L5N 2M2 T: (905) 566-0606 E: info@eflyn.com www.eflyn.com Introducing Grab, Scan and Go selfordering kiosks for grocers! Visit Eflyn to see how self-order and digital signage kiosks can delight your customers!

EGG QUALITY ASSURANCE™ 21, rue Florence St. Ottawa, ON K2P 0W6 T: (613) 238-2514 E: eqa@eggs.ca www.eggquality.ca The Egg Quality Assurance™ mark on egg cartons certifies Canadian eggs have been produced according to strict food safety and animal care standards. Learn more! BOOTH #1239

ETHICAL BEAN COFFEE 1315 Kootenay St. Vancouver, BC V5K 4Y3 T: (604) 431-3830 F: (604) 431-3834 E: info@ethicalbean.com www.ethicalbean.com For the coffee lover. Delicious arabica beans artisan roasted in Vancouver. Always organic, always fairtrade. BOOTH #1221

✪ FAUXMAGERIE ZENGARRY

209 Main St. N. Alexandria, ON K0C 1A0 T: (613) 525-4722 E: sales@zengarry.com www.zengarry.com Fauxmagerie Zengarry is a Canadian, artisanal, award-winning fine cashew cheese. Core flavours are dairy-free, gluten-free, vegan and free from artificial flavours. BOOTH #1632

FEDERATED INSURANCE COMPANY OF CANADA 660-3100 Bl. Le Carrefour Laval, QC H7T 2K7 T: (800) 361-0790 F: (450) 687-6663 E: mauro.ditullio@federated.ca www.federated.ca Federated Insurance offers customized insurance solutions designed for the grocery store industry, featuring industry leading coverage such as product recall, transit, computerized equipment and infestation. BOOTH #1320

FENTIMANS NORTH AMERICA 2286 Holdom Ave. Burnaby, BC V5B 4Y5 T: (604) 324-0565 E: dcurrie@informbrokerage.com www.drinkfentimans.com Fentimans brewed craft sodas are naturally brewed and fermented for seven to ten days for authentic flavour. Great for mixing or on their own. BOOTH #1711

BOOTH #636

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2019 | GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

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TRADE SHOW & CONFERENCE TUESDAY, OCT. 22, 2019 CONFERENCE 8:00 AM – 11:00 AM TRADE SHOW 11:00 AM – 4:30 PM

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23, 2019 CONFERENCE 7:30 AM – 11:15 AM TRADE SHOW 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM

FLORA MANUFACTURING & DISTRIBUTING LTD. 7400 Fraser Park Dr. Burnaby, BC V5J 5B9 T: (360) 354-7118 E: info@florahealth.com www.florahealth.com Flora, a family-owned-and-operated company, manufactures and distributes premium quality healthy supplements, using plant-based, organic and nonGMO ingredients whenever possible. BOOTH #1611

FMF STOREFIXTURES 73 Shoemaker St. Kitchener, ON N2E 3B5 T: (519) 748-9142 E: sales@fmfstorefixtures.com www.fmfstorefixtures.com Grocery tilt trucks, stock carts, uboats with flip deck, heavy duty double deck stock trucks. BOOTH #414

FMS SOLUTIONS 5511 Tomken Rd. Ste. 204 Mississauga, ON L4W 4B8 T: (877) 435-9400 E: tim.parks@fmssolutions.com www.fmssolutions.com FMS provides a comprehensive suite of financial applications specifically for the retail grocery industry including critical accounting functions, payroll services, and retail inventory management. BOOTH #818

FOOD DISTRIBUTION GUY 2785 Lindholm Cres. Mississauga, ON L5M 4P7 T: (416) 768-7648 E: richard@fooddistributionguy.com www.fooddistributionguy.com Food Distribution Guy provides industry expertise, addresses distribution challenges that assist clients in breaking through the competitive landscape to attain listings in the grocery sector. BOOTH #1503

FOOD & NATURE (PVT) LTD. No.106/6A, Araliya Uyana, Depanama, Pannipitiya, Western Sri Lanka 10280 T: (011) 566-6616 F: (071) 937-7059 E: mail@fadna.com www.fadna.com FADNA Brand Herbal Teas are manufactured naturally–without using preservatives, artificial flavors, colors. They are packaged in compatibility with international standards. Factory has obtained HACCP/ISO Certifications. BOOTH #603

FOUR FATHERS BREWING COMPANY 125 Guelph Ave. Cambridge, ON N3C 1A5 T: (519) 616-2337 E: tim@fourfathersbrewing.ca www.fourfathersbrewing.ca

Sampling premium Ontario craft beer. Proudly brewed in Cambridge, Ontario. A variety of beers ranging from light and crisp lagers, to hopforward citrus ales. BOOTH #1808C

FOUR O’CLOCK|TRANS-HERB INC. 1090 Parent St. St-Bruno de Montarville, QC J3V 6L8 T: (450) 441-0779 E: info@fouroclock.ca www.fouroclock.ca Discover our blends that offer herbaceous, spicy, floral and fruity flavours, our certified organic infusions and our original blends. BOOTH #1504

✪ FRESH IS BEST SALSA & CO. #12 - 1425 Cariboo Place Kamloops, BC V2C 5Z3 T: (250) 377-7555 F: (250) 377-8148 E: info@freshisbest.ca www.freshisbest.ca Western Canada’s top-selling fresh salsa and corn tortilla chips. Gluten-free, kosher, non-GMO, preservative-free. BOOTH #1619

FUTURE ENTERPRISES PTE LTD. 31 Harrison Road, #08-01 Food Empire Building Singapore, 369649 T: (403) 389-1724 F: (403) 389-1724 E: ajayhanda@foodempire.com www.foodempire.com Kracks Potato Chips are the core snack product of Food Empire Holdings (Food Empire), an SGX mainboard-listed and global food and beverage company. BOOTH #1703

GALA BAKERY INC. 190 Hempstead Dr. Hamilton, ON L8W 2E8 T: (905) 578-6485 F: (905) 578-6483 E: info@thegalabakery.ca www.thegalabakery.com At Gala Bakery, we consistently deliver premium niche gourmet pastries through our commitment to product excellence and innovation, using only the finest quality ingredients. BOOTH #1731

GAY LEA FOODS CO-OPERATIVE LTD. 5200 Orbitor Dr. Mississauga, ON L4W 5B4 T: (800) 264-0504 E: questions@gayleafoods.com www.gaylea.com As a co-operative of 1,400 dairy farmers, we are dedicated to innovative, high quality products for your family to enjoy. Stop by for a taste! BOOTH #1118

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GBS FOODSERVICE EQUIPMENT INC. 2871 Brighton Rd. Oakville, ON L6H 6C9 T: (905) 829-5534 E: pdouglas@gbscooks.com www.gbscooks.com GBS is a Canada-wide stocking distributor of quality foodservice equipment focused on the retail/grocery HMR channel. GBS is your one-stop resource. BOOTH #1203

GENERAL MILLS 5825 Explorer Dr. Mississauga, ON L4PW 5P6 T: (905) 212-4000 E: craig.teeple@genmills.com www.lifemadedelicious.ca Our people are inspired by purpose. Every day, we are proud to serve the world by making food people love. BOOTH #613

✪ GET SAUCED

9620-58 Ave. Edmonton, AB T6E 6C1 T: (780) 462-2418 F: (780) 466-3135 E: sales@getsauced.com www.getsauced.com We are a family owned company based in Edmonton. For the last 31 years we have been offering unique gluten free sauces, spices, hot sauce. BOOTH #1915

GLOBE POS SYSTEMS 294 Walker Dr., Unit 12 Brampton, ON L6T 4Z2 T: (416) 900-4050 F: (416) 900-4050 E: sales@globepos.ca www.globepos.ca Globe POS Systems has been providing system solutions since 1970. We offer many easy-to-use, easy-tomanage point of sale systems, scales, security systems, cameras, and more. BOOTH #1602

GLORY INTERNATIONAL TRADE INC. 1020 Matheson Blvd. E., Unit 17 Mississauga, ON L4W 4J9 T: (647) 525-5305 E: info@gloryitinc.ca www.gloryitinc.ca Our company specializes in herbal tea, pretzels, candies and wafers. BOOTH #410

✪ GOODLIFE GROUP INC.

1275 Eglington Ave., E. Mississauga, ON L4W 2Z2 T: (905) 507-8000 E: info@goodlife-group.com www.goodlife-group.com Crispy & Crunch, Hand Rolled & Baked Seaweed Snack. Schisandra Berry Drink–unique superfood that combines five tastes in one sip. BOOTH #1919

GRACE FOODS CANADA INC. 70 West Wilmot St. Richmond Hill, ON L4B 1H8 T: (905) 886-1002 F: (905) 886-1798 E: GraceCanadaAnswers@gkco.com www.gracefoods.ca Authentic Caribbean food and beverages including jerk seasonings, hot pepper sauces, coconut water and organic coconut products. Bringing the flavour of the Caribbean to Canadians. BOOTH #618

GROCERY BUSINESS MAGAZINE PO Box 23103 Longworth PO Bowmanville, ON L1C 0H0 T: (905) 697-0467 E: info@grocerybusiness.ca www.grocerybusiness.ca Grocery Business Magazine is Canada’s leading grocery publication and eNews provider, serving independents across Canada with trending information they can use to increase profit. BOOTH #605

✪ HAPPY POPS

130 Bermondsey Rd. Toronto, ON M4A 1X5 T: (416) 854-2949 E: info@happypops.ca www.happypops.ca Happy Pops specializes in all natural frozen fruit bars handcrafted in Canada. They are vegan and gluten free. BOOTH #1740B

✪ HAPPY OR NOT

360 Bay Street, Ste. 999 Toronto, ON M5H 2V6 T: (416) 579-9523 E: vrempel@arvo-group.com www.arvo-group.com HappyOrNot, a global leader in continuous daily satisfaction measurement, collecting over 700,000 feedbacks from consumers daily, can provide insights that no other survey method can. BOOTH #1134

✪ H2 CRAFT SPIRITS &

RADICAL ROAD BREWING CO. 407 Scarborough Rd. Toronto, ON M4E 3N1 T: (416) 844-6339 E: julian@globalbeverageco.com www.globalbeverageco.com Featuring Radical Road beers and innovative non-alcoholic spirits. Also introducing a new line of premium Kombucha products. BOOTH #1814

✪ HEAT SEAL LLC

4922 East 49th St., Ste. #100 Cleveland, OH USA 44125 T: (216) 341-2022 F: (216) 341-2163 E: custserv@heatsealco.com www.heatsealco.com The Energy Smart® wrapper is saving supermarkets 80% on their utility bills each month and paying for itself in less than two years. BOOTH #1609

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GROCERY GROCERY INNOVATIONS INNOVATIONS CANADA CANADA

A WORLD OF OPPORTUNITIES MORE TRADE. MORE TASTES. MORE TRENDS. OCTOBER 22 & 23, 2019 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

HEIDELBERG FOODS LTD. 1035 Reitzel Pl. St. Jacobs, ON N0B 2N0 T: (519) 664-3512 E: dbuist@heidelbergfoods.com www.heidelbergfoods.com We specialize in premium quality, great tasting, shelf-stable deli meat products and meat snacks. Products are made from the finest quality meats and spices. BOOTH #1841

HENDERSON BREWING CO. 128a Sterling Rd. Toronto, ON M6R 2B7 T: (416) 863-8822 E: michelle@hendersonbrewing.com www.hendersonbrewing.com We are a craft brewery located in Toronto. Our brews use creative recipes to bring the history, characters and locations throughout the city to life. BOOTH #1815

HERO NATURE PRODUCTS (PVT) LTD. No. 49 Industrial Estate Dankotuwa, Sri Lankda 61130 T: (943) 122-6520 F: (943) 122-6520 E: natures@herozip.com www.heronature.com We are a leading manufacturer & exporter of organic coconut products. Major products are organic virgin coconut oil, organic coconut flour, organic desiccated coconut & coconutips. BOOTH #603

HEYJUTE™ 24 Manor Ridge Trail Mt. Albert, ON (905) 473-4090 E: heyjute@megalith.net www.HeyJute.com Replacing plastic with eco-friendly natural plant fibre alternatives. Jute bags, PLA meat trays, horticulture products, burlap, custom designed green packaging. BOOTH #1136

HG CANADA 2871 Brighton Oakville, ON L6H 7V4 T: (905) 257-7110 F: (905) 829-9914 E: grayson@hgcanada.com www.hgcanada.com HG Canada manufactures premium performance household cleaning products. HG provides high margin, premium priced cleaning products for all areas and surfaces of the home. BOOTH #1715

HOBART CANADA 105 Gordon Baker Rd., Ste. 801 Toronto, ON M2H 3P8 T: (866) 334-2371 F: (866) 651-1102 E: marketing@hobart.ca www.hobart.ca Hobart, Baxter, Traulsen, Vulcan and Berkel. Brands you know and trust,

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service you depend on. Visit our booth to see the latest in Hobart food machines, warewashing equipment and weighing equipment. BOOTH #745

HOLLANDIA BAKERIES/ GOOD FOOD COMPANY 95 West Beaver Creek Rd. Richmond Hill, ON L4B 1H2 T: (905) 762-1153 F: (905) 762-9796 E: dsimile@goodfoodinc.com www.hollandiacookies.com Hollandia Bakeries since 1954 has been a local small and large batch manufacturer of cookies, specializing in value and value-added biscuits. BOOTH #1626

✪ HORSE AND BUGGY

BRANDS/GOLDEN BON BON 120 Turnbull Crt., Units K,L,M Cambridge, ON N1T 1H9 T: (519) 620-8572 F: (519) 620-8573 E: orders@horseandbuggybrands.com www.horseandbuggybrands.com Canadian company started in 1987. We roast peanuts and package candy. Distributor of another Canadian company’s products, Golden BonBon Almond and JuJube nougat. BOOTH #1833

HUER FOODS INC. 27478 - 55th Ave. Langley, BC V4W 3Y1 T: (604) 626-4888 E: info@huerfoods.com www.huerfoods.com Soft and chewy candy, gummies, vegan candy, sensible sweets, private label, Huer brand, Variety of packaging formats, SQF Certified, distribution from Montreal and Langley. BOOTH #541

HUSSMANN CANADA INC. 5 Cherry Blossom Rd., Building 1 Unit 3 Cambridge, ON N3H 4R7 T: (519) 653-9980 F: (519) 653-4511 E: rob.arabski@hussmann.com www.hussmann.com Hussmann enables excellence in food retailing with merchandising and food display equipment, refrigeration systems, service, maintenance, energy solutions, food quality expertise and store planning services. BOOTH #903

✪ ICE BOX COOL CO., LTD.

South Wangjiayuan Village, Tongji District, Jimo, Qingdao Shandong, China 66200 T: (905) 432-0502 E: billysolmes@iceboxcool.com www.iceboxcool.com Ice Box Cool Co., Ltd is Canadian owned and operated, with established North American and European sales for superior Gourmet Ice Solution. BOOTH #442

ICONIC BREWING CO. 73 Bathurst St. Unit 309 Toronto, ON M5V 2P6 T: (647) 621-5447 E: jenna@iconicbrewing.co www.iconicbrewing.co 'Better for you’ beverages that are sugar free, sweetener free and gluten free. Both beverage alcohol and non alcoholic beverages. BOOTH #1802

I-D FOODS CORPORATION 26 Claireville Dr. Etobicoke, ON M9W 5T9 T: (416) 679-0833 F: (416) 679-8601 E: info@idfoods.com www.idfoods.com The largest independent Canadian full-service distributor and importer of specialty food products, servicing retailers in all channels. Brands include Maille, Tabasco, Bahlsen and Blue Dragon. BOOTH #1232

✪ IDA’S COOKIES

9-328 Passmore Ave. Toronto, ON M1V 5J5 T: (647) 349-8118 E: info@idascookies.com www.idascookies.com Ida’s Cookies are premium handmade shortbread cookies proudly made in Toronto. We believe in delivering the best quality product so you can indulge with confidence. BOOTH #434

✪ IGLOO REFRIGERATION LTD.

124 Norfinch Dr. T: (416) 663-3051 E: info@igloo400.com www.igloofoodequipment.com We specialize in refrigeration, cooking equipment and smallwares for restaurants, delis, bakeries, supermarkets, convenience stores and more. BOOTH #1513

IMAGINEXSOLUTIONS AUTHORIZED METRO WIRE DEALER 39 Royalavon Cres. Etobicoke, ON M9A 2E7 T: (416) 821-2323 E: info@imaginexsolutions.com www.imaginexsolutions.com Premium wire shelving solutions for retail display and storage. In stainless steel, food safety, antimicrobial and specialty finishes. BOOTH #1329

INCUBE MOBILITY SOLUTIONS 1166 South Service Rd. W. Oakville, ON L6M 5T7 T: (905) 465-9696 E: marketing@e-incube.ca www.e-incube.ca InCube is a provider of supply chain software and a distributor of top-of-theline mobile hardware devices in the FMCG & CPG industry. BOOTH #428

INTERNATIONAL DAIRY DELI BAKERY ASSOCIATION 8317 Elderberry Rd. Madison, WI USA 53717 T: (608) 310-5000 F: (608) 238-6330 E: kcampbell@iddba.org www.iddba.org IDDBA is the leading trade association for dairy, deli, and bakery buyers and sellers. We are committed to developing programs and services that support our members and the industry. BOOTH #1318

IQFOODCHAIN 193 Henlow Bay Winnipeg, MB R3Y 1G4 T: (204) 781-7381 F: (204) 500-0464 E: info@iqdigitec.com www.iqfoodchain.com Is your supply chain now fully compliant with Safe Food for Canadians Regulations? Stock shrinkage a problem? IQFoodChain Traceability simplifies compliance and cuts your costs. BOOTH #1932

ISHIDA CANADA INC. 2220 Argentia Rd., Unit 7 Mississauga, ON L5N 2K7 T: (647) 428-0279 E: sales@ishidacanada.ca www.ishidacanada.ca World leader in manufacturing of weighing and packaging solutions. Food wrapping, scales, high-speed weigh-price labelling, meat slicers, pizza presses, labels and film. BOOTH #936

ITALPASTA LTD. 116 Nuggett Crt. Brampton, ON L6T 5A9 T: (905) 792-9928 E: info@italpasta.com www.italpasta.com Since 1989, Italpasta has been using only the finest 100% Canadian durum semolina to manufacture our premium pasta for Canadians. BOOTH #1125

JAYALANKA SUPPLIERS No.212/49, Bodhiraja Mawatha, Colombo 11, Western Province, Sri Lanka 1100 T: (077) 602-0001 F: (011) 292-8004 E: jayalankasuppliers@gmail.com www.jayalankasuppliers.lka Specialist in Sri Lankan food items. All varieties of kithul products, sesame products and Sri Lankan spices. BOOTH #603

✪ JETVAC INC.

4280 Harvester Rd., Unit 15 &16 Burlington, ON L7L 5Z5 T: (905) 639-8240 F: (905) 639-8245 E: info@jetvac.ca www.jetvac.ca

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TRADE SHOW & CONFERENCE TUESDAY, OCT. 22, 2019 CONFERENCE 8:00 AM – 11:00 AM TRADE SHOW 11:00 AM – 4:30 PM

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23, 2019 CONFERENCE 7:30 AM – 11:15 AM TRADE SHOW 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM

Jetvac Inc. manufactures and sells Supermarket Vacuum Generating Units that remove condensate and grey water from refrigeration cases without the need for floor drains. BOOTH #1524

JEWELS UNDER THE KILT 6325 Fifth Line Fergus, ON N1M 2W5 T: (519) 787-1486 E: info@jewelsunderthekilt.com www.jewelsunderthekilt.com Jewels Under the Kilt produces handcrafted, roasted nuts, flavored nuts, nut butters and granolas using fruit from local orchards and Ontario’s finest Maple Syrup. BOOTH #1729A

✪ JRTECH SOLUTIONS

2365 rue Guenette Montreal, QC H4R2E9 T: (514) 889-7114 F: (514) 889-7114 E: info@jrtechsolutions.ca www.jrtechsolutions.ca JRTech Solutions is a privately held corporation and the leading provider of electronic shelf label technology for the Canadian retail market for more than 10 years. BOOTH #834

JUUL LABS CANADA 600-317 Adelaide St. W. Toronto, ON M5V 1P9 T: (844) 250-1033 E: retailers@juul.ca www.juul.ca Juul Labs’ mission is to provide Canada’s five million adult smokers with a real alternative to cigarettes. Juul is intended for current adult smokers only. BOOTH #538

✪ KANDRICK TEA

BEVERAGES LANKA P.O.Box.01, Mathugama, Western, Sri Lanka 12100 T: (077) 909-9882 E: kandricktea@gmail.com www.kandricktea.com Kandrick Tea proudly presents our customers a taste of Lanka in your home through our conveniently packaged 100% premium ceylon black, white and green tea products BOOTH #603

KETCHUM MANUFACTURING 1245 California Ave. Brockville, ON K6V 7N5 T: (613) 342-8455 F: (613) 342-7550 E: lucasg@ketchum.ca www.ketchum.ca Ketchum Manufacturing specializes in custom printed point-of-purchase signage for retail promotions that help increase awareness, exposure and sales of your products in store. BOOTH #831

KISSAN INTERNATIONAL (CANADA) INC. 2691 Markham Rd. Scarborough, ON M1X 1L4 T: (416) 299-3060 E: kissan@kissan.ca www.kissan.ca Kissan has been a trusted name in Canada for over 35 years, providing quality products for authentic Indian food lovers here and around the globe. BOOTH #829

KOLAPORE SPRINGS 1843 23rd St. E. Owen Sound, ON N4K 5P7 T: (705) 888-3218 E: gary@kolaporesprings.com www.kolaporesprings.com Ontario raised rainbow trout are processed as Fresh Fillets, Whole Dressed Fish and Smoked Trout Fillets at our CFIA HACCP facility in Owen Sound, Ontario. BOOTH #1643

KRAFT HEINZ CANADA 95 Moatfield Dr. Toronto, ON M3B 3L6 T: (416) 441-5000 E: information@kraftheinz.com www.kraftcanada.com Kraft Heinz is the fifth-largest food and beverage company in the world with iconic brands including Kraft, Heinz, Classico, KD, Jell-O, Philadelphia and Maxwell House. BOOTH #1225

KRUGER PRODUCTS LP 200-1900 Minnesota Crt. Mississauga, ON L5N 5R5 T: (905) 812-6900 F: (905) 812-6910 E: reception@krugerproducts.ca www.krugereproducts.ca Kruger Products is a leading Canadian manufacturer and distributor of tissue products and paper towels for consumer in home and away-from-home use. BOOTH #1208

L.H. GRAY & SON LIMITED R.R. # 7 Strathroy, ON N7G 3H8 T: (519) 245-0480 F: (519) 245-5829 E: crittinger@grayridge.com www.grayridge.com We are a grader and producer marketing regular, specialty and further processed egg products under the Gray Ridge, Gold Egg and Conestoga Farms brands. BOOTH #1030

LACTALIS CANADA 405 The West Mall Toronto, ON M9C 5J1 T: (416) 626-1973 E: contactus@parmalat.ca www.parmalat.ca

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With nearly 140 years of brand heritage in the Canadian dairy industry, we offer milk, cheese, yogourt with brands such as Astro, Balderson, Black Diamond, Lactantia. BOOTH #1119

✪ LAKEVIEW FARMS

1600 Gressel Dr. Delphos, OH USA 45833 T: (800) 755-9925 F: (419) 695-9900 E: erniewilliams@sympatico.ca www.lakeviewfarms.com Deli layered dips, chilled desserts, hummus under the Tribe brand. Brands include Luisa’s, RoJo’s, Senor Rico, Cheesecake Factory. BOOTH #1525

LAKE OF BAYS BREWING CO. 2681 Muskoka Rd. 117 - PO Box 17 Baysville, ON P0B 1A0 T: (705) 767-2313 E: info@lakeofbaysbrewing.ca www.lakeofbaysbrewing.ca Sample core brands and seasonal beers from one of Ontario's most successful craft breweries at booth 1808A. Taste the great outdoors! BOOTH #1808A

LCBO 1 Yonge St. Toronto, ON M5E 1W7 T: (833) 840-6272 E: lcbogroceryoperations@lcbo.com www.lcbowholesaleoperations.com We are the socially responsible, performance-driven, innovative beverage alcohol distributor, helping ensure a wide assortment of products make their way to Ontario consumers. BOOTH #1224

LENBROOK MOTOROLA SOLUTIONS 633 Granite Crt. Pickering, ON L1W 3K1 T: (905) 831-6555 E: mdellacamera@lenbrook.com www.lenbrookcanadasolutions.com

Lenbrook Canada Solutions is the exclusive Canadian distribution and service specialist for Motorola Solutions Two-Way Business Radios. We deliver a full line of communication products. BOOTH #928

LEONIDAS Boulevard Jules Graindorlaan 41-43 Brussels, Belgium, B1070 T: (201) 925-6715 E: etienne.lemarie@leonidas.com www.leonidas.com Fresh Belgian chocolates. Ready for retail and food-service. 100% cocoa butter Belgian chocolates. Local inventory. BOOTH #931

LE VERSANT ROUGE 578 Rang 4 Est Saint-Georges de Windsor, QC J0A 1J0 T: (819) 828-2890 F: (819) 828-2890 E: info@leversantrouge.com www.leversantrouge.com The Versant Rouge turns different fruits into jelly, butter and organic sugar free spreads. The company is located in Quebec and has been in existence for more than 30 years. BOOTH #639

LIVA FOODS PO Box 67013 South Common Mall Mississauga, ON L5L 5V4 T: (647) 408-6079 F: (905) 607-3666 E: info@livafoods.com www.livafoods.com Liva date sugar is a raw, organic, plant-based nutrient rich healthier alternative sugar. It has a fine texture and a subtle caramel flavour. BOOTH #441

LIVBON INC. 225 Industrial Pkwy. S Aurora, ON L4G 3V5 T: (416) 456-2271 E: info@livbon.ca www.livbon.ca Our traditional Arancina recipe is one that has been passed down from many generations. Our Arancini are the traditional Sicilian style and flavour. BOOTH #1645

LOBLAWS INC. 1 President’s Choice Circle Brampton, ON L6Y 5S5 T: (905) 459-2500 E: Business.Development@loblaw.ca www.loblaws.ca The Affiliated Independent Group will help you build your grocery business by adding NoName products to your offerings. Come see us to find out how. BOOTH #1509

LONDON ICE CREAM CO. 3397 White Oak Rd. London, ON N6E 3A1 T: (519) 455-8810 F: (519) 455-5584 E: nwic@newwaveicecream.com www.londonicecream.ca We offer premium and food service real deal ice cream, sherbets, creamcycles, sorbet (dairy free), no sugar added ice cream and frozen yogurt. BOOTH #1732

✪ LOTUS PRODUCE BAGS

1000 Camino De Las Ondas Carlsbad, CA 92011 P: (760) 688-9962 W: info@lortustrolleybag.com www.LotusTrolleybag.com Offer the Lotus produce bag which are a set of reusable eco-friendly produce bags. Plus the Lotus Trolley Bag system to eliminate plastic waste. BOOTH #440

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A WORLD OF OPPORTUNITIES

GROCERY GROCERY INNOVATIONS INNOVATIONS CANADA CANADA

MORE TRADE. MORE TASTES. MORE TRENDS. OCTOBER 22 & 23, 2019 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

MADEGOOD 2720 Steeles Ave. W. Vaughan, ON L4K 4N5 T: (416) 360-8200 E: D.chanderpaul@madegoodfoods.com www.madegoodfoods. comcaproducts/granola-minis MadeGood® is our family business and passion, and the inspiration came out of our life-long relationship with healthy food. BOOTH #935

MARKETING IMPACT LTD. 50 Planchet Rd. Concord, ON L4K 2C7 T: (905) 738-0888 F: (905) 738-1334 E: sales@displaypeople.com www.displaypeople.com Marketing Impact designs and manufactures POP displays, merchandising products, shelf-management systems; sign holders; spring-loaded pushers; security solutions, etc. Always Innovating! We are your source for effective display and merchandising. BOOTH #1705

MAPLE LEAF FOODS 6987 Financial Dr. Mississauga, ON L5N 0A1 T: (905) 285-5000 E: info@mapleleaf.com www.mapleleaffoods.com Maple Leaf Foods is Canada’s leading meat and plant protein company - the home of Maple Leaf, Schneiders, Prime, Mina, and LightLife products. BOOTH #1025

MARTIN’S FAMOUS PASTRY SHOPPE, INC. 1000 Potato Roll Lane Chambersburg, PA USA 17202 T: (800) 548-1200 E: tlushbaugh@potatorolls.com www.potatorolls.com Our potato rolls provide a sweet, buttery flavour and soft, pillowy texture that adds a golden touch to any meal. #1 Hamburger Bun in USA! BOOTH #827

the same probiotic benefits but with a refreshing, smooth taste and a light-hearted spirit! Available in Black Currant and Raspberry Ginger.

Nestled in the heart of Muskoka, Muskoka Brewery handcrafts premium beers as unique and refreshing as the region they’re from.

BONED BROTH PO Box 91987 West Vancouver, ON V7V 4S4 T: (647) 962-3587 E: Gina@McLeanMeats.com www.mcleanmeats.com Organic and RWA deli meat, bacon, sausages, lasagna, jerky, beef sticks, made in Ontario and delicious! Try Boned Broth, it’s organic!

MONERIS 3300 Bloor St. W. Toronto, ON M8X 2X2 T: (855) 404-7009 E: isabel.mifsud@moneris.com www.moneris.com Moneris is Canada’s largest provider of innovative solutions for mobile, online and in-store payments, processing more than one in three transactions.

✪ NAD COMPANY INC

METRO 360 120 Sinnott Rd. Toronto, ON M1L 4N1 T: (416) 285-2050 F: (416) 285-2056 E: customerservice@metro360.ca www.metro360.ca “Better For You” food products that provide a healthy alternative to people of all lifestyles.

MONTPAK 5730 Place Maurice-Cullen Laval, QC H7C 2V1 P: (450) 665-5659 E: info@montpak.ca www.montpak.ca Quality veal, lamb and beef supplier.

BOOTH #629

✪ MCLEAN MEATS/

BOOTH #1512

BOOTH #930

✪ METTA TEA CO.

P.O. Box 36041 North York, ON M3B 0A3 T: (416) 803-5481 E: contact@mettateaco.com www.mettateaco.com Metta Tea Co. sources premium matcha green tea from Japan and distributes within North America to consumers who are eager for its health benefits. BOOTH #420

MIMI FOOD PRODUCTS INC. 1260 Creditstone Rd. Vaughan, ON L4K 5T7 T: (905) 660-0010 F: (905) 660-3342 E: mike@mimifoods.ca www.mimifoods.ca Pizza dough, focaccia, panouzzo buns/sliders, ciabatta crusts/breads, flatbreads, custom formulations, private label opportunities, in a variety of flavours, fully topped/baked. BOOTH #1727

✪ M-C DAIRY

106 North Queen St. Etobicoke, ON M8Z 2E2 T: (416) 231-1491 F: (416) 231-1879 E: info@m-cdairy.com www.futurebakery.com Our mission is to craft traditional Old World bacterially cultured fresh dairy products that are natural, healthy and qualitatively best in class. BOOTH #1641

✪ MCLAREN DOORS

420 Industrial Parkway S. Aurora, ON L4G 3V7 T: (905) 713-0772 F: (905) 713-0676 E: info@mclarendoors.com www.mclarendoors.com Premium PVC roll-up overhead truck door manufacturer. Specializing in

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freezer, refrigerated and dry freight doors with a primary focus on the grocery industry.

MIWE CANADA INC. 3055 Lenworth Dr. Mississauga, ON L4X 2G3 T: (905) 614-0505 E: b.garisto@miwe.com www.miwe.com With high-performance, comprehensive in baking processes, high consulting and first-class service, MIWE is the world leader in the baking industry. BOOTH #728

MOLSON COORS 33 Carlingview Dr. Toronto, ON M9W 5E4 T: (416) 679-1786 E: kate.hanrahan@molsoncoors.com www.molsoncoors.com/en Introducing Clearly Kombucha, a “Kombucha for the rest of us,” with

BOOTH #508

BOOTH #1129

BOOTH #738

MOODWATER 100 King St. W. Floor 56 Toronto, ON M5X 1C9 T: (844) 495-6663 F: (416) 322-8501 E: info@mymoodwater.com www.mymoodwater.com MoodWater is the “funnest” alkaline spring water in the world! Not only is our water packed with all sorts of nutrients and “Alkaliney” goodness, but every bottle also comes with a guaranteed smile on your face! BOOTH #1345

MOTHER’S PIZZA PARLOUR AND SPAGHETTI HOUSE 4145 North Service Rd. Ste. 200 Burlington, ON L7L 6A3 T: (905) 315-5041 E: brian@thepopshoppe.com www.motherspizza.ca This iconic Canadian brand is now bringing their signature pizzas to homes across the country through its line of prepared frozen food offerings. BOOTH #430

✪ MOUNTAIN WAFFLE CO.

815 Summit Rd. Narberth, PA 19072-1322 T: (610) 660-0610 F: (610) 660-0610 E: david@mountainwaffle.com www.mountainwaffle.com Mountain Waffle Co. makes the greatest variety (more sizes, flavors and packaging types) of the highest quality (all natural, non-GMO, RBST free) Belgian waffles. BOOTH #707

MUSKOKA BREWERY 1964 Muskoka Beach Rd. Bracebridge, ON P1P 1R1 T: (705) 646-1266 E: tap.room@muskokabrewery.com www.muskokabrewery.com

BOOTH #1219

931 Des Sorbiers Pincourt, QC J7V 0C9 T: (514) 923-6983 E: raymondbujold@gmail.com www.dumet.ch Food distributor servicing independent, c-stores & mass retailers what they need. Offering no minimum orders, delivery in the same week and excellent customer service. BOOTH #4451

NATISA (42 DEGREES COMPANY DISTRIBUTOR) 117 Lockport Way Stoney Creek, ON L8E 6E8 T: (905) 643-8142 E: natisa1@icloud.com www.natisagroup.com We are distributors for the 42 Degrees Company, which manufacturers self-heating canned beverages that include coffee, cappuccinos, lattes and hot chocolate. BOOTH #439

✪ NATURE KNOWS-READY

TO EAT FRESH FRUITS & VEGETABLES 7050 Telford Way Unit 100B Mississauga, ON L5S 1V7 T: (905) 612-0085 F: (905) 612-0085 E: awatson@natureknows.ca www.natureknows.ca Ready-to-eat fresh fruits and veggies help reduce waste, stay fresh 50% longer in our breathable eco-friendly single serve to family sizes (no plastic). BOOTH #1729B

NEALE'S SWEET N NICE FOODS INC. 1288 Ritson Rd. N. Unit 405 Oshawa, ON L1G 8B2 T: (888) 964-7729 E: operations@sweetnnice.ca www.sweetnnice.ca All natural premium caribbean Ice cream and frozen dessert. 5 flavors: Coconut, Guava Passionfruit, Mango, Pineapple Coconut, Rum & Raisin. Three sizes: 100ml; 500ml; 5.7L BOOTH #1828

NESTLE CANADA INC. 25 Sheppard Ave. W. North York, ON M2N 6S8 T: (416) 512-9000 F: (416) 218-2654 E: Consumer.care@ca.nestle.com www.nestle.ca Nestle Canada has a wide variety of food, beverage and nutrition products to help you and your family live happier and healthier lives. BOOTH #811

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2019 | GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

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TRADE SHOW & CONFERENCE TUESDAY, OCT. 22, 2019 CONFERENCE 8:00 AM – 11:00 AM TRADE SHOW 11:00 AM – 4:30 PM

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23, 2019 CONFERENCE 7:30 AM – 11:15 AM TRADE SHOW 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM

NIMBUS WATER SYSTEMS INC. 112 Oakdale Rd. Toronto, ON M3N 1V9 T: (416) 616-1184 E: steve@nimbuswatersystems.com www.nimbuswatersystems.com Full service to all makes and models of water equipment. Best range of equipment and options for vended and store-use. Purchase and revenue share. BOOTH #641

✪ NORTHERN DANCER SALES

1146 Glenridge Dr. Oakville, ON L6M 2K7 T: (416) 705-0807 F: (905) 825-2761 E: gingriselli@northerndancersales.com www.northerndancersales.com We pride our success on passion for the business, integrity, honor and truth. Our brands include Yummy Doh, Importations Papille, Galloni, Martelli Foods, Victory’s Kitchen and more. BOOTH #502 & 502A

✪ NORTHERN TRADE WORKS 15927 58th St. Edmonton, AB T5Y 2R5 T: (587) 987-0910 E: service@northerntradeworks.com www.northerntradeworks.com Space and category technology providers with real world knowledge from both the retailer and vendor perspectives. Experts on retail from store operations to integrated data. BOOTH #1802

N’TAKE ENVIRO PRODUCTS 615 Orwell St. Mississauga, ON L5A 2W4 T: (905) 272-2247 F: (905) 272-2247 E: s.mitchell@ntake.com www.ntake.com N’Take is Canada’s leading supplier of custom reusable enviro bags and totes. We use recycled materials and eco-friendly manufacturing methods for all our products. BOOTH #1215

NUTRIBITES 5292 272 St. Langley, BC V4W1S3 T: (778) 952-2926 E: Jordan@canature.ca www.NutriBites.ca NutriBites brings specialty products to the grocery channel focusing on single ingredient freeze-dried treats for dogs and cats. BOOTH #526

OLD DUTCH FOODS LTD. 100 Bentall St. Winnipeg, MB R2X 2Y5 T: (204) 632-0249 F: (204) 632-7016 E: consumercare@olddutchfoods.com www.olddutchfoods.ca

Old Dutch Foods is a national snack food company, manufacturing and distributing a full assortment of your favourite Old Dutch and Humpty Dumpty snacks. BOOTH #1408

OLISUR–OLIVOS DEL SUR S.A. 93 Forest Valley Cres. Dundas, ON L9H 0A7 T: (905) 464-7266 E: atyreman@cogeco.net Product of Chile: 100% estate grown, 100% extra virgin, non-GMO, gluten free, carbon neutral, acidity less 0.20%. Harvest to extraction less than two hours. BOOTH #924

ONTARIO CORN FED BEEF 25 Enterprise Dr. London, ON N6N 1A3 T: (905) 301-0137 E: john@ontariocornfedbeef.com www.ocfbeef.com Our high-quality beef is produced on Ontario family farms and is recognized around the world for its high-quality standards and award winning taste. BOOTH #741

ONTARIO PORK 655 Southgate Dr. Guelph, ON N1G 5G6 T: (519) 767-4600 F: (519) 829-1769 E: jeremy.yim@ontariopork.on.ca www.ontariopork.on.ca/retail Give consumers the confidence to know they’re buying tasty, nutritious Ontario pork. Our checkmark logo tells consumers your pork is premium quality and Ontario grown. BOOTH #1537

OZERY BAKERY 11 Director Crt. Vaughan, ON L4L 4S5 T: (905) 265-1143 E: jlewis@ozerybakery.com www.ozerybakery.com Ozery Bakery creates vegan bread and crackers across North America. We aim to make better for you bread that is healthier and delicious! BOOTH #1228

P.K. DOUGLASS INC. 1033 Jayson Crt. Mississauga, ON L4W 2P4 T: (416) 729-1002 F: (905) 624-3304 E: mclow@pkdouglass.com www.pkdouglass.com P.K. Douglass Inc. is your go-to source for margin building seasonal goods, toys, cleaning supplies, gift bags, bows, gift wrap and general merchandise. BOOTH #1403

#GICSHOW19 | DOWNLOAD SHOW APP

PANELA BAKING FACTORY 2768 Slough St. Mississauga, ON L4T 1G3 T: (647) 389-7870 E: panelafactory@gmail.com www.panelafactory.com Panela is a producer of fresh baked goods and confectionery products with the highest quality and made with fresh ingredients. BOOTH #1831

✪ PAN-OSTON

PO Box 267 660 Neil Dr. Peterborough, ON K9J 6Y8 T: (707) 748-4811 E: philip.golsby@panoston.ca www.panoston.ca Pan-Oston, representing Airwave, Southern Case Arts and Pan Oston under the umbrella brand Complete Retail Solutions. Innovative solutions that create results while reducing costs. BOOTH #1344

✪ PASTACO

5341 John Lucas Dr. Burlington, ON L7L 6A8 T: (416) 630-3635 E: Info@PastaCo.ca www.PastaCo.ca Since 1986, PastaCo has been preparing quality and authentic pastas and sauces, using only fresh and all natural ingredients, without using any additives or preservatives. BOOTH #1636

PAZ BAKERY 4403 Morrison St., Unit 2 Niagara Falls, ON L2E 2B4 T: (519) 820-0572 E: pazbakery.ca@gmail.com www.pazbakery.ca Producers of Cheese Dots, a frozen, bake at home, gluten-free cheese bread. Traditional Brazilian recipe. True Canadian ingredients. BOOTH #1730

PEAK PERFORMANCE PRODUCTS 330 Brunel Rd. Mississauga, ON L4Z 2C2 T: (416) 674-7325 E: info@pppinc.ca www.pppinc.ca We offer all natural health products, brain health products, vegan and high protein snacks, supplements, and keto-friendly products. BOOTH #513

PEMBERTONS & ASSOCIATES INC. 3610 Nashua Dr., Unit 1 Mississauga, ON L4V 1X9 T: (905) 678-8900 E: reginab@pemcom.com www.pemcom.com Established in 1930, Pembertons is dedicated to bringing the latest processing technology to the Canadian food processing industry. We provide solutions! BOOTH #1533

PEPSICO 5520 Explorer Dr. Mississauga, ON L4W 5L1 T: (416) 316-1695 F: (416) 316-1695 E: tobi@markiv.ca www.pepsico.ca Discover the new ‘better for you’ products that PepsiCo just launched in the market. But don’t worry, we still have our regular indulgent products! BOOTH #909

✪ PETE’S GLUTEN FREE

20-5390 Canotek Rd. Ottawa, ON K1J 1H8 T: (613) 695-9599 E: info@petesglutenfree.com www.PetesGlutenFree.ca Real food made with ingredients you can pronounce, 2/3 whole grains and seeds, made S.M.A.R.T. a healthy blend of Sorghum, Millet, Arrowroot, brown Rice, Tapioca. BOOTH #1838

PRAIRIE GIRL BAKERY Unit 106, 18 King St. E. Toronto, ON M5C 1C4 P: (416) 556-0225 E: orders@prairiegirlbakery.com www.prairiegirlbakery.com Six-pack frozen mini cupcakes that are gluten free, vegan and nut free, baked from top quality ingredients. BOOTH 1837

PRINTEX TRANSPARENT PACKAGING 3380 South Service Rd., Ste. 109 Burlington, ON L7N 3J5 T: (905) 632-8722 F: (905) 632-1458 E: info@ptpackaging.com www.ptpackaging.com We are the largest designer and manufacturer of clear plastic folding cartons in North America. Food Grade Certified. High-end graphics and effects. BOOTH #1312

PROCTER & GAMBLE INC. 4711 Yonge St. Toronto, ON M2N 6K8 T: (416) 730-4714 E: nazarec.tl@pg.com www.pg.com P&G has been doing business in Canada for more than 100 years. We are strongly committed to providing branded products and services of superior quality. BOOTH #625

PURITY LIFE HEALTH PRODUCTS LP 6 Commerce Cres. Acton, ON L7J 2X3 T: (519) 853-3511 E: order@puritylife.com www.puritylife.com Proud to be the leading distributor in Canada! With our three locations, we are able to supply over 7,000 stores Canada wide. BOOTH #1412

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GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

A WORLD OF OPPORTUNITIES MORE TRADE. MORE TASTES. MORE TRENDS. OCTOBER 22 & 23, 2019 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

QUAKER BAKERY BRANDS INC. 1207 N Mason St. Appleton, WI USA 54912 T: (920) 734-9206 E: jdhofmeister@quakerbakery.com www.quakerbakery.com Golden Home Ultra thin pizza crusts 12” regular, 12’ sprouted grain and 7” regular. Come to our booth for a free sample of these excellent crusts.

RENTEKNIK GROUP INC. 1122 International Blvd., Ste. 100 Burlington, ON L7L 6Z8 T: (905) 634-3888 E: administration@renteknikgroup.com www.renteknikgroup.com Featuring both ClimaCheck & Panoramic Power, with the utilization of realtime data collection to form part of the analysis and engineering components.

✪ RANA MEAL SOLUTIONS INC.

REVUO - CONSUMER MANAGEMENT PLATFORM 300 Supertest Rd., Unit 1 Toronto, ON M3J 2M2 T: (647) 569-2377 E: info@cbes.ca www.nosite.com The future of personal shopping AI based consumer management and advanced shopping platform. Combine shopping list with in-store consumer management and customized personalized advertising.

BOOTH #515

3700 Steeles Ave. W. Woodbridge, ON L4L8K8 T: (416) 951-8234 E: mmcalughlin@giovannirana.ca www.giovannirana.ca Italy’s favourite Filled Pasta is now available in Canada. Please visit our booth to sample our fresh pasta and take advantage of our show special. BOOTH #539

RAPID DOSE THERAPEUTICS 1121 Walker’s Line, Unit 3 Burlington, ON L7N 2G4 T: (416) 477-1052 E: sales@rapid-dose.com www.quickstrip.life QuickStrip™ is an oral thin dissolvable strip that delivers an active ingredient precisely and quickly into your bloodstream, by-passing the stomach and liver. BOOTH #1034

REDFROG ENTERPRISES LTD. 203 - 11945 95A Ave. Delta, BC V4C 3W1 T: (604) 587-9907 F: (866) 246-5657 E: redfrog_enterprises@yahoo.ca www.redfrogenterprises.com Redfrog Enterprises is an ethnic food producer, specializing in confectionery, snacks, sauces, frozen food, and ready-to-eat items. Stop by to sample our chips and crackers. BOOTH #1037

REIF ESTATE WINERY 15608 Niagara Parkway Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON L0S 1J0 T: (905) 468-7738 E: andrea@reifwinery.com www.reifwinery.com Reif Estate Winery is one of Niagaraon-the-Lake’s founding family wineries. It is home to some of the oldest vinifera vineyard plantings in Canada allowing us to consistently produce bold and complex wines. BOOTH #1728

✪ RELAXUS PRODUCTS

1590 Powell St. Vancouver, BC V5L 1H3 T: (800) 668-9876 F: (604) 879-0899 E: simon@relaxus.com www.relaxusonline.com Come see what’s new in health and wellness, general gift, and massage! Tons of great products to chose from, including attractive P.O.P displays. BOOTH #606

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BOOTH #833

BOOTH #406

RIVERSIDE NATURAL FOODS 2720 Steele’s Ave. W. Vaughan, ON L4K 4N5 T: (416) 360-8200 E: d.chanderpaul@madegoodfoods.com www.madegoodfoods.com/ca/ MadeGood® Granola Minis are organic, gluten free, Non-GMO project verified and contain the nutrients in one full serving of vegetables from six different sources. BOOTH #445A

✪ RIZOPIA FOOD

PRODUCTS INC. 55 Leek Cres. Richmond Hill, ON L4B 3Y2 T: (905) 709-8838 E: ivan@rizopia.com www.rizopia.com Before Rizopia, tasty gluten free pasta was simply a myth. Now, al dente rice pasta is a reality. This continues with our latest pulse pasta. BOOTH #1630

ROLL-A-SHADE 7240 Woodbine Ave., Ste. 215 Markham, ON L3R 1A4 T: (416) 639-1365 F: (416) 639-1366 E: paul.bruin@rollashade.com www.rollashade.ca Roll-A-Shade solutions will: lower energy costs, reduce heat gain and glare, protect perishable inventory and maximize advertising space. Visit our booth to learn more! BOOTH #435

ROTOBALE COMPACTION SOLUTIONS INC. 7232 Arthur Rd. #5 W. Kenilworth, ON N0G 2E0 T: (519) 323-3673 F: (519) 323-3816 E: info@rotobalecompaction.ca www.rotobalecompaction.com Rotobale is a Canadian manufacturer

of compactors and balers with over 50 years experience. We design custom recycling equipment solutions for grocery retailers installing across Canada. BOOTH #719

RTS RETAIL 1027 Industrial Place St. Clements, ON N0B 2M0 T: (800) 663-2803 E: dnorley@rtscompaniesinc.com www.rtsretail.com RTS Retail has a full line of convenience store and gas bar merchandising products and fixtures, as well as eCommerce essentials. BOOTH #1019

RUBIKLOUD TECHNOLOGIES INC. 207 Queens Quay W., Ste. 801 Toronto, ON M5J 1A7 T: (844) 782-4553 E: events@rubikloud.com www.rubikloud.ai Rubikloud is an artificial intelligence (AI) company that has created the world’s leading, cloud-native, machine learning platform for retail. BOOTH #427

RUST-OLEUM CANADA 200 Confederation Pkwy. Concord, ON L4K 4T8 T: (905) 532-1900 E: dwhaley@rustoleum.ca www.rustoleum.ca Specialty cleaning products that are safe to the environment. Specializing in tackling mould around the home. Krud Kutter, Mean Green and Concrobium. BOOTH #825

RYDING REGENCY MEAT PACKERS LTD. 70 Glen Scarlett Rd. Toronto, ON M6N 1P4 T: (416) 767-3343 F: (416) 766-9167 E: info@rydingregency.com www.rydingregency.com Ryding Regency Meat Packers Ltd. is a family-owned business dedicated to providing you with the best beef and veal products Canada has to offer. BOOTH #736

SALUMERIA IL TAGLIERE 16880 Centerville Creek Rd. Caledon, ON L7C 3B5 T: (905) 584-7458 E: info@iltagliere.ca www.iltagliere.ca Artisan producer of dry-cured traditional Italian pork products. All salumi products are made locally in Caledon, Ontario on a federally licensed plant. BOOTH #1638

SAMANALA NATURAL FOODS (PVT) LTD. No.01, Malwanegedara, Moonamaldeniya, North west, Sri Lanka 60218 T: (077) 346-8699 E: sales@samanalanaturalfoods.com

www.samanalanaturalfoods.com We manufacture a range of Organic Coconut Kernel products, tropical fruits, spices and herbs for the export market with food safety standards of ISO 22000. BOOTH #603

SAPADILLA SOAP COMPANY 2101 E Kemper Rd. Cincinnati, OH 45241 T: (289) 270-3370 E: info@sapadilla.com www.sapadilla.com Born in Vancouver, BC; Sapadilla Soap Co. makes nice little ecocleaners and soaps that do nice little things for you, your home and the earth. BOOTH #528

SAPRO TEMIZLIK URUNLERI SANAYI VE TICARET A.S. Ortakoy Mahallesi Ilter Bulvari No. 27 Silivri Istanbul, Turkey 34592 T: (514) 922-1906 E: yalginornek@sapro.com.tr www.sapro.com.tr/en Manufacturing of all types of wet wipes (baby wipes, flushable wipes, facial cleansing wipes, disinfecting cleaning wipes, car care wipes). Specialized in private label projects. BOOTH #534

SAPUTO DAIRY PRODUCTS CANADA GP 101 Royal Group Cres. Vaughan, ON L4H 1X9 T: (905) 266-8800 E: public.saputo@saputo.com www.saputo.com Manufacturer/distributor of a vast range of fluid/cultured dairy products and specialty cheeses. Some of our brands include Neilson, Milk2Go, Armstrong, Woolwich, AlexisdePortNeuf & Joyya. BOOTH #1009

SCHINKELS LEGACY 19 McGregor Place Chatham, ON N7M 2B2 T: (519) 351-0818 E: tim@schinkels.ca www.schinkels.ca Schinkel’s Legacy products are produced using tradition methods, including using only natural hardwood smoke, and are gluten and MSG free. BOOTH #1844

✪ SELLERS PUBLISHING

161 John Roberts Rd. South Portland, ME USA 4106 T: (207) 772-6833 F: (207) 772-6814 E: rsp@rsvp.com www.rsvp.com Sellers publishes RSVP®, Wicked Funny® and High Note® greeting cards, 200+ calendars, gift & trade books, and High Note® Premium Planners & Stationery. BOOTH #614

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2019 | GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM #GICShow19


A R E V O L U T I O N I N D I S P L AY S E C U R I T Y Quick and easy installation Compatible with existing store hooks (up to ¼” diameter)

U.S. and Canadian Patent Pending

Guards your product in 2 easy steps: Universal anti-theft device Does not compromise selling space

displaypeople.com

1. Push lever down to release a single product

Visit us at Booth 1705

2. Back lever guards the rest of the hook

1 800 410-0264 sales@displaypeople.com

MIMI FOODS INFO@MIMIFOODS.CA

ARTISTIC DOUGH PRODUCTS

VISIT BOOTH 1727 CUSTOM FORMULATIONS AVAILABLE: PARBAKED CRUSTS PIZZA BUNS

PIZZA DOUGH BALLS FLATBREADS FOCACCIA PANUOZZO BREAD


GROCERY GROCERY INNOVATIONS INNOVATIONS CANADA CANADA

A WORLD OF OPPORTUNITIES MORE TRADE. MORE TASTES. MORE TRENDS. OCTOBER 22 & 23, 2019 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

SHOPHERO 1881 W. 820 N. Provo, UT USA 84601 T: (855) 361-9525 E: billing@shophero.com www.shophero.com Grocery e-commerce is growing faster than anyone expected. Visit us to learn how you can offer online grocery ordering at your store. BOOTH #1003

SIR SOLUTIONS 3565 Jarry E., office 650 Montreal, QC H1Z 4K6 T: (514) 593-4760 E: infoventes@sirsolutions.com www.sirsolutions.com SIR Solutions provide retail businesses with a point of sale and management software, customized services and equipment that evolve according to their business growth. BOOTH #1313

✪ SMART SERVE ON

5407 Eglinton Ave. W. Ste. 105 Toronto, ON M9C 5K6 T: (416) 645-4517 E: info@smartserve.ca www.smartserve.ca Since 1995, Smart Serve® ON, has been developing and delivering responsible alcohol beverage sales & service training in the province of Ontario. BOOTH #1936

SMUCKER FOODS OF CANADA CORP. 80 Whitehall Dr. Markham, ON L3R 0P3 T: (905) 940-9600 F: (905) 940-5979 E: ben.white@jmsmucker.com www.smuckers.ca Smucker’s is proud to introduce new 1850 Coffee, Jif Dark Roast Peanut Butter, Nature’s Recipe Dog Treats, Milkbone Wonder Bones, and more! BOOTH #1319

SNAPPAY 4307 Village Crt. Mississauga, ON L4Z 1S2 T: (905) 279-1717 E: vivian.shen@snappay.ca www.snappay.ca SnapPay enables merchants to drive new revenue from consumers who want to pay using Alipay and WeChat Pay using strategic marketing solutions. BOOTH #1708

✪ SONORA FIRE GRILL LTD. 6-2011 Lawrence Ave. W. Toronto, ON M9N 3V3 T: (416) 875-7772 F: (416) 242-3246 E: Kulin@sonorafiregrill.ca www.sonorafiregrill.ca

Authentic Mexican and Tex Mex foods for retail box outlets, food service products. Manufacturing and distribution services. Lines include sauces, meats, tacos, burritos etc. BOOTH #419

SPEARHEAD ENTERPRISES 675 Development Dr. Kingston, ON K7M 4W6 T: (416) 770-1136 E: chuck@spearheadbeer.com www.spearheadbeer.com Spearhead Enterprise is a multidiscipline company that includes a sales agency representing Ontario’s top craft beer and cider. BOOTH #1813

✪ SPRUCEWOOD

HANDMADE COOKIE CO. 628 Ontario St. Cobourg, ON K9A 3C4 T: (905) 372-0707 F: (905) 372-1771 E: info@sprucewoodbrands.com www.sprucewoodbrands.com Artisan shortbread cookie-savoury/ cheddar & sweet flavours. Nut free, low sugar, all natural. Just five clean ingredients each flavour. Private label opportunities. HACCP Certified. BOOTH #1637

✪ SRP CANADA

60 Leek Cres., Unit 1 Richmond Hill, ON L4B 1H1 T: (800) 387-3323 F: (905) 947-9147 E: joe.botnick@srpcompanies.com www.srpcompanies.ca SRP is Canada’s leading marketer and distributor of quality, on-trend impulse products. With a coast-to-coast sales and merchandising team serving over 10K retail locations. BOOTH #402

SRI LANKA EXPORT DEVELOPMENT BOARD No 42, Navam Mawatha, Colombo 02, Colombo, Sri Lanka 200 T: (941) 123-0072 E: erandi@edb.gov.lk www.srilankabusiness.com 10 Sri Lankan exhibitors from sectors of spices, organic coconut kernel products (coconut oil, coconut spreads, coconut chips), confectioneries, Tea, and other processed foods. BOOTH #603

ST-ALBERT CHEESE CO-OPERATIVE INC. 150, rue St-Paul St-Albert, ON K0A 3C0 T: (613) 987-2872 E: karine.yelle@fromagestalbert.com www.fromagestalbert.com/?lang=en Winner of several awards over the years, St-Albert Cheese Co-operative is well known for producing cheeses, mostly cheddars, made from 100% pure Canadian milk. BOOTH #1628

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✪ STAR WHOLESALE

✪ THE BENEFIT AISLE

BOOTH #518

BOOTH #530

1430-246 Stewart Green SW Calgary, AB T3H 3C8 T: (403) 312-4969 E: bmarlow@starwholesaledsd.ca www.starwholesaledsd.ca Star Wholesale is a national DSD company that distributes food products as well as meat snacks, 100% rayon biodegradable compressed towels and paper straws.

✪ START-UPS CHOICE

6-425 Hespeler Rd. Cambridge, ON N1R 8J6 T: (416) 859-8651 E: info@startupschoice.com www.startupschoice.com/ start-ups-choice Provide sales & distribution support offer multi services: sales brokering, demos/merchandising/order taking, franchise opportunity, cannabis private label, marketing - Start-ups Choice Expo. BOOTH #1514

STATION COLD BREW COFFEE CO. 343 Horner Ave. Etobicoke, ON M8W 1Z6 T: (800) 987-4524 E: info@stationcoldbrew.com www.stationcoldbrew.com Since 2014 we’ve been handcrafting beverages that sit at the crossroads of quality and convenience, never sacrificing flavour for function. Fuel every moment, without compromise. BOOTH #1724

STM DISPLAY SALES INC. 2230 Meadowpine Blvd. Mississauga, ON L5N 6H6 T: (905) 814-5252 F: (905) 814-8147 E: info@stmdisplays.com www.stmdisplays.com STM Display Sales is your source for POP display/store fixture needs from steel shelving, slat wall, gondola systems, snap frames, hooks, to custom acrylics. BOOTH #1024

✪ SUNSHINE PICKLES

30043 Jane Rd. Thamesville, ON N0P 2K0 T: (519) 692-4416 F: (519) 692-5590 E: info@picklesplease.ca www.picklesplease.ca We offer Canadian grown and processed conventional and certified organic pickled products. Co-packing and private label opportunities as well. BOOTH #1744

TFB ASSOCIATES LIMITED 7300 Warden Ave. #210 Markham, ON L3R 9Z6 T: (905) 940-0889 E: customer.service@tfb.ca www.tfb.ca TFB & Associates is a privately owned importer and distributor of food, beverage and health care products to Canada.

1290 Cornwall Rd., Unit C Oakville, ON L6J 7W5 T: (905) 844-8820 E: info@thebenefitaisle.ca www.thebenefitaisle.ca Exclusive only to CFIG members. This pooled group benefits program is tailored specifically for this industry, offers members massive savings and on-going support. THE CANADIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF THE PHILIPPINES Unit 1406 Antel Corporate Center 121 Valero St., Salcedo Village Makati City, Philippines 1200 T: (632) 843-6466 F: (632) 843-6469 E: info@cancham.com.ph www.cancham.com.ph Our mission is to represent, support, and promote Canada-Philippines business interests through various organized events and activities. BOOTH #839

✪ THE CIDER KEG

1398 Vittoria Rd. Vittoria, ON N0E 1W0 T: (519) 426-0705 E: info@ciderkeg.com www.ciderkeg.com From our farm to your table - Fresh Apple, Mulled & Tart Cherry Cider, Non-alcoholic sparkling cider. Grown, pressed and bottled at our SQF faciltiy. BOOTH #1825

THE FRAUXMAGERIE ON GEORGIAN BAY 43 Helen Street, Unit B Meaford, ON N4L 1J9 T: (519) 538-0721 E: sales@thefrauxmagerie.com www.thefrauxmagerie.com Aged and fresh line of plant based frauxmage. BOOTH #1840

✪ THE GREAT

CANADIAN MEAT CO. 1390 Hopkins St. Whitby, ON L1N 2C3 P: (905) 666-9395 E: info@greatcanadianmeat.com Canada's premier maker of quality meat snacks. Our carefully selected ingredients are 100% Canadian and manufactured locally in Whitby, Ontario. Snack local! BOOTH #1824

✪ THE PLANT YYZ INC

399 Four Valley Dr. Unit 17 Vaughan, ON L4K5Y7 T: (647) 865-7985 E: info@theplantfoods.com www.theplantfoods.com Specializing in plant-based, fresh, fully cooked pasta meal kits and protein activated sauces and condiments. BOOTH #1639

BOOTH #1308

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2019 | GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

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TRADE SHOW & CONFERENCE TUESDAY, OCT. 22, 2019 CONFERENCE 8:00 AM – 11:00 AM TRADE SHOW 11:00 AM – 4:30 PM

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23, 2019 CONFERENCE 7:30 AM – 11:15 AM TRADE SHOW 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM

TRADITION JUICES 3333 rang du Cordon St-Jean-Baptiste, QC T: (450) 467-4744 F: (450) 467-4744 E: m.demers@vpj.ca www.vpj.ca Jodoin Orchards is an apple grower and packer and the manufacturer of Tradition Juices, San Perrio Sparkling Lemonades, Xavier Sparkling juices and Bennett’s Prune Nectars. BOOTH #425

TRAJECTORY BEVERAGE PARTNERS 435 North Service Rd. Oakville, ON L6M 4X8 T: (416) 571-2622 E: ptoms@diamondwines.com www.trajectorybeverages.com Trajectory Beverage Partners – wholly owned subsidiary of Diamond Estates Wine & Spirits, proudly represents a variety of popular Canadian and imported wines, beers and spirits. BOOTH #1702

TREE OF LIFE CANADA 6185 McLaughlin Rd. Mississauga, ON L5R 3W7 T: (905) 507-6161 F: (905) 507-2727 E: canada.sales@treeoflife.com www.treeoflife.ca The leading distributor of natural/ organic, specialty/ethnic, gourmet cheese, and growing in the frozen sector, Tree of Life has helped Canadians to “Live & Eat Well.” BOOTH #1108

TSS GROUP JAPAN 2-3-19 Deshio, Minami-ku Hiroshima, Japan 734-8585 T: (647) 621-2010 E: beyondthebounds.incorp@gmail.com TSS Group Japan will showcase unique Japanese foods and cookware, combining Japan’s outstanding craftsmanship with innovative technology. BOOTH #519

✪ UDDERLY RIDICULOUS INC.

906200 Township Rd. 12 Bright, ON N0J 1B0 T: (647) 888-0444 E: sales@udderlyridiculous.ca www.udderlyridiculous.ca Artisan Goat Milk Ice Cream in six gourmet flavours. An indulgent treat with added health benefits and digestible for lactose intolerant consumers. BOOTH #1739

UNILEVER CANADA 160 Bloor St. E. Toronto, ON M4W 3R2 T: (416) 415-3000 E: jessica.gizuk@unilever.com www.unilever.ca

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Unilever is one of the world’s leading consumer goods companies providing everyday needs for nutrition, hygiene, and personal care.

We manufacture and export organic and conventional value added coconut products which are dairy free, gluten free, vegan and non GMO.

UNIVERSITY OF GUELPH, CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION CAREER SERVICES AND EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING 50 Stone Rd. Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 T: (519) 824-4120 E: csteele@uoguelph.ca www.recruitguelph.ca/cecs Identified as Canada’s food university, for your hiring needs you’ll want to tap into the talent at University of Guelph. Drop by our booth!

WILLIWAW NATURAL PET TREATS 595 Oster Lane Concord, ON L4K 2B9 T: (905) 660-7213 E: williwawpettreats@gmail.com www.williwawtreats.ca Fresh ingredients, eco-friendly packaging, and a passionate team of dog lovers–We are WilliWaw.

BOOTH #711

BOOTH #1605

WALKER ENVIRONMENTAL 3700 Steeles Ave. W., Ste. 601 Woodbridge, ON L4L 8K8 T: (866) 946-6764 F: (877) 264-7273 E: customerservice@walkerind.com www.walkerind.com/ walker-environmental-group Walker Environmental is Canada’s largest provider of grease trap cleaning and maintenance, used cooking oil collection and organics recycling solutions. Materials collected generate renewable energy. BOOTH #1131

WESTON FOODS 1425 The Queensway Etobicoke, ON M8Z 1T3 T: (416) 252-7323 E: WestonFoodsCCC@WestonFoods.ca www.westonfoods.ca At Weston Foods, we are a leading North American bakery company with a specialized focus across all key bakery categories, including breads and sweet goods. BOOTH #525

WHITEWATER BREWING CO. 78 Pembroke St. Cobden, ON K0J 1K0 T: (613) 646-0005 E: thebreweryboys@whitewaterbeer.ca www.whitewaterbeer.ca Whitewater Brewing Company brews high-quality craft beer from locally sourced ingredients. The foundation of our company is built practicing sustainability & encouraging an active lifestyle. BOOTH #1811

WICHY PLANTATION COMPANY PVT LTD. 107 UDA Industrial Estate, Katuwana, Homagama, Sri Lanka, 10200 T: (011) 562-7521 F: (011) 289-1693 E: kushan@wichy.com www.wichy.com

BOOTH #603

✪ YELLOFRUIT

2869 Bloor St. W., Ste. 269 Toronto, ON M8X 1B3 T: (416) 902-6030 E: andrew@fro.ba www.yellofruit.com Yellofruit is a plant-based frozen banana dessert made from organic ingredients in our Canadian, peanut-free facility. BOOTH #1738

BOOTH #1625

WILLOWBROOK NURSERIES INC. 935 Victoria Ave. Fenwick, ON L0S 1C0 T: (800) 661-5237 F: (905) 892-3790 E: kevinv@willowbrooknurseries.com www.willowbrooknurseries.com Wholesale plant nursery growing flowering shrubs, evergreens, flowering vines, trees and perennials BOOTH #645

WORKPLACE SAFETY & PREVENTION SERVICES 5110 Creekbank Rd., Ste. 300 Mississauga, ON L4W 0A1 T: (905) 614-1400 F: (905) 614-1414 E: customercare@wsps.ca www.wsps.ca Workplace Safety & Prevention Services provides risk management solutions that drive small business success – health & safety expertise & solutions for creating healthy work environments. BOOTH #1133

YAWDI’S 111 Mammoth Hall Trail Scarborough, ON M1B 1P8 T: (647) 405-3769 E: vgeorge@yawdi.ca www.yawdi.ca Yawdi’s was established for true foodies at heart with a devotion to creating extraordinary artisan products that have been handcrafted to perfection! BOOTH #1736

✪ YEIN TRADING

& GLOBAL INC. 13744 Excelsior Dr. Santa Fe Springs, CA USA 90670 T: (562) 404-0377 E: info@chimexproduce.com www.visvitaglobal.com Visvita brand manufactures, exports, and distributes highest quality beverages including Aloe Vera drinks in two sizes and 11 natural flavors, Young coco water, Chia drink. BOOTH #408

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2019 | GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

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GROCERY GROCERY INNOVATIONS INNOVATIONS CANADA CANADA

A WORLD OF OPPORTUNITIES MORE TRADE. MORE TASTES. MORE TRENDS. OCTOBER 22 & 23, 2019 | TORONTO CONGRESS CENTRE GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

EXHIBITORS BY CATEGORY ADVERTISING/MEDIA/ MARKETING PROGRAMS

Canada Beef Canadian Cattlemen’s Association Canadian Grocer CF&R Services Inc. Colour Innovations/Raining Communications Dana Industries Distribution Canada Inc. (DCI) Eflyn Grocery Business Magazine HappyOrNot (Customer Experience Management) Ketchum Manufacturing Quaker Bakery Brands Inc. REVUO - Consumer Management Platform ShopHero SnapPay The Frauxmagerie on Georgian Bay Western Grocer Magazine

AUTOMATION SYSTEMS InCube Mobility Solutions Roll-A-Shade

BAGS

De Luxe Paper Polar Pak/Novolex HeyJute N’Take Enviro Products

BAKED GOODS: FRESH/ FROZEN/REFRIGERATED Adel Corp Bald Baker Bimbo Canada Cavendish Farms Ceylon Biscuits Limited Gala Bakery Inc. Hollandia Bakeries/ Good Food Company Ida’s Cookies Martin’s Famous Pastry Shoppe, Inc. Mother’s Pizza Parlour and Spaghetti House Mimi Food Products Inc. MIWE Canada Inc. Mountain Waffle Co. Northern Dancer Sales Ozery Bakery Panela Baking Factory Paz Bakery Pete’s Gluten Free Prairie Girl Bakery Quaker Bakery Brands Inc. Sprucewood Handmade Cookie Co. Start-Ups Choice Weston Foods

BEAUTY & PERSONAL CARE

Danial’s Distribution Inc. Procter & Gamble Inc. Relaxus Products Sapro Temizlik Urunleri Sanayi ve Ticaret A.S. Unilever Canada

Ace Hill Beer Amsterdam Brewery Arterra Wines Canada Carlsberg Canada Cowbell Brewing Co. Four Fathers Brewing Company H2 Craft Spirits & Radical Iconic Brewing Co. Lake of Bays Brewing Co. Road Brewing Co. Henderson Brewing Co. LCBO Muskoka Brewery Reif Estate Winery Smart Serve Ontario Spearhead Enterprises Trajectory Beverage Partners Whitewater Brewing Co.

BEVERAGES

A. Lassonde Inc. Acosta Advantage Solutions Ancient Nectars Bad Dad Tea Inc. Baytna Management Inc. Boshkung Brewing Co. Ltd. Carlsberg Canada Coca-Cola Ltd. Colour Innovations/Raining Communications Crazy D’s Prebiotic Soda Labs Ethical Bean Coffee Fentimans North America Future Enterprises Pte Ltd. GoodLife Group Inc. Grace Foods Canada Inc. H2 Craft Spirits & Radical Iconic Brewing Co. Kandrick Tea Beverages Lanka Road Brewing Co. Metro 360 Metta Tea Co. Molson Coors MoodWater Muskoka Brewery Natisa (42 Degrees Company Distributor) Nimbus Water Systems Inc. PepsiCo Smart Serve Ontario Snowery Station Cold Brew Coffee Co. TFB Associates Limited The Cider Keg Tradition Juices Tree of Life Canada Yein Trading & Global Inc.

BUYING GROUP

BARCODING EQUIPMENT/SYSTEMS Globe POS Systems

BEER/WINE/CIDER

Distribution Canada Inc. (DCI)

CANNABIS

CCI Rapid Dose Therapeutics

CARTS

Almac Industrial Systems

CHECKOUT EQUIPMENT Globe POS Systems Pan-Oston

CLEANING PRODUCTS HG Canada Rust-Oleum Canada

34

COFFEE & TEA

Bad Dad Tea Inc. Classic Touch Foods Ethical Bean Coffee Flora Manufacturing & Distributing Ltd. Food & Nature (Pvt) Ltd. Four O’Clock/Trans-Herb Inc. Future Enterprises Pte Ltd. Glory International Trade Inc. Kandrick Tea Beverages Lanka Kraft Heinz Canada Liva Foods Metta Tea Co. Natisa (42 Degrees Company Distributor) Nestle Canada Inc. Northern Dancer Sales Sri Lanka Export Development Board Smucker Foods of Canada Corp. TFB Associates Limited

COMMUNICATION SOLUTIONS

Lenbrook/Motorola Solutions

CONDIMENTS

Dots Snacks Get Sauced I-D Foods Corporation Kissan International (Canada) Inc. Northern Dancer Sales Start-Ups Choice TFB Associates Limited The Plant YYZ Inc. TSS Group Japan Yawdi’s

CONFECTIONERY

Advantage Solutions AGM Bakery Ceylon Biscuits Limited Glory International Trade Inc. Horse and Buggy Brands/ Golden Bon Bon Huer Foods Inc. Jayalanka Suppliers Leonidas Le Versant Rouge NAD Company Inc. Nestle Canada Inc. Panela Baking Factory Redfrog Enterprises Ltd.

CONSULTING SERVICES

Neale's Sweet N Nice Foods Inc. Saputo Dairy Products Canada GP St-Albert Cheese Co-operative Inc. Tree of Life Canada

DISPLAY CASES

Arneg Canada Coolio North America Dana Industries Dauphinais Inc. GBS Foodservice Equipment Inc. Hussmann Canada Inc. Marketing Impact Limited Muskoka Brewery

DISTRIBUTOR/WHOLESALE Brandt Meats CTS Foods Glory International Trade Inc. Horse and Buggy Brands/ Golden Bon Bon Igloo Refrigeration LTD Kissan International (Canada) Inc. Lenbrook/Motorola Solutions Leonidas Loblaws Inc. Natisa (42 Degrees Company Distributor) Northern Dancer Sales P.K. Douglass Inc. Pete’s Gluten Free Purity Life Health Products LP Quaker Bakery Brands Inc. Relaxus Products SRP Canada Star Wholesale Start-Ups Choice TFB Associates Limited The Frauxmagerie on Georgian Bay Willowbrook Nurseries Inc. Yein Trading & Global Inc.

E-COMMERCE ShopHero

ENGINEERING & OPERATIONAL EFFICIENCY Renteknik Group Inc.

ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES HeyJuteTM Jetvac Inc. Walker Environmental

CCI Food Distribution Guy Northern Trade Works The Benefit Aisle Workplace Safety & Prevention Services

FINANCIAL SERVICES

COUPON REDEMPTION SERVICES

FIXTURES: STORE

CF&R Services Inc.

DAIRY & EGGS

Burnbrae Farms Ltd. Egg Quality AssuranceTM Gay Lea Foods Co-operative Ltd. L.H. Gray & Son Limited Lactalis Canada London Ice Cream Co.

BDO Canada LLP Federated Insurance Company of Canada FMS Solutions The Benefit Aisle

Atlantic Stainless Fabricators Ltd Coolio North America Dana Industries FMF Storefixtures ImagineXsolutions authorized Metro Wire Dealer Pan-Oston Roll-A-Shade

FLOORING HG Canada

FOOD PREPARATION EQUIPMENT Atlantic Stainless Fabricators Ltd GBS Foodservice Equipment Inc. Heat Seal LLC Hobart Canada Igloo Refrigeration LTD McLaren Doors MIWE Canada Inc. Pembertons & Associates Inc.

FOODS: BABY

Nestle Canada Inc.

FOODS: CANNED Bedessee Imports Ltd. Campbell Company of Canada CanDisPro Corporation

FOODS: DELI

Brandt Meats CanDisPro Corporation CTS Foods Heidelberg Foods Ltd. Lakeview Farms Northern Dancer Sales Saputo Dairy Products Canada GP The Frauxmagerie on Georgian Bay Tree of Life Canada

FOODS: DRY

Advantage Solutions Bedessee Imports Ltd. Food Distribution Guy Fresh Is Best Salsa & Co. Future Enterprises Pte Ltd. General Mills Hollandia Bakeries/ Good Food Company Italpasta Ltd. Kissan International (Canada) Inc. NAD Company Inc. Northern Dancer Sales NutriBites Purity Life Health Products LP Rizopia Food Products Inc. Salumeria il Tagliere TFB Associates Limited Unilever Canada

FOODS: ETHNIC

Bedessee Imports Ltd. Canadian Wise Foods Cedar Valley Selections Dots Snacks Get Sauced Grace Foods Canada Inc. Future Enterprises Pte Ltd. Hollandia Bakeries/ Good Food Company Italpasta Ltd. Kissan International (Canada) Inc. M-C Dairy Northern Dancer Sales Olisur - Olivos Del Sur S.A. Rana Meal Solutions Inc. Redfrog Enterprises Ltd. Sonora Fire Grill Ltd. TFB Associates Limited Tree of Life Canada

GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2019 | GROCERYINNOVATIONS.COM

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TRADE SHOW & CONFERENCE TUESDAY, OCT. 22, 2019 CONFERENCE 8:00 AM – 11:00 AM TRADE SHOW 11:00 AM – 4:30 PM

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23, 2019 CONFERENCE 7:30 AM – 11:15 AM TRADE SHOW 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM

FOODS: FROZEN

McLean Meats/Boned Broth Mountain Waffle Co. NAD Company Inc. Neale's Sweet N Nice Foods Inc. Northern Dancer Sales PastaCo Riverside Natural Foods Rizopia Food Products Inc. Sprucewood Handmade Cookie Co. Samanala Natural Foods (Pvt) Ltd. St-Albert Cheese Co-operative Inc. Sunshine Pickles TFB Associates Limited The Frauxmagerie on Georgian Bay Udderly Ridiculous Inc. Wichy Plantation Company Pvt Ltd. WilliWaw Natural Pet Treats Yawdi’s Yellofruit

AGM Bakery Bedessee Imports Ltd. Boreal Berry Farm Burnbrae Farms Ltd. Cavendish Farms Gala Bakery Inc. Future Enterprises Pte Ltd. Happy Pops LivBon Inc. London Ice Cream Co. McLean Meats/Boned Broth Mimi Food Products Inc. Mother’s Pizza Parlour and Spaghetti House Mountain Waffle Co. Neale's Sweet N Nice Foods Inc. Nestle Canada Inc. Northern Dancer Sales PastaCo Paz Bakery Tree of Life Canada Udderly Ridiculous Inc. Unilever Canada Yellofruit

FOODS: HEALTH

FOODS: PREPARED

ActivPOP Crazy D’s Prebiotic Soda Labs Fauxmagerie Zengarry Food & Nature (Pvt) Ltd. GoodLife Group Inc. Happy Pops Hollandia Bakeries/ Good Food Company I-D Foods Corporation Liva Foods MadeGood Metro 360 Nestle Canada Inc. Northern Dancer Sales Prairie Girl Bakery Riverside Natural Foods Rizopia Food Products Inc. The Frauxmagerie on Georgian Bay Wichy Plantation Company Pvt Ltd.

FOODS: KOSHER

Hollandia Bakeries/ Good Food Company Jewels Under The Kilt M-C Dairy Northern Dancer Sales Riverside Natural Foods The Cider Keg

FOODS: NATURAL/ ORGANIC

ActivPOP Bad Dad Tea Inc. Boreal Berry Farm Cedar Valley Selections Dots Snacks Ethical Bean Coffee Fauxmagerie Zengarry Flora Manufacturing & Distributing Ltd. Food & Nature (Pvt) Ltd. Four O’Clock/Trans-Herb Inc. General Mills Grace Foods Canada Inc. Hero Nature Products (Pvt) Ltd. Huer Foods Inc. Olisur - Olivos Del Sur S.A. Jewels Under The Kilt L.H. Gray & Son Limited Lakeview Farms Le Versant Rouge Liva Foods MadeGood M-C Dairy

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Classic Touch Foods Fresh Is Best Salsa & Co. Italpasta Ltd. LivBon Inc. Kissan International (Canada) Inc. Kraft Heinz Canada Lakeview Farms Nature Knows-Ready to Eat Fresh Fruits & Vegetables Northern Dancer Sales PastaCo Sri Lanka Export Development Board The Plant YYZ Inc.

FOODS: SEAFOOD Kolapore Springs Tree of Life Canada

FOODS: SNACK

ActivPOP Adel Corp Bald Baker Baytna Management Inc. Bimbo Canada Campbell Company of Canada CanDisPro Corporation Food Distribution Guy Fresh Is Best Salsa & Co. Future Enterprises Pte Ltd. Happy Pops Heidelberg Foods Ltd. Hollandia Bakeries/ Good Food Company Horse and Buggy Brands/ Golden Bon Bon Ida’s Cookies Jewels Under The Kilt MadeGood Metro 360 Nature Knows-Ready to Eat Fresh Fruits & Vegetables Northern Dancer Sales Old Dutch Foods Ltd. Panela Baking Factory Peak Performance Products PepsiCo Purity Life Health Products LP Redfrog Enterprises Ltd. Riverside Natural Foods Sri Lanka Export Development Board Star Wholesale The Great Canadian Meat Co. WilliWaw Natural Pet Treats

FOODS: SPECIALTY

AGM Bakery Baytna Management Inc. Bedessee Imports Ltd. Cedar Valley Selections Fauxmagerie Zengarry Hollandia Bakeries/ Good Food Company I-D Foods Corporation Ida’s Cookies Kissan International (Canada) Inc. Leonidas Martin’s Famous Pastry Shoppe, Inc. Mimi Food Products Inc. Mother’s Pizza Parlour and Spaghetti House Northern Dancer Sales Olisur - Olivos Del Sur S.A. Prairie Girl Bakery Rana Meal Solutions Inc. Sunshine Pickles TFB Associates Limited The Frauxmagerie on Georgian Bay The Great Canadian Meat Co. The Plant YYZ Inc. Tree of Life Canada Yellofruit

FOODS: SPREADS

Bee Maid Honey Limited Kissan International (Canada) Inc. Le Versant Rouge LivBon Inc. Northern Dancer Sales Smucker Foods of Canada Corp. Yawdi’s

FOODSERVICE

Adel Corp Classic Touch Foods Dorfin Inc. Hollandia Bakeries/ Good Food Company Nature Knows-Ready to Eat Fresh Fruits & Vegetables Nimbus Water Systems Inc. Northern Dancer Sales Pete’s Gluten Free Sonora Fire Grill Ltd. Sprucewood Handmade Cookie Co.

FOODSERVICE EQUIPMENT

Almac Industrial Systems Dauphinais Inc. GBS Foodservice Equipment Inc. Heat Seal LLC Hobart Canada LivBon Inc. MIWE Canada Inc.

FRUITS/VEGETABLES

Boreal Berry Farm Nature Knows-Ready to Eat Fresh Fruits & Vegetables

GARDEN/FLORAL/ SEASONAL

Sellers Publishing Willowbrook Nurseries Inc. P.K. Douglass Inc.

HOME DELIVERY SERVICE Atripco Delivery Service Nature Knows-Ready to Eat Fresh Fruits & Vegetables

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HOUSEHOLD PRODUCTS

Cookina Inc. Dorfin Inc. Eco-Max (Prism Care Corporation) HG Canada Lotus Produce Bags P.K. Douglass Inc. Procter & Gamble Inc. Rust-Oleum Canada Sapadilla Soap Company Sapro Temizlik Urunleri Sanayi ve Ticaret A.S.

HOUSEWARES Cookina Inc.

HUMAN RESOURCES

University of Guelph, Co-operative Education Career Services and Experiential Learning

INSURANCE

The Benefit Aisle

IMPORT/EXPORT

Brandt Meats CTS Foods Jayalanka Suppliers Leonidas Northern Dancer Sales Sprucewood Handmade Cookie Co. SRP Canada TFB Associates Limited Yein Trading & Global Inc.

JUICES

Ancient Nectars The Cider Keg Tradition Juices TSS Group Japan

LABELLING & PRICING EQUIPMENT Digi Canada Inc. Globe POS Systems Ishida Canada Inc.

MATERIAL HANDLING & BACKROOM EQUIPMENT

Almac Industrial Systems Atlantic Stainless Fabricators Ltd FMF Storefixtures InCube Mobility Solutions Pembertons & Associates Inc. Rotobale Compaction Solutions Inc. RTS Retail

MEAL SOLUTIONS

Kraft Heinz Canada L.H. Gray & Son Limited Nature Knows-Ready to Eat Fresh Fruits & Vegetables

MEAT: BEEF

Artisan Farms Direct Ltd. Canada Beef Canadian Cattlemen’s Association Ontario Corn Fed Beef Ryding Regency Meat Packers Ltd.

MEAT: OTHER

Acosta Canadian Cattlemen’s Association Canadian Wise Foods Colour Innovations/ Raining Communications Heidelberg Foods Ltd.

MEAT: PORK

Maple Leaf Foods McLean Meats/Boned Broth Ontario Pork Ryding Regency Meat Packers Ltd. Salumeria il Tagliere

MEAT: POULTRY Maple Leaf Foods

MEAT PROCESSING

Canada Beef Ishida Canada Inc. Maple Leaf Foods Ontario Corn Fed Beef Pembertons & Associates Inc. Ryding Regency Meat Packers Ltd. Schinkels Legacy The Great Canadian Meat Co.

MONEY/CURRENCY HANDLING SYSTEMS Eflyn

NATURAL PRODUCTS

Crazy D’s Prebiotic Soda Labs Eco-Max (Prism Care Corporation) Crazy D’s Prebiotic Soda Labs GoodLife Group Inc. HeyJuteTM Hollandia Bakeries/ Good Food Company Iconic Brewing Co. Nature Knows-Ready to Eat Fresh Fruits & Vegetables Northern Dancer Sales NutriBites Peak Performance Products Relaxus Products Riverside Natural Foods Rust-Oleum Canada Sapadilla Soap Company Sprucewood Handmade Cookie Co. Station Cold Brew Coffee Co. TFB Associates Limited The Frauxmagerie on Georgian Bay Tradition Juices Udderly Ridiculous Inc. Willowbrook Nurseries Inc.

PACKAGING

Cookina Inc. Dana Industries De Luxe Paper - Polar Pak/ Novolex Digi Canada Inc. Egg Quality AssuranceTM Heat Seal LLC HeyJuteTM Ishida Canada Inc. Lotus Produce Bags Nature Knows-Ready to Eat Fresh Fruits & Vegetables Printex Transparent Packaging

PALLETS/SUPPLY CHAIN SOLUTIONS CHEP Canada Inc.

PAPER PRODUCTS

Acosta De Luxe Paper - Polar Pak/ Novolex Dorfin Inc. Kruger Products LP

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GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA

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PET FOOD & SUPPLIES

SPICES & FLAVOURINGS

Acosta NutriBites Smucker Foods of Canada Corp. WilliWaw Natural Pet Treats Danial’s Distribution Inc.

Bedessee Imports Ltd. Canadian Wise Foods Get Sauced Jayalanka Suppliers Kissan International (Canada) Inc. Sri Lanka Export Development Board Sonora Fire Grill Ltd.

PLANT PROTEIN

STATIONARY SUPPLIES

PHARMACEUTICALS: OTC

Maple Leaf Foods

STORE FURNISHINGS & DESIGN

Digi Canada Inc. Eflyn Ketchum Manufacturing Moneris SIR Solutions SnapPay STM Display Sales Inc.

FMF Storefixtures Northern Trade Works Roll-A-Shade RTS Retail

TECH/IT

PRIVATE LABEL

Coolio North America Eco-Max (Prism Care Corporation) Egg Quality AssuranceTM HeyJuteTM Hollandia Bakeries/ Good Food Company Huer Foods Inc. Lotus Produce Bags Nature Knows-Ready to Eat Fresh Fruits & Vegetables Northern Dancer Sales N’Take Enviro Products Ontario Corn Fed Beef Panela Baking Factory Relaxus Products Sapro Temizlik Urunleri Sanayi ve Ticaret A.S. Sprucewood Handmade Cookie Co. Station Cold Brew Coffee Co. Sunshine Pickles The Cider Keg Wichy Plantation Company Pvt Ltd.

RECYCLING/BALERS

Rotobale Compaction Solutions Inc.

REFRIGERATION

Arneg Canada Dauphinais Inc. GBS Foodservice Equipment Inc. Hobart Canada Ice Box Cool Co., Ltd. Igloo Refrigeration LTD Hussmann Canada Inc. Jetvac Inc. MIWE Canada Inc. Pan-Oston

ADP Canada Globe POS Systems InCube Mobility Solutions IQFoodChain JRTech Solutions REVUO - Consumer Management Platform Northern Trade Works Rubikloud Technologies Inc. ShopHero SnapPay

TOBACCO/TOBACCORELATED PRODUCTS/VAPE Juul Labs Canada

TRADE ASSOCIATION

Distribution Canada Inc. (DCI) International Dairy Deli Bakery Association The Canadian Chamber of Commerce of the Philippines Workplace Safety & Prevention Services

TRADE PUBLICATIONS Canadian Food & Grocery Guide Canadian Grocer Grocery Business Magazine Western Grocer Magazine International Dairy Deli Bakery Association

TRANSPORTATION

Atripco Delivery Service DTS Advance Logistics Inc. (Customs Broker, International Freight Forwarder, 3PL Solution & Distribution) McLaren Doors

VITAMINS & SUPPLEMENTS

RESEARCH, TRAINING & PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

International Dairy Deli Bakery Association Smart Serve Ontario (Certification Program)

SECURITY SYSTEMS & EQUIPMENT

Flora Manufacturing & Distributing Ltd. Peak Performance Products Rapid Dose Therapeutics

WASTE MANAGEMENT

Rotobale Compaction Solutions Inc. Walker Environmental

WATER

Marketing Impact Limited

SIGNAGE & GRAPHICS

#GICShow19

Workplace Safety & Prevention Services

Danial’s Distribution Inc. Sellers Publishing

POS SYSTEMS & EQUIPMENT

Ketchum Manufacturing

WORKPLACE HEALTH & SAFETY

Iconic Brewing Co. MoodWater Nestle Canada Inc. Nimbus Water Systems Inc.

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Profile for ensembleiq

Canadian Grocer September 2019  

Canadian Grocer September 2019