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ISSUE 34 • SUMMER 2017

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY

Farm

GUIDE

SPECIAL INSERT

A Passion for Peaches Happy Canyon AVA The Beer Trail L O YA L T O L O C A L


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CALYPSO ST. BARTH • GEORGE • HUDSON GRACE • INTERMIX • JAMES PERSE • KENDALL CONRAD LITTLE ALEX’S • MALIA MILLS • MATE GALLERY • MONTECITO BARBERS MONTECITO NATURAL FOODS ONE HOUR MARTINIZING • PANINO‘S • PRESSED JUICERY • READ N’ POST • RORI’S ARTISANAL CREAMERY SPACE N.K. APOTHECARY • TOY CRAZY • UNION BANK • VONS COAST VILLAGE ROAD AND HOT SPRINGS


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SANTA BAR BAR A

®

page 30

JOHN COX

C AROLE TOPALIAN

summer page 34

Departments 8 Food for Thought

22 Beer Trail

by Krista Harris

Behind the Bottle, Beyond the Barley by Rachel Hommel

10 Small Sips Turmeric Tonics

26 Edible Ink

Cooking al Fresco

The Basics of Beer by Bambi Edlund

11 Vertical Tasting Poké Bowls

28 Santa Barbara County Beer Trail

13 In Season

30 Edible Garden

14 Seasonal Recipes Red Gazpacho Yellow Squash and Tomato Lasagna Patatas Bravas

20 Drinkable Landscape Porter Packs a Punch by George Yatchisin

Turning a Garden into a Micro Farm by Joan S. Bolton

Santa Barbara County Farm Guide (Insert)

34 Ranch to Restaurant The Bear and Star by Sarah Wood

70 Event Calendar 72 Eat Drink Local Guide and Maps

page 16 4 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2017

COLIN QUIRT

80 The Last Sip Summer’s Don’t-Miss Dish by Liz Dodder


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SANTA BAR BAR A

®

summer Features 36 A Passion for Peaches At Buttonwood Farm by Jennifer LeMay

by Leslie Westbrook

48 Conquering the King The Happy Canyon AVA

page 14

by Sonja Magdevski

Recipes in This Issue

58 Making America Stronger

Soups and Side Dishes

One School Lunch at a Time by Nancy Oster

18 Patatas Bravas 14 Red Gazpacho

64 The Sweet Taste of Summer

Main Dishes

by Pascale Beale

16 Yellow Squash and Tomato Lasagna

Desserts 68 Caramelized Nectarines with a Lemon Syllabub 68 Plum Ice Cream 68 Summer Berry Pavlova

Beverages ABOUT THE COVER

Illustration of Buttonwood peaches by Jennifer LeMay (PaintingsByJen.com)

6 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2017

21 The Santa Barbara Sangaree

COLIN QUIRT

42 The Farm Cart The Good Life in Small Town Carpinteria


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FOOD FOR THOUGHT

STE VEN BROWN

The Summer Issue Today I just bought my first box of peaches from Buttonwood Farm and Winery’s produce stand. Biting into one of their juicy, ripe peaches is like biting into the first day of summer. On the drive home, I thought about the sweet peaches that my grandfather grew at his micro farm in Red Bluff. When I visited for a week one summer, I was treated to fresh sliced peaches topped with cream for breakfast. To this day I think of him whenever I eat an exceptional peach. I also thought about last summer, when we announced that the Santa Barbara County Food Action Plan had just been released, and Nancy Oster wrote an article about the challenges of getting local produce onto grocery store shelves. The Food Action Plan challenged us to think of ways we could improve the local food system. This summer we’ve created the first-ever Santa Barbara County Farm Guide as a foldout insert in this issue. With support from the Santa Barbara Certified Farmers Market, Santa Barbara County Food Action Plan, Cultivate Events, Bragg Live Food Products, The Food Liaison and Harvest Santa Barbara, we are excited to offer this useful resource to our readers. Our hope is that it will bring a deeper awareness of how to support local farms and food production. And on a more tangible note, we hope it encourages people to visit farms, farm stands and farmers markets in their neighborhood or in parts of Santa Barbara County that they might not have known about. Summer is also a very good time to visit our local breweries. And we just happen to have a Beer Trail map for that. Our local beer makers are incredibly innovative—brewing up delicious collaborations with local produce and artisan foods. It seems fitting to focus on both farms and breweries in the same issue. I don’t think you can separate the enjoyment of eating and drinking from the locales where those foods or beverages are produced. Looking ahead to fall, it’s not too early to start thinking about joining Edible Santa Barbara’s month-long Eat Local Challenge during October. You can find out more or learn how to join on our website. But for now, savor the sweet tastes of summer and enjoy everything that Santa Barbara County has to offer this season.

Krista Harris, Editor and Co-Publisher

Visit our website EdibleSantaBarbara.com Follow us on Facebook and Pinterest at Edible Santa Barbara and Twitter and Instagram at EdibleSB. Contact us at info@ediblesantabarbara.com

8 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2017

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Contributors Pascale Beale Joan S. Bolton Rosminah Brown Fran Collin David Cowan Liz Dodder Jennifer Esperanza Matthew Freeman Rachel Hommel Maddie Gordon Jennifer LeMay Nancy Oster Sonja Magdevski Colin Quirt Carole Topalian Leslie A. Westbrook Rob Wood Sarah Wood George Yatchisin Edible Santa Barbara® is published quarterly and distributed throughout Santa Barbara County. Subscription rate is $28 annually. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be used without written permission from the publisher. Publisher expressly disclaims all liability for any occurrence that may arise as a consequence of the use of any information or recipes. Every effort is made to avoid errors, misspellings and omissions. If, however, an error comes to your attention, please accept our sincere apologies and notify us. Thank you.

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Small Sips

ADAM JAMES

by Rosminah Brown and Krista Harris

Cooking al Fresco The Gourmet Girls Go Camping

Turmeric Tonics Fresh Fuzion Juices

Hot off the cold press is fresh turmeric juice from Fresh Fuzion, based in Santa Barbara. A tea made from turmeric and black pepper—sometimes called “golden milk”—has been popular in South and Southeast Asia for thousands of years. The root is known for being anti-inflammatory and is used for treating arthritis. It also helps detox the liver, boost the metabolism and is an antioxidant. Combined with ginger, which is also in the same family, the juice has a spicy zing kick to it, and yes, it does taste good. You could use it as a recovery beverage from a strenuous workout or a hangover cure. But most benefits come from continual use over time for things such as chronic pain or inflammation from injuries and sickness. Fresh Fuzion’s pineapple-turmeric juice has the addition of bromelain, which also aids in digestion and has anti-inflammatory properties. This pineapple-turmeric version also cuts the hot spice of the ginger and turmeric with some extra sweetness. Fresh Fuzion is the creation of longtime Santa Barbara resident Chef Dave Mertens. He came up with the juice blends to address his own health issues before deciding to get FDA approval to distribute them to the public. Cold pressing extracts juice without heat, which can alter the nutritional properties of fresh ingredients. And unlike other fresh juices, Fresh Fuzion is High Pressure Pasteurized—also a cold process—which retains freshness and nutrition but allows its juice to last longer under refrigeration, so it is easier to buy in bulk and store or have delivered safely. Fresh Fuzion is available locally at Gladden and Sons Produce, Tri-County Produce, Shalhoob Meat Co., Montecito Natural Foods, Pacific Health Foods and online at TurmericMeUp.com.

Looking for recipes and inspiration for your next camping trip? The Gourmet Girls Go Camping by local authors Gail Kearns, Lindsey Moran and Denise Woolery is out just in time for summer. The Gourmet Girls refuse to compromise their love of good food while in the great outdoors and have a cookbook to show for it. They’ve been coming together for over 20 years of holidays, camping and summer parties, and over these shared experiences they’ve cooked and dined together. All the recipes have been created and tested by the group while camping and they strive to bring the camp cookout to a whole new level. This group does not do canned beans and weenies. Think scallop ceviche with avocado, freshly baked pizza from the camp grill, coq au vin, persimmon pudding— even a whole baked salmon with lemon dill cream sauce. The Gourmet Girls Go Camping is designed to be out in the field, reminiscent of the ubiquitous Thomas Guide map books of our distant lives before online maps. It’s ring-bound and easy to flip through, with a flexible yet reinforced cover that can fold back. All the vegetarian dishes scattered throughout the book are listed in the index under ‘V’ for quick retrieval. So handy. Best of all, the cookbook functions just as well for preparations in your home kitchen and backyard. Thanks, local ladies, for promoting the outdoors and sharing your good food with us. The Gourmet Girls Go Camping is available at many booksellers and online at GourmetGirlsOnFire.com.

10 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2017


vertical TASTING

Poké Bowls Big Eye Raw Bar

Just in time for the hot summer months are refreshing bowls of fish and rice from Big Eye Raw Bar in the Santa Barbara Public Market. Poké is a raw fish dish originally from Hawaii; the word itself means “to slice or cut.” It is usually sauced with soy and sesame oil, but Big Eye presents a fusion of poké with Japanese sushi and Chef David Rosner’s own creative touches. Here are four delectable selections from their menu. Each bowl is an ample serving and is $13–$14.

Classic Ahi Bowl This is the classic Hawaiian poké bowl, but with the Rosner touch. It has cucumber, scallions, macadamia nuts and wakame seaweed. Like all the bowls, it normally has sushi rice, but you can substitute “riced” cauliflower or mixed greens for the rice. The cauliflower looks identical to the rice and is delicious. Ask for a spoon so you can get every last bit.

Salmon Bowl This is a lighter, brighter bowl with flavors of lemon and ginger. The salmon is lightly dressed with a ginger vinaigrette and the bowl includes edamame, shallots, lemon and shiso. Perfect for pairing with a white ale on a warm day or evening.

Garden Bowl For those who don’t care for raw fish, they have several cooked bowls, including this one that is perfect for vegans and vegetarians or anyone who loves vegetables and the flavors of pesto. It includes cauliflower, squash, peeled cherry tomatoes, miso, pine nuts and basil. Pair with a crisp, mineral Chardonnay for a refined and elegant lunch.

Local Yellowtail Bowl And now for something very creative: a bowl of local yellowtail combined with perfect squares of fresh watermelon along with kimchi, spicy wakame and a kaffir lime vinaigrette (sourced from neighbor il Fustino). It is strangely addicting. Try pairing it with a dry rosé for the perfect summer dinner. Big Eye Raw Bar offers five other bowls including chirashi, braised chicken and miso-glazed local cod, plus sushi, oysters and other starters. They are located inside the Santa Barbara Public Market at 38 W. Victoria St., open Mon–Sat 11am–10pm, Sun 11am–9pm. BigEyeRawBar.com

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2017 | 11


in Season this summer Summer Produce Apricots Artichokes Asparagus Avocados Basil Beans, green Blackberries Blueberries Cabbage Cantaloupe Celery Cherries Chiles Chives Cilantro Collards Corn Cucumber Dill Eggplant Figs Grapefruit Grapes Lavender Limes Melons Mint Mustard greens Mulberries Nectarines Onions, green bunching Peaches Peppers Plums/Pluots Raspberries Squash, summer Strawberries Tomatillo Tomatoes Turnips Watermelon

Year-Round Produce

Almonds, almond butter (harvested Aug/Sept)

Apples Arugula Beans, dried Beets Bok choy Broccoli Carrots Cauliflower Chard Dandelion Dates

(harvested Sept/Oct)

Edible flowers Garlic

(harvested May/June)

Herbs

(Bay leaf, oregano, parsley, rosemary, sage, thyme)

Kale Leeks Lemons Lettuce Mushrooms Onions, bulb

(harvested May/June)

Oranges Pistachios, pistachio oil (harvested Sept/Oct)

Potatoes Radish Raisins

Summer Seafood Halibut Rock fish Salmon, King Sardines Shark Spot prawns Swordfish Tuna, albacore White seabass Yellowtail

Year-Round Seafood Abalone (farmed) Black cod Clams Oysters Rock crab Sanddabs Urchin

Other Year-Round Eggs Coffee (limited availability) Dairy

(Regional raw milk, artisanal goat- and cow-milk cheeses, butters, curds, yogurts and spreads)

Fresh flowers Honey Olives, olive oil Meat

(Beef, chicken, duck, goat, rabbit, pork)

Potted plants/herbs Preserves Wheat

(Wheat berries, wheat flour, bread, pasta and baked goods produced from wheat grown locally)

(harvested Sept/Oct)

Spinach Sprouts Squash, winter

(harvested July/Oct)

Walnuts, walnut oil (harvested Sept/Oct)

Yams

(harvested Aug/Sept)

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2017 | 13


seasonal

Recipes Red Gazpacho There are many versions of gazpacho and this one is a compilation of the ones I remember eating in Spain years ago. My version keeps things simple, and it relies on using the best ingredients available. High-quality bread, local olive oil and vinegar and, of course, the most flavorful summer tomatoes you can find. Makes 4 servings 4 slices day-old bread Filtered water Tomatoes

Egg Salad Sandwich

1 clove garlic 1

⁄ 3 cup olive oil

1

to do with your ⁄ 4 cup sherryWhat vinegar or white wine beautiful vinegar onion-skin-dyed Easter

eggs? First on the list must be a classic egg salad sandwich. You have many variations to choose from so you won’t get Pinch of sweet Spanish smoked moredozens to taste tired of them, even paprika, if you’veormade of eggs. 1–21⁄ 2 cups cold, filtered water

Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste Makes 2 sandwiches 3 hard-boiled eggs, peeled and coarsely chopped GARNISH IDEAS Pick 3 or more of the following: choppedorhard-boiled egg, 2 tablespoons mayonnaise 1 tablespoon mayonnaise chopped green onion or sweet onion, chopped cucumber, and 1 tablespoon crème fraiche chopped red peppers, fresh herbs such as basil, mint or Salt and pepper, to taste parsley, ice cubes (great for a hot day).

Additions: Remove the crusts from the bread and place the bread in a large A tablespoon something crunchy, capers, chopped bowl of water.•Let soak for 10ofminutes, then removesuch and as squeeze celery, chopped vegetables, chopped radishes the water from the bread. Place pickled the garlic and tomatoes in the bowl or chopped onion of a food processor and process until fine. Add the bread, olive oil,

COLIN QUIRT

vinegar, 1 cup•water and process until smooth, adding more water basil, A sprinkling of chopped fresh herbs, such as parsley, if needed. Add paprika, andor pepper, process briefly. Taste and cilantro, salt chervil tarragon adjust seasoning. forsomething at least 2 hours as long as overnight. • A Chill dash of tangy,orsuch as lemon or lime juice, or the Serve well chilled and add a swirl of olive oil to each bowl, serving pickled juice or caper brine if you used either of those or a dash the garnishes onofthe side, so that each person can add what they like. white wine vinegar Bread (sliced bread, baguette, bagel, roll, croissant or slider bun) – Krista Harris Additional mayonnaise and/or mustard (optional) Additional pickled vegetables (optional) Lettuce Combine the eggs, mayonnaise, seasoning and additions and mix until incorporated but with a still chunky texture. Taste and add 14 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2017 more seasoning or additions if needed.


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EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2017 | 15


seasonal

Recipes

Yellow Squash and Tomato Lasagna Makes 6 – 8 servings 2–3 yellow or red tomatoes, thinly sliced Salt and pepper, to taste Olive oil 1 onion, diced 2 cloves garlic 2–3 yellow zucchini or yellow squash, thinly sliced 8 ounces of lasagna noodles or slices of grilled eggplant 4 cups tomato sauce 1

⁄ 4 cup pesto

4–5 ounces fresh, soft goat cheese 1

⁄ 2 cup slivered fresh basil leaves

4 – 8 ounces mozzarella cheese, grated

Slice the tomatoes, lightly season with salt and pepper and let them drain while you prepare the rest of the ingredients. Preheat oven to 350°. In a large skillet, sauté the onion, garlic and yellow squash until tender, adding salt and pepper to taste. Bring a large pot of salted water to boil. Add the noodles and cook until just tender. Drain, rinse under cold water and drain again. Alternatively you can make or buy fresh or no-boil lasagna noodles. And a gluten-free alternative is to use thin slices of grilled eggplant.

Cover the dish with foil and bake for 30 minutes. Put a baking sheet on the rack below to catch any sauce that bubbles over. Uncover and top with an even layer of the mozzarella and bake for another 15 minutes, or until the cheese is melted and bubbly. – Krista Harris

16 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2017

COLIN QUIRT

In a 13- by 9-inch baking dish, spread a little of the tomato sauce. Arrange a layer of noodles (or eggplant) over the sauce. Cover with the sautéed squash and onions. Crumble the goat cheese on top and add half the basil. Top with more tomato sauce and the second layer of noodles (or eggplant). Arrange the sliced tomatoes on top of the noodles. Dab or spread them with the pesto and top with the remaining basil. Add the remaining tomato sauce evenly over the top.


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Recipes

Patatas Bravas Old World meets New World in this dish created in the tapas bars of Madrid using ingredients originating from South America. In Santa Barbara you will find these spicy fried potatoes on restaurant menus or at backyard dinner parties. It’s a natural to pair the dish with Santa Barbara County Albariño, Tempranillo or other Spanish wine varietals. Makes 4–6 servings 2 pounds potatoes 1 small onion, diced 2 cloves garlic 1–2 chili peppers, to taste 3 medium red tomatoes, cored and diced 2 teaspoons sweet Spanish smoked paprika 2–3 teaspoons sherry vinegar or white wine vinegar, to taste Salt and pepper, to taste Olive oil Coarse sea salt

Bring a large pot of water to boil and add the whole potatoes. Cook until tender, drain and set aside to cool. When cool enough to handle, peel and cut into bite-sized pieces. If they are small, round potatoes, you can simply cut them in half. While the potatoes are cooking, heat a large skillet over medium heat and add olive oil and the onion, sauté until translucent. Then add the garlic, peppers, tomatoes and paprika. Cook until tender, about 15 minutes. Add the mixture to a blender or food processor along with the vinegar, salt and pepper and blend until smooth. Taste and adjust seasoning. In the same skillet, add enough olive oil to generously cover the bottom and fry the potatoes, in batches, until they are browned and crusty. Add additional olive oil as needed. As the potatoes are done, you can set them on a paper towel to drain. Then add them all to a serving platter, sprinkle with coarse salt and drizzle some of the sauce on top of the potatoes. You can also put some of the sauce in a small container on the side for dipping. You will most likely have sauce leftover and it is delicious as spread on crusty bread or served as a sauce with fish or chicken. – Krista Harris

COLIN QUIRT

seasonal


Egg Salad Sandwich What to do with your beautiful onion-skin-dyed Easter eggs? First on the list must be a classic egg salad sandwich. You have many variations to choose from so you won’t get tired of them, even if you’ve made dozens of eggs. Makes 2 sandwiches 3 hard-boiled eggs, peeled and coarsely chopped

FOXEN

2 tablespoons mayonnaise or 1 tablespoon mayonnaise and 1 tablespoon crème fraiche

®

Salt and pepper, to taste

V I N E Y A R D & W I N EAdditions: RY • A tablespoon of something crunchy, such as capers, chopped celery, chopped pickled vegetables, chopped radishes or chopped onion • A sprinkling of chopped fresh herbs, such as parsley, basil, cilantro, chervil or tarragon • A dash of something tangy, such as lemon or lime juice, or the pickled juice or caper brine if you used either of those or a dash of white wine vinegar Bread (sliced bread, baguette, bagel, roll, croissant or slider bun) Additional mayonnaise and/or mustard (optional) Additional pickled vegetables (optional) Lettuce

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Combine the eggs, mayonnaise, seasoning and additions and mix until incorporated but with a still chunky texture. Taste and add more seasoning or additions if needed. Create an open-faced or closed sandwich using additional mayonnaise on each slice if you love mayonnaise—or just mustard, or neither. Pickled vegetables make a great topping as well, such as a couple stalks of Pacific Pickle Works Asparagusto.

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DRINKABLE LANDSCAPE

Porter Packs a Punch by George Yatchisin

I

’m going to have to ask you to sit down. You see, I’m going to tell you to put ice in your beer. I’m going to tell you to make a cocktail without any spirits in it. And I’m going to have you make a sherbet, but I don’t mean a frozen fruit mixture. But first I’m going to have to tell you the story about an old concoction with a misleading name, the sangaree. Sure, it sounds like sangria, but that drink wasn’t invented until the early 1960s and took the U.S. by fruity storm at the 1964 World’s Fair in New York. The history of the sangaree, on the other hand, goes back centuries. We can join the story with famed mixologist Professor Jerry Thomas, who in his How to Mix Drinks or The Bon Vivant’s Companion, right between the Slings and Skins (cocktails simply had better names in the 19th century), offers a section of sangarees, a kind of punch made with different bases: port wine, sherry, brandy, gin, ale or porter. 20 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2017

Enter The Dead Rabbit, winner of the World’s Best Cocktail Bar Award from Tales of the Cocktail in 2015. Even better for those of us who don’t live in Uber-ing distance of lower Manhattan, the bar’s The Dead Rabbit Drinks Manual won Tales’ Best Bartending/Cocktail Book 2016 award. And so we turn to them for inspiration, and to see if what sounds sort of odd really works. (You know how some recipe books seem more for inspiration and contemplation than actual athome creation.) While the recipe only has four ingredients and two garnishes, two of those four ingredients require you to do some advance work, for just like a food recipe, the secret is a layering of flavors. Porter lends itself to such culinary magic as it’s so deep and wide. Why not start with one of Santa Barbara’s best, Telegraph Brewing’s Stock Porter? Their description nails it: “A tantalizing combination of coffee, vanilla and chocolate aromas married to a fruity, refreshing acidity.” If we take one of the origin stories for porter at its word—that the style was drunk by hard laborers to give them sustenance through the day— we can see why it’s a fine summer quaffer: It’s not really heavy or too potent at 5.7% ABV. Nothing has changed since Thomas Mortimer wrote in 1810 in a General Dictionary of Commerce, Trade and Manufactures, “It is a wholesome, cooling and at the same time nutritive beverage.” The tricky part is making a sherbet, a word more confusing than sangaree given what comes to mind now is something more like sorbet. Just think of sherbet as an advanced simple syrup, and that’s a bar basic. Yes, you start with something that sounds like a ritual priests used to do before Vatican II, whip up an oleo-saccharum, but that’s just peeled lemons and sugar and some elbow grease. What makes a sherbet so much richer than a simple syrup is you use fruit juice and not water as the base. Given that Santa Barbara seems a heaven of lemons, adding this flavor to the local porter seems particularly fitting. Not to mention delicious — talk about underlining the acidity! The mace tincture is particularly easy to put together, once you find mace, of course. It lost the popularity battle with its cousin nutmeg, partially because it’s more expensive. While both come from the evergreen tree Myristica fragrans, nutmeg is the pit of the tree’s fruit and mace is the lacy covering of the seed— you get a lot more pit than aril per seed. Its flavor is subtler and more suggestive than nutmeg (and you’ll grate some of that for a sensory blast as a garnish anyway). And while you generally can only buy mace powdered, try to hunt down strips you can grind fresh, as it loses its kick quickly. But the powdered will do in a pinch.


The Santa Barbara Sangaree Makes 1 cocktail 6 ounces Telegraph Stock Porter 3 dashes Mace Tincture 3

⁄ 4 ounce Lemon Sherbet

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3 dashes Angostura Bitters Fresh nutmeg, grated Lemon peel

In a mixing glass, carefully combine the first four ingredients —remember the beer is carbonated and will want to foam up if you’re too rough with it. Add ice and stir until chilled. (Using chilled porter certainly speeds up the process.) Pour into a tulip beer glass and add one large cube of ice. Grate some fresh nutmeg atop. Twist the lemon peel over the glass and along the rim to express oils and leave things lemony fresh. Discard the peel.

Lemon Sherbet

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(Starting with an oleo-saccharum) 4 lemons for peels 11⁄ 2 cups granulated sugar 12 ounces fresh lemon juice (depending on their juiciness, that will be 4 or 5 more lemons in addition to the ones you peel)

Peel 4 lemons using a vegetable peeler; avoid getting any of the white pith if possible. Collect these peels in a bowl and add the sugar. With a muddler or heavy spoon, mash the peels into the sugar. Oils might be expressed, and that’s good. (It’s OK if they aren’t, too— it will depend upon your lemons.) Let the combination sit for at least 30 minutes at room temperature. That’s your oleo-saccharum.

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Add all of that bowl’s content to a small saucepan with the lemon juice. Warm on medium heat but do not boil; stir to dissolve the sugar. When the consistency is smooth and beginning to thicken to a light syrup, remove from heat and strain out the peels. In refrigerated bottles the sherbet lasts for up to three weeks.

Mace Tincture 1 ounce dried mace 41⁄ 2 ounces Everclear 41⁄ 2 ounces water

Combine mace and Everclear in a jar and let sit for 3 days, shaking occasionally (it likes to separate). Strain through the finest sieve you have. Add that and the water into a clean jar. Given it’s fueled at 151 proof, you’ve got this forever. George Yatchisin happily eats, drinks and writes in Santa Barbara. He blogs at GeorgeEats.com.

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EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2017 | 21


BEER TRAIL

Behind the Bottle, Beyond the Barley Foraging, Sourcing and Drinking Local in the Craft Beer Community by Rachel Hommel Fermentation Station Firestone Walker Brewing Company–Barrelworks, Buellton

STE VEN BROWN

Locally Sourced Ingredient: Wild Yeast

“Stay with the beer. Beer is continuous blood. A continuous lover.” — Charles Bukowski

B

eer. Barley. Hops. Yeast. Water. A beautiful science experiment so eloquently simple yet utterly profound. It has been said that fermentation does all the work, but our local brewers have created a community rich in talent. They are more than brewers; they are tastemakers and artists… all inspired by their craft and our local bounty. I have shared beers, stories and laughs with many of them. Some of their stories could fill an entire book. Behind the glass, we encounter a thirsty and diverse landscape, a hoppy wonderland of locally sourced flavors and ingredients. There are over 20 breweries in Santa Barbara County and all are worthy of visiting, as you’ll see on the Beer Trail Map. The six ingredients discussed below are an introduction to the local beer scene’s dedication to the craft, passion for our products and support for our local economy. This summer, make sure to sip, savor and repeat. 22 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2017

It all begins with one simple ingredient: yeast. Jim Crooks of Firestone Walker is an institution in his own right. The man is brilliant, a mad chemist, giddy about the art and science of fermentation. Many brewers have worked under him or beside him to harness the magic that is fermentation. Utilizing local flora for Barrelworks’ line of sour beers, Crooks began sourcing indigenous yeast from Foxen Vineyard. Clipping semi-ripe grape clusters, the wild yeast on the grapes was used to create the first batch of De La Casa, an Indigenous Barrel-Aged Saison. “Yeast really does all the work, we are just putting the ingredients together,” said Crooks, Barrelworks’ master blender. “We are taking a step back in time, exploring what can you get from your environment, the bacteria, the flora.” Known as their “house” beer (available only in their tasting rooms), the 2017 batch was harvested off Chardonnay grapes, yielding notes of citrus, tropical fruit and white pepper. As it mutates and adapts to the environment, the yeast is fed from the decanted grape juice matter, resulting in a crisp, refreshing summer beer. Approaching lambic beers similar to wine, there is a certain art in the backbone of blending— and wild yeast is at the forefront. What winemakers work to get out of their system, Firestone works into their system, creating tart funky beers full of aroma, body and acidity.


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“We have always come from wine, inspiring how we blend flavors, balance acidity… effectively breaking down the boundaries of beer making,” said Crooks. “It’s a renaissance time right now for beer.”

Backyard Bounty Telegraph Brewing Company, Santa Barbara

Locally Sourced Ingredient: Foraged Fruit There’s nothing quite like picking fruit from your own backyard (or your neighbors’). Telegraph Brewing, started in 2006, has been sourcing locally for over 10 years, as part of their core philosophy. The Obscura Series began in 2010 as an adventure into wild beers, often using local fruit for their tart and funky sours. Their Obscura Pêche Barrel-Aged Sour blends whole local peaches from owner Brian Thompson’s backyard tree, supplemented from the farmers market when necessary. This perfect summer beer keeps with the philosophies of traditional brewing, taking advantage of what’s in season. “Traditionally, a brewer would make do with what they had around them,” said Thompson. “We live in a region that is so rich in agricultural bounty we wanted to take advantage of that.” Using seasonal, local fruit in the batch not only yields a purer flavor but also adds local microflora to the complexity (due to wild yeast living on the skin). This results in some exquisite and flavorful small-batch beers, as exemplified in their line of Reserve Wheat fruited sour beers. Past lineups have included locally sourced hibiscus, apricot and fruit blends. Sourced from Telegraph’s parking lot guava tree, the Passionfruit & Guava Reserve is a German-style Berliner Weisse, infused with passionfruit and guava purées. When not foraging, Telegraph celebrates our local agrarians, from Goodland Organics in Goleta to Friend’s Ranches in Ojai. “When we were just starting, there wasn’t a local beer scene. We wanted to make sure our beers reflected Santa Barbara,” said Thompson. “Our beer celebrates the local agriculture and landscape, making the beer world a better place in the process.”

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EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2017 | 23


A Sweet Story Third Window Brewing Co., Santa Barbara

Locally Sourced Ingredient: Chocolate Sometimes all you need to do is “walk about” your neighborhood to get inspired. Third Window Brewing has done just that, creating the incredibly decadent “Walkabout” Stout, inspired by the area’s surplus of local citrus and rich local chocolate. Kris Parker, founder and brewer, is the mastermind behind this sweet treat, utilizing Twenty-Four Blackbirds Chocolates, a Santa Barbara– based bean-to-bar chocolatier. Utilizing roasted cacao nibs from the 75% Cedeño blend, the chocolate yields lightly sweet floral notes upfront, which pairs effortlessly with the juicy citrus, foraged locally (from regulars and the neighborhood). “I try to keep as much of the economic impact of the brewery in our home as I possibly can,” said Parker. “Collaboration is really at the core of who we are. We just want to hang out with our friends and make great beer.” It is hard to talk about Parker, the grandson of actor Fess Parker, without talking about his background in wine. Growing up on the ranch, Kris Parker has always been interested in terroir and its expression of the local environment. Like a fine wine, this idea is translated into every batch of his beer. It’s exemplified in the delicious chocolate-forward 2017 Walkabout, which is built upon the components of chocolate, extracting the flavor of the cocoa nibs with hints of coffee. With each sip, the beer represents a specific place and time, a product reminiscent of the people who helped create it. “Every beer is a vintage. It’s a distinct thing that is alive and then it’s gone,” said Parker. “I don’t mind having a great deal of variance in our beers; they are all telling a story of this unique period in time.”

Take a Walk on the Wild Side brewLAB, Carpinteria

Locally Sourced Ingredient: Native Herbs The experimental team at Carpinteria’s brewLAB, an active group of hikers and herbalists, looks no further than the mountains for inspiration. After reading Sacred and Herbal Healing Beers by Stephen Harrod Buhner, the nano brewery crew began brewing test batches of beers sourced from native plants, reinforcing their sacred, almost spiritual quality. Exploring the plants for both flavor and medicinal qualities, brewLAB has foraged a variety 24 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2017

of native plants for their beers, including California coastal sagebrush, Santa Cruz Island yarrow, mugwort, pineappleweed/ wild chamomile and coyote mint. “Beer is our medium to explore the world, using our sensory organs to our fullest, touching and tasting, and experimenting with what’s in our backyard,” said co-founder/ brewer Peter Goldammer. Exploring the ancient craft of bittering with herb mixtures, not hops, brewLAB has created a variety of tart Gruit beers (think a hop-free, beer tea). Experimenting batch by batch, selections have included “There Gosé Gruit”— a tart and refreshing Gosé/Gruit hybrid with mugwort, sagebrush, seawater and toasted coriander—and the “Humming Juniper”— an herbal and tart gruit with yarrow, juniper berries and the brewery’s favorite, hummingbird sage, offering a nice floral quality. Touted as a dream enhancer, mugwort has been known to also help with stomach issues and nerves, while sage can aid in inflammation and cognition. Foraged locally, this is beer as “farmacy.” “What we do goes beyond just beer,” said Goldammer. “It’s more ethereal… it is an orchestration. It is the medium we use to bring people together, to push people to discover new styles, to talk to each other.”

A Different Kind of Buzz M. Special Brew Co., Goleta

Locally Sourced Ingredient: Coffee Coffee and beer has become a magnetic (and energetic) force in the beer scene. Like any famous pairing, quality matters. M. Special Brewing recently began working alongside Daniel Randall of Goleta-based Green Star Coffee, sourcing organic coffee beans for a series of cask-aged beers. The result of this synergistic relationship is the “Green Star” Special, a rotating series that pairs different coffee roasts alongside different beer styles—from pale ales to IPAs. “We love coffee, they love beer, the pairing seemed like a natural fit,” said Brewmaster Joshua Ellis. “The spirit of collaboration is one and the same as the spirit of brewing in this town.” Trying several different roasts, they landed on the Organic Red’s Espresso, alongside their pale ale. This particular roast, originally created for Red’s, gives all the coffee aroma without the acidity or bitterness. Creamy, rich and deep… with a perfectly balanced backbone for a pale ale. Unlike coffee IPAs, which can be overbittered when you add coffee’s naturally occurring acidity, pale ales offer a well-rounded smoothness to your caffeine kick. “This beer is really intriguing, the unique juxtaposition of a light pale ale with a strong, full-body coffee flavor,” said Ellis. “I started brewing beer to make beer I couldn’t buy in stores. It really is a passion project for all of us.”


Sugar, Ah, Honey, Honey Island Brewing Company, Carpinteria

Locally Sourced Ingredient: Honey No passion project might be quite as humbling as owner Paul Wright’s story. Gifted a “Beer Machine” home-brew kit in the ’90s by his wife… well, the rest is history for this Carp institution, opened in 2001. Just as synonymous with Carpinteria is the famous Avocado Festival and the amber beauty that is Island Brewery’s Avocado Honey Ale, a 10-year veteran with a sweet story. When originally brainstorming how Island could be involved in the festival, Wright decided to create a beer made not from avocados, but local avocado honey, sourced from a neighborhood beekeeper (and brewery regular). “We joke that this beer is a gateway beer for craft-beer newcomers,” said Wright. “Avocado honey is very distinctive to this area; this is our local product.” As one of the first alcoholic beverages, honey is totally fermentable… adding an extra buzz of alcohol to your beer. Sourced from the foothills of Carpinteria, avocado honey has a dark, intense flavor, similar to molasses. Contributing a rich amber color and smoothness to the honey ale, the beer has become a summer classic, a “collaboration between bees, beekeepers, avocado growers and brewery workers.” And just remember: No avocados were harmed making this beer! Smooth and approachable, this year-round beer represents Island’s commitment to growing the Central Coast Beer Trail. “I love that nowadays, you can go up and down the 101 and enjoy craft beer wherever you go,” said Wright. “No matter where you start or finish, you can guarantee you will find great beer on the Central Coast.”

r

These ingredients are just the beginning of a vibrant beer community blooming around us locally. “Santa Barbara is just now coming to age, with a rich and diverse portfolio of microbreweries,” said Joshua Ellis. “It’s coming of age because of the spirit of community.” While Hunter S. Thompson noted that “good people drink good beer,” we Santa Barbarians (and Barbeerians) know that great people drink local beer. Rachel Hommel is a fearless gourmet and world traveler, promoting culinary tourism in the 805. When not rallying for fair food, Rachel Hommel can be spotted at the farmers market, practicing yoga and dancing to the “beet” of life. A native of Las Vegas, she is a lead tour guide and freelance writer. Follow her at TasteTrekTravel.com.

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GOOD Goleta

5668 Calle Real Goleta, CA 93117 805.770.2730

Next to Panino, Across from Trader Joe’s

Downtown

331 Motor Way Santa Barbara, CA 93101 805.845.5379 Corner of State and Gutierrez

La Cumbre

3849 State St. Suite i157 Santa Barbara, CA 93105 805.569.0011 In La Cumbre Plaza, next to Vons

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2017 | 25


EDIBLE INK

The malt is combined with hot water. As it soaks (in a vessel called a mash tun), the starches break down and convert to sugars, which will feed the yeast in step 6.

Beer begins with grain— most often barley, but wheat, rice, oats, rye, and others are sometimes used. The grain is first malted: It is soaked in water, and when it begins to germinate, it is dried in a kiln. The resulting roasted grain is called malt. The dry malt is then milled to crush the kernels and release the starches.

W

Lautering is the process of separating the sugary liquid, called wort, and the spent remains of the grain. This step takes place in the lauter tun.

hile ingredients and scope may vary, the beer-making process is fairly standard. Smaller-scale equipment can often do multiple steps in one vessel, but each of these steps is necessary to deliver that heavenly delight we like to call BEER.

The wort is boiled with bittering hops (added at the start), and aromatic hops (added at the end).

Ales are served around two weeks after brewing, lagers 4–6 weeks after brewing.

After about 90 minutes, the boiling wort sits for half an hour or so, allowing the hops and sediment to fall to the bottom of the kettle. From there it is pumped through a heat exchanger, which cools it to about 60ÂşF. The beer stays in the conditioning tank for anywhere from several days to several months, depending on the type of beer being produced. Some carbonation takes place during the fermentation stage, but the finished beer can be further carbonated, as required, before leaving the conditioning tank.

bambiedlund.com 26 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2017

The chilled wort, yeast, and oxygen are left to ferment and become beer. Ales are fermented warm, with yeast on top, for as few as seven days; lagers are fermented cold, with yeast on the bottom, for up to three months.


1 1 0 1 stat e

5 2 8 anacapa

2 5 0 stor ke R D

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Monday–Friday 10am–6pm, Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am– 4pm

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2017 | 27


Santa Barbara County

Lompoc

501 State St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 SBBrewCo.com

Solvang Brewing Company – Hoptions Taproom & Eatery

Figueroa Mountain Brewing Co.

234 N. H St. Lompoc, CA 93436 SolvangBrewing.com

Solvang Solvang Brewing Company

Santa Maria Figueroa Mountain Brewing Co. 560 E. Betteravia Rd. Santa Maria, CA 93454 FigMtnBrew.com

Santa Maria Brewing Company 1451 Fairway Dr. Santa Maria, CA 93455 SantaMariaBrewingCo.com

Santa Maria Brewing Company 115 Cuyama Lane Nipomo, CA 93444 SantaMariaBrewingCo.com

Orcutt Naughty Oak Brewing Co. 165 Broadway St. Orcutt, CA 93455 NaughtyOak.com

Buellton Firestone Walker Brewing Company – Barrelworks 620 McMurray Rd. Buellton, CA 93427 FirestoneBeer.com

Figueroa Mountain Brewing Co. 45 Industrial Way Buellton, CA 93427 FigMtnBrew.com

1547 Mission Dr. Solvang, CA 93463 SolvangBrewing.com

Goleta Captain Fatty’s 6483 Calle Real Goleta, CA 93117 CaptainFattys.com

Draughtsmen Aleworks 53 Santa Felicia Dr. Goleta, CA 93117 DraughtsmenAleworks.com

M. Special Brew Co. 6860 Cortona Dr. Goleta, CA 93117 MSpecialBrewCo.com

Hollister Brewing Co. 6980 Marketplace Dr. Goleta, CA 93117 HollisterBrewCo.com

Santa Barbara Pure Order Brewing Co. 410 N. Quarantina St. Santa Barbara, CA 93103 PureOrderBrewing.com

Third Window Brewing Co. 406 E. Haley St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 ThirdWindowBrewing.com

Telegraph Brewing Company

Los Olivos

418 N. Salsipuedes St. Santa Barbara, CA 93103 TelegraphBrewing.com

Figueroa Mountain Brewing Co.

The Brewhouse

2363 Alamo Pintado Ave. Los Olivos, CA 93441 FigMtnBrew.com

229 W. Montecito St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 SBBrewhouse.com

28 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2017

Santa Barbara Brewing Company

137 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 FigMtnBrew.com

Night Lizard Brewing Company 607 State St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 NightLizardBrewingCompany.com

Topa Topa Brewing 120 Santa Barbara St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 TopaTopa.beer

Brass Bear Brewing 28 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 BrassBearBrewing.com

Carpinteria Island Brewing Company 5049 6th St. Carpinteria, CA 93013 IslandBrewingCompany.com

Rincon Brewery 5065 Carpinteria Ave. Carpinteria, CA 93013 RinconBrewery.com

brewLAB 4191 Carpinteria Ave. Carpinteria, CA 93013 BrewLabCraft.com

Tap Rooms Not an exhaustive list, just a few to get you started.

Lama Dog 116 Santa Barbara St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 LamaDog.com

Babi’s Beer Emporium 380 Bell St. Los Alamos, CA 93440 BabisBeerEmporium.com

The Back Room 515 Fourth Pl. Solvang, CA 93463 ValleyBrewers.com/The-Backroom

The Good Life 1672 Mission Dr. Solvang, CA 93463 TheGoodLifeCellar.com

MAP ILLUSTR ATION BY MADDIE GORDON

BeerTrail


EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2017 | 29


EDIBLE GARDEN

Turning a Garden into a Micro Farm

ANNA DEL ASKI

by Joan S. Bolton

Linus deLaski feeds the Babydoll sheep at Solminer’s 5-acre deLanda vineyard in Los Olivos.

F

ew of us have the land, the guts or the determination to become a full-time farmer. But it’s still possible to enjoy a slice of the homesteading life. In a smallish urban or suburban yard, your orchard might be reduced to a few container-grown fruit trees, with row crops squeezed into a couple of raised beds. In a larger setting, you might work in a dozen bearing trees, a dedicated plot for growing vegetables and trellises for grapes, raspberries, blackberries, kiwis and passionfruit.

The Next Step Taking on several small farm animals will create an even more bucolic feel and establish a living rhythm to your day. Backyard chickens are the gateway animal. Ducks, rabbits, pygmy goats, Babydoll sheep and honeybees are all worth the 30 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2017

effort as well. They’ll eat garden waste, control overgrown brush and put fresh dairy products and honey on the table. Most are sweet pets, too, often with engaging personalities. I’m not suggesting that you add butchery to your list of mini farm chores. If nothing else, your animals will provide hours of entertainment. And all but the honeybees will produce an unending supply of manure to improve the fertility and tilth of your soil. Do check local zoning ordinances first, which may restrict the type and number of animals. For example, the City of Santa Barbara has among the most liberal policies for a city, allowing up to 15 chickens (no roosters) and rabbits in a typical residential neighborhood and up to four beehives on a lot less than 10,000 square feet. Livestock is allowed on lots of more


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or cheap kiddie pool. The yucky sludge that accumulates in and around the pond will do wonders in your garden. Rabbits are phenomenally cute and produce terrific fertilizer, while yarn afficionados covet their fiber. They are often raised in hutches, although they can be toilet trained and live indoors. Either way, they are naturally shy and should be handled gently. Yet they still need stimulation. Provide at least four hours of out-of-the-cage playtime daily and stock their living space with plastic baby toys, a phone book or a straw broom to chew. Indoors, they may live eight to 14 years. Bunnies Urgently Needing Shelter, BunsSB.org, is a terrific resource.

C AROLE TOPALIAN

Goats are great for milk, cheese, butter, soap, fiber and manure. They eat weeds and are especially nimble on hills, clearing brush for fire protection. They’re also accomplished escape artists and need a strong, tall pen and a place to get out of the rain. Goats are herd animals, so plan on at least two. They’re friendly, exceptionally curious and can be leash-trained to go on walks. Pygmy goats live 10 to 14 years, while larger Nubians may live to 20.

The medium-sized Nubians are popular dairy goats.

than 1.5 acres with the required setbacks. In the County of Santa Barbara, you may have even more options, depending on your lot’s zoning designation.

Getting Started Acquire animals with your eyes wide open. You’ll need to feed and water them at least once a day. Figure out their food and a place to store it, and know which medications and salves to have on hand. Line up a livestock veterinarian. Not all animals get along. If you raise different kinds, set up their spaces so they’ll peacefully coexist. And develop a backup plan for when you’re away. These animals can live a long time, too, so be prepared to care for them for 10, 15, even 20 years. Chickens are enormously popular, with their eggs and manure as obvious benefits. They’re pretty good at pest control and relatively quiet as they go about their business. Their coop should offer shade, shelter from rain, protection from predators and one nesting box for every four hens. Laying hens need a run—figure at least 10 square feet per bird—to stretch their scrawny legs and peck the dirt. Avoid roosters. They can crow all day long, annoying you and your neighbors. Ducks bear large eggs and don’t tend to uproot plants when they’re foraging for bugs. Big White Pekin ducks are a good choice. At about 10 pounds, they’re too heavy to fly away. To prevent them from nesting in your yard, house them in a coop with a human-size door so you can more easily collect their eggs. During the day, provide a pond, such as a sunken trough 32 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2017

Babydoll sheep are among the most adorable farm animals. An ancient breed from England, they produce milk for making cheese, and a fine wool. They’re adept at trimming lawns and fields and clearing brush beneath fruit trees, berries and grapevines, spreading small droppings of manure as they go. They are flock animals, so prepare for a pair or more. They may be timid at first, then more outgoing as they ease into their new digs. Expect your Babydolls to live about 15 years. Honeybees may be endangered, but local beekeepers are passionate about building up local populations and encouraging others to take up the practice. Both the Santa Barbara Beekeepers Association (SBBA.org) and the Beekeepers Guild of Santa Barbara (BeeGuildSB.org) offer classes about the merits and art of keeping bees.

Aging Your Manure Wait to apply chicken or duck manure to your plants. While still fresh, the slimy, smelly stuff is high in nitrogen and can burn roots. Don’t worry about separating it from the straw bedding. Add the bits and pieces to an existing compost bin or corral it in a square of chicken wire, then let it age for six to 12 months. Pour the duck sludge over your compost pile. Or dilute it, then water it in around fruit trees or vines. Herbivores like rabbits, goats and sheep produce dense, nutrient-rich pellets that bear only a slight odor. Compost the manure/bedding combo for several months or strew it right away between vines, berries or fruit trees, letting the nutrients slowly leach into the soil. Joan S. Bolton is a freelance writer, garden coach and garden designer who confesses to a lifelong love affair with plants. She and her husband, Tom, have filled their four-acre property in western Goleta with natives and other colorful, water-conserving plants. They also maintain avocado, citrus and fruit trees and grow vegetables and herbs year-round. SantaBarbaraGardens.com


EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2017 | 33


R A N C H T O R E S TA U R A N T

The Bear and Star

Parker Family Restaurant

JOHN COX

ROB WOOD

by Sarah Wood

L

KRISTA HARRIS

os Olivos’ newest restaurant came about when Chef John Cox first visited the stunning, 714-acre Fess Parker Ranch last year. Cox, who earned accolades for his work at Sierra Mar at the Post Ranch Inn in Big Sur, found himself on a tour past the ranch’s long-established vineyards and new wagyu cattle, as owner Eli Parker sought Cox’s advice for selling the prized beef to restaurants. But Cox immediately saw potential for something even better. He imagined creating a restaurant for the Parker Family where they could serve the wagyu and other products from their ranch themselves. “It would be such a waste for that wagyu to go out of the family—no one is going to have the same connection to those 34 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2017

animals,” Cox says. “You talk about the terroir—as soon as you let go of something from the ranch, people are not going to appreciate it in the same way.” Katie Parker, a former bucking bull breeder who has been raising wagyu cattle for three years in the Southwest and is thrilled to be able to fulfill Fess Parker’s dream of raising them on the Los Olivos Ranch, can’t say enough about the creative, calm and organized leadership that Cox has brought to the enterprise. “It’s so incredible when the world aligns you with the right people,” Katie Parker says. In August Eli Parker and his sister Ashley Parker made Cox a partner-chef in what would become The Bear and Star restaurant, and Cox started work on the project in September.

JOHN COX

Chefs John Cox (left) and Jeremy Tummel. Smoked wagyu carpaccio and, below, Morro Bay oysters and The Bear and Star’s signature cornbread.


(The restaurant name is a reference to California and Texas, the two states Fess Parker considered home. Both are influences for the restaurant’s “refined ranch cuisine.”) “For the most part, we’re thinking back to meals that really resonated with us growing up, re-envisioned for a modern California restaurant,” Cox says, describing the intent behind the restaurant’s cuisine and referring to his and Sous Chef Trent Shank’s childhoods in Texas, and Chef Jeremy Tummel’s experience growing up on Santa Maria tri-tip in Santa Barbara. Standouts at a tasting held one night a couple of weeks before the opening included deviled eggs prepared with local sea urchin and sea cucumber roe, and a remarkably umami-filled blackened tofu dish served with an update of Texas caviar, the tasty marinated salad traditionally built around black-eyed peas rather than fish eggs. Other exceptional dishes included a melt-in-your-mouth, savory smoked wagyu carpaccio with cured egg yolk, koji, charred scallions, radishes and mushrooms; deeply flavorful wagyu tri-tip; and Morro Bay oysters dressed with a bright pink peppercorn and Meyer lemon mignonette. But amazingly, the food is likely to only get better, as The Bear and Star gradually ramps up the ranch’s production and replaces the ingredients the chefs are purchasing with meat, vegetables, fruits and eggs produced right on the ranch. The plan is to feed the livestock grape pomace from the wine operation and spent grain from Kris Parker’s craft brewery,

Third Window, in something of a closed loop of sustainability akin to those of other farm-operating chefs who have inspired Cox, such as Dan Barber of Blue Hill at Stone Barns in upstate New York. Katie Parker leads horseback rides at the hilltop ranch, where the family’s 300 acres of vineyards as well as 75 head of wagyu cattle and its chickens, quail, rabbits and organic row crops and heirloom fruit trees may be viewed; soon grazing pigs, sheep and beehives will be part of the scenery, too. But guests don’t have to venture farther than the restaurant itself to see the ingredients of a future meal being raised: Step onto the patio, and you’ll find an aquaponics system that the restaurant built with repurposed grape bins and uses to produce catfish, edible flowers and greens; venture into the “chef ’s room,” a private dining room lined with Cox’s personal knife and cookbook collection, and you’ll find mushrooms growing in a glass tower, and through a window to the kitchen, microgreens thriving. “It’s a very supportive and open environment but the team is also just very proactive in making things happen,” Cox says, adding that as a result, “the restaurant is way more exciting than anything I’d imagined six months ago.” The Bear and Star is located at 2860 Grand Ave., Los Olivos; 805 686-1359; TheBearAndStar.com

Sarah Wood is editor and publisher of Edible Monterey Bay.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2017 | 35


STE VEN BROWN

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A Passion for Peaches at Buttonwood Farm

DAVID COWAN

by Jennifer LeMay

Fred Munch, Buttonwood’s peach orchard manager.

I

f you don’t think of growing peach trees as an art, you probably haven’t met Fred Munch. He is

Buttonwood Farm Winery & Vineyard’s organic peach orchard manager and the man responsible for getting peaches bursting with flavor to the on-site Santa Ynez Valley farm stand, year after year. For many people, one of the true signs of summer is the arrival of sweet, juicy peaches that embody long days and sunshine. Fred has been growing peach trees for 37 years, and more than 20 of those have been spent honing his specialized farming techniques at Buttonwood. Wearing his signature straw hat, white T-shirt, jeans and boots, he led me from the winery’s tasting room to the orchard just out back, to meet the trees that range in age from just a few years to almost 25 years old.

Seyburn Zorthian, a partner at Buttonwood and the Resident Artist—her stunning abstract calligraphic artwork graces the winery’s labels and the tasting room’s walls—joined us for the tour. She pointed out that some of the more mature peach tree roots have had a rough time during the recent drought, as they reach down into the subsoil to depths that are at least proportionate to the tree above. Nevertheless, fruit production has been good, thanks in large part to Fred’s methods of feeding the trees organic compost from a nearby farm, planting new varieties, removing trees that aren’t producing and carefully pruning each tree himself with state-ofthe-art tools. I noticed the soil was pretty rocky around the base of the trees. It turns out that this alluvial, sandy riverbed soil that offers good drainage is their preferred growing medium, and that peach trees are adapted to climates where they will get enough sunlight and temperatures will drop to at least 45° in winter. The Navajo once grew large orchards in the Southwest. Today, California is the largest supplier of peaches in the U.S., followed by South Carolina and Georgia. “The genetic material of a tree plays an important role,” Fred explained. “And you have to experiment to see how a specific variety does on your farm, under current conditions.” In case you’re wondering where Fred gets his trees, the answer is Fowler Nursery in Newcastle, California, a provider to the industry and backyard growers since 1912, whose website assures you as a customer that they are “rooting for your success.” Fred showed us the few trees that were among the first 30– 40 planted when the orchard started. Their trunks were thick, grooved and gnarled; for some reason, I was surprised to learn that trees get wrinkles, too. Peach trees are among the shortestlived of the deciduous fruit trees, and they are only supposed to produce fruit for about 8–14 years. “Technically, these are over the hill,” says Fred, “but then again, so am I.” They’re still producing good peaches, so they get to stay.

The Farm As we made our way down the rows of trees, admiring the pink blossoms that seemed fastened to the branches, Seyburn told us about her mother, Betty Williams, who bought the farm in 1968 and had the vision to grow everything organically—grapes for the winery, various vegetables and eventually the fruit orchards.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2017 | 37


DAVID COWAN STE VEN BROWN

Above: The peach orchard in springtime. Below: The newest variety of tree is Galaxy, also called a donut peach.

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STE VEN BROWN

Buttonwood’s iconic farm truck.

Originally from Louisiana, Betty was highly educated, creative and enterprising. She understood the importance of sustainable farming and set out to create a working farm based on practices that would benefit people, animals and the land. The Santa Barbara Independent recognized her efforts and honored her as a “Local Hero” in 1992, the same year that Buttonwood opened its beautifully designed tasting room on the farm and planted the peach orchard. Buttonwood is also home to pears, almonds, persimmons and olives, but is most famous for its peaches—and of course, its vineyard and excellent wines. A few years after the first Buttonwood peach trees were planted, Fred was brought in to prune them. He noticed the orchard could use a few improvements and sent Betty a detailed, narrative “written consultation” along with one of his invoices. “She called me right away,” he said. Betty was already sold on his pruning skills, but now she was impressed with his writing and his obvious commitment to sustainable and organic farming methods. They met at her house on the farm and talked about peach varieties, the irrigation system and Fred’s ideas for making the orchard more productive. His knowledge came from running a peach orchard in nearby Ballard Canyon for 16 years, through a partnership that had recently come to a close. She offered him a contract position on the farm, and he’s managed the orchards ever since. Fred’s monthly reports over the years about the progress of the peach trees provided Betty with updates and entertaining stories about goings on at the farm, including during her later years when she didn’t go out as much. These eventually became inspiration for Life’s a Peach at Buttonwood! (2008), a charming book that includes Betty’s own words, along with those from others on the farm, accompanied by photos and illustrations.

Working in the Orchard Fred starts pruning in December and continues through March. He approaches the task in three steps, starting with a chainsaw to remove the largest branches, then going in with a pneumatic lopper, a commercial tool that uses compressed air and greatly reduces manual labor (“all you do is pull the trigger!”), making it possible for him to prune the orchard’s 300 peach trees all by himself. In the last step, he uses hand tools. The peach trees are pruned in a vase shape, allowing sunlight and air into the open center. Since peaches produce on new wood, pruning also helps by stimulating the trees to grow more wood, and in turn, more peaches. “Look at these monsters!” Fred gestured toward the Springcrest peach trees that he planted about five years ago. Their branches were as thick as some of the other tree trunks in the orchard. Together these 15 trees produced 3,000 pounds of fruit in past seasons. Flavorcrest is another variety that has performed well, and Spring Rose, a white peach, is another winner. Fred became even more animated when he showed us his newest variety of tree called Galaxy, also called a donut peach (they are saucer-shaped, with a dip in the middle). They produce an incredible amount of fruit, known for being juicy and having a low-acid sweet flavor. The peaches are delicate and bruise easily like most white peaches, so it’s a good thing they don’t have to travel far to the farm stand. Our tour continued as Fred brought us over to a covered area filled with heavy equipment to see another secret of his success. What would a farm be without tractors? All three of his are specially adapted to work in the orchard and, like the pruning equipment, save a substantial amount of time and labor. EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2017 | 39


One tractor from the 1950s has a deep bucket loader, perfect for moving compost into the orchard. Another is small enough to maneuver between the rows and get close to the trees, used for harvesting, spraying and tilling the soil for weed control. A tractor dubbed the “Euthanizer” removes trees that are not producing. Nearby we saw a pile of broken roots, vestiges of a recent removal. The trees must also be kept free of disease and infestation. Fred works to keep the keep trees healthy and resistant by selecting suitable varieties, keeping the soil healthy, getting good rootstock, and feeding with high-quality organic compost instead of chemical fertilizers. Since Buttonwood adheres to organic methods (even though it’s not certified), only non-restricted biological, botanical and elemental substances are used, such as copper and sulfur. Mechanical methods like rototilling keep weeds under control. It’s probably safe to say that most people aren’t aware of how much goes into producing great-tasting peaches!

A Farming Culture Another benefit to growing different varieties is that the harvest season is extended. Spring Rose peaches come as early as May, while Fairtime arrives in late August and into early September. Most of the other varieties—including Suncrest, Springcrest, Old Elberta, Babcock, Red Haven, Opale and O’Henry—are harvested in summer, so if all goes well, the produce stand can stay open continuously for a few months. There are no guarantees, however, and the stand may be closed at times. Fred is not afraid to remind people that Buttonwood is a farm, not a factory. People still come in droves to shop at the farm stand, and those who come for the wine often find themselves drawn there as well. Buttonwood peaches can even be enjoyed year-round in the form of jams and preserves that are sold in the farm’s wine tasting room.

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“Betty used to say ‘a cherub would graduate to an angel’ after eating one of my peaches,” Fred recalled. It’s no accident that the peaches from Buttonwood are so luscious. Fred has taken on this “farming project of a lifetime” in a quest to re-establish an agricultural system that is small-scale, sustainable and successful in the marketplace. It’s a system he says worked very well for many years in this country. “Communities had farms that supported them, and those farms were supported by the communities.” It’s an experience people get when they come to the produce stand at Buttonwood—they get to see a working farm. “We are bringing back a farming culture, where kids grow up knowing where their food comes from,” he says. “And how real peaches taste.” Buttonwood farm stand customers pay retail prices, and are happy to do so. They get an outstanding product, and that’s because Fred has made sure the fruit is harvested at the right time, grown using the right methods, and has selected the varieties that will thrive here. The demand for Buttonwood peaches continues to grow. Last year the trees produced 13,000 pounds of delicious goodness for the farm’s loyal customers, their friends and newcomers. When Betty started the farm, she envisioned it as a haven for her family and others who wanted to be part of a sustainable and financially viable venture, with beautiful architecture, gardens, and operations that honor both natural and human resources. As I toured the peach orchard, I came to realize that the roots in this place are healthy and deep, both literally and figuratively. The farm’s history is steeped in organic farming, community support and family connections, and these elements are still central to its operations today. Jennifer LeMay is a designer, writer and artist who loves great local food and our bountiful farmers market. She has contributed to Edible Santa Barbara since 2010. JLeMay.com

STE VEN BROWN

DAVID COWAN

STE VEN BROWN

From left: Older trees in the orchard are still producing fruit; Fred talks about his specialized pruning techniques; Springcrest peaches for sale at the farm stand.


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Jason and Katie Lesh with their daughter Chandler (named after the variety of strawberry).

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The Farm Cart

The Good Life in Small Town Carpinteria by Leslie A. Westbrook PHOTOGRAPHY BY JENNIFER ESPERANZA

Jason and Katie Lesh are bringing the farm to their loyal following.

I

t’s a lovely Tuesday afternoon at the Farm Cart, a wooden produce stand on rubber wheels

permanently parked in the garden beside the Carpinteria Library and Friends of the Library Used Bookstore, come rain or shine.

Kai Gloger, a fourth grader who attends Canalino School, is chomping on a stalk of broccoli as though it was an ice cream cone. She boldly declares (to all within earshot): “I am so glad there is a Farm Cart because there is SO MUCH BROCCOLI!” I am glad too, I tell Kai, who informs me that her backpack is filled with carrots, artichokes and, no surprise, more broccoli. This is where I grocery shop, lucky me: from a gypsy cart that sprouted almost five years ago, in September 2012. I am here to pick up my bi-weekly Farm Box, a wonderful bounty full of the familiar—lettuce, carrots, kale, perhaps a few apples or tangerines—and often a surprise or two (fab sweet potatoes) that urge me to expand my usual culinary repertoire. There’s a flow of many other customers on Farm Box Tuesday and the Farm Cart is more than our food source: It is the heartbeat and a community meeting place for food-savvy Carpinterians. EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2017 | 43


Above: A typical Farm Box. Below, ripe blueberries and summer produce at the Farm Cart.

“More organic than organic” is Katie and Jason Lesh’s motto—so you can be certain of the purity (no chemicals or sprays) of the fruits and veggies from local farmers as well as eggs from Carpinteria High School hens that dine on Farm Cart scraps. “Our vision is for people to know where their food comes from and why it’s so important to eat organic. We’d like to see organic produce put into the hands of everyone,” says the couple, dedicated to providing access to “real food.” The cart, which operates six days a week during summer (closed Thursdays, when the weekly farmers market blossoms nearby), peddles a steady and seasonally changing array of tasty, organic, locally grown produce. Katie grew up with access to great food— as Katie Shepard, daughter of local farmer hero Tom Shepard—and got her hands 44 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2017

in the earth from a young age. Her parents had the same cart here from 1998 to 2006, and she and Jason reopened when the city offered them a lease they could not refuse. Shepard’s Salad—the ready-to-go mix of lettuces created and made famous by Katie’s dad—can often be found. In summer, there are plenty of cucumbers, Roma tomatoes, peppers and eggplant from Tom’s farm. When they first began, only produce from Tom’s Carpinteria farm plot, where the couple picked, was sold. When he moved his farm to Buellton, the duo began harvesting beets and lettuce on José Alcantar’s Carpinteria Farm and then reached out to other farmers. “Having grown up here, we know anybody growing on their properties,” Jason told me, while noshing on a salad from


The Food Liaison (also a customer). “We will take organic produce from small backyard growers if we know them. I grill them— if they have weeds, that’s a telltale good sign that they aren’t spraying Roundup!” One such small local grower they support is Jeff Morrill, who supplies sweet and juicy Satsuma and Dancy Mandarins. Other farmers who supply the farm cart include Carpinteria’s Frecker Farms (lettuce), Steve Dyer Farm (tasty Rincon Mountain Hass avocados), John Givens/Givens Farm and Roots Farms (especially for sweet corn in the summer). There are also lots of lettuces, heirloom tomatoes and melons from good friend José Alcantar, who provided a mariachi band for Katie and Jason’s wedding in 2014. As seasons change, so does the array of colors and choices— organic asparagus and organic strawberries were just coming in as I wrote this in early spring; by the time you read it a summer bounty of fragrant grapes, stone fruits and more should be in abundance. Peaches, nectarines, grapes, blueberries and artichokes, which don’t grow commercially in our climate, are sourced seasonally from friends who grow organically in Bakersfield. Katie’s delightful email Farm Cart alerts are always full of good cheer, news and recipes and her colorful Instagram account photos are so pretty you could eat ’em. It’s always a delight to see the darling young mother and have a chat. “I know every single person that drives by,” Katie laughs. “I talk a lot—entertaining people is part of the job!” Earlier this year, January and February rains slowed down business and wiped out the couple’s savings—but they got back on track and have grown their business in the past year to some 260 Farm Box customers weekly. The couple, who both grew up and went to school in Carp and met at a concert at the Plaza Playhouse, have a social agenda as well. Get Jason talking and you will discover that still waters run deep. Soon after they met, Jason, who has “always been socially conscious,” whisked Katie off to Baja for the weekend and then on a longer trip to Southeast Asia on goodwill missions. In Ensenada, they took skateboards to kids. In Cambodia, they explored sweat shops and sex trafficking but, discovering much corruption, turned their efforts to helping build a children’s home in Sumatra. Called Villa Warna Warni, it houses 22 village children and provides school scholarships. They also helped set up a 1.5-acre organic garden for the residents. Last winter, Jason, along with employees Chris Everett and Donnie Watts, delivered a van full of food to the Dakota Pipeline protesters. Right after Thanksgiving, they “hustled out there” with 800-plus pounds of potatoes and yams from the Farm Cart, 400 pounds of butternut squash from Frecker Farms, 1,000 pounds of butternut squash and carrots from Roots Farm and 40 pounds of espresso donated by the French Press. “You never really know why you are called,” Jason said, telling me that he was blessed to spend two days with Native American elders involved with the protest.

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“There are not many times that there is a mindful, prayerful protest. I wanted to see how that model can really work,” he said. The couple’s generosity, as their business model becomes more successful thanks to their Farm Box program, extends to Santa Barbara. They are working on a pilot program with The Food Bank, donating a box for every two boxes sold. They have also been testing another “giving back” model of Farm Boxes delivered to schools (Lou Grant, Peabody, El Montecito and All Saints) with a small portion of the proceeds given directly to the schools for art programs, field trips and other needs. Jason would like to see school kids peddle Farm Boxes, rather than sugary cookies or GMO popcorn, for fundraising. “Kids really know a lot these days about eating healthy. After school, kids come here for strawberries, not to Foster Freeze [next door] for ice cream,” Jason told me. The couple also jumped on the gypsy bandwagon when asked to partner with Indivisible Carpinteria in a fundraising campaign to provide fresh organic produce to needy immigrant families living in Carpinteria. Katie, pregnant with their second child due in September, also has instructive videos on their Facebook page featuring family and farmers. Her great kitchen tricks like “How to de-seed a pomegranate” (demonstrated in a white blouse!) and “How to massage your kale like a boss!” are charming. Jason takes pride in his wife’s creative business abilities, telling me, “Now that the business is stable, I never knew that she would be such an awesome business partner. She’s such a hard worker and so humble.” As I finished chatting with Jason, as if on cue, Abraham Moreno arrived with his mom to pick up their Farm Box. I couldn’t help but ask the barefooted 7-year-old: “If you had your choice between strawberries from the Farm Cart or an ice cream from Foster Freeze, which would you choose?” Abraham paused and considered the question carefully before replying, “Strawberries!” “That’s what gives me faith in humanity: the children,” Jason said as we laughed while he rewarded his young customer with a handful of the sweet ripe berries. “We are really blessed to have an awesome, loyal customer base,” Jason concluded. I presume that Kai, the local princess of broccoli, as well as the barefoot king of strawberries, the couple’s 3-year-old daughter Chandler (named for the strawberry) and all the other kids and grown-ups who praise and frequent and dance around the gypsy Farm Cart, would heartily agree that we are the blessed ones. Leslie A. Westbrook lives in Carpinteria and shops at the Farm Cart a few times a week. She is also a founder of Indivisible Carpinteria. Her writing has been published nationally and globally, but she likes writing about her own backyard best these days.


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Conquering the King The Happy Canyon AVA by Sonja Magdevski PHOTOGRAPHY BY FRAN COLLIN

The Happy Canyon of Santa Barbara AVA has close to 800 acres of vineyards.

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Viticulturist Ben Merz of Coastal Vineyard Care Associates.

I

t is hard to find someone as enthusiastic about Happy Canyon as viticulturalist Ben Merz. In many ways he talks about the area as the same awed 7-year-old boy who first came to the Santa Ynez Valley from Germany in 1984. His parents were successful Arabian horse breeders who moved to this rich agricultural valley at a time when horses were king and the American dream was bright. Today close to 800 acres of vineyards have taken over many of the horse pastures that once dotted the landscape, though the dreams of fortune are the same. Starting in the 1970s, Happy Canyon turned into an idyllic escape for the wealthy. Most of those landowners’ original goals did not include planting grapes, as several of their stories attest, although a vineyard lifestyle has its allure, not to mention agricultural tax incentives under the Williamson Act. As Wes Hagen said in a recent email about the area, “Happy Canyon will always be inhabited by that crazy brand of farmer and winemaker who will write the checks to make the highest quality, and limited quantity, of wine.�

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Cabernet Sauvignon grapes in early summer. When cut in half, the grapes reveal the developing seeds.

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I met Merz at the intersection of Happy Canyon Road and Secretariat for a tour of the area’s vineyards. On all sides were horse barns and vineyards gleaming freshly sprouted neongreen spring growth. “We have a lot to see,” Merz said as we drove directly to Grassini Vineyard, planted in 2003. Named by bootleggers (and their customers) who sold moonshine during Prohibition, Happy Canyon is the most recent area of Santa Barbara County to become a grape-growing region. The first plantings began in 1996 and the first wine produced from the area was released in 2001. The Happy Canyon of Santa Barbara American Viticultural Area (AVA) was recognized in 2009. Only a handful of owners, who can easily be named by anyone in the industry, grow all of the fruit in Happy Canyon: Starlane, Vogelzang, Happy Canyon Vineyards, McGinley, Grassini, Tommy Town, Crown Pointe and the newest addition of Grimm’s Bluff. This is in contrast to most of the other Santa Barbara AVAs, where dozens of vineyards diversify the terrain. The advantage to being a latecomer in the grape-growing game is that Happy Canyon seems to have avoided most of the planting mistakes made by other AVAs. Vineyard managers seemed to understand from the start that the heat-loving Bordelais varietals were perfect for the hottest region in the Santa Ynez Valley. This also fits the desires of many of the vineyard owners in the area, who have planted grapes with the desire to conquer the king of grapes: Cabernet Sauvignon, a wine with an elite pedigree that garners escalating auction prices for First Growth Bordeaux and years-long allocation lists from cult Napa producers. Arguably, Cabernet Sauvignon launched the Napa Valley into the world-renowned wine region—and most heavily visited—that it is today. Even though Happy Canyon began its grape-growing life in the right direction, the AVA still has a ways to go in detaching itself from the clutches of past mistakes. The coastal cool climate areas of the Sta. Rita Hills and the Santa Maria Valley originally planted Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot alongside Pinot Noir and Chardonnay in the late 1960s. The nascent grape-growing area was risking everything on what was in vogue at the time with little understanding of what the resulting wines would become. Bordeaux varietals need extended periods of heat and proper vineyard management to remove what are called methoxypyrazines, a set of aroma compounds that produce herbaceous, green pepper qualities in wine. At some levels, these compounds can add complexity to a wine. At other levels they are negative and distracting. The Burgundian varietals of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay thrive in the cooler climates, as too much heat can result in flabby, bland wines. The easiest, though not exact, way to picture this is growing a cactus next to a pine tree. It can be done, though one species is going to be happier than the other depending on the location. By the time Happy Canyon started planting vines, growers had 30 years of experience in the area to figure out where the cactus and pine tree grow best.


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BALLARD CANYON A.V.A.

154

LOS OLIVOS A.V.A. Sant a Ynez

B uel l t on

246 154

Lake Cachuma

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Sol vang 1

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HAPPY CANYON OF SANTA BARBARA A.V.A.

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Unfortunately, people tend to remember green-tasting Cabernet Sauvignon, and it is proving harder to remove from the minds of sommeliers who have yet to venture into the new exciting world of Happy Canyon. Many of them would rather stick with the Napa Valley tried and true. Plus, it is what most of their Bordeaux-drinking customers ask for. Dierberg-Starlane Winemaker Tyler Thomas joked during our interview that their sales representative has visited retail shops throughout the country asking managers to see their Santa Barbara County Cabernet section, only to be met with blank stares.

All kidding aside, Happy Canyon’s biggest obstacle can also be its biggest asset as a new crop of winemakers like Thomas work to craft uniquely expressive wines representative of the soils and climate of Happy Canyon. This is an opportunity to dust off the blue-emblem-blazer country club stigma that Cabernet has with newer wine consumers as a fresh group of younger winemakers in and out of the area are working with fruit from Happy Canyon to create their own brand identity. They see the value and uniqueness of the fruit and are intent on capitalizing on its newness, before demand and eventually prices skyrocket. EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2017 | 51


In 2016 the average price of Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon grapes was $6,800 per ton, according to the state crop report, while average prices in Happy Canyon were half that. Today, Sta. Rita Hills Pinot Noir averages $4,500 per ton and is the most sought-after grape in the county. Contrast that to the early 1970s, when Santa Barbara County vineyards couldn’t give Pinot Noir away.

plant vines in Happy Canyon in the late 1990s after searching for more than 15 years for an ideal spot to plant Cabernet Sauvignon, their first love of wine. Santa Barbara County beat out Bordeaux and the Napa Valley. Jim and Mary Dierberg worked with Napa Valley’s top consultants before planting their Starlane property with a long-term multi-generational vision to establish a premier Cabernet Sauvignon estate.

Above and left: Happy Canyon Vineyard and Piocho Ranch. Above and right: A sweeping view of Happy Canyon looking down from the top of Grassini Vineyards.

“We have opted to show off a different side of Cabernet in California,” said Thomas, who worked for a number of years at top-scoring wineries in Napa before moving to DierbergStarlane Vineyards in 2013. “Part of the opportunity here is not being beholden to an area style. I am a plant science guy and wine for me is seeing through the vines and asking the question, ‘What is the style of the property?’ There is a lot of risk in this, but it is honest.” Thomas had lengthy conversations with the Dierberg Family, owners of First Bank, who were among the first to

52 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2017

“Our best asset is this incredible vineyard,” Thomas continued. “The real value and differentiating proposition is that we have this dirt. If our wines are the same as everyone else’s or if we try to pair it with another style we are not using our best asset. In the past, in spite of trying to make these wines in other styles, the Starlane-ness kept shining through so maybe what we need to do is refine that expression and let Starlane be Starlane.”


Grassini Vineyards.

The Majesty Back in the truck, Merz drives me to the tippy top of Grassini Vineyards, with the most glorious 360-degree view of Happy Canyon. We are standing in a relatively new planting of Cabernet Sauvignon, where the vines reach a mere two feet off the ground covered in limestone rocks to capture as much reflective heat as possible from the earth below. Merz explains that even though Happy Canyon is the hottest region in Santa Barbara, it is still slightly cooler in most years than the Napa Valley so every tool is used to maximize the vines’ ripening potential, customized for each spot. The cost of farming this elevated Cabernet vineyard with tight row spacing and only a small circuitous rocky road to access it is too expensive to sell the grapes, so all the fruit goes to the winery’s estate program. I asked Merz why Cabernet Sauvignon was chosen for this spot instead of the more certain Sauvignon Blanc, a grape varietal from Happy Canyon that has proven not only profitable for producers but successful for winemakers, and popular with wine critics, retailers and consumers.

“We are still trying to convince the world that Happy Canyon has the ability to produce world-class Cabernet that is not like Napa Valley, it is its own animal,” Merz answered. “The challenge with Happy Canyon is that we don’t have critical mass yet. Like the Sta. Rita Hills, nobody knew about it 15 years ago. And you need more people working with the grapes and doing a nice job with the wines and that is how it happens.” As a winemaker who has visited several wine-growing regions, Happy Canyon continues to amaze me. This vantage point high above is no different. It always feels like a fairytale hidden from plain view. Yet very few people can ever visit. As the AVA was created, one of the contingencies from the surrounding community was that no public tasting rooms would exist. On the one hand it maintains this elitist allure, while shutting out the possibility of individual discovery beyond a retailer or sommelier acting as a temperamental gatekeeper. Sean Pitts, managing director of Happy Canyon Vineyards, said he has mixed emotions about public accessibility. “I think there is value in the exclusivity of it all, that you are not allowed to taste here, and potentially that value gets shifted into the EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2017 | 53


price of the wine,” said Pitts, whose tasting room is located in the city of Santa Barbara 50 miles away from the property. “But the other side of the coin is that I do think if you brought tastings here it would help us grow up and grow faster and I don’t think that would be a bad thing.” Creating public awareness for Happy Canyon is the primary reason winemaker and restaurateur Doug Margerum, who had been sourcing Happy Canyon fruit since he began making wine, decided to gather the small group of vineyard owners in 2008. At the time, the Sta. Rita Hills had been recently awarded AVA status and was lauding its cool-climate terroir as perfect for Burgundian varietals, and wine critics were responding favorably. The push to create the Sta. Rita Hills was a direct 54 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2017


reaction to the same wine media who previously viewed the broader Santa Ynez Valley AVA as too warm for Burgundian varietals. The pendulum shifted and now it was Happy Canyon’s turn to take back the heat and stamp its own message. “There was no really good way to go into the marketplace and say ‘Hey, these are Bordeaux varietals from Santa Barbara County’ when the whole promotion of Santa Barbara at the time was cold-climate Pinot and Chardonnay,” Margerum said. “We needed to have some way to designate that there was another distinct area within Santa Barbara County marked Happy Canyon, so we got everyone together.” The group pitched in the funds and hired winemaker Wes Hagen to research and write the petition. He had just come off of writing the successful Sta. Rita Hills AVA document and was excited to begin a new venture on the opposite side of the Highway 246 corridor, 30 miles east of his home turf nestled into Lake Cachuma and the Los Padres national forest. The transverse mountain range that defines the coolclimate Sta. Rita Hills stops at the entrance of Happy Canyon as a result of a geological shift millennia ago. “Sta. Rita Hills and Happy Canyon are bookends of this grape-growing climate—the coolest and the warmest—where premium quality wine grapes can be produced,” Hagen said. “Happy Canyon not only has the perfect climate for Bordeaux cultivars, but also a very unique geology and soil profile. Fortunately, the vineyards are younger, they had better knowledge of matching clonal material with climate and soil, and almost all of the plantings out in Happy Canyon are well matched to the place.” I am reminded of my conversation with Vineyard Manager John Belfy of Buona Terra Farming when I asked him if Happy Canyon got it right with its initial plantings. Belfy planted some of the first vineyards in the area, including Vogelzang, Starlane and Happy Canyon Vineyards. “People need to hang in there,

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CLINT WEISMAN

Winemaker Doug Margerum spearheaded the efforts to designate Happy Canyon as an AVA.

it is still too early to understand what Happy Canyon can be in the future,” Belfy said. “Wine growing is not for the faint of heart or for those in a hurry. The vines in this area are just starting to come into their own. In Napa the vines are older, with a lot more people making a lot more wine. There are more opportunities to make great wine based on the sheer number of examples. Happy Canyon wines are wonderful and are only getting better and better.”

The Future Landscape From the top of Grassini, after Merz outlines the established Happy Canyon vineyards I have visited, he says he wants to show me a secret vineyard planting tucked up right next to Lake Cachuma that will be the easternmost planting in the AVA once it is complete. We drive along a long desolate dirt road until we see, like a mirage, the beginning of what will be 120 acres of vineyards planted with the potential for 80 more acres in the coming years. The owners had been looking for years throughout the state until they chose Santa Barbara County for their future development. Merz has been working on the property since 2015 and can barely contain his excitement. “The majority of the vineyard will be planted to Bordeaux varietals, though we

56 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2017

have also planted small percentages of every single other varietal that winemakers have been begging us to plant for years,” Merz said. “We finally have this opportunity to do so.” Merz is the type of vineyard manager who is on top of the wine media game, following critics, scores and winemakers from the area, readily prepared to rattle off high points for those who have fared well sourcing fruit from vineyards he manages. Reputation and awareness in the larger wine world is vitally important for Merz, who can’t hide his hometown pride. “I give people advice on where to plant and what to plant and how much to plant and in the end it has to work out,” he said. “I can’t be standing there in 10 years with people saying, ‘I can’t believe we listened to this guy.’ I truly believe in this region and I know we haven’t reached our full potential but we are well on our way. This is a long-term play. I know this region will continue to prove itself every year because there is a lot of exciting stuff happening.” As we drove back to civilization I asked Merz if ego is what drives people to take on such challenging resource-intensive projects. One of the area’s pioneering vineyard managers, Dale Hampton, has always said that grape-growing is a big risk and only a few people have the ability to stomach it all the way to the end. Merz admitted that most of the people who’ve planted in Happy Canyon are accomplished with deep pockets equally committed to success in this industry, as well. “One thing they are not making any more of is land,” Merz said. And yet the intricacies of grape growing and wine marketing continue to stump even the most steadfast early adopters, who are amazed at the persistent challenges. The Dierberg family is the perfect example. They told me when they first came to the area they consulted with the Firestone family, who are credited with establishing the first estate winery in Santa Barbara County in 1972. The Firestone family’s fortune came from the Firestone Tire and Rubber Company started in the early 1900s. The Firestone family tried to dissuade the Dierberg’s from planting, revealing that their venture had proven more costly than anticipated. “This is a tough business, harder than you would think,” said Jim Dierberg overlooking their vineyards one afternoon from their back porch. The property sits right against the San Rafael Mountains and feels remote amidst their vast expanse. “It makes banking look easy,” Mary Dierberg laughed. “One thing I am still consistently amazed at is how complex growing grapes and making wine is. No matter what we think we know there is always more we can learn.” “That is the best part, too,” said Jim. “You will never conquer it. For your whole life and your great-great-greatgrandchildren’s lives they will never get it all. There is more to learn every day.” Sonja Magdevski is winemaker/owner of Casa Dumetz Wines, a tiny producer in love with Grenache and specializing in Santa Barbara County Rhône varietals. She is also a reemerging journalist finding her way in the intricate and wonderful world of wine.


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Making America Stronger One School Lunch at a Time by Nancy Oster

D

uring World War I, about 30% of our nation’s recruits were rejected due to malnutrition and poor health. The rejection rate at the beginning of World War II was about 45%. The National School Lunch Program was enacted in 1946, in response to post-war concerns that the effects of malnutrition on future soldiers posed a national security risk. When President Truman signed the bill to provide permanent funding and low-cost commodity foods to schools throughout this country he said, “Congress has acted with great wisdom in providing the basis for strengthening the nation through better nutrition for our children.”

Truman also pointed out that although we had the capacity to feed “plenty of good food to every man, woman and child in the country,” our failure was in the distribution of that food. Developing community infrastructures to move food from our nation’s farms onto school lunch plates was at the heart of the National School Lunch Program. Cafeterias were built and skilled “lunch ladies” served freshly prepared farm-raised foods to school children in the 1950s. But over time, these infrastructures began to crumble, giving way to off-site bulk-processed reheatable foods. Then in 2007, a movement began locally to restore our school lunch focus on fresh farm vegetables and to ensure a robust food security network for our community. With this in mind (as well as the recent talks of budget cuts to the School Lunch Program), I climb the steep flight of stairs to the Food Services office of Santa Barbara Unified School District (SBUSD). In the background, trucks unload fresh produce at the adjacent warehouse and school district trucks leave carrying food supplies to school kitchens. Food Services Director Nancy Weiss greets me warmly as I enter her office, sunlight bouncing off the cascading ringlets of her reddish brown hair. Within a few minutes she’s showing me cell phone photos of the fruit on her plum tree and we’re discussing the sweet smoky flavor of grilled Blenheim apricots. It becomes clear as we talk that Nancy’s determination and energy have been a major force in bringing fresh whole ingredients back into the SBUSD kitchens. Prior to working for the school district, Nancy owned SOhO restaurant in downtown Santa Barbara, where she specialized in farm-to-table meals. When she sold SOhO and began working in the Goleta Valley Junior High cafeteria in the mid-’90s, she was shocked to learn that the school served lunches prepared by McDonald’s, Taco Bell and Domino’s Pizza. The district was buying frozen heat-and-serve food to reduce skilled labor and equipment costs. Fast-food culture had taken hold and food service directors around the country were buying in to this new version of efficiency. Schools had no use for stoves and ovens, so the districts were not replacing them. Box cutters had become one of the most frequently used kitchen devices. EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2017 | 59


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Appalled, she tried to make things like Chicken Parmesan out of the chicken nuggets. “A chef has to be flexible, creative and open minded,” she says, but this was a new level of challenge. Nancy persisted and she eventually took over as the school’s kitchen manager. Then in 2007, she was asked to be interim school food services director for the Santa Barbara Unified School District. That’s when things really began to change. Nancy knew she had more on her plate than just sourcing better ingredients. The whole infrastructure needed rebuilding. She needed to network with local farmers, develop systems for moving food from the farms to school kitchens, create more storage for fresh produce, invest in new equipment and train her kitchen workers how to prepare fresh food in large quantities. Fortunately the Orfalea Foundation’s School Food Initiative (a county-wide assessment of school food needs) coincided with Nancy’s interim and subsequent permanent role as food services director. Nancy credits the Orfalea Initiative with sharing the vision, guidance, groundwork and support for rebuilding Santa Barbara’s food distribution infrastructure. Free to focus on bringing whole food ingredients back into the kitchens, she began by replacing expensive highly processed prepared foods with low-cost high-protein commodity ingredients. Historically school lunches have been an outlet for surplus foods such as dairy products, poultry, beef and grains purchased by the US Department of Agriculture to support American farmers. Nancy also saw the opportunity to move towards a more nutrient-rich plant-based diet, integrating fresh organic fruits and vegetables from local farms into the school menu. Today, about 35% to 70% of the produce the district schools serve comes from local farms (depending on the time of year). The majority of this produce is loaded into trucks fresh from the fields and delivered to the district warehouse by Harvest Santa Barbara and The Berry Man. However, Nancy also orders directly from a few local farmers. One of them is José Alcantar. “Anything he grows and can sell us, we’ll buy,” she says. I was soon to see why. Nancy invited me to visit Alcantar Organics in Carpinteria on a chilly morning in February. The air was clear, the sky deep blue and the surrounding green-gray hills sharply contoured. José’s day had begun hours earlier. He smiled in greeting, his eyes shaded by a raffia cowboy hat. He offered me an orange Clementine and we shared a sticky handshake… an indication of the Clementine’s sweetness. This is just one of his four farms. At this location, José and his four workers grow most of the salad greens for the school district’s salad bars. We tasted as we walked—ruby red romaine next to rows of green and purple kale, dark green spinach and plump red and green cabbages. Rainbow rows of carrots were newly planted—white, yellow, orange, red and purple. José was preparing an area for tomatoes. The last of his curly kale plants stood tall with their lower stalks picked clean, looking like a Dr. Seuss forest.


José has been farming organically since he came to the United States at age 16. He worked at Tutti Frutti Farms for almost 20 years before leaving his role as foreman to start his own five-acre organic farm in Carpinteria. José now farms 18 acres. His ongoing carrot, beet and radish plantings keep the district supplied with these items all year long. “The watermelon radishes are coming along nicely,” he tells Nancy. He shows us cell phone photos of the huge fennel bulbs he’s growing for her at another property. As we leave, we pass his seedling nursery, where thousands of seedlings are ready to plant. “I like watching my plants grow,” he says affectionately. And it’s clear his plants feel the love. My next visit would be to the La Colina Junior High kitchen. It’s pizza day and two of the kitchen staff, Nora Canto and Roxan Garza, are out sick. Cafeteria manager Kathleen McNeil is pulling chicken breasts out of the convection oven to put into the Caesar salads that Ketut Karang is assembling on stainless steel prep tables near the stove. Eva Escoto is in the next room preparing cucumbers, carrots, romaine mixed with dark green kale, jicama, snap peas and blueberries for the salad bar. A sign near the salad bar indicates that carrots and blueberries are the Featured Harvest items that will be highlighted in the menu throughout the month. This is the first of two visits I will make to the La Colina kitchen. On this introductory visit I quickly join the production team. I help Ketut with the Caesar salads that will be sold from carts at lunchtime along with pizza and the sandwiches that Eva has made. The pace picks up when Ana Monzon and Leo Charco arrive. Ana cuts fresh fruit and vegetable sticks and puts them, seasoned with lime and chili spices, into cups while Leo prepares 30 chicken quesadillas to grill and sell from the Mobile Café truck parked outside. I help Ketut assemble and wrap chicken, pork and vegetarian burritos, which go into a warmer where they will be sold at the snack window along with freshly made double cheeseburgers and homemade cookies. Meanwhile Kathleen bakes 26 pizzas. The roar of the convection ovens mixes with the buzz of alarms reminding us not to let the pizzas burn. Declarations that we are almost ready increase in volume as students line up outside. Nine hundred students have just 35 minutes to eat and get back to class. On my second visit I arrive early to make pizza dough with Ketut. While the cellophane-wrapped pizza slice has become a symbol of half-hearted meal planning, freshly made pizza remains a daily option at La Colina. “Pizza is not the enemy when made with love and whole ingredients,” Nancy says. The cost is low because this pizza is made using USDA commodity grains and cheese. Served with a green salad and fruit, it’s a complete meal that the kids will eat with enthusiasm.

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Ketut tells me to measure out two gallons of cornmeal and two cups of yeast while he measures out the white and wheat flours. I feel like I’m baking in the giant’s kitchen. We create 22 large pizzas that will be topped, baked and served the next day. I’m impressed by the smooth efficiency of the kitchen and the skill of these cooks. Eva brings me some of her kale chips to taste, Nora has finished a huge batch of bright green salsa verde and is roasting yellow squash with onions for our morning break. This is restaurant-quality food. Even the salad dressings are made from scratch. It has not always been this way. In fact, the La Colina kitchen was closed down until 1996 when Kathleen was given the job to reopen it. “They had been transporting the food over from a nearby high school,” she says. “We had to find what we could in storage and make due with that to get started.” She was hired for 6½ hours a day but worked 8. Kathleen brings me a box of José’s organic vegetables delivered that morning. “Taste this beautiful sweet celery,” she says, breaking off a piece. “Look at these cauliflowers—white, yellow, green and purple. I love the smell of this feathery fennel. These cabbages are delicious sautéed and delicious raw.” Kathleen never stops moving; it’s easy to see how Kathleen’s love of good food inspires her staff. The La Colina kitchen staff arrives at 6am. Roxan had already prepared fruit smoothies and breakfast for the students before I arrived. Later in the day, Leo and Ana will coordinate the Supper Program, which provides nutritious balanced dinners five days a week at six cafeterias and five Mobile Café sites community-wide. La Colina is just one of the 11 kitchens in the school district, employing 130 people who procure, prepare and distribute food for 28 sites. Food services like this are the lifeblood of our community. While many of us do not worry about food security, Nancy says “There is real hunger in our community.” She sees it firsthand every day. “District wide, almost 49% of our students qualify for free or reduced-cost lunches.” All schools in the district provide free breakfasts to all of their students and eight schools also provide free lunches to all students. All schools receive state and federal reimbursement based on the number of free, reduced and paid lunches they serve each day. The district’s Supper Program and a Summer Food Service Program also provide free meals to youth under 18 and low-cost meals to adults. Both of these federally funded programs are open to the public. While the SBUSD provides a key spoke in the food distribution wheel, it is not alone in addressing food security in our community. The Food Bank of Santa Barbara, the Carpinteria Unified School District and the Goleta Union School District all have programs that work alongside each other to fill food distribution gaps. In times of crisis they work together with the Red Cross to shelter and feed displaced community members and emergency personnel. Thanks to Nancy Weiss, Kathleen McNeil, José Alcantar and many other community members like them, Santa Barbara’s 62 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2017

Resources SB Unified School District, Food Services SBUnified.org/departments/business-services/ food-services/

Supper Program SBUnified.org/departments/business-services/ food-services/supper-club/

2016 Summer Food Service Program SBUnified.org/2016/06/20/summer-food-serviceprogram/

Summer Meals From mid-June through August, Santa Barbara Unified School District provides breakfasts, lunches and suppers free to any youth 18 years or younger at sites throughout the community. Open to the public, this program offers low-cost meals for adults as well. See SBUnified.org/ departments/business-services/food-services for details. The Food Bank of Santa Barbara County offers free meals for youth through their Picnic in the Park Program (FoodBankSBC.org/programs/picnic-in-the-park/). The Boys and Girls Clubs, Community Action Commission and the Carpinteria, Guadalupe and Lompoc school districts also offer summer meal service programs at sites within Santa Barbara County (CDE.ca.gov/ds/sh/sn). The Los Alamos Foundation offers free summer lunches for school age children at the Los Alamos County Park (TheLosAlamosFoundation.org). To find the meal locations nearest you, text “SUMMERFOOD” to 805 877-877 from your cell phone.

food distribution infrastructure is once again strong and vital. As Congress considers budget cuts to social services, we must encourage our legislators to reinforce, not undermine, this system that helps us feed our communities and keeps us strong and healthy as a nation. Nancy Oster’s two children remember “hot lunches” at La Colina in the 1980s as previously frozen microwaved cheeseburgers and greasy soggy fries. She apologizes to them for not taking away their lunch money and making them take homemade “hippie granola” bag lunches to school instead. She is grateful to recent Woman of the Year Award winner Nancy Weiss and her skilled food service providers for their dedication to putting healthy food back onto our local school lunch trays.


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The Sweet Taste of

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My father’s motto: “Always leave room for dessert”

I

grew up in London. Damp, cold, wet London. The longWe discovered ice cream unlike any we had tasted before. awaited arrival of summer and less inclement weather Vanilla ice cream that was delicately scented and flecked with the caused the local population to flood outdoors to local telltale signs that real vanilla beans had been used and that left a parks and expose their pale, vitamin-D-deprived bodies to the lingering sweet, creamy taste in one’s mouth; pale pistachio ice sun’s rays. We were no exception. cream that captured the essence of that nut; and lemon sorbets so tangy they made your mouth pucker and your eyes squeeze shut. With the first hint of a blue sky and vaguely warm weather we would rush across Hampstead heath, have a picnic and As years passed, the sound of summer included Petula cavort in the grass—rolling down hills, flying kites and sailing Clark, the Rolling Stones and Mongo Jerry singing about what small boats on the local ponds. he did In the Summertime, and we kept on a quest to find the best ice cream we had ever had. If chocolate and vanilla These activities were only interrupted by the clarion call of were the benchmarks by which we tested and compared each the ice cream van’s jingle that summoned all the children in the establishment, it was ice creams made with fresh fruit that park like the Pied Piper, all of us running full tilt to get there reflected the mastery of the ice cream maker. first, clutching pennies in our sticky hands to buy iced lollies with fantastic names such as Orange In a small village on the Kwench, Fab and Zoom—the last, a Mediterranean we finally found “ He was a magician when it three-tiered, multi-flavored, rocketthe acme of ice cream shops. It was shaped concoction that stained your came to ice creams, particularly a miniscule establishment tucked tongue bright red. This was how we away down a narrow alleyway that those made with fruit. They knew summer had nearly arrived. led to the harbor. We’d actually have exuded the very essence of to stand in the alleyway, so “shop” British school holidays began might be a bit of an exaggeration. in the third week in July. Then, for the ingredient.” six glorious weeks, we would escape The owner would roll up across the Channel to France and the metal shutters, maneuver the head south. My brother and I would be crammed in the back refrigerated display case to the front of the shop and edge of my parent’s convertible as we drove through the winding behind it in order to serve his customers. He was a magician roads of Provence, top down, sun blazing, sunglasses on, as the when it came to ice creams, particularly those made with fruit. Beach Boys were waxing lyrical, at full volume, about the joys They exuded the very essence of the ingredient. His cassis ice of Surfin’ USA on the car’s eight-track tape… cream was nothing short of miraculous in its depth of flavor. Summer after summer, we would walk down the alleyway, with “If everybody had an ocean snippets of music floating on warm wisps of air from a Summer Across the U.S.A. Breeze to Bob Marley, who had us Jammin on our way to this Then everybody’d be surfin’ teeny place to taste new creations filled with peaches, nectarines, Like Californ-i-a…” raspberries and blackberries. This was the sound of summer. Nancy Sinatra sang about Many years later, I introduced my children to the ice cream her boots, the Beatles took us on journey in a Yellow Submarine man. Each had their favorites. My son: chocolate, of course; my and Van Morrison sang about his Brown Eyed Girl. These daughter: strawberry; and I would delve into his slightly tangy were the sounds that drifted through the warm breeze in the ethereal black currant gem. We would stroll along the harbor afternoon as we came in from the sun, sand still on our feet, walls, ice cream melting as we looked out over the boats, to the for an afternoon siesta, and these were the tunes that would sound of Pharrell Williams encouraging everyone to Be Happy accompany us as we drove to get the best of all summertime blaring out from a local bistro. treats—magnificent ice cream.

64 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2017


COLIN QUIRT

Summer Berry Pavlova.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2017 | 65


It became our summer ritual. When oldies came on the Austen. I found this historical tidbit whilst searching the term. Peek inside the Universal Cook: and City and Country radio, they would scream in embarrassment as I would sing Housekeeper, written in 1792 by John Francis Collingwood and Got to Give it Up a la Marvin Gaye, perhaps, then all would John Woollams, cooks at The Crown and Anchor Pub in the be forgiven as we headed to the ice cream man. You can Strand in London, and you will find three recipes for syllabub understand our dismay, then, when on our last visit to this little including this one, which is priceless: village, thinking of nothing else than THAT ice cream, the little emporium had simply vanished, a gaudy jewelry shop in its “A Syllabub Under a Cow. Having put a bottle of red or white place. This was tragic. We stood bemused, unsure where to go wine, ale or cyder [sic], into a china bowl, sweeten it with sugar, and what to do. and grate in some nutmeg. Then hold it under the cow, and milk Thankfully the old shop owner had imparted a soupçon into it until it has a fine froth on the top. Strew over it a handful of of his technique to me during our many discussions over the currants cleaned, washed, and picked, and plumbed before the fire.” years. Basically it came down to combining a purée made with This whipped cream concoction has a touch of wine and the finest fruit available and wondrous cream. I returned home sugar in it. It’s pretty much the perfect match for any fruit, and vowed to make the best ice cream I could, keeping his including nectarines. Most of all it’s easy to make and utterly principles in mind. The plum ice cream (on page 68) is the delicious. (See recipe on page 68.) result of those experiments. If the taste of a piece of fruit can transport you, so can a If ice cream was one part of the song. One Sunday, not long ago, taste of summer, fruit was the other. I was driving back to Santa Barbara “ I recently ate a nectarine that from Ventura with a flat of rather This was (and still is) the time of lush peaches, one bite of which would release extraordinary dark red, sweet transported me back to a bracelet of sweet juice running down strawberries in the back of the car. those childhood summers. your arm; of fragrant strawberries; of I was listening to a ’60s oldies station luscious, fat, ripe figs; and of Cavaillon It was a perfect pale white on the radio to much eye-rolling melons, whose honey-sweetened flesh from my daughter, who immediately and pink sphere.” tasted of the ripest apricots. put in her ear buds to drown out Summer desserts tended to revolve all possible singing from me. As we around what we could pick. Often, it was just a simple piece of rounded the long bay leading into Carpinteria, watching the fruit, or perhaps, on special occasions, fruit and ice cream, and, waves rolling on shore, the Beach Boys’ Surfin’ Safari played. if you were at my grandmother’s house, fruit and crème fraiche, I cranked up the volume and belted out the song: or perhaps a clafoutis or tart. The essential ingredient was the “Let’s go surfin’ now berry or stone fruit at hand. We made jams, jellies and canned Everybody's learning how fruit for the winter from everything we picked in her garden. Come on and safari with me After weeks soaking up the sun, my brother and I would (Come on and safari with) return to London to start another school year, carefully At Huntington and Malibu bringing back a jar or two of our grandmother’s favorite jams. They’re shooting the pier For a month or so afterwards we would savor the essence of the At Rincon they’re walking the nose season encapsulated in those canning jars. The jam would rarely We’re going on safari to the islands this year last longer than that. So if you’re coming get ready to go…” I recently ate a nectarine that transported me back to those childhood summers. It was a perfect pale white and pink sphere. As I took a bite, time compressed in an odd Harry Potter-like time-tuning way, and I was whisked back to my grandmother’s tiled kitchen, pots bubbling on the stove as she crafted her preserves. Then, in a kaleidoscope of images, I was carried at warp speed to London and a series of classic desserts popped into my head: strawberries and cream, lemon possets, summer pudding and syllabubs. Funny how the taste of something can trigger such instant memories, and in this case a desire to re-create one of those dishes. A syllabub. Don’t you love that word? It sounds like something that came out of a novel by Dickens or Jane

66 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2017

And then it hit me: MALIBU, RINCON… You mean to say that the song I sang as a child driving around France in the ’70s is about the same beach I am driving by now! I was stunned. I stopped singing as the revelation struck me. I was living that sun-kissed Californian dream that I fantasized about when I looked out my rain-splattered windows in London, and my daughter was, is, well, a California Girl! I pondered this as we drove the rest of the way home. We were having friends over for a late lunch in the garden. I had planned to make a Pavlova for dessert, hence the strawberries. This dessert managed to combine my French and English childhood favorites into one, meringues, cream and fruit, a type of Vacherin meets Eton mess. It seemed oddly appropriate.


MEDIA 27

Caramelized Nectarines with a Lemon Syllabub.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2017 | 67


RECIPES Plum Ice Cream Makes 8 servings 11 ⁄ 2 pounds plums

2 tablespoons butter 1 ounce sugar (2 tablespoons) 1 teaspoon vanilla paste

1 teaspoon rose water

Place the nectarine slices into a large bowl. Set aside.

4 egg yolks

Warm the butter, sugar and vanilla paste in a small saucepan over low heat. When the sugar has dissolved, pour the mixture over the nectarines and toss to coat.

5 ounces sugar (⅔2 ⁄ 3 cup) 1 pint (2 cups) heavy cream Seeds from 1 vanilla bean, 1 teaspoon vanilla paste or pure vanilla extract

Place a large bowl in the fridge to chill. Blanch the plums for 1 minute in a saucepan of boiling water. Drain, peel and pit the plums. Purée the fruit with the rose water using a blender or food processor. Refrigerate the purée until cold. In a medium-sized bowl, whisk together the egg yolks and the sugar until pale. Pour the cream and vanilla into a medium-sized saucepan. Bring almost to a boil. Remove from the heat. Then whisk the cream, a little at a time, into the egg yolk mixture to make a custard. Pour the custard mixture back into the saucepan and heat slowly, stirring continuously until the mixture coats the back of a spoon. The custard will be fairly thin at this point. Pour the custard into the chilled bowl and refrigerate until the mixture is cold.

Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Cook the nectarine slices for 3–4 minutes, turning them occasionally, until just browned and starting to render their juice. Divide the nectarine slices and pan juices among eight serving bowls or jars and spoon some of the syllabub on top. Serve immediately.

Summer Berry Pavlova Makes 8 servings 4 egg whites at room temperature Pinch of salt 8 ounces (just over 1 cup) ultra-fine sugar (you can make your own by processing the sugar in a food processor for 1 minute) 2 teaspoon cornstarch 1 teaspoon white-wine vinegar

When the custard is cold, combine it thoroughly with the plum purée. Using an ice cream machine, freeze according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

A few drops of good vanilla essence or vanilla paste

Caramelized Nectarines with a Lemon Syllabub

2 pints strawberries, raspberries, blueberries and blackberries

Makes 8 servings

Beat the egg whites with a pinch of salt until satiny peaks form. Then beat in the sugar, a fourth at a time, until the meringue is stiff and shiny. Sprinkle the cornstarch, vinegar and vanilla over the whipped egg whites and fold in lightly.

FOR THE SYLLABUB 1

⁄ 2 cup sweet white wine or other dessert wine

5 ounces (⅔2 ⁄ 3 cup) sugar Zest and juice of 1 lemon 2 cups heavy whipping cream

Chill a bowl in the fridge until it is very cold. In a separate bowl, combine the wine, sugar, lemon zest and juice, and stir to dissolve. Refrigerate this mixture for at least 30 minutes. Pour the cream into the chilled bowl and whisk the mixture until it barely forms soft peaks. Do not over beat. Add the chilled wine-lemon mixture gradually to the cream, whisking continuously, until it forms soft peaks. Refrigerate the syllabub until you are ready to serve the dessert.

FOR THE NECTARINES 8 nectarines, halved, pitted, and sliced

68 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2017

3

⁄ 4 pint of cream

1 tablespoon sugar

Preheat the oven to 300° and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

Draw a 9-inch circle on a piece of parchment paper. Place the parchment paper on a baking sheet. Mound the meringue mixture onto the circle drawn on the parchment paper. Flatten the top, indenting it slightly and smooth the sides. Place on the bottom rack of the oven and immediately reduce heat to 250° and cook for 1¼ hours. Turn off the oven and let it cool with the door closed. Whip the cream with the sugar until it holds soft peaks. Top the meringue with whipped cream and berries and serve. Pascale Beale grew up in England and France surrounded by a family that has always been passionate about food, wine and the arts. She was taught to cook by her French mother and grandmother. She is the author of The Menu for All Seasons and Salade. Visit her website and blog: The Market Table at PascalesKitchen.com.


EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2017 | 69

MEDIA 27

Plum Ice Cream.


SWUIM NM T EERR EEDDI IBBLLEE EEVVEENNTTSS S AT U R D AY

S AT U R D AY

JULY

JULY

Red, White & Brew Beer Garden

Homebrewing a GlutenReduced All-Grain Beer

1

JU LY

1–4pm at the Santa Barbara Maritime Museum Join us as we celebrate summer on the museum patio overlooking the Santa Barbara Harbor. Enjoy beer from three local breweries paired with small bites by local restaurants. $25 Advance/Members; $35 at the door. SBMM.org/Events/RedWhite-Brew.

T U E S D AY

W E D N E S D AY

JULY

JULY

4

noon–5pm at Telegraph Brewing Co. Hosted by Telegraph and Draughtsmen Aleworks, this class is for intermediate homebrewers who would like to expand their techniques and methods for brewing gluten-reduced all-grain beers. $25. More info and tickets at Eventbrite. com; search: Telegraph Brewing.

JULY

12–16

12

Valley Piggery Fourth of July BBQ

Sensory Analysis and Off-Flavor Tasting Panel

11am–6pm at Refugio Ranch in Los Olivos

7–8:30pm at Telegraph Brewing Co.

Come celebrate Independence Day with a pig roast and fixin’s brought to you by Valley Piggery, with wine specials by the glass and bottle. Find more info at RefugioRanch.com.

1

126th Annual Santa Barbara County Fair 11am–10pm daily at Santa Maria Fairpark From jams and jellies to pies, photography, homemade quilts and floriculture, the Fair provides visitors with an abundant, interesting mix of educational fun. Award-winning wines, fine art, live entertainment, agriculture, horticulture, junior livestock auction and rodeo. $8–10. SantaMariaFairpark.com.

Telegraph’s brewing team will guide attendees through a tasting flight of six basic off-flavors including bacterial contamination, DMS, diacetyl, isovaleric acid, oxidation, and sulphur. $25/pp. More info and tickets at Eventbrite.com; search: Telegraph Brewing.

F R I D AY

S AT U R D AY

S AT U R D AY – S U N D AY

JULY

JULY

15

JULY

15–16

Sunset Rare & Reserve Wine Tasting

Los Alamos Third Saturday Evening Stroll

The Santa Barbara French Festival

5– 8pm at downtown Los Alamos

11am–7pm at Oak Park in Santa Barbara

14

6:30–9pm, at Chase Palm Park Carousel in Santa Barbara

The Los Alamos merchants on Bell Street invite everyone to experience Los Alamos community charm first-hand with its new Third Saturdays program. Ongoing. For more information call 805 344-1900.

Taste some of California’s best reserve and rare wines as part of the California Wine Festival. These limited tickets offer samples from Santa Barbara County, Napa, Sonoma and more. $110–140; for tickets and more information visit CaliforniaWineFestival.com.

Celebrate Bastille Day weekend with crepes, pastries, wine, mimosas, entertainment and more. Sign up for a raffle for the chance to win a French getaway. The event is free and familyfriendly. Visit FrenchFestival.com for more info.

F R I D AY

W E D N E S D AY

F R I D A Y- S A T U R D A Y

S A T U R D A Y- S U N D A Y

JULY

JULY

26

JULY

28–29

JULY

29–30

Ca’Del Grevino Summer Concert: Drive-In Romeo’s

Edible Santa Barbara Summer Issue Release Party

Playground Series Beer Showcase

The Santa Barbara Greek Festival

5:30– 8pm at Ca’Del Grevino Santa Maria

6–8pm at Buttonwood Farm Winery & Vineyard

Fri 2–10pm & Sat noon–10pm at Telegraph Brewing Co.

11am–7pm at Oak Park in Santa Barbara

Part of the Summer Concert Series. Enjoy rockin’ rhythm & blues at the winery. Ticket includes entrance into the Ca’ Del Grevino Estate. Beverages and food are sold separately at the event. Parking is free. For more info and tickets visit Grevino.com/Events.

Join us as we celebrate the Summer issue at Buttonwood’s Solvang tasting room. Featuring local farm fresh goods, Buttonwood peaches, wine by the glass, and seasonal bites. Free to attend; food and beverages for purchase. More info at EdibleSantaBarbara.com.

Taste your way through three homebrew beers created as part of the Telegraph Summer School Series, plus a special tasting room collaboration project. Available both days while supplies last. No tickets necessary.

21

70 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2017

Enjoy the sights, sounds and tastes that define the traditional Greek way of life. Stroll through Santa Barbara’s beautiful Oak Park, and experience the simple pleasures of life in a Greek village. Free and family-friendly. SantaBarbaraGreekFestival.org.


For updates and more details on these and other events, visit EdibleSantaBarbara.com W E D N E S D AY – S U N D AY

S AT U R D AY

M O N D AY

AUGUST

AUGUST

AUGUST

In the Vineyard & On the Farm Dinner

Edible Santa Barbara Supper Club at Loquita

2–6

Old Spanish Days Fiesta

A UMGUST AY

A celebration of Santa Barbara’s heritage, through music, parades, fiestas, dancing and family events. Serious foodies frequent the mercado at Our Lady of Guadalupe Church with its wide array of authentic Mexican cuisine and entertainment. Full listing of events can be found at OldSpanishDays-Fiesta.org.

5

7

4:30pm at the Bernat Vineyard, Los Olivos

6pm at Loquita in Santa Barbara

Dine with Bernat winemaker Sam Marmorstein where wine starts—the vines. The farm-based menu created by Los Olivos Café’s Chris Joslyn will accompany Bernat Wines. $125; reservations required. To reserve your seat visit LosOlivosCafe.com and click on the “Special Event” tab.

Join us for a Paella Party at Loquita Restaurant. Chef Peter Lee will treat us to assorted pintxos, family-style tapas, paella and house made Sangria on the patio. For menu, additional information and to purchase tickets, visit EdibleSantaBarbara.com.

F R I D AY

F R I D AY

S AT U R D AY

W E D N E S D AY

AUGUST

AUGUST

AUGUST

AUGUST

Ferragosto Festival

Topa Topa Brew Dinner Pop-Up

Buttonwood All Farm Dinner

Solvang Third Wednesday

5:30pm at Buttonwood Winery, Solvang

6–9pm at The Food Liaison Chef Nirasha and the lead brewers from Topa Topa Brewing Co. will collaborate to create a tasting menu showcasing organic local farmers and craft brews. $125; visit TheFoodLiaison.com for more info.

Starting with appetizers, Buttonwood’s farm-to-table feast takes place pond-side in the middle of their 39-acre vineyard. Taste farm-raised meat, fruits and vegetables with award-winning Buttonwood wines; everything on the table raised, grown and produced on Buttonwood Farm. For reservations call 805 688-3032.

3–7pm in downtown Solvang Stroll through the lively streets of Solvang while tasting at five participating wine or beer tasting rooms. $20 includes the tastings, a specialty logo glass and a map to help you navigate your way through all the fun. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit SolvangThirdWednesday.com.

W E D N E S D AY

S U N D AY

S AT U R D AY

S AT U R D AY

AUGUST

AUGUST

AUGUST

AUGUST

Sip N Swirl Summer Series

Flamenco in the Funk Zone

5:30–7:30pm at the Canary Hotel featuring a rotating collection of local wineries who will showcase their best vintages. Sip N Swirl-goers have the opportunity to learn about one of Santa Barbara County’s leading industries, while enjoying entertainment and a selection of premium cheeses. $35.

10am–2pm at Loquita Loquita is spicing up Sunday Brunch with live flamenco performances by Zermeno Dance Academy! Let flamenco dancers entertain while enjoying exquisite brunch specialties crafted by Executive Chef Peter Lee. Reservations are recommended. For full brunch menu and reservations visit LoquitaSB.com.

Zaca University: Rooted in the Vineyard

11

6–9pm at The Biltmore Four Seasons Resort A celebrated festival in Italy, Ferragosto comes to Santa Barbara this August. Join us at the oceanfront Coral Casino Beach and Cabana Club for a tasting of local white wines and an Italian inspired fritto misto bar. $78; visit FourSeasons.com/ SantaBarbara/Dining/Holidays_and_ Events/Dining-Events for more info.

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20

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9:30am–noon at Zaca Mesa Winery in Los Olivos Sample grapes from the vines as you learn what characteristics influence our winemaker’s picking decisions. Includes an exclusive tour of the vineyard and tasting with Certified Sommelier Dane and Winemaker Kristin and a catered lunch. $60–$75; ZacaMesa.com

Argentine Festival 11am–6:30pm at Pershing Park in Santa Barbara Come, eat, dance, enjoy and experience the Argentine culture firsthand. Authentic Argentine food, performances and lessons from traditional Argentine Folklore, Tango, Cumbia and Boleadora show. The event is free and family-friendly. Visit ArgenFestSB.com for more info.

S U N D AY

S AT U R D AY

S AT U R D AY

SEPTEMBER

SEPTEMBER

SEPTEMBER

Santa Barbara Fermentation Festival

FigtoberFest

Farm to Table Dinner

10

S E PT E MBER

12

11am–5pm at Rancho La Patera & Stow House in Goleta The 7th annual festival focuses on microbiome and glyphosate research and features education stages; hands-on demos; health and science experts; exhibitors, food tastings; DIY Pickle Station; kids program; and a 21+ Farm-to-Bar Area. SBFermentationFestival.com.

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30

1pm–close at all Fig Mountain Taprooms

5–7pm at Zaca Mesa Winery in Los Olivos

Celebrate Oktoberfest at Figueroa Mountain Brewing Company’s FigtoberFest featuring our FigtoberFest lager, stein specials, German food, music, contests and more. Figueroa Mountain Brewing taprooms can be found in Arroyo Grande, Santa Maria, Los Olivos, Buellton, Santa Barbara and Westlake Village in California. Free admission. FigtoberFest.com.

Celebrate fall harvest with an intimate evening of farm-to-table dining. Enjoy course after course paired expertly with our favorite Zaca Mesa wines. In the midst of the harvest, K’Syrah will prepare seasonal dishes using locally sourced ingredients that will be sure to excite your palate. $145/$165. ZacaMesa.com for more information and to purchase tickets.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2017 | 71


edible

SA NTA BARBA R A COUNT Y

E AT DRINK LOC AL GUIDE & MAPS

Santa Barbara County has its own unique food tradition and lifestyle. We’d like to help you find some of the area restaurants, bakeries, food producers and specialty retail shops that contribute to the distinctively Santa Barbara experience. From Ballard to Carpinteria, and from catering to wine tasting, our Guide will help you find what you are looking for and more.

Ballard Ballard Inn & Gathering Table

Carpinteria The Food Liaison

Goleta Backyard Bowls

2436 Baseline Ave. 805 688-7770 BallardInn.com

1033 Casitas Pass Rd. 805 200-3030 TheFoodLiaison.com

5668 Calle Real 805 770-2730 BackyardBowls.com

Elegant accommodations, attentive staff and awardwinning cuisine make the Ballard Inn & Gathering Table one of the most sought-after small luxury inns in the Santa Barbara Wine Country.

Catering. Counter. Classes. Utilizing many locally grown organic ingredients, enjoy daily rotating entrées and soups, seasonal menu and gourmet salad bar. Corporate and event catering since 2013. Sign up for cooking classes online. Lunch counter Mon–Fri 11am–3pm.

Santa Barbara’s most innovative breakfast and lunch spot featuring Acai Bowls and smoothies. They also offer oatmeal, yogurt and more.

Buellton Alma Rosa 250-G Industrial Way 805 688-9090 AlmaRosaWinery.com With certified organic vineyards in the Sta. Rita Hills, Alma Rosa focuses on Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, as well as other food-friendly wines with the high acid and extraordinary balance for which Richard Sanford’s wines have been known since 1976. .

Margerum Wine Company

59 Industrial Way 805 686-8500 MargerumWines.com Located at the gateway to the Sta. Rita Hills, Margerum now offers tasting at their winery on Industrial Way in Buellton. Taste Margerum and Barden releases, sample wine from tank or barrel and tour the winery. Open Sat and Sun 11am–5pm.

The Hitching Post II

Giannfranco’s Trattoria 666 Linden Ave. 805 684-0720 Giannfrancos.com Experience authentic Italian regional cuisine at this family-owned and family-operated trattoria in downtown Carpinteria. Chef Giovanni prepares each dish from the freshest local and imported foods to offer his creative take on Tuscan grill specialties. Weekday lunch served 11am–3pm. Weekend lunch served noon–3pm. Dinner served 5–9pm; closed Tue.

HEAT Culinary 4642 Carpinteria Ave. 805 242-1151 HeatCulinary.com Santa Barbara County’s culinary school, food truck and full service caterer. HEAT events are known for personalized service, organic ingredients, large portions and attention to detail. Offering originality and undivided attention to create a memorable event.

Sly’s

406 E. Hwy. 246 805 688-0676 HitchingPost2.com

686 Linden Ave. 805 684-6666 SlysOnline.com

A favorite of locals and visitors since 1986. Serving wood-grilled fare, prepared in the regional barbecue tradition, along with their highly regarded Hitching Post Wines. Casual and relaxed setting.

Sly’s is known for great food, with an emphasis on farmers market and local produce, great cocktails and great times in Carpinteria. Open Mon–Fri for lunch 11:30am–3pm; lounge menu weekdays 3–5pm; dinner Sun–Thu 5–9pm, Fri and Sat 5–10pm; and weekend brunch & lunch Sat–Sun 9am–3pm.

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Isla Vista Food Cooperative 6575 Seville Rd., Isla Vista 805 968-1401 IslaVistaFood.coop The Isla Vista Food Co-op is our 45 year-old community grocery store, open to the public and cooperatively owned by over 2,000 people. Income from the grocery store directly supports the Co-op’s goal of making high-quality food more widely accessible. Open 8am–10pm daily.

The French Press & Dune Coffee Roasters 250 Storke Rd. 1A 805 968-0493 DuneCoffeeRoasters.com Sourcing, roasting and serving the best coffees from around the world. They love serving their carefully selected coffees and in-house-baked pastries and bread to the community. Visit The French Press & Dune Coffee Roasters and let them show you the magic of coffee! Open Mon–Fri 6am–7pm, Sat–Sun 7am–7pm.

Lompoc Central Coast Specialty Foods 115 E. College Ave., Ste. 10 805 717-7675 CentralCoastSpecialtyFoods.com High-quality local & imported specialty foods, including charcuterie, gourmet cheeses, a fullservice deli, exotic meats (alligator, wild boar, bison and more), specialty foods from around the world,


and local beers and wines. Catering available; small intimate affairs to large special events. Open MonWed 10am–6pm, Thu–Fri 10am–7pm, Sat 10am–6pm and Sun 10am–4pm.

Babcock Winery & Vineyards 5175 E. Hwy. 246, Lompoc 805 736-1455 BabcockWinery.com A passion for revolutionary farming and conservation continue to define this family-owned Sta. Rita Hills winery. Stunning single-vineyard Pinot Noirs are showcased alongside acclaimed Chardonnays and other varietals. Chill in the super soulful tasting room filled with vintage, art and eclectic treasures. Tasting room open daily 11am–5:30pm.

Longoria Wines 415 E. Chestnut Ave. 866-759-4637 LongoriaWine.com Longoria Wines is a small family-owned winery with over three decades of producing acclaimed artisanal wines from some of the finest vineyards in Santa Barbara County. Enjoy a tasting or a glass of wine in the tasting room or lounge of the restored historic JM Club at their new winery facility in Lompoc, open daily 11am–4:30pm.

Melville Winery 5185 E. Hwy. 246, Lompoc 805 735-7030 MelvilleWinery.com Melville’s 100% estate boutique winery is located in the heart of the Sta. Rita Hills appellation. They are dedicated to growing and producing exceptional cold-climate Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Syrah. Their wine is grown exclusively from their own land with their hands. Quality. Purity. Open daily 11am–4pm.

Scratch Kitchen 610 N. H St. 805 819-0829 Scratch-Kitchen.com With a wealth of local and seasonal produce and local wines, Scratch Kitchen aims to highlight all the best culinary elements of the Lompoc and Santa Ynez Valleys. Open for lunch and dinner Tue–Sat 11am–9pm, brunch Sun 10am–2pm and Sun dinner 5pm–9pm.

Los Alamos Babi’s Beer Emporium 380 Bell St. 805 344-1911 BabisBeerEmporium.com Great beer. Impeccable selection. Great fun. Adventurous beer drinkers can discover unique, hardto-find craft beers, ciders and special projects—on tap or in bottle. Stay to have a bite from Valle Fresh’s tacos and tapas menu. Thu 4–8pm, Fri–Sat noon–8pm, Sun noon–6pm.

room in historic Los Alamos and through their wine club. Open Thu noon–7pm; Fri–Sat 11am–7pm; Sun 11–6pm. Vineyard tours and barrel sampling available by appointment.

Full of Life Flatbread 225 W. Bell St. 805 344-4400 FullofLifeFoods.com Full of Life Flatbread offers an extremely innovative menu based almost entirely on what is grown locally and in season. Open Thu–Sat 5–10pm; Sun 4–8pm; Sat–Sun lunch 11am–3pm.

Bell Street Farm Eatery & Market

Martian Ranch & Vineyard

406 Bell St. 805 344-4609 BellStreetFarm.com

9110 Alisos Canyon Rd. 805 344-1804 MartianVineyard.com

This cozy and delicious eatery is surrounded by gorgeous vineyards and farmland. Award-winning cuisine and sophisticated yet comfortable design, a distinctive environment to enjoy a meal, snack or wine tasting for residents and visitors alike. Assemble your own picnic baskets and accessories for creating a portable meal, as well as gifts and merchandise from local artisans and some of the best of California. Thu and Mon 11am–4pm, Fri–Sun 11am–5pm.

The Martian Ranch tasting room is open Wed–Sun 11am–5pm. Taste their estate-grown biodynamically farmed wines for an out-of-this-world experience! Winery tours daily; vineyard tours on the weekends. Enjoy wines by the glass, bocce court, horseshoe pit and dog-friendly picnic areas. Open Wed–Sun 11am–5pm. Mon and Tues by appointment only.

Bob’s Well Bread 550 Bell St. 805 344-3000 BobsWellBread.com Making bread the old-fashioned way: handcrafted in small batches with the finest ingredients and baked to perfection in a custom-built stone-deck oven. Drop in to taste what visitors and journalists are raving about as “worth the drive”—signature Pain au Levain, award-winning artisanal breads, croissants and specialty pastries. All-day menu of made-to-order breakfast, lunch and weekly special dishes. Indoor-outdoor picturesque café. Thu–Mon 7am–6pm. Café closes at 3pm. Closed Tue and Wed.

Casa Dumetz 388 Bell St. 805 344-1900 CasaDumetzWines.com A boutique winery specializing in Rhône varietals crafted with premier Santa Barbara County fruit. Their wines are sold almost exclusively at their tasting

Plenty on Bell 508 Bell St. 805 344-2111 PlentyOnBell.com Longtime Los Alamos chef and local favorite Jesper Johansson is back in the kitchen at Plenty on Bell, serving local, seasonal food. Open for breakfast and lunch Tue–Sat 8am–3pm; dinner Fri only 5:30–8pm. Closed Monday.

Valle Fresh at Babi’s Beer Emporium

388 Bell St. 805-865-2282 ValleFresh.com Tasting counter now open inside Babi’s Beer Emporium in Los Alamos. Specializing in handcrafted, genuine food sourced from local farms, ranches and artisans. This family-owned catering company offers personalized menus for all occasions including weddings, pop-up events, food and wine pairings, themed dinners, gourmet taco bars and more. Thur–Sat noon– 8pm, Sun noon–5pm.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2017 | 73


Los Olivos Andrew Murray Vineyards 5249 Foxen Canyon Rd. 805 686-9604 AndrewMurrayVineyards.com Andrew Murray, a grape-growing pioneer and Rhône varietal visionary in Santa Barbara County, founded his winery in 1990. Andrew and his team look forward to sharing the AMV experience with you at their stunning Estate Winery and Visitor Center along Foxen Canyon Road. Tasting room open daily 10:30am–5:30pm.

Olive Hill Farm 2901 Grand Ave. 805 693-0700 OliveHillFarm.com Specializing in local olive oils, flavored oils and balsamic vinegars as well as many locally produced food products. Olive oil and vinegar tastings with fresh local bread available. Open daily 11am–5pm.

Zaca Mesa Winery 6905 Foxen Canyon Rd. 805 688-9339 ZacaMesa.com Since 1973, this family-owned winery has been dedicated to crafting some of Santa Barbara County’s most distinctive wines. Tasting room and picnic area open daily 10am–4pm.

Montecito

Montecito Country Mart

3315 State St. 805 569-2400 RenaudsBakery.com

The Montecito Country Mart, built in 1964, has recently been renovated and preserved, with its original barber shop, post office, market, old-fashioned toy store, as well as Rori’s Ice Cream and Merci to Go artisan food shop. Independent boutique shops include Mate Gallery, Kendall Conrad, Calypso, Intermix, Malia Mills, Hudson Grace, James Perse and Space NK Apothecary. Shops open Mon–Fri 10am–6pm; Sat–Sun 10am–5pm.

Renaud’s is a bakery specializing in French pastries and French-style cakes, as well as a bistro offering an extensive menu for breakfast and lunch. Open Mon– Sat 7am–5pm; Sun 7am–3pm.

Montecito Village Grocery 1482 E. Valley Rd. 805 969-1112 MontecitoGrocery.com Offering local and organic produce, full service butcher and deli, gourmet cheese, amazing wines and craft beers. Great selection of non-dairy, gluten free, vegetarian and vegan products. Convenient parking and friendly staff. Open daily 7am–8pm.

San Ysidro Ranch 900 San Ysidro Ln. Santa Barbara 805 565-1724 SanYsidroRanch.com Visit the Stonehouse, named one of the 50 Best Restaurants in America by Open Table, or visit Plow & Angel for a comfortable and convivial atmosphere.

Tecolote Bookstore

American Riviera Bank

1470 E. Valley Rd. 805 969-4977

525 San Ysidro Rd. 805-335-8110 AmericanRivieraBank.com

Tecolote Bookstore is an independent bookstore located in the upper village of Montecito. Open Mon–Fri 10am–5:30pm; Sat 10am–5pm; closed Sun.

Offering a local and sustainable approach to banking. The founders of American Riviera Bank are a carefully selected group of successful, prominent, experienced and influential community and business leaders who understand the unique needs of the Santa Barbara community. Open Mon–Thu 9am–5pm; Fri 9am–5:30pm.

Santa Barbara

Bree’Osh 1150 Coast Village Rd. 805 969-2500 Breeosh.com Bree’Osh is a French artisan bakery café specializing in sweet and savory brioche bread made with traditional sourdough. Featuring local, organic, high-quality ingredients. Open Wed–Fri 7am–3pm; Sat–Sun 7am–2pm. Closed Mon–Tue.

Here’s the Scoop 1187 Coast Village Rd. 805 969-7020 ScoopSB.com Here’s the Scoop is a local, family-owned business that makes traditional Italian gelato flavors like Stracciatella and Pistachio. Their seasonal farmers market sorbets use local, organic farm-fresh fruits, vegetables and herbs. Sorbets are non-dairy, organic and vegan. Mon–Thu 1–9pm, Fri–Sat noon–10pm, Sun noon–9pm.

74 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2017

Renaud’s Patisserie & Bistro

1016 Coast Village Rd. 805 969-9664 MontecitoCountryMart.com

Backyard Bowls 3849 State St. 805 569-0011 BackyardBowls.com Santa Barbara’s most innovative breakfast and lunch spot featuring Acai Bowls and smoothies. They also offer oatmeal, yogurt and more.

Commercial Fishermen of Santa Barbara Saturday Market Santa Barbara Harbor CFSB.info/the-saturday-fishermans-market Saturday mornings year-round on the commercial pier in the Santa Barbara Harbor (directly across from Brophy Bros.), from 7am to 11am weather permitting. Come buy fresh and live sustainable seafood, direct from the fishermen and farmers who catch and grow it. Seasonal offerings include crab, urchin, halibut, rockfish, abalone, seaweeds, mussels, lobster, black cod, sea snails and more.

Il Fustino 3401 State St. 805 845-3521 ilFustino.com Il Fustino is Santa Barbara’s first and finest olive oil and vinegar tasting room. Il Fustino purveys only the finest and freshest olive oils, all grown and milled in California. They also provide an unparalleled selection of artisan vinegars.

Telegraph Brewing Co. 418 N. Salsipuedes St. 805 963-5018 TelegraphBrewing.com Handcrafting unique American ales that embrace the heritage of California’s early brewing pioneers and use as many locally grown ingredients as possible. Visit the tasting room, open Tue–Thu 3–9pm; Fri–Sat 2–10pm; Sun 1–7pm. Telegraph beer is available at many restaurants and grocery stores in Santa Barbara County and throughout California.

The Dining Room at Belmond El Encanto 800 Alvarado Pl. 805 770-3530 Belmond.com/ElEncanto Dine in the elegant Dining Room or delight in a romantic dinner under the stars on The Terrace. An innovative menu presented by Chef Johan Denizot offers contemporary California-coastal cuisine, complemented with gracious service and a side of stunning Santa Barbara views. Open 7am–10pm daily.

Santa Barbara (Downtown) 805 Boba 651 Paseo Nuevo #213 805 845-5655 805Boba.com 805 Boba offers authentic Taiwanese “bubble” tea with a local twist. Featuring fresh local fruit, handcrafted syrups, tea, tapioca pearls and many other options, 805 Boba strives to provide the best-quality slushes, smoothies and tea in Santa Barbara. Ask about their Farmers Market Edition boba featuring seasonal produce from the Santa Barbara Farmers Market.

American Riviera Bank 1033 Anacapa St. 805 965-5942 AmericanRivieraBank.com Offering a local and sustainable approach to banking. The founders of American Riviera Bank are a carefully selected group of successful, prominent, experienced and influential community and business leaders who understand the unique needs of the Santa Barbara community. Open Mon–Thu 8am–5pm, Fri 8am–6pm.

Au Bon Climat 813 Anacapa St. 805 963-7999 AuBonClimat.com The tasting room and the Jim Clendenen Wine Library are known for world-class Chardonnays and Pinots. Jim Clendenen has been making wines of vision and character for over 30 years, along with other varietals. Amazing lineup of current releases and library wines available. Tasting room open Mon–Fri noon–6pm, Sat and Sun 11am–6pm.


Destination Maps

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1. Broken Clock Vinegar Works 2. Succulent Café Wine Charcuterie 3. Valley Brewers 4. The Olive House 5. Solvang Visitors Bureau 6. Buttonwood Farm and Winery

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EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2017 | 75


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76 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2017

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16. OnQ Financial 17. Somerset 18. The French Press & Dune Coffee Roasters 19. August Ridge Vineyards 20. American Riviera Bank 21. C’est Cheese 22. The Wine Cask, Au Bon Climat, Margerum Wines 23. B  ara’s Fresh 24. Cebada Wine & Forbidden Fruit Orchards 25. McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams 26. The French Press & Dune Coffee Roasters 27. Telegraph Brewing Co. 28. Belmond El Encanto 29. Renaud’s, Loreto Plaza  30. Il Fustino 31. Backyard Bowls, La Cumbre 32. Lazy Acres

FLO

1. Santa Barbara Maritime Museum, Commercial Fishermen of Santa Barbara Saturday Market 2. Riverbench Santa Barbara, Helena Avenue Bakery, The Lark Santa Barbara, The Lucky Penny, Les Marchands Wine Bar & Merchant, Loquita, Santa Barbara Wine Collective 3. Municipal Winemakers 4. Lama Dog 5. Backyard Bowls, Downtown SB 6. Chocolate Maya 7. Green Table 8. Grapeseed Co. 9. 805 Boba 10. Barbareño 11. Scarlett Begonia 12. Bouchon Santa Barbara 13. SB Public Market, Il Fustino 14. Renaud’s, Arlington Plaza 15. Ca’ Dario Pizzeria

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August Ridge Vineyards

Ca’ Dario Pizzeria

5 E. Figueroa St. 805 770-8442 AugustRidge.com

29 E. Victoria St. 805 957-2020 CaDarioPizza.net

August Ridge crafts wine that combines the spirit of California with the restrained, classic elegance of wines from northern and central Italy. Distinctive wines from the Paso Robles region to be opened as you gather for a meal, surrounded by friends, family and loved ones.

Chef Dario Furlati’s flagship eatery offers a fine Italian dining experience featuring authentic recipes made with fresh, local ingredients. Handmade pastas, local seafood, weekly farmers market specials and an extensive Italian wine list. Located in the heart of the downtown Arts District. Serving lunch and dinner Sun-Thu 11:30am–10pm, Fri–Sat 11:30am–10:30pm.

Backyard Bowls 331 Motor Way 805 845-5379 BackyardBowls.com Santa Barbara’s most innovative breakfast and lunch spot featuring Acai Bowls and smoothies. They also offer oatmeal, yogurt and more.

Barbareño 205 W. Canon Perdido 805 963-9591 Barbareno.com Offering a casual approach to the classic California tavern, highlighting the traditions and specialties of the Central Coast and its many outstanding purveyors. Sit inside and enjoy the enticing atmosphere of an open kitchen, or outside on the patio alongside the Santa Maria grill. Dinner nightly 5–9:30pm; barbeque lunch Thu–Fri 11:30am–2pm; closed Tue.

Bouchon 9 W. Victoria St. 805 730-1160 BouchonSantaBarbara.com Bouchon sources all of its ingredients using an “asfresh-and-as-local-as-possible” approach. Experience fine dining, excellent regional wines and relaxed service in a warm, inviting ambience. Private dining in the Cork Room is available for groups of 10–20. Dinner nightly 5–10pm.

Cebada Wine & Forbidden Fruit Orchards 8 E. De La Guerra St. 805 451-2570 Tasting Room 805 735-4648 Farm CebadaWine.com Cebada Vineyard is a working farm that vinifies estategrown Pinot Noir and Chardonnay located west of Sta. Rita Hills AVA. Their boutique winery produces sophisticated Burgundy-style wines. The handcrafted wines are made on the farm and available at the farm or downtown Santa Barbara. Tasting room open daily; farm tours available by appointment.

C’est Cheese 825 Santa Barbara St. 805 965-0318 CestCheese.com In addition to being a local source for the finest cheeses and artisanal foods, C’est Cheese serves breakfast and lunch—fresh salads, soups, sandwiches and incredible pastries. Open Mon–Fri 9am–6pm, Sat 8am–6pm, Sun 9am–3pm.

Chocolate Maya 15 W. Gutierrez St. 805 965-5956 ChocolateMaya.com Chocolate Maya handmade chocolate confections: a variety of velvety truffles and chocolate-dipped temptations that are made from the highest-quality chocolate (Valrhona, Felchlin, Mesocacao including some small bean-to-bar artisans couverture) fresh local ingredients and some exotic findings from their travels overseas.

Grapeseed Company 21 W. Ortega St. 805 456-3655 TheGrapeseedCompany.com The Grapeseed Company creates botanical spa and skin care products handcrafted from the byproduct of wine plus antioxidant-rich local and organic ingredients. Open Mon–Fri 10:30am–6pm, Sat 11am–5pm, closed Sun.

Green Table 113 W. De La Guerra St. 805 618-1233 Green-Table.com Delicious homemade foods, cleanses and drinks with original recipes that offer organic, gluten-free and vegetarian dishes, from matcha lattes to quinoa veggie burgers. Their vision is a world where natural, organic food is the staple of our meals and we eat to nourish our bodies while enjoying the great taste. Mon–Sat 8am–5pm, Sun 8am–2pm.

Il Fustino 38 W. Victoria St. 805 845-4995 ilFustino.com Il Fustino is Santa Barbara’s first and finest olive oil and vinegar tasting room. Il Fustino purveys only the finest and freshest olive oils, all grown and milled in California. They also provide an unparalleled selection of artisan vinegars.

Margerum Wine Company 813 Anacapa St. 805 845-8435 MargerumWineCompany.com Located in the historic El Paseo complex, Margerum offers two venues for tasting in Downtown Santa Barbara. Enjoy a tasting (or a glass) of handcrafted, small production Margerum and Barden wines sourced from top vineyards around Santa Barbara County. Open Mon–Wed noon–5pm, Thu–Sun noon–6pm.

Santa Barbara Maritime Museum 113 Harbor Way, Ste 190 805 962-8404 SBMM.org The Santa Barbara Maritime Museum brings history to life through its educational programs and interactive exhibits, as well as events. Open 10am–5pm. Closed Wed.

McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams 728 State St. 805 324-4402 McConnells.com McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams, founded in Santa Barbara in 1949, is now in its third generation of family ownership. They make their ice creams as they always have: from scratch, using Central Coast, grass-grazed milk, cream and the finest local, sustainable and organic ingredients from partner farms, artisans and purveyors they’ve worked with for decades. No preservatives. No stabilizers. No additives. Ever. A 70-year sweet legacy of keeping it real.

On Q Financial 1332 Anacapa St. 805 845-0694 OnQFinancial.com Since 2013, On Q Financial’s goal has been to ensure the mortgage process is streamlined and smooth for every client. Their team even works closely with community partners to provide homebuyers’ workshops to the Santa Barbara community. They are ready to help you purchase a home or refinance your existing home loans—in Santa Barbara and beyond.

Renaud’s Patisserie & Bistro 1324 State St. 805 892-2800 RenaudsBakery.com Renaud’s is a bakery specializing in French pastries and French-style cakes, as well as a bistro offering an extensive menu for breakfast and lunch. Open Mon–Sat 7am–5pm, Sun 7am–3pm.

Riverbench Vineyard & Winery 137 Anacapa St., Suite C 805 324-4100 Riverbench.com Established in 1973, when the first Chardonnay and Pinot Noir grapes were planted on the property. For years since then, some of the most renowned wineries have purchased Riverbench fruit for their wines. In 2004, Riverbench began producing their own still and sparkling wines in limited quantities, with many available exclusively through their tasting rooms in Santa Maria and Santa Barbara. Open 11am–6pm daily.

Scarlett Begonia 11 W. Victoria St., #10 805 770-2143 ScarlettBegonia.net Scarlett Begonia will always strive to have interesting, thoughtful food. Menus change weekly with an innovative, fresh approach to breakfast, lunch and dinner. Showcasing progressive modern cuisine, Scarlett Begonia features sustainable, organic, high quality ingredients coupled with innovative cooking to provide one of the most food-centric experiences in Santa Barbara. Open for dinner and cocktail hour Tue– Sat 4:30–9pm, breakfast and lunch Tue–Sun 9am–2pm.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2017 | 77


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131 Anacapa St., Ste. B 805 284-0380 LesMarchandsWine.com

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Les Marchands is a European-style wine bar and retail shop with a world-class team of sommeliers providing unique experiences in wine, food and education. With an extensive wine list, Les Marchands offers something for everyone. Open Sun–Thu 11am–9pm; Fri–Sat 11am–11pm.

Loquita 202 State St. 805 880-3380 LoquitaSB.com Loquita, a tribute to Santa Barbara’s Spanish origins, presents authentic Spanish food including tapas, wood-fired seafood, grilled meats and three types of paella. Menu created by Executive Chef Peter Lee and Spanish Chef Perfecte Rocher. Open Tue–Sun 5–10pm.

Lucky Penny 127 Anacapa St. 805 284-0358 LuckyPennySB.com Offering casual dining fare of breakfast goodies, espressos, coffees and teas, wood-fired pizzas, sandwiches and salads, beer and wine. Outdoor patio seating. Located in the heart of Santa Barbara’s Funk Zone. Open Sun–Thu 11am–9pm, Fri–Sat 11am–10pm.

Santa Barbara Wine Collective Somerset 7 E. Anapamu St. 805 845-7112 SomersetSB.com Decor inside Somerset is a paean to mid-century modern with luxurious counterpoints, while outside is a beautiful and timeless walled garden with 100year-old olive trees and a central hearth. All produce is sourced within a 100-mile-radius. Taking advantage of proximity to the Santa Barbara coast, Chef utilizes local fish and livestock humanely raised on local ranches. Open Mon–Fri 5:30pm–close, Sat–Sun 5pm–close.

Santa Barbara (Funk Zone) Lama Dog 116 Santa Barbara St. 805 880-3364 LamaDog.com Craft beer tap room and bottle shop located in Santa Barbara’s Funk Zone. Open Sun–Wed 11:30am–10pm, Thu 11:30am–11pm, Fri–Sat 11:30am–midnight. @lamadog

Helena Avenue Bakery

The French Press & Dune Coffee Roasters

131 Anacapa St., C 805 880-3383 HelenaAvenueBakery.com

1101 State St. and 528 Anacapa St. 805 963-2721/805 962-7733 DuneCoffeeRoasters.com

An artisan bakery offering wholesome breads and handmade seasonal pastries. Specializing in baked goods made from scratch and a complete menu of grab-and-go items ideal for dining in or takeaway. Offering an expanded breakfast and espresso menu. Open daily 7am–7pm. Inside SB Wine Collective, off Helena Avenue.

Sourcing, roasting and serving the best coffees from around the world. They love serving their carefully selected coffees and baked-in-house pastries and bread to the community. Visit The French Press & Dune Coffee Roasters and let them show you the magic of coffee! Open Mon–Fri 6am–7pm, Sat–Sun 7am–7pm.

The Wine Cask 813 Anacapa St. 805 966-9463 WineCask.com The Wine Cask Restaurant features the freshest local ingredients, the best wine list in town and seasonal signature cocktails. They offer fine dining in their exquisite Gold Room and casual dining in the courtyard and at their Intermezzo bar. Lunch: Tue–Fri 11:30am–3pm. Dinner: Tue–Sun from 5:30pm. Last seating at 9pm Sun–Thu and at 10pm Fri–Sat.

78 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2017

The Lark 131 Anacapa St., Ste. A (805) 284-0370 TheLarkSB.com The Lark, Santa Barbara’s premier dining destination, features locally sourced seasonal ingredients celebrating the abundant bounty of the Central Coast. Meals are served family-style with handcrafted cocktails and an extensive wine list to complement Chef Jason Paluska’s creations. Open Tue–Sun 5–10pm.

131 Anacapa St., Ste. C 805 456-2700 SantaBarbaraWineCollective.com Santa Barbara Wine Collective is a downtown tasting room for five local like-minded producers focusing on Santa Barbara County’s unique terroir. Wines are available for tastings, by the glass or bottle or to take home. Open Sun–Thu 11am–7pm, Fri–Sat 11am–8pm.

Santa Barbara (Mesa) Lazy Acres 302 Meigs Rd. 805 564-4410 LazyAcres.com Santa Barbara’s best source for wholesome, natural and organic foods and products with real people dedicated to providing unmatched personal service. Mon–Sat 7am–11pm, Sun 7am–10pm.

Santa Maria Cambria Estate Winery 5475 Chardonnay Ln. 805 938-7318 CambriaWines.com Family-owned, sustainably farmed estate winery. Visit and experience the flavors of the Santa Maria Bench. Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, Pinot Gris, Viognier and Syrah. Open daily 10am–5pm.

Foxen Vineyard & Winery 7200 and 7600 Foxen Canyon Rd. 805 937-4251 FoxenVineyard.com The Foxen Boys’ winery and tasting room features Burgundian and Rhône-style wines. Visit the historic


shack “Foxen 7200” for Italian and Bordeaux-style wines. Picnic tables and scenic views at both locations. Open 11am–4pm daily.

Riverbench Vineyard & Winery 6020 Foxen Canyon Rd. 805 937-8340 Riverbench.com Established in 1973, when the first Chardonnay and Pinot Noir grapes were planted on the property. For years since then, some of the most renowned wineries have purchased Riverbench fruit for their wines. In 2004, Riverbench began producing their own still and sparkling wines in limited quantities, with many available exclusively through their tasting rooms in Santa Maria and Santa Barbara. Open 10am–4pm daily.

Santa Ynez The Brander Vineyard 2401 N. Refugio Rd. 805 688-2455 Brander.com Established in 1975, The Brander Vineyard is one of the oldest and most distinguished wineries in Santa Barbara County. Founder Fred Brander has dedicated himself to making exceptional block designates of estate Sauvignon Blanc and Cabernet Sauvignon that push the quality envelope for Bordeaux-style wines. Open daily 11am–4pm.

The Lucky Hen Larder 1095 Meadowvale Rd. Santa Ynez 805 691-9448 TheLuckyHenLarder.com The Santa Ynez Valley Cheese Company is the only “cut-to-order” cheese shop in the SY Valley. The shop features over 100 artisan and farmstead cheeses as well as Lucky Hen Larder proprietary goods and picnic items and handcrafted sandwiches daily. Open Mon– Sat 10am–5pm; Sun 10am–4pm.

SY Kitchen 1110 Faraday St. 805 691-9794 SYKitchen.com Modern Northern Italian dishes showcasing local ingredients and Chef Luca Crestanelli’s light touch. Specialties include homemade pastas; pizzas served from the wood-fired oven; oak-grilled chicken, seafood, lamb and steak. The bar features dazzling cocktails crafted by Alberto Battaglini. Also featured is The Courtyard, a casual outdoor lounge with full service dining. Lunch daily 11:30am–2:30pm, Aperitivo MonThur 4–5:30pm, Dinner Sun–Thur 5–9pm and Fri–Sat 5–9:45pm.

Solvang Buttonwood Farm Winery 1500 Alamo Pintado Rd. 805 688-3032 ButtonwoodWinery.com In 1968 Betty Williams came to Buttonwood, creating a life that found expression through a connection with the land. The vineyard now has 33,000 vines with a mix of Sauvignon Blanc, Semillon, Marsanne, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and Syrah. Tasting room open daily 11am–5pm.

Lincourt Vineyards 1711 Alamo Pintado Rd. 805 688-8554 LincourtWines.com Lincourt Vineyards is the perfect stop for a picnic in Wine Country. Stop by our tasting room to sample our estate-grown Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir, Gruner Veltliner, Sauvignon Blanc and Chardonnay. Open daily 10am–5pm.

Succulent Café Wine Charcuterie 1555 Mission Dr. 805 691-9444 SucculentCafe.com Comfort food with a twist, prepared with seasonal and local farm-fresh ingredients. The best charcuterie plates around feature farm-fresh cheeses, house-made jams, pickled veggies, nuts and fruit. Great local wine, craft beer and signature cocktails. Breakfast/Lunch: weekdays (except Tue) 10am–3pm, Sat & Sun 8:30am–3pm. Dinner Wed–Mon 5–9pm.

Source Guide Bragg Live Foods Bragg.com Founded in 1912 by Dr. Paul C. Bragg and now run by his daughter Dr. Patricia Bragg in Goleta, Bragg Live Food Products offers organic and natural health products and publishes self-health books. Available locally at Fairview Gardens’ Farm Stand, Lassen’s, Gladden and Sons, Tri-County Produce, Whole Foods Market, Lazy Acres and in the health section of your neighborhood grocery store.

Drake Family Farms DrakeFamilyFarms.com

Jimenez Family Farm 805 688-0597 JimenezFamilyFarm.com Small family-run local farm specializes in sustainably grown food and their famous handmade pies, quiches and small-batch preserves. Visit them at the farmers market to purchase produce, pies, jams and naturally fed and farm-raised rabbit, lamb, pork, goat and poultry.

Moscow Copper Co. 888 269-3349 MoscowCopper.com Makers of the Original 100% Copper Moscow Mule Mugs and celebrating 75 years of true authenticity. Perfect for gifts, events, corporate gifting, weddings or anniversaries. Shop original copper mug sets, flasks, a new recipe book, custom engraving, cookware and more.

On Q Financial 1332 Anacapa St. 805 845-0694 OnQFinancial.com Since 2013, On Q Financial’s goal has been to ensure the mortgage process is streamlined and smooth for every client. Their team even works closely with community partners to provide homebuyers’ workshops to the Santa Barbara community. They are ready to help you purchase a home or refinance your existing home loans—in Santa Barbara and beyond.

Plow to Porch 805 895-7171 PlowToPorch.com Plow to Porch Organics is a local organic/pesticide-free produce and grocery delivery service to members who subscribe. They simplify the purchase of local fresh organic produce and other organic, local foods in order to inspire good nutrition, support local farmers, protect the environment and make eating healthy food fun!

Making locally produced farmstead artisan goat cheese in Ontario, California. At Drake Family Farms every goat has a name and their goat cheeses are made on the farm with milk exclusively from the farm’s own animals. Available at local farmers markets and online.

Santa Barbara Certified Farmers Market

Earthtrine Farm

Santa Barbara – Tree Farm

Known by some as the “Organic Alchemist,” Robert “BD” Dautch and his family have been farming for nearly 40 years. Famous for their culinary herbs, Earthtrine is home to more than 20 varieties of flavorful herbs and a wide selection of organic salad greens, bitter greens, assorted mixed fruits and vegetables. Certifed Organic by CCOF and supplying restaurants and schools for three decades. Find Earthtrime Farm produce at the Saturday and Tuesday Santa Barbara Farmers Markets and on Sunday in Ojai.

Harvest Santa Barbara 805 696-6930 HarvestSantaBarbara.com Delivering freshly harvested wholesale produce— sourced directly from local family farms—to schools, restaurants, hospitals and retail businesses. Their mission is to be the catalyst for a healthier, more sustainable food system by strengthening the ties between farmers and the community.

805 962-5354 SBFarmersMarket.org Seven markets, six days a week. See schedule in the Farm Guide insert.

CalAtlanticHomes.com Brand new homes in the foothills of Santa Barbara County. Coming Spring/Summer 2017.

Winfield Farm 805 686-9312 WinfieldFarm.us Taste the magic of Winfield Mangalitsa! Mangalitsa ground pork (the real hamburger) and hickory smoked bacon are now featured in the Larder Meat Company’s Larder Club meat box, delivered monthly throughout California (sign up at http://www.lardermeatco.com). You can also order through our Mangalitsa Market on the Winfield Farm website – Please call first! Follow us on Facebook (WinfieldFarmBuellton), Twitter (@WinfieldFarm.us) and Instagram (Winfield_Farm).

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2017 | 79


The Last Bite

Summer’s Don’t-Miss-Dish by Liz Dodder

Crispy White Sea Bass with Summer Corn and Shishito Peppers The Gathering Table at

Ballard Inn Ballard Inn has been a fixture in Santa Ynez Valley since 1985, known as a wine country getaway with romantic ambiance and award-winning cuisine. Now, it’s undergone a complete transformation, from the 15 guest rooms to the modern farmhouse dining room complete with a long, communal table in front of the fireplace. And the cuisine is also refreshed: California Creative with a menu featuring shared plates. Chef Budi Kazali is still at the helm, consistently producing some of the top cuisine in the area. His style is to use local, organic produce to create favorite and innovative dishes, frequently with an Asian spice or flavor. “Growing up in Indonesia, I crave some of the foods I had when I was young,” Kazali says. “And I’m lucky that Shu Takikawa is growing some of them right here in Los Olivos at The Garden of…..” Takikawa’s organic, clean produce is a result of his genuinely caring for the land and his lettuce is widely known as the best (he’s something of a master farmer and other farmers come to study under him). Kazali gets produce like shishitos and yu choy from him, and local sea bass and abalone from Santa Barbara area fishermen. “It’s great to get such innovative stuff that’s such great quality — it really allows me to do something fun and challenging.”

Liz Dodder is a drinker, eater and traveler who has eaten five kinds of foie gras in one day. She’s also a blogger, writer, photographer, recipe developer, web designer, social media maven and Certified Specialist of Wine (CSW). CaliCoastWineCountry.com

80 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2017

LIZ DODDER LIZ DODDER

To make the crispy sea bass, he sautés chopped onion, garlic and corn until soft, then adds white wine and white miso and cooks until reduced by half to make a sauce that is drizzled on the plate. He cooks peppers until charred on one side, then chars corn and adds tomatoes and basil, stirring and seasoning before adding to the plate. Then he cooks the fish and adds that to the plate, topping with micro cilantro. He will also be cooking up Shiso Herb-Crusted Tempura Abalone with Daikon Radish Sprouts and Ogo seaweed this summer!


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Edible Santa Barbara Summer 2017  

Celebrating the local food and wine culture of Santa Barbara County.

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