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The Journal of Dewitt Clinton Thomas: A Voice from the Grave

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VOL. I, NO. 43

PSJA North Thespians Named State Theatre Champions

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 2018

Summer Nights At Historic Museum Return By Popolar Demand

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STDOI RECEIVES $3.6 MILLION FROM NIH FOR FATTY LIVER RESEARCH

NATIONAL PREVENTION WEEK 2018 PG.7

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Wednesday, May 16, 2018

GEORGE F. WILL WASHINGTON -- The path to today’s problems with Iran passed through the University of Chicago squash court where on Dec. 2, 1942, for 4.5 minutes physicist Enrico Fermi, making calculations on a slide rule, achieved the controlled release of energy from an atomic nucleus. Historian Richard Rhodes says that Fermi and his colleagues were risking “a small Chernobyl in the midst of a crowded city.” Humanity was already on the path to the dangerous present in 1918 when the British physicist Ernest Rutherford, who was criticized for missing a meeting about anti-submarine warfare, said, “I have been engaged in experiments which suggest that the atom can be artificially disintegrated. If this is true, it is of far greater importance than a war.” So, when wondering about what can be done about Iran’s nuclear-weapons aspirations -- and North Korea’s nuclear-weapons facts -- remember this: Some advocates of the Iran nuclear agreement thought its purpose was to block “all of Iran’s pathways to a bomb,” which was Barack Obama’s formulation when his goal was to dismantle the infrastructure of Iran’s program. Other advocates of the deal thought it was prudent to pretend to think this. The realistic purpose, however, was the more modest one of making the “pathways” longer and steeper, in the hope that internal Iranian ferments would begin to make that nation less menacing by the time it began to make nuclear weapons. Although much sophistication has

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After Nixing The Iran Nuclear Deal, Is Containment Our Only Option? been added over the decades, the basic recipe for building nuclear weapons comes from the 1940s, and for ballistic missile technology from the 1950s. The Soviet Union was an almost prostrate nation with a shattered society when, just 51 months after the guns fell silent on V-E Day (May 8, 1945), it detonated its first nuclear weapon in August 1949. China was an almost entirely peasant society, with a population of 694 million (about half of today’s), when in 1964 it detonated a nuclear weapon. In 1998, Pakistan, with a per capita income of $470, acquired such weapons. Nuclear nonproliferation efforts have been more effective than seemed possible 60 years ago. During the 1960 presidential campaign, John F. Kennedy cited “indications” that by 1964 there would be “10, 15 or 20” nuclear powers. As president, he said that by 1975 there might be 20 such powers. Today, sanctions can increase the price Iran pays for attempting to acquire nuclear weapons; Israel can assassinate scientists working in Iran’s nuclear program. If, however, Iran wants such weapons as intensely as its decades of costly efforts suggest, it will get them. It is a law of arms control: Significant agreements are impossible until they are unimportant, which means until they are not significant. If Denmark wanted nuclear weapons, we would consider that nation daft but not dangerous. Iran’s regime is malevolent, but there are polls (how do you poll in a theocratic police state?) showing substantial support for the nuclear weapons program and ballistic missile development. The median age in Iran is 30.3 (in the United States: 38.1; in the European Union, 42.9). The nation is more porous to outside influences than can suit the regime, which has a despotism’s normal preference for intellectual autarky. So, buying time was not a negligible goal for the original deal or for whatever comes next, if anything does.

It is condign punishment for Obama that his signature foreign policy achievement, the deal with Iran, could be so casually jettisoned. It should have been a treaty. If it were, it would have enjoyed more public support and could not have been erased by what created it -- presidential unilateralism. Obama’s successor might learn from this when -- if -- he produces an alternative plan for a slightly more distant and less dangerous future. Seventy-three years have passed since the first nuclear explosion, in New Mexico. Less than a month after this there occurred the first two, and so far the only, uses of nuclear weapons. Sixty-nine years have passed since the Soviet Union became the second nuclear power. Deterrence as the basis of containment has not been restful

but has been successful. Nevertheless, in September 2012, the Senate voted 90-1 for a nonbinding resolution “ruling out any policy that would rely on containment as an option in response to the Iranian nuclear threat.” So, almost six years ago the Senate declared unacceptable a policy that, perhaps six years from now, the United States might have no alternative but to accept. George Will’s email address is georgewill@washpost.com. (c) 2018, Washington Post Writers Group. George F. Will writes a twice-weekly column on politics and domestic and foreign affairs. He began his column with The Post in 1974, and he received the Pulitzer Prize for Commentary in 1977.


Wednesday, May 16, 2018

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Valley Schools Ranked Among The Best In Nation Campus IDEA College Preparatory San Juan IDEA Frontier College Preparatory IDEA College Preparatory Mission IDEA Quest College Preparatory The Science Academy of South Texas South Texas High School for Health Professions South Texas Business Ed. and Tech. Academy PSJA Thomas Jefferson Early College High School Mission Collegiate High School Brownsville Early College High School Valley View High School Achieve Early College High School IDEA College Preparatory San Benito Sharyland High School Veterans Memorial High School McAllen High School Pace High School Jimmy Carter Early College High School Mercedes Early College Academy IDEA College Prep Robert R Vela High School Hanna High School Rio Grande City High School Sharyland Pioneer H S La Feria High School

IDEA Public Schools, South Texas ISD take top spots in rankings IDEA Public Schools’ College Preparatory Academy was ranked tenth in the state and 54th in the nation in U.S. News & World Report’s 2018 Best High Schools rankings. IDEA Public Schools claimed the top four spots in the Valley in this year’s rankings and claimed two more spots on the top 25 Valley high rankings. According the magazine, IDEA’s College Preparatory in San Juan, Frontier College Preparatory, College Preparatory in Mission, and Quest College Preparatory took the top positions in the Rio Grande Valley. South Texas Independent School District high schools took the next three spots in South Texas. The Science Academy of South Texas, South Texas High School for Health Professions and South Texas Business Education and Tech Academy took the fifth, sixth, and seventh spots.

District

Texas Ranking

National Ranking

Graduation Rate

College Readiness

IDEA Public Schools IDEA Public Schools IDEA Public Schools IDEA Public Schools STxISD STxISD STxISD PSJA ISD Mission CISD Brownsville ISD VV ISD McAllen ISD IDEA Public Schools Sharyland ISD Brownsville ISD McAllen ISD Brownsville ISD La Joya ISD Mercedes ISD IDEA Public Schools Edinburg CISD Brownsville ISD RGC CISD Sharyland ISD La Feria ISD

10th 12th 14th 22nd 24th 35th 44th 49th 55th 59th 72nd 74th 80th 81st 138th 151st 154th 165th 180th 181st 189th 209th 213th 228th 232nd

54th 65th 84th 127th 130th 176th 227th 253rd 336th 359th 456th 502nd 535th 542nd 1178th 1322nd 1340th 1518th 1906th 1956th 2085th 2324th 2433rd 2707th N/A

100% 99% 100% 100% 98% 100% 100% 100% N/A 100% 95% 100% 100% 97% 99% 93% 96% 100% 100% 100% 94% 92% 95% N/A 97%

93.20% 91.3 86.60% 82.40% 82% 75.30% 71.80% 69.50% 64.80% 63.60% 59.70% 57.70% 56.60% 56.40% 42.40% 39.8th 38.50% 36.70% 31.10% 30.60% 28.80% 25.90% 24.50% 21.60% 21.30%

PSJA ISD’s Thomas Jefferson Early College High School too the eighth spot while Mission CISD’s Mission Collegiate High School and Brownsville ISD’s Early College High School took the ninth and tenth spots, respectively. To produce the 2018 Best High Schools rankings, U.S. News & World Report teamed with North Carolina-based RTI International, a global nonprofit social science research firm. A four-step process determined the Best High Schools. The first three steps ensured that the schools serve all of their students well, using their performance on the math and reading parts of their state proficiency tests and their graduation rates as the benchmarks. For those schools that made it past the first three steps, a fourth step assessed the degree to which schools prepare students for college-level work. Schools were judged on college-readiness performance using Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate test data as the benchmark for

success. AP is a College Board program and IB is an International Baccalaureate (IB) program; both offer college-level courses at high schools across the country. This measured which schools produced the best college-level achievement for the highest percentages of

Weslaco Chamber to host Morning Meet Up Thurs, May 24 -- The Weslaco Chamber of Commerce will host its next Morning Meet Up on Thursday, May 24 at 7:30 am at Chef’s Corner Café in Weslaco. Enjoy breakfast, networking and a special presentation by Weslaco Fire DepartmentChief Antonio Lopez. Chief Lopez will be discussing the city’s improved Fire ISO Class

their students. The attached chart lists the top 25 Valley high schools, as listed by U.S. News & World Report. The chart includes the campus, the district, the ranking in Texas, the national ranking, graduation rates, and college readiness rates.

Rating and how it positively affects business and homeowners alike. The fee is $5 for members and $10 for non-members. Call 956- 968-2102 to RSVP. Chef’s Corner Café is located at 918 S. Utah. Pictured are Laura Espinoza, Weslaco Chamber Marketing Director and Antonio Lopez, Weslaco Fire Department Chief/ Emergency Management Coordinator.

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Holy Spirit Catholic Church Celebrates Anniversary Holy Spirit Catholic Church of McAllen will be celebrating its 37th anniversary with the opening of a new entrance into the Church from Lark Street. “On May 22, 1981, Pentecost Sunday, we were established as Holy Spirit Parish by the most Reverend John Fitzpatrick in the Diocese of Brownsville,” said Msgr. Louis Brum, Pastor at Holy Spirit. “This Sunday, May 20, 2018, Pentecost Sunday, we are honored to have with us the Most Reverend Daniel Flores, Bishop of our Diocese, who will bless the ‘Welcoming Jesus’ statue and bless officially the new Entrance of our Church facing Lark Street.” The “Welcoming Jesus” bronze statue is 13 feet high and was designed and created by the graduating class of the Sculpture Department of UTRGV. “We are most grateful to all students who were part of this three year project,” Msgr. Brum said. “Our special thanks is extended to Mr. Douglas Clark, Assistant Professor of the Sculpture Program.” Brum also expressed a heartfelt thanks to the members of our Building Committee, Financial Committee, Parish Pastoral Council, Pentecost planning Committee, all the organizations in the community and all parishioners who have been part of this dream that has now become a reality. Holy Spirit Catholic Church is located at 2201 Martin Avenue, just off of North 23rd Street.


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Wednesday, May 16, 2018

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The Journal of Dewitt Clinton Thomas: A Voice from the Grave

The Museum of South Texas History welcomes Dr. Joseph E. Chance for another informative and engaging Sunday Speaker Series presentation. Chance will present, “The Journal of Dewitt Clinton Thomas: A Voice from the Grave,” Sunday, May 20, at 2 p.m. at the Museum of South Texas History. This short presentation is taken from The Journal of Dewitt Clinton Thomas (Chance, Suerte Press, 2010) and presents the viewpoints and observations of a man dead for more than 100 years. Thomas offers advice to his children on topics that range from morals and dancing to the handling of money. In his lifetime he notes the changes that he sees in “the paradise” he finds in Texas as an 1845 immigrant to the disappointing condi-

tion of the land in 1870. T h o m a s chronicles the extinction of the buffalo in Texas and predicts the Joseph Chance ecological disaster that would later be brought on by the advent of the railroads to west Texas, creating the genesis of the dust bowls of the 1930s. Thomas, a lifetime Democrat, courageously battled the Progressive Party and its free silver coinage platform as proposed by William Jennings Bryan which Thomas correctly identified as an inflationary measure designed to relieve the financial pressures felt by the debtor class.

Dr. Chance is a fifth generation Texan whose great-great-grandfather fought for Texas independence at San Jacinto and whose great-grandfather fought at Shiloh. He is the author of 10 books, numerous articles and essays, and the newspaper column, “History by Chance,” that appeared in The Valley Morning Star, of Harlingen, Texas. His book, The Best of History by Chance, is a compilation of some of his favorite columns and essays. These range in interest from a study of the cowboy ballad “Sam Bass” to a history of Texas’ greatest football team. Dr. Chance was raised in Austin before making the Valley his home. Currently, he is a retired professor residing in Edinburg with his wife. His published works include “My Life in

the Old Army: The Reminiscences of Abner Doubleday,” “Murder in Mathis” and “The Best of History by Chance.” Sunday Speaker Series is included in the fee for regular museum admission. FRIENDS of the MOSTHistory are admitted free as a benefit of FRIENDship. The Museum of South Texas History is located in downtown Edinburg at 200 North Closner Boulevard on the Hidalgo County Courthouse square. Hours of operation are from 1 p.m.–5 p.m. Sunday and 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Tuesday–Saturday. For more information about MOSTHistory, including becoming a FRIEND, visit MOSTHistory.org, like us on Facebook, follow on Twitter, find on Google+ or call (956) 3836911.

City of McAllen Prepares For 90th Annual Independence Day Celebration Call for parade entries and pageant contestants

PSJA North Thespians Named State Theatre Champions

For the second year in a row, the PSJA North Early College High School Thespians were named the 2018 UIL 6A State Champion Theatre team for their combined results in the One-Act Play, Film and Theatrical Design competitions at the UIL State Competition held May 3-5 in Austin. In addition, 11 students from PSJA North ECHS and PSJA Southwest ECHS earned State Champion gold medals in their categories. The UIL 6A State Champion Theatre Team award combined the results from all 40 PSJA North ECHS students who advanced to the second level of competition in their categories including One Act Play, Film and Theatre Competitions. Being named State Champions is the highest honor a high school student theatre team can receive in this category. In addition to PSJA North ECHS, the PSJA Southwest ECHS Thespians also advanced and competed, earning 3rd place at State. A total of six PSJA North ECHS students and five from

PSJA Southwest ECHS earned State Champion gold medals in their categories. The following students earned State Champion gold medals: PSJA North ECHS • Analisa Isquierdo – 11th grade • Marc Cervantes – 12th grade • Heather Medina – 12th grade • Christopher Trevino – 12th grade • Smiley Torres – 12th grade • Roman Casillas – 11th grade PSJA Southwest ECHS • Danny Ortiz – 12th grade • Yasha Alaniz – 11th grade • Ethan Greeno – 11th grade • Estrella Candelaria – 11th grade • Aren Kintigh – 11th grade “Our students have put a lot of time and dedication to theatre arts,” said PSJA North ECHS Drama Teacher Jacqueline Zepeda. “It’s great that the State is recognizing them for their hard work and accomplishments.

While it may seem like a long way off, the 4th of July is right around the corner and the City of McAllen is already making plans to celebrate the nation’s birthday in one of the largest community events held in the City of McAllen. The annual Independence Day Celebration kicks off with an early morning patriotic parade, family friendly festivals that are held throughout the day and culminating with a sizzling fireworks musical display that enchants everyone in attendance. To get ready, the City of McAllen Parks and Recreation Department is currently accepting entries for this year’s festivities. Businesses, civic and youth groups, and nonprofit organizations, and especially, veterans and veterans groups are invited to participate in the parade and other festivities. All entries should feature a patriotic theme. There is a cap to the number of parade entries, so interested participants should submit their applications quickly, as space is reserved on a first come, first serve basis. The parade is also carried live on the McAllen Cable Network, now found on Spectrum Channel 1300, as well as on the City of McAllen website and Facebook Live. Additionally, organizers are looking for the sparkliest and most patriotic contes-

tants to compete in the Little Miss 4th of July pageant competition. This year, will feature four different age categories and for older girls, an interview and talent portion. Registration fee is only $25 and participants must register onsite at Palm View Community Center, located at 3401 Jordan Avenue. Those competing do not need to live in McAllen to compete and cannot be holding any other pageant titles. Those interested need to hurry and sign up; there is a cap of contestants in each category. The Little Miss 4th of July pageant will be held on Saturday, June 16. Entry forms for the parade and pageant are available by request by emailing pardmarketing@mcallen.net or at the McAllen Parks & Recreation Office, 1000 S. Ware Rd. For more information, please contact (956) 681-3333 or visit www.mcallenparks.net.


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Wednesday, May 16, 2018

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Summer Nights At History Museum Return By Popular Demand

Back for its eighth year, the Museum of South Texas History presents Summer Nights at the Museum on June 14, June 28 and July 12 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. This three-night series brings history to life with hands-on activities, living history re-enactors, music and entertainment. Your favorite puppet characters will be back with new adventures and an interactive scavenger hunt designed to guide your family through the galleries. Children who complete the hunt will be entered in a drawing for a nightly prize from the Museum Store. Those who participate in all three nights will be entered for a grand prize drawing! Imagine the Rio Grande Valley as part of the ocean floor, in a prehistoric time, when giant sea turtles were hunted by mosasaurs of the deep. Or, picture the area during the Ice Age when early peoples moved from place to place in search of seasonal plants and after herds of Columbian mammoths. The River Frontier exhibit will be the focus for June 14 and showcase the heritage of South Texas and northeastern Mexico from prehistory through the Spanish Colonial era to the end of the Mexican War of Independence. Favorite activities such as atlatl throwing, the archaeological dig pit and rebozo wrapping will return this year. Learn how Spanish explorers struggled to survive in a new land and how they navigated the seas to come to the New World. What if you could take a trip from Rio Grande City to Brownsville on a steamboat loaded with bales of cotton, ready to export past a Union blockade in the Gulf of Mexico? Or, get on horseback, and join vaqueros on a cattle drive north through dusty trails and open range?

On June 28, the River Highway exhibit will feature the history of South Texas and northeastern Mexico from the beginning of the Texas Revolution through the steamboat era on the Rio Grande through the United States Civil War and cattle kingdom to the end of the 19th century. The steamboat and wharf will be loaded with tradesmen, musicians and stocked with cotton to trade. Guests will learn about vaquero skills such as roping, cattle roundup and cattle branding. Choo choo! Did you hear that? It’s 1904, and the railroad has finally reached South Texas with trains full of modern farming equipment and new people looking to make a living. Let’s send it back with fresh citrus and cars full of vegetables while watching our families and cities grow too. Finally, the River Crossroads exhibit will be featured on July 12 when families will discover the great technological feats of the 20th century. Dress like a Mexican revolutionary, learn the impact of the railroad lines, and use a decoder to decipher secret military telegraphs. Be transported into the WWII era by learning to spot enemy planes, working on a recycled goods drive, and looking through a German U-boat periscope. Admission to Summer Nights at the Museum is the regular admission price, passes and coupons excluded: Adults (ages 18+) $7; seniors (ages 62+) and students with ID (13+) $5; children ages 4 to 12, $4; children ages 3 and under are free. As a participating museum in the Blue Star Museums, starting Memorial Day, all active duty military personnel and up to five family members receive free admission to all three Summer Nights at the Museum.

Museum volunteers dressed in representative outfits welcome visitors to enjoy hands-on activities.

The Museum of South Texas History is located in downtown Edinburg at 200 N. Closner Blvd. on the Hidalgo County Courthouse square. Hours of operation are from 1 p.m. – 5 p.m. Sunday and 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Tuesday–Saturday.

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For more information about MOSTHistory, including becoming a FRIEND, visit MOSTHistory.org, like them on Facebook, follow on Twitter, find on Google+ or call (956) 383-6911.

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Wednesday, May 16, 2018

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Palm View Golf Course Hosts 2018 Frost South Texas College 2018 Board Election Bank Amateur Golf Championship Brings Two New Trustees Annual McAllen golf tournament features region’s best golfers, new date

The Palm View Golf Course will once again host the 2018 Amateur Golf Championship at the Palm View Golf Course, Friday, June 22 through Sunday, June 24, at the municipal golf course, located at 2701 South Ware Road. The tournament has a new earlier date this year, which was previously held later in the year in September. “The goal is to promote amateur golf in the Rio Grande Valley through a competitive golf event and the ‘tournament player; in mind,” said Carlos Espinosa, Director of Palm View Golf Course. “The tournament really challenges golfers to work through their game at a much more intense pace.” Frost Bank is the sponsor of the 2018 Amateur Golf Championship, which culminates with the awards presentation on Sunday, June 24 at approximately 6:30 p.m. “We are so proud to be the presenting sponsor for this year’s Amateur Golf Championship tournament,” said Raymond Jenkins, Market President of Frost Rio Grande Valley. “Frost’s long standing sponsorship reflects

the values we share with the City of McAllen and the golf community as well as our focus on strong relationships with our business partners.” The tournament is for amateur golfers with an established handicap of 12 or less who have not competed in high school or college golf tournaments during the 24 months immediately preceding the first round of the McAllen Amateur Golf Championship. Members of college or high school golf teams are not eligible. The field is limited to the first 150 registered and paid entries. The entry fee is $145.00 per player. Entries should be maile to: FROST BANK, McAllen Amateur Golf Championship, c/o Palm View Golf Course, PO Box 220, McAllen Texas 78505-0220.

Three South Texas College Board of Trustee seats were up for election this spring. The election resulted in two new members and one returning trustee. Board members are elected by constituents in the districts they represent and serve a six-year term. Those elected in May 2018 will serve through 2024. Victoria “Vicky” Cantu was elected to represent District 2. Cantu won the election with 70 percent of the vote and will serve the areas of La Joya, Western Mission, Palmview, Sullivan City, Penitas, and Western Alton. Cantu says she’s excited to begin her journey with South Texas College. “I plan to serve as a public advocate and ambassador for the college,” said Cantu. “Meanwhile I’ll also be advocating for the best interest of our students.” Rene Guajardo was elected to be STC’s District 6 representative that encompasses Donna, South Alamo, South San Juan, Southwestern Pharr, South Weslaco, and Progresso. Guajardo took 57 percent of votes.

“My goal is to continue to break the barriers that hold back our students from achieving their ultimate goal of obtaining a higher education in the Rio Grande Valley,” said Guajardo. “In essence, it is all about helping all students across the RGV achieve a post-secondary education.” Rose Benavidez will remain the STC representative for Starr County. Benavidez took nearly 70 percent of the vote and will begin her second full term. Benavidez thanked the constituents of District 1 for their votes. “The election is over but our campaign to strengthen and improve our community continues,” said Benavidez. “We are humbled with the steadfast support and enduring trust you have granted us and we are eager to continue to work for you and with you.” STC board members will serve the college community and participate in monthly public meetings ensuring the voices of their constituents are represented and addressed.


VOL. I, NO. 19

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 16, 2018

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WWW.GOODHEALTHGUIDETX.COM

NATIONAL PREVENTION WEEK 2018 ACTION TODAY. HEALTHIER TOMORROW.

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Wednesday, May 16, 2018

DR. JOHN BLANGERO

STDOI Receives $3.6 Million From NIH For Fatty Liver Research BY JENNIFER L. BERGHOM RIO GRANDE VALLEY, TEXAS– The South Texas Diabetes and Obesity Institute (STDOI) at The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley School of Medicine has received a five-year, $3.6 million grant from the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute for Minority Health and Health Disparities, to study the environmental determinants of fatty liver disease in Mexican Americans. The project, led by Dr. John Blangero, professor and director of the Genomics Computing Center at the STDOI and interim chair of the Department of Immunology and Microbiology at the UTRGV School of Medicine, will use magnetic resonance imaging to study liver fat and liver stiffness, which indicate fatty liver disease. The STDOI is partnering with UT Health San Antonio’s Research Imaging Institute, under a subcontract led by Dr. Geoff Clarke, to take the MRIs, said Blangero, who is the project’s principal investigator. Clarke is the project’s co-principal investigator. “Fatty liver disease is a significant public health problem in South Texas and represents a major risk factor for liver cancer,” Blangero said. “Our project is focused on identifying environmental factors involved in fatty liver disease risk using a novel approach in which we increase these environmental signals by controlling for genetic factors.”

This is the first time this method has ever been used and is a previously unrealized benefit of the human genome project, Blangero said. Scientists will perform thousands of different measurements reflecting human biological variation and look for those variations that help predict fatty liver disease, then track down their source in the environment. Blangero said he hopes the team’s findings can lead to the creation of treatments and medications, as well as measures of prevention. The project will focus a sample of 1,000 Mexican Americans in large families from across South Texas –including the Rio Grande Valley—whom the institute has been studying since 1991. Dr. John H. Krouse, dean of the UTRGV School of Medicine and executive vice president for Health Affairs at UTRGV, said the grant will advance the School of Medicine’s mission to engage in research that will benefit the Rio Grande Valley and the world. “The School of Medicine is committed to participating in research in relevant areas of concern for health and disease in the Hispanic population, including cancer, diabetes, obesity and related diseases,” Krouse said. “This project addresses illnesses that greatly affect the Hispanic population, and can lead to innovations that will improve health outcomes for this population.” The grant runs through Nov. 30, 2022.

Medicare is sending new ID cards this year. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid are sending a new Medicare ID card for all Medicare beneficiaries starting in April 2018. The process will be in waves by states and should finish by April 2019. Beneficiaries in Texas will receive ID cards after June 2018. Medicare beneficiaries do not need to take any action at this time, but it is vital that your correct mailing address is registered with the Social Security office so that you can receive your new card. One major change in the new Medicare ID Card is that the Social Security number won't be listed in the card; instead, it will have a Medicare Beneficiary Identifier number, 9-digit combination of letters and numbers. This change was designed to prevent Medicare fraud. It is important that you provide your doctors and health providers with the new ID card when it arrives. Both cards will be valid during the transition. Be Alert! Avoid Scams! With the new change, it’s normal to have confusion, but keep in mind that: *Medicare will not charge any fees for the new ID card; *Do not share your personal information. Medicare will not call you asking to verify your personal information. If you receive a call, it’s a scam, hang up the phone. * The old ID card needs to be destroyed after the transition time. Do not give your old card to anyone. *Make sure your mailing address is up to date with the Social Security office. If you moved recently or changed your P.O. Box, please visit or call the Social Security office to provide them with your new information, or go online to make the proper changes. *Texas will be issuing new ID card after June 2018, as posted on the CMS web page. Please check your mail for the new card

Call today to enroll or get answers to your questions.

Marta Jimenez

Jimco Insurance Services 5520 N MCCOLL RD MCALLEN TX 78504 O: (956) 631-2202 C: (956) 467-6994


Wednesday, May 16, 2018

You Can Control Your Asthma

Using what you know about managing your asthma can give you control over this chronic disease. When you control your asthma, you will breathe easier, be as active as you would like, sleep well, stay out of the hospital, and be free from coughing and wheezing. Asthma is one of the most common lifelong chronic diseases. One in 13 Americans (more than 24 million) lives with asthma, a disease affecting the lungs and causing repeated episodes of wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness, and coughing. Although asthma cannot be cured, you can control your asthma successfully to reduce and to prevent asthma attacks, also called episodes. Successful asthma management includes knowing the warning signs of an attack, avoiding things that may trigger an attack, and following the advice of your healthcare provider. Asthma deaths have decreased over time and varied by demographic characteristics. The rate of asthma deaths decreased from 15 per million in 2001 to 10 per million) in 2016. Deaths due to asthma are rare and are thought to be largely preventable, particularly among children and young adults. In most cases, we don’t know what causes asthma, and we don’t know how to cure it. Some things may make

it more likely for one person to have asthma than another person. If someone in your family has asthma, you are more likely to have it. Regular physical exams that include checking your lungs and checking for allergies can help your healthcare provider make the right diagnosis. Then you and your healthcare provider can make your own asthma management plan so that you know what to do based on your own symptoms. Using your asthma medicine as prescribed and avoiding common triggers that bring on asthma symptoms, such as smoke (including second-hand and third-hand tobacco smoke), household pets, dust mites, and pollen will help you control your asthma. Make sure you are up to date on vaccinations that help protect your health. Respiratory infections like influenza (flu) can be very serious for you, even if your asthma is mild or your symptoms are well-controlled by medication. Flu can trigger asthma attacks and make your asthma symptoms worse, and is more likely to lead to other infections like pneumonia. Getting the recommended vaccines will help you stay healthier. The important thing to remember is that you can control your asthma.

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The Valley Times – May 16, 2018  
The Valley Times – May 16, 2018  
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