Edible Santa Barbara Winter 2021-2022

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edible ®

The Digester: Organic Waste Earns Its Keep Life in the Vines: Dormancy It’s Time to Make Food Decisions with the Climate Crisis in Mind A Sweet Season L O YA L

T O

L O C A L


“American Riviera understands our structure and our needs. They help us to help others.” – ROSA PAREDES

31

Tino Muñoz Thirty one years of banking on the Central Coast

This is True Community Banking Sister Arthur and Rosa Paredes of St. Vincent’s Institution with Tino Muñoz, Portfolio Manager

Combining our expertise with yours to find solutions for your unique needs.

Visit us at AmericanRiviera.Bank • 805.965.5942


Tasting daily at the Margerum & Barden Tasting Room at Hotel Californian, 19 East Mason, Santa Barbara Margerum Wines are available at margerumwines.com, fine restaurants and food & wine retailers.


edible

SANTA BAR BAR A

®

LIZ DODDER

MEGAN SOREL

Winter 21–22

page 20

page 56

Departments 6 Food for Thought by Krista Harris

8 Small Bites 11 Farmers Markets

54 Support Local Guide

13 In Season

56 The Last Bite

Coq au Vin by Krista Harris

14 Seasonal Recipe Persimmon and Pear Galette by Jane Chapman

STE VEN BROWN

A Great Fruit Cocktail by George Yatchisin

Winter Scones Spicy Cabbage Slaw

2 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2021–22

24 Drinkable Landscape

Holiday Reading List

14 Seasonal Recipes

page 14

22 Holiday Gift Guide

Winter’s Don’t Miss Dish Cast-Iron Seared Fish Sandwich at Little Dom’s Seafood by Liz Dodder


The Beer Garden is Back. Support The Garden and sample one-of-a-kind craft beers, great food, and listen to live music in one of Santa Barbara’s most stunning locations.

Limited space available. Get your tickets today at sbbg.org/beer

Generously sponsored by


edible

SANTA BAR BAR A

®

Winter 21–22

Features 26 Life in the Vines Dormancy 30 We Are What We Eat It’s Time to Make Food Decisions with the Climate Crisis in Mind

page 53

by Twilight Greenaway

38 The Digester Organic Waste Earns Its Keep by Janice Cook Knight

48 A Sweet Season

Recipes in This Issue Salads 16 Spicy Cabbage Slaw

Sugar and Spice and All Things Nice

Main Dishes

by Pascale Beale

18 Coq au Vin

Desserts and Baked Goods 50 The PCC in a Jar 53 Pear Almond Cake 20 Persimmon and Pear Galette 53 Winter Pavlova 14 Winter Scones

Beverages 25 Have You Never Been Pomelo Cocktail 25 Pomelo Simple Syrup and Candied Strips COVER PHOTO OF PEAR ALMOND CAKE BY PASCALE BEALE

4 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2021–22

PASC ALE BE ALE

by Adam McHugh


FOXEN

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V I N E YA R D & W I N E R Y

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EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2021–22 | 5


FOOD FOR THOUGHT

ERIN FEINBL AT T

Each holiday season, we find ourselves at the crossroads of indulgence and thoughtful reflection. It’s a time of celebration— entertaining, baking, presents and parties. It’s also a time to see out the old year and look forward to the new one. Perhaps to make resolutions for the new year or to think about how we can make the world a better one. This issue embraces all of it. As you read the articles in this issue, you might find yourself thinking about the climate crisis and ways to reduce our carbon emissions along with baking the beautiful pear cake pictured Krista Harris toasting marshmallows. on the cover. If you make the Coq au Vin recipe for a dinner party (and I hope you do), you might find yourself talking about reducing waste (composting is a great topic of conversation). This winter, as you are driving through the Santa Ynez Valley, you might look at the bare grapevines on the hillsides and see a new kind of beauty in them after reading Adam McHugh’s article, “Life in the Vines: Dormancy.” My resolution for this new year is not very ambitious. It’s not very original. And I hope it won’t be very difficult. It’s simply to express more gratitude. I will start by voicing my appreciation for the writers and everyone who contributed to this issue (see the box on the right for specific names). Their dedication and creativity are what make this magazine unique, and I could not be more proud of the work they do. I also want to thank the advertisers who make this and every issue possible. Some of them have been with us for years, and I consider them true kindred spirits and partners in this endeavor. And, of course, I am incredibly grateful for our readers. It is our readers who keep us going and provide the inspiration for all of our work. A print magazine is one of those things that requires the hands of many to create. In addition to our writers, editors, photographers, advertisers and readers, we rely on the paper mill, the printer and the freight company to get the magazine from concept to what you hold in your hand. Due to supply chain disruptions, we had to switch to another type of paper for the cover. Hopefully our next issue will be back on our signature paper and, in the meantime, I am more grateful than ever to the people who work behind the scenes to create this magazine. So as you read the pages of this issue, I hope you find what you need—some sweet recipes, some thought-provoking articles, gift ideas, places to go, food to try and the opportunity to reflect on what is important to you. Cheers and Happy New Year.

Krista Harris, Editor and Publisher Visit our website at EdibleSantaBarbara.com and sign up for our email newsletter or go directly to EdibleSantaBarbara.Substack.com/welcome.

6 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2021–22

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SANTA BAR BAR A Member of Edible Communities

Edible Communities James Beard Foundation Publication of the Year (2011)

PUBLISHER & EDITOR

Krista Harris RECIPE EDITOR

Nancy Oster COPY EDITING & PROOFING

Doug Adrianson DESIGNER

Steven Brown ADVERTISING

ads@ediblesantabarbara.com SOCIAL MEDIA

Jill Johnson CONTRIBUTORS

Pascale Beale Jeffrey Bloom Jane Chapman Liz Dodder Twilight Greenaway Erin Feinblatt Janice Cook Knight Adam McHugh Megan Sorel Carole Topalian Lael Wageneck George Yatchisin ADVISORY GROUP

Pascale Beale, Jordan benShea, Rosminah Brown, Janice Cook Knight, Katie Hershfelt, Jill Johnson, Nancy Oster Edible Santa Barbara® is published quarterly and distributed throughout Santa Barbara County. Subscription rate is $28 annually. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be used without written permission from the publisher. Publisher expressly disclaims all liability for any occurrence that may arise as a consequence of the use of any information or recipes. Every effort is made to avoid errors, misspellings and omissions. If, however, an error comes to your attention, please accept our sincere apologies and notify us. Thank you.

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in historic

Los Alamos reservations at picolosalamos.com

Photo: Nell Campbell

Garden or Indoor Dining Wednesday - Sunday weekend brunch

The SBCC Promise The SBCC Promise has provided more than 5,000 local high school graduates with the opportunity to pursue their dreams at Santa Barbara City College. Created in 2016, the SBCC Promise covers all required fees, books, and supplies for two years, and is completely funded by private gifts.

Your gift makes it possible. sbccfoundation.org | (805) 730-4401

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2021–22 | 7


small

BITES

Holiday Reading List Cookbook Recommendations We asked a group of Edible Santa Barbara contributors for their favorite cookbook recommendations. These are the books we own and treasure— and they would make great gifts for the cookbook lovers in your life. Around the Table: Recipes & Stories from The Lark in Santa Barbara By Jason Paluska, Sherry Villanueva; Photography MacDuff Everton Pages: 392 Hardcover Price: $35 Publisher: AVP Editions

Cannelle et Vanille and Cannelle et Vanille Bakes Simple By Aran Goyoaga Pages: 352 / 320 Hardcover Price: $35 / $35 Publisher: Penguin Random House

There is so much love for all things local in this beautiful, oversized coffee table cookbook—a focus on regional ingredients, mouthwatering recipes and a foreword by Betty Fussell. Fans of the restaurant will seek out the recipes for their crispy Brussels sprouts and fried Castelvetrano olives. You can’t help but be intrigued to find out that it’s a pinch of Douglas fir needles that sets off their exquisite sea urchin on brioche. The section on “The Basics” covers everything from brining, curing, pickling and fermenting to butchering—with detailed instructional photos that will make you want to move the cookbook from the coffee table to the kitchen. This is an excellent gift for anyone who loves Santa Barbara, with the added bonus of being a book for the serious home cook. How many cookbooks offer you recipes for not just a smoked pork belly but all its accompaniments: roasted blackberry gastrique, almond brittle, pickled corno de toro peppers, chicharron? Or how about herb-crusted bone marrow with Aleppo pepper buttermilk biscuits and Campari and grapefruit marmalade? Towards the end of the book, don’t miss reading the story of how The Lark was conceived and built.

Last year I finally learned to make truly good glutenfree bread: yeasted bread with flavor, great texture and a beautiful crumb. While most of the world seemed to be making sourdough bread from wheat, I made recipes from Aran Goyoaga’s book, Cannelle et Vanille: Nourishing, GlutenFree Recipes for Every Meal and Mood. The book includes 100 recipes, and not just for baked goods: Soups, salads, entrees, even paella cooked over a wood fire are included (Goyoaga is from the Basque region of Spain, after all). But it was the 14 recipes for baked goods that intrigued me. I loved her pizza, which I cooked on a pizza stone in my outdoor grill. There are cakes, tarts and even a gluten-free puff pastry! And yes, you can learn to make sourdough gluten-free bread here, too. I am thrilled that Goyoaga is about to publish her third book, Cannelle et Vanille Bakes Simple: A New Way to Bake GlutenFree. Here are 100 recipes for breads, bagels, sourdough starter and sourdough boule, olive oil brioche, English muffins, jam-filled scones, tarts, cookies and holiday treats, as well as things to go with baked goods: including cultured cashew-coconut butter. Finally, gluten-free recipes that are delicious and satisfying.

— Krista Harris

— Janice Cook Knight

8 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2021–22


Six Seasons: A New Way with Vegetables By Joshua McFadden with Martha Holmberg Pages: 384 Hardcover Recipes: 225 Price: $40 Publisher: Artisan

Six Seasons author Joshua McFadden is both farmer and chef. A farmer knows when to harvest a vegetable at its peak flavor; a chef skillfully brings that flavor to the table so we can indulge in its perfection. Chef McFadden’s mantra is “real food, simple food, in season.” His technique for making croutons caught my attention in the opening pages. His torn, not cut, croutons have crisp edges and a little bit of chew at the center. Crispy edges, he says, absorb vegetable juices and vinaigrettes better. I frequently use his recipe for herbed butter, which turns a cold, hard stick of butter into a colorful bit of food art. You just smoosh the butter onto a small wooden cutting board, then sprinkle it with garden herbs, citrus peel and edible flowers. Serve with a crusty loaf of bread hot from the oven. Elegant! Seasonal sections feature vegetables that ripen during that season. For example, a late-summer salad showcases grilled green tomatoes, avocado, purslane, feta and watermelon. And for winter? McFadden guides us to the earthy mellow sweetness of root vegetables, squashes and brassicas, picked after their starches convert to sugar. Delicious! Winner of the 2018 James Beard Award for Best Book in Vegetable-Focused Cooking.

The Flavor Equation By Nik Sharma Pages: 352 Hardcover Price: $35 Publisher: Chronicle Books

Have you ever wondered how you taste food? How the sight, sound, aroma and mouthfeel of food affects our emotions as we eat? Nik Sharma reveals all this and more in his intriguing, exquisitely photographed and illustrated cookbook, The Flavor Equation. The chapters explore the brightness, bitterness, saltiness, sweetness, savoriness, fieriness and richness of foods. This unique approach to categorizing foods makes us look and appreciate the qualities of dishes in a new light by explaining how each of taste sensations works. It’s mesmerizing, and the recipes are just delicious, such as burrata with chili oil and Thai basil potato and roasted corn herbed raita; a warm kale, white bean and mushroom salad with chili tahini; a shepherd’s pie with kheema and chourico; or sweet treats such as cherry and pepper granola bars, saffron swirl buns with dried fruit, blueberry and Omani lime ice cream. All of these will start your taste buds singing. — Pascale Beale

Bavel By Ori Menashe, Genevieve Gergis with Lesley Suter Pages: 296 Hardcover Price: $40 Publisher: Ten Speed Press

— Nancy Oster

Cooking Your Local Produce By Greta Hardin Pages: 184 Softcover Price: $40 Publisher: Ward Street Press

Greta Hardin combines her love of vegetable gardening with her experience as a schoolteacher to address the everlasting question: What to do with all the produce from a farmers market, garden or CSA? Her approach is simple, inviting and unpretentious. It’s perfect for adults and children who are looking for easy and approachable ways to make delicious food from seasonal abundance. — Rosminah Brown

In the opening section of this beautifully photographed book, Ori Menashe writes that he wanted to capture the “aroma, flavor and sensation” of the foods of his childhood and family linage, spanning Morocco, Georgia, Persia and beyond. The resulting cookbook is a delicious, sumptuous amalgam of tastes, spices and a glorious sense of the region. It’s a cookbook that makes you want to dive in and savor every dish, from the simplest whipped feta and classic hummus, to more elaborate dishes such as the rose-petal-festooned wedding rice or grilled dourade with wholeseed chermoula and turmeric chicken with toum. The dessert chapter offers spiced-filled twists on classics such as a Baharat spice–scented peach cobbler. This book transports you on a fragrant culinary journey through the culinarily rich region that is the Middle East. — Pascale Beale EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2021–22 | 9


Salade II: More Recipes from the Market Table

Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and Diet Dictocrats

By Pascale Beale Pages: 240 Softcover Price: $29.95 Publisher: M27

By Sally Fallon Morell Pages: 674 Softcover Price: $27 Publisher: NewTrends Publishing

Prolific local cookbook author (and regular Edible Santa Barbara columnist) Pascale Beale updates her first Salade book—and in the process adds 40 new recipes to the tried-and-true classics. I have to admit I’m biased, since Pascale has contributed to this magazine since its first issue. Her style of cooking resonates with me like no other cookbook author. Pascale has a clear passion for eating local and shopping at the farmers market, and there is no better way to showcase produce than by creating a salad. But these are not your ordinary salads. Some are substantial enough to serve as a main course or a holiday side dish: Grilled Zucchini and Tarragon Roasted Chicken Salad or Roasted Kale and Sweet Potato Salad. There are salads for every season, and the best way to use this book is to find some delectable produce at the farmers market and then turn to the section in her book about that ingredient and find your inspiration.

Nourishing Traditions is a wonderful foundational cookbook for anyone who eats for health—or wants to start. In addition to hundreds of recipes, author Sally Fallon Morell takes the reader on a journey around the world to learn about the history of traditional peoples, their ancestral diets and what we can learn from these tried-and-true methods of food sourcing and preparation. The first 75 pages cover nutrition information and throughout the book recipe sidebars are filled with additional tips, anecdotes and research. From savory stocks and stews to bubbly ferments and cultured foods, recipes are simple and focus on how to make the most nutrient-dense, traditional versions of your classic favorites. You’ll want to read this book as much as you’ll want to cook from it—and it will serve as a timeless reference for any home cook or chef.

— Krista Harris

— Katie Hershfelt

Wine Country Table: With Recipes that Celebrate California’s Sustainable Harvest

Ottolenghi Flavor By Yotam Ottolenghi and Ixta Belfrage Pages: 317 Hardcover Price: $35 Publisher: Ten Speed Press

Yotam Ottolenghi has already taken the world by storm with his flavor-packed recipes influenced by Mediterranean and European ingredients. Now he pairs up with Ixta Belfrage, who brings more Central and South American ingredients to the mix, to offer a cookbook that’s considerably less complicated than his earlier works. And (surprise!) this one is vegetarian but packed with so much umami you might not even notice. Hence: flavor. — Rosminah Brown

By Jane Fletcher, photographs by Robert Holmes and Sara Remington Pages: 352 Hardcover Price: $45 Publisher: Rizzoli

From north to south, this is an epic journey through wine and food. You can’t help but stop and linger a while longer on the Central Coast with images of Zaca Mesa and profiles of Cambria Winery and Carpinteria’s Hilltop & Canyon Farms. The recipes in the book do an excellent job of highlighting regional ingredients: Lamb Meatballs with Artichokes and Olives and Scallop Crudo with Avocado and Pink Peppercorns. —Krista Harris

10 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2021–22


S A N TA

B A R B A R A

C O U N T Y For some locals, a Saturday morning stroll through one of the area’s biggest farmers markets is a habitual start to every weekend. Arrive at the downtown Santa Barbara Farmers Market empty-handed at 8:30am and leave with armfuls of vegetables, fruit, herbs, eggs, meat, cheese, bread, flowers and plants from as many as 90 vendors. Head to the Tuesday Farmers Market on State Street and make an evening of it—meandering down the street for shopping, wine tasting, live music and dining. Our farmers markets are generally year round and rain or shine, but hours can vary from season to season, so check market websites or call for more information.

CARPINTERIA

Carpinteria Farmers Market

LOMPOC

800 block of Linden Ave. Thu 3–6:30pm SBFarmersMarket.org

Camino Real Marketplace At Storke & Hollister Sun 10am–2pm SBFarmersMarket.org

ORCUTT

Central City Farmers Market Oak Knoll South Corner of Bradley Rd. and Clark Ave. Tue 10am–1pm Farmers Market Orcutt on Facebook

SANTA MARIA

Montecito Farmers Market

SANTA BARBARA

(Seasonal)

Corner of Santa Barbara & Cota St. Sat 8:00am–1pm SBFarmersMarket.org

Old Town Farmers Market

SantaMariaValley.com

SOLVANG

VANDENBERG VILLAGE

Saturday Fishermen’s Market Santa Barbara Harbor Sat 6–11am CFSB.info/Sat

Solvang Village Copenhagen Dr. & First St. Wed 2:30–6:30pm SBFarmersMarket.org

600 & 800 Blocks of State St. Tue 3–7pm SBFarmersMarket.org

Downtown Fridays Corner of Main St. & Broadway Fri 5–8pm

Downtown Santa Barbara Farmers Market

Santa Maria Farmers Market Broadway & Main St. (located in Town Center West) Wed noon–4pm SantaMariaValley.com

1100 & 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd. Fri 8–11:15am SBFarmersMarket.org

Ocean and I St. Fri 2–5pm Facebook.com/ LompocCertified FarmersMarket

GOLETA

Lompoc Certified Farmers Market

MONTECITO

Route One Farmers Market 3745 Constellation Rd. Sun 10am–2pm

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2021–22 | 11


CAROLE TOPALIAN

12 | EDIBLE EDIBLESANTA SANTA BARBARA BARBARA WINTER WINTER 2021–22 2021–22


in

Season this winter WINTER PRODUCE

YEAR-ROUND PRODUCE

WINTER SEAFOOD

Artichokes

Almonds, almond butter (harvested Aug/Sept)

Halibut

Avocados Basil

Apples

Ridgeback shrimp

Mussels

Arugula

Rock fish

Broccoli rabe (rapini)

Beans, dried

Sardines

Brussels sprouts

Beets

Cabbage

Bok choy

Celery

Broccoli

Celery root

Carrots

Chanterelle mushrooms

Cauliflower

Cherimoya

Chard

Blood oranges

BLOOD ORANGES

Cilantro Citron Collards Dill

BRUSSELS SPROUTS

Escarole

Spiny lobster CAULIFLOWER

Fennel Green garlic

Dates (harvested Sept/Oct)

Black cod

Edible flowers

Oysters

Kale

Kohlrabi

Leeks

Kumquats

DILL

Lettuce

Mustard greens

Mushrooms

Onions, green bunching Papayas

Onions, bulb (harvested May/June)

Parsnips

Oranges

Pea greens Peas, snap

Pistachios, pistachio oil (harvested Sept/Oct)

Persimmon

Potatoes

Pineapple guava

KIWI

Radicchio Romanesco

Shallots

Rutabagas

Spinach

Sapote

Sprouts

Strawberries

Squash, winter (harvested July/Oct)

Sunchokes RADICCHIO

Tangerines/Mandarins Turnips

Rock crab BOK CHOY

Sanddabs Urchin

OTHER YEAR-ROUND

URCHIN

Eggs Coffee (limited availability) LEEKS

Dairy (Regional raw milk, artisanal goat- and cow-milk cheeses, butters, curds, yogurts and spreads) Fresh flowers Honey Olives, olive oil

Radishes Raisins (harvested Sept/Oct)

Pomelos

OYSTERS

Clams

Lemons

Limes

Tomatoes, hothouse

YEAR-ROUND SEAFOOD Abalone (farmed)

Kiwi

Sweet potatoes

White seabass

Herbs (Bay leaf, mint, oregano, parsley, rosemary, sage, thyme)

Grapefruit

Spot prawns

Dandelion

Garlic (harvested May/June)

Fava beans

MUSSELS

HONEY

Meat (Beef, chicken, duck, goat, rabbit, pork) SPINACH

Potted plants/herbs Preserves Wheat (Wheat berries, wheat flour, bread, pasta and baked goods produced from wheat grown locally)

Walnuts, walnut oil (harvested Sept/Oct) Yams (harvested Aug/Sept)

PASTA

WALNUTS

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2021–22 | 13


seasonal

Recipe

Winter Scones These are great for weekend or holiday breakfasts. Make the dough the night before and then cut and bake the next morning. MAKES 8 SCONES

2 cups all-purpose, unbleached flour, plus extra for dusting

1 4

cup granulated sugar

1 tablespoon baking powder

1 2

teaspoon baking spices (cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice or

ginger or combination)

1 2

teaspoon salt

Grated peel of 1 small orange, about a teaspoon (optional) 1 stick ( 1 ⁄2 cup) unsalted butter

1 3

cup whole milk

1 large egg, lightly beaten

1 2 cup

dried fruit (raisins, dried cranberries, dried cherries

or chopped dates)

Preheat oven to 450°. Line a baking sheet with parchment or a silicone mat. In the bowl of a food processor, combine the 2 cups flour, sugar, baking powder, nutmeg, salt and orange peel. Pulse a few times to thoroughly combine the ingredients. Add the butter in a few small pieces and process until the mixture resembles coarse meal. Add the milk and just ½ of the egg and pulse only until the dough clumps together.

STE VEN BROWN

Turn the dough out onto a well-floured board and knead it as you incorporate the dried fruit. Shape and roll out the dough into a flattened circle about ½ inch thick. Note: If you like, at this point you can wrap the dough in plastic wrap and refrigerate for a few hours until you are ready to bake. With a pastry cutter or a knife, cut the dough into 8 equal wedges. Place on the lined baking sheet. Brush the tops with the remaining egg and bake for approximately 15 minutes, or until golden brown. Cool slightly and serve with butter or clotted cream and jam. —Krista Harris

14 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2021–22


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seasonal

Recipe

Spicy Cabbage Slaw This is a fresh and flavorful slaw that is great to serve whenever you want something light and refreshing. You can substitute green cabbage for the Napa cabbage, just be sure to slice it very thin. MAKES 6–8 SERVINGS

1 Napa cabbage, thinly sliced (about 1 1 ⁄2 –2 quarts) 2–3 scallions, thinly sliced 1 bunch fresh cilantro, stems removed and chopped (about 1 cup) 1 jalapeño pepper, seeded and finely chopped Handful of chopped peanuts, optional FOR THE DRESSING

1 teaspoon peanut butter 3–4 tablespoons lime juice 2 tablespoons tamari soy sauce 6 tablespoons olive oil Salt and pepper, to taste

Combine the shredded cabbage, scallions, cilantro and jalapeño pepper in a bowl. Sprinkle some chopped peanuts on top if you like.

STE VEN BROWN

In a small bowl, combine the peanut butter, lime juice and soy sauce. Whisk in the olive oil and add salt and pepper to taste and add a little more lime juice if needed. Drizzle some of the dressing over the cabbage and toss thoroughly. Add more dressing if needed to coat thoroughly. Serve immediately. — Krista Harris

16 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2021–22


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seasonal

Recipe

Egg Salad Sandwich What to do with your beautiful onion-skin-dyed Easter eggs? First on the list must be a classic egg salad sandwich. You have many variations to choose from so you won’t get tired of them, even if you’ve made dozens of eggs. Makes 2 sandwiches 3 hard-boiled eggs, peeled and coarsely chopped 2 tablespoons mayonnaise or 1 tablespoon mayonnaise and 1 tablespoon crème fraiche Salt and pepper, to taste

Additions: • A tablespoon of something crunchy, such as capers, chopped celery, chopped pickled vegetables, chopped radishes or chopped onion • A sprinkling of chopped fresh herbs, such as parsley, basil, cilantro, chervil or tarragon • A dash of something tangy, such as lemon or lime juice, or the pickled juice or caper brine if you used either of those or a dash of white wine vinegar Additional mayonnaise and/or mustard (optional) Additional pickled vegetables (optional) Lettuce Combine the eggs, mayonnaise, seasoning and additions and mix until incorporated but WINTER with2021–22 a still2021–22 chunky texture. Taste and add 18 | EDIBLE EDIBLESANTA SANTA BARBARA BARBARA WINTER more seasoning or additions if needed.

STE VEN BROWN

Bread (sliced bread, baguette, bagel, roll, croissant or slider bun)


Coq au Vin This is inspired by Julia Child’s recipe in Mastering the Art of French Cooking. Although, there really is no need to improve on her classic and beloved recipe, I have made a version that is a little easier so that you’ll be tempted to make it more often. What doesn’t change is the delicious, rich flavor of this classic braise of wine and chicken. And it is the perfect make-ahead dinner party dish—you could make the entire thing the day before and then reheat and serve. What to serve with it? Mashed potatoes and a simple green salad are my favorite accompaniments. MAKES 4–6 SERVINGS

12–24 pearl onions, about 1 inch diameter, peeled Olive oil Salt and pepper Butter, 6 tablespoons total

1 2

pound mushrooms, left whole if small, quartered or

sliced if large 3–4 ounces bacon or smoked pork belly, cut into small pieces 4 chicken legs (drumstick and thighs together or cut apart) Salt and pepper

1 4

cup brandy

3 cups (1 bottle) Pinot Noir or other red wine Approximately 1 cup chicken stock or more, if needed 1 1 ⁄2 teaspoons tomato paste 2 cloves garlic, finely minced Sprig of thyme, stems removed 1 bay leaf 3 tablespoons flour Fresh parsley

Preheat oven to 425°. Toss the onions with olive oil to cover and season generously with salt and pepper. Arrange in 1 layer on a baking sheet and roast until tender and golden brown, approximately 15–20 minutes, stirring/turning them over about halfway through. Remove from oven and set aside. Put 2¼ cups of water in a large deep skillet or Dutch oven. With a chopstick or handle of a wooden spoon, measure the level of the liquid. Make a note of that for later. Pour out the water (perhaps on a plant) and dry the skillet. Melt 2 tablespoons of the butter in the same skillet over high heat. When it is foamy, add the mushrooms and cook for 5–10 minutes, or until browned. Remove from heat, season with salt and pepper and set aside. Add another 2 tablespoons of butter to the skillet and add the pork belly or bacon lardoons. Sauté until lightly browned, then push aside to make room for the chicken. Pat the chicken legs dry and season with salt and pepper. Add to the skillet and cook each side for a couple minutes or so, until browned. Remove the chicken pieces and set aside. Carefully pour in the brandy and deglaze the pan, scraping up any browned bits. Add the wine and add the chicken pieces back into the skillet. Add just enough chicken stock so that the chicken is covered. Add the tomato paste, garlic, thyme and bay leaf. Bring to a simmer then cover and cook over low heat for 25–30 minutes, or until chicken is tender and reaches an internal temperature of 165°–170° using an instant read thermometer. Remove the chicken (which will be stained a dramatic wine color) and bring the liquid to a boil. Reduce the liquid until it comes to the mark you measured with the chopstick or wooden spoon earlier. Remove bay leaf and add salt and pepper to taste. Blend the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter with the flour into a paste. Briskly whisk the butter mixture into the liquid and continue cooking for another minute or so until thickened enough to coat the back of a spoon. Add back in the chicken pieces along with the onions and mushrooms and baste everything with the sauce. Serve from the hot Dutch oven or transfer to a serving platter. Sprinkle with a little fresh minced parsley. — Krista Harris

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2021–22 | 19


seasonal

MEGAN SOREL

Recipe

20 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2021–22


Persimmon & Pear Galette

BY JANE CHAPMAN

Slowly drizzle the ice water into the dough until it is slightly shaggy but it can hold together. Pour the dough onto a lightly floured work surface and shape into a small disk about 1 inch thick. Wrap the pastry in plastic wrap and store in the refrigerator for a minimum of 1 hour. You may make this a few days ahead and store until you are ready to assemble and bake. PERSIMMON AND PEAR FILLING

2–3 Bosc pears, halved, cores removed and sliced about 1 ⁄2 inch thick 2 Fuyu persimmons, cores removed and sliced about 1 ⁄2 inch thick

⁄ cup turbinado sugar and some reserved to

1 4

sprinkle on pastry before baking

⁄ teaspoon salt

1 4

⁄ teaspoon vanilla extract

MEGAN SOREL

1 4

Jane Chapman.

P

MAKES 6–8 SERVINGS PASTRY DOUGH

1 3 ⁄4 cups all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon granulated sugar

1 teaspoon fresh orange juice 1 tablespoon unsalted butter cubed 1 large egg

ersimmons are one of my favorite fruits, and as soon as the temperatures drop and the beautiful jeweltoned fruits begin to ripen, I am reminded of this cozy winter galette, a rustic free-form tart. It calls for Fuyu persimmons, which are less sweet and have a nice crunch. When combined with the sweetness of the Bosc pear, they give a well-balanced and -spiced mouthful. Serve this dish warm or at room temperature with fresh whipped cream on the side. This galette makes a wonderful dessert or an accompaniment to a weekend brunch.

3 4 teaspoon

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

fine-grain salt

⁄ cup cold and unsalted butter

3 4

3 tablespoons ice water plus a bit more if needed

Combine the flour, sugar and salt in a bowl and place in the freezer for 10–15 minutes, until very cold. Cut the butter into small cubes In the bowl of an electric mixer, combine the flour and butter mixture until the butter cubes are about pea size.

Combine the sliced fruit, sugar, salt, vanilla extract, cinnamon and orange juice into a bowl and gently stir until the fruit is coated with the sugar, juices and spices. TO ASSEMBLE THE GALETTE

Preheat oven to 400°F. Roll out the dough on a slightly floured surface until it is about 12 inches round. Carefully transfer the rolled-out pastry to a parchment-lined baking sheet. Using a slotted spoon, pile the fruit filling in the center of the pastry dough. Be careful not to pour too much liquid with the fruit as it will make the bottom soggy. Place and space the cubed butter on top of the fruit and begin folding the edges of the dough, leaving a large hole in the center. Beat the egg and brush evenly over the surface of the pastry. Sprinkle a few pinches of sugar evenly over the galette. Bake on the center rack for about 30–45 minutes, until the dough is a golden brown. Due to the delicate nature and quick cooking time of pears you may want to make a foil tent and place over the fruit center if the outer crust needs more time to bake. Jane Chapman is a Santa Barbara native whose parents, Mark and Margaret Huston, are both professional chefs and the owners of Jane restaurants and the beloved Montecito Café. After 20 years of experience in the restaurant business, Jane’s newest venture, The Communal Table Santa Barbara, combines her love of food with meaningful and curated conversations for women. www.CommunalTableSB.com

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2021–22 | 21


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drinkable

LANDSCAPE

A Great

Fruit Cocktail WORDS BY

George Yatchisin

T

he person who used to own our house left us a botanical wonder in the backyard: a pomelo tree. At first, we thought it was a grapefruit, but then its fruit just kept growing larger. That’s only fitting, as the pomelo’s scientific name is Citrus maxima, and you could have slept through your Latin class and still figure out that translation. True to form, the one plucked from the tree that I used to work on this cocktail weighed in at 3.6 pounds. Be careful when gathering the fruit, as a pomelo’s branches have nasty, inchlong spikes Vlad the Impaler would be proud to call friends. Turns out that the pomelo is an ancestor citrus; references to them in China go back 4,000 years. Humans, doing what we do, started hybridizing to get to all the citrus we now know and love, but that doesn’t mean Gramp’s pomelo should be forgotten. The pomelo might not be as well-known as its popular descendant, the grapefruit, because its pith is crazy thick. Under its greenturning-to-yellow-skin, you’ll find at least an inch of white pith, so the fruit reward for the size of the globe is surprisingly small. If you score ¾ cup of juice from one fruit, you’ve done well. But that juice is wonderful, with less astringency than grapefruit. Some compare its taste to a happy grapefruit-tangerine marriage.

Enter Ventura Spirits with this smoother, easier sipping style amaro, as befits laid-back Angelenos. Their website compares it to Aperol, but it’s less sticky and more orange than red in both 24 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2021–22

color and flavor, if that makes sense. It’s sort of a Pacific sunset in a bottle: There’s a hint of regret as to the day’s loss, but also the pick-me-up promise of the night to come. Very citrus-forward, it brings up the classic herbal bitterness and a hint of fennel in its lingering finish. And in this cocktail, it truly sings alongside the pomelo juice, all the ranges of citrus flavors echoing as if they got played on the organ at Disney Concert Hall. That said, a little buffering sweetness never hurt anybody, hence the barely more than a splash of simple syrup. Even there, you get to sneak in more flavor by making it a pomelo simple syrup. Be careful peeling the rind from the fruit; I used a vegetable peeler and then cut those wider strips into narrower ones, about a quarter of an inch wide by two inches long. Once sugared, these are sort of addictive and certainly make a bit of a festive addition to your coupe.

STE VEN BROWN

So, of course, that makes me think, “Cocktail!” The most famous grapefruit concoction is the Greyhound, and as a lover of skinny-headed, speedy dogs and citrusy gin drinks both, I couldn’t resist a variation on one of those. But the Have You Never Been Pomelo Cocktail—in addition to being a homage to Olivia Newton-John and AM 1970s radio (and why not?)— also gets a bit more exotic with another local-ish product, the addition of Ventura Spirits Amaro Angeleno. Amaro, of course, has been a hot topic in mixology circles for the past few years, so every distiller/winery wants to make one. And given that there are easily a hundred Amari just in Italy, there’s lots of room to be expressive in this wonderful world of root- and peel- and herband bark-infused bitterness.


In case you can’t find pomelos, as I imagine not every drinkable landscape is blessed with a pomelo tree, a grapefruit will do, but note that pomelos tend to be sweeter, so you might need a bit more simple syrup in your shaker to balance that out. Or decide you like to be pleasingly puckered. A Have You Never Been Pomelo is particularly refreshing and makes a great brunch drink with its sunshine punch, so consider whipping it up instead of another boring mimosa. The pomelo is also much more popular in Southeast Asia—you’ll find the fruit served up in salads, and some even braise the pith as a meat substitute—to the point it’s often associated with good luck for the Lunar New Year. True enough, for it’s a fruit as big as a full moon.

OPEN MON: 12– 4PM, TUE – WED BY APPOINTMENT, THU–SAT: 12–7PM, SUN: 12– 6PM

388 Bell Street, Los Alamos, CA 93440 805.344.1900 CasaDumetzWines.com

George Yatchisin happily eats, drinks and writes in Santa Barbara. He blogs at GeorgeEats.com.

RECIPES

Have You Never Been Pomelo Cocktail MAKES 2 COCKTAILS

3 ounces London Dry Gin (Ford’s recommended) 1 1⁄2 ounces Ventura Spirits Amaro Angeleno 2 ounces fresh pomelo juice

Extra virgin olive oils, flavored olive oils, olive tapenades, table olives, gourmet vinegars, local food products.

Open Thursday through Monday 11am–5pm 2901 Grand Ave., Los Olivos 805 693-0700 olivehillfarm.com

⁄ ounce pomelo simple syrup

1 2

2 candied pomelo strips

Shake all ingredients in a shaker with ice until well chilled. Strain into a coupe. Garnish with candied pomelo strip.

R E N A U D ’ S

P A T I S S E R I E

S ant a B ar b ara | Lo n g B e ac h | La Can ad a | M o ntec ito w w w. re n au d sb i st ro. co m

Pomelo Simple Syrup and Candied Strips 1 cup water 1 cup granulated sugar, plus additional for strip-rolling As many thin strips from the peel of a pomelo you care to peel and cut

Combine water in sugar in a small saucepan and bring to a boil. Set to simmer and add the pomelo strips. Simmer for 5 minutes. Take off the heat. Once cool, you can pour off and bottle the simple syrup. Refrigerated, it will last for weeks. Let the strips dry slightly. Then in a shallow bowl with a few tablespoons of sugar, gently roll the strips around so they get more sugar-coated. Use as much sugar as you want—these can be as sweet as you’d like. (I’d advise starting with just 3–4 tablespoons of sugar to start.) Spread out the sugared strips on a silicon mat or parchment paper to dry. Once dry, keep in a plastic bag or glass container. These will last for weeks stored in a cool, dry place. Assuming you don’t eat them all as candy even when you’re not making a cocktail.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2021–22 | 25


LIFE IN THE VINES DORMANCY WORDS BY

Adam McHugh

H

ere in the Santa Ynez Valley, the calendar turns by our first afternoon cloud cover since late April. around the life cycle of the grapevine rather than the To the north, the winter sunset casts swaths of dusty rose and countdown of the traditional seasons. garnet onto the San Rafael Mountains, the foothills in emerald The conventional wisdom of the seasons doesn’t seem to shadow beneath. On the southern edge, thick fog foams like apply here. We don’t feel autumn chill until Thanksgiving. whitecaps over the Santa Ynez range. All the green growth that Winter is January, and when the first 80° day arrives in early exploded out of the vines is extinguished, and in a few weeks the April, our people celebrate the return of summer like they woody canes will be piled up like old bones and cremated into thought it would never come. What a relief after those frigid ash. I am glad for the wines that still breathe in the wineries after 60° days in February. It is the rhythmical changes in the vines the lights are switched off, living memories of a harvest gone by. around us— seasons of Dormancy, Bud Break, Veraison and The past is not dead as long as there is old wine. Harvest—that help us tell time. This is but a brief pause in the labor of the vineyard because The descent into Dormancy is a beautiful death. Lingering while the vines go dormant, vineyard workers do not. The first leaves crinkle in the November winds, taking their final bow in task is to sow cover crops. If you take a jaunt into Happy Canyon costumes of gold and rust and in the short afternoons of January, burnt orange. The vineyards with ages of unobstructed mountain The vine masters call this stage and the liquidambar trees that views expanding before you, you speckle town parks are our will see hillsides covered with miles senescence—when the leaves change only arenas for fall foliage, but of auburn-tinged sticks. If there has and slowly die, and the energizing sap they do put on a good show. been early rain, there will be a lush The vine masters call this stage goes home to the ground for a long sleep. carpet of green between the rows that senescence—when the leaves hides the loamy clay soils. change and slowly die, and the Sometimes this green carpet energizing sap goes home to the ground for a long sleep. during Dormancy is woven with wild grasses and weeds, but The work in the cellars takes a welcome holiday. The usually it is a cocktail of seeds carefully mixed for the healing bubbling energies of Harvest have waned, and the fragrant grape of the soil. The key ingredient is nitrogen. Plants like clover spirit that filled the October air has dissipated. New wines have and peas capture the nitrogen out of the air and impart it into been entrusted to barrel, and the slow breaths they take through the soil. Nitrogen is milk for the vines: essential for growth and the wood will sustain them through winter. protein development. Cereal crops like barley, oats and rye also replenish tired soils with nitrogen and carbon, at the same time Tourists take their cue from the pace of the wineries and, they break up the dirt to allow oxygen to penetrate. aside from the week of Thanksgiving and the week after Christmas, the tasting rooms fall quiet. The lone exception is Cover crops are surprisingly clever little plants. They hold the Danish village of Solvang, which looks like it was plucked moisture, vital in an arid climate like Santa Barbara County, straight out of the wintry slumber of Hans Christian Andersen. but have shallow roots that do not compete with the long roots Solvang resembles a fairy-tale Christmas village all year round, of the vines. They prevent erosion in wet winters. They attract but during the holiday season it lights up like Santa Lucia and beneficial insects like ladybugs and lacewings that will prey on enfolds horse-led carriages of tourists into a cozy Juletide hug. aphids, which would otherwise feast on new spring growth like Easter brunch. And, with enough rain, peas will show off their For me, a gentle grief accompanies the fade into Dormancy. soft purple flowers, and daikon radish its lily-white blossoms It is a moment of wistful pause, a reflection on a season until they go to seed. well lived but now departed. The sparkling, endlessly blue horizons of August are replaced by the closer, steel-blue skies of Later in Dormancy, winter pruning will begin in earnest. In December. And on the eastern side of the valley, we are shaded other parts of the world, vines are pruned back in January or early Opposite: Early February at Martian Vineyard in Alisos Canyon.

26 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2021–22


STEVEN BROWN

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2021–22 | 27


JEFFRE Y BLOOM

Most of the old wood is pruned away, leaving a few carefully chosen buds.

28 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2021–22


JEFFRE Y BLOOM

Looking through the rows at Zaca Mesa vineyard.

February, but here pruning is delayed as long as possible. Pruning alerts the plant to start producing new growth. The temperate winters here threaten an early bud break, which is a farmer’s nightmare because the frost danger looms until April. If it weren’t for the plant enzymes that keep them in hibernation through the winter, the vines here would be rousted out of bed by a warm spell in February, and all our farmers would need therapy. Almost all the vineyard work here is done by hand, and as we get closer to the annual springtime miracle, the vines will be full of workers, pruning shears at the ready. The speedy and skilled teams of immigrant vineyard workers are the backbone of the wine industry here. Most of the old wood will be mercilessly snipped off, clearing the way for new growth. A few carefully chosen buds will be left on the arms of each vine. I have whiled long afternoons pruning in my friend Matt’s vineyard, McKinney Family Vineyards. It is surprisingly complicated work, requiring a myriad of decisions about what to take and what to leave. We would all start at the same time, but a couple of hours later my friends would be back at the house—two glasses in. And I would still be halfway down my row as the sun dropped behind the mountains, agonizing over every cut. “Don’t quit your day job, McHugh!” they would heckle me from behind a bottle of Sangiovese. But I know my row produced far better wine than their careless, unfeeling work. Pruning is about energy management. It harnesses the energy of the plant to produce the best possible fruit. If you leave the vine to manage itself, it will pop out shoots and leaves in every which way. Vines care not for wine. Their only mission is to reproduce,

and the birds seem to be quite undiscriminating consumers. If it were up to them, vines would produce a jungle of vegetation and a mass of watery fruit. It is up to humans to sculpt vines in such a way that just the right amount of foliage produces just the right amount of fruit. It is a high-wire balancing act. Vineyard managers try to match the vigor of the vine with its growing conditions, and to channel that energy into small amounts of choice fruit. In the shaping of grapevines, less is more. The air over Santa Ynez tells us when pruning season is under way. The late winter winds carry primal aromas of smoldering branches, that ancient ritual that reminds us life will be reborn from the ashes. Truly in this dead season, there are signs of life everywhere. In California, it is the summers that are brown, and the winters are green. Parched creek beds start to murmur, and horses come out of their stables to feast on prairies of lush grass. It isn’t the revelry of Bud Break, when the valley will burst in salvos of color, but Dormancy here is a verdant and bucolic season, a still and glossy pond waiting for life to bubble over again. Dormancy is not the last phase of the vine’s annual cycle. It is the first season of the new one. The vines are barren, the leaves decompose and the cuttings go to ash. Death is making way for life. Adam McHugh’s new book, Blood from a Stone, will be released in December 2022. It tells the story of how Adam went from hospice chaplain and grief counselor in the San Gabriel Valley to wine educator and tour guide in the Santa Ynez Valley.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2021–22 | 29


Photo: Saverio Blasi/shutterstock.com 30 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2021–22

edible Communities |

S IG N AT U RE

S E C T ION


WE ARE WHAT WE EAT It’s Time To Make Food Decisions With the Climate Crisis in Mind

STO RY

BY

Twilight Greenaway, senior editor of Civil Eats,

produced in partnership with civileats.com

If we had been told, a decade ago, that so many climate-

they said that other parts of the world—developing na-

fueled disasters would hit the food system so soon, would

tions with little infrastructure and large numbers of subsis-

we have believed it?

tence farmers—would face the worst of the problem. And

If someone had described the catastrophic flooding of the Missouri river that submerged a million acres of corn

those of us in North America? We’d be fine until at least the end of the century.

and soybeans in 2019 (followed a year later by winds in the

Then someone turned the lights back on, the economists

same region that were so destructive they flattened corn si-

thanked the audience and everyone went home. I wrote

los), produce crops in Texas freezing in April, winemakers

about the lecture, quoted the experts on the science and was

having to throw away entire vintages because they tasted of

careful to take a similarly calm tone, as if I were writing from

wildfire smoke, shellfish in British Columbia being literally

a great distance about something that may or may not occur.

cooked alive in the ocean and ranchers throughout the West

Of course, some climate scientists were already issuing

being forced to sell off tens of thousands of cattle so they

dire warnings at that point, and many had made concerns

wouldn’t starve due to drought—would we have listened?

about our ability to feed ourselves central to their pleas

Would we have done more to prepare?

for action.

I can’t help but think back to a lecture I sat in on in

But most of us had no idea how urgently we needed to

2008 on the future of food and climate change by a pair of

prepare for what we’re now seeing play out in the food sys-

Ivy League economists. I had seen An Inconvenient Truth

tem—and in the world at large. Indeed, the stakes couldn’t

and was serious about local food. And I had a hunch that

be higher. Food production has been rocked to the core and

reducing my “food miles” wouldn’t cut it.

many small and medium-scale farmers are contemplating

The economists talked about the potential boon to crop yields, due to “increased photosynthesis” and “CO2

throwing in the towel. This fact was driven home for me this summer, as I

fertilization,” but added that warming temperature and ris-

trudged through ankle-deep mud on my family’s small farm

ing evaporation would balance one another out, at least in

in Captain Cook, Hawaii—on what was once the “dry side

our lifetimes. Some places would get too wet, and some

of the island” but has seen record-level, nearly non-stop rain-

would be too dry, they warned. And, as if to reassure us,

fall for the past year. My mother, a farmer, was dismayed at

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2021–22 | 31 ediblecommunities.com


the constant rain’s impact on her orchards, and by the host of new

be marketing ploys, but it’s clear that they’ve realized “sustain-

invasive species—from fire ants and wild boars to slugs that carry

ability” is a term they must use literally, as in, do their business

a brain-eating parasite—that are thriving there due to warming

models have a future?

temperatures. The soil has been consistently saturated with water,

When it comes to making sure the rest of us have a future,

and the coffee and fruit trees are suffering from multiple fungal

however, I’m betting on the work of small-scale farmers and

diseases at once. The vegetables in the gardens are often stunted

ranchers—and more of them working at a human scale—as one

and mildewy as the sun has stubbornly refused to shine.

of our most important solutions to the climate crisis.

And I thought about those self-assured economists when I

If done right, farming and ranching can help bring the natu-

returned home to drought-stricken Northern California, where

ral world back into balance. And it has the potential to reverse our

I saved water from my kitchen and shower and lugged it to the

current scenario: millions of acres of land covered in monocrops

tiny garden I struggle to keep alive through the dry season. Most

growing in soil that is overly tilled, void of most life and actively

of the small-scale farms in the area didn’t have the luxury of re-

washing into the ocean nearly every time it rains.

claimed water; instead, they found themselves abandoning doz-

Soil holds three times more carbon globally than the atmo-

ens of acres at a time, making radical changes to their business

sphere does. And it can hold more if it’s managed in a way that

models, and discontinuing their CSAs. Meanwhile, the ongoing,

brings more of it back to life. But to do that we need producers

often terrifying onslaught of wildfires made the mere thought of

who are immensely curious and dedicated—who see the chal-

rain seem like a mirage on the other end of a very long desert.

lenge at hand and want to rise to meet it.

The fact that these “new normals” have already had a dra-

They need to work in concert, and they need to represent a

matic impact on the food system probably shouldn’t be a sur-

much wider swath of the population—here in North America

prise. Global temperatures have already risen 1.5 degrees Celsius

that means intentionally making space for exponentially more

above pre-industrial levels and the impacts are evident. The sixth

young people, more Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BI-

assessment report published by the Intergovernmental Panel on

POC) producers, and more LGBTQ producers. It also means

Climate Change (IPCC) in August warned of significant drops in

passing systemic policies that help them explore, invest in and

crop yields for corn, wheat, rice and other cereal grains if global

modernize the farming practices that have long been successful

temperatures hit the 2 degree C level. If that happens, the report

at cooling the planet.

said, there will be “more times of year when temperatures exceed

In plain terms that means we need more perennial crops, trees

what crops can stand” and “risks across energy, food and water

on farms (i.e., agroforestry and silvopasture), managed grazing,

sectors could overlap spatially and temporally, creating new and

cover crops, waffle gardens and other methods of deep-soil plant-

exacerbating current hazards, exposures, and vulnerabilities that

ing, crop diversity, prescriptive burns, seed sovereignty, local food

could affect increasing numbers of people and regions.”

and farm infrastructure, and multitrophic aquaculture.

Among the clear list of hazards are the “food shocks” caused

We need to help more farmers control weeds without tilling

by extreme weather events—and they show no sign of slowing

the soil. We need more compost on the surface of the soil and

down. For these reasons, food prices are expected to grow at a

more mycelia and living ecosystems below. We also need more

steadier clip than most of us have experienced in our lifetimes.

plants at the center of our plates. We need to spend more time

According to the United Nation’s Food and Agriculture Organi-

listening to Indigenous communities and remembering that our

zation (FAO), for instance, global food prices rose by nearly 33

needs are inextricable from the needs of the natural world, and

percent between September 2020 and September 2021.

the ecosystems that have kept it in balance for millennia.

It’s not just farmers who are scrambling to respond. Many of

Most of this probably won’t require new cap and trade

the world’s largest, most powerful food companies are starting

markets, new consumer labels or new technology. But it will

to examine their supply chains in a new light, hoping to posi-

require more hands—and very likely a different, more collec-

tion themselves as part of the solution. Multinational food com-

tive approach to land ownership, at a moment when building

panies like General Mills, Smithfield, Unilever and Danone are

housing is considered a much more valuable use of land than

all publicizing the changes they’re making in their supply chains

producing food.

to address emissions and rethink their farming practices. Some

None of this will mean much if we don’t also stop burning

of these changes could have a real impact and others might just

fossil fuels—and subsidizing that burning on a global scale. But continued

32 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2021–22

edible Communities |

S IG N AT U RE

S E C T ION

ediblecommunities.com


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36 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2021–22


there’s more and more agreement among scientists and cli-

their foods, it often has the curious effect of making us

mate advocates that we also need to turn more of our agri-

into the kinds of people who want to vote for—and fight

cultural soil into a carbon sink, and that doing so is a matter

for—systemic change.

of how—not if.

I was thinking about this recently while lugging a

The good news is that a lot of smart people are already

bucket of dishwater out to my garden and feeling a little

working on the how. And that’s where your dinner—and

like I was wasting my time, as my neighbors were still turn-

breakfast, lunch, snacks—enter the picture.

ing on their hoses. It hurts my back, it’s absurdly time con-

There’s a healthy debate in both agriculture and climate

suming. But every time I do it, I am made again and again

circles about the value of individual action versus the need

into the person who notices water and who keeps noticing

for systemic change. And food, thankfully, lies at the in-

water—who notices plants, notices soil. And being that

tersection of both. What we do—and eat—every day is

person is what makes me ache for climate policy that pri-

who we are. When we support people who produce food

oritizes survival for all.

with soil health and the climate in mind—whether that’s

Can we change the food system in time to help cool the

buying from them directly, using a farmers’ market dollar-

planet? That’s an open question. Do we have any real choice

matching program or dining in restaurants that cook with

but to try? As I see it, absolutely not.

Closing Thoughts From Our Founder Thank you for joining us on these pages, the third in a series of thought leadership pieces from Edible Communities. We would like to send a special thanks to our partners for this issue, Twilight Greenaway, Naomi Starkman and the team at Civil Eats who made this story possible. Telling powerful stories about local food and community has been the mission of Edible Communities for the past 20 years. And while I know we’ve had an impact on the way food is grown and consumed throughout North America, now more than ever there is a greater urgency for all of us to do more. A lot more. As Twilight so elegantly points out in this article, taking individual action daily—whether recycling household water in our garden or demanding more inclusivity for those raising the food we eat—is what keeps us aware and makes us pay attention. It is what makes it impossible for us to ignore the honest reality inherent in: “What we do—and eat—every day is who we are.” And it is what will ultimately lead to systemic change. During this holiday season and as we begin a new year, I want to express my deep and enduring gratitude to the network of wildly talented individuals who are the lifeblood of Edible Communities—the publishers, editors, contributors and staff who so diligently work to bring you these important stories throughout the year—every single one of whom has courageously and tirelessly fought to keep their local food communities alive, even in the face of a global pandemic. With independent journalism being threatened today more than at any time in our history, it’s especially important for us to support their efforts. The ability to maintain editorial independence and to dive deeply into urgent issues like the climate crisis are critical to the health of our society. That is why organizations like Civil Eats (civileats.com) are so important to us and to our mission. I encourage you to subscribe to their newsletter, donate, be informed, pay attention—help effect change. Tracey Ryder, Co-Founder & CEO Edible Communities

edible Communities |

S IG N AT U RE

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THE DIGESTER Organic Waste Earns Its Keep WORDS BY

Janice Cook Knight +

Anaerobic digestion facility.

38 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2021–22

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

Lael Wageneck


Entrance to the Tajiguas Landfill and ReSource Center.

I

f I were a hawk flying over the 101 between Refugio and Gaviota, I would notice some large, recently constructed buildings in

the landscape. This is where the City of Santa Barbara and parts of the County of Santa Barbara bring their refuse. Humans might not notice it from the freeway: the Tajiguas Landfill. All civilizations need a place like this. Ancient peoples left middens—refuse piles where they dumped their garbage, to be discovered by archaeologists. What will archaeologists discover about us? Our landfills are filled with scrap lumber, discarded furniture, old shoes, plastic containers, doggie-doo bags, mattresses and plastic toys of all sorts. These items in our landfill seem like a waste of resources, and they are. Some of this could have been recycled. Yet many human-made things aren’t easy to recycle because they’re made of a mix of materials. Think of those old sneakers: a rubber sole; a fabric top made of polyester, canvas or leather; metal grommets; perhaps some plastic components too — all of those might be part of a shoe. Some of that is organic and biodegradable, some of that is recyclable, but no one is going to take the shoe apart to recycle it. So into the landfill it goes. EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2021–22 | 39


Materials Recovery Facility What processes take place inside the MRF?

1

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5 6

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8

Both RESIDENTIAL and BUSINESS TRASH and RECYCLABLES end up at the MRF. RECYCLABLES are processed separately from trash. Workers manually pre-sort and bags are removed. Materials then make their way through the MRF and are processed. TRASH is placed into a size-reducing machine to break it up. Various screens sort material into different-sized streams. Heavier, organic material falls through a special screen and is sent to the ANAEROBIC DIGESTION FACILITY where it is processed into compost and energy. Other screens allow small objects like glass particles to pass through—while large items bounce over. Forced-air fans lift paper and fiber-based products to their sorting areas. Magnetic drums attract metals away— from plastics, which are segregated by types. Separated recyclable commodities are baled and stacked. They are ready to be sold and made into new products. (60% of the trash sent to the MRF is reclaimed for use). Unfortunately, not all of the waste going through the MRF is recyclable; 40% of the trash is sent to the landfill and buried.

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All civilizations need a place like this. Ancient peoples left middens — refuse piles where they dumped their garbage, to be discovered by archaeologists. What will archaeologists discover about us? Our landfills are filled with scrap lumber, discarded furniture, old shoes, plastic containers, doggie-doo bags, mattresses and plastic toys of all sorts. These items in our landfill seem like a waste of resources, and they are. Some of this could have been recycled. Yet many human-made things aren’t easy to recycle because they’re made of a mix of materials. Think of those old sneakers: a rubber sole; a fabric top made of polyester, canvas or leather; metal grommets; perhaps some plastic components too— all of those might be part of a shoe. Some of that is organic and biodegradable, some of that is recyclable, but no one is going to take the shoe apart to recycle it. So into the landfill it goes. What’s really surprising about our landfill, though, is how much food is in it. According to Carlyle Johnston, project leader at the County of Santa Barbara, food makes up about 25% of the waste in our garbage cans. If we all made home compost diligently, that number could be far less or even nonexistent. But for the general population, it’s 25%. Other items, like wood and items made of plant materials (like tissues, paper towels or plant-based fabrics) bring the organic total up to at least 30%, possibly as much as 40%. Organic materials break down much more quickly than shoes (which have petrochemical-based materials) or polyester mattresses or discarded plastic toys. As the food and other organics break down in the landfill, methane gas is released, and if not captured and treated, contributes to climate change. Once upon a time, Elings Park was known as the Las Positas Landfill. Many of us never knew that or have forgotten, since it closed in 1965. Santa Barbara continues to capture methane escaping from this closed landfill. (The majority of landfills, even closed ones, are mandated to capture and treat landfill gas.) At Tajiguas, the County has built a ReSource Center to better harvest our collective waste (see table on page 40). The Materials Recovery Facility (MRF, or “murf ”) will separate the various wastes. A specialized processing plant, known affectionately as the “digester,” will convert the organic components removed from the mixed trash and turn it into a form of compost, while also capturing the biogas (a mixture of primarily methane and CO2 ) and distributing back to the energy grid via Southern California Edison. An “anaerobic” digester, it can break down organic matter in the absence of oxygen. The landfill gas from previously buried waste powers up the Materials Recovery Facility. It’s estimated that our current landfill has enough capacity to last less than a decade before it’s completely full. Adding the new facility will extend its life and will also divert 60% more materials from the landfill. This will bring our total recovered materials up to 85%. State law mandates require our community to recover at least 75%. Various wastes are separated at the Materials Recovery Facility.

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The PROCESS at the Anaerobic Digestion Facility 1 2

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7

Organics separated from trash are trucked from the MRF to the AD Facility. This organic material is then combined with green waste and placed inside a bunker. While the material is inside, percolate—a liquid infused with bacteria—is circulated throughout the bunker. Bacteria used in this process comes from cow manure and helps create methane. The material finishes breaking down into a product called digestate. Conveyor belts take the digestate to the top deck. Loaders then place the digestate with additional green waste into windrows for composting. Once the organics are mature compost, the material is processed to remove residual materials such as broken glass, rocks, or plastic. Finished compost can then be marketed for community use. Biogas is collected from the digesters and converted to energy, which will be used to power the facility and also be distributed to the community.

When our landfill has reached capacity, the plan is to keep the ReSource Center operational, at least for some time, to continue to recover materials. After recovery, trash that must still be buried will be transported to whatever new landfill spot is chosen. Environmental criticism of the project was understandable. People don’t like to see more waste processing added to our beautiful Gaviota Coast, not a great place to put a landfill in the first place. When the landfill was built there in the 1960s, it just seemed like open space to many. Now we want to preserve that land. I visited the landfill and took a tour of the Materials Recovery Facility just a few days before the fire. I was struck by the beautiful view. As part of the tour, we drove over the previously buried hills of trash. There went the ’60s and ’70s; another hill, the ’80s. It was strange to think that what looked like a hill was really man-made and filled with deeply buried trash. The Tajiguas Landfill utilizes falcons and a falconer to keep seagulls from rampaging the trash that is being buried. Before the falcons arrived, thousands of seagulls came to pick through the leavings, impacting the local beach with their droppings. The day we visited, we saw the falconer at work, but did not see the working falcons, as both—two females—were busy on a mission. There were no seagulls in sight. Given that wasted food is such a large portion of our bins (and that food is easily biodegradable), it makes sense to find a way to process and use it. The trash coming out of our cans is now separated on large conveyor belts. Misdirected plastics that can be recycled are removed and sent to the recycling center.

Above: Food scraps and other organic waste is directed to the digester, where it is made into compost.

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Top: Organic material is combined with green waste and placed inside a bunker. Bottom: The finished compost.

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Top: Screens filter out unwanted material from the compost before it goes out for distribution. Bottom: The wood chip biofilter at the Materials Recovery Facility.

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Even though residents have designated blue bins for recycling at home, about 30% of what goes into our trash cans is recyclable plastic, cans or paper. These items are easy to recycle. Why are we still so sloppy? It can be confusing to stay on top of what is allowed to be recycled. Food scraps and other organic waste is now directed to the digester, where it is made into compost. This is not the world’s purest compost, though it’s still quite useful. Because it’s coming from a mixed waste stream (our garbage bins), bits of ground glass could find their way in, making it unsuitable for row crops such as lettuce or broccoli. It could, however, be used for orchards, golf courses, parks and other types of farms. It will be tested and free of toxic materials before it’s released for such use. Carlyle Johnston says the digester has flexibility for future use. If the County chooses to collect food waste at home in the future, the new facility can compost that, along with restaurant food waste that is already being collected, to produce a very clean compost that could be either sold residentially or to farmers planting row crops. The ReSource Center was nearly fully operational this fall before the fire damaged some of the equipment. Here are its statistics: Besides diverting 60% more waste from the landfill than was previously possible, the ReSource center will reduce greenhouse gas emissions comparable to the amount produced by 28,000 cars. It has created 100 permanent jobs and produces enough energy to power 2,000 homes. The ReSource Center operates from the recovered energy it produces. In the future, where will we construct another landfill? When this one closes, the County may divert waste to an existing landfill that still has room, such as the one in Santa Maria, or in Simi Valley (even though it’s in Ventura County, it’s about the same distance away.) Yet, nobody wants a landfill in their backyard. Other counties don’t want our waste. Trucking garbage a long distance is expensive, too. Perhaps in the future we will invent a system for processing waste that requires less space. Maybe we’ll figure out what to do with all those plastics that are not easily recycled. Or perhaps laws will be in place that require that our people-made products return to the earth more easily. Metal, glass, cardboard, paper and food waste are all recyclable or biodegradable. Could we make better use of these and eliminate plastics? Could we simply use less? Being a prosperous city and one with an abundance of tourism, Santa Barbara generates more trash per capita than lessaffluent communities. A lot more. We buy and use lots of stuff, including food-to-go with those pesky containers, simply because we can afford to. One thing we can do something about is making compost at home. During our tour of the facility Johnston said, “If you want to make a difference, compost.” (Look for more on that in a future article.) With a clear vision, our hawk flies over the Gaviota Coast. She circles near the beach and doubles back over the hills. In the generations of hawks that have lived here, the landfill is just an

interesting contemporary feature, one that began not so long ago and someday will end. A loose wing feather drops to the earth while she flies. No one need worry about picking it up and recycling it. It’s made of organic material that finds its way into the ecosystem without any help from humanity. It already knows what to do. Janice Cook Knight is an award-winning writer, cookbook author and cooking teacher based in Santa Barbara. She enjoys gardening, music and the science of cooking, and is thrilled by a good recipe. She blogs with her daughter Sarah Migliaccio Barnes at TriedAndTrueKitchen.com and can be found on Instagram @triedtruekitchen.

Natural Resources Everthing We Have Comes From the Earth Renewable or Recycling Carbon Resource Product Non-Renewable Location Footprint Recyclability Trees Paper Renewable Vietnam High Trees Cardboard Renewable

Indonesia & Vietnam

Non- Sand Glass California Renewable Oil Plastic

Non- Renewable

1–2x

High 1–2x Low Forever

California Medium 1–2x & Malaysia

Non- Bauxite Aluminum California High Renewable

Forever

Non- Iron Steel East Asia Renewable

Forever

Low

More Information The Alisal Fire in October breached Santa Barbara County’s landfill and some damage resulted, especially to the wood chip biofilter at the Materials Recovery Facility. However most parts of the facility are fully operational again and the ReSource Center is open again for tours. For more information, visit www.lessismore.org/articles/take-a-tour-of-theresource-center/ According to Cal Recycle (California’s Department of Resources Recycling and Recovery), California currently leads the nation in waste management: 65% of materials from municipal waste are being diverted away from landfills and are either being recycled or used to make biogas for energy, or used to produce compost or other reusable materials. There are already 15 operational digesters in California similar to the one we have built in Santa Barbara at Tajiguas; 11 more will become active in California in the next year. Europe already has several hundred of these types of facilities. For more info, visit CalRecycle.ca.gov.

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48 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2021–22


A SWEET SEASON Sugar and Spice and All Things Nice WORDS AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY

A

few years ago I was invited to my first-ever cookie exchange. The host gave me a crash course on the history and etiquette of such an event. Food gift exchanges date back to medieval times, when the sharing of sweetmeats and delicacies was a mark of hospitality and respect. In the same vein, cookie exchanges have a long, revered tradition in the United States. Evidently there was much to consider, and careful planning went into which cookie to make and how many cookies I should bring. I pored over books, debating trying something new, but decided to bake my favorite tried-and-true shortbread, making 3-D Christmas trees and reindeers using some nifty cookie molds I found in a local store. I had no idea what to expect and was stunned by the assortment of confections that covered every horizontal surface in the house. From gingerbread men to pecan tassies, from snickerdoodles to rugelach, from oatmeal raisin to chocolate chip, the tables fairly groaned under the weight of those beautiful handcrafted treats. My children and I were enchanted. This was a tradition we could whole-heartedly sink our sweet teeth into. There is a Norwegian proverb I adore: “Cookies are made of butter and love.” That encapsulates everything a cookie should be—a mouthful of deliciousness, a sweet treat, all the more so when you are making them for someone you care about. There are few things that give more pleasure than a homemade delectable gift, and given that we are heading into the sweetest time of year, what better than to explore the seasons indulgent traditions? In an unscientific survey of friends and family I posed the following question: “From fruitcakes to ginger cookies, from brownies to blondies, what sweet treat makes your family holidays special?”

Pascale Beale

Traditional favorites topped many people’s responses, Christmas pudding, fruitcakes—Irish, whiskey and classic versions—apple, pecan and pumpkin pies, holiday cookies and shortbread galore, plenty of Norwegian Krumcake, Yule logs and so on. Family recipes passed down through generations also proliferated, such as a buckwheat honey cake to celebrate the Jewish New Year, a favorite tamale recipe to celebrate Christmas in California and, as my daughter reminded me, we always make a cranberry coulis to serve on Thanksgiving Day. There were also a few unusual flavor combinations and traditions that piqued my curiosity, including homemade cinnamon buns served with Bloody Marys on Thanksgiving morning, stuffed and baked orange shells filled with mashed sweet potatoes and topped with a marshmallow, and sending favorite cookie recipe ingredients packed in jar. More on the latter later. All these sweet musings made me think in earnest about some of the dishes I have planned for our family’s gatherings in the upcoming season. We are, like many families, an amalgam of cultural origins whose culinary traditions have morphed over time into a Californian / pan-European hybrid. Our multi-generational French-English family holds strong views on anything to do with food, particularly at this time of year, and my children hold fast to these gastronomic mores, especially the sugary ones. Apple tarts or crumbles and pecan pie at Thanksgiving; panettone, Christmas pudding and Buche de Noel at Christmas. Should I turn everything on its head and try all new dishes? At the mere mention of this, there were a few shrieks of disapproval similar to those voiced when I suggested an everything but the turkey Thanksgiving: “What? No apple tart, no mince pies, no Buche de Noel, no pudding? Are you kidding?!”

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2021–22 | 49


I decided to keep some (yes, the mince pies stay on the menu) and to try a new twist to other favorites such as refashioning our family quatre quart recipe (French pound cake) into a pear-filled Thanksgiving treat, and creating a new winter pavlova. If the past 18 long pandemic months have taught us anything, it’s been about our ability to pivot and change with the times. There is something appealing about adapting desserts to a new season, and given that the average Christmas Day hereabouts is rarely below 65°, I love the idea of some light(er) desserts. Let’s hope the family agrees. For those who cannot make it around the table, we have enthusiastically decided to adopt the tradition of sending

cookie ingredients in a jar, complete with the recipe tucked into a card. We may not be able to have a cookie exchange, but we can still share the season’s delights with our friends. My son and I worked on perfecting the recipe together and, after a few test batches, have come up with a drop cookie we named the PCC (Post-Covid Cookie) in the hope that it will, eventually, bring us all back together again. Pascale Beale grew up in England and France surrounded by a family that has always been passionate about food, wine and the arts. She was taught to cook by her French mother and grandmother. She is the author of The Menu for All Seasons, Salade II, Les Fruits and Les Legumes. Visit her website and blog: The Market Table at PascalesKitchen.com.

RECIPES

The PCC in a Jar I particularly like oatmeal raisin cookies, but I also like cookies with a little crunch, and something that is not too sweet. In researching cookies in a jar, I came across a recipe with the terrific name of Cranberry Hootycreeks (named after the road the author, Susan O’Dell, lives on) which inspired the basis for this Post-Covid Cookie (PCC). The mixture looks very pretty in a Mason jar. Remember to add the recipe instructions along with the container so that the recipient can bake them! MAKES 24–30 COOKIES

YOU WILL ALSO NEED TO ADD: 5 ounces (1 1 ⁄4 sticks) softened butter 1 large egg, whisked 1 teaspoon vanilla paste or pure vanilla extract TO PACK THE JAR:

In a small bowl combine the flour, salt, baking soda, cardamom, cinnamon and pepper. Pour the flour mixture into a clean and dry quartsize Mason jar. Tap the jar on the counter to compact the flour a little.

teaspoon salt

Layer the remaining ingredients—the rolled oats, brown sugar, granulated sugar, golden raisins, cranberries, pistachios, pecans and almonds—into the jar, packing each layer down. The jar will be completely full.

teaspoon baking soda

TO MAKE THE COOKIES:

teaspoon ground cardamom

Preheat oven to 350°F.

teaspoon ground cinnamon

In a standing mixer fitted with a paddle attachment (or in a large mixing bowl using a sturdy wooden spoon), cream the butter until it is light and fluffy. Add the egg and vanilla and stir to combine. Don’t worry if the egg is not completely absorbed by the butter. Add all the jar ingredients and mix together well.

INGREDIENTS FOR THE QUART-SIZED MASON JAR: 1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour 1 2 3 4 1 2 1 2

6 grinds black pepper 1 1 ⁄4 cups rolled oats

cup packed brown sugar

cup granulated sugar

cup golden raisins

cup dried cranberries

cup pistachios

cup pecans

cup sliced almonds

2 3 1 3 1 4 1 4 1 2 1 4 1 4

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Shape the cookie mixture into 1-inch balls. Place them on a parchmentlined sheet pan or cookie sheet at least 2 inches apart. Bake for 12–14 minutes, or until the edges of the cookies are lightly golden. Remove from the oven and let sit on the cookie sheet for at least 5 minutes, then transfer to a cookie rack to cool. Once completely cooled they can be kept in an airtight container.


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Winter Pavlova

Pear Almond Cake

Long thought of as summertime treats, pavlovas can be glorious at any time of year. It’s hard to resist ethereal meringues and clouds of whipped cream. And what could be better than individual pavlova cakes, glistening with jewel-like pomegranates, topped with infused berries and powdered with a dusting of sugar? It’s a showstopping, fairy-tale confection if ever there was one—which hopefully will have everyone dreaming of sugarplums, lords a-leaping and ladies dancing.

I have been making quatre quart (a French pound cake) since I was a little girl. The recipe is a family favorite and over the years I have adapted it to incorporate many different fruits. From apricots to apples, bananas to chocolate, it is versatile and oh so good. This version highlights pears. The result is a pretty, moist cake. The almonds give a nice crunch to the topping and balance the soft sweetness of the pears. If there are leftovers, it’s pretty good with a cup of coffee for breakfast too!

MAKES 8–10 SERVINGS 4 egg whites at room temperature Pinch of salt 8 ounces (just under 1 cup) ultra-fine sugar (you can make your own by processing granulated sugar in a food processor for 1 minute)

MAKES 8–10 SERVINGS

2 teaspoons cornstarch

8 ounces butter (2 sticks)

1 teaspoon white-wine vinegar

8 ounces sugar (1 cup plus 2 tablespoons)

Few drops of good vanilla essence or vanilla paste

3–4 ripe pears, peeled and chopped

3 4

pint cream

(1 1 2

cups)

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract or vanilla paste

1 tablespoon sugar

8 ounces flour (1 3⁄4 cup plus 1 tablespoon)

2 half-pint baskets of raspberries

1 teaspoon baking powder

2 pomegranates, seeded

4 eggs, separated

1 tablespoon powdered sugar

1 2

Preheat oven to 300°F and line 2 sheet pans or cookie sheets with parchment paper.

1 tablespoon powdered sugar

Beat the egg whites with a pinch of salt until satiny peaks form. Then beat in the sugar, a spoonful at a time, until the meringue is stiff and shiny. Sprinkle the cornstarch, vinegar and vanilla over the whipped egg whites and fold in lightly. Using a large spoon, scoop 1⁄8 of the meringue mixture onto the parchment paper creating a disk that is approximately 3 inches wide and 1 inch high. Use the spoon to create an indentation in the center of each disk, and use the back side of a knife to smooth the sides of each disk. You can also score the sides with a palette knife if you want to create a pattern. Depending on the size you will have 8 to 10 disks. Bake only six disks on each baking sheet. Place on the bottom rack of the oven and immediately reduce heat to 250° and bake for 40–45 minutes. The sides of the meringue should be just crispy and you should be able to gently peel each disk off the parchment. Note: Do not overcook the meringues; the goal is to have a soft marshmallow interior and a light, crispy exterior. Turn off the oven and let it cool with the door closed. When the meringue has completely cooled, transfer it to a pretty serving plate or platter. Whip the cream with the sugar until it holds soft peaks. Top each pavlova meringue with whipped cream. Scatter the raspberries and pomegranate seeds over the cream and then lightly dust the entire pavlova with powdered sugar.

cup sliced almonds

Preheat oven to 400°F. Melt the butter in a saucepan placed over medium heat. Once the butter has melted, add the sugar and stir until melted. Add the pears and vanilla, stir to combine and cook for 2–3 minutes. Add the flour and baking powder, stir until completely absorbed by the mixture and then remove from the heat. When this cake mixture has cooled to the touch, add in the egg yolks and stir together. Whisk the egg whites in a separate bowl, and then fold the whisked egg whites into the cake batter. Line a 9-inch cake tin with parchment paper. Pour the cake mixture into the cake tin and bake for 30 minutes, or until a knife inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean. Set on a cooling rack. Combine the sliced almonds and powdered sugar in a small bowl so that the almonds are complexly coated in a fine layer of sugar. Place the cake onto a serving plate or cake stand. Sprinkle the almonds all over the top of the cake. Note: The cake will keep for 2–3 days in a covered container. It is delicious served with a little crème fraiche or vanilla ice cream—or both.

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STE VEN BROWN

COLIN QUIRT

ROB HATHERILL

edible

SA NTA BARBA R A COUNT Y

SUPPORT LOC AL GUIDE Now more than ever, it’s important to seek out and support local businesses. Here is our guide of some of the current and past advertisers that we fully support and hope you will, too. Click on any of the websites for a direct link to get more information about what they offer and any updated hours of operation.

Farms & Ranches Winfield Farm 805 686-9312 www.WinfieldFarm.us Taste the magic of Winfield Mangalitsa! Mangalitsa ground pork (the real hamburger) and hickory-smoked bacon are now featured in the Larder Meat Company’s Larder Club meat box, delivered monthly throughout California (sign up at www.LarderMeatCo.com). You can also order through our Mangalitsa Market on the Winfield Farm website—please call first! Follow us on Facebook (WinfieldFarmBuellton), Twitter (@ WinfieldFarm.us) and Instagram (Winfield_Farm).

Food & Restaurants Bob’s Well Bread 550 Bell St., Los Alamos, CA 805 344-3000 2249 Baseline Ave., Ballard, CA 805 691-9549 www.BobsWellBread.com Now in two locations with convenient online ordering, Bob’s makes bread the old-fashioned way: handcrafted in small batches with the finest ingredients and baked to perfection in a custom-built stone-deck oven. Drop in to taste what visitors and journalists are raving about as “worth the drive” about—signature Pain au Levain, award-winning artisanal breads, croissants and specialty pastries. All-day menu of made-to-order breakfast, lunch and weekly special dishes. Indooroutdoor picturesque café. Los Alamos: Thu–Mon 7am–4pm. Ballard: Thu–Mon 8am–4pm. Café closes at 3pm. Closed Tue and Wed.

Chocolate Maya 15 W. Gutierrez St., Santa Barbara 805 965-5956 www.ChocolateMaya.com Chocolate Maya handmade chocolate confections: a variety of velvety truffles and chocolate-dipped temptations that are made from the highest-quality chocolate (Valrhona, Felchlin, Conexion, including small bean-to-bar artisans couverture) fresh local ingredients and exotic findings from their travels overseas. Covid-19 hours noon–4pm every day. Closed on Wednesday. 54 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2021–22

Il Fustino

Renaud’s Patisserie & Bistro

La Arcada 1100 State St. San Roque Plaza, 3401 State St., Santa Barbara, 805 845-3521 www.ilFustino.com

3315 State St., Santa Barbara 805 569-2400 1324 State St., Santa Barbara 805 892-280 1187 Coast Village Rd., Montecito 805 324-4200 www.RenaudsBistro.com

Il Fustino is Santa Barbara’s first and finest olive oil and vinegar tasting room. Il Fustino purveys only the finest and freshest olive oils, all grown and milled in California. They also provide an unparalleled selection of artisan vinegars. San Roque Plaza: Open Mon–Sun 11am–5pm. La Arcada: Open Thu–Sun noon–4pm.

Olive Hill Farm 2901 Grand Ave., Los Olivos 805 693-0700 www.OliveHillFarm.com Specializing in local olive oils, flavored oils and balsamic vinegars as well as many locally produced food products. Olive oil and vinegar tastings with fresh local bread available. Open Thu–Mon 11am–5pm.

Pico 458 Bell St., Los Alamos 805 344-1122 www.PicoLosAlamos.com Located in the historic 1880 General Store, offering a casual dining experience with innovative cuisine made from locally sourced ingredients. The extensive wine list has earned a Wine Enthusiast “Top 100 Wine Restaurant” award two years running. Open Tue– Thu 3–9pm; Fri–Sat noon–10pm; Sun Burger Night noon–9pm.

Plow to Porch 805 895-7171 www.PlowToPorch.com Plow to Porch Organics is a local organic/pesticide-free produce and grocery delivery service to members who subscribe. They simplify the purchase of local fresh organic produce and other organic, local foods in order to inspire good nutrition, support local farmers, protect the environment and make eating healthy food fun! Subscriptions start at $22.50.

Renaud’s is a bakery specializing in French pastries and French-style cakes, as well as a bistro offering an extensive menu for breakfast and lunch. Open Mon– Sat 7am–4pm; Sun 7am–3pm.

Wine & Beer Au Bon Climat 813 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara 805 963-7999 www.AuBonClimat.com The tasting room and the Jim Clendenen Wine Library are known for world-class Chardonnays and Pinots, yet other varietals are available. Jim Clendenen made wines of vision and character for over 30 years. Amazing lineup of current releases and library wines on hand. Tasting room open Mon–Fri noon–6pm, Sat and Sun 11am–6pm. Outdoor wine tasting daily. Reservations recommended.

Babi’s Beer Emporium 380 Bell St., Los Alamos 805 344-1911 www.BabisBeerEmporium.com Great beer. Impeccable selection. Great fun. Adventurous beer drinkers can discover unique, hardto-find craft beers, ciders and special projects—on tap or in bottle. Stay to have a bite from Dim Sama’s menu. Thu–Sat noon–7pm, Sun noon–6pm, Mon noon–4pm, Tue–Wed by appointment only.


Specialty Retail

Buttonwood Farm Winery 1500 Alamo Pintado Rd., Solvang 805 688-3032 www.ButtonwoodWinery.com

Blue Sky Body Care 818 599-9119 www.BlueSkyBodyCare.com

Since 1983, the vineyard and its award-winning wines have been hand-raised and hand-crafted with the goal of environmental responsibility. The vineyard now has 38,000 vines highlighted by Sauvignon Blanc and Cabernet Franc, along with small blocks of Semillon, Grenache Blanc, Chenin Blanc, Grenache, Syrah, Merlot, Malbec and Cabernet Sauvignon. Tasting daily by appointment 11am–3:30pm.

Hand-fashioned organics. Beyond soap, grey-water friendly, compostable packaging, fair-trade and handcrafted, yucca-based vegan.

ella & louie

805 691-9106 www.EllaAndLouie.com

Casa Dumetz 388 Bell St., Los Alamos, 805 344-1900 www.CasaDumetzWines.com

C AROLE TOPALIAN

A boutique winery specializing in Rhône varietals crafted with premier Santa Barbara County fruit. Their wines are sold almost exclusively at their tasting room in historic Los Alamos and through their wine club. Thu–Sat noon–7pm, Sun noon–6pm, Mon noon–4pm, Tue–Wed by appointment only.

Foxen Vineyard & Winery 7600 Foxen Canyon Rd., Santa Maria 805 937-4251 www.FoxenVineyard.com The Foxen Boys’ winery and tasting room features Burgundian and Rhône-style wines. Visit the historic shack “Foxen 7200” for Italian and Bordeaux-style wines. Picnic tables and scenic views at both locations. Open daily by reservation.

Lafond Winery 6855 Santa Rosa Rd., Buellton, 805 688-7921 www.LafondWinery.com Lafond Winery & Vineyards is the sister label to neighbor Santa Barbara Winery. With the first grapes belonging to Lafond Vineyards being planting in 1962, owner Pierre Lafond established the first commercial winery in Santa Barbara County. The Lafond label specializes in Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Syrah. Visit the tasting room in the Sta. Rita Hills 11am–5pm daily.

Margerum & Barden Tasting Room at the Hotel Californian, corner Winery Tasting Room, 59 Industrial Way, Buellton; 805 686-8500 www.MargerumWines.com Enjoy wine tasting, order from their menu, and stock up on provisions at the combined Margerum and Barden Tasting Room across the street from Hotel Californian in the Santa Barbara Funk Zone. Indoor and outdoor patio seating, with an indoor mezzanine that can host private events. Handcrafted Rhône varietal wines from Margerum Estate Vineyard and from grapes grown at top Santa Barbara County vineyards. All complemented with a simple fare menu—cheese and charcuterie, pizzas, paninis, salads and other foods to complement the wine. The winery in Buellton is open by appointment for wine tasting and winery tours.

Refugio Ranch Wines 2990 Grand Ave., Los Olivos 805 697-5289 www.RefugioRanch.com Refugio Ranch is a 415-acre former cattle ranch nestled into the Santa Ynez mountains. The 28 acres of vineyards are farmed and harvested by hand, with a focus on low yields and concentration of fruit. Visit the tasting room in Los Olivos—a converted early-1900s warehouse now home to two tasting bars, a VIP lounge and an expansive outdoor deck.

Roblar Winery and Vineyards 3010 Roblar Ave., Santa Ynez 805 686-2603 www.RoblarWinery.com

Floral designer Tracey Morris has two great loves: flowers and people. Relying on more than 25 years of design experience, Morris helps clients celebrate their big occasions with exquisite and expressive floral arrangements. Ella & Louie produces a range of looks from classic elegant designs or brightly colored flower crowns to unusual yet stylish. Local delivery.

Professional Services American Riviera Bank 525 San Ysidro Rd., Montecito, 805-335-8110 www.AmericanRivieraBank.com 1033 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara 805 965-5942 www.AmericanRivieraBank.com

Located in an oak-studded 40-acre vineyard in the heart of Santa Barbara County, Roblar Winery and Vineyards reflects the spirit of Santa Ynez Valley—rustic, authentic and bold. They showcase the variety and beauty that Santa Ynez has to offer, with a diverse lineup of delicious wines, a menu of truly farm-to-table, locally sourced foods and their fantastic estate-driven experiences.

Offering a local and sustainable approach to banking. The founders of American Riviera Bank are a carefully selected group of successful, prominent, experienced and influential community and business leaders who understand the unique needs of the Santa Barbara community. Montecito branch open Mon–Thu 9am–5pm; Fri 9am–5:30pm. Santa Barbara branch open Mon–Thu 8am–5pm, Fri 8am–6pm.

Santa Barbara Winery

Blue Sky Biochar

28 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara 805 963-3633 www.SBWinery.com

818 599-9119 www.BlueSkyBiochar.com

Santa Barbara Winery is the oldest winery in Santa Barbara County. Established in 1962, Pierre Lafond pioneered the commercial vineyard business under the Santa Barbara Winery label in the Sta. Rita Hills. The winery and tasting room is located in Santa Barbara’s Funk Zone and is one of the only fully operating wineries of its kind in the urban district. Tasting room open 11am–6pm daily.

Taste of Sta. Rita Hills 2923 Grand Ave., Los Olivos, 805 688-1900 www.TasteOfStaRitaHills.com Taste of Sta. Rita Hills is the go-to store for unique Sta. Rita Hills and Central Coast wines, featuring hard-tofind wines by Sea Smoke, Paul Lato, Bonaccorsi and many others. They offer some of the best Pinot Noir and Chardonnay from the Central Coast.

Zaca Mesa Winery 6905 Foxen Canyon Rd., Los Olivos 805 688-9339 www.ZacaMesa.com Since 1973, Zaca Mesa Winery has crafted distinctive wines from their unique mesa-top vineyard. As an early pioneer of the region, they now have 150 acres planted, specializing in the production of estate-grown Rhône-style wines. Tasting room and picnic area open daily 10am–4pm. Call for more information on winery tours and private event space.

Garden and landscape design, edible gardens, living soil, food forests.

SBCC Foundation 805 730-4401 www.SBCCFoundation.org The SBCC Foundation was established in 1976 to provide Santa Barbara City College with private philanthropic support. The foundation acts in partnership with the college and bridges the gap between available public funding and institutional need, as determined by the college leadership. The SBCC Foundation provides more than $4 million annually for student success programs, scholarships, book grants and other critical needs of the college in order to support SBCC students as they prepare for careers, transfer to fouryear universities and pursue lifelong learning goals.

SEEAG 805 901-0213 www.seeagSEEAG.org Since 2008, the nonprofit SEEAG (Students for EcoEducation & Agriculture) has impacted the lives of over 60,000 students, offering a variety of agricultural education programs free of charge, including the annual Santa Barbara County Farm Day, held this year on September 18. Their mission is to educate students and the greater community about the farm origins of our food and agriculture’s contribution to our nutritional well-being.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com WINTER 2021–22 | 55


AS

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Winter’s

Don’t-Miss Dish Words and photos by Liz Dodder

Cast-Iron Seared Fish Sandwich at

Little Dom’s Seafood

T

his airy seafood tavern sits in the middle of Carpinteria’s main street, just blocks from the beach (in the old Sly’s location). It’s warmly reassuring to those who’ve eaten at Little Dom’s in Los Angeles; it has the same wooden art deco bar, a combination of casual café booth and outdoor seating, cozy dining banquettes and takeaway deli. Here, as in LA, the building’s history and architecture influence the restaurant’s 1940s feel and design—a perfect neighborhood joint for local seafood, Italian food staples (don’t miss the rice balls!) and Little Dom’s signature crunchy, smashed-fried potatoes. This new outpost focuses on local seafood, with a raw bar serving oysters, uni, marinated market fish (crudo) and fish rillettes on seeded flatbread and oven pan-roasted fish options, plus a squid ink pasta with local uni butter. Owners Warner Ebbink and Chef Brandon Boulet, the same duo behind the LA version, say the seafood focus was a no-brainer here. They source halibut, albacore and other big fish from Wild Local Seafood’s open-ocean fishing boats, and smaller fish including Vermillion Snapper and Rockfish from their day boats, all based in the Santa Barbara Harbor. They saw an opportunity to source all kinds of local species of fish and base the menu on what’s available from the boats, all while adding to the local economy (especially important to the duo during this last year). Wanting to support local organic farmers as well as fishermen, they looked to their neighboring farms and Carpinteria’s Thursday 56 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA WINTER 2021–22

farmers market. Being so close to the food they source means serving it fresher than ever, sometimes within hours. And it shows. To make the Cast-Iron Seared Fish Sandwich at home, make sure you have a good cast-iron skillet and some medium-bodied, thick-cut white fish fillets like snapper, rockfish or halibut (nothing too oily). Marinate chopped Napa or Savoy cabbage in white balsamic vinegar, fennel seed, oregano and salt at least 2 hours or in the fridge overnight. Make some pickled green tomato slices using your favorite pickling recipe that’s slightly sweet (this can be done a day ahead of time). Heat the skillet over high heat until it’s very hot, and add grapeseed oil (or olive oil or butter). Season each side of the fish with a mix of oregano, paprika, cayenne, salt and pepper. Sear the fish on each side to get a crust, about 2–3 minutes per side. Butter a brioche bun on each side and toast it in the same skillet to get the edges crispy. Make chile aioli by mixing mayonnaise, Calabrian chile oil/paste, garlic and lemon juice. Smear on both sides of the bun, add the cabbage, the fish and the pickled green tomatoes and serve with crispy potatoes or salad. Liz Dodder is a drinker, eater and traveler who has eaten five kinds of foie gras in one day. She’s also a blogger, writer, photographer, recipe developer, web designer, social media maven and Certified Specialist of Wine (CSW). www.CaliCoastWineCountry.com


2009

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Spring 2009 / Number 1

SANTA BARBARA Celebrating the Food Culture of Santa Barbara County

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Summer 2009 / Number 2

SANTA BARBARA

Celebrating the Food Culture of Santa Barbara County

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Fall 2009 / Number 3

SANTA BARBARA Celebrating the Food Culture of Santa Barbara County

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Winter 2009 / Number 4

SANTA BARBARA Celebrating the Food Culture of Santa Barbara County

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ISSUE FIVE • SPRING 2010

SANTA BARBARA

edible

SANTA BARBARA

Celebrating the Food Culture of Santa Barbara County

Celebrating the Food Culture of Santa Barbara County

Sustainable Seafood Fairview Gardens A Culinary Journey The Pod Squad Whitcraft Winery

Heirloom Heaven Abalone Palmina Winery The Hidden Promise of Suburbia Food from the Hearth

Local Honeybees Culinary Bootcamp Edible Landscape Thanksgiving Santa Barbara Channel Seafood

Chocolate: From Cacao Bean to Confection Salmon A Seasonal Stew Endless Pastabilities

Eggs Backyard Chickens Beekeeping Salt: The Essential Ingredient Artichokes Community-Supported Agriculture

Member of Edible Communities

Member of Edible Communities

Member of Edible Communities

Member of Edible Communities

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

ISSUE SIX • SUMMER 2010

Wine Caves: Down to Earth Stone Fruit Recycling Edible Flowers

edible

Celebrating the Food Culture of Santa Barbara County

Grass-Fed Beef In the Kitchen with Bradley Ogden What the Kids Are Growing Canning Farmers Market MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

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ISSUE 8 • WINTER 2010 MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

SANTA BARBARA

Celebrating the Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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ISSUE 9 • SPRING 2011 MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

SANTA BARBARA

Celebrating the Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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ISSUE 10 • SUMMER 2011 MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

SANTA BARBARA Celebrating the Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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ISSUE 11 • FALL 2011 MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

SANTA BARBARA Celebrating the Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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ISSUE 12 • WINTER 2011 MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

SANTA BARBARA Celebrating the Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Where’s the

An Interview with

Santa Barbara

Winter Blossoms

Scoop?

One of TIME magazine’s “100 most influential people of 2010” talks to us about his garden, cooking and his upcoming lecture in Santa Barbara

Croissants!

Unsung Heroes

Bob and Ellie Patterson’s Artisanal Gelato and Sorbet

Wild Yeast Bread Profound Pairings A Passion for Spices

edible

Salt of the Sea Sorrel and Rhubarb The Rituals of a Meal

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Pistachio Harvest La Huerta Mission Gardens Farmer to Table

Biodynamics

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ISSUE 16 • WINTER 2012

Santa Barbara Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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ISSUE 17 • SPRING 2013

Nothing Like Chocolate The Lazy Gardener

Santa Barbara Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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ISSUE 18 • SUMMER 2013

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

EAT DRINK

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

Giannfranco’s Trattoria Culinary Inspirations Edible Mushrooms

For Love of Pinot The Art in Artisan Bread Zaca University

Santa Maria-Style Barbecue Lompoc Beans Ice Cream

Regenerative Earth Farms Aquaponics Exotic Edible Trees

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

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ISSUE 23 • FALL 2014

Santa Barbara Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

T HE BE L LY OF T HE

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ISSUE 24 • WINTER 2014

Santa Barbara Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Funk Zone

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ISSUE 20 • WINTER 2013

ISSUE 21 • SPRING 2014

Santa Barbara

Santa Barbara

The COOKS Issue

The Art of Small Farming Tending Henry The Perfect Salad

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Guerilla Brewing and Feral Fermentation

WINE & BREAD ISSUE

ISSUE 22 • SUMMER 2014

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Eating in Los Alamos Market Walk with Patricia Perfect Picnics

5 YEAR

ISSUE

COOKS ISSUE MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

LIVING BEER

LOCAL

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Diving for California Gold Fish on Friday Fisherman’s Market

ISSUE 19 • FALL 2013

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

THE

Sauvignon Blanc Coffee: Grown in Goleta Eating Acorns

Santa Barbara

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

ISSUE 15 • FALL 2012

Santa Barbara

Lompoc Wine Ghetto Culinary Lavender Pasta and Water

ISSUE 14 • SUMMER 2012

Eating Daylilies

Almonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend

of the Harvest

Renaud’s Patisserie & Bistro

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ISSUE 13 • SPRING 2012

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Michael Pollan

ISSUE SEVEN • FALL 2010

SANTA BARBARA

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ISSUE 25 • SPRING 2015

Santa Barbara

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ISSUE 26 • SUMMER 2015

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Anniversary Issue

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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ISSUE 27 • FALL 2015

Santa Barbara Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

ISSUE 28 • WINTER 2015

Santa Barbara Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

EAT DRINK

LOCAL ISSUE

The

EAT DRINK

COOKS

LOCAL The New Solvang The Thrill of the Grill All Aboard to Carpinteria

The Season for Persimmons Eating Lotus Santa Maria Agriculture

Fine Chocolate Solvang’s Kringle and Crown Do Your Kids Cook?

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

Strawberries: A Love Story The Pig Next Door Decorative Eggs

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

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ISSUE 29 • SPRING 2016

Issue

The COOKS Issue

ISSUE

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ISSUE 30 • SUMMER 2016

Santa Barbara Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Gaviota Wine Without Water Home Off The Range Grunion

The Shrimping Life Unleashing the Yeast Savoring Wildlands

E AT • D R I N K • R E A D • T H I N K

E AT • D R I N K • R E A D • T H I N K

E AT • D R I N K • R E A D • T H I N K

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ISSUE 31 • FALL 2016

Santa Barbara Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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ISSUE 32 • WINTER 2017

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

E AT • D R I N K • R E A D • T H I N K

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ISSUE 33 • SPRING 2017

Interwoven: Santa Maria In Search of Masa Chef Justin West

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ISSUE 34 • SUMMER 2017

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

ISSUE 35 • FALL 2017

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Harvest & Holiday

Harvest

& Holiday

ISSUE

ISSUE

Building

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY

Farm

ISSUE

Food

GUIDE

Communities

SPECIAL INSERT

The Tiny Mess A Big Taste of a Small Town No Cider House Rules

Santa Maria AVA The Channel Islands Eyes On Hives Girls Inc.

The Papaya Man Santa Ynez AVA Cottage Industry

The Fervor for Fermentation Year of the Rooster The Apiary

A Passion for Peaches Happy Canyon AVA The Beer Trail

A Sicilian Christmas Reverie Loyal to the Soil Fairview Gardens

E AT • D R I N K • R E A D • T H I N K

L O YA L T O L O C A L

L O YA L T O L O C A L

L O YA L T O L O C A L

L O YA L T O L O C A L

L O YA L T O L O C A L

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ISSUE 36 • WINTER 18

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Bringing the Homestead

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ISSUE 37 • SPRING 18

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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• SPRING ISSUE ISSUE 38 •37 SUMMER 2018 18

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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ISSUE ISSUE 37 39 •• SPRING FALL 2018 18

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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ISSUE 40 • WINTER 2019

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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ISSUE ISSUE 40 41 •• WINTER SPRING 2019

S anta B arbara Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

ISSUE 42 • SUMMER 2019

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

The

Home

ISSUE

Wine Issue

ISSUE

Ten Glas s es Celebr ating Ten Year s

In Search of

Local Sea Renewal and Rebuilding

Renewal and Rebuilding

Cookbooks: Culinary Journeys Teach Kids to Cook Blue Sky Center in Cuyama

A Love Letter to Los Olivos From Grape to Great Winemaking Takes a Journey

Barbara County in this Issue A Love LetterSanta to Los Olivos From Grape Farm to GreatGuide Winemaking Takes a Journey

L O YA L T O L O C A L

L O YA L T O L O C A L

L O YA L T O L O C A L L O YA L T O L O C A L

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ISSUE 43 • FALL 2019

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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Harvest & Holiday ISSUE

San Ysidro Ranch

Urchin

ISSUE 44 • WINTER 2020

Santa Barbara & Wine Country

Meyer Lemon Tart at the Stonehouse

Heirloom Green Corn Frittata and Her Cousins Earth to Table Mistaken Identity

Funghi e la Cucina Italiana Talking Shiitake Jetsetter of the Vines Comfort Food

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Santa Barbara & Wine Country

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Santa Barbara & Wine Country

Y E A R

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L A T OR LYO C/A L L O Y A L A N N I VL O E YA R S

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ISSUE 47 • SUMMER 2021

Santa Barbara

®

Heirloom Green Corn Frittata and Her Cousins Earth to Table Mistaken Identity

ISSUE 48 • FALL 2021

Santa Barbara & Wine Country

®

Wishful Recycling Wine Trailblazers A Beer in Every Kitchen Noey Turk T E N

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Santa Barbara & Wine Country

The

Sustainability Issue

Nourish & Nurture

Cooks

Issue

I S SUE

I Sea Olives Drinking the Landscape Everything But the Bird Dry Hopped Wine T E N

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Julia Child in Santa Barbara A Trio of Chef Memories Demystifying the Sommelier L O Y A L

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Julia Child in Santa Barbara A Trio of Chef Memories Demystifying the Sommelier LOYAL

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Gather. Nurture. Feed. Repeat. From Garden to Breadboard Baking Bread with Wild Yeast A Taste of Macedonia in Los Alamos Building a Better Meat System L O Y A L

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L O C A L

Sustainability & Wine

Finding Solutions to Food Waste

Rosé: Life Seen Through Pink Colored Glasses L O YA L

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L O C A L

The Birds & The Beef Day Trippin’

Purple Urchin Pearl Munak Rethinking Hunger The Sea Cellar Nurturing Nature

The Digester: Organic Waste Earns Its Keep Life in the Vines: Dormancy

Food Security and Cooking from Scratch Nine New Santa Barbara County Wines

It’s Time to Make Food Decisions with the Climate Crisis in Mind A Sweet Season

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Thank you, Santa Barbara County for all your support! If you would like to be in our Spring 2022 issue, please email us at ads@EdibleSantaBarbara.com

L O YA L

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L O C A L

2022


T h e O l d e s t C o m m e r c i a l W i n e ry i n S a n ta B a r b a r a C o u n t y F A M I L Y O W N E D & O P E R AT E D S I N C E 19 6 2

Lafond Winery & Vine yards

Santa Barbara Winery

J O I N U S T H I S S E A S O N AT O U R N E W S A N TA B A R B A R A W I N E R Y TA S T I N G R O O M L O C AT I O N AT

2 8 A N A C A PA S T R E E T S A N TA B A R B A R A F U N K Z O N E We’d like to extend our sincere gratitude for the support & friendship of the Santa Barbara community & our loyal W ine Club members over the years. We are honored to be part of this special community!

S A N TA B A R B A R A W I N E RY S A N TA B A R B A R A F U N K Z O N E TA S T I N G R O O M & W I N E R Y 2 8 A N A C A PA S T R E E T, S A N TA B A R B A R A | 8 0 5 . 9 6 3 . 3 6 3 3 W W W . S B W I N E R Y. C O M

L A F O N D W I N E RY & V I N E YA R D S W I N E R Y & V I N E YA R D S I N S TA . R I TA H I L L S 6 8 5 5 S A N TA R O S A R O A D , B U E L LT O N | 8 0 5 . 6 8 8 . 7 9 2 1 W W W . L A F O N D W I N E R Y. C O M