Enjoy Magazine: Northern California Living — August 2022

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NORTHERN CALIFORNIA

AU G U S T 2 0 2 2

ISSUE 191

WA N D E R LU S T time for an adventure

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contents Northern California Living

CALIFORNIA ADVENTURE DISTRICT 60 | Cooling Off in the California Adventure District

GOOD FINDS 41 | Vida Juice Bar in Red Bluff

GOOD TIMES 53 | Take a Trip to the Oregon Shakespeare Festival

IN EVERY ISSUE 17 | My Town: Michele Goedert 56 | Recipe: No-Hassle, No-Cook Gazpacho 63 | Downtown Details 64 | Enjoy the View: Chadwick Hufft 68 | What’s Cookin’: Cheesecakes Unlimited Feta Chicken Salad 74 | Giving Back: Shasta Land Trust

LOCALS 29 | Chef Pam’s Bella Cucina

AUGUST 2022 ISSUE 191

WANDERLUST

21

Time for an Adventure

19 | Three Shasta Wheelmen Vie for Top Mileage 22 | McCloud River Redband Trout 32 | Iruai Winery in Scott Valley 36 | Butte Artists Mural Association Sheds Light on Public Art 45 | Northern California Artist Lauren Forcella

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Photo by Kara Stewart

49 | Clary Rose Farms in Fort Jones


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Angela Mangrich (CA DRE Lic. # 02154038) Veronica Gibbons (CA DRE Lic. # 01973294) D.R. Horton is an Equal Housing Opportunity Builder. *D.R. Horton is America's largest new home builder by volume according to Builder Magazine. Images are representational only. Homes are subject to prior sale. Home and community information, including pricing, included features, terms, availability and amenities, are subject to change at any time without notice or obligation. Square footages are approximate. D.R. Horton CA2, Inc.: CA DRE License #01239752; Contractor’s License #750190.


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Simply the most advanced care in the region. When you or a loved one faces a serious health condition, access to advanced treatment can make all the difference. So it’s reassuring to know that the most advanced care in our region is provided at Dignity Health – Mercy Medical Center Redding, offering clinical distinctions that include: • The most advanced cardiac care with Stanford Medicine cardiac surgeons who treat patients locally • Shasta County’s only obstetrics services and neonatal intensive care unit • Comprehensive cancer care with a nurse navigator who guides patients every step of the way • Nationally recognized orthopedic and spine surgery program • Certification by the Joint Commission as a Primary Stroke Center • Highest level of trauma care from Glenn County north to the Oregon border At Mercy Medical Center Redding, we’re proud to have served as the region’s leader in care for generations. Learn more about what sets us apart at DignityHealth.org/MercyRedding.


The headquarters at Lema Ranch the Foundation’s hub The headquarters building at Lema Ranch is the hub of The McConnell Foundation — where half of its staff perform their daily work. Our philanthropy and priorities stretch through five counties in northern California and the countries of Nepal and Laos. The personnel who work in Accounting, Facilities, Human Resources, IT, Community Meetings, and Program Services – which includes Children, Youth & Education, Community Vitality, International, NatureBridge in Yosemite, Scholars & Sustainability – work together to carry out the mission and values of the Foundation. We are grateful to Leah McConnell who dedicated personal resources to design, build and maintain Lema Ranch for staff, board and guests. Now 25 years later, Lema Ranch and our philanthropy are being managed to be shared into perpetuity.

Photo Credit: Rob Vargas

Photo Credit: Jeannine Hendrickson

Celebrating

25

Years

The McConnell Foundation Helping build better communities through philanthropy


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Charlotte Bell A Shasta Lake Dinner Cruise for and two adult Shasta Caverns tours.

©2022 by Enjoy Magazine. All rights reserved. Reproductions without permission are strictly prohibited. Articles and advertisements in Enjoy Magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the management, employees, or freelance writers. Every effort is made to avoid errors, misspellings and omissions. If an error is found, please accept our sincere apologies and notify us of the mistake. The businesses, locations and people mentioned in our articles are solely determined by the editorial staff and are not influenced by advertising.

Marshall Clark Photo by Kara Stewart karastewartphotography.com

Enjoy and Enjoy the Store are trademarks of Enjoy, Inc.

AUGUST 2022

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editor’s note AUGUST 2022 MAYBE IT’S YOUR innate sense of adventure, or perhaps it’s just the desire to temporarily escape the North State’s stifling heat – either way, embrace your wanderlust! The California Adventure District’s numerous bodies of water couldn’t be more appealing than they are in the summertime, and we’ve collected some of our favorite places to cool off. The Oregon Shakespeare Festival is a lovely destination for a summer day, and you can enjoy Ashland’s trout-stocked lakes, abundant trails, imaginative dining options and wonderful wineries while you’re there. With each stage featuring a different play, there’s something for just about everyone. Or check out Iruai Winery in Scott Valley, which showcases alpinestyled wines and a staunch commitment to environmental kindness. The proprietors can’t wait to tell you more about the unique way in which their natural wine comes to be. Need some inspiration to stretch yourself? Look no further than the Shasta Wheelmen, which boasts several members who earned national acclaim for their performance in a recent bike challenge. If you’re inclined to preserve these magical moments, be sure to bring your camera, journal or canvas with you. Artist Lauren Forcella was drawn into her painting career thanks in part to a love of the outdoors, launched in early childhood when she enjoyed frequent backpacking trips into the Trinity Alps Wilderness Area. Perhaps your next adventure will lead to some new opportunities for creative expression. Wherever you may wander, Enjoy Northern California Living.

AUGUST 2022

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“The world is big and I want to have a good look at it before it gets dark.” —John Muir

AUGUST 2022

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MICHELE GOEDERT REALTOR

my town: blessed with choices

T

he My Town contributors who precede me no doubt called out the incredible number of amenities that the Redding area boasts: Excellent schools, little traffic, glorious weather, a world-class trail network, the landmark Cascade Theatre, the breathtaking Sundial Bridge and the oasis that is the arboretum, to name just a few. At the edges, we share with fox and fawn rolling hills that meet mountains, lakes, national forests and a national park. We are blessed with choices. You can browse the golden treasures of a King Tut exhibit at Turtle Bay Exploration Park or lose yourself at one of Whiskeytown Lake’s cloistered waterfalls, our very own jewels. You can delight in night skiing on the slopes of majestic Mt. Shasta or grab a bite and enjoy the band at the food truck hub in the Cultural District. You can take in a collegiate baseball game at historic Tiger Field on a hot summer’s night or drop a line in the cool waters of Clear Creek. People who grow up here are like the Sacramento River salmon that make the journey home to spawn. After living on both coasts, my husband and I returned to Redding to raise a family. Our sons are our greatest accomplishment and growing up in Redding served them well. They benefited from school choice in an area of distinguished public and charter schools where intra-district transfers are common. They knew our neighbors who, in turn, knew them by name. Nature and open space were our backyard, while lovely parks and well-appointed sporting fields were readily available. While the amenities seduce people to boomerang back or relocate here, the community compels them to stay. Sure, we have civic squabbles, but our lives are mostly quiet – until they’re not, and then we step up. Not so long ago, GoFundMe named Redding a Top 10 most generous community. It was evident during the Carr Fire when residents fed, housed, clothed, furnished and funded the multitudes who lost their homes. On Giving Tuesdays, donation records are regularly broken. Volunteer opportunities and volunteers abound here. I have met so many amazing people volunteering! Redding is where I have made wonderful memories, made best friends, married my high school sweetheart, launched a career and raised a family. I have never forgotten where I started. I will always be proud to call my town home. Photo by MC Hunter Photography

AUGUST 2022

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WANDERLUST

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BY RICHARD DUPERTUIS

5K FINISH T H R E E S H A S TA W H E E L M E N V I E F O R TO P M I L E AG E

LATE LAST SPRING, three competitive bicyclists rolled leisurely toward the finish line. Gary Nelson, Keith Elzner and Cindy Begbie took it easy because this was no race. The dozen or so fellow Shasta Wheelmen members following at their pace formed a procession of honor for the three ride leaders, who finished a contest not of speed, but distance. This was the last day of May, officially National Bike Month, and the final day to log miles in two concurrent competitions – one national, one international – and the results were all but in as the three ride leaders finished in Anderson River Park at a potluck celebration dinner. As they rolled in, dozens of club members roared their support with a chorus of cheers and woo-hoos. Truly a momentous effort, between May 1 and 31, Begbie rode her bicycle a total of 1,024 miles, aimed at taking first place in the national female category. Elzner cranked his to second place nationally in the male category with 3,204 miles, a leg-cramping average of more than 100 miles per day. Incredibly, Nelson dusted that with an IV-assisted 5,003 miles, nailing first place in both the national and international contests. To reach this lofty goal, Nelson tried to sleep six hours a night to ride 10 hours a day. “Just getting on the bike every day is a challenge,” he says. “Your mind is telling you you can’t do it. Your mind is telling you to go back to bed. I had to totally immerse myself to get through it all.”4 continued on page 20

Three Shasta Wheelmen lead a triumphant procession to the celebration potluck in Anderson River Park

Cindy Begbie, Gary Nelson and Keith Elzner

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“Just getting on the bike every day is a challenge,” he says. “Your mind is telling you you can’t do it. Your mind is telling you to go back to bed. I had to totally immerse myself to get through it all.” Gary Nelson with an IV-assisted 5,003 miles, nailing first place in both the national and international contests.

He mapped out a 20-mile route that wound through mostly Anderson neighborhoods and counted his laps, usually ending a day at eight or nine, or 160 to 180 miles. Every. Day. The 56-year-old, 5-foot-6, 150-pound cyclist became a 135-pound machine. To counter any possible damage to his body, he included his doctor’s office on his route and scheduled six appointments. “Three were just checkups, to see how I was doing,” he says. “The three others, they put an IV on me, an intravenous hydration pack. And potassium.” Nelson knows medical procedures well. He was in his 30s when he had to go on disability for nine herniated discs, after years of bending over eight hours a day welding sheet metal. He went on pain killers, then began to fade. “I was sitting in a chair, waiting to die,” he recalls. “Then one day I was walking to the mailbox, and this old guy goes riding by on a bicycle. I bought a $250 bike. On a bike, your back doesn’t twist. It’s beautiful for

me because it’s the only thing I can do without hurting myself.” Patty Shackleton, a Shasta Wheelmen board member, remembers the first time she saw Nelson ride with the club. “He showed up on a green comfort bike,” she says. “I motivated him to chase me up hills. Me, 15 years his senior. Pretty soon he got a new bike.” Impressed with his discipline and dedication to cycling, she nominated him to a leadership position in the club. “He has become a really stellar ride captain,” she says. “When we ride, he talks to everyone. He makes them feel included. He makes sure no one’s left behind. He tries to help everybody.” One of those he helped is this year’s second place national winner. When Elzner joined the club, Nelson took him under his wing. The younger rider credits his ride captain for keeping him on the road. Nelson and Elzner pedaled that 20-mile course together on many 10hour days. “If it wasn’t for Gary, I wouldn’t be riding,” Elzner says. Begbie, the third finisher, dismounted at the potluck in the park

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LIFE JACKETS SAVE LIVES Throughout the Summer season, pools, lakes, and rivers are popular destinations to have fun when escaping the heat. Swimming is one of life’s greatest pleasures. Be water safety aware so you can stay safe and enjoy the water at the same time, learning to swim means much more than learning strokes; it is learning water survival skills, water safety, and developing comfort in the water.

CHOOSING THE RIGHT LIFE JACKET: no matter what the water activity or life jacket style chosen, the most important thing is this: Remember to be responsible and ALWAYS wear a life jacket when boating and when needed to ensure safety while in or near water. Not all U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jackets perform the same way. Some will rotate a person so they are face up if they become unconscious and some will not, so check the label to be sure it is appropriate for your planned activities and the water conditions you expect to encounter; ensure it fits properly; and test its performance so you are comfortable with how it fits and functions. Infants and younger children should wear a U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jacket with both a collar for head support and a strap between the legs.

If a life jacket fits properly... • It will help keep your head above the water. • If it’s too big, the life jacket will ride up around your face. • If it’s too small, it will not be able to keep your body afloat. • Life jackets designed for adults will not work for children! Try it on for size! • Check the manufacturer’s label to ensure that the life jacket is a proper fit for your size and weight. • Make sure the jacket is properly fastened. • Hold your arms straight up over your head. • Ask a friend to grasp the tops of the arm openings and gently pull up. • Make sure there is no excess room above the openings and that the jacket does not ride up over your chin or face. • For the best fit, try the life jacket in shallow water under safe and supervised conditions. For more information on the new life jacket labels, please visit www.WearItLifeJacket.com.

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Photos courtesy of Shasta Wheelmen

believing her 1,024 miles had scored the national first place award, but later found out a faceless opponent had bested her by just 20 miles. Contestants track their standings online. Some cycling apps or devices allow a rider to upload their mileage manually, and not necessarily on the same day they ride. A bicycle-encouraging nonprofit called Love to Ride runs the national competition though their website and accepts uploads of miles ridden by the 31st for up to a day or two later. The international contest is similarly managed through an app called Strava and an online account. Though surprised by the final number, Begbie shows no disappointment. “I’m not that competitive,” she says. “I actually crept up to 1,000 miles without realizing it, because I didn’t know how to look up the stats.” She said she was just following Nelson’s encouragement. “Months ago, I had the stamina, but no speed. I wanted to leave the rides,” she recalls. “The club wouldn’t hear of it. Gary stuck with me. He will help anyone he sees who wants to know more.”

Nelson has announced he will pass on next year’s competition and instead will train Elzner, perhaps for the coveted international first place award. He’s made the same offer to Begbie. “I don’t know if that’s in my future,” she muses. “Love to Ride worked two-fold for me. I’m riding consistently and I’m training for a 545-mile ride coming next month.” Nelson says he’s rendered speechless by the support and praise he’s received from his bike club. “I wanted to create a little excitement,” he says. “I did better than I thought.”•

Richard DuPertuis is a Redding grandfather who writes. His stories and photographs have appeared in newspapers, magazines and online. He strives for immortality not by literary recognition, but through diet and exercise. He can be reached at dupertuis@snowcrest.net

Rancheria

According to the National Drowning Prevention Alliance, death and injury from drownings happen every day in domestic environments such as home pools, hot tubs, bathtubs, even buckets. They also happen in open water like oceans, lakes, rivers and streams. In the U.S., drowning takes an average of 3,500-4,000 lives per year. That is an average of 10 fatal drownings per day.

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WANDERLUST

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BY MEGAN PETERSON

FISH TALE Photos courtesy of California Department of Fish and Wildlife

Photo courtesy of Discover Siskiyou

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M C C LO U D R I V E R R E D B A N D T R O U T ONE OF THE MOST famous fish in the world comes from Siskiyou County’s scenic McCloud River. Identified as the McCloud River Redband Trout, this subspecies of rainbows is an inland trout that is native only to the upper McCloud watershed. But in the 19th century, their genetics made a global splash. “The history of the McCloud River spawning operations is intriguing,” explains Sam Plemons, a senior environmental scientist who worked with the McCloud River Redband Trout at the California

Department of Fish and Wildlife for nearly 15 years. “In 1872, the United States Fish Commissioner, Spencer Baird, tasked Livingston Stone, a prominent fish biologist, to go to the Pacific Coast in search of salmon eggs to supplement or support declining Atlantic salmon populations. Stone ended up on the McCloud River, approximately two miles upstream from the confluence with the Pit River, an area now inundated by Shasta Lake.” What soon followed was a makeshift salmon spawning operation at the site and the transport of salmon eggs back to the East Coast – often with mixed results. So, in 1879, Stone established a companion trout breeding station to also transport trout eggs. “They found that4 continued on page 24

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Photo courtesy of California Department of Fish and Wildlife

McCloud River rainbow trout are now the source of many rainbow trout populations throughout the world.

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trout were much more successful and became established in many of the waters they were stocked in, as opposed to salmon,” Plemons says. “McCloud River rainbow trout are now the source of many rainbow trout populations throughout the world.” According to Michael Dege, a senior environmental scientist responsible for wild trout with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, the McCloud River Redband Trout is a “showy little fish” and generally easy to identify. “It has a rather pronounced brick-red lateral stripe on it which may show up more with the spawning and the sexes, and they maintain their parr marks (dark vertical bars on their sides) as adults, whereas most rainbow trout only have them when they’re juveniles. Their fins can be white tipped with some coloration of a gold sheen or yellow to them at times and there’s some spotting that goes on which might emphasize some of these colors more.” Dege also gives a caveat. “What I tell people is with every stream you go to, you can catch a high degree of variability with this trout.” What makes the McCloud River Redband Trout a genetically distinct subspecies is the fact that it has been geographically isolated above the McCloud River’s impassable Middle Falls for thousands of years. Many types of trout (including most rainbows) are anadromous, meaning they migrate from fresh water out to the ocean until they swim back upstream to breed where they were born. But McCloud River Redband Trout don’t migrate, so they’ve evolved independently. “We don’t even find another native fish species in some of these headwaters so really it’s a pretty odd thing we have,” Dege says.4 continued on page 26

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Surprisingly, few people outside of the avid angling community know about the gem we have right here in our backyard. Conservation of these fish has been a collaborative project between the University of California at Davis and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife for more than 25 years. “The general objective is to identify where populations of McCloud River Redband Trout exist, because these are the core conservation populations that are integral to the continued persistence of the species,” explains Plemons. One of the biggest threats to the fish is the rapidly changing environment. Dege notes, “I would put them in the category of a key indicator species. Because of their biology, trout usually require cold, clean water. And the fact they live at about 4,000 to 4,500 feet, they’re very susceptible to climate change because that elevation is going to get less snow and more precipitation, and it’s going to come through the system much faster than the historic snowpack in the Sierras.” Plemons likewise emphasizes the unique nature of these fish and their pristine environment. “Surprisingly, few people outside of the avid angling community know about the gem we have right here in our backyard. If you’re up for a day or weekend of exploring, I would highly recommend visiting the upper McCloud River. In just an hour from Redding, you’re in the heart of McCloud River Redband Trout country, with its long and fascinating history.”

Photos courtesy of California Department of Fish and Wildlife

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For anglers ready to do some exploring, Plemons directs them to the Heritage Trout Challenge administered by the Heritage and Wild Trout Program. The challenge is to catch and document six different species or sub-species of native trout in their historic drainages – including the McCloud River Redband Trout. “The Heritage Trout Challenge is designed to recognize California’s native trout, highlight angling opportunities for them, and provide an avenue for interested stakeholders to become involved in their conservation and management,” explains Plemons. He also notes an additional perk. “Pursuing the challenge will take you to some of the most beautiful, remote, and scenic areas of California.”• Look for an upcoming presentation by Michael Dege this fall at the Mt. Shasta Sisson Museum & Hatchery in Mt. Shasta.

Megan Peterson has been a freelance storyteller for more than two decades, with writing credits ranging from National Geographic to the Sundance Channel. She also brings a background in marketing and audio tours, and has traveled and worked on six continents. Megan currently lives in Siskiyou County with her family and a menagerie of pets.



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delizioso LOCALS

BY CLAUDIA MOSBY

PHOTOS: MELINDA HUNTER

C H E F PA M ’ S B E L L A C U C I N A

BY THE AGE OF 3, Pam Buono was “making cookies, raviolis – the whole bit” with her great aunt. “I grew up in a traditional Sicilian household where we always had Sunday dinner,” says the founder of Chef Pam’s Bella Cucina. “I helped my mother and father cook.” By age 16, she was serving as a chef ’s apprentice at Boston’s prestigious Parker House Restaurant, where she spent six years developing her culinary skills. “This was before women were in the back of the house,” says Buono. “I mean, it’s a man’s business. It was rough.” To emphasize her point, she says she worked for three Gordon Ramsey-type chefs during those years. Not all men, however, were disparaging; her father and the neighbor across the street, who happened to be the executive chef at the Parker House, supported her culinary pursuits. The neighbor also ran a catering

business, and when he had a weekend event, he would ask her father what she was doing. “He knew I could handle it,” she says, “and he wanted me to help him cater.” Buono completed all of her academic work at the University of Massachusetts, but it would take several more years – following marriage, family and life in between – before she completed her formal culinary education. While teaching cooking classes at That Kitchen Place and offering private cooking lessons, Buono says her late husband encouraged her to get her degree. “When I started classes, my instructor said, ‘You could be teaching this,’ Buono recalls. “When I told him where I had apprenticed, he asked, ‘What are you doing here?’ She graduated from that culinary program in 2004.4 continued on page 30

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I want people - when they hear the name Bella Cocina - to feel a sense of family, heritage and cooking from the heart. Buono specializes in Mediterranean and Southern Sicilian Italian cuisine. Today she teaches cooking classes at Sizzles Kitchen in downtown Redding and continues to teach private in-home classes to small groups. “People are usually interested in learning how to make homemade pasta – ravioli, fettuccine, tortellini,” she says of the private class requests, “and there’s a big interest in learning how to make cannoli.” Gluten-free cooking classes and recipes, including those featuring pizza and pasta, are also available. In addition to Italian cuisine, Buono specializes in dishes of Syrian, Greek, Persian and Moroccan origin. Her three-hour classes include written recipes, a cultural presentation, information on spices and recipe longevity. Class participants can either engage in hands-on cooking or simply observe if they learn better by watching rather than doing in the moment. Buono travels to Sacramento a couple times a month to shop for specialty Italian ingredients and says finding Middle Eastern ingredients locally is similarly challenging. “I’ve had to change some of the recipes to make it easier for people to make them with substitutions,” she says. “I don’t like to order online, but sometimes I have to.” She cites Barberry as an example, which she describes as a small sour-tasting berry (think unsweetened cranberry) about the size of a currant that is used in traditional Iranian dishes. “There’s no substitute for that,” she says. “They’re either good or they’re dry, so ordering online is a gamble.”

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A recent catering event required the chef to prepare a popular Syrian cake recipe that called for orange blossom and rose waters, and saffron, all of which came from the specialty shops Buono sources from Sacramento. Though she once catered events for upwards of 50 people, these days she prefers to keep it small. “Twenty-five is about my max,” she says. This gives her time and space to make and package her marina and tomato-eggplant-olive sauces, Sicilian fig jam and Italian biscotti, which are sold through Sizzles Kitchen and online at chefpamsbellacucina.com. “Everybody’s into microwave stuff out of a box and fast food. I don’t want to eat that,” says Buono. “I want to prepare beautiful cuisine in a beautiful kitchen. I want people – when they hear the name Bella Cocina – to feel a sense of family, heritage and cooking from the heart.”• www.chefpamsbellacucina.com

Claudia Mosby is a Redding-based freelance writer. She is the founder and director of The Expressive Spirit, a wellness company in Mt. Shasta offering spiritual direction, arts and nature-based activities and consultancy for grief and loss.


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WANDERLUST

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elevated BY MEGAN PETERSON

I R U A I W I N E R Y I N S C OT T VA L L E Y

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“BACCHUS AMAT COLLES,” goes the Latin saying. Or, to put it in English: “Bacchus loves the hills.” Undoubtedly the Roman god of wine knew a thing or two about high-elevation grapes in the Alps, which are historically regarded as being smaller in size, possessing more flavor and color, and having a tougher skin. Now, winemaker Chad Westbrook Hinds and his wife and partner, Michelle Westbrook Hinds, are creating alpinestyled wines at their recently founded Iruai Winery in Scott Valley that sits at about 2,700 feet above sea level. “We are definitely one of the highest-elevation vineyards in California,” explains Michelle. Chad adds, “Whichever part of the Alps you’re in, you can find all sorts of different Chad and Michelle Westbrook Hinds • Photos courtesy of Iruai Winery types of wines, but the main thing is that you have a shorter window for which to get the grape ripe. So, like in Scott Valley, the winters and springs are much cooler and fall comes on earlier. I tend to think this makes the character of the grape much more interesting. In general, you get a fruit expression bookended by lots of natural acidity that imparts savory qualities and more earthiness.” Michelle’s roots in Scott Valley go back more than 150 years. “My family’s been here off and on since the Gold MAK E YO Ufor R college WAY R IOmet UN D S Rush. I moved away and A then Chad.” InI S K I YO U C O U N T Y O N T H E B U S Berkeley, Chad had already been experimenting with urban wineries, as well as his own acclaimed label Methode Sauvage. But in Scott Valley, the couple decided to roll the dice on a whole new experiment. “I’d say after years of getting entrenched in that world of trying to find more fun and unusual grapes to work with, it became really exciting to have the prospect of finding a place where it’s actually approachable to purchase land and do farming ourselves. That gives us the freedom to work with varieties that aren’t typically represented in California at large.” Michelle adds, “Scott Valley is also a place we have always come to recharge, and when we realized we could make it work to live here, we were excited for the opportunity to bring something we love to a place we love.”4 continued on page 34

“... I tend to think this makes the character of the grape much more interesting. In general, you get a fruit expression bookended by lots of natural acidity that imparts savory qualities and more earthiness.”

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“I would hope that the giant red wines would express an air of the wild that you wouldn’t necessarily see in the Willamette Valley where everything’s very cultivated and if you fly over it, you just see patchworks. Whereas hopefully if you fly over where we’re trying to plant, you see forests and us just hanging out on the edges.”

Photos courtesy of Iruai Winery

Loving the place also means exploring a deeper environmental vision. “I don’t know if Chad would call himself this, but he is kind of a natural pioneer. He likes to do things for himself and try new things,” explains Michelle. Chad agrees, proud of the permaculture methods and organic processes they are trying to employ in the production of their wines. And, by not trying to remove character or use additives, Chad tries to give the wines a strong sense of place. “I would hope that the giant red wines would express an air of the wild that you wouldn’t necessarily see in the Willamette Valley, where everything’s very cultivated and if you fly over it, you just see patchworks. Whereas hopefully if you fly over where we’re trying to plant, you see forests and us just hanging out on the edges.” At the vineyard, it’s easy to see this vision up close. “We’re doing our best to use a diversity of cover crops to hopefully help the grapes grow in ways that require less management and manipulation. And then you look beyond the vineyards and see the Marble Mountains.” But when it comes to what many connoisseurs call “terroir,” Chad believes there’s more than just the land in Scott Valley that’s adding character to his wine. “When people talk about terroir, you often think of soil and climate, but there’s also a social aspect to consider. Hanging out with a lot of people who raise cattle or sitting outside by a fire makes me want to also have some wines with a darker fruit expression and more tannin structure. So, recently we’ve been making a lot deeper and darker red wines than we used to make hanging out in restaurants and wine bars.” An “air of the wild” also truly encapsulates the fermenting process. “We make natural wine, as opposed to what they teach you in winemaking school. Which is, basically, you get grapes, you kill off any ambient yeast with sulfur. Then you temperature control them, wait for the right moment to add artificial yeast, add nutrients and enzymes. We go in the complete opposite direction and let the yeast that is already on the grapes do all the work. We are basically just shepherding the process along, trying to make sure nothing goes too awry. We also do some unusual things as well, like whole cluster fermentation where stems are included in the ferments, and fermenting white wine grapes on their skins, also called orange wine,” Chad says. For someone buying their first bottle of Iruai, Chad notes they have a variety of fuller-bodied reds, some whites and rosés for specific tastes, but he recommends starting with the aptly named Shasta-Cascade. “It’s a blend with all sorts of fun Alpine things in it, but there’s also Pinot Noir, and I feel like anybody can get on board with a pretty easy drinking, medium bodied red wine.”• Iruai Winery • www.iruaiwine.com Open by appointment only

Megan Peterson has been a freelance storyteller for more than two decades, with writing credits ranging from National Geographic to the Sundance Channel. She also brings a background in marketing and audio tours, and has traveled and worked on six continents. Megan currently lives in Siskiyou County with her family and a menagerie of pets.

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WANDERLUST

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BY KAYLA ANDERSON

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PHOTOS: SUNSHINE RUSH

BUTTE ARTISTS MURAL A S S O C I AT I O N S H E D S L I G H T ON PUBLIC ART

WHILE WALKING ALONG the streets of any major city, you may notice a colorful mural, sculpture or interesting public artwork that grabs your attention. Public art is rampant in Mexico, Los Angeles and other parts of the world; however, plenty of gorgeous, 24/7-accessible art is right here in the North State, too. During the pandemic when people were stuck at home, local artist Beatrice Richer noticed the creativity splashed upon local walls and wanted to understand the story behind the pieces. Originally from Montreal, Canada, Richer remembers skipping school one day to walk around and take in the art, and therefore thought to create a public art map like Montreal has. “There’s a huge mural culture out there and I had some general knowledge about it. I moved out to Oroville before the Camp Fire and noticed a lot of art, and thought it was a shame that I didn’t know who the artists were or what some of the art pieces meant,” Richer says. With a bit more time on her hands, Richer created a map of where people could find public art in Butte County and posted it to her newly formed Butte Artists Mural Association website. “Mural art is a big part of California and Mexico as well, and I thought I could bring that to a small town,” Richer says, adding that she studied art history and anthropology at Concordia University in Canada and learned more about the Chicano art scene in East LA and how it boomed in the 1960s. “SeizerOne in Chico is a good example of that” style of art, Richer says. As a self-proclaimed spontaneous person, Richer says she started building the mural map and then formed the Butte Artists Mural Association on a whim. “The art is already here, and being an artist myself, I’m the kind of person who likes to advocate for other artists,” she says. “I’m decent with computers and this was something I was able to do at home during COVID. I took a lot of pictures myself and Daniel Donnelly (an art instructor at Butte College) helped.”4 continued on page 38

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N THE WAL

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I WANT AN ART SCENE TO BE SOMETHING PEOPLE NATURALLY TAKE PART IN. 38

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ALWAYS SAY YOU CAN IND ART ANYWHERE

As well as being involved with the Chico Art Center, Donnelly was able to help Richer explain some of those pieces more in depth, and fill in the stories behind the Love mural on Humboldt and Park Avenue as well as the public art piece in Bidwell Park that pays homage to the town’s biking culture. “This is an ongoing project. It took me one or two months to pull together,” Richer says of the culmination of murals, public art pieces, sculptures and art galleries she knows about. More than 300 pieces are featured on the map. Richer believes social media makes it much easier to learn more about the art, too, as the Butte Artists Mural Association gives people an avenue to share information about what pieces are included in the map or who is currently working on a project. Richer is hoping to grow the Association to build something more cohesive, making it a way for professional artists to connect with those interested in art and create conversation about their public art pieces. “This is a pet project that’s rolling a little more. But it is special, getting to meet the volunteers face-to-face and learning more about the art and the artists behind them.” Richer also says she tries to put herself in the footsteps of people who don’t know a lot about art and bridge the gap. “I see a mural and wonder, ‘Who made that?’ and then try to find the story behind it. And there are others who admire a certain piece and want something like it on their walls, and they will ask me about it.” But her main goal is to have more art to amplify Northern California’s small towns’ spot on the map. She’s already coordinating with Tehama Creatives to make a map for art in Tehama County, and is in touch with some of the Tehama artists who happen to have a lot of art in Butte County. “I want to have more art on the walls, more non-art people interested in this, and build a more community approach to public art. This could be an avenue for artists to present themselves professionally, and in using their technique, inform people and educate. I always say you can find art anywhere. And if people are ever interested and want to pick up a paintbrush, they should reach out to me. We’re always interested in projects and ideas,” she says. “There’s no profit involved in doing this. I like it and want to know more about artists in this area. I want an art scene to be something people naturally take part in.” • Butte Artists Mural Association www.buttemurals.org

Kayla Anderson is a freelance writer, marketer and action sports enthusiast who grew up wakeboarding on Lake Shasta and learning to ski at Mt. Lassen. She holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Chico State University and loves to visit her parents in Redding.

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GOOD FINDS

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BY MELISSA MENDONCA

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PHOTOS: SUNSHINE RUSH

Vibrant Life V I DA J U I C E B A R I N R E D B LU F F

“It’s the best compliment I can get,” she says of her customer’s enthusiasm. “It’s warm and welcoming, a happy, safe space.”

THERE’S A VIBE that Yesenia Zaragoza strives for in her Vida Juice Bar in Red Bluff. Vida means “life” in Spanish and she knew she hit her mark when a customer exclaimed, “It’s like your heart exploded in here!” With its bright pink wall and Mexican décor, Vida proclaims not only Zaragoza’s pride in culture, but her commitment to a vibrant life through health and connection. “It’s the best compliment I can get,” she says of her customer’s enthusiasm. “It’s warm and welcoming, a happy, safe space.” Vida Juice Bar took life in July 2018 after Zaragoza realized, “There was nowhere in the community to get a juice, a real apple juice.” She’d been juicing at home for years, yet yearned for a place to stop by for juice when out in town with her toddler daughter, Emiliana, now 7. “I remember someone telling me, ‘No one juices in Red Bluff ’ and I thought, ‘I live in Red Bluff and I juice,’” she says. “It was trial and error to develop juices,” she says. “I started with a $50 juicer from Walmart. That’s what I could afford.” Six months into her venture, she found herself at JuiceCon. “It was my first time traveling by myself and I went to Miami. When I got there, I realized that these people were way more established,” she adds. “I thought, ‘This is way out of my league.’ But I embraced it and I learned. Now I have a $16,000 juicer.” With a juicer of this caliber, she serves cold pressed juices which are more efficient at extraction and have a shelf life of up to four days. The blends she creates are named after Spanish affirmations, including EnergiaEnergy (orange, apple, pineapple, ginger and cayenne), Fuerza-Strength (almond milk, banana, chia seeds, protein powder, coffee and peanut butter), and SentirFeel (mango, pineapple, spinach, kale and apple juice). “The classic orange and carrot takes people back to home,” she says of her customers from Mexico.4 continued on page 42

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“It’s a community that took me in well,” she says. “They’ve taken really good care of me.” “Growing up, it wasn’t always easy to embrace my culture,” she says of her immigrant roots. “As an adult, I fully embrace it. And I want to show it. I’m making up for all of the time I didn’t embrace who we are.” Zaragoza was raised in Washington state after immigrating with her parents and four other siblings from Mexico as a child. Any challenges she’s had as a businesswoman have been tempered by her family’s experience through immigration. “If two people with five kids who don’t know the language can make it, there’s no excuse,” she says of her own difficulties. “We make it work. There’s no other option, and that’s part of being a first-generation immigrant.” While fresh juice is often seen as trendy and expensive, Zaragoza has a core value to keep hers within reach of a wide variety of customers. “I want everybody to be able to afford them. I’m a single mom and I want moms to come in and get their kids a fresh juice.” When it’s apple season in Washington, her mom drives down with bushels of fresh apples. She also serves acai bowls, sandwiches and salads. The warmth and commitment to vibrant, inclusive living and business is honed not only by her immigrant experience, but by the pain and trauma of losing her father to suicide. He was the one who started Zaragoza juicing to help her eyes, and was her role model for a strong work ethic. “I have really bad eyesight and my dad swore carrot juice would fix it,” she says with a laugh. “That’s not the case.” Losing him rocked her world and yet galvanized her spirit of persistence. “I lost my dad to suicide, so this is my life,” she says. “Life still goes on. My logo has a silhouette of my parents.” Zaragoza says some of her most impactful moments as a business owner have been the conversations she’s had with guests. “We’ve created such a safe place where people open up. We have good energy with all the positive words. Life can suck, but it’s so good, too.” Zaragoza moved to the North State – first to Redding, then to Red Bluff – just a month after her father passed. Just as she strives to care for her customers, she says Red Bluff has given her plenty, as well. “It’s a community that took me in well,” she says. “They’ve taken really good care of me.” • Vida Juice Bar 124 South Jackson St., Suite A, Red Bluff Find them on Instagram

Melissa Mendonca is a graduate of San Francisco State and Tulane universities. She’s a lover of airports and road trips and believes in mentoring and service to create communities everyone can enjoy. Her favorite words are rebar, wanderlust and change.

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WANDERLUST

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BY JON LEWIS

a fine palette NORTHERN CALIFORNIA ARTIST LAUREN FORCELLA LAUREN FORCELLA was practically dragged into art at age 40, and nobody was more surprised than she was that a wealth of talent had been waiting for her to pick up a brush. “Oh my gosh! This is what I’m supposed to be doing,” she recalls thinking after putting paint to canvas at a San Rafael-based creative process workshop. Forcella had been focusing on her writing – a longtime passion of hers – when her friend finally convinced her to give painting a try. If nothing else, Forcella thought, she might be able to illustrate the children’s book she had just written. “I was transformed after the first time,” she says. “I had a latent talent I had no idea about. I knew my life would change right then.” Life did change, but not quite in the way she envisioned. Her thenhusband accepted a promotion to New Hampshire just as her workshop finished and the couple, with their four children, moved cross-country in the middle of winter. Amid the whirlwind (the family moved three times in the next six months), Forcella showed a new friend four of her first paintings. That friend promptly rented Forcella a studio and surprised her with the keys two days later. Forcella began painting in earnest, while also parenting her kids and finding time to earn a third-degree black belt in taekwondo. Writing continued to be a part of Forcella’s life and painting started to take a back seat when she launched Straight Talk Advice, a syndicated peer-to-peer advice column for teens. The column appeared in 24 newspapers, including the Redding Record Searchlight, and was in production from 2004 to 2016. But the urge to paint was just too strong and Forcella retired the column. “I said, ‘That’s it, this is what I’m going to do.’ Now it’s all about nature,” she says. That love of the outdoors started at an earl y age – 7 years old, to be precise – when her family moved to Lewiston. Living in a forested neighborhood of Bureau of Reclamation housing (construction of the Trinity Dam had recently been completed), Forcella fell in love with life in the woods.4 continued on page 46 Photo by Jon Lewis

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“I’m finding my true purpose now. Art is how I can share the emotional connection with the natural world…” She befriended Jeanne Gravette, whose father, Bob, took the young girls on backpacking trips into the Trinity Alps Wilderness Area. “We both felt cleansed from our ‘modern’ lives,” Forcella recalls. “We were both blown away by the way we felt, sleeping under the stars. The woods saved me. When I’m in nature, it’s an emotional time for me. When I was 14, I knew I was going to work for the Earth.” That inspiration became prophesy when Forcella earned a geology degree and worked for a spell as a hydrogeologist in Oregon. A self-taught artist, Forcella naturally adopted an impasto style of painting, applying generous swaths of oil paint with each brushstroke. Her painting sessions are often absorbing and intense, in the “premier coup” manner befitting a French impressionist with the goal of finishing a work in one sitting. “It lends directness,” she says. “It’s emotionally gripping.” Her earliest works were impressionistic landscapes done in acrylics; she added oil paints to her repertoire when she entered her “rose period” that produced large and deftly shaded depictions of roses, “the symbol of life and the divine feminine.” After a stint with mixed-media “dreamscapes,” Forcella used her oils to tell visual stories. These days, she’s back to nature. Forcella’s nature includes a lot of purple. “It’s a universal color. It’s in everything … all the shadows in nature. I have a lot of thoughts about purple,” she says. From her palette spring trees, rivers, mountains, flowers, oceans, trails and more. “I’m finding my true purpose now. Art is how I can share the emotional connection with the natural world,” she says, calling her mid-life transition to art a faith-based jump with the belief a parachute will manifest itself, “and it worked out.”•

“Lupine and Oaks” • Photo courtesy of Lauren Forcella

“River Sundown” • Photo courtesy of Lauren Forcella

Forcella’s artwork will be featured at the North Valley Art League’s Carter House Gallery, 48 Quartz Hill Road in Redding, from Aug. 3 to Aug. 27. A reception will be held from 5 to 7 pm Friday, Aug. 5. www.laurenforcella.com

Jon Lewis is a Redding-based writer with more than 40 years of experience. A longtime San Francisco Giants fan, his interests include golf, fishing and sharing stories about people, places and things. He can be reached at jonpaullewis@ gmail.com.

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Lauren Forcella’s “Ponderosa Pine” • Photo by Jessica Zettlemoyer


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WANDERLUST

|

BY MEGAN PETERSON

C L A R Y R O S E FA R M S IN FORT JONES

growing,

naturally

AT CLARY ROSE FARMS in Fort Jones, the mother-daughter duo of Katherine and Monica Chaplin have spent the last decade building a truly unique business centered around the intersection of farming, food and art. Organic in all senses of the word, they’ve evolved to include everything from herbs and animals to pottery and earthen building on the farm. “We came here in 2011 wanting to help with the local food movement here in Scott Valley. Our goal was to start building a community that enabled farmers, growers and crafters to be able to make money in the local economy,” explains Katherine Chaplin. This desire helped lead to the formation of the Etna Farmers Market as well as the on-site development of the farm itself, which now features several unique adobe and cob structures, as well as a pottery studio that produces one-of-a-kind pottery. “Monica started out as a natural builder, building houses out of clay. And so, when we got here, we thought, ‘What projects are we going to do?’ Our vision was to have workshops here where we could share knowledge so one of the first things we did was build a cob oven. It turned out to be incredible and encourage a lot of people locally to build their own earthen ovens. But once you do one earth building project, you have to do another. Eventually this drove us to pottery, which is basically creating art from the earth.” The name “Clary Rose” comes from a combination of middle names. “My middle name is Rose and Monica’s middle name is Claire. It’s also the name of an herb,” Katherine says. The duo started making perfume together about 15 years ago before purchasing the historic Marlahan Ranch. ”We got started on the farm in 2011 and the pottery started about six years ago,” Chaplin explains. Herbs are still one of the many things grown on the garden, along with a variety of fruit, vegetables and flowers. “The grapes and the raspberries have done well here, so those are some of our mainstays in the summer. We also have a salsa garden, peppers, tomatillos, tomatoes and eggplants. It’s been a lot of adapting and figuring out what people really want and what’s reasonable to grow in this climate that doesn’t take so much water that it’s not worth growing. For instance, we don’t grow string beans because they take so much water.” Monica adds, “It’s also about finding things that grow naturally and just want to grow in abundance. Lemon balm, lavender, rosemary and sage are all things that have done well and come back4 continued on page 51

Photos courtesy of Clary Rose Farms AUGUST 2022

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FISHING TRADITIONS START HERE! Cool off! We are 10 degrees cooler than Redding.

Mary Smith Campground 100 boat slips Patio/fishing boat rentals 80 RV sites Bait shop Free fishing advice

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RELIVE THE

90S!

Photos courtesy of Clary Rose Farms

each year. That means we don’t have to worry about the planting every year, so a lot of the upfront labor costs kind of get dealt with. That helps with how much labor you’re going to put in each season.” The evolving nature of the farm has created an oasis that is inviting to birds and people alike. “I see the garden as a work of art and so everything has to look pretty,” Katherine says. “We don’t grow long rows of the same thing and it’s all very organic looking and a little bit overgrown. A Virgo would have a hard time in the garden because there aren’t perfect rows with bark trails.” The pottery studio is also attached to a passive solar chicken house, which Monica describes in detail. “We decided to build this chicken coop when we first moved here because there was such a shortage of food for the bears that they came down and wiped out all the chicken coops nearby. So, we built these walls that are almost two feet thick of straw and cob. And then it just kind of morphed into a greenhouse and then a pottery studio.” Faced with drought and COVID for the last two years, mother and daughter have had to adapt themselves, pivoting to some offerings online, as well as investigating new types of farming. They speak over each other with excitement as they describe their research. “We’ve been looking into dry land farming like in the Middle East and how they create these incredible gardens with less water than we have. One of the things we learned is that they don’t do raised beds. They dig a big ditch and then they’ll plant a lot of different layers into that so all the water flows down into the lower part, which is obviously what water does naturally.” But it’s Katherine who sums up the whole endeavor concisely. “We’re experimenting all the time. A lot of times everything just totally goes belly up, but sometimes it turns out better than expected. There are a lot of mistakes, but it’s always a learning experience. Just like everything, right? But, I can say it keeps things interesting.” •

‘S END OF SUMMER

PARTY

Sunday Sept. 4

BUY TICKETS NOW

To learn about where to purchase produce or pottery, visit the Etna farmers market on Saturdays throughout the summer or email Clary Rose at claryrosepottery@gmail.com

Megan Peterson has been a freelance storyteller for more than two decades, with writing credits ranging from National Geographic to the Sundance Channel. She also brings a background in marketing and audio tours, and has traveled and worked on six continents. Megan currently lives in Siskiyou County with her family and a menagerie of pets.

AUGUST 2022

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Fact-Based News & Music With Heart Rhythm & News News from NPR, JPR and music from emerging artists. • Shasta County – 89.7 FM • Siskiyou County – Mt. Shasta 88.1 FM Yreka 89.3 FM

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GOOD TIMES

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BY LINCOLN KAYE

Staging a Comeback TA K E A T R I P T O T H E O R E G O N S H A K E S P E A R E F E S T I VA L

How I Learned What I Learned • Photo by Jenny Graham

DRIVING UP INTERSTATE 5 from Northern California, signs of resurgence abound after the past two years of wildfires and lockdowns: bright wildflowers amidst the blackened tree trunks and a steady stream of California cars headed for “near abroad” tourist attractions.

Prime among these has always been the Oregon Shakespeare Festival in Ashland. Just a couple of hours’ scenic drive from Redding, the festival offers world-class theatre at affordable prices, with tickets selling for $35 to $75 under a newly streamlined reservation system. All4 continued on page 54 AUGUST 2022

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Unseen • Photo by Jenny Graham

“O, wonder! How many goodly creatures are there here! How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world, That has such people in’t!” — William Shakespeare, The Tempest

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this in a quaint college town nestled amidst trout-stocked lakes, hilly hiking/biking/ bridle trails, gourmet dining and prizewinning wineries. Now rounding out its 87th year, the Oregon Shakespeare Festival’s repertoire ranges from cutting-edge world premieres to new takes on old classics, “black-box” experiments to hum-along musicals, stand-up monologues to lavish Shakespearean extravaganzas. With three state-of-the-art stage venues plus scores of unionized actors and technicians to support, the festival has been hard-hit by recent closures. Yet, as Shakespeare himself says (in “Henry VI Part III”), “Wise men ne’er sit and wail their loss but cheerily seek how to redress their harms.” So Artistic Director Nataki Garrett has mapped out 2022 as the festival’s comeback season, with seven fresh live-stage productions plus edgy online offerings. Aptly enough, the season kicked off in June with five very different plays united by the “comeback” theme of resilience. Coming back from the very verge of death, war photographer Mia, protagonist of ArabAmerican playwright Mona Mansour’s one-act psychodrama “unseen,” is plucked unconscious from a Syrian battlefield. She wakes up, amnesiac, in her ex-lover’s Istanbul flat. Through a series of dreams, flashbacks and soul-searching dialogues, she overcomes PTSD to recollect her own suppressed act of heroic witness – a storyline all too salient in

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this era of renewed wartime trauma and frontline photojournalism. With an all-female cast of three (to play seven roles), “unseen” uses video projections, musical montages and lightning costume changes to steer the audience through its phantasmagoric narrative. The impact is heightened by the intimacy of its venue, the 270-seat “black box” Thomas Theater. By way of contrast, the Oregon Shakespeare Festival staged another comeback drama – “The Tempest,” its Shakespearean seasonopener – in its grandest venue, the 1,200-seat outdoor Elizabethan stage. Modeled on Shakespeare’s own Globe Theatre, the Elizabethan offers director Nicholas Avila a baroque array of balconies, ramps, runways and trap doors (plus ultra-modern sound, lighting and projection systems) for a bombastic Tempest full of FX wizardry. It’s a retro production that stresses the straightforward retributive storyline rather than the more nuanced dreamtime dimensions or the subtleties of Shakespeare’s language. But the show is briskly paced, with slapstick clownery, gratifying come-uppances and dewy young love – so what’s not to like? On alternate nights, the Elizabethan stage is given over to a drastically different tale of resilience – “Revenge Song,” a manga-themed take on the amours of a cross-dressing 17th century French opera diva. The 2022 season’s other musical – “Once On This Island” – boils down to the same


resilient story arc, but pitched in the far gentler idiom of creole rhythms and Caribbean pastel hues. It’s a retelling of Hans Christian Anderson’s Little Mermaid fairytale, recast against a backdrop of Haiti’s “colorist” caste system with a presiding pantheon of Voodoo demiurges. Linchpin of the show is the central Mermaid character, Ti Moune. She’s played by Ashland neophyte Ciera Dawn, a polymath who acts, dances or sings with equal aplomb, ably supported by a 16-member cast, all playing multiple roles. So much talent makes for a snug fit onto the thrust-stage of the festival’s mid-sized (600-seat) Bowmer Theater. Yet on alternate days, the same stage is filled to bursting by the solo talent of a single actor, Stephen Anthony Jones, playing the late auteur August Wilson in “How I Learned What I Learned.” In an uninterrupted 105-minute monologue, Jones presents us an old man wryly recalling the vagaries of a young man inventing himself as an artist and as a Black American male in 1960s Pittsburgh.

Wilson is best known for his 10-play Pittsburgh Cycle, a decade-by-decade chronicle of 20th century Black experience in his hometown. But, rounding on his 60s and having completed the Cycle, he set his course on a more free-form “stand up” raconteurial style. Wilson himself performed the first iterations of “How I Learned” before his untimely death in 2005. Director Tim Bond, who brought many of the Cycle plays to the Oregon Shakespeare Festival stage over the years, says he’s now “thrilled” to collaborate with dramaturg Costanza Romero, Wilson’s widow, on this 2022 Ashland revival.• Oregon Shakespeare Festival • www.osfashland.org

Lincoln Kaye has been reporting for half a century, first on U.S dailies, next as a merchant banker in London, then as a foreign correspondent in Asia for 20 years, and finally as a forest fire lookout in the Shasta-Trinity National Forest. He now divides his time between Canada and NorCal.

OSF Elizabethan by Kim Budd

The Tempest • Photo by Jenny Graham

Once on This Island • Photo by Jenny Graham

AUGUST 2022

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RECIPE

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BY TERRY OLSON

soup’s

— COLD— N O - H A S S L E , N O - C O O K G A Z PA C H O

WHAT DO YOU DO when it’s hot enough to fry an egg on the sidewalk and you are craving soup? The last thing you want to do is turn on the oven or spend more than 15 minutes in the kitchen. It’s time for gazpacho – a refreshing, healthy and delicious cold soup that originated in southern Spain. Gazpacho really is more of a drink than a soup. Depending on the ingredients and how you make it, it’s a cross between a soup, a salsa and a smoothie. The first time I enjoyed gazpacho I called it “liquid salad.” There are so many different ways to prepare gazpacho – based on region, chunkiness, vegetable-based, fruit-based and so on. But there is one universal truth of this delicious concoction: It is the perfect meal when it is just too darn hot to cook. Gazpacho also takes advantage of the season because all the vegetables, fruits and herbs are fresh and abundant in the summer. No matter what type of gazpacho you desire, finding the ingredients in the produce section – or your backyard garden – should be a snap. Not only is gazpacho easy to make, but it is also fun to say. Go ahead and let those three

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syllables roll out of your mouth: Guhz-PAHchow. No one knows the exact origin of the word or what it means. Spain was controlled by the Ottoman Empire from the 8th and 15th century, so some scholars claim the word comes from an Arabic language. Some say the word derives from the Hebrew word Gazaz, which loosely translates to “break in little pieces.” Others believe it comes from the Latin word Caspa, which means “fragments or little pieces.” Over the years, I have made cantaloupe gazpacho for an appetizer, a tomato gazpacho for a main course and a watermelon gazpacho for dessert. All are easy to make and perfect on these hot summer nights. You can make gazpacho days in advance – in fact, if it sits in the fridge for a day or two, the flavors coalesce and it tastes even better! On a blistering hot day, serve your family a refreshing gazpacho with sourdough bread. If you want to add some protein, arrange a few precooked shrimps on top of the bowl. This recipe has zero fat and only 60 calories per serving! •


NO-HASSLE, NO-COOK GAZPACHO Servings: 6 Prep Time: 15 minutes Chilling Time: 30 minutes Total Time: 45 minutes

INGREDIENTS • 1 cup finely chopped English cucumber • 1 cup finely chopped bell pepper (any color will do) • 6 whole Roma tomatoes seeded and finely chopped • ¼ cup minced red onion • 1 T minced jalapeño • 1 large garlic clove minced • ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro • 2 T lime juice • 2 T apple cider vinegar • 1 T Worcestershire sauce • 4 cups tomato juice • 1 tsp. salt • 1 tsp. ground pepper • 1 tsp. hot sauce

INSTRUCTIONS Step 1: In a large bowl, toss together the cucumber, bell pepper, tomato, onion, jalapeño, garlic and cilantro. Step 2: Add the lime juice, zest, apple cider vinegar, Worcestershire sauce and tomato juice to the bowl. Stir to combine. Step 3: Season with salt and pepper. Stir in the hot sauce. Step 4: Cover and chill for at least 30 minutes. (You can make this recipe up to three days in advance. Store in airtight container and refrigerate until ready to serve.) Step 5: Serve chilled or at room temperature.

Terry Olson loves culinary arts, adult beverages and hiking in the North State wilderness. You may find him soaking up the scenery at one of our area’s many state or national parks or sitting in a barstool sipping a cold locally brewed craft beer.

AUGUST 2022

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JOIN THE 9 IN 10 BEER

DRINKERS WHO PLAN AHEAD FOR

A SAFE RIDE

HOME

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CALIFORNIA ADVENTURE DISTRICT

|

BY NIGEL SKEET

Playing it Cool CO O L I N G O F F I N T H E C A L I FO R N I A A DV E N T U R E D I ST R I C T WITH SUMMER in full swing, the desire to cool down, especially in a body of water, becomes a natural draw. Luckily the California Adventure District has many choices, even with this year’s drought. Water levels are lower than normal, but they are still accessible and enjoyable for a day out. Here are some of the top spots in California Adventure District:

1. The Pacific Ocean: 3 hours from Redding. The Northern California beaches in Del Norte, Humboldt and Mendocino counties span a combined 320 miles of epic adventures. For example, the Lost Coast Trail is a well-known 25-mile hike along the ocean’s edge with a guaranteed outcome of “wow, that was amazing, and cold.” If you would like to get on the ocean itself, take some kayaking lessons at Kayak Trinidad, or if you just want to cool off, there is a plethora of beaches where you can just sit and do nothing.

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2: Lassen Volcanic National Park: 50 minutes from Redding. Snow in summer? Yes, even here in sweltering Northern California you can still experience some snow, but you have to travel to find it. Lassen often has snow at the higher elevations and in the more shaded areas of the national park that get less direct sunlight. Escape the heat and go throw some snowballs! Call the park ahead of time to check conditions and to inquire if there is indeed snow on the ground. 3: Trinity Lake: 20 minutes from Weaverville. Trinity Lake is an artificial lake in the middle of the wilderness and is the perfect spot to spend a couple days away from it all. The water is quite low this year but it is still a wonderful place to unplug and unwind for a couple of days. 4: Manzanita Lake, Lassen Volcanic National Park: 50 minutes from Redding. When it gets in the triple digits in Redding, it’s refreshing to head up to the backside of Lassen Peak and play in the remaining snow, if it’s still there, and spend a day or two, or three, at Manzanita Lake. Manzanita Lake offers spectacular views and is the perfect spot for camping, swimming, kayaking and paddleboarding. For the kids, there are ranger-led programs throughout the season and there is plenty to do for everyone. 5: Whiskeytown Lake: 15 minutes from Redding. With a myriad of trails and situated in what feels like a valley, Whiskeytown Lake is the perfect spot to spend the whole day with friends and family, cooling off in the summer heat. The lake itself is easily used for swimming, paddleboarding and sailing, and there are some great spots for jumping off the cliffs into the water. Brandy Creek Beach at Whiskeytown is a local favorite, but there are many little alcoves around the shore that double as private beaches.

6: Heart Lake and Castle Lake: 20 minutes from Mt. Shasta. Mt. Shasta is a beautiful area to go to cool off in the summer. The increased elevation helps, of course, and there are some fantastic bodies of water to hang out and play in. Besides Lake Siskiyou, which is the big one close to town, Heart and Castle lakes are two local favorites. Heart Lake is an easy spot to get to, only 10 miles southwest of Mt. Shasta, and it offers an incredible day out. The views are spectacular and the water is fresh, perfect for swimming or kayaking. Heart Lake is quite small and it does get busy, so get there early if you want to find a good spot for the day. There are no services at Heart Lake, so bring food and supplies. Castle Lake is quite a bit bigger than Heart Lake and offers a similar experience – it’s a spectacular setting, easy to get to and is a fantastic spot to spend the day in the water. • www.CaliforniaAdventureDistrict.com

AUGUST 2022

Nigel Skeet is originally from England. He moved to Redding 11 years ago after living in Los Angeles for 25 years. As a creative partner with the firm U! Creative and with an extensive background in photography and marketing, Nigel is committed to elevating the global presence of Northern California.

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SEPTEMBER 23 & 24,

2022

MOTHER HIPS JOE CRAVEN & THE SOMETIMERS RAINBOW GIRLS  STEVE POLTZ

ANDRE THIERRY  AJ LEE & BLUE SUMMIT COFFIS BROTHERS  BROTHERS REED MEGAN SLANKARD & THE WRECKAGE  BIG RICHARD WOLF JETT  HATTIE & THE MOON HOWLERS VERONICA MAY & THE MAGNETICS ROBBIE SCHAEFER  JONATHAN FOSTER SOUL PUNCH  A DYAR SITUATION  ONE SOL DANGER KITTY  ALLISON AND VICTOR ANNA JAE WITH MUMBLEFINGER SCAN HERE TO BUY TICKETS THE STONE HEARTS  HONEYBEE ANNIE COTY  ACROSS THE GRAIN TWO DAYS, 3 STAGES, 20+ PERFORMANCES DOWNTOWN REDDING, CA @reddingrootsrevival


WHAT’S HAPPENING

DOWNTOWN DETAILS THANK YOU FOR SUPPORTING DOWNTOWN REDDING BUSINESSES. A pocket park is a small park accessible to the general public. While the locations, elements and uses of pocket parks vary considerably, the common defining characteristic is its small size. Typically, a pocket park occupies a single lot and is smaller than one acre. They are frequently created on small, irregular pieces of public or private land. Unlike larger parks, pocket parks are sometimes designed to be fenced and locked when not in use. Pocket parks can serve as focal points of activity and interest in downtowns. Common elements often include greenery and small areas with benches, markers, or art installations. Pocket parks provide communities with a place to sit and rest, and they are an ecological foothold for urban wildlife. Despite their small footprint, pocket parks can dramatically enhance the quality of life of their surrounding communities. They can increase a neighborhood’s aesthetic appeal and shape a distinct, positive visual identity for a city as a whole. The creation of pocket parks encourages public participation and residential collaboration toward a meaningful long-term improvement to the community. Through this community organization, the development of pocket parks promotes grassroots planning and strengthens relationships between residents and the city. In turn, this community participation can foster community pride and empower residents to tackle additional neighborhood improvement projects.

The Art Hunger develops artistic and cultural events, designed to be a catalyst to nurture and showcase the arts community in Northern California. The Art Hunger Summer Gallery is back at the IOOF Hall in Downtown this summer. Having a consistent home in the hall has increased visibility for mature and developing artists, enhanced the Redding Cultural District and activated an important corner in Downtown Redding.

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BY VIVA DOWNTOWN AND THE ENJOY TEAM

DOWNTOWN BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT Superb Skate Shop Rob and Haylee Givens wanted

to have a place for the skating community to gather and feel at home, so late last year they opened Superb Skate Shop. Rob has been a skateboarder since he was a preteen and says skateboarding gave him something positive to do and thinks it probably saved his life. He shares his knowledge of the sport with kids and adults alike. Not only does Superb Skate Shop sell skateboards, they offer apparel and skateboard related items. They also have fun events.

1350 Tehama St. • (530) 338-2226

Superb Skate Shop owner Rob Givens

Downtown Barbers Inc. Owners Ezequiel Gomez and Javier Alvarez opened their shop downtown in early 2021. They are the masters of fades and offer haircuts, shaves, beard trims, line ups and eyebrow trims. They run a clean shop, and they’re professional and welcoming. The shop has the look and feel of an old-fashioned barbershop. They take pride in their work, their attention to detail is on point and they are great listeners and conversationalists. You’ll leave there looking and feeling like your best self. 1327 Tehama St. • (530) 560-5500 • Book online using Booksy

Join Art Hunger at its upcoming shows: Blockbusters: An Art Show About Movies August 5th - 27th Art Show Opening: Friday, August 5 Viva El Pop! September 2nd - 30th Art Show Opening: Friday September 2

Downtown Barbers Inc. owners Ezequiel Gomez and Javier Alvarez

For more information visit www.thearthunger.com AUGUST 2022

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ENJOY THE VIEW

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BY CHADWICK HUFFT

www.EnjoyMagazine.com AUGUST 2022


CRYSTAL CREEK FALLS

Chadwick Hufft has lived in Northern California all of his life. His love for wildlife and landscape photography led him to buy his first camera at age 13. He is currently 17, and beginning college classes in photography and graphic design. Find more of his work on Instagram, @chadwickhufft_photo.

AUGUST 2022

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WHAT’S COOKIN’ | RECIPE AND PHOTO BY CHEESECAKES UNLIMITED

CHEESECAKES UNLIMITED FETA CHICKEN SALAD

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AU G U S T 2 0 2 2 R E C I P E

One of the toughest decisions a person can make in the summer is which salad to enjoy at Cheesecakes Unlimited. Fortunately, their chefs have shared the recipe for their Feta Chicken Salad, one of the most popular on their menu, and one that’s easy to make at home. Enjoy!

INGREDIENTS:

DIRECTIONS:

2 oz. feta cheese

Combine all ingredients in a bowl. Finish with a

2 oz. diced tomatoes

dressing of garlic basil vinaigrette, made with

2 oz. diced cucumber 2 oz. sliced red onion 2 oz. sunflower seeds

balsamic pesto, olive oil, red wine vinegar, salt and pepper to taste. Serves one.

Full head of lettuce – romaine, red, green or sweet butter lettuces (basic spring mix) 4 oz. chicken

Recipe courtesy of:

LOVE OUR RECIPES?

Come into Enjoy the Store in Redding each month and ask for your FREE recipe card.

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Can you detect self-neglect? Self-neglect happens when older people no longer take care of themselves well. The behavior is usually unintentional. Seniors may not recognize these signs – but you can. Check in on loved ones, friends and neighbors.

Watch for warnings:

• Self-isolation or isolation caused by others • Lack of adequate food, water • Dirty clothing or hygiene • Unusually messy home, or a change in previous tidiness • Lack of medication or medical aids; Untreated medical conditions

If an elder or dependent adult needs help,

Call Shasta County Adult Protective Services

(530) 225-5798 24-hour hotline. Don’t wait to help someone in need.

• Unpaid bills, eviction notices or utilities shut off

Adult Protective Services, a program of Shasta County Health and Human Services Agency, provides assistance to elderly and dependent adults.


—— discover R ed Bluff —— SHOP LOCAL

of CHERYL A. FORBES

* SHOP

RED BLUFF Cheerful Sunflower Decor & Gifts at

Estate Planning, Wills and Trusts, Probate and Trust Administration 349 Pine Street • P.O. Box 1009 Red Bluff, California, 96080

TEL (530) 527-7500

Cheryl@AttorneyCherylForbes.com

Estate Planning For Future Generations

Accents!

It's back to school time. Have a safe and fun return!

•Automatic refills •Refill ordering 24/7 via phone or email •Free delivery •Free mailing of prescriptions

Elmore has sweet gift ideas and, always free gift wrapping!

650 Main Street Downtown, Red Bluff | 530.690.2655

elmorepharmacy.com • 401 Walnut St., Red Bluff (530) 527-4636 • Find us on

Fine Jewelry, Lapidary, and Museum

Mon.-Fri. 9am-5pm 78 Belle Mill Rd. (530) 527-6166


—— discover R ed Bluff —— ★

ROUND •UP• SALOON Quite literally,

A COOL PLACE TO BE! Since 1971, we’ve been meeting by accident! Don’t let the dog days of summer get you down! We always have your family in mind at Gary’s Auto Body.

530.529.Ouch

529-(6824)

Se habla español 13548 Trinity Avenue, Red Bluff

Come down and enjoy our mister system on the patio. Pine Dog plays every Wednesday during street market!

610 Washington Street 530.527.9901

Not just a bar... but a fun place to be!

BBQ Tri tip Every Friday!

COME BY EVERY FRIDAY FOR A&R’S AWARD-WINNING RED BLUFF BARBECUE!

A&R CUSTOM BUTCHERING RETAIL MEATS & DELI

TRAEGER AND A&R GO HAND IN HAND! COME CHECK OUT THE TRAEGER PRODUCTS IN STORE. We are an Authorized Repair Center

1055 Main St. Red Bluff

530.527.6483


—— discover R ed Bluff —— TRG Excavation

F O R A L L YO U R E XC AVAT I O N N E ED S!

• Brush clearing • Demolition • Septics

• Defensible Space • Site development • Private road maintenance • Build driveways and roads

FF U L B D E R ’S B BO SION TRANSMISiS nce 1987... Serving

years! Red Bluff for over 30

3 (530) 529-449

WE RE FLASH AND REPROGRAM COMPUTER SYSTEMS. WE’RE OPEN. WE’VE BEEN HERE 30 YEARS AND WE WILL BE HERE 30 MORE!

Lic. #967399

Family owned and operated by Tom & Stephenie Gregory (530) 347-5866 • info@trgearth.com • trgearth.com Redding * Anderson * Cottonwood * Red Bluff

440 Antelope Blvd. #6

Red Bluff

bobsperformancetrans.com

SEE US FOR YOUR STREET ROD PROJECT HELP.

Reynolds Ranch & Farm Supply

33rd

ANNIVERSARY by Farmers Best Feeds PARTY Sponsored

August 13, 2022 at Reynolds Ranch and Farm Supply 501 Madison St. Red Bluff (530) 527-1622

Reps on hand • Giveaways • Door prizes Hot Dogs and Drinks support Red Bluff Little League, food provided by Farmers!

Come join us as we celebrate!


GIVING BACK | BY CLAUDIA MOSBY

this land S H A S TA L A N D T R U S T THIS MONTH, Enjoy spoke with Paul Vienneau, executive director of the Shasta Land Trust, about its role in environmental stewardship and land conservation within the region. ENJOY: How do you describe Shasta Land Trust? VIENNEAU: The Shasta Land Trust is a community nonprofit that believes in protecting what makes Shasta County so special. This includes our vibrant agriculture, open space, public recreation, wildlife and amazing habitats across our local streams, rivers and lakes. ENJOY: What are the geographic boundaries of the lands protected by Shasta Land Trust? VIENNEAU: Since 1998, we have worked within Shasta County, but we are not specifically limited to that border. ENJOY: The website features an impressive list of protected properties, an eclectic mix of ranches, preserves, park lands and even a gun club. Why were these different types of lands chosen?

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VIENNEAU: A large focus since our beginning has been working with willing landowners who believe in the benefits associated with protecting their land. While our properties may seem different, they all contain special conservation values that make them worth protecting. For example, the gun club property contains a small nonprofit that operates on a protected property ripe with habitat and open space value. The similarity amongst them all is the importance they provide to our community.

ENJOY: What environmental features are particularly notable about the Pit River Tribal lands?

ENJOY: What is the Trust’s current land conservation project?

ENJOY: What do you want readers to know about land conservation and environmental stewardship?

VIENNEAU: We are working to wrap up seven new conservation easement projects across Shasta County. One special project is the return of the Pit River Tribe’s ancestral lands in the Hat Creek/Fall River area. With the transfer of ownership from PG&E to the Pit River Tribe, these lands will once again be managed in line with the Tribe’s cultural and historical practices. We are helping guarantee that the land once occupied by the Pit River Tribe is once again managed with its historical importance in mind. We’ve built strong relationships with the Tribe and look forward to working with them long into the future as they once again retain ownership of these special places.

www.EnjoyMagazine.com AUGUST 2022

VIENNEAU: The area (Hat Creek Watershed) includes a mixture of annual grasslands, wet meadows, chaparral and different forest types. Ponderosa pine, native oak and gray pine forests are foraging and breeding grounds for the acorn woodpecker, western gray squirrel, black bear and mule deer, among other wildlife.

VIENNEAU: The most important thing is recognizing that the natural world we are surrounded by here in Shasta County is not a forever guarantee. We must work hard to make sure the outdoor places we love are protected if we want them to be there for the next generation. Land conservation allows for this future to be possible. • Shasta Land Trust www.shastalandtrust.org

Claudia Mosby is a Redding-based freelance writer. She is the founder and director of The Expressive Spirit, a wellness company in Mt. Shasta offering spiritual direction, arts and nature-based activities and consultancy for grief and loss.


M. D. musically driven I am what you might call a local product. After graduating from Enterprise High, I attended Shasta College, earning an A.A. degree in Medicine. My time at Shasta prepared me to transfer to UC Davis and ultimately receive my M.D. degree from the USC School of Medicine. Then, my wife and I returned to Redding for my Medicine Residency and started my medical practice with Redding Family Medical Group. My practice and I aged together for 40 years. Reflecting on my life, I can say that Shasta College played a significant role in how it all played out. Growing up in a rural town, a person has an uphill battle in getting an education and pursuing a career. However, I was blessed with some exemplary instructors at Shasta College who inspired me to pursue a medical career. When I was at Shasta, it was a troubling time for America. The Vietnam war was on the decline, and Shasta was a safe place for returning veterans. I attended class with many veterans and knew how important Shasta College was in their lives.

David Shasta College Knight

I participated in the band classes at Shasta, and when I returned in the ‘80s, I joined the Shasta College Community Band with Dr. Larry Grandy. I have enjoyed playing in many musical groups with the college since then. Looking back, I always have felt that going to Shasta College was one of the best decisions in my life. Besides an excellent education, I grew up a lot, got a sense of direction and some confidence to follow it, and I even met my wife there!

ShastaCollege.edu/apply or call… www.shastacollege.edu Shasta College is an equal opportunity educator and employer.

530 242-7650


1261 Market Street Redding, CA 96001