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edible

ISSUE 47 • SUMMER 2021

Santa Barbara & Wine Country

®

The

Sustainability Issue

Sustainability & Wine

Finding Solutions to Food Waste

Rosé: Life Seen Through Pink-Colored Glasses L O YA L

T O

L O C A L

The Birds & the Beef Day Trippin’


“It’s Like Banking With Friends”

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edible

SANTA BAR BAR A

®

LIZ DODDER

STE VEN BROWN

Summer 2021

page 18

page 56

DEPARTMENTS 6 Food for Thought

24 Edible Books

by Krista Harris

A Chat with Fanny Singer by Anna Maria Giambanco Dipietro

8 Small Bites Seaside Greens Triple Chip Cookies Gaviota Givings by Rosminah Brown

1 5 In Season 16 Seasonal Recipe Black Bean and Ham Flautas

2 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2021

AMY ROBB

Creating Community Resilience by Jennifer LeMay

54 Support Local Guide

56 The Last Bite

17 Farmers Markets

Summer’s Don’t-Miss Dish: Homemade (Popcorn) Ice Cream at peasants FEAST by Liz Dodder

18 Edible Exploration

Day Trippin’ — Summer Adventures in Southern California

page 16

26 Edible Garden


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SANTA BAR BAR A

®

Summer 2021

FEATURES 30 Waste Not, Want Not Finding Solutions to Food Waste by Janice Cook Knight

37 The Birds & the Beef 44 Sustainability & Wine A Guide to the Most Common Eco-Friendly Wine Practices

page 50

by Hana-Lee Sedgwick

48 Rosé

RECIPES IN THIS ISSUE

Life Seen Through Pink-Colored Glasses

Salads

by Pascale Beale

50 Grilled Asparagus Salad 50 Shaved Fennel and Radish Salad

Main Dishes 16 Black Bean and Ham Flautas ABOUT THE COVER Beach Picnic by Darya Petrenko.

4 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2021

Desserts 53 Raspberry Rose Panna Cotta

PASC ALE BE ALE

by Joy Manning


ChocolateMaya.com 15 West Gutierrez Street • Santa Barbara, California 93101 Phone: (805) 965-5956 Fax: (805) 563-1263

Monday–Friday 10am–6pm, Saturday 10am–5pm, Sunday 10am– 4pm

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2021 | 5


FOOD FOR THOUGHT

STE VEN BROWN

STAYING CONNECTED For the past dozen or so years, I have used this page as my opportunity to speak directly to you— our readers. Maybe you read it to find out what I have to say about the current issue. For some of you, it’s a prologue to reading the magazine cover to cover. Others read from back to front and might arrive on this page after reading the articles.

However you come to it, I’m glad you do. On this page I try to give you a little bonus information and provide context for some of the articles. Plus, I like jotting down my thoughts to you each quarter. At the beginning of this year, I realized that I could do something similar in a weekly email newsletter. In fact, in a newsletter, I could elaborate on topics that I would never have room for in the magazine. I could invite some of our writers to do the same. Krista Harris at Casa Dumetz.

So in late January, I revamped the format of our email newsletter and started sending it out weekly. The response surprised me a bit. I started getting emails from people telling me that they loved it. Some of our writers have participated by writing about timely subjects that they never would in a magazine article. The format is nice because I can include links to articles I’m reading, recipes I’m making or even our latest tweets. Probably the most surprising thing about this newsletter is that I love doing it. Instead of being a weekly chore or a deadline that looms, I look forward to coming up with a topic and finding things to share. I recently started what will be a periodic series called “20 Questions with…” And the first person I interviewed was Doug Margerum. The questions are lighthearted yet thought-provoking. Think of it as a way to get to know someone you may have seen mentioned in the magazine, but in a different way. And I’m open to your suggestions about people to interview or questions to ask. If you’d like to check out the newsletter or sign up to receive it each week, you can go to EdibleSantaBarbara.substack.com/welcome. You can also find an archive of past newsletters there in case you missed one. This past year has taught me that there are different ways to stay connected with people. I’m so appreciative that our advertisers and readers continue to support this magazine. Thank you for holding it in your hands right now. And if I can bring you a little something extra each week into your email inbox, I’m happy to do that, too.

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Member of Edible Communities

Edible Communities James Beard Foundation Publication of the Year (2011)

PUBLISHER & EDITOR

Krista Harris RECIPE EDITOR

Nancy Oster COPY EDITING & PROOFING

Doug Adrianson DESIGNER

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Jill Johnson CONTRIBUTORS

Pascale Beale Rosminah Brown Anna Maria Giambanco Dipietro Liz Dodder Krista Harris Janice Cook Knight Jennifer LeMay Joy Manning Nancy Oster Hana-Lee Sedgwick Carole Topalian Candice Vivien Edible Santa Barbara® is published quarterly and distributed throughout Santa Barbara County. Subscription rate is $28 annually. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be used without written permission from the publisher. Publisher expressly disclaims all liability for any

Krista Harris, Editor and Co-Publisher

occurrence that may arise as a consequence of the use of any information or recipes. Every effort is made to avoid errors, misspellings and omissions. If, however, an error comes to your

Visit our website at EdibleSantaBarbara.com and sign up for our email newsletter or go directly to EdibleSantaBarbara.Substack.com/welcome.

6 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2021

®

SANTA BAR BAR A

attention, please accept our sincere apologies and notify us. Thank you.


FOXEN

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V I N E YA R D & W I N E R Y

Wines of Elegance & Balance Since 1985 Solar powered. Sustainable wine growers. Open Daily by Reservations | 7600 Foxen Canyon Road | 805.937.4251 | www.foxenvineyard.com

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2021 | 7


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BITES

Seaside Greens WORDS AND PHOTOS BY

Rosminah Brown

Julian Cantando

W

hen Julian Cantando began leasing greenhouse space off Patterson Road in Goleta in 2019, he had no idea that a pandemic would soon bring many things to a halt. But from an operations perspective, the shutdown fit within his business plan just fine. As it turns out, Julian thrives in his socially distanced space alongside his plants. He runs Seaside Greens as a one-man operation, growing his quarter-acre space full of tender greens and specialty fruit. Passiflora vines now climb up the walls and into the rafters of the glass house, and he has crafted a dense tunnel of vines with passion fruit peeking downwards like delicate purple Easter eggs. He grows sunflower sprouts and pea tendrils, more tender than those grown outside in our bright sunny climate. The seeds germinate on organic mats. After harvesting, the base strata is composted and used for his other plantings of variegated sorrel, edible flowers, red gingers, mustard greens and masses of

8 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2021

goldenberries, aka Cape Gooseberries. These berries are related to tomatillos and have a similar papery husk but turn yellow when ripe and are much sweeter than a tomatillo. In his previous life, Julian was a bartender while attending horticulture classes at Santa Barbara City College, but he has found the bright side of pandemic solitude in working for himself where he has time to grow his business (literally) and experiment with propagating exotic fruit. You won’t find him at the farmers markets, because he delivers direct—rolling up in his Prius for masked and contactless drop-off. His clients already include restaurants like the Lark, Toma and El Encanto. A four-ounce box of tender shoots ranges from $6–$10 depending on the variety of sprout, all pesticide- and herbicide-free. You can find Seaside Greens through Instagram @seaside. greens or by emailing jmcantando@gmail.com.


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BITES

Triple Chip Cookies WORDS AND PHOTOS BY

L

indsay Koenig came to Santa Barbara in 2018, already with a solid resume of restaurant and fine-dining experience from the San Francisco Bay Area. She was the sous chef at Bettina in Montecito when the pandemic hit, and she began making cookies and hand pies to sell in Bettina’s provisions section. By June of last year, her baked goods were popular enough that she started her own business —called Triple Chip, after her most popular cookie, loaded with dark chocolate, milk chocolate and white chocolate chips. Now Triple Chip is her full-time job, and it has taken off throughout the pandemic. She operates from her home in Santa Barbara as a one-woman business, conducting all baking, sales and delivery herself, which was an ideal situation given the need for social distancing. For administrative help, her family stepped in to assist. Now that she has settled into her home and business, Lindsay’s pastry experience has been expanding into cakes, pies, seasonal cookies and creative babka flavors. (Pizza babka, anyone?) But cookies are still her most popular items— in baked form or as raw cookie dough. That’s right, cookie dough. Her dough contains no eggs! The secret is using flaxseed in place of the eggs. Can you taste the difference? According to our blind taste test of three different varieties of her cookies, apparently not!

Rosminah Brown

We lined up the Triple Chip, the Oatmeal Raisin and the Brown Butter Salted Caramel Chip. We found that both the egg and eggless options were all utterly delicious. When asked to pick which contained eggs, the tasting group picked the flaxseed ones. Ultimately, we decided that the cookies with eggs were slightly denser, while the flaxseed cookies were slightly softer—and both were delightful to eat. If it weren’t for having the egg vs. flaxseed side by side, there would be no discernible difference. This was especially impressive given that the regular brown butter cookies contain both eggs and extra yolks. As Santa Barbara begins to open back up, Lindsay hopes to focus more on wholesale business and pop-ups. Currently, you can find her cookies at Dean: A Coffee Shop and all three Natural Cafés in Santa Barbara and Goleta, as well as ordering from her directly for home delivery between Carpinteria and Goleta. Lindsay is a SoCal gal at heart, and we are so glad she chose Santa Barbara to put down her roots. We are looking forward to seeing more of her pastry creativity in the future. Find out more at TripleChipSB.com and follow on Instagram @triplechipsb.

Opposite: Lindsay Koenig

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BITES

Heidi Tautrim at Orella Ranch.

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Heidi with the Kunekune pigs.

Gaviota Givings WORDS AND PHOTOS BY

G

Rosminah Brown

uner Tautrim’s family has owned and farmed Orella Ranch along the Gaviota Coast since1866. He and Heidi met at Dos Pueblos High School, married and have been raising their family at the ranch. As a longtime permaculturist, Guner oversaw the bulk of operations on the ranch while Heidi maintained her career as a massage therapist at an upscale Goleta resort. Orella Ranch had been developing a retail side to their farming operations, called Gaviota Givings, where they raised heritage Kunekune pigs, chickens, and even a few cattle. Everything changed for Heidi on March 16 last year, when the pandemic hit and her massage business was put on indefinite hold while Santa Barbara County went into lockdown. So she focused on the ranch business, and she dove full-on into raising the farm animals, working the fields and expanding retail sales. As county residents retreated into their homes, they also looked into more local sources for their food. With Heidi managing sales and organizing the business, Gaviota Givings met the increased local demand. All of Gaviota Givings’ beef, pork and poultry are raised to Orella’s sustainable land management standards, meaning the animals are raised organically, ethically and compatibly with the farmland overlooking the beautiful Gaviota coastline.

details and record-keeping—all skills that helped the business thrive. In place of resort clients, she is now spending time making deliveries, growing relationships with restaurants and households and engaging with the community at pop-ups, like at Captain Fatty’s Brewery in Goleta. With a simple rural turnoff from Highway 101, the Gaviota Coast turns out to be centrally located to serve all corners of Santa Barbara County. Customers now come from as far as Cuyama seeking their organically raised meat.

For Heidi, it was an opportunity to immerse herself with the land she lives on, truly hands-in-the-dirt time. She is vibrant and personable and a natural at organizational

Visit GaviotaGivings.com and find them on Instagram @Gaviota_givings.

Her therapy business was once the stable foundation of their family. But the switch to ranch work created synergy with the Orella team, resulting in a successful pivot to meet the demand for local food. Working alongside Guner (and their children) has been a surprise success in a time when so much was uncertain. Their teamwork has now outpaced the income her service industry job once provided. Simultaneously supplying Gaviota Givings’ organic and ethically produced meat to happy customers has created a much greater sense of community and connection than she could ever have with resort clients. It was simply the better fit—financially and culturally. That, coupled with her deeper intertwined relationship with the land and its animals, has forever changed her role at Orella Ranch from resident to farmer.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2021 | 13


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in

Season this summer SUMMER PRODUCE

YEAR-ROUND PRODUCE

SUMMER SEAFOOD

Apricots

Halibut

Artichokes

Almonds, almond butter (harvested Aug/Sept)

Asparagus

Apples

Salmon, King

Arugula

Sardines

Basil

Beans, dried

Shark

Beans, green

Beets

Spot prawns

Blackberries

Bok choy

Blueberries

Broccoli

Cabbage

Carrots

White seabass

Cantaloupe

Cauliflower

Yellowtail

Celery

Chard

Cherries

Dandelion

Chiles

Dates (harvested Sept/Oct)

Avocados

Chives

CHERRIES

EGGPLANT

Rock fish

Swordfish ALMONDS

Tuna, albacore

YEAR-ROUND SEAFOOD

Edible flowers

Black cod

Collards

Garlic (harvested May/June)

Clams

Herbs (Bay leaf, oregano, parsley, rosemary, sage, thyme)

Cucumber Dill Eggplant Grapefruit

DILL

Grapes

Leeks

OTHER YEAR-ROUND

Lemons

Onions, bulb (harvested May/June)

Melons Mint

POTATOES

SQUASH

Onions, green bunching Peaches

Potatoes

Fresh flowers

Radishes

Plums/Pluots

Olives, olive oil

Spinach

Raspberries

Sprouts

Squash, summer

Squash, winter (harvested July/Oct)

Strawberries Tomatillo

Walnuts, walnut oil (harvested Sept/Oct)

Tomatoes Turnips WATERMELON

Yams (harvested Aug/Sept)

HONEY

Honey

Raisins (harvested Sept/Oct)

Peppers

Coffee (limited availability) Dairy (Regional raw milk, artisanal goat- and cow-milk cheeses, butters, curds, yogurts and spreads)

Pistachios, pistachio oil (harvested Sept/Oct)

Mustard greens

URCHIN

Eggs

Oranges

Mulberries

Watermelon

Urchin

Mushrooms

Limes

Rock crab Sanddabs

Lettuce

Lavender

Nectarines

Oysters BOK CHOY

Kale

Figs

OYSTERS

Abalone (farmed)

Cilantro Corn

SALMON

SPINACH

Meat (Beef, chicken, duck, goat, rabbit, pork) Potted plants/herbs Preserves Wheat (Wheat berries, wheat flour, PASTA bread, pasta and baked goods produced from wheat grown locally)

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2021 | 15


seasonal

Recipe

Black Bean and Ham Flautas These flour tortilla flautas are pan fried instead of deep fried, making them less heavy with a very flavorful filling of black beans and leftover ham. Add the garnishes and a side salad for an easy and delicious dinner. MAKES 2 SERVINGS

Olive oil 1 1 ⁄2 cups cooked black beans or a (15-ounce) can of black beans, rinsed and drained

1 4

cup green salsa

Juice of 1 lime 1 teaspoon ground cumin 1 teaspoon smoked paprika

1 2

Egg Salad Sandwich

teaspoon Hatch chili powder

Salt and pepper, Whattototaste do with

your beautiful onion-skin-dyed Easter on theorlistNiman mustRanch be a classic egg salad sandwich. 3–4 ounces eggs? local, First sustainable ham, diced You have many variations to choose from so you won’t get 2 ounces smoked gouda cheese tired of them, even if you’ve made dozens of eggs. 4 (8-inch) flour tortillas

Makes 2 sandwiches

Garnish: cilantro, sour cream, avocado, salsa

3 hard-boiled eggs, peeled and coarsely chopped

tablespoons mayonnaise 1 tablespoon In a medium2pan, preferably nonstick, heat or some olive oil on mayonnaise 1 tablespoon fraiche medium-highand heat. Add the beanscrème along with the salsa and lime juice; stir to combine. the spices, salt and pepper and cook for Salt and Add pepper, to taste 4–5 minutes, mashing the beans as you stir so that it becomes a thick paste. Add the ham and cheese and stir to combine. Additions:

Arrange the tortillas on yourofwork surface crunchy, and divide theasblack bean • A tablespoon something such capers, chopped filling equally amongst them—putting the filling chopped in a largeradishes strip or chopped celery, chopped pickled vegetables, down the middle. Roll or fold each one so that it covers the filling onion and place seam side down. of chopped fresh herbs, such as parsley, basil, • A sprinkling cilantro, chervil tarragon Clean out the pan or grab a neworone and place over medium heat, • Aolive dashoil ofto something tangy, such as lemon or lime adding enough evenly coat the bottom. Put each flautajuice, or the juice or caper brinecook if you of those or a dash seam side downpickled into the heated pan and forused 2–3 either minutes, of white press down slightly and wine flip itvinegar over and cook another 2–3 minutes,

AMY ROBB

or until golden brown andbread, crisp. Serve two bagel, per plate garnishor slider bun) Bread (sliced baguette, roll,and croissant with any or all of the following: chopped cilantro, drizzle of sour Additional mayonnaise and/or mustard (optional) cream, avocado slices and salsa. Additional pickled vegetables (optional) — Krista Harris Lettuce Combine the eggs, mayonnaise, seasoning and additions and mix until incorporated but with a still chunky texture. Taste and add 16 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2021 more seasoning or additions if needed.


S A N T A

B A R B A R A

C O U N T Y

For some locals, a Saturday morning stroll through one of the area’s biggest farmers markets is a habitual start to every weekend. Arrive at the downtown Santa Barbara Farmers Market empty-handed at 8:30am and leave with armfuls of vegetables, fruit, herbs, eggs, meat, cheese, bread, flowers and plants from as many as 90 vendors. Head to the Tuesday Farmers Market on State Street and make an evening of it— meandering down the street for shopping, wine tasting, live music and dining. Our farmers markets are generally year round and rain or shine, but hours can vary from season to season, so check market websites or call for more information.

Lompoc

Carpinteria

Carpinteria Farmers Market

800 block of Linden Ave. Thu 3–6:30pm SBFarmersMarket.org

Camino Real Marketplace At Storke & Hollister Sun 10am–2pm SBFarmersMarket.org

Oak Knoll South Corner of Bradley Rd. and Clark Ave. Tue 10am–1pm Farmers Market Orcutt on Facebook

Montecito Farmers Market

Corner of Santa Barbara & Cota St. Sat 8:00am–1pm SBFarmersMarket.org

Solvang

Saturday Fishermen’s Market Santa Barbara Harbor Sat 6 –11am CFSB.info/Sat

Solvang Village Copenhagen Dr. & First St. Wed 2:30– 6pm (until 6:30pm in summer) SBFarmersMarket.org

500 & 600 Blocks of State St. Tue 3–7:00pm SBFarmersMarket.org

Downtown Fridays Corner of Main St. & Broadway Fri 4– 8pm (Seasonal) SantaMariaValley.com

Downtown Santa Barbara Farmers Market

Old Town Farmers Market

Santa Maria Farmers Market Broadway & Main St. (located in Town Center West) Wed noon–4pm SantaMariaValley.com

Santa Barbara

Orcutt Central City Farmers Market

Santa Maria

1100 & 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd. Fri 8–11:15am SBFarmersMarket.org

Ocean and I St. Fri 2–5pm Facebook.com/ LompocCertified FarmersMarket

Goleta

Lompoc Certified Farmers Market

Montecito

Vandenberg Village

Route One Farmers Market 3745 Constellation Rd. Sun 10am–2pm

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2021 | 17


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EXP LORATI ON

Roapd Tri

Day Trippin’

A

s the world begins to reopen, we are all looking for things to do that don’t require getting on a commercial airplane just yet. As such, our local Edible teams put together a very limited list of suggested activities and places to eat by county to keep your summer active, all within a two- to fourhour drive. From southern San Luis Obispo County on down to northern San Diego County, one of the best ways to beat the summer heat is well known: Head to the beach. However, beaches can get crowded, especially on weekends and very hot days. Our recommendation?

18 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2021 2021

As long as you are not looking for the extra safety of lifeguards, seek out lesser-known beaches—some that might be just up the street from the popular sites— and enjoy more space to play. Be cautious of riptides, though. It could be worth your time to search ocean safety information on Parks.Ca.gov. Each county also boasts gorgeous hiking trails and designated bike paths. Check out AllTrails.com/US/ California to get started. For an interactive version with links and more information, visit EdibleSantaBarbara.com to view our digital issue!


San Luis Obispo County (30-minute to 2-hour drive) For more information on SLO County visit EdibleSLO.com.

Day Trip Idea

1

Stop in at Gopher Glen Apple Farm stand in San Luis Obispo (open mid to late summer) to grab some locally grown fruit and treats while you wait for your appointment to soak in the natural minerals at Avila Hot Springs. Nearby, Avila Beach boasts a lovely car-free boardwalk with shops and eateries to enjoy. Or, if you are in the mood for a hike, check out the Seven Sisters of San Luis Obispo (Nine Sisters in SLO County) and pick your trek based on time and difficulty. If you are feeling ambitious, you could start your day standing in line to get the monstrous handmade-daily cinnamon rolls at Old West Cinnamon Rolls in Pismo Beach.

Day Trip Idea

2

Grab a takeaway lunch at Splash Café in San Luis Obispo on your way out to Montaña de Oro State Park, just past Los Osos, for hiking, beach exploring and maybe a whale sighting or two. For an extra treat, stop at Ember in Arroyo Grande for a handcrafted wood-fired dinner on the way home. If you make it into town on a Thursday, be sure to make time for the Downtown SLO Thursday Farmers Market from 6–9pm.

Day Trip Idea

3

Start the day off early and catch farm-fresh breakfast on the patio with ocean views at Lido in Pismo Beach. (Make reservations for the Champagne brunch for a great deal!) Spend a bit of time walking the newly refurbished pier and promenade or stroll the beach to help digest. If you feel up for some fast fun, rent ATVs or dune buggies and spend the day in the Oceano Dunes. Try The Spoon Trade in Grover Beach to grab seasonal dinner before the drive home. Or if peanuts sound good, stop in at Klondike’s Pizza in Arroyo Grande where you can throw the (free) peanut shells onto the floor as you munch.

Santa Barbara County In Santa Barbara County we have our choice of day trips to the cool coast or the sunny wine country—either way adventure in your own backyard awaits.

Day Trip Idea

1

Spend the day wine tasting. Pick a geographic area, a type of wine or a specific varietal to focus on. Then select wineries that fit your criteria. You should expect to pay around $15 for a tasting, but the fee is often waived if you purchase wine or join the wine club. Stay hydrated and well-fed by scheduling a lunch in between tastings or a leisurely picnic. For picnic supplies, stop by Bob’s Well Bread (in Los Alamos and Ballard), Cailloux Cheese Shop (in Solvang) or Lucky Hen Larder (in Santa Ynez).

Opposite: Santa Barbara County (Steven Brown). Above left to right: Pismo Preserve (Kayden DeLeon). Splash Café at Pismo Pier. (Splash Café). Happy Canyon (Rob Hatherill)

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2021 | 19


Bonus Trip Idea

H

And now for something a little different —Mystery Picnic Experience. Plan ahead for this one. Order a friends or family picnic adventure from AmazingCo and explore Santa Barbara and locally owned businesses by solving clues sent to your smartphone. Pick up prepaid food and visit the local cultural sites suggested on your way to your final picnic destination.

Day Trip Idea

2

Summer is a great time to visit Lotusland when the lotus are blooming. Located in Montecito, this exquisite estate has a series of gardens filled with rare plants and stunning landscape design features. Reservations are required for the two-hour selfguided walking tour. After your tour, stop for gelato at Here’s the Scoop or grab a bite at one of the many restaurants lining Coast Village Road.

Day Trip Idea

3

Try out a new beach. Santa Barbara County has miles of beautiful coastline and accessible beaches. If you are looking for something a little different, take the drive to Jalama Beach with options for camping or day-use picnic areas. About an hour from Santa Barbara, the turnoff from Highway 1 takes you along a 14-mile scenic drive. At the beach, try one of the “world famous” burgers from the Jalama Beach Store and Grill.

Ventura County (30-minute to 2-hour drive) For more information on Ventura County in general, visit EdibleVenturaCounty.com.

Day Trip Idea

1

Drink in the local scene. Hit the local hiking trails early in the day and plan for a stop at one of the ice cream shops as a reward. Be sure to bring loads of water and a camera! Some of those vistas are breathtaking. Finish off the day strolling around the Harbor Villages in Oxnard or Ventura to keep things cool.

Above: Lotusland (Steven Brown). Bottom left: Jalama Beach (Krista Harris). Middle right: Ventura Biking Hiking Ridge (VenturaLand Trust).

20 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2021


Day Trip

Day Trip Idea

2

Visit an island. Pack a large picnic lunch and lots of water, grab a spot on an Island Packers boat (or private plane with Channel Islands Aviation if you’re feeling fancy) and head out to the spectacular Channel Islands National Park for a day of hiking, kayaking, snorkeling or scuba diving. Primitive camping is available, but there are no services available on the islands, so pack it in and pack it out!

Los Angeles County (1.5-hour to 3-hour drive) For more information on LA County in general, visit EdibleLA.com.

Day Trip Idea

1

From Long Beach, head over to South Catalina Island via Catalina Express ferry. Once there, the options are endless! Rent scuba gear or a kayak for a water adventure; book a foodie tour; rent a golf cart in downtown Avalon and check out the gorgeous island views and landscape; hang out on the beach; hop on the Nautilus for a semi-underwater tour; or book the Catalina Island Zipline Tour. Want to do it all? Rent a room and plan a longer stay!

Day Trip Idea

2 (especially with kids)

Spend the earlier part of the day at the Discovery Cube in Santa Ana (in nearby Orange County), then plan a visit to the Time Travel Mart in Echo Park on the way home. Timing matters here, though, so either give yourself lots of time to sit in traffic, or plan to avoid the busiest times (6–9am and 3–7pm).

Day Trip Idea

3

Bike it out. This trip is best done on a cooler day (earlier summer) or earlier in the day (9am probably being the latest start time). Grab bikes (or rent them), catch the Rails to Trails bike path at the Ventura Pier and head to Ojai. The path is a very manageable gradual up, but if you are not an avid biker, take it slow and take breaks as needed. Maybe stop for a coffee on the way, and try Sage Ojai or Ojai Rôtie for a lovely outdoor lunch. When it starts to get too warm, coast your way back to the beach. Top left to right: Inspiration Point, Anacapa Island (Francisco Blanco). Catalina Island (Bonandbon). Bottom: Ojai Rôtie (Joe Haddad).

Day Trip Idea

3

After a day at the beach or some lovely oceanfront hiking, grab an early dinner (opens at 5:30pm) at Opaque in Santa Monica for a dining-in-the-dark experience. Then grab a bottle of wine and a blanket and head over to Cinespia for an outdoor movie at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery.

Bonus Trip Idea

H

Leave your stilettos at home and grab an Uber or assign a designated driver for this adults-only day trip to explore the fun and quirky side of LA. If you plan for the right Sunday, you can EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2021 | 21


Roapd Tri

start with the local-maker-focused Hollywood Artisan Market on La Cienega or, if it has reopened, Smorgasburg Los Angeles in DTLA, the largest open-air food market in America. For lunch, try the gorgeous Michelin-chef-run Openaire, perched atop the Line Hotel on Wilshire. To work that off, consider a walking tour of the hidden staircases or seeing if you can find the Sunken City (access to the ruins prohibited). Pair dinner with a tour at the Lost Hills Distillery, an LA treasure surrounded by a moat. Then finish off the evening with a drink or two at Davey Wayne’s (only open Th–Sa—and only if you can find the secret entrance).

San Diego County (North County) (3- to 4-hour drive) For more information on San Diego County visit EdibleSanDiego.com.

Day Trip Idea

1

Solana Beach is the perfect seaside town for a summer day trip or overnight stay. It even has an Amtrak train station for those who want to ditch the car. Enjoy a day at the beach or browse the shops in the artsy Cedros Design District. Stop by Claire’s On Cedros for a hearty breakfast or lunch or pick up something to-go at Claire’s Too, their nearby coffee shop and bakery. In the evening check to see who’s playing at the Belly Up Tavern.

Day Trip Idea

2

If it is nature you want, start the day exploring the eight miles of trails at Torrey Pines State Reserve, just south of Del Mar. Check out Bird Rock Coffee Roasters on the way in and for lunch try Bushfire Kitchen on the way back to the 5 freeway for some tasty health-conscious options or, to stick with ocean views, eat on Sbicca’s rooftop terrace. Finish the afternoon with an educational stop to walk the trails at San Elijo Lagoon Ecological Reserve. Bring a camera! You might catch a glimpse of a rare bird species. If you still have time for an early dinner, try Ki’s Restaurant just down the street for hearty homestyle meals with an ocean view.

Day Trip Idea

Above left to right: Sunken City, San Pedro (MSPhotographic). Solana Beach (Loco Steve). Bottom; Torrey Pines hike (Aaron Castagna), San Elijo Lagoon Ecological Reserve (Nadine Castagna)

22 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2021

3

Another eco-conscious beach town worth exploring, an Encinitas trip should be planned on a Sunday to ensure time to visit the Leucadia Farmers Market, found in the playground of a local elementary school. See what Pannikin Coffee and Tea has to offer and maybe take your drink down the street to Stonesteps for a stair climb down to a stunning beach surrounded by steep cliffs. When you are ready to move on, find parking near Encinitas Boulevard and North Coast Highway 1 and enjoy a leisurely stroll south, where you will find adorable shops and amazing restaurants, including Prager Brothers, which features long-fermented sourdough and organic pastries. Just two blocks away on B Street, find the beach access to Moonlight Beach. Or walk all the way down to K Street to try Swami’s Café, and then check out the surf at Swami Beach.


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edible

BOOKS

A Chat with Fanny Singer Anna Maria Giambanco Dipietro

O

ne Sunday morning in March, I was fortunate enough to sit and chat (via telephone) with Fanny Singer, author, art critic and co-founder of the lifestyle brand Permanent Collection. The daughter of restaurant royalty, she released a memoir with recipes entitled Always Home: A Daughter’s Recipes and Stories in March 2020. The timing could not have been more appropriate for a book with such a title when you recall just where we all spent most of our time at the start of the pandemic. My husband gifted me a copy of the book, procured at a Santa Barbara County bookshop, The Book Loft, in Solvang. Singer pulls readers in as she shares poignant snapshots of travels, meals and a charming cast of characters that whisk you away to Berkeley, Provence and beyond. From meals with famous chefs to bohemian feasts at a blacksmith’s forge in San Francisco to wine tasting with renowned winemakers in France, Almost Home is part travelogue and part slideshow of what it was like growing up as the daughter of activist, author and OG earth mama Alice Waters.

GARE TH HACKER

WORDS BY

The stories from Singer’s life and 60 recipes provided just the right hit of escapism and inspiration, as I’d hit a pocket of what I refer to as Covid Cooking Fatigue. I wanted to know Singer’s thoughts on this topic, and we had a lovely chat that touched on the importance of sustainability, connecting with nature and finding inspiration in and out of the kitchen. Back in the spring of 2020, Singer was in Berkeley with her mom where she, like the rest of us, faced the uncertainty 24 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2021

Egg Spoon


These days, Singer lives in Los Angeles, where she finds inspiration Left to right: Alice Waters and Fanny Singer. at local farmers markets. I couldn’t help but feel encouraged as we spoke about the importance of shopping for fresh, local, seasonal ingredients. Whether she’s experimenting with citrus and passion fruit or, as she put it, “finding 50 ways to use kumquats: curing, roasting and preparing fresh salsa for tacos.” She shared how strolling the market in Hollywood has also become a way to spend time with her godmother. A great tip for flushing out Covid-related fatigue: Walking a farmers market with friends and loved ones in search of vibrant, regional ingredients can be absolutely healing. Having been present at the birth of the farm-to-table movement, Singer said, “Shopping at farmers markets can be a life-affirming experience; seeing what’s happening in nature at that moment in the season will revive you.” She touched on the beauty of Qi or ch’i in traditional Chinese culture, and how it pertains to the life force in our food. Qi translates literally as “air” and figuratively as “energy flow” and “material energy.” When taking this concept into account, you may view the oranges or kale you picked up today with newfound appreciation. Singer reminds us that the very life force in the food we consume determines how healthy or unwell we are. “There is no ‘nature and us’—we are a part of nature, deeply integrated into the natural world.” Being conscious of how and where our foods are grown, having reverence for nature and tasting the terroir in our foods keeps us inspired, healthy and connected. I was beyond pleased that Singer, a Berkeley native, suggested that I visit a farm in Goleta. The Center for Urban Agriculture at Fairview Gardens is a California nonprofit organization established in 1997 by a family friend of Singer. Santa Barbara locals can take advantage of the farm stand, as well as weekly pre-packaged produce bags

BRIGIT TE L ACOMBE

of a pandemic, including concerns about shopping for fresh ingredients. She shared how they’d make “compost stock” using vegetable trimmings to brew healthful soups. That lost its luster in time, and so many of us had similar experiences, particularly when faced with the challenge of preparing three nutritionally sound meals a day, every day.

available for pickup or delivery on Wednesdays. It’s a nice way to check out what might be a new-to-you local business while supporting sustainable farming practices in our community. Lastly, if you’re looking for a unique kitchen implement, consider the Egg Spoon from Fanny Singer’s Permanent Collection. I love that the brand collaborates with craftspeople in the United States, Europe and Japan to produce small runs of products using high-quality materials and unique processes. An easy way to try your hand at fire cooking, infuse some fun into breakfast and get your kids into (supervised) cooking al fresco, this tool might just be the way to go. An added perk: 5% of every spoon purchase is donated to The Edible Schoolyard Project, founded by Alice Waters in 1995. So, may I suggest we all take Fanny Singer’s advice “get out for a hike, see the ocean, stand barefoot and enjoy some of that Santa Barbara uni—it’s so fresh and, dare I say, as good as the uni imported from Japan to make sushi!” Grab a copy of Almost Home, and find yourself agreeing with author Ruth Reichl when she said of Singer’s book, “I’m pretty sure everyone who reads Almost Home will come away with the same feeling I have: Why don’t I live like this? How can I do better? I love this book.” Same here, Ms. Reichl, same here. Anna Maria is a copywriter based in Santa Barbara County. She draws from her experience as a wellness professional, plant-based cook and graphic artist to create approachable, educational content. Anna Maria is also a wine writer with WSET Level 2 with distinction certification.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2021 | 25


edible

GARDEN

Creating Community Resilience WORDS BY

W

hat is it about gardens that brings people together? I think it has to do with the joy of working outside, seeing plants grow, harvesting fresh food and, of course — as kids in their school gardens will tell you— getting dirty. Ecology, collaboration, permaculture and food literacy are the pillars of a new project that connects gardens with schools and the community while benefiting the local environment. The Santa Barbara Ecological and Edible (SBEE) Garden Project is envisioned as an archipelago of edible permaculture gardens that will promote biodiversity, increase access to locally grown food and create a connection between the community and natural ecosystems. 26 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2021

Jennifer LeMay

Santa Barbara City College (SBCC) and local nonprofit Explore Ecology have teamed up and were awarded a $100,000 grant from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to collaborate with five community partners on the project. The SBEE Garden Project will bring together teachers, students and community members of all ages. I had the opportunity to speak with some of the key people involved and learn how this timely project and significant funding will benefit our community and local ecosystems. “This is the largest EPA Environmental Education grant ever awarded to an organization in Santa Barbara County and one of the largest in California in recent decades,” says Rachel Johnson, director of grants for the SBCC Foundation. “It speaks to the


collaborative work and far-reaching impact of SBCC, Explore Ecology and our incredible community partners.” The garden locations range from schools and youth centers to community gardens and homes. Students and community members will visit, study and work in the gardens, sharing the lessons and bounty the gardens produce. Their efforts will help revitalize local landscapes, establish native habitats and sustainable food systems, improve soil and water quality and help build community resilience. The gardens will provide food for those in need, helping to address the high levels of food insecurity in our community.

“By slowing down and asking the right questions, we are creating a garden that will help build community resilience.”

JENNIFER LEMAY

The scope of the SBEE Garden Project resonates with the principles of permaculture design. Permaculture gardens are developed over time, using observation and flexibility to adapt to a particular site’s needs and promote healthy ecosystems. Five diverse nonprofit partners will contribute their unique expertise and learning opportunities: Somos Semillas of El Centro, United Boys & Girls Clubs of Santa Barbara County, Mesa Harmony Garden, Youth Drought Project’s Community Food Forest, and the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden. The project will connect the edible gardens to each other and to the community through educational programs and research. Signs near the entrance to Mesa Harmony Garden.

JENNIFER LEMAY

Vegetables growing in a demonstration raised bed at Mesa Harmony Garden.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2021 | 27


JENNIFER LEMAY

JENNIFER LEMAY

The gardens provide important habitat for pollinators. In addition to honey bees, many native pollinators will visit gardens that feature native plants.

Bananas growing at Mesa Harmony Garden.

Daniel Parra Hensel teaches environmental horticulture at SBCC. The students in his Advanced Permaculture Design course work closely with community members to design a foodproducing, native-habitat garden as part of the Somos Semillas (“we are seeds”) program at El Centro Community Center in Santa Barbara. Their detailed design report will incorporate input from everyone involved with the center, and students in subsequent courses will work on garden installation.

providing dozens of schools and youth groups with on-site gardening programs. Lindsay Johnson, executive director of Explore Ecology, says they will work with SBCC and others in the network to connect all of the gardens with the standardsbased education taught at surrounding schools. “We’re really looking forward to this project—partnering with SBCC students, hosting educational events for families and creating a bridge between the school gardens and the community.”

“The community is front and center in this process — we asked about their vision for the garden and what they want to grow and eat,” says Daniel. “By slowing down and asking the right questions, we are creating a garden that will help build community resilience.”

Last year, a winter vegetable garden provided healthy snacks for children at the Westside unit of the United Boys & Girls Clubs of Santa Barbara County. Jesse Gonzalez, the club director, says that they will rehabilitate their garden with assistance from SBCC students and faculty with the grant funding. He’s looking forward to the garden providing more opportunities for the children, as it’s a central part of their after-school program that promotes healthy lifestyles.

Says Adam Green, PhD, professor of environmental science and biology at SBCC, “This grant will allow us to create spaces that restore biodiversity, grow healthy food, connect with the community and educate students. These efforts show how a community college can reach out beyond its campuses and partner with residents, community groups and local schools to make Santa Barbara a healthy and enjoyable place to live and raise your family.” Students will also continue to develop the permaculture gardens at SBCC that started in 2015 and supply produce for the campus food pantry. The two-year grant will also allow Explore Ecology to devote an extra hour per week at six Santa Barbara School District schools through its School Gardens Program. For 25 years, the nonprofit has been a vital force for garden education, 28 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2021

“The kids enjoy the fresh produce and get exercise as they help plant, water, weed and harvest the vegetables,” Jesse says. “It’s been great, as it’s something we’ve been able to do outside and safely during the pandemic.” The new garden will also include plants to attract native pollinators and a stormwater catchment system to reduce water runoff pollution from the facility. Mesa Harmony Garden, a volunteer-led community food forest in the Mesa neighborhood of Santa Barbara, features more than 100 fruit trees, among other crops. The churchowned land sat vacant for many years until 2010 when a group


of SBCC students proposed creating an edible garden with the goal of sharing food with those in need while building community. Board president Hugh Kelly has been volunteering at the garden from the start. He says, “Mesa Harmony Garden is a mature food forest, where SBCC students and others can discover firsthand the potential for urban landscapes to become biodiverse and productive edible gardens with healthy soil, well-managed water and no chemical inputs.” Through the SBEE Garden Project, they hope to expand their volunteer base and educational programs, inspiring similar gardens at people’s homes and community spaces. Another food forest in the Mesa neighborhood is just getting started—in the front yard of a private home. Heading up the project is Brad Smith, founder of the Youth Drought Project. He explains that SBCC faculty and students will work on garden design and installation and that most of the food will go to the SBCC student pantry. Explore Ecology will help develop an educational component so that community members can visit the garden to learn about native species, water retention and runoff prevention, drought resistance and growing food. “Our goal is to show that the most beautiful gardens are productive and designed to emulate nature,” Brad says. The Santa Barbara Botanic Garden (SBBG) will research insect pollinators in four of the project’s gardens. The SBBG’s mission is to conserve California’s native plants and habitats, which play an integral role in sustainable gardening and provide resources for both pollinators and beneficial pestcontrol insects. SBBG Director of Conservation and Research Denise Knapp says, “Our SBCC intern will monitor the gardens from season to season, gathering data on the insects that are visiting and which plants are supporting them.” They will work with SBCC on the research project and use the California Pollinator Project’s Citizen Scientist Pollinator Monitoring Guide to analyze and report the data. (She says there are about 1,600 species of native bees in California!) They plan to share their information through the iNaturalist social network of naturalists, citizen scientists and biologists. Thanks to the SBEE Garden Project, our community will benefit from edible gardens that promote biodiversity, native habitats, local food production and community resilience. With assistance from select local agencies and organizations, the project partners will track and evaluate results from all of the project activities. Gardens help to build resilience on many levels. They’ve long been spaces where people join together to work, create, learn about natural systems—and remember that it’s fun to dig in the dirt. Jennifer LeMay is a writer, designer and artist. She’s grateful for great local food, our bountiful farmers market and all those who work to make our community and food system more resilient.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2021 | 29


30 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2021


WA ST E N OT, WAN T N OT Finding Solutions to Food Waste WORDS BY

Janice Cook Knight

I

n nature, there’s no such thing as waste. Food that is not eaten by humans or animals becomes food for other organisms, such as worms, mold or bacteria. It gets broken down into its component molecules, eventually becoming soil or water. Everything is broken down and completely recycled. And yet, in our modern food system, food waste is an enormous problem. It’s estimated that 25% or more of all produce in America is wasted: It either goes bad, or simply is not eaten. If you consider all foods, including prepared food, that number is more likely between 30 and 40%.

I realize that many don’t have these options available or wouldn’t enjoy composting and keeping chickens even if they could. In our modern life, with food so abundantly available (for many of us, but certainly not all) we don’t have to be as concerned with where our food is coming from or where our spoiled food is going, either. But it wasn’t always like this. For many folks, getting enough food to eat, as well as storing food for the future, is of great concern.

Humans have developed many ways to preserve food. Drying, smoking, pickling, curing, cold-storage and lactofermentation (which is responsible In our household, we definitely for sauerkraut, cheese and yogurt) waste some food. That’s certainly Why is so much food going to have been used since ancient not our intention, but it happens. waste? With an abundance of food times. More recently we have I’m not sure what percentage is added canning, refrigeration and wasted. We try to use things up, and seed available, why are freezing, coatings such as wax and we try not to overbuy. This last people going hungry? on apples and even wrapping year especially, with food shortages plastic around vegetables, such as and the need to stay home, we’ve cucumbers, to help keep them fresh longer. become conscious of using every precious bit. We’ve eaten out very little. I’m astounded at the meals we’ve made from leftovers. This People learned to preserve food to survive lean times, mainly is how people have always operated in less abundant times. And it winter. Now we ship some foods many miles, and preservation is the way many people must live now, in this country and all over is meant to help keep food relatively fresh after a trip across the the world. state, the country or around the world. When I have to throw out food we haven’t used—lettuce gone bad, slimy parsley at the bottom of the vegetable drawer, mushy cucumbers we forgot we had—it goes into our compost pile, so I don’t perceive it as exactly wasted. It’s going to be made into soil. Foods that are marginal go to our chickens, a great source of recycling, as they turn food past its prime into eggs that we will eat. Their waste product, chicken manure, will eventually be composted and added back to our garden soil. We also have a couple of worm bins. The worms turn old produce and coffee grounds into “worm gold”—worm compost, an excellent soil additive.

The Goleta-based company called Apeel got its start as an incubator business in 2012. James Rogers was a graduate student in materials science at UCSB who became fascinated with how to make fresh produce last longer. One day, while driving through lush farmland, he listened to a podcast about global hunger. He wondered, Why is so much food going to waste? With an abundance of food and seed available, why are people going hungry? At the time, his research project involved solar power. But the food questions stuck with him, and eventually he began doing another kind of research: What if there was a way to add

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2021 | 31


longevity to fruits and vegetables to keep them from spoiling? His research was so promising that the Gates Foundation donated $100,000, and Apeel Sciences was born.

The company has developed different formulas, and one of them meets certified organic standards, already being applied to apples. So far, Apeel doesn’t have market competition.

All fruits and vegetables naturally have a “skin” on their surfaces, a protective coating to help keep moisture in and keep oxygen out. This skin surface, called “cutin,” is composed of fatty acids such as lipids and glycerides. The skin of an orange is more protective than the skin on a strawberry because of the arrangement of molecules. So oranges last longer, but both oranges and strawberries (and all other fruits and vegetables) have the same molecular components in their skins. All are subject to eventual decay. Rogers and his team discovered a water-soluble formula made from the peel, seeds and pulp of fruits and vegetables. The coating, a powder mixed with water, is then applied in various ways, such as dipping or spraying.

Apeel benefits retail outlets since its coating slows down natural decomposition, giving produce more time to be purchased while optimally ripe. It’s beneficial to the consumer because an avocado will last twice as long on my kitchen counter at home. It’s beneficial to growers because it gives them more time to wait until fruit is fully ripe before picking it. The technology reduces our carbon footprint by saving water, reducing plastic usage and reducing the use of some pesticides and fungicides. A tremendous amount of water is saved because the water used to produce crops has not “gone to waste.”

perfect process. But when these vegetables spoil before being used, all the work of farming, the cost of water, fertilizer, transportation, distribution and marketing that went into the asparagus or lettuce has essentially gone to waste. Even though I can compost those vegetables, a great deal of energy used to grow and market those items has been expended, without the intended payoff.

Organic apples treated with Apeel are available in the Northwest. Apeel avocados can be purchased at Kroger markets in the United States, which includes the Ralphs chain locally. Caviar limes, a local Santa Barbara product from Goodland Farms, are sold on the Fruitstand website.

Since Apeel began to research and eventually develop a viable product, further investments have added $380 million to the company, which is now valued at one billion dollars. Investors Asparagus will not last long without refrigeration. Leave a bunch include the Rockefeller Foundation, Viking Global, The Gates of asparagus on the kitchen counter for a day, and it will become Foundation, Andreessen Horowitz, wilted and limp. Eventually, it will Oprah and Katy Perry. Pretty decompose. But carefully wrapped, Apeel benefits retail outlets since amazing growth for what was once then placed in a refrigerator drawer a small Goleta startup. Now the (which is often humidified), that its coating slows down natural company is mid-sized, with offices same asparagus will last several days, decomposition, giving produce in several other countries as overseas especially if it was very fresh to begin more time to be purchased markets are being developed, with. Lettuce is another example of including sub-Saharan Africa, a food that desperately needs refrigwhile optimally ripe. eration. Being mostly made of waMexico, Central and South America and Southeast Asia. Apeel is already ter, it will go bad very quickly. First, established in Europe in partnership with the Dutch food the lettuce dehydrates. Then oxygen goes to work on it to further company Nature’s Pride. Avocados are a popular product. Apeel is break it down; eventually, molds will set in. working with small farmers in Africa to treat cassava root, a staple In nature, these processes are a good thing. Eventually, crop in many parts of the world. Apeel intends to help small the asparagus or lettuce will break down completely, and farmers who do not have access to refrigerated supply chains. under the right conditions, become part of the soil: nature’s

Jason De Turris is senior vice president at Apeel. He shared Apeel’s motto: Food Gone Good. The coating “doubles or triples the time that produce will keep, depending on the particular item. It keeps what’s already good, good—including textures—and for longer.” The Apeel coating is invisible and without taste. There’s no need to remove it before eating produce coated with it. It’s not allergenic and is considered by the FDA to be “generally regarded as safe (GRAS). Apeel doesn’t impact the respiration rate of the produce or the ethylene gas in bananas. The usual ripening process happens as it normally would, just more slowly.

32 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2021

A cucumber is about 95% water. Houweling, based in Camarillo, is a large producer of English cucumbers. Their cucumbers had been wrapped in plastic, but they’ve switched to Apeel. The coating is more effective than plastic, and in a year’s time the company will save as much as 60,000 pounds of plastic wrap. I have to admit I was a bit skeptical at first. Adding a coating to food to keep it longer? Then, it occurred to me that refrigeration is a fairly recent development, only about 100 years old (for home use), and yet we rely on it constantly to keep our food fresh. I imagine some people protested refrigerators when they were first invented—they must have seemed so strange. I see Apeel’s product as a response to our modern world.


APEEL

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2021 | 33


Apeel has developed a way to keep produce fresh longer, which greatly reduces waste in stores and at home and makes shipping produce more viable. Crops still need to be carefully picked and handled; the Apeel coating won’t be effective if an avocado or an apple has been punctured in shipping because oxygen finds its way in to do damage. Already the stores that are selling Apeel-coated produce have experienced economic benefits. Avocados ripen more slowly, giving them twice as long to be sold. It is so beneficial to the producers and retailers that they are happy to pay for the product themselves, and the cost is not passed on to the consumer—a win-win for everyone. Of course, I had to taste an Apeel avocado. The Ralphs store on Carrillo Street downtown had an Apeel avocado display right at the entrance to the produce section. I bought two plump avocados, which looked like Haas, but simply said they were from CalAvo, grown in Mexico, and also wore Apeel stickers. They seemed nearly ripe. Do Apeel avocados ripen the way an untreated avocado would, I wondered? The next day the end of one of them seemed slightly soft, just like a ripe avocado should. I cut into it, and the knife went in like butter. I have to say the avocado was unusually creamy and delicious, one of the best avocados I’ve eaten lately, and I eat avocados almost every week. Does Apeel have applications at the farmers market? It’s possible, though if you are buying produce that is very fresh, it’s not likely necessary. Special equipment is needed to apply the coating. Since farmers markets sell directly to consumers, there is no middleman and no real-time delay between harvest and sale; plus, the produce I buy at farmers market seems twice as fresh already as what I’d buy at a grocery store. Small farmers hope to sell out of everything they are bringing to market that day, and they plan for that. Though it gave me pause: While I can keep most produce in my refrigerator and have it last long enough for me to use it within a week or two, strawberries tend to go bad very quickly. While apples and beets can keep well wrapped in a vegetable drawer for literally weeks, strawberries and raspberries are fragile. I would love for them to last twice as long. Still, there is something beautiful about their fragrant fragility. If strawberries lasted longer, would it spoil my experience of them? The taste of some delicate foods is fleeting; their time is so short — or so I have always thought. There are many causes of food waste, and Apeel can help remedy some of them. What can we, personally, do to improve the situation? It might help to have better national education about “use by” dates on food. A lot of good food is routinely thrown out because people misunderstand those designations. And, Americans tend to devalue our food since we typically spend much less on food than other countries do. Is it because we have so much inexpensive junk food in this country? Eating local food is important to reduce food waste. If food doesn’t have to travel a great distance, we are saving greenhouse gas emissions and reducing our carbon footprint. Added benefit: 34 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2021


We are supporting local farmers, along with our local economy, and also insuring we will have food available. This past year, more than in any year I can remember, I am grateful that we have a strong local food supply because food shortages, especially in supermarkets, were pervasive. Our local food bank has a Backyard Bounty program to share surplus food with our community. Refrigeration and freezing are still great ways to keep food fresh. We can also learn more about preserving food when we have excess (see below.) We need to be collectively thoughtful, strategizing to buy the food we need without overbuying and using what we have on hand in a timely manner. Janice Cook Knight is an award-winning writer, cookbook author and cooking teacher based in Santa Barbara. She enjoys gardening, music and the science of cooking, and is thrilled by a good recipe. She blogs with her daughter Sarah Migliaccio Barnes at TriedAndTrueKitchen.com and can be found on Instagram @triedtruekitchen.

Waste Not Want Not RESOURCES A few good books to help preserve our food bounty:

Preserving Food Without Freezing or Canning: Traditional Techniques Using Salt, Oil, Sugar, Alcohol, Vinegar, Drying, Cold Storage, and Lactic Fermentation

Garden Dining Tuesday - Sunday weekend brunch

458 Bell Street picolosalamos.com 805.344.1122

T H E G AT H E R I N G TA B L E

BY THE GARDENERS & FARMERS OF TERRE VIVANTE (CHELSEA GREEN, WHITE RIVER JUNCTION, VERMONT, 2007)

Well-Preserved: Recipes and Techniques for Putting Up Small Batches of Seasonal Foods

AT T H E

(800) 638-2466 • ballardinn.com • 2436 BASELINE

BY EUGENIA BONE (CLARKSON POTTER, NEW YORK, 2009) Dine In • Take-Out

The Joy of Pickling: 250 Flavor-Packed Recipes for Vegetables and More from Garden or Market BY LINDA ZIEDRICH (HARVARD COMMON PRESS, BOSTON, 2009)

ramenkotori.com ramenkotori@gmail.com P. 8 0 5 . 6 91. 9 6 7 2

1618 c o p e n h a ge n d r i ve

ramen kotori

s o lv a n g , c a l i fo r n i a 9 3 4 6 3

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E A T. D R I N K . T H I N K . How we inhabit this planet and envision its future is more critical

—consumers who have the power to reshape the world we live in. Every

now than at any time in our history. This past year has certainly taught

farmer, rancher, entrepreneur and organization we champion is better off

us that—it has exposed our vulnerabilities, our frail insignificance in the

because of you. You read, learn, take action and vote with your forks. It will

scheme of things. Yet during this turbulent and challenging time we have

be you who ultimately tilts the scale toward a more sustainable future, a

also found hope.

more sustainable food system.

On the following pages, we bring you the first in a series of thought lead-

Thank you for joining us as we collectively set our sights on creating a

ership stories that span topics on sustainability, hunger, restaurant revital-

future that is nothing less than extraordinary. One that binds the ecosystems

ization and regenerative agriculture. These are the values that Edible Com-

of our lives to Mother Nature without a disconnect between what is on our

munities, as an organization, has been devoted to for the past two decades.

plates and where it comes from—where all of the seemingly smaller choices

Our work lends itself to the singular notion that excellent storytelling has

we make today add up to massive, beautiful and everlasting positive change.

the power to change lives; and that by exploring and elevating important conversations like these, we can create massive change.

Tracey Ryder

We also know that change is impossible without the support of our readers

Marshall Johnson, Vice President of Conservation Ranching for Audubon standing in a field of prairie grass. Photo courtesy of Audubon

Words Bill and Katie Delaney Photos Jesse Brantman

36 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2021

edible Communities |

S IG N AT U RE

S E C T ION

Co-Founder, Edible Communities


T H E BI R DS & T H E BE E F WO R DS

BY

Joy Manning

+

P HOTOS

BY

Candice Vivien

You’ve seen the headlines: Beef is destroying the planet.

now means adding 1 million acres of land to the 2.5 million

You’ve heard all about the greenhouse gases and pollution a

acres that have already been certified as bird-friendly. “It means

typical beef operation produces. But the idea that beef is an en-

a lot to partner with an organization that has built its brand in

vironmental disaster isn’t quite that simple. Those dire warnings

alignment with our core values,” says Johnson.

are based on one kind of beef: The conventional, factory-farmed

Darrell Wood, founding Panorama rancher, was the first in

kind. And it is, by far, the most commonly consumed beef in

the network to get certified. “I volunteered. I wanted to see how

North America. In fact, 97% of the beef in the US food supply

it went and what the level of difficulty would be for ranchers,”

is grain-fed, feedlot beef.

he says. And he discovered the benefits greatly outweighed any

But there’s another way to produce beef, a way that actu-

extra effort. In large part, the certification is an acknowledge-

ally enriches the environment. And it’s happening across at

ment of what Panorama ranches, all of which were already or-

least 3.5 million acres of American grassland. Kay Cornelius,

ganic, have been doing for years.

a fourth-generation rancher and new general manager at Pan-

As part of the program, each ranch gets an annual visit from

orama Meats, intends to add another million acres to that total

a rangeland biologist who takes soil samples, measures the veg-

by 2030 through a groundbreaking new partnership with an

etation, and assesses how the ranch affects bird life. Then Audu-

unlikely ally: The National Audubon Society.

bon creates a habitat management plan for the rancher with suggestions for improvements. “The ranches enrolled are going

A NEW SE A L O F A P P R OVA L “All of our data proves that grassland birds are the most im-

to become even more bird friendly, but they were already doing great things,” says Johnson.

periled group of bird species in America. Grassland birds have lost 53% of their population since 1970, and 95% of all grass-

FARMERS F IRST

land birds live on cattle ranches,” says Marshall Johnson, vice-

Cornelius isn’t new to dramatically growing a network of

president of Audubon’s conservation ranching initiative. The

environmentally friendly farmers. Before taking the helm of

nonprofit’s “Grazed on Audubon Certified Bird-friendly Land”

Panorama Meats as general manager last September, she dou-

seal was established to recognize ranches that are managed in a

bled sales in her role as vice president for the biggest and best-

way that protects those birds. Saving these birds is a vital part of

known name in humanely raised meats, Niman Ranch. “I spent

maintaining biodiversity. Like bees, birds are important pollina-

12 years there working for farmers, and in my new job I’m still

tors, and they help maintain the delicate balance of a grassland

helping farmers earn a living,” she says.

ecosystem.

Finding ways to grow and protect a rancher’s livelihood is a

Through Audubon’s new partnership with Panorama, every

high priority for Cornelius personally and central to Panorama

ranch in Panorama’s network will earn that Grazed on Audubon

Meats’ mission. “I grew up in a rural community during the farm

Certified Bird-friendly Land seal. “We began the project of in-

crisis years. My mom and dad really struggled,” she says. The

troducing this certification in 2013, and we enrolled our first

experience of watching her once-thriving farming community

ranch in 2017,” says Johnson. Joining forces with Panorama

dry up back then informs everything she does today. “At Niman

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2021 | 37 Visit ediblecommunities.com for more photos and podcasts


Ranch, we really celebrated the family farmer doing the right thing and we’re doing the same thing at Panorama.” The simplest way to keep these family farms in business is to ensure they are able to get their product to market and to be paid a fair price. Being part of Panorama’s network helps them accomplish these goals, and the Audubon’s bird-friendly seal provides a major boost, a way to make these special packages of meat stand out from everything else in the butcher’s case for environmental conscious consumers.

4 Ways to Shop for Sustainable Meat Not every supermarket is stocked with grass-fed, grass-finished and bird-friendly beef—yet. If you can’t find it at your store, there are still ways to purchase sustainable steaks, chops, and burgers wherever you are. Here are some tips to get you started. 1. SHOP ONLINE

Panorama has partnered with online retailer CrowdCow.com and you can find their beef as well as meat from other high-quality sustainable ranchers there.

2. BUY A COW SHARE

In many communities, smaller farmers and ranchers will sell onehalf, one-quarter, or one-eighth of a single animal to you. Check out EatWild.com to find one near you. Red-winged blackbird

SAVI NG G R ASS L A N D The connection between beef, birds, grassland, and climate change isn’t immediately obvious. To understand how a properly managed ranch can actually help remove carbon from the atmosphere, you have to understand the long history of North America’s grassland. Before they were hunted nearly to extinction in the

3 . S H O P AT YO U R FA R M E R S M A R K E T

Farmers markets are typically a great place to connect with the kind of farmers and ranchers who are passionate about sustainability and land stewardship.

late 19th century, wild bison grazed an area just the right amount to promote the growth of a complex and robust root system without killing the plants. Domestic cows, if left to their own devices, will eat the grass down to the bare earth, destroying the grassland. To make them more like their ancestors, ranchers must use rotational grazing, moving them from spot to spot to achieve that ideal level of grazing. “Cattle can mimic what historic bison used to do. That’s why we need them,” says Johnson. Continued...

38 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2021

edible Communities |

S IG N AT U RE

S E C T ION

4. ASK QUESTIONS

When you’re shopping, ask your butcher where the beef comes from and how it was raised. This educates you and lets them know there’s a demand for sustainable beef.


EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2021 | 39


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42 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2021


Darrell Wood and Kay Cornelius of Panorama Organic

Without animals grazing, grassland becomes overwhelmed

these eco-minded ranchers can only protect the grassland, the

with weeds and invasive plant species. The soil quality is de-

birds, and the whole ecosystem it supports if they can earn a

graded, and animal life, birds and pollinators like bees lose their

living doing it.

habitat. Vernal pools dry up and disappear. Without well-man-

That’s where you come in.

aged grassland, some species can even become extinct. “There’s a vernal pool on my ranch that hosts an endangered species called

A MARK ET SOLUTION

fairy shrimp,” says Wood. “I have a stream that goes through

The way Kay Cornelius sees it, people are looking for three

my property that’s one of the major salmon spawning streams

things when they’re shopping for grass-fed beef. “They want

in California.”

to know it’s organic, they want to know that the animals were

And then there’s the matter of carbon. It’s true that cows emit

treated humanely, and they want to know about the environ-

carbon into the atmosphere, about 80 tons annually for a ranch

mental impact,” she says. “With the USDA organic seal and the

of 150 acres, according to the Texas Department of Agriculture.

Step 4 animal welfare standards, we had the first two covered.”

There’s also a certain amount of carbon emissions associated with

But until this new partnership with Audubon, Panorama had

the farm equipment (32 tons). But well-managed grassland, with

no iron-clad way to convey their commitment to the environ-

its deep root systems, lush vegetation, and rich soil, is actually

ment in a way easily understood by busy shoppers.

able to remove 500 tons of carbon from the atmosphere per year,

The Grazed on Audubon Certified Bird-friendly Land seal

giving it an overall positive effect on the environment rather than

requires third-party certification. Audubon is one of the most

a negative one. It should be noted that this only applies to cattle

trusted names in conservation. This means, in an era of spuri-

ranches with high standards for land management and environ-

ous label claims, the Audubon seal stands out as meaningful.

mental stewardship--not conventional factory farms.

According to Johnson, since the first ranches were enrolled in

Raising beef cattle on pasture this way does take longer:

the program in 2016, bird abundance has increased on those

Cows don’t fatten up as quickly without the grains provided by

grasslands by 36%. This is a good indication that other species,

feedlots, and they expend more energy grazing than on a feed-

especially bees and other pollinators necessary for the food sup-

lot. It also requires more space. As a result, a rancher practicing

ply, are flourishing as well.

this kind of regenerative agriculture cannot produce the same

“Consumers buy grass-fed beef to vote for a change in the envi-

volume of beef on the same acreage as a factory farm. Their beef

ronment. Paying a little more for beef is a nudge in the right direc-

must therefore be sold at a premium.

tion,” says Cornelius. It’s a small price to pay for doing your part to preserve America’s grassland and the birds that call it home. e

The preservation of this land is important to everyone, but

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2021 | 43 ediblecommunities.com


CAROLE TOPALIAN

44 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2021


SU STAI NABI L I T Y & WI N E A Guide to the Most Common Eco-Friendly Wine Practices WORDS BY

Hana-Lee Sedgwick

M

any California vineyards and wineries have dedicated much time and effort to foster a better environment, not only for their immediate benefit but also for preserving the land and ecosystems for generations to come. However, when it comes to being “green” or “eco-friendly” in wine, the various certifications and how they differ can be quite confusing. To help one better understand the different strategies for sustainability in wine, from organic to biodynamic and beyond, we’re breaking down a few of the most common green viticulture terms and certifications used in California and what they actually mean.

Organic vs. Organically Grown Much like the organic produce you might find at the farmers market or grocery store, organic grapes are grown without the use of artificial fertilizers or chemicals like pesticides and herbicides. When a California wine is labeled as being “made with organic grapes,” 100% of the grapes used must be certified organic. “Organic wine,” however, indicates that a wine is made from organic grapes, but also that all additives such as yeasts and fining agents are organic and non-GMO and that sulfites have not been used in the production process. So, if grapes have been grown organically in a vineyard but a winemaker adds sulfur during production, the wine would be labeled as “made with organic grapes” rather than “organic wine.” You may be wondering, what’s the big deal with sulfites anyway? Sulfites, also known as sulfur dioxide, are chemical compounds that act as a preservative to maintain flavor and freshness in wine by preventing oxidation and inhibiting bacterial growth. Sulfites can occur naturally in some foods, such as tea, dried fruit and fermented foods, and are generally safe to consume. However, a very small percentage of people are sensitive to these compounds and find that sulfites contribute to headaches and/or irritate respiratory tracts. Interestingly, sulfur restrictions for organic wine are different in Europe, where wine can contain small amounts of sulfites and still be recognized

as organic. For this reason, there is much debate over sulfur limitations in the U.S., since many California wines meet the E.U.’s organic standards but can’t be labeled organic here. “Organic” in the U.S. is the only wine term regulated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, as opposed to a third-party certification program. Some producers choose to have their grapes certified by a state agency such as California Certified Organic Farmers (CCOF), a USDA-accredited nonprofit organization that promotes and supports the organic food and agriculture movement. The benefit of going through a state agency is that it typically offers an expedited certification process—less than 12 weeks, in the case of CCOF. Given the long-term benefits of organic farming, it may seem like a no-brainer for a winery to pursue organic certification, but it can be a costly and time-consuming endeavor. The certification process requires that the land be farmed organically for at least three years; depending on the degree of conventional farming used prior, five or even seven years can be a more realistic timeline for a full transition. Once certified, a vineyard must maintain organic practices and meet rigorous certification standards to ensure yearly renewal. Of course, organic farming doesn’t come without challenges and risks. Without access to synthetic pesticides or chemical herbicides, things like unpredictable weather, pests and other factors outside of one’s control could result in lower yields or, worse, lasting damage to a vineyard. For that reason, some vintners choose to use organic farming practices but forgo certification, so they aren’t limited in their ability to pivot to conventional methods quickly and effectively should something threaten their vineyards. All that being said, followers of the organic movement strongly believe the extra time and dedication is worth the effort, as they claim it can result in more interesting, characterdriven wines and that it ultimately contributes to a healthier ecosystem built for longevity.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2021 | 45


Biodynamic Viticulture “Biodynamic” wine production is similar to organic in that it involves organic farming practices, such as eliminating the use of chemicals, but it takes many other factors into account to employ a more holistic approach in the vineyard. Essentially, biodynamic farming views all parts of the vineyard—not just grapes, but also soils, animals and insects— as a regenerative living organism. Driven by this perspective, biodynamic viticulture uses a complex system designed to align the balance between vine, earth, stars and farmer so that each part contributes to the next to become a self-sustaining environment. Biodynamic viticulture is guided by the principles of Rudolf Steiner, an early-20th-century Austrian philosopher who believed in aligning farming practices to the movements of the Earth. As such, biodynamic viticulture depends on the lunar calendar and astrological influences, which dictate the best days for certain vineyard practices, like pruning and harvesting, to take place, and which days to just let nature take its course. In order to create a rich, fertile growing environment and support the overall health of the vineyard, biodynamic viticulture uses natural materials and compost-based fertilizers. Also incorporated into the process are animals such as sheep, chickens and horses, which are brought in to live on the land and fertilize it. Biodynamics also calls for specific—albeit somewhat strange—practices in the vineyard, such as the burying of cow horns. Yes, you read that right. Cow horns are stuffed with manure, buried and then left in the ground through winter. Once removed, the materials inside the horns are spread throughout the vineyard, which is said to stimulate the soil’s vitality. In the cellar, winemakers must practice low-intervention winemaking, such as omitting the use of chemicals or manufactured additions like commercial yeasts, to ensure the wines reflect the nuances of the vineyard. Biodynamic wines in the U.S. must be certified, which is overseen in California by the nonprofit organization Demeter USA. While some consider the biodynamic process a bit wacky or “out there,” champions of biodynamics claim it is the best way to express terroir in wine and protect the integrity of the vineyard. In any case, some of California’s most prominent wineries are Certified Biodynamic.

Sustainable Viticulture “Sustainably produced” wine is made with the intention of mitigating wastefulness in winemaking, from water resources in the vineyard to energy efficiency in the winery. It also takes into account social and economic responsibilities. What many people aren’t aware of, though, is that “sustainable” viticulture has no legal requirements, as it’s up to the vintners themselves to decide which techniques to implement to create a more 46 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2021

sustainable environment. For that reason, it is one of the most flexible green viticultural practices, allowing both organic and biodynamic practices. But because it is so vague, it can come across as meaningless since it carries no guarantees of green practices. More often, a winery will choose to pursue certification to establish credibility, of which there are a few different avenues one can take. Certified California Sustainable Winegrowing (CCSW) is one pathway, which works to ensure the long-term sustainability of the California wine community. CCSW is defined by three areas of sustainability, often referred to as the three “E’s”: Environmental Soundness, Social Equality and Economical Feasibility. To achieve the CCSW stamp of approval, a winery must translate these principles into the everyday operations of winegrowing and winemaking, with criteria ranked from 1–4 for things like water and energy usage, greenhouse gas emissions and creating favorable environments for employees and the community. Once fully accredited by a third party, the CCSW certification indicates both that the winery is certified and that 85% or more of the grapes are from certified vineyards. Sustainability in Practice, or SIP Certified, is another soughtafter certification for vineyards, wineries and wine, with strict standards based upon the “three P’s” of sustainability: People, Planet and Prosperity. To achieve certification, a winery is measured on a set of holistic practices that look at sustainability at every level, from water management and energy efficiency to safe pest management and habitat preservation, as well as social equity and ethical business management. SIP also prohibits the use of specific, high-risk pesticides. Sustainability practices are verified through independent records and on-site inspections, with final approval granted by an independent advisory board to those wineries achieving a score of at least 75%. Some California wine regions have their own certifications pertaining to sustainable viticulture, backed by a set of meaningful standards deemed essential to that particular region. Two examples of regional certifications include the Napa Green Certification for wineries and vineyards in Napa County, and the LODI RULES Sustainable Winegrowing Certification for vineyards within the Lodi AVA. Given all the overlap—and, in some cases, the vagueness between various terms and certifications—it’s easy to see how eco-friendly practices in wine can be confusing to the consumer. Regardless of the certification, though, if a winery or vineyard is making a true effort to green their operations, for the good of the environment and community around them, one can’t help but applaud their dedication. Hana-Lee Sedgwick is a Santa Barbara native who writes about wine, food and travel. As a freelance writer, editor and wine consultant, she happily spends her downtime eating, drinking and wandering, documenting it on her blog, Wander & Wine.


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R O SÉ

Life Seen Through Pink-Colored Glasses WORDS BY

I

come from a large French family who all have very strong opinions about wine. Red wine in particular, as that is what they have always favored, more specifically the wines from Bordeaux. To say that there is a cultural bias amongst them is an understatement. Like many people, I also grew up with the view that rosé was not a very serious wine. It was trotted out on hot summer days, perfect for picnics and barbecues or for quaffing down in large quantities at an outdoor party, a wine which was often a little too sweet, and one that few people had any qualms about adding ice cubes to. It was certainly not a wine that one would pair food with, let alone plan a meal or an elaborate party around. Oh, how times have changed! Rosé sales have exploded over the past decade, notably for pale, dry, more acidic Provencal-styled rosés. Winemakers around the globe and all over Santa Barbara County have taken note. Many have added a rosé to their wine portfolio where 10 years ago they made none. This surge in the wine’s popularity began in the early 2000s in France. Now, rosé outsells white wines in that country.

48 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2021

Pascale Beale

Rosé’s lack of pretension and affordability have made it hugely attractive to millennials in particular, and savvy marketing by some of Provence’s biggest producers have driven its popularity to Instagram-frenzied heights. The demand for the beautifully hued wines has made the United States the second-largest consumer of rosé, after France. Since 2014, the U.S. even has a National Rosé Day (this year, it’s on June 12). In 2017, rosé sales in the U.S. jumped a staggering 53%, and the trend continues. So, what is all the fuss about, and why did we all embrace this style of wine now? Eight years ago, I was lucky enough to have lunch at a winery in Provence that has since become synonymous with the epitome of rosé, Chateau D’Esclans (Home of Whispering Angel). Located in undulating hills, inland from the Mediterranean, some 25 kilometers from the ancient city of Fréjus, the vineyard and its charming and charismatic owner, Sacha Lichine, were turning the rosé world on its head. He believed that rosés could be subtly crafted wines and he set about transforming the market.


“What differentiates today’s rosés from the overly sugared blush bottles of the past is finesse,” he once said. His goal was, and is, to make “wines that are light yet floral, with a delicate richness, and the paler the wine, the better.” This is the style of rosé that has become so prestigious and has influenced winemakers around the world. As we toured the winery, he and his cellar master explained their winemaking process: maceration. Rosés are made from many varietals of red grapes which, once harvested, are gently crushed to allow the juice to macerate (sit on their skins), anywhere from a few hours to a few days, in order to extract the desired amount of color and flavor. The juice’s limited contact with the grape skins gives rosés their much-vaunted pinkish hues. The grapes are then lightly squeezed in a press to extract the optimal amount of juice, which is, in turn, poured into stainless steel tanks, or oak barrels, and vinified similarly to a white wine. I learnt more about rosés in those few hours than I had ever known before. The visit broadened my perspective. A few years later, I returned to the Chateau, on what was then its 10th anniversary celebration. As the sun set, the Italianate building was bathed in pink light. The 300 guests were serenaded into a huge covered tent hung with elaborate chandeliers and festooned with gigantic floral arrangements. The appetizers and the multi-course dinner all featured prodigious quantities of truffles, paired with a vertical tasting of the Chateau’s finest wines. The evening was enchanting, and I could write paragraphs about the astonishing food and two-foot-high pyramids of black tubers, but what struck me the most was just how far “simple” rosés had come. This was now wine on an international bestseller list. No sooner had I returned to the States than I started reading about rosé festivals across the country. The press announced that guests in the Hamptons had a momentary panic attack when it appeared that they were going to run out of “the pink stuff.” It seemed Florida positively bathed in it. New City launched an annual “Pinknic”—a two-day festival bringing together chefs, foodies, musicians and more—dedicated to celebrating summer with a fresh glass of rosé in hand. At the 2016 event, banners read “Save water, drink rosé,” and they did, en masse.

California, now home to more than 4,500 wineries, also joined in. From Napa Valley to Los Angeles, La Vie en Rosé– themed festivals flourished, sprouting like the state’s spring poppies in every wine-growing region. Everyone got the message. Rosé was refreshing, uncomplicated, easy to choose and fun! The advent of Covid put a stop to mass gatherings, but wineries quickly pivoted to online tastings to share their latest vintage. Now, after a one-year hiatus, “drink pink” festivals and competitions are gearing back up for 2021. I admit I have joined in the fun too. Whereas 10 years ago I would never have served a rosé at a cooking class, much less paired it with dishes at a winemakers’ dinner, now those very winemakers are extolling the virtues of their own rosés to pair with all types of food. Karen Steinwachs, the esteemed winemaker at Buttonwood Farm and Winery, often suggests rosés (she makes two: a very pale, very dry Grenache rosé and a Syrah rosé) to go with foods that are notoriously difficult to pair wines with, such as grilled artichokes and asparagus, or with an endive, herb and goat cheese salad, for example. She has made a convert of me, and I now champion its versatility. For instance, I use a lot of herbs in my cooking and have found that serving a crisp rosé with a herb pesto risotto is just the ticket. It also works incredibly well with all types of grilled and roasted fish, white meats, vegetarian feasts and provides a refreshing complement to spicy food, such as a hot Thai curry, an Indian vindaloo or a spicy chili. A few years ago, I traveled in Europe with friends from California. During our peregrinations around the French countryside, we cooked and ate meals together in every pied-à-terre we stayed in. This nocturnal communal gathering always began with a platter of excellent gooey cheese procured from whatever local market we could find, a crunchy baguette or fougasse, a little pâté or rillettes and some rosé. This was de rigueur. This lovely ritual followed us back across the Atlantic, and when our motley crew got together, everyone brought rosé. We laughed every time, reminisced about the trip, caught up on the news about our kids, munched on a piece of cheese, and delighted in a glass of nostalgia—pink-tinged of course. Hopefully, we will be able to gather around the table and do the same again soon! RECIPES p50

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2021 | 49


PASC ALE BE ALE

Grilled Asparagus Salad

Recipes

Shaved Fennel and Radish Salad This is a simple yet very elegant, crisp and refreshing salad. It’s also quick and easy to prepare. I particularly like to serve this alongside grilled or roasted fish or as part of a vegetarian feast. MAKES 8 SERVINGS

4 medium-sized fennel bulbs, very thinly sliced, lengthwise, on a mandoline if possible

I have one of those cast-iron griddle pans that you can put on top of your stove. I never used it very much until a few years ago when I started to conquer my apprehension about grilling in general. I also had an aversion to schlepping and cleaning my underused barbecue that lived outside under a tree, so I thought I’d give this griddle thing a try. Why did I not do this before? It’s fantastic and so easy to use! Asparagus cooked this way somehow tastes even better. The little charred bits on the stalks are earthy tasting, yet the stalks retain their herbaceous qualities. This is now one of my favorite ways to prepare asparagus. If you have mastered your barbecue, you can, of course, grill them over hot coals too, but put them in a vegetable grill basket or pan; otherwise, they have the annoying habit of falling through the grill and getting overly singed. MAKES 8 SERVINGS

FOR THE SALAD 1 pound green asparagus, tips left whole; stems cut into 1 1 ⁄2 -inch pieces 1 pound white asparagus, tips left whole; stems peeled, then cut into 1 1 ⁄2 -inch pieces Olive oil Salt Black pepper 20–30 small Thai basil leaves 2 burrata, cut into eighths

10 radishes, ends trimmed then thinly sliced

FOR THE VINAIGRETTE

4 ounces crumbled feta

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 tablespoons finely chopped dill

1 tablespoon lemon juice

Salt

1 teaspoon white wine vinegar or champagne vinegar

Pepper

1 tablespoon finely chopped dill

FOR THE VINAIGRETTE

1 4

cup olive oil

Zest and juice of 1 lemon 2 teaspoons white wine vinegar or champagne vinegar

Place the fennel slices, side by side in a concentric pattern, on a large serving platter. You will not use all of the slices to cover the platter. Add any remaining fennel slices to the center of the platter. Arrange the radishes on top of the fennel. Scatter the feta and dill over the top. Season with salt and pepper. In a small bowl, whisk the vinaigrette ingredients together to form a smooth emulsion. Pour the vinaigrette over the salad when ready to serve.

50 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2021

1 teaspoon finely chopped chives

Place the asparagus in a shallow dish. Lightly drizzle with olive oil, and sprinkle with a generous pinch of salt and 8–10 grinds of black pepper. Shake the dish back and forth a few times to make sure the asparagus spears are coated. Place a cast-iron griddle on the stove over medium-high heat. Once it is hot, lay the asparagus stalks on the griddle and cook for 1½ minutes. Turn once and cook for another minute. The vegetables should still be bright green and al dente. Carefully remove the cooked asparagus and place them on a serving platter, arranged with tips pointing outwards like a giant flower. Dot the salad with basil leaves and burrata. In a small bowl, whisk all the vinaigrette ingredients to form an emulsion. Pour over the warm asparagus and serve.


MEDIABE27ALE PASCALE

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2021 | 51


PASCALE BE ALE

52 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2021


Raspberry Rose Panna Cotta MAKES 8 SERVINGS

1 teaspoon vegetable oil

cup milk

ounces powdered gelatin

1 2 1 4

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3 cups cream 1 tablespoon rose water

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1 tablespoon honey 2 tablespoons sugar

1 4

cup crème fraiche

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Very lightly oil the inside of eight small bowls. Place the milk in a large bowl and add the gelatin to it. Whisk together thoroughly so that the gelatin is fully dissolved in the milk. Place the cream, rose water, honey and sugar in a saucepan. Bring the mixture to a boil, stirring frequently to ensure that the honey has dissolved. As soon as the mixture boils, remove from the heat and let it cool for 5 minutes. Slowly incorporate the cream mixture into the milk mixture, whisking constantly. Add the crème fraiche and whisk again. Carefully pour the panna cotta mixture into the eight oiled bowls. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for a minimum of 2 hours. This dessert can be made the day before. To serve, carefully run a thin knife around the edge of each bowl. Place a small dessert plate over the bowl and invert it so that the panna cotta is now on the plate. Spoon some of the berry mixture over the panna cotta

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and serve. Repeat with each bowl. FOR THE BERRIES 1 tablespoon butter tifying

2 teaspoons sugar 1 teaspoon rose water

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6 ounces raspberries

Place the butter, sugar and rose water in a small sauté pan, placed over medium heat. Once the butter has melted, add in the raspberries and cook for 3 minutes, shaking the pan once or twice. Be careful to not overcook the berries. Pascale Beale grew up in England and France surrounded by a family that has always been passionate about food, wine and the arts. She was taught to cook by her French mother and grandmother. She is the author of The Menu for All Seasons, Salade II, Les Fruits and Les Legumes. Visit her website and blog: The Market Table at PascalesKitchen.com.

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SA NTA BARBA R A COUNT Y

SUPPORT LOC AL GUIDE Now more than ever, it’s important to seek out and support local businesses. Here is our guide of some of the current and past advertisers that we fully support and hope you will, too. Click on any of the websites for a direct link to get more information about what they offer and any updated hours of operation.

Winfield Farm 805 686-9312 www.WinfieldFarm.us Taste the magic of Winfield Mangalitsa! Mangalitsa ground pork (the real hamburger) and hickory-smoked bacon are now featured in the Larder Meat Company’s Larder Club meat box, delivered monthly throughout California (sign up at www.LarderMeatCo.com). You can also order through our Mangalitsa Market on the Winfield Farm website—please call first! Follow us on Facebook (WinfieldFarmBuellton), Twitter (@ WinfieldFarm.us) and Instagram (Winfield_Farm).

Food & Restaurants Ballard Inn & Gathering Table 2436 Baseline Ave., Ballard, 805 688-7770 www.BallardInn.com Elegant accommodations, attentive staff and awardwinning cuisine make the Ballard Inn & Gathering Table one of the most sought-after small luxury inns in the Santa Barbara Wine Country. Gathering Table open to the public Wed–Sun from 5–9pm.

Bob’s Well Bread 550 Bell St., Los Alamos, 805 344-3000 www.BobsWellBread.com Making bread the old-fashioned way: handcrafted in small batches with the finest ingredients and baked to perfection in a custom-built stone-deck oven. Drop in to taste what visitors and journalists are raving about as “worth the drive”—signature Pain au Levain, awardwinning artisanal breads, croissants and specialty pastries. All-day menu of made-to-order breakfast, lunch and weekly special dishes. Indoor-outdoor picturesque café. Thu–Mon 7am–6pm. Café closes at 3pm. Closed Tue and Wed.

temptations that are made from the highest-quality chocolate (Valrhona, Felchlin, Conexion, including small bean-to-bar artisans couverture) fresh local ingredients and exotic findings from their travels overseas. Covid-19 hours noon–4pm every day. Closed on Wednesday.

Il Fustino La Arcada 1100 State St. San Roque Plaza, 3401 State St., Santa Barbara, 805 845-3521 www.ilFustino.com Il Fustino is Santa Barbara’s first and finest olive oil and vinegar tasting room. Il Fustino purveys only the finest and freshest olive oils, all grown and milled in California. They also provide an unparalleled selection of artisan vinegars. San Roque Plaza: Open Mon–Sun 11am–5pm. La Arcada: Open Thu–Sun noon–4pm.

Pico 458 Bell St., Los Alamos, 805 344-1122 www.PicoLosAlamos.com

1618 Copenhagen Dr., Solvang, 805 691-9672 www.RamenKotori.com Mom-and-pop ramen shop offering farmers market– inspired Japanese dishes including traditional Shoyu ramen, Karaage Japanese fried chicken, gyoza pot stickers, kimchi fried rice and seasonal pickles.

Renaud’s Patisserie & Bistro 3315 State St., Santa Barbara, 805 569-2400 1324 State St., Santa Barbara, 805 892-280 1187 Coast Village Rd., Montecito, 805 324-4200 www.RenaudsBistro.com Renaud’s is a bakery specializing in French pastries and French-style cakes, as well as a bistro offering an extensive menu for breakfast and lunch. Open Mon– Sat 7am–5pm; Sun 7am–3pm.

Plow to Porch 805 895-7171 www.PlowToPorch.com Plow to Porch Organics is a local organic/pesticide-free produce and grocery delivery service to members who subscribe. They simplify the purchase of local fresh organic produce and other organic, local foods in order to inspire good nutrition, support local farmers, protect the environment and make eating healthy food fun! Subscriptions start at $22.50.

PureWild Co.

15 W. Gutierrez St., Santa Barbara, 805 965-5956 www.ChocolateMaya.com

www.PureWildCo.com

54 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2021

Ramen Kotori

Located in the historic 1880 General Store, offering a casual dining experience with innovative cuisine made from locally sourced ingredients. The extensive wine list has earned a Wine Enthusiast “Top 100 Wine Restaurant” award two years running. Open Tue– Thu 3–9pm; Fri–Sat noon–10pm; Sun Burger Night noon–9pm.

Chocolate Maya Chocolate Maya handmade chocolate confections: a variety of velvety truffles and chocolate-dipped

delicious way to better health. Available for purchase at Rainbow Bridge, Westridge Markets and Pacific Health Foods.

PureWild Marine Collagen Infusions combine organic juices like blueberry, lime and mango with wild harvested marine collagen and adaptogens for a

COLIN QUIRT

Farms & Ranches


Wine & Beer

Rhône-style wines. Tasting room and picnic area open daily 10am–4pm. Call for more information on winery tours and private event space.

Au Bon Climat 813 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, 805 963-7999 AuBonClimat.com

Specialty Retail

The tasting room and the Jim Clendenen Wine Library are known for world-class Chardonnays and Pinots, yet other varietals are available. Jim Clendenen has been making wines of vision and character for over 30 years. Amazing lineup of current releases and library wines on hand. Tasting room open Mon–Fri noon–6pm, Sat and Sun 11am–6pm. Outdoor wine tasting daily. Reservations recommended.

Blue Sky Body Care

Babi’s Beer Emporium

805 691-9106 www.EllaAndLouie.com

818 599-9119 www.BlueSkyBodyCare.com Hand-fashioned organics. Beyond soap, grey-water friendly, compostable packaging, fair-trade and handcrafted, yucca-based vegan.

ella & louie

Great beer. Impeccable selection. Great fun. Adventurous beer drinkers can discover unique, hardto-find craft beers, ciders and special projects—on tap or in bottle. Stay to have a bite from Dim Sama’s menu. Thu–Sat noon–7pm, Sun noon–6pm, Mon noon–4pm, Tue–Wed by appointment only.

Buttonwood Farm Winery 1500 Alamo Pintado Rd., Solvang, 805 688-3032 www.ButtonwoodWinery.com Since 1983, the vineyard and its award-winning wines have been hand-raised and hand-crafted with the goal of environmental responsibility. The vineyard now has 38,000 vines highlighted by Sauvignon Blanc and Cabernet Franc, along with small blocks of Semillon, Grenache Blanc, Chenin Blanc, Grenache, Syrah, Merlot, Malbec and Cabernet Sauvignon. Tasting daily by appointment 11am–3:30pm.

Casa Dumetz 388 Bell St., Los Alamos, 805 344-1900 www.CasaDumetzWines.com A boutique winery specializing in Rhône varietals crafted with premier Santa Barbara County fruit. Their wines are sold almost exclusively at their tasting room in historic Los Alamos and through their wine club. Thu–Sat noon–7pm, Sun noon–6pm, Mon noon–4pm, Tue–Wed by appointment only.

Flying Embers www.FlyingEmbers.com @FlyingEmbersBrew Flying Embers Hard Kombucha is an organic sugar-free and gluten-free beverage, brewed in an adaptogen root blend with live probiotics.

Foxen Vineyard & Winery 7600 Foxen Canyon Rd., Santa Maria 805 937-4251 www.FoxenVineyard.com The Foxen Boys’ winery and tasting room features Burgundian and Rhône-style wines. Visit the historic shack “Foxen 7200” for Italian and Bordeaux-style wines. Picnic tables and scenic views at both locations. Open daily by reservation.

Lafond Winery Vineyard: 6855 Santa Rosa Rd., Buellton, 805 688-7921 Funk Zone: 111 Yanonali St., Santa Barbara, 805 845-2020 www.LafondWinery.com Lafond Winery & Vineyards is the sister label to neighbor Santa Barbara Winery. With the first grapes belonging to Lafond Vineyards being planting in 1962, owner Pierre Lafond established the first commercial winery in Santa Barbara County. The Lafond label specializes in Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Syrah. Visit

C AROLE TOPALIAN

380 Bell St., Los Alamos, 805 344-1911 www.BabisBeerEmporium.com

the Funk Zone tasting room Sun–Thu 10am–6pm, Fri–Sat 10am–7pm or the vineyard in the Sta. Rita Hills 10am–5pm daily.

Margerum & Barden Tasting Room at the Hotel Californian, corner Winery Tasting Room, 59 Industrial Way, Buellton; 805 686-8500 www.MargerumWines.com Enjoy wine tasting, order from their menu, and stock up on provisions at the combined Margerum and Barden Tasting Room across the street from Hotel Californian in the Santa Barbara Funk Zone. Indoor and outdoor patio seating, with an indoor mezzanine that can host private events. Handcrafted Rhône varietal wines from Margerum Estate Vineyard and from grapes grown at top Santa Barbara County vineyards. All complemented with a simple fare menu—cheese and charcuterie, pizzas, paninis, salads and other foods to complement the wine. The winery in Buellton is open by appointment for wine tasting and winery tours.

Santa Barbara Winery 202 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara 805 963-3633 www.SBWinery.com Santa Barbara Winery is the oldest winery in Santa Barbara County. Established in 1962, Pierre Lafond pioneered the commercial vineyard business under the Santa Barbara Winery label in the Sta. Rita Hills. The winery and tasting room is located in Santa Barbara’s Funk Zone and is one of the only fully operating wineries of its kind in the urban district. Tasting room open Sun–Thu 10am–6pm, Fri–Sat 10am–7pm.

Taste of Sta. Rita Hills 2923 Grand Ave, Los Olivos, 805 688-1900 www.TasteOfStaRitaHills.com Taste of Sta. Rita Hills is the go-to store for unique Sta. Rita Hills and Central Coast wines, featuring hard-tofind wines by Sea Smoke, Paul Lato, Bonaccorsi and many others. They offer some of the best Pinot Noir and Chardonnay from the Central Coast.

Zaca Mesa Winery 6905 Foxen Canyon Rd., Los Olivos 805 688-9339 www.ZacaMesa.com Since 1973, Zaca Mesa Winery has crafted distinctive wines from their unique mesa-top vineyard. As an early pioneer of the region, they now have 150 acres planted, specializing in the production of estate-grown

Floral designer Tracey Morris has two great loves: flowers and people. Relying on more than 25 years of design experience, Morris helps clients celebrate their big occasions with exquisite and expressive floral arrangements. Ella & Louie produces a range of looks from classic elegant designs or brightly colored flower crowns to unusual yet stylish. Local delivery.

Professional Services American Riviera Bank 525 San Ysidro Rd., Montecito, 805-335-8110 www.AmericanRivieraBank.com 1033 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara 805 965-5942 www.AmericanRivieraBank.com Offering a local and sustainable approach to banking. The founders of American Riviera Bank are a carefully selected group of successful, prominent, experienced and influential community and business leaders who understand the unique needs of the Santa Barbara community. Montecito branch open Mon–Thu 9am–5pm; Fri 9am–5:30pm. Santa Barbara branch open Mon–Thu 8am–5pm, Fri 8am–6pm.

Blue Sky Biochar 818 599-9119 www.BlueSkyBiochar.com Garden and landscape design, edible gardens, living soil, food forests.

The Foodbank of Santa Barbara County 805 967-5741 www.FoodbankSBC.org Working every day to move people from hunger into health. The mission of the Foodbank is to provide nourishment to those in need by acquiring and distributing safe nutritious foods via local agencies and providing education to solve hunger and nutrition problems in Santa Barbara County. For information about their Covid-19 relief efforts, please visit https:// foodbanksbc.org/disasterrelief/.

SBCC Foundation 805 730-4401 www.SBCCFoundation.org The SBCC Foundation was established in 1976 to provide Santa Barbara City College with private philanthropic support. The foundation acts in partnership with the college and bridges the gap between available public funding and institutional need, as determined by the college leadership. The SBCC Foundation provides more than $4 million annually for student success programs, scholarships, book grants and other critical needs of the college in order to support SBCC students as they prepare for careers, transfer to four-year universities and pursue lifelong learning goals.

EdibleSantaBarbara.com SUMMER 2021 | 55


AS

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Summer’s

Don’t-Miss Dish Words and photos by Liz Dodder

Homemade (Popcorn) Ice Cream at

peasants FEAST

By now, we all know many Covid stories. The past year has brought immeasurable disruption, heartbreak and hard times, as well as surprising stories of survival, love and hope. In early March 2020, local chef and caterer Michael Cherney and his wife, Sarah, got the keys to the building that would become their new, family-run restaurant in Solvang. Then everything changed. As we all entered lockdown, the Cherneys’ plans—15 years in the making—were no longer valid. They made a decision: Their story would be of community and of love. Shifting immediately to a to-go business model, they opened their doors on April 1, 2020. Cherney’s menu at peasants FEAST is a product of many things: a stint at a Michelinstarred restaurant, experiences working farms and producing food, plus years of cooking and eating up and down the Central Coast. The menu was pared down during the pandemic, and the new dining room transformed into a homeschooling room for their two kids. Twelve-year-old Reina, an aspiring pastry chef with an affinity for ice cream, liked helping in the restaurant. She decided to try making a buttered popcorn ice cream, along with a growing list of other favorite flavors, and to offer them on the menu. Most of Reina’s ice cream flavors come straight from the farm: Peaches and cream from Buttonwood Farm, strawberry from Roots Farm, popcorn kernels from Finley Farms and mint from chefs’ home gardens. To prepare the popcorn ice cream, pop corn in a big stockpot with clarified butter. Heat 2 cups whole milk in a pan to a bare simmer, add 2 cups popped popcorn, cover and turn it off. Leave it until it’s room temperature, about 1 hour. Pour the mixture through a fine-mesh strainer. Return popcorn milk to the pan, add some butter and heat to medium. In a separate bowl, combine 3 egg yolks and 1/3 cup sugar; whisk until smooth. Add a cup of warmed popcorn milk to the egg mixture and whisk vigorously. Pour the mixture back into the pan with remaining popcorn milk. Heat to 165° whisking constantly. Strain it again, then refrigerate completely. Freeze according to ice cream maker directions. Serve with a little fleur de sel (sea salt). Liz Dodder is a drinker, eater and traveler who has eaten five kinds of foie gras in one day. She’s also a blogger, writer, photographer, recipe developer, web designer, social media maven and Certified Specialist of Wine (CSW). CaliCoastWineCountry.com

56 | EDIBLE SANTA BARBARA SUMMER 2021


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Spring 2009 / Number 1

SANTA BARBARA Celebrating the Food Culture of Santa Barbara County

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Summer 2009 / Number 2

SANTA BARBARA

Celebrating the Food Culture of Santa Barbara County

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Fall 2009 / Number 3

SANTA BARBARA Celebrating the Food Culture of Santa Barbara County

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Winter 2009 / Number 4

SANTA BARBARA Celebrating the Food Culture of Santa Barbara County

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ISSUE FIVE • SPRING 2010

SANTA BARBARA

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SANTA BARBARA

Celebrating the Food Culture of Santa Barbara County

Celebrating the Food Culture of Santa Barbara County

Sustainable Seafood Fairview Gardens A Culinary Journey The Pod Squad Whitcraft Winery

Heirloom Heaven Abalone Palmina Winery The Hidden Promise of Suburbia Food from the Hearth

Local Honeybees Culinary Bootcamp Edible Landscape Thanksgiving Santa Barbara Channel Seafood

Chocolate: From Cacao Bean to Confection Salmon A Seasonal Stew Endless Pastabilities

Eggs Backyard Chickens Beekeeping Salt: The Essential Ingredient Artichokes Community-Supported Agriculture

Member of Edible Communities

Member of Edible Communities

Member of Edible Communities

Member of Edible Communities

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

ISSUE SIX • SUMMER 2010

Wine Caves: Down to Earth Stone Fruit Recycling Edible Flowers MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

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ISSUE SEVEN • FALL 2010

SANTA BARBARA

Celebrating the Food Culture of Santa Barbara County

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ISSUE 8 • WINTER 2010 MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

SANTA BARBARA

Celebrating the Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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ISSUE 9 • SPRING 2011 MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

SANTA BARBARA

Celebrating the Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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ISSUE 10 • SUMMER 2011 MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

SANTA BARBARA Celebrating the Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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ISSUE 11 • FALL 2011 MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

SANTA BARBARA Celebrating the Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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ISSUE 12 • WINTER 2011 MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

SANTA BARBARA Celebrating the Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

ISSUE 13 • SPRING 2012

Santa Barbara Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Where’s the

An Interview with

One of TIME magazine’s “100 most influential people of 2010” talks to us about his garden, cooking and his upcoming lecture in Santa Barbara

Croissants!

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ISSUE 14 • SUMMER 2012

Santa Barbara Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Unsung Heroes

Bob and Ellie Patterson’s Artisanal Gelato and Sorbet

Salt of the Sea Sorrel and Rhubarb The Rituals of a Meal

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Lompoc Wine Ghetto Culinary Lavender Pasta and Water

Pistachio Harvest La Huerta Mission Gardens Farmer to Table

Biodynamics

Nothing Like Chocolate The Lazy Gardener

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ISSUE 16 • WINTER 2012

Santa Barbara Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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ISSUE 17 • SPRING 2013

Santa Barbara Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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ISSUE 18 • SUMMER 2013

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

EAT DRINK

Eating in Los Alamos Market Walk with Patricia Perfect Picnics

Sauvignon Blanc Coffee: Grown in Goleta Eating Acorns

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

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ISSUE 21 • SPRING 2014

Giannfranco’s Trattoria Culinary Inspirations Edible Mushrooms

For Love of Pinot The Art in Artisan Bread Zaca University

Santa Maria-Style Barbecue Lompoc Beans Ice Cream

Regenerative Earth Farms Aquaponics Exotic Edible Trees

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

Santa Barbara Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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ISSUE 22 • SUMMER 2014

Santa Barbara Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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ISSUE 23 • FALL 2014

Santa Barbara Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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ISSUE 24 • WINTER 2014

Santa Barbara Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Guerilla Brewing and Feral Fermentation

WINE & BREAD ISSUE

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

Santa Barbara

ISSUE

COOKS ISSUE

Funk Zone

ISSUE 20 • WINTER 2013

LIVING BEER

LOCAL T HE BE L LY OF T HE

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ISSUE 19 • FALL 2013

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

THE

Eating Daylilies

Diving for California Gold Fish on Friday Fisherman’s Market MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

ISSUE 15 • FALL 2012

Santa Barbara

Almonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend

of the Harvest

Renaud’s Patisserie & Bistro

Wild Yeast Bread Profound Pairings A Passion for Spices

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

Winter Blossoms

Scoop?

Michael Pollan Grass-Fed Beef In the Kitchen with Bradley Ogden What the Kids Are Growing Canning Farmers Market

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

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ISSUE 25 • SPRING 2015

Santa Barbara

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ISSUE 26 • SUMMER 2015

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

The COOKS Issue

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

ISSUE 27 • FALL 2015

Santa Barbara Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

EAT DRINK

LOCAL ISSUE EAT DRINK

5 YEAR

LOCAL

Anniversary Issue

The New Solvang The Thrill of the Grill All Aboard to Carpinteria

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

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The COOKS Issue

ISSUE

The Art of Small Farming Tending Henry The Perfect Salad

The Season for Persimmons Eating Lotus Santa Maria Agriculture

Fine Chocolate Solvang’s Kringle and Crown Do Your Kids Cook?

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

ISSUE 28 • WINTER 2015

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ISSUE 29 • SPRING 2016

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Gaviota Wine Without Water Home Off The Range Grunion

The Shrimping Life Unleashing the Yeast Savoring Wildlands

E AT • D R I N K • R E A D • T H I N K

E AT • D R I N K • R E A D • T H I N K

E AT • D R I N K • R E A D • T H I N K

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ISSUE 30 • SUMMER 2016

Santa Barbara

Santa Barbara

Strawberries: A Love Story The Pig Next Door Decorative Eggs

MEMBER OF EDIBLE COMMUNITIES

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ISSUE 31 • FALL 2016

Santa Barbara Celebrating the Local Food and Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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ISSUE 32 • WINTER 2017

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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ISSUE 33 • SPRING 2017

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

ISSUE 34 • SUMMER 2017

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Harvest

& Holiday ISSUE

The

Building

Issue

Communities

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY

Farm

ISSUE

Food

COOKS

GUIDE

SPECIAL INSERT

Interwoven: Santa Maria In Search of Masa Chef Justin West

The Tiny Mess A Big Taste of a Small Town No Cider House Rules

Santa Maria AVA The Channel Islands Eyes On Hives Girls Inc.

The Papaya Man Santa Ynez AVA Cottage Industry

The Fervor for Fermentation Year of the Rooster The Apiary

A Passion for Peaches Happy Canyon AVA The Beer Trail

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ISSUE 35 • FALL 2017

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Harvest & Holiday

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Bringing the Homestead

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Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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Renewal and Rebuilding

Renewal and Rebuilding

Cookbooks: Culinary Journeys Teach Kids to Cook Blue Sky Center in Cuyama

A Love Letter to Los Olivos From Grape to Great Winemaking Takes a Journey

Barbara County in this Issue A Love LetterSanta to Los Olivos From Grape Farm to GreatGuide Winemaking Takes a Journey

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Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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Harvest & Holiday ISSUE

Urchin

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Santa Barbara & Wine Country

Heirloom Green Corn Frittata and Her Cousins Earth to Table Mistaken Identity

Funghi e la Cucina Italiana Talking Shiitake Jetsetter of the Vines Comfort Food

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Santa Barbara & Wine Country

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Santa Barbara & Wine Country

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Sustainability Issue

Cooks

San Ysidro Ranch

Meyer Lemon Tart at the Stonehouse

Wishful Recycling Wine Trailblazers A Beer in Every Kitchen Noey Turk T E N

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I Sea Olives Drinking the Landscape Everything But the Bird Dry Hopped Wine T E N

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S anta B arbara Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Ten Glasses C el eb r a t i n g Ten Yea r s

A Sicilian Christmas Reverie Loyal to the Soil Fairview Gardens

Santa Barbara

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

ISSUE ISSUE 40 41 •• WINTER SPRING 2019

Wine Issue

Local Sea

Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

Santa Barbara

Celebrating the Local Food & Wine Culture of Santa Barbara County

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ISSUE 40 • WINTER 2019

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In Search of

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Home

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Julia Child in Santa Barbara A Trio of Chef Memories Demystifying the Sommelier L O Y A L

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Julia Child in Santa Barbara A Trio of Chef Memories Demystifying the Sommelier LOYAL

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Gather. Nurture. Feed. Repeat. From Garden to Breadboard Baking Bread with Wild Yeast A Taste of Macedonia in Los Alamos Building a Better Meat System L O Y A L

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Sustainability & Wine

Finding Solutions to Food Waste

Rosé: Life Seen Through Pink Colored Glasses L O YA L

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The Birds & The Beef Day Trippin’

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Thank you, Santa Barbara County for all your support! If you would like to be in our Fall 2021 issue, please email us at ads@EdibleSantaBarbara.com

Heirloom Green Corn Frittata and Her Cousins Earth to Table Mistaken Identity T E N

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T h e O l d e s t C o m m e r c i a l W i n e ry i n S a n ta B a r b a r a C o u n t y F A M I L Y O W N E D & O P E R AT E D S I N C E 19 6 2

Lafond Winery & Vine yards

Santa Barbara Winery

T H A N K Y O U T O O U R S A N TA B A R B A R A C O U N T Y C O M M U N I T Y & F R I E N D LY V I S I T O R S F O R Y O U R S U P P O R T we’d like to extend our sincere gratitude for the support & friendship of the santa barbara community & our loyal wine club members over the years. w e a re h o n o re d t o b e p a r t o f t h i s s p e c i a l c o m m u n i t y.

P I E R R E L A F O N D . D AV I D L A F O N D . M I C H E L L E L A F O N D

S A N TA B A R B A R A W I N E RY S A N TA B A R B A R A F U N K Z O N E TA S T I N G R O O M & W I N E R Y @ S A N TA B A R B A R A W I N E R Y | S A N TA B A R B A R A | 8 0 5 . 9 6 3 . 3 6 3 3 W W W . S B W I N E R Y. C O M

L A F O N D W I N E RY & V I N E YA R D S W I N E R Y & V I N E YA R D S I N S TA . R I TA H I L L S 6 8 5 5 S A N TA R O S A R O A D , B U E L LT O N | 8 0 5 . 6 8 8 . 7 9 2 1

S A N TA B A R B A R A F U N K Z O N E TA S T I N G R O O M @LAFONDWINERY | 805.845.2020

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