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The magazine for your English

2010/2011

Kid lit

Poster

My time

4

8

10

The Lord of the Flies

Saint Valentine’s day

for

KID ON THE ROAD

THE NORTHWEST OF ENGLAND

Music and the web


glossary

2

Let’s see, I can pay 16 dollars to substitute the lead* or I can buy new speakers for 80 dollars.

Jeremy, do you know how much sugar there is in that can?

Jeremy, don’t even think about it!

I think I should buy new speakers*.

It’s only

That is to say… it’s only YOUR money.

money.

Of course. There isn’t any.

Like many other fizzy drinks, it’s sweetened with corn syrup. A totally natural drink.

You won’t have any tattoos* on your body, not until you’re an adult anyway.

If I stare at your face long enough, I can see the future.

lead: electrical wire speakers: equipment that transmits sound from a radio, CD player, etc tattoos: a permanent picture that is drawn on the body using ink wrinkles: a line that appears on your skin when you’re getting older

It’s good..

It was better when what I learned at school was so little that it could fit on a tiny piece of paper that I could stick on the fridge.

And at that point, your body will change by itself.

Oh Jeremy!

Yes. Really?

Mm..

AAAAGH!

I predict with certainty that those little wrinkles* around your eyes will become bigger.


CONTENTS

EDITORIAL

2 Cartoon Strip Zits

Hi everyone! Welcome back to another fascinating issue of Kid. We’ve got lots of fun in store for you such as a look at a very famous children’s story ‘Lord of the Flies’, a trip around the North-West of England - the home of two great football teams, and a report about two very different but well-loved types of food. There’s also something for music lovers in our article ‘my time’ and for all you formula 1 fans, we take a look at Lewis Hamilton. Happy reading

Angela

6 Report Sushi or kebab?

8 Poster Saint Valentine’s

12 Kid on the road The North-West of England

4 Kid lit Lord of the Flies

10 My time Music and the web

14 Fun and games

m u e s u m A of art in Krakow

16 Famous faces Lewis Hamilton

glossary

entrepreneur: businessman houses: (here) contains, incl ude

s

an extraordinary In Krakow in Poland d contemporary art museum of modern an located where once has been opened. It’s y owned by Oskar there was a pan factor entrepreneur* Schindler, the German 00 Jews during famous for saving 1,1 seum, which is 8,000 the Holocaust. The mu s* an area dedicated square metres, house permanent to Schindler, and also itions of national and temporary exhib ists. and international art

Oskar Schindler is famous throughout the world thanks to the film Schindler’s list (1993). Who directed the film? a b c

Ferzan Ozpetek Steven Spielberg Rob Cohen 

Grammy In this issue you will come across: _ present perfect _ gerunds and infinitives _ 1st conditional _ so and such _ adjectives, adverbs and prepositions

Page 3: Steven Spielberg. Page 4-5: Castaway means someone who has to survive on a desert island usually for a long period of time. Rules / obey / savages / English. page 6-7: The painting ‘The Sunflowers’by Van Gogh. Page 8-9: c) an umbrella – of course, it isn’t a very romantic gift but it’s also considered unlucky. Page 1011: “Continue to follow your dreams, work hard and keep away from girls”. Page 12-13: The two other football teams are Manchester City and Everton. b) a Scouser. Page14: A: 1) traditional, 2) carbohydrates, 3) calories, 4) balanced, 5) proteins, 6) expensive, 7) raw, 8) nutritious. B: possible answers: Gerrard is older than Rooney, Rooney is younger than Gerrard, Rooney isn’t as old as Gerrard, Rooney plays as a forward while Gerrard plays as a midfielder, Rooney plays in shirt number 10 while Gerrard plays in shirt number 8, Gerrard has played for one team all his career while Rooney has played for two teams, they’ve both won player of the year. C: 1 b; 2 d; 3 a; 4 c. Page 16: Madame Tussaud’s Wax museum in London.


4

t/ present perfec unds passives /ger s and infinitive

d r Lo lies F e h t of

KID LIT

g n i d l o G m a i l l i W y b

Welcome back to our feature Kid lit where we take a look at some of the classic stories that have left their mark on society throughout the years. You’ve probably all heard of the book – well, trilogy – Lord of the Rings by Tolkien, but have you heard of another book with a similar title but absolutely nothing to do with the Tolkien book? was written in 1954 by William Golding, so let’s read on to find out more.

What’s it about? It’s about a group of boys who become castaways on a desert island. Do you remember the word ‘castaway’? We met it a couple of issues ago when we had a look at the story ‘Treasure Island’. Castaway means __________________________ . The story takes place during the second World War. The schoolchildren are evacuated* from their school in London but they never arrive at their destination as their plane crashes during the journey. They have to learn to look after themselves but without the structure and order of civilization, some of them become anarchic and rebel while others behave peacefully and work together well. When the body of a parachutist* falls to earth, they imagine it to be a kind of ‘beast’ and are afraid of it. The story ends as eventually they are rescued by a passing ship.


The main characters Ralph is the boy who is voted chief on the island. He takes control and introduces two rules for the island – the first is to have fun and the second is to keep a fire burning at all times so that they can be seen by passing ships. He tries to keep things running smoothly* even when chaos and disorder erupts. His main rival is Jack, the leader of the school choir. At the beginning, Jack is a normal boy but as the story progresses he becomes violent and irrational. He leads many of the boys away from Ralph and turns them into hunters*. Piggy is an overweight* boy wearing glasses, and is often made fun of* by the other boys. However, he’s intelligent and often gives Ralph good advice. His pair of glasses are used to make the fire which they keep burning for passing ships. The Lord of the Flies is a pig’s head, which they offer to the beast as a sacrifice*. Another important symbol in the book is a shell. Only the person holding the shell can speak during a meeting, in order to stop everyone talking at the same time. It represents democracy and order. When the shell is broken at the end of the story, this represents the end of democracy and civilization.

glossary

curriculum: (here) subjects that are studied at school evacuated: leave a place because it isn’t safe hunters: people wh o kill wild animals made fun of: ma de jokes about so meone in an unpleasant way overweight: fatter than you should be parachutist: some one who jumps ou t of an aeroplane wearing a parachu te smoothly: without difficulties or pro blems

cessful ery suc v ’t n s , it wa s he Flie first published by 1960 it wa any t f o d s r, a m e Lor v w in e ok ow m* the bo pies. H rriculu o u c c 0 e 0 When h t 3,0 ded in ld only he 100 as inclu and so w d ne of t n a o r s e a ll e e in . a bests magaz 05. Britain ‘Time’ in y b ls 5 to 20 o 2 n o 9 e s 1 o untain sch h m c o r s wa the mo els f v it o , o t 5 n n 0 e e 0 giv In 2 nguag name n used glish la as the as bee h w , h e best En ic b h towns t to Rock’ w ferent hough t if d s a e w h ‘Castle ft ast ame o the be s ‘Lost’. s the n a where g in V serie K T n e e h h t ned in by Step mentio ks. s o a o b w ’ is s in h he Flie rd of t ‘The Lo

s trivia

Can you ... Read the following quote from the book Lord of the Flies and comple te with one of the words in the box.

ENGLISH

OBEY

SAVAGES

RULES

We’ve got to have ___

_____

and _______them. After all we’re not ___ we’re __________ .

____,

The answer is on page 3


6

REPORT

Sushi

or keb

ab?

In the come last few y e a Here’ bout*. Th ars a real s why p ey ta ste g assion fo ! r ood, you c some typ Far an a es o n find d wid them f food su e Altho ugh s ch every ome t a part wher as kebab ypes o icular e a and i f food place to rem t’s be nd sushi h origin , they ain th come ate in a ’re fa ere.… pizza r too Like o a sor s A goo - it’s k specia t r of tre d d exa islike? nown l just The sa The m nd. mple and lo F me ca i s o i h r s e v t or me he Ita ed th wides n be s But in a r r l e p a o i a a r u t t i n ead* d of k alked ? ghou any ca th t e

it’s di

fficult

se, ev bab a the w en if y nd su orld. shi no ou do to res wada n’t wa ist the ys. nt to m try th em,

about ey be of foo come these d. Ma , the m t w ny pe o very “Do I ore th ople h differ like it ey a ent ty ve ask ?“ An those pes d so t ed th in fav e w m o par our o selves Let’s h ties h f fish ave a ave fo and t look a rmed hose t som in fav e of t o u r of m he arg e at. umen ts.


THOSE WHO LIKE Fish: Sushi

THOSE WHO DON’T LIKE

Meat: Kebab

Fish: Sushi

Meat: Kebab

Raw* fish is more nutritious than cooked fish!

Kebab meat is special and rich.

Cooked fish is safer than raw fish!

Kebab meat isn’t safe as it remains too long in contact with the air.

Sushi is more natural!

A kebab is a balanced* meal: protein (meat) , vitamins (vegetables), carbohydrates (bread).

Fish isn’t always safe (eg: tuna can contain mercury).

Kebab has too many calories.

A plate of sushi is not only to be eaten but also to be looked at. Also the presentation of food is good for our health.

A kebab is fast and tasty*

Presentation and decoration is a waste* of time!

It’s bad to eat in a hurry.

It’s worth spending more for the atmosphere in the sushi restaurant.

Kebab shops are cheap and lively places.

Eating sushi is too expensive.

A kebab shop isn’t a real restaurant.

Sushi was born many centuries ago and preparing it is an art.

The original kebab comes from an antique tradition.

Sushi is eaten everywhere and no longer has anything traditional about it.

Kebab is eaten everywhere and no longer has anything traditional about it.

glossary the right amounts balanced: contains all pen hap ut: abo e com raw: not cooked our tasty: with a nice flav it isn’t worth doing it waste of time: (here) in many places widespread: existing

Do you eat with your eyes? How important is what food looks like for you and the art of preparing it?

a b c

Extremely important What’s your ideal restaurant Very important like? Write at least 3 adjectives! Not very important ……………………………..

Sushi can really be considered an ‘art’. Did you know that the Japanese chef Kawasumi has created a copy of a famous painting with sushi? Can you guess which one? a b c

“Sunflowers” by Vincent Van Gogh “Mona Lisa” by Leonardo da Vinci “Spring” by Botticelli

…………………………….. ……………………………..

The answer is on page 3


This feast of love is celebrated every year on February 14th. Let’s discover together something about the origins of this romantic festival.

Saint Valentine’s day is celebrated every year in Britain too and in some schools it’s traditional to organize parties in the classroom where children exchange chocolates and cards.

One theory is that it is named after a Christian martyr who was called Valentine. During the reign of emperor Claudius, marriages and engagements were cancelled as he couldn’t find enough men to fight with him in his military campaigns. Saint Valentine was a priest and married young men and women in secret. He was discovered and sentenced to death and the date was February 14th.

There are different theories regarding the origins of this festival, but all dating back to Roman times.

Saint Valentine’s day

POSTER


a b c d

The answer is on page 3

chocolates jewellry an umbrella flowers

Which wouldn’t you give to your loved one on St. Valentine’s Day?

Roses are red. Violets are blue. Carnations are sweet And so are you!

A typical Valentine’s poem that you can find on many Valentine’s cards.

Valentine’s day is big business in Britain and people spend about £500 million on cards, flowers, chocolates and other presents. What about you?

One of the customs observed on Saint Valentine’s day is to go out for the evening with ‘your loved one’. Those who don’t have a ‘date’ try to find one before February 14th arrives. This custom originated from the belief that birds chose their partners on that day. For this reason, Valentine’s day was called ‘the Bird’s Wedding day’ in some parts of England.




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The Web and success Thanks to the web we can become famous all over the world. This is what happened to Justin Bieber, a Canadian boy who has become a pop star. Justin put his performances of famous songs on YouTube, using simple home-made videos. Some talent scouts* noticed him and Justin became famous. He’s also sung for the American president Barack Obama.

Bieber Justin

Do you want to try? If you want people to hear your music, first you have to upload* your video on sites such as YouTube or MySpace. It’s important that the video expresses you and your music. It’s also important to create your own site, in order to explain your style with simplicity and originality. Nowadays, there are a lot of sites that can help you become famous – but choose them carefully and be careful about the information about yourself that you make public. You never know who might read it! And remember, if you have success on the web, the next step is the hard reality of the record companies.

glossary

, t show” a “secre s e iz n a g ind ace or s. It’s a k ar My Sp us artist o le m Every ye a f e h e ar litt ncert wit site ther e h t at h n a free co t O r *. ge re hunt of the sin e m a n of treasu e th s before discover few day a clues* to ly n o evealed will be r ert. the conc

concert

Greyson Chance He’s American and is only 13 years old, but he has become famous on YouTube with a video filmed during a school concert. In the video Greyson sings a Lady Gaga cover, “Paparazzi”, playing it on the piano. During a famous TV show, Lady Gaga phoned him and said … put the words in order to discover the phrase.

“away Continue hard, your dreams, to follow work and keep from girls” _______________________________________ _______________________________________ Greyson Chance

et The secr

brand new: extrem ely new clues: words or ob jects that help you to discover something like a mystery or crime critic: a job where the person has to give their opinion abou t a film, a book or music talent scouts: a job where the perso n goes looking for new tal ent treasure hunt: a kind of game wh ere you have to look for clues in order to find the final prize upload: put your videos or photos on the internet

_______________________________________ The answer is on page 3


12

KID ON THE ROAD

al / 1st condition d such / an so / s gerund prepositions

The North-W e s t of England In this issue we continue our journey around England, visiting the North-west part of the country. We couldn’t visit this region, without mentioning the two biggest cities and their famous football teams which are located here. Can you guess which ones? Read on to find out!

Unauthorised photocopying is illegal.

Liverpool We start off today by crossing the river Mersey and arriving in the city of Liverpool. Liverpool is famous as the home of the Beatles (ask your parents if you don’t know who they are) and the home of Liverpool Football club. It was European capital of culture in 2008 and there are so many different types of museums and art galleries there such as the Beatles Museum, the Maritime Museum, the Tate Modern, the Museum of Slavery. If you go to Liverpool, you can’t miss visiting the Albert Docks. It was the old port of Liverpool and was opened in 1846. Now it’s an area with many shops and museums. And if you’re a football fan, then why not visit Anfield, the home of Liverpool football club.


Manchester Manchester is located just 53 km away from Liverpool and is also a lively, vibrant* city with lots of things to see and do. If you’re interested in weapons* and battles then you can visit the Imperial War museum, which is filled with objects from history. If you’re interested in art, there’s the Lowry museum. Lowry was an artist who came from Salford, near Manchester. He was famous for painting scenes of life in the industrial areas of Northern England. He had an unusual style and drew men and women as matchsticks*, that is to say very simple drawings with lines to represent the people. Manchester is also famous for its music scene, especially in the 1980s and 90s with bands such as Oasis, Take That and Simply Red originating from there. And of course, if you like football then you can’t miss visiting Old Trafford, the home of Manchester United.

Rivalry Rivalry* between the two cities has existed for many years as they are such similar kinds of cities which are so near to one another. This also has something to do with the fact that both cities have the two most successful football teams in the North-West. An important sports event that takes place every year is the North-west derby when Manchester United and Liverpool play against each other at football. So who usually wins? Well, it seems that Manchester United has won the most matches. Let’s take a look at two very important players who make up the teams.

glossary

imitation: a copy landscapes: an area of land that is beautiful to look at matchsticks: a small stick that produces a flame rivalry: when two teams or people are always competing against each other vibrant: full of life weapons: arms such as knives, guns etc.

Wayne Rooney (Manchester United)

Steve Gerrard (Liverpool)

Date of birth

24th October 1985

30th May 1980

Place of birth

Liverpool

near Liverpool

Height

1,78 m

1,83 m

Playing Position

forward

midfielder

Number

10

8

Career so far

2002 - 2004 Everton 2004 - now Manchester United

1998 - now Liverpool

Family

married with one son

married with two daughters

Award won

2009 - 10 Player of the year

2008 - 09 Player of the year

Do you know....?

Other things to see If you have had enough of visiting cities, then it’s time for a bit of nature. Our first stop is Blackpool, a town situated on the sea. It’s famous for its illuminations, coloured lights that are hung in the streets during the month of October and Blackpool Tower which is an imitation* of the Eiffel Tower in Paris. The town is full of entertainment and shows, so you can never get bored here. And finally, if you’re tired after all this travelling, our last stop today is the Lake district. A beautiful hilly region situated near the border with Scotland. As the name suggests, it’s a region of lakes and magnificent landscapes*. You can go sailing on the lakes, go walking in the hills or just sit and watch the sunset. Well, that’s enough travelling for today. Bye until next time!

What do you call

a b c

Do you know....?

someone from Liv

erpool?

a Mancunian a Scouser a Cockney

The answer is on

page 3

Both the cities of Liverpool and Manchester have two football teams. Can you name the others?

____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________


14

FUN AND GAMES

A. Look at the anagrams and try to work out the words to do with food. 1) Sushi is an ancient dish, so we can say that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a _____________ dish. (ntrdalitaoi) 2) Bread and pasta are _____________. (basarcodrhyet) 3) The kebab is often criticised as itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s full of _____________. (locearis) 4) Food that contains protein, carbohydrates and vitamins can be described as complete and _____________. (necdalab) 5) Important substances found in meat, eggs and fish are _____________. (toprines) 6) Sushi is sometimes criticised for being too _____________. (penxiseev) 7) _____________ fish is used to make sushi. (War) 8) Sushi is more _____________ than a kebab. (trusuition)

B. Look back at the feature Kid on the road and write the similarities and differences that exist between the two footballers, Rooney and Gerrard. Example: They are both married. Gerrard is taller than Rooney. 1) ______________________________________________________________________________ 2) ______________________________________________________________________________ 3) ______________________________________________________________________________ 4) ______________________________________________________________________________ 5) ______________________________________________________________________________ 6) ______________________________________________________________________________ 7) ______________________________________________________________________________ 8) ______________________________________________________________________________

C. Look at the following football idioms and match them with their meaning. 1. score an own goal

a. get something started

2. give it your best shot

b. make a problem for yourself

3. get the ball rolling

c. cancel something

4. kick something into touch

d. make a big effort

The answers are on page 3


Liven up your lessons! With audio CD and Teacherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s guide English

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2


16

FAMOUS FACES

Lewis Hamilton

He’s the youngest Formula 1 World Champion. Now everyone’s waiting for his next performance in the Grand Prix 2011. Like in a fairytale An English journalist said that his rise* to success has been like in a fairytale: wonderful and fast like a magic spell*. Lewis was born into a family with little money, but he worked hard and in a few years he got to where he wanted. He started at 8 years old with go-kart racing. At 10, he won the GP2 championship and when he met Ron Dennis, owner and director of McLaren, he told him calmly “I want to race in Formula 1”. At 13 years old he entered in the junior team and at 22 years old he became a full-time pilot.

glossary lookalik e: someo ne who re another sembles person rise: ach ieve succ es spell: wo rds or ac s tio unaccep table: no ns that make ma g t reachin of behav g usual s ic happen iour tandards

In Formula 1 the competition is really hard. The rivalry with Fernando Alonso was so strong that in 2008 some fans of Alonso insulted Lewis with racist insults. This was unacceptable* and consequently the FIA (International Automobile Federation) launched the campaign “Racing against Racism”. During the same year Lewis became the youngest Formula 1 world champion.

His hobbies Lewis loves listening to music, playing the guitar and going out with friends.

Hamilton is still very young, but he’s so famous in England that he has a lookalike*. Read the phrase in the mirror and discover where.

XAW S’DUASSUT EMADAM NODNOL NI MUESUM

__________________________________ __________________________________ The answer is on page 3

tives/

past simple/ adjec adverbs

Complemento operativo allegato al volume Flash on English 2. Non vendibile separatamente. Copyright Eli 2011

Racing to win, also against injustice


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