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23 November 2020 | Vol. 99 No. 19

Creating and delivering powerful PLD opportunities Celebrating our teacher workforce

Iwi online portal connects learners

Integrating mindfulness into learning


I wonder how we can ignite creativity in young Kiwis?

The Wonder Project is a free programme for schools, designed to get young Kiwis excited about science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM). With each of the Wonder Project Challenges, schools are supported by industry professionals who help inspire kids to see the wonder in STEM.

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This issue:

Spotlight on teacher workforce Editor’s note Covid-19 has affected so many aspects of teaching and learning this year, including the way teachers access professional learning and development. Many conferences and courses have been postponed or delivered differently and in many cases, PLD had to take a back seat while teachers’ first priority was grappling with the more immediate challenges of lockdown and distance learning. So it was inspiring to speak to a Christchurch teacher who took a different approach to PLD, producing a series of podcasts on a range of relevant and engaging topics on his return to school. The podcasts were aimed to provide PLD opportunities for his Kāhui Ako colleagues; however, there is scope for a nationwide series. PLD is a key focus of this issue, as is our teacher workforce. We share the experiences of a number of teachers who have taken different pathways into teaching. Next year the Education Gazette turns 100! We are looking forward to marking this milestone by looking back at education over the past 100 years. If you have any historical photos or video footage from your school, kura or early learning centre that you would like to share with us for our centenary content, please get in touch at gazette@education.govt.nz.

2 Accessing PLD by podcast

14 Beginning teacher motivated to make a difference

22 Cook Islands schools benefit from PLD support

23 November 2020 | Vol. 99 No. 19

On the cover

Creating and delivering powerful PLD opportunities Celebrating our teacher workforce

Iwi online portal connects learners

P2. Christchurch teacher, Joseph Houghton, has developed a podcast series which offers an innovative way of delivering PLD.

Integrating mindfulness into learning

6

10

Back on home soil

16

Gateway to identity and hope

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Te Kura programmes expanded to support ākonga in Auckland

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Talanoa Ako - learning and talking about education

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Mā ngā akoranga ahumoni hou ki te reo Māori ngā ākonga Māori e tautoko ki te NCEA

Teach First NZ in action

Regulars

28 Integrating mindfulness into learning

32

35

Notices

40

Vacancies

New PLD priorities set to start moving

Key contacts

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View us online

Reporter Joy Stephens reporter@edgazette.govt.nz

Education Gazette is published for the Ministry of Education by NZME. Educational Media Ltd. PO Box 200, Wellington.

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ISSN 0111 1582

The deadline for vacancies and notices to be printed in the 7 December 2020 edition of Education Gazette is 4pm on Friday 27 November 2020.

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TUKUTUKU KŌRERO  23 November 2020

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PLD

Accessing PLD by podcast A Christchurch teacher has produced 16 podcasts with diverse voices to make professional learning and development (PLD) easy to access for his Kāhui Ako.

Joseph began his podcast series with the purchase of a microphone and some audio editing software.

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PLD

T

eacher Joseph Houghton is director of Māori and Pacific Achievement at Shirley Boys’ High school and an across school lead for Ōtākaro Kāhui Ako, which includes seven schools and 13 early childhood centres in east and north Christchurch. The father of five is also doing a PhD on empowering Pacific voice in secondary education in Christchurch and has close ties to the University of Canterbury. Prior to the nationwide school closures, the Ōtākaro Kāhui Ako had partnered with the University and Ara: Institute of Canterbury with plans to deliver a Kāhui Ako conference, which has now been postponed until mid-2021. “We were looking for a new and innovative way to deliver PLD for our staff to connect with. While podcasts aren’t new, I did a bit of research online and I couldn’t find any Kāhui Ako podcasts. We’d thought let’s try to get a podcast episode out before lockdown. “We were literally in the recording studio about to push record on an episode when the Prime Minister announced Level 4. We had 48 hours to sort ourselves out so we canned the podcast. Over the lockdown period with my family, I did a lot of research in terms of listening to podcasts and getting myself informed on how they are structured and how they run,” he says.

Relevant voices Joseph taught himself how to use the audio editing software, Adobe Audition, and formulated a plan for his return to school. With a store-bought microphone, he began interviewing people face to face or via Zoom meetings. The first podcast episode was about Māori and Pacific voices in lockdown learning, featuring Tufulasi Taleni from the University of Canterbury and Dr Melanie Riwai-Couch, who was working for Evaluation Associates, now sponsors of the podcast series: Ōtākaro Kōrero. “As soon as we got access back to school, I recorded the first episode which was around how our Māori and Pacific families were going through lockdown. I wanted it to be relevant: that episode is still interesting.

I wanted our teachers to be able to have a sense of how our Māori and Pacific families were going and how they had gone during lockdown and how they had found the learning,” explains Joseph. Expertise and talent were sourced from friends, colleagues and academics and, in one case, an expert Joseph saw on Breakfast TV. “Dr Daniel Hikuroa had been on Breakfast TV. They were talking about Mātauranga Māori and his work and so I contacted Dan via Linked In and asked him if he would be interested in having a conversation and recording a podcast for our teachers. He was very keen. Episode 12 features him and is about being the best teacher of science for Māori students. “I’ve tried to give different people a chance to offer their voice, so we have interviewed teachers, principals, professors, students – there’s a real variety. In general, I’ve never had anyone turn me down. I’ve asked 16 people, we’ve had 16 podcasts and we’ve got about 10 in the bank either being recorded in the near future, or planned.”

Cutting-edge PLD For the past five months, Joseph and his colleagues have produced approximately one podcast episode every one to two weeks, focusing mostly on culturally responsive practice, as well as literacy and wellbeing. Topics include: Listening to Māori and Pacific whānau voice; Being the best teachers of English for Māori and Pacific students; Hauora – being an upstander; and Wellbeing perspectives. “We have tried to connect with evidence based, practical and cutting-edge people, to produce relevant and exciting content. “My philosophy with anything like this, is looking for 50 per cent from within our Kāhui Ako and 50 per cent beyond. We are celebrating our professionals, staff, even some of our students, families and communities, but also stretching ourselves to go beyond what we are experiencing, so we’re not only inward looking, but also outward looking,” he says.

Discussing the Teaching Council’s Professional Standards for a podcast with Maria Lemalie, assistant principal at Shirley Boys’ High School.

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PLD

The podcasts are geared to teachers in the Ōtākaro Kāhui Ako and in Christchurch. Joseph says says a Kāhui Ako podcast offers an opportunity to contextualise PLD needs that are relevant to a particular area. He hopes that other teachers in the area will host their own podcasts.

Nationwide potential But Joseph also believes there is potential for a New Zealand-wide podcast series. The most popular episode to date was an interview with a teacher from Naenae College in Wellington: ‘Being the best teachers of English for Māori and Pacific students’. “I’d seen something a friend had posted during lockdown about teaching his Māori and Pacific kids and I thought this would be a great podcast. That episode (episode 4) has had more than 100 downloads.

“We have tried to connect with evidence based, practical and cutting-edge people, to produce relevant and exciting content.” Joseph Houghton “We did one episode on the Ministry of Education’s Talanoa Ako app which is going to benefit Pacific families nationwide. Looking at the episodes we have done to date, I don’t see anything that will be limited to our local context. “There might be one or two questions within a podcast about how to do something within the context of living in Christchurch. I would be asking questions with my own schools in mind, whereas a Kāhui Ako in Auckland will have different questions around what teachers and students can do within the context of living in Auckland.” With more than 700 downloads to date, Joseph and his Kāhui Ako colleagues are on a roll. Coming up, there are more podcasts in the pipeline including: a school’s journey in engaging more with tikanga Māori and an interview with a Pākehā history teacher who is passionate about supporting Māori students. Closer to home, Joseph plans to interview Maria Lemale, assistant principal at Shirley Boys’ High School, about how she brings the Teaching Council’s professional standards to life with her teachers. “Not every podcast will push every teacher’s buttons, but some of our principals have said they listen when they go to the gym in the morning, some listen on the commute to school, others have shared it with staff and will use it to start a conversation,” says Joseph. The Ōtākaro Kōrero podcast series can be accessed via Apple or Spotify and can be found at otakaro-korero.simplecast.com.

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Teacher Kōrero Q: What do you like most about listening to a podcast for PLD? What are the pros and cons of this mode of delivery? A: I really like that we are able to share relevant learning with staff and we can engage with it at a time that works for us.

Q: Do you think the topics to date are relevant to you? A: The topics have been excellent, there has been a lot of great content around culturally responsive practice. I think this is really topical for all staff.

Q: Which podcast was of most interest to you and why? A: I enjoyed the tenth episode of the Ōtākaro Kōrero podcast where I was introduced to the Talanoa Ako app which is designed to support Pacific families and their child’s educational journey. The app includes a wealth of information about time management, NCEA, literacy and career pathways. It also allows families to set educational goals for themselves and create a plan for their children. This was something that I have been able to pass on to our community.

Andrew Barker, Principal, Waitākiri Primary School Q: What do you like most about listening to a podcast for PLD? What are the pros and cons of this mode of delivery? A: What I enjoy about the Ōtākaro Kōrero podcast series is that it offers a wide range of topics in a format that can be accessed anywhere. I can listen on my commute to and from school, when out walking, etc. The only con that I can think of is that I am unable to ask questions that might deepen or settle my understanding of the topics being discussed.

Q: Do you think the topics to date are relevant to you? A: So far the topics have been really relevant. As teachers we should all be aiming to develop our understanding of teaching in a culturally responsive manner, so this topic has been particularly interesting and important. As wellbeing comes more to the fore alongside culturally responsive practice (these two are really intertwined) this has also been relevant.

Q: Which podcast was of most interest to you and why? A: One recent episode has been Growing Culturally Responsive Practice. Although for primary, there were still lots of takeaways which can be applied to other levels of teaching. Particularly that the teacher is not separate from the student, but both are part of the learning environment. It is not teacher vs student, but rather both are involved in creating an environment where learning happens.

Peter Beswick, teacher, Shirley Boys’ High School Q: What do you like most about listening to a podcast for PLD? What are the pros and cons of this mode of delivery? A: The podcasts have been a great way to delve a little deeper into issues that have been raised or introduced during professional learning workshops. I enjoy the ability to listen to these podcasts at a time that is convenient to me. Another aspect of these podcasts that I have found really worthwhile, is the range of presenters. It is always great to hear from both educational academics and those at the chalkface.

Q: Do you think the topics to date are relevant to you? A: All of the topics revolve around the Kāhui Ako achievement challenges so they do hold a large amount of relevance for our learning community. I personally find the podcasts about current educational research very useful indeed. Learning about current research, via podcast, makes the information digestible. I have enjoyed the opportunity to hear from educational researchers as this helps to bridge the gap between research and practice.

Q: Which podcast was of most interest to you and why? A: I really enjoyed the podcast about the latest research around reading interventions. This is a highly topical issue that is facing our society. I really enjoyed hearing how researchers’ findings can have a significant impact on classroom practice.

Lisa MacKay, teacher, Avonside Girls’ High School

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Joseph plans an episode on values with Pete Beswick, Wellbeing Lead at Shirley Boys’ High School.

“I’ve tried to give different people a chance to offer their voice, so we have interviewed teachers, principals, professors, students ....” Joseph Houghton

OneSchool Global

F

inding the time or financial support to undertake professional development is an ongoing challenge for educators. Yet, there has never been a more important time for educators to be equipped for success in an increasingly digital world.

As a school at the forefront of innovation in teaching and learning, OneSchool Global New Zealand (formerly Westmount School) recognises the importance of professional development for its educators. "We have a culture of innovation here. Between our self-directed learning framework, and the way we embrace technology in our learning and teaching, we know we do things differently to many other schools," said Jenni Dittmer,

Equipping Educators for Success OneSchool Global NZ's Teacher Academy Director. "As a result, we know we need to invest in our educators to equip them to be successful." OneSchool Global NZ operates an in­ house Teacher Academy, which provides free ongoing training and development programmes to staff. The Teacher Academy programme includes courses in Self-Directed Learning; Thinking for Learning; Aspiring Leadership; Coaching for Success and Engaging Digital Learners. To further support professional development, educators at OneSchool Global New Zealand are also provided with 1.5 hours of professional development time every Wednesday afternoon. And, with 17 campuses in

New Zealand and over 125 campuses globally, OneSchool Educators are afforded a range of opportunities to interact with a global network of teaching peers. Looking ahead to 2021, OneSchool Global New Zealand has a range of teaching positions available across New Zealand. "We look to recruit and develop educators who are passionate, inspirational, warm and who model a love of learning," said Jenni Dittmer. "Additionally, working for an organisation that values innovation, means we are also looking for teachers who have a growth mindset, who are team players and who can solve problems - we need teachers who are life-long learners themselves."

To find out more about employment opportunities with OneSchool Global NZ, visit

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TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 23 November 2020

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RETURNING TEACHERS

Back on home soil Teachers return to Aotearoa Returning to New Zealand after teaching overseas has given Matthew Easterbrook and Holly Pears new perspectives on how to connect with students and highlighted the positive aspects of life for teachers here.

After three years teaching in the Cook Islands, Matthew was ready to return to teaching in New Zealand.

Holly is pleased to be back teaching in New Zealand after teaching abroad.

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RETURNING TEACHERS

A

fter three years as head of the Science faculty at Tereora College, the national college of the Cook Islands, Matthew Easterbrook and his family decided it was time to return home. They swapped the Cook Islands for Christchurch, where Matthew is now Assistant Head of Science and Head of Biology at Burnside High School. Matthew had taught for several years in New Zealand before their prior move to the Cook Islands and this held him in good stead, with NCEA being the main secondary qualification there too. He speaks positively of his time in the Cook Islands, noting he misses the climate while also commenting on the impact his time there had on his cultural understanding. “Culturally it’s quite different,” he says. “There’s almost more respect, but in a different way. It took a while for the students to warm up to me but it really showed the value of teacher-student relationships.” Matthew’s adjustment back to life in Aotearoa did take some time, but he feels he is starting to get there. “I thought the size of the school might be an issue but it wasn’t so bad, though coming into a bigger department was a bit of a challenge. I’ve gone from a department with six teachers to one with more than 20!” One thing that did assist Matthew and his family with their return to New Zealand was the Overseas Relocation Grant (ORG).

“It really helped with getting through the first few months,” he explains. “Financially it can be quite harsh moving countries but getting the grant was straightforward and prompt – even though some of my application was still being processed during lockdown.” Phil Holstein, Matthew’s principal at Burnside, was quick to agree that the grant is beneficial in bringing people to New Zealand to teach. “It is a wonderful way of assisting teachers to come back to New Zealand, or for beginning teachers to move within New Zealand,” says Phil. “It gives them the confidence and support to make a significant change. For our schools, it is a great resource that enables us to get quality staff.” The jandals and t-shirts for work might be things of the past but Matthew still draws on the lessons he learned in the Cook Islands. “Teaching overseas only enhances your teaching practice when you return,” explains Matthew. “When you come back you have that experience you can apply in a New Zealand context.” “Teaching and living in the Cook Islands gave me a greater appreciation for Pacific cultures and people – the sort of thing only first-hand experience can provide. I can identify with students as individuals more than I could previously and it just reaffirmed how having those relationships is so important.”

“Teaching overseas only enhances your teaching practice when you return. When you come back you have that experience you can apply in a New Zealand context.” Matthew Easterbrook

Matthew found the Overseas Relocation Grant helpful with his return to teaching in New Zealand. gazette.education.govt.nz

TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 23 November 2020

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RETURNING TEACHERS

Holly’s story Holly Pears is another New Zealand-trained teacher who has returned home recently. Holly teaches at Fergusson Intermediate School in Upper Hutt, where she is also a specialist in Performing Arts. Holly had been further away than Matthew, having been teaching at an international school in Egypt (and the UK before that) prior to returning in mid-2019. Her adjustment to teaching in a New Zealand context was a bit more of a challenge, as she had to unlearn some of the very resultsfocused ways of doing things from her previous schools and didn’t have much prior teaching experience in Aotearoa to fall back on. “I really wanted to come back, which was super helpful,” she says. “I’ve appreciated how The New Zealand Curriculum gives you more freedom to plan and teach. Previously I seemed to just be following what other people had planned. It’s nice to be trusted to teach.” She also appreciates the way her school values her as an individual too. “Who you are is a priority and is important – things weren’t always like that overseas,” she says.

Holly heard about the ORG through a friend and said it helped with settling back into life in Aotearoa. “Setting yourself up when you’ve only got a suitcase is hard. It really helps to help get established again,” she explains. Holly’s principal at Fergusson Intermediate, Simon Kenny, notes how challenging recruitment can be for schools. Pre-Covid, they would get a lot of overseas applications, and the quality of those applications would often be mixed, says Simon. “It is important for us that the teachers we employ are familiar with The New Zealand Curriculum and our kids,” he explains. The ORG can help with getting high quality applicants. “It is an advantage to have some support with this,” Simon says. Holly notices similar benefits to Matthew as she reflects on how her time overseas has helped her back in New Zealand. Teaching in the UK and Egypt gave her “more of a global perspective and greater cultural awareness”. “I feel like you can empathise with kids more authentically than if you’ve only been in one place. It’s completely different when you go elsewhere and see people from different backgrounds.”

Relocation grant available for eligible teachers who moved within New Zealand The Domestic Relocation Grant (DRG) is a new initiative designed to support early learning services, schools and kura to get qualified teachers and kaiako to those places and in those subjects most needed. The DRG supplements the Overseas Relocation Grant and recognises that sourcing new teachers and kaiako from overseas is currently challenging due to measures necessary to control the transmission of COVID-19. A returning teacher or kaiako, or a beginning teacher who is moving within Aotearoa New Zealand to fill a teaching vacancy, may be eligible for reimbursement of up to $5,000 (GST inclusive) for actual incurred relocation costs. Please refer to the Internal Revenue’s list of eligible expenses before starting the application. Expenses that are not on the list will not be reimbursed. For each expense claimed, please upload a matching PDF copy of each receipt or invoice that shows clear evidence of the expense description and amount. Bank statements cannot be accepted as evidence of expenditure. Go to teachnz.govt.nz for more information, including eligibility criteria and the application process.

Holly says her experience teaching abroad has given her greater cultural awareness.

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RETURNING TEACHERS

Holly is a teacher and performing arts specialist at Fergusson Intermediate School.

Burnside High School principal Phil Holstein (right) says the Overseas Relocation Grant helps bring teachers like Matthew (left) back to New Zealand.

“I’ve appreciated how The New Zealand Curriculum gives you more freedom to plan and teach.” Holly Pears

You inspire your students. Who inspires you? As a teacher, you know the learning never stops. A life-long learner is who you are, and it’s what you’re inspiring in your students. So, what is your next learning adventure? Where are you heading? What are your ambitions? SCNC7488

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www.canterbury.ac.nz TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 23 November 2020

9


IWI LEADERSHIP

A Year 11 student at Te Kura o Kokohuia participating in a blended reality workshop.

I

n 2017, Ngaa Rauru launched an online portal which can be accessed by tribal members and 10 schools and education providers in the rohe – tribal land which stretches between Patea and Whanganui. The Iwi education priorities encompass maatauranga (education from external sources) and moohiotanga (knowledge from within the Iwi) and include whakapapa (identity), tuupuna koorero (stories handed down) and te ao hurihuri (the modern world). Te Kooiwi-roa is an online resource, which has seen 925 online views since December 2019, says Ngaa Rauru education coordinator, Ngareta Patea.

“The online portal was designed using local Maaori research and Iwi members’ expertise. The entrance to the portal is a wharepuni adorned with tukutuku panels: the tukutuku designs come from the 12 active marae across Ngaa Rauru,” she says. Ngareta explains there’s a matrix approach to each of the whenu (content strands) in the panels, which overlap.

Gateway to identity and hope

“If you click into any one of those panels, you will be able to access the Iwi content resources that we have developed so far. We’ve got a number of ebooks, videos, compilations and have also provided an array of material packaged as unit plans. While the unit plan might talk about the environment (te taiao), it actually covers quite a number of the moohiotanga and the whenu,” she says.

A virtual wharepuni with tukutuku panels which are portals to the stories and knowledge of Ngaa Rauru Kiitahi, is just the beginning of the vision of the south Taranaki Iwi to nurture and develop the potential of its people.

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IWI LEADERSHIP

Buy-in from schools Apart from two koohanga reo and two Maaori medium kura just outside the tribal boundaries, Te Kooiwi-roa is also being used by kura auraki (English-medium) schools which have agreed to embed the Ngaa Rauru curriculum into their school’s curriculum and engage an Iwi expert (pouako) to help with facilitation and delivery of the learning. “We went to every education centre throughout Ngaa Rauru tribal rohe to discuss whether or not they want to ‘buy in’ to this. The portal was absolutely free for them and they could purchase any of the tactile resources at cost,” says Ngareta. She says the unit plans provided for teachers offer a haakari/platter for them to choose from. “There are some options and ideas about how the content links back to our whenu, and it also connects to The New Zealand Curriculum.”

Spring of knowledge Ngareta gives the example of an inquiry study completed by Whenuakura School near Patea, which used ideas and resources from the online portal, tactile resources and activities developed by the Iwi, and Iwi experts. “The school has been doing a study around the waterways up at Wai o Turi Marae on the southern side of the Patea River. There’s an untouched puna (spring), so the whole school went to the marae and were guided and facilitated through some learning with the local kuia. “They used resources from the online portal and took the opportunity to work with one of our Iwi pouako to help focus

on the curriculum intent of that school. They had access to our Iwi-developed resources such as board books, flash cards, taonga aa iwi, traditional Maaori instruments, poipiu, ebooks, posters, kono and a range of unit plans to support teaching practices. “These reaffirm the learning, the resource materials and ebooks that are available online as well, “ explains Ngareta. Following their marae stay, Whenuakura School principal Kat Haerewa wrote: “This inquiry topic explores its connections within the community. A visit to Wai o Turi Marae last term provided an excellent introduction to the unit of work. This overnight stay forged an ongoing relationship between Wai o Turi and Whenuakura School; a relationship fostered over the generations and reinforced in this exchange. “The tamariki learned about the marae and about Paarara ki te Uru, the local puna. Each term, they will learn about a different part of the history and the environment of the marae. In term 3 they were also invited to visit Whenuakura Marae, to learn about the connections between Whenuakura and Wai o Turi.”

Augmented reality projects The Iwi has partnered with Christchurch research and development company JIX Ltd to develop the portal and is currently discussing concepts around different ways to use digital technologies to share Iwi content. For example, Ngareta shares that she is from a small marae called Kai Iwi in the Ngaa Rauru rohe. “When I was growing up, I was involved in weaving tukutuku panels. My dad, the late William Rakeipoho Bennett, his younger sister and older brother were traditional Maaori arts and crafts practitioners. We were involved in

the building of a dining room, Te Ririno o te Rangi, at Kai Iwi marae. “We are talking to JIX about the possibility of a virtual tour of our wharepuni and wharekai, with my father as an avatar: welcoming people into the dining room because he ran the kitchen and we were his workers. “A virtual tour would allow you to walk through the doorway, and be greeted by a number of tukutuku panels; so creating an opportunity for elearners to virtually touch the panels, and hear their stories,” she says. A number of co-design waananga or workshops have recently been held by Te Kaahui o Rauru Iwi Development Team, who engaged with each of the three marae clusters (paahuki) of the Iwi. “Those hui have just finished and debriefs provided around our Iwi priorities and where education sits within that. For our Iwi, education doesn’t stand alone; it’s coupled with a whole range of different things: environment, economic development and this year it has been about our hauora due to the recent Covid-19 raahui, and will remain so for a while.”

Potential and hope The online portal, Te Kooiwi-roa, offers content and resources for a range of people at various levels and aims to help tamariki mokopuna through to matua (adult) learners achieve their potential, says Ngareta. “This is ako using those resources starting from koohanga reo, early childhood centres, beginners in mainstream schools to middle and secondary schools, where they could use these as another pathway forward that looks at inquiry learning. “The inquiry learning component will help individual learners think more broadly about what that means for them, how they connect

“The online portal was designed using local Maaori research and Iwi members’ expertise.” Ngareta Patea

Ngareta Patea.

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IWI LEADERSHIP

to where they come from; and the sorts of conversations they could be having in their own communities.” Ngaa Rauru has been working with the Ministry of Education across a number of projects for many years, including developing an education strategy called HOPE MAAKU (HOPE= Helping our people excel) to support the ongoing development of tribal members. “There are a whole range of reasons for this, when I think about providing opportunities that are centred around what we believe is intrinsic to growing our people to thrive and excel. It’s around partnering, local investment decisions, planning that enables Maaori learners to succeed as Maaori, and to continually realise, attain and celebrate Iwi potential. “We want to provide opportunities for all tamariki mokopuna and rangatahi, not just Iwi learners,” explains Ngareta.

Future thinking Augmented reality projects will be part of Te Kura i Huna, the Iwi school of excellence, which has been outlined in the Te Kura o Rauru Education Framework. Of the 7,549 total learners affiliated with Ngaa Rauru Iwi, only 1.7 per cent (128 learners) attend schools within their rohe. They wish to establish Te Kura i Huna on a digital platform mai i te koopae kii Rangiaatea (from womb to heaven), to enable their uri (descendants) access to an Iwi-led education on a digital platform across the education pathway, no matter where they live. “We have been working alongside JIX to help us develop the next phase of sharing our moohiotanga: Te Kura i Huna. We are wanting to provide access across our Iwi locally, nationally and globally, but it will also be hugely beneficial to Aotearoa learners in general.” Te Kura i Huna will support Iwi participation in education across a variety of platforms including a blended reality platform to realise Maaori potential and provide a pathway that will deliver a better future across Aotearoa and globally. “If we don’t embark on this journey, there is the fear that all of this intrinsic knowledge that has been left behind from our tuupuna, our taonga tuku iho, will be lost. Everything is really critical, for us, like most other Iwi, no doubt,” says Ngareta. “This will provide education resilience and sustainability for our people on so many levels,” says Mike Neho, chair of Te Paepae o Te Kaahui o Rauru. Please note: Ngaa Rauru uses double vowels instead of macrons when writing te reo Māori.

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Education Gazette | 23 November 2020

Sakthi Ranganathan from JIX Ltd leads a discussion with Year 9-10 students of Te Kura o Kokohuia about mixed reality learning.

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IWI LEADERSHIP

Showing the potential of digital technology to share stories and information.

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TEACHER WORKFORCE

Beginning teacher motivated to make a difference

Beginning teacher Ethan Nisbett shares his pathway into teaching and why this is the profession for him.

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than Nisbett left high school with plans to start a career in the sports industry, but 10 years on he’s back in the classroom, now as a beginning teacher passionate about driving educational achievement. “After finishing high school, I worked at a local recreation centre running sports competitions and helping with the holiday programme. That was enough to make me realise I needed to refocus by prioritising my education so I signed up for a foundation certificate in sport and recreation at Unitec. “Suddenly I found a thirst for learning, particularly in the autonomous style. I went on to do a Bachelor of Sport and was so inspired by teaching that I went on to university to complete a postgraduate teaching diploma.”

Rewarding work At the start of 2020, Ethan joined Waitākere College, teaching PE & Health. He says he has found his vocation. “I love engaging with young people and finding what makes them tick. ‘Light bulb moments’ are what I live for, and I find the work incredibly rewarding. “My transition into Waitākere College as a beginner teacher has been greatly helped by the coaching I have done within this community. The students and I have seen each other in a real-world setting and that allows me to be authentic. “I love my school community, and as I grew up in this neighbourhood, I understand the complexity of our student population. It helps too that the school’s emphasis on a growth mindset and manaakitanga blends well with my values.

Beginning teacher Ethan says he has found his vocation.

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“My two biggest support networks are our mentorship programme and our Beginner Teacher Programme (BTP). My mentor Philip Brain is nothing short of amazing; we meet regularly to discuss everything from effective pedagogy, school protocols, assessment and anything else that pops up. Our BTP leader, Ruth Monk, is equally amazing – her enthusiasm and love for her students is contagious. gazette.education.govt.nz


TEACHER WORKFORCE

“I love engaging with young people and finding what makes them tick. ‘Light bulb moments’ are what I live for, and I find the work incredibly rewarding.” Ethan Nisbett “The tech-savvy style of my teacher training has been hugely helpful in equipping me to engage with students, particularly during the disruptions imposed by Covid-19. And on the job I have learned a lot about restorative justice and how we can defuse conflict as well as empower students to make better decisions without punishment. My main teaching goal is to build and develop assessment using a strengths-based approach rather than the traditional essay-style assessment.”

A natural fit Waitākere College principal Mark Shanahan says employing Ethan was a “no brainer”. “When Ethan was on practicum here, he got involved in rugby coaching, which is a passion he shares with so many students. Once you observe a teacher who wants to contribute to the wider life of the college and builds positive relationships with students in and outside the classroom you know you have a natural fit for our kids here. He had mana that students respected and a reflective humility showing that he was here to learn.”

Ethan with his mentor Philip Brain (right) and principal Mark Shanahan (left).

Mark says the National Beginning Teacher Induction Grant (NBT) allowed the school to consider appointing new teachers because it reduced barriers for making sure there were very good resources available to the teachers in both starting and progressing through the year. “We were able to strengthen our induction and support programme for all our beginning teachers. We take pride in the care and support provided for our beginning teachers as we want them to have the best positive impact on the learning of their students while they too are adjusting to the craft that is teaching. “We cater or target professional development opportunities for specific needs that a beginner teacher may have and Ethan has been involved in a 3-day coaching programme, as well as specific resourcing such as the PE Geek subscription made available for the department.” On top of this, each beginning teacher has a timetabled specialist subject mentor to inform and support with the skills needed in the specific subject discipline.

“We use the Specialist Classroom Teacher to meet regularly with the beginning teachers and new teachers to focus on lesson planning for successful outcomes,” says Mark. “This resource allowed us to then drill down with teachers needing fine tuning in this area. Beginning teachers have the opportunity to shadow and observe experienced teachers across the school to see the range of teaching techniques that work with their subject and with different students and classes, and are actively involved in our PD programme held each week. Some even lead sessions.”

National Beginning Teacher Induction Grant The NBT is valued at $10,000 (ex GST) and is paid to eligible state or stateintegrated schools to fund recruitment and structured mentorship of beginning teachers, enabling them to “shadow” and be mentored by an experienced teacher before taking on their own class and teaching independently. New Zealand state and state-integrated schools meeting one or more of the following criteria are eligible to apply: » Decile 1–5 schools » Severely isolated schools » Schools that require teachers for te reo Māori as a subject or for the provision of Māori medium education » Secondary schools that require teachers for secondary (Years 9–13) STEM subjects The beginning teacher must be a New Zealand citizen or permanent resident, provisionally certificated, and not have taught as a qualified teacher in a school previously. For more information go to the TeachNZ website, teachnz.govt.nz.

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LEARNER SUPPORT

Te Kura programmes expanded to support ākonga in Auckland Te Aho o Te Kura Pounamu (Te Kura) is expanding its Big Picture and NCEA catch-up programmes in term 4 and over the summer to provide additional support for Auckland students following this year’s Covid-19 disruptions.

Dawid discovered the art of knife-making through a Big Picture project.

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n an unsettling and stressful year, it’s heartening to know additional steps are being taken to support Auckland ākonga affected by disruptions due to Covid-19.

Across the region senior students are facing a range of challenges. Some have already left school or are significantly behind and at risk of disengaging, others have faced barriers to participating in learning this year. There are also ākonga who may only need a few additional credits to gain an NCEA or University Entrance. To support these students the Ministry of Education has partnered with Te Aho o Te Kura Pounamu (Te Kura) to expand its programmes in term 4 and over the summer. Te Kura Chief Executive Mike Hollings says the temporary expansion of its Big Picture and NCEA catch-up programmes to accommodate more students will provide an opportunity to have a positive impact for Auckland ākonga who enrol. “We are pleased to play a part in the joint effort of the Ministry of Education and other educators, schools, and kura to support students and whānau affected by Covid-19.”

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Maintaining contact, engagement and wellbeing Big Picture learning, introduced at Te Kura a decade ago, is an approach that puts the student at the centre of their learning – it’s highly personalised and based on the student’s interests, passions and potential. Te Kura educator Evan Shewchuk says Big Picture meets a specific need for students, with its kaupapa of supportive positivity. “The pandemic had a mixed impact on our students. Our focus during the lockdowns was around maintaining contact and engagement, and ensuring ākonga wellbeing through regular online huinga ako that allowed us to interact as a group along with one-onone contact with ākonga and their whānau through individual virtual catch-ups.” “Overall, we worked hard to meet the needs of our ākonga in very trying and disruptive circumstances, and now we’re expanding that approach to help many more ākonga who have not re-engaged for one reason or another since the lockdowns ended.”

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At a glance: Te Kura supporting Auckland ākonga Te Kura 400 learning programme (a version of Big Picture) is for students who are disengaged, or at risk of disengaging from education. There are 400 additional places in this programme for Auckland ākonga in term 4, with online and face-to-face learning available at locations all around the Auckland region. Eligible students can either enrol full-time with Te Kura or stay enrolled at their school while they participate in the Te Kura 400 learning programme.

Dawid enjoyed pursuing practical projects through the Big Picture learning programme, as offered by Te Kura.

The targeted dual-tuition programme is aimed at senior secondary students in Auckland with some engagement in learning, but who are at risk of not achieving their NCEA goals for the year. There are up to 3,000 additional places in this online programme in term 4 for ākonga who need additional support in one or two subjects. Summer School is for students throughout Aotearoa who, at the end of term 4, need up to approximately 10 additional credits to achieve an NCEA or University Entrance and progress to further study, training, or employment. This programme is delivered nationwide, with extra places available to support Auckland ākonga. Summer School runs over the summer break from 21 December. Registrations are now open.

Want to know more? More information about the Big Picture and targeted dual-tuition programmes is on the Te Kura website or email Akl2020. Tekuraresponse@education.govt.nz.   Information about Summer School is also available on Te Kura’s website or email summerschool@tekura.school.nz.

“It’s good to take up a new challenge so I thought of it as an opportunity to try new things.” Dawid Steenkamp

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LEARNER SUPPORT

Pathway to an exciting career

Liam says the Big Picture programme has helped shape his career aspirations.

This approach has taken one of Evan’s students on an inspirational journey towards a career in the outdoors. Liam Amanono says being part of the programme has kept him interested and engaged. He lives in Massey with his whānau and is now in his final year. Liam’s advice to anyone considering enrolling is “Go for it – give it a try! I’ve found it good for me, it’s helped me develop my confidence and being able to work at your own pace is good. Keep an open mind, try new things!” Liam enjoys the flexibility of Big Picture learning, saying it keeps him motivated as the focus is on things he enjoys including outdoor activities. This focus has helped shape his career aspirations. “I’m close to achieving NCEA Level 3 and next year I’m going to Unitec to do a Diploma in Outdoor and Adventure Education at Adventure Works.”

Passion projects help maintain motivation Big Picture has also helped Kaitaia student Dawid Steenkamp decide what he might do next. When he talks about Big Picture’s ‘passion projects’ it’s obvious Dawid is passionate about the programme and what the future may hold for him. He’s still working through his options, perhaps a building apprenticeship or a blacksmithing course so he can build on his Big Picture learning. “I love practical projects! They’re good fun and you learn faster than with paperwork projects. I love anything hands-on, like farming, horticulture, woodwork, blacksmithing and knife-making.” Dawid discovered the art of knife-making through a Big Picture project. An interest in metalwork led to an interest in blacksmithing and learning how knives are made. “Big Picture helps you continue with your passion whatever that might be. For me that became knife-making. I loved that project because I could also show other people how to make a knife. I like to share my skills with others!” Covid-19 meant Dawid couldn’t see his friends or go to the beach, but he decided to look on the bright side of the situation. “It’s good to take up a new challenge so I thought of it as an opportunity to try new things. Doing all my learning online was harder – it was challenging but I could see how my teachers persevered. I also like learning from the other students – it’s a really cool experience. When you first meet someone you only see the outside of them but then you get to see the inside of them when they talk about something they are interested in, whether it’s beekeeping or surfing, novel writing or clockmaking.”

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LEARNER SUPPORT

Ākonga working at their own pace With Te Kura’s targeted dual-tuition programme, eligible students remain enrolled at their school while accessing targeted support from Te Kura in one or two NCEA subjects. This allows students to choose a few standards to focus on and work through their courses at their own pace. Ākonga enrolled in this programme also have the option to continue their studies during Summer School, so they can access further support to catch up on their NCEA goals. Offering flexible, highly personalised programmes based on each student’s interests, passions and potential means motivation remains high, even in challenging times. Te Rina Leonard, Te Kura’s Deputy Chief Executive: Learning Delivery says many young people have faced – and continue to face – multiple challenges due to Covid-19 disruptions. “Te Kura is committed to doing whatever it takes to support these students to re-engage with their learning and reset their journey back into education.”

Te Kura educator Evan Shewchuk helps student Bailey with a Big Picture learning project.

“I’ve found it good for me, it’s helped me develop my confidence and being able to work at your own pace is good.” Liam Amanono


PACIFIC EDUCATION

Talanoa Ako learning and talking about education The Talanoa Ako programme, which takes an ‘as Pacific by Pacific’ approach, recently featured at the 2020 SunPix Pacific Peoples Awards.

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he Talanoa Ako programme partners with Pacific organisations and communities to lift the confidence and capability of Pacific parents to support their children’s education.

The programme provides practical support for parents. Topics From left to right: Moe Sa’u, Talanoa Ako Programme Director, covered include understanding NCEA, the importance of Elizabeth Keresoma, Director of FocusED and Talanoa Ako literacy and numeracy, understanding school reports, partner, and Rose Jamieson, Deputy Secretary Parent information on learning pathways, ESOL, careers and Information and Community Intelligence (PICI) group. Visit this article vocational information, and parent and learner tips. online at gazette. education.govt.nz to find The programme takes an ‘as Pacific by Pacific’ more information about approach and is delivered through community the Ako Centres, links to the partners in 65 Ako Centres across Aotearoa radio sessions and how to including 11 schools. To support Pacific parents during Covid-19, the programme delivered 10 sessions on 531pi radio in seven Pacific languages and English. Pacific teachers supported the development of the content into radio formats and delivered the sessions.

download the Talanoa Ako app.

The radio sessions are still available and can be provided to Pacific parents. The programme information is also available via the Talanoa Ako app in 10 Pacific languages and English. Talanoa Ako recently won the Pacific Service Excellence Award at the 2020 SunPix Pacific Peoples Awards. The recipients are nominated and voted for by Pacific communities. Rose Jamieson, Deputy Secretary, Parent Information and Community Intelligence, received the Award on behalf of the Ministry of Education.

Recipient of Pacific Education Award, Lynn Lolokini Ikimotu Pavihi with her children. Recipient of Pacific Education Award - Sosaiete Aoga Amata Samoa i Aotearoa Incorporated (SAASIA Inc).

“The Ministry is humbled to be recognised by the Pacific community and to be nominated for this award. We thank our Talanoa Ako partners across Aotearoa and all the communities, churches and homes that are benefitting from this programme. Using an ‘as Pacific by Pacific’ approach has been a key part of the success of the programme.” The Ministry of Education also sponsors the Pacific Education Award. This year the award recipients were Sosaiete Aoga Amata Samoa i Aotearoa Incorporated, a strong advocate and supporter of Gagana Samoa in early childhood education, and Lynn Lolokini Ikimotu Pavihi, associate principal at Favona Primary School and passionate author and advocate of Vagahau Niue.

“We thank our Talanoa Ako partners across Aotearoa and all the communities, churches and homes that are benefitting from this programme. Using an ‘as Pacific by Pacific’ approach has been a key part of the success of the programme.” Rose Jamieson 20

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Help broaden their horizons and challenge stereotypes Inspiring the Future is an exciting new programme that’s coming to schools across Aotearoa Based on research from Aotearoa and overseas, Inspiring the Future has been created to broaden young people’s horizons, help challenge stereotypes and address unconscious biases that can limit their potential.

At an Inspiring the Future event, young people hear from people in their own communities They learn about different jobs and why people love doing them, how those people got started in their careers and challenges faced along the way.

Designed with the curriculum in mind When you sign up, you’ll receive a resource pack that includes everything you need to run an Inspiring the Future event. The resource pack includes fun classroom activities to do before and after events that you can incorporate into your art, literacy or social studies programmes.

If you’d like to host an Inspiring the Future event, visit: inspiringthefuture.org.nz and complete the expression of interest form. We’ll let you know when there are enough role models in your area, so you can schedule events online, read their profiles and invite them to attend.


PLD

Cook Islands schools benefit from PLD support A professional learning and development (PLD) programme delivered to five schools in the Cook Islands in response to Covid-19 has helped them make strides towards a more powerful and effective use of technology in their practice.

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s school communities across New Zealand adapted to distance learning during Covid-19 Alert Levels 3 and 4, schools and teachers in the Pacific were preparing for how they would respond if they had to do the same in their countries. The Ministry of Education invited Massey University’s PLD provider Tātai Angitu to support five schools in the Cook Islands – Araura College, Enuamanu School, Mangaia School, Tereora College and Titikaveka College – to help them prepare for learning from a distance. Led by Dr Lesieli Tongati’o, Tātai Angitu facilitators Misha Shamdass and Jacky YoshiokaBraid created a bespoke PLD programme that

was able to be delivered entirely online through Google Classroom, where teachers could engage with the PLD in their own time at a pace that suited them. The modulised course on blended learning was supplemented with readings, videos and tasks as well as a weekly Zoom session.

“Terrific” opportunities Tim and Julianna Collier, New Zealand teachers from Gisborne who are teaching at Tereora College in Rarotonga, participated in the professional learning with teachers from other schools across the country. Connecting with participants via Zoom, email and telephone, the Massey facilitators modelled

Juliana Collier working with Technology students in the new facilities at Tereora College.

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PLD

A rainbow of hope over CICC Arorangi Mission House. At a time of anxiety and fear, Tereora College teacher Charlotte Cousins captured this uplifting image on her way to school and shared it with her colleagues.

“The opportunities this offers are terrific – little things happened that were special: like seeing a colleague join a Zoom session for the very first time.” Tim Collier the use of flexible digital technologies to teachers. “The opportunities this offers are terrific – little things happened that were special: like seeing a colleague join a Zoom session for the very first time,” says Tim. “Teachers are now starting to explore these ideas with their classes. The work with the PLD facilitators all took place online, using a range of different technology platforms and apps.” A barrier to using technology in learning in the Cook Islands has been limited connectivity, but this is rapidly changing. Some of the

Student Leaders conduct an assembly.

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islands, including Rarotonga and Aitutaki, have recently been connected to the world by an undersea internet cable, however, until visitors return to the islands, and commercial demand increases, there is not the speed needed to support the seamless use of IT in learning. “The big thing about IT-infused learning is the readiness of the teachers. The PLD with Massey has helped contribute to this. Here we’ve been given the opportunity to get ahead,” explains Tim.

Tailored support Tātai Angitu tailored its support to meet the specific needs articulated by the schools. Schools wanted support in a variety of areas,

including transitioning to distance learning, lesson planning for NCEA subjects and levels, physical and emotional wellbeing, and leadership support. Pacific Realm countries offering the NCEA qualification were offered the same access to the PLD support that New Zealand schools received during the Covid-19 response, working with accredited New Zealand PLD facilitators who have expertise working with Pacific teachers and learners. While Rarotonga has so far had no cases of Covid-19 and has not gone into lockdown, schools are better prepared now in case this does occur.

When it rains, the satellite internet connection is often lost, making distance learning challenging. TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 23 November 2020

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Tawera Black, a kaiāwhina at Te Wharekura o Mauao, helping students with Sorted in Schools and Te whai hua – kia ora.

MĀTAURANGA PŪTEA

Mā ngā akoranga ahumoni hou ki te reo Māori ngā ākonga Māori e tautoko ki te NCEA Kua takahi ngā ākonga Māori kura tuarua i te ara e whiwhi waetohu ai rātou mō te NCEA mā te ako mō te moni i tētahi kohinga rauemi akoako i whanaketia e te Commission for Financial Capability (CFFC).

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ua whakaterea e te CFFC ētahi rauemi mā roto i Te whai hua – kia ora, te hōtaka noho teina ki te kaupapa angitu o Sorted in Schools i whakahaeretia ki ngā kura auraki puta noa i Aotearoa. Kei te reo Māori ngā rauemi e haere hāngai ana ki ngā paerewa, kua whiwhi tohutuku hoki i te NZQA, a, ki te tutuki i ēnei paerewa, ka riro mā te ākonga he waetohu hei kohinga ki ngā tohu mātauranga NCEA. Ka tirohia te whakahaere moni, te penapena pūtea, te nama, te whakarite whāinga, te inihua, te haumitanga, te KiwiSaver me te ahungarua, ka hoahoatia ēnei kia whakaakona e te kaiako me te whānau hei wāhanga o ngā akoranga o ia, ahakoa te kaupapa ako. Ko Te whai hua - kia ora anake te hōtaka mātauranga ahumoni kua hoahoatia mō ngā Kura Reo Māori, kua whai tohu tuku NZQA anō, me te wātea ki ngā kura katoa mō te kore utu. Hei tā te Kaikōkiri o te CFFC, a Erin Thompson, i te pākaha taha ahumoni o te Covid-19 ki ngā hapori Māori, kātahi ka tino hiranga rawa atu te whakaterenga o ngā rauemi hou nei. Hei tā Thompson, “I kitea ngā rangahau a CFFC i ngā ngoikoretanga ahumoni o ētahi whānau maha inā ngā taumahatanga o te Covid-19. O ngā kāinga e 34% i tino raru ki te taha ahumoni, e 22% he kāinga Māori. Kei te āwhina a Te whai hua – kia ora i tētahi whakatipuranga rangatahi ki te whakapakari i te taha ahumoni, kia whītikihia ai rātou ki ngā pūkenga e kaupare ake ai i ngā raruraru ahumoni ka pā pea i tō rātou pakeketanga.” Ka whakamahia e ngā rauemi ngā pakiwaitara a Māui ki te kōrero mō ōna

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raukaha me ōna āheinga ki te hunga rangatahi. Kāore te hōtaka e whāiti mai ki te moni anake, ka atawhaitia anō te oranga ahumoni ki ngā ākonga me ō rātou whānau mō te āhua ki te taha hinengaro, te taha tinana, te taha whānau me te taha wairua. Hei tā Thompson ano, “Mā Te whai hua – kia ora, ka whakahautia ngā ākonga kia titiro kē ki te whai rawa kia pai ai tā rātou whakatau me aha rātou e taea ai te noho ora. Ki te pērā, ka ako rātou i ētahi pūmanawa moni hiranga mō waho atu i ngā tawhā o te kura, e tū pakari ai a rātou taha āheitanga ahumoni, e puta pai ai rātou ki tua ki te ao whānui o te mātauranga, o te whakangungutanga, o te whai mahi rānei.” Kei reira hoki he tautoko mō ngā kaiako. “Ka whakahaeretia e mātou he hui whāiti whanaketanga mō ngā kaiako, kia rongo i te māia i a rātou e whakamahi ana i ngā rauemi me te whakaako i te kaupapa. E tuwhera ana te kaupapa nei ki ngā ākonga me ngā whānau, ka mutu, i ētahi kura, ka pohiri i ngā mema o te whānau ki te āwhina ki te whakaako i te hōtaka,” hei tā Thompson. Mai i te whakaterenga o Te whai hua – kia ora i te tau 2019, kua rēhita mai tētahi e 60% o ngā kura ki te whakaako i ngā rauemi, tērā tonu ka toro atu ngā whakaakoranga ki ētahi tauira e 42,000. I whakaterea ngā rauemi mā ngā tauira o te Tau 9 me te Tau 10 i tērā tau. Kua hoahoatia hoki ngā rauemi NCEA mō te taumata ki te Kaiaka, ki te Kairangi hoki, ka taea nei te tāpae ki te tautoko i te Taumata 1. He tāpiritanga ēnei ki ngā rauemi neke atu i te 300 e wātea ana i te pae tukutuku a Sorted in Schools me Te whai hua – kia ora. Mō ētahi atu kōrero tirohia a sortedinschools.org.nz/mme

New money lessons in te reo help Māori students gain NCEA Māori secondary students are now on their way to gain credits toward NCEA by learning about money thanks to a new collection of learning materials developed by Te Ara Ahunga Ora, the Commission for Financial Capability (CFFC). The CFFC has launched the resources through Te whai hua - kia ora, a sister programme to the successful Sorted in Schools used in mainstream schools around New Zealand. The resources are in te reo Māori, aligned to unit standards and have gained NZQA accreditation, enabling ākonga (students) who complete them to gain credits that contribute to an NCEA qualification. They cover money management, saving, debt, goal setting, insurance, investing, KiwiSaver and retirement, and are designed to be taught by kaiako and whānau as part of dayto-day lessons in any subject. Te whai hua – kia ora is a financial education programme specifically designed for Māori medium education, NZQA accredited and available free to all kura. The CFFC’s Kaikōkiri (Learning Specialist), Erin Thompson, says the financial impact on Māori communities due to Covid-19 made the launch gazette.education.govt.nz


of these new resources even more critical. “CFFC research revealed the financially vulnerability of many whānau due to the effects of Covid-19. Of the 34 per cent of households facing financial hardship, 22 per cent of those were Māori,” says Thompson.

After-school tuition is a growth industry

“Te whai hua – kia ora is helping a new generation of rangatahi (young people) become financially resilient, so they’re better equipped to weather financial storms throughout their adult lives.”

Fostering wellbeing The resources use stories of Maui to relate his strengths and capabilities to rangatahi. Rather than being simply about money, the programme fosters an understanding of what financial wellbeing looks like for the students and their whānau in terms of taha hinengaro (mental health), taha tinana (physical health), taha whānau (family health) and taha wairua (spiritual health). “Through Te whai hua – kia ora, ākonga are encouraged to look at wealth through a different lens so they can determine for themselves what they need to do to attain wellbeing. In the process, they will learn valuable money skills that go beyond the school gates and gain the financial confidence and capability to transition into the wider world of future education, training or employment,” says Thompson. And there is wrap-around support for kaiako too. “We run professional development workshops with kaiako to help them feel confident to use the resources and teach the subject. Ākonga and whānau are welcome and in some kura, whānau members visit to help teach the programme,” says Thompson. Since Te whai hua – kia ora launched in 2019, 60 per cent of kura have registered to teach the resources, potentially reaching more than 42,000 students. Resources for students in Years 9 and 10 were launched last year and build on more than 300 resources already available through the Sorted in Schools and Te whai hua – kia ora website. gazette.education.govt.nz

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TEACHER WORKFORCE

Teach First NZ in action On-the-job training is proving transformational for teachers and schools engaged with Ako Mātātupu|Teach First NZ employment-based trainee teacher programme.

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nehunga High School has long partnered with Ako Mātātupu|Teach First NZ, employing up to five new programme participants each year since 2014. “We fully support Teach First NZ’s aim to develop top graduates and professionals into highly effective teachers and inspirational leaders in schools that serve lower decile communities,” says principal Deidre Shea. “Their participants better represent our diverse communities. Participants go through a rigorous interview and selection process, and have much to offer education and young people.” In particular, the programme addresses the difficulties experienced by decile 1–5 schools in recruiting quality teachers of science, technology, mathematics, English, and te reo Māori. Teach First NZ graduate Reid Douglas joined the school in 2018 and teaches product

design, technology, and design and visual communication. “We were thrilled when Reid applied to return to teach at his former school! He has a Master of Product Design, considerable industry experience, and is a person of integrity who relates exceptionally well with others, including his students. As a former student and a local resident, he is deeply connected to our community,” says Deidre. “Product design teachers are rare, and outstanding product and design teachers like Reid, extremely so. Reid has contributed two outstanding years as a teacher already. He is now qualified as a teacher and will continue in his role permanently from 2021.”

“I would likely not have pursued teaching if it hadn’t been for this work-as-you-train model. I wanted a job where I would be reminded of purpose every day and working with students to share my love for creativity and design seemed a good place to start.” The practical aspect of being able to continue in employment while training was also a big attraction for environmental scientist Teina Wells-Smith, now teaching science at Whangārei Boys’ High School. But Teina’s main driving force was to contribute to positive change in education equity.

Apprenticeship-like role

“The goals of Teach First NZ aligned with my own. Education inequity has been part of Aotearoa since before my grandparents’ generation and I was keen to be a part of a movement committed to overcoming this.

Reid says Teach First NZ has facilitated his career transition by providing an apprenticeship-like role.

“In previous roles I had worked with school groups guiding tours or running environmental workshops, and I saw the positive impact I

Teina, pictured here with students Adyn (left) and Leo (right), is injecting his experience into the science curriculum.

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TEACHER WORKFORCE

“I would likely not have pursued teaching if it hadn’t been for this work-as-you-train model.” Reid Douglas could make on these rangatahi. My younger whanaunga never really considered science as an option because they didn’t see themselves represented in that field, so I found I could share my passion for science and encourage our young Māori to get into this field. “One of the strengths of the programme is trying to place the participants in schools in a community where we’re from. Many of my students are whanaunga of mine so I know I’m making a direct impact on my own people. “I also believe in our school values. They are Māori values, their meanings are universal, and when they are embedded in our teaching and learning we will be able to develop our students of Whangārei Boys’ High School into fine young men.”

Bringing science to life Principal Karen Gilbert-Smith says Teina brings a wealth of knowledge and a focus on bringing the sciences to life, particularly for Māori students, which has led to an increase in their interest in pursuing sciences. “A great example of this was his work with students to develop science fair projects focused on Māori concepts. He also leads professional development within the faculty again focused on weaving Māori concepts through the science curriculum. An example of this was manufacturing kawakawa balm with Year 9 students. “He is a key driver in reviewing the junior science curriculum with a view to utilising more community expertise and increasing student engagement. The reciprocity is evident in that we can provide opportunities to Teina to add his valuable voice and expertise and the outcomes for our students are improved as a result. “Teina is definitely a curriculum leader and we are excited about the opportunity to work with him into the future.”

Reid relishes the opportunity to learn on the job through the Teach First NZ programme.

Partnership opportunities Ako Mātātupu|Teach First NZ partners with eligible secondary schools who share a passion for addressing educational inequality. Programme participants are recruited for their potential to be effective teachers and leaders, and to teach in high-demand subjects in low decile schools. To date, more than 54 per cent of candidates have taught STEM subjects and 17 per cent have taught te reo Māori. Partnership opportunities include: co-hosting events and workshops; sharing best practice with the Teach First NZ network; receiving professional development (mentor training, cultural responsiveness development); hosting school visits; or employing one of the participants. For information on eligibility and how to partner with Change to Ako Mātātupu | Teach First NZ, visit their website at teachfirstnz.org.

gazette.education.govt.nz

TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 23 November 2020

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WELLBEING

Integrating mindfulness into learning

Mindfulness practices are emerging as one of many strategies schools and kura can use to support learner wellbeing. Education Gazette looks at one mindfulness programme that has recently been scaled up, allowing more schools access.

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Education Gazette | 23 November 2020

Students at Kaiti School participate in a mindfulness exercise. Supplied by Pause Breathe Smile; credit: Brennan Thomas.

gazette.education.govt.nz


WELLBEING

O

n any given day at St Mark’s Church School in Wellington, you can see students practising mindful breathing or movement, using these techniques to calm down after lunch, or doing jigsaw puzzles to wind down at the end of class. It’s all part of a mindfulness practice the school has integrated into its wellbeing programme and local curriculum. The school has been using mindfulness programme Pause Breathe Smile over the last two years. Deputy principal Erica Harvison sees mindfulness as a tool for helping their learners consider their emotions and deal with conflict – and she has noticed positive benefits to the school’s culture. “When there’s an issue, instead of an explosive reaction, it stops them in their tracks and gives them a moment,” says Erica.

What is mindfulness? Mindfulness is purposefully engaging attention in the present moment, in what is happening within and around us. There is a growing body of international research that suggests that mindful awareness practices can benefit physical and mental health, as well as support emotional regulation and metacognition (thinking about your thinking). As such, many schools, like St Mark’s, have chosen to incorporate mindfulness practices into their teaching and learning programmes as part of an integrated whole-school approach to supporting learner wellbeing. This includes recognising and responding to the diverse strengths and needs of the learners and their school communities. It’s important to note that mindfulness practices are one of many strategies schools and kura might decide to utilise to support learner wellbeing. There is no silver bullet or single programme that will work for every student and every school.

Pause Breathe Smile Pause Breathe Smile is a mindfulness programme available to schools. Originally developed by Grant Rix at the Mental Health Foundation, the programme was first launched in 2013 and has since been expanded to reach more than 300 schools and 60,000 students across Aotearoa. Now, thanks to funding support from Southern Cross, the Pause Breathe Smile programme will be available free to all primary and intermediate schools. The programme essentially provides professional development for teachers to work through a series of eight lessons with their students, focusing on things like simple mindful breathing, eating and movement. Schools are then able to lay a foundation that they can use to integrate mindfulness into their wider school programme. Despite its clear structure, there is room for schools to make the programme their own. “Mindfulness needs to be responsive to what’s happening,” says Grant, now the mindfulness director at the Pause Breathe Smile Trust. “Many schools don’t see it as the ‘be all, end all’. Instead, it’s something that can ignite interest in mindfulness and wellbeing.” Pause Breathe Smile aligns with the health and physical education curriculum, as well as aspects of the social sciences and science curriculum, and New Zealand Curriculum key competencies: thinking; managing self; relating to others; and participating and contributing.

It connects with and affirms te ao Māori values and perspectives by integrating the principles of the hauora model Te Whare Tapa Whā. Breath and body-based practices are used for exploring the interplay between physical sensations, thoughts, emotions, relationships with others, and interconnectedness with the natural world.

Expanding the programme After receiving funding from Southern Cross, the Pause Breathe Smile Trust will now be able to offer the programme, at no cost, to all primary and intermediate schools that are taking a schoolwide approach. Schools that are having their whole staff trained together will be given priority. Southern Cross chose to support Pause Breathe Smile after looking for a way to make an impact in the youth and health areas. Additionally, they wanted to find something that their own staff (around 3,200 of them) could connect with. Pause Breathe Smile ticked all the boxes. “It also had the clinical efficacy and proven track record we were hoping for,” notes Greg Gent, Southern Cross Chair. “We want to see a change in the schools the programme is in,” he says. Grant Rix sees a range of benefits to this support from Southern Cross. Removal of the cost barrier and increased capacity will, at the most basic level, give more schools, teachers and children access to this programme. “It’s also an opportunity to engage with schools more and get an understanding of how they are going with it,” Grant says. He also hopes this will continue the discussion around mindfulness in New Zealand and its role in supporting learner wellbeing.

For more information, see the Pause Breathe Smile website.

Tools and resources There are several resources available to schools to support social and emotional wellbeing and building positive school cultures. For example, Sparklers, developed to help support the wellbeing of young people following the Christchurch earthquakes, is now a widely used wellbeing resource across New Zealand. The Ministry of Education offers a range of resources to support schools to build safe, positive and relationally based environments that promote and respond to learner wellbeing. These include the Positive Behaviour for Learning (PB4L) School-Wide framework, PB4L Restorative Practices, and initiatives on the horizon, such as the implementation of new Wellbeing Curriculum Leads and guidance. gazette.education.govt.nz

A mindfulness activity underway at Baverstock Oaks School. Supplied by Pause Breathe Smile; credit: Carmen Bird.

TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 23 November 2020

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WELLBEING

One Tokomaru School student completed this project as part of his mindfulness inquiry.

Taking a whole-school approach to wellbeing Tokomaru School’s focus on mindfulness, as part of its schoolwide wellbeing programme, has had a positive impact on its school culture.

I

t’s a wet, cold day in rural Manawatū and the Tokomaru School playground is deserted. Even the hardiest kids are spending their morning break inside. It’s also a Friday near the end of term 3, so one might expect the classrooms to be full of noisy students and tired teachers. At this school, however, the words that spring to mind to describe the atmosphere are calm, quiet and relaxed. Jacqui Frost, team leader at the Year 1–8 school, lights up as she talks about the school’s efforts to improve student wellbeing. Jacqui has helped introduce a schoolwide programme that has changed students’ attitudes and sees all children and teachers practising mindfulness every day. Jacqui’s initial aim was to make the school’s learner pathway more practical and accessible for all their children. “Lots of schools have learner pathways, which is telling kids where we want them to be. I wanted to show them how to get there because often we miss that part out,” she says.

A different approach At that point she was teaching a class with children from Years 2–4 and was dealing with some difficult behaviours. Based on her own research into growth mindset and mindfulness, she decided to try doing things a little differently.

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Education Gazette | 23 November 2020

The programme that developed was about focusing on growing their kids’ mana and helping them become more confident and relaxed along the way: “For us, these soft skills, these life skills, are what ground you.” Following the success of the programme in her own class, Jacqui was supported by her principal, Sonia Mudgway, to expand what they were doing to the whole school. Since then, Jacqui and the other teachers at Tokomaru have trialled a whole lot of things, “some of them good, some of them not so good”. One thing that is working is the Pause Breathe Smile mindfulness programme, which is now part of the school’s wellbeing programme. Jacqui speaks glowingly of the way her colleagues gave Pause Breathe Smile a go. What really mattered in terms of getting her fellow teachers on board was that they could simply pick up the programme resources and use them every day.

Powerful impact on seniors The schoolwide programme has also had an especially powerful impact on the senior students – those readying themselves for heading off to high school. Jacqui and the other teachers had noticed that these children had more and more anxiety-driven issues, particularly when it came time to think about the transition into Year 9. For one very anxious student, Jacqui reported that their programme “helped him to realise that what he felt was normal and that everyone feels this way”. Jacqui is clearly proud of the impact the programme has had on the school – including her colleagues. She’s quick to point out that she has “grown so much with it as well.” Another teacher at the school noted that the mindfulness focus had helped her, offering improved sleep patterns as a specific example.

There are signs that the school’s approach to wellbeing is working.

A group of ākonga all mentioned how the mindfulness part of the programme helps them to start their day calmly and gets them ready for what’s ahead. They also commented on how they use these skills outside of school, especially when trying to relax or when dealing with things that require patience, like annoying siblings!

“We still have some issues, every school does, but we tracked our playground behaviour incidents and they’ve just dropped right down,” says Jacqui.

“You have an opportunity every week to have a conversation with a child that is ‘hey, we want to grow you as a person and we care about you’,” says Jacqui.

“You can’t expect all teachers to be experts in mindfulness and this took that pressure off,” Jacqui says.

gazette.education.govt.nz


WELLBEING

Students at Baverstock Oaks School enjoy taking part in Pause Breathe Smile exercises. Supplied by Pause Breathe Smile; credit: Carmen Bird.

“You have an opportunity every week to have a conversation with a child that is ‘hey, we want to grow you as a person and we care about you’.” Jacqui Frost

Supporting social and emotional wellbeing Visit this article online to access these resources to support students’ social and emotional wellbeing and positive school culture. » He Māpuna te Tamaiti – Supporting Social and Emotional Competence in Early Learning. A written resource that aims to help teachers to build the social emotional competence of young children in early learning services through Te Whāriki: He whāriki mātauranga mō ngā mokopuna o Aotearoa the early learning curriculum. » Teaching for Positive Behaviour. This written resource supports teachers in all New Zealand primary and secondary schools to understand and draw on effective inclusive strategies that enhance students’ behaviour, engagement, participation, and learning » Guide to Positive Peer Relationships. This online guide provides strategies and resources to support students to build relationships and work successfully with others.

gazette.education.govt.nz

» Incredible Years Teacher (IYT) progamme. IYT programmes teach strategies for promoting positive behaviour and managing challenging ones, to improve the emotional development and social wellbeing of learners aged 3–8. » PB4L School-Wide. An evidence-based, whole-school tiered approach to developing consistency around teaching, monitoring and acknowledging behavioural expectations, that promotes and supports social and emotional wellbeing and inclusion. » Positive Behaviour for Learning: Restorative Practices. A relational approach that focuses on building and maintaining positive, respectful relationships across the school community, grounded in beliefs about equity, dignity, mana, and the potential of all people. » Mental Health Education and Hauora: Teaching interpersonal skills, resilience, and wellbeing.

TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 23 November 2020

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PLD

New PLD priorities set to start moving This term sees the first school and kura projects approved under new priorities for regionally allocated professional learning and development (PLD), ready for their PLD journeys to start in term 1 2021.

I

n a combined terms 3 and 4 2020 allocation round, schools and kura have submitted proposals against the new priorities through the online PLD system which was updated for the change. The new priorities, well supported across the sector and wider community, refocus PLD on capabilities that promote equitable learning opportunities and inclusive practices, so all ākonga are supported to thrive in their learning and be secure in their identity, language and culture.

New PLD priorities for Māori medium and te reo Māori settings: » Mātauranga and te reo Māori » Aromatawai » Marau ā-kura.

New PLD priorities for English medium settings: » Cultural capability » Local curriculum design » Assessment for learning. Digital fluency remains a PLD priority for all schools and kura. You can read the descriptions of the new priorities on the PLD website.

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Education Gazette | 23 November 2020

The priorities were introduced on 26 August 2020 in an online presentation by Secretary for Education Iona Holsted, Associate Deputy Secretary – Curriculum, Pathways & Progress Pauline Cleaver, and Group Manager Te Uepū Reo Māori Kiritina Johnstone from the Ministry of Education; Dr Mere Berryman of the University of Waikato, and Dr Margie Hohepa. Teachers and kaiako are encouraged to view the recorded presentations on the PLD website (https://pld.education.govt.nz/) and three short video animations on the same webpage that stimulate thinking about why the refocused priorities matter for our young learners and their whānau. Iona Holsted noted in her presentation that the new priorities reflect that what was heard through Kōrero Mātauranga really matters and makes a difference in education. “While all of the new priorities have an important contribution to make, I see building cultural capability as essential if all young people are going to feel connected and welcomed at school,” said Iona, who emphasised the importance of cultural capability in removing racism and discrimination from any learner’s lived experience of education. Iona also noted that this year’s lockdown experience underscored the importance of digital fluency which remains a priority for all schools and kura. Kiritina Johnstone noted the part PLD and the new priorities play in Māori medium and te

reo Māori settings in helping continue to strengthen cultural identity and in looking strongly and deliberately at what students need to help them be successful in their education journey and future.

Doing things differently The new priorities also bring a need to make some adjustments and do some things differently for real progress to happen, said Pauline Cleaver. These adjustments and improvements in PLD include a redeveloped PLD website (https://pld.education.govt.nz/) where you will find information about how regionally allocated PLD works and how to apply as well as helpful guides, an updated facilitator database for finding a facilitator for your approved PLD and a link to the new online system where proposals and PLD projects are submitted and managed. The website is your best place to start if your school, kura, Kāhui Ako or cluster has identified a PLD need and the news section is where you can keep up to date. The Ministry is working with the PLD provider network and others on strengthening the facilitator capability that supports the new priorities, with strong participation in recent webinar workshops. A better approach is being developed for ‘assuring quality’ of the PLD services providers and facilitators deliver into schools and kura.

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PLD

“It is important we get this right and work with our provider network and school and kura communities in doing this and to test it will work well. This means the shape of the approach will become defined over the next year, rather than being fully in place in term 1 2020,” said Pauline. Already in place this month, to help schools and kura with successful proposals for PLD against the new cultural capability priority, is an initial list of existing providers and their facilitators approved by the Ministry to deliver cultural capability PLD. There are opportunities planned for adding more providers and facilitators.

Tūngia te ururua kia tupu whakaritorito te tupu o te harakeke. Sometimes challenging the existing ways of doing or seeing things is required to release creativity and progression.

Schools and kura need to choose their facilitators from the list for cultural capability PLD approved for regionally allocated PLD funding.

New priorities – a challenge for all The priorities and these other PLD improvements cannot alone, realise the progress they are intended to promote so that as Iona said “every one of our ākonga is supported to thrive in their learning, secure in their identity, language and culture.” Recognising this, two key themes ran through the speakers’ presentations: the challenge for all of us of making a real difference for ākonga, and the importance of participation – of using the opportunity PLD offers to successfully take up this challenge.

gazette.education.govt.nz

TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 23 November 2020

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In 2021, Education Gazette Tukutuku Korero will turn 100. Help us mark this milestone by sending any historical photos or footage you would like to share from your school, kura or early learning centre to gazette@education.govt.nz.


NOTICES

Classroom resources

Contents

Classroom resources Community involvement Conference / AGM Jubilees and reunions Projects and programmes Student competitions and scholarships Professional learning and development (PLD)

35 35 35 35 35 36 36

Notices

Notices from any agency outside the Ministry of Education are published at the Ministry’s discretion. The Ministry does not accept responsibility for the information contained in such notices.

Reminder

Education Gazette Tukutuku Korero is the official medium for the Ministry’s notices, so staff are expected to read the ‘Official notices’ section.

Word limit

For general notices the description is limited to 100 words. Word limits don’t apply to notices from official sources such as the Ministry of Education and the Education Council.

Deadlines for notices

Copy for 7 December closes 4pm, Friday 27 November 2020. Submit your notice online at: gazette.education.govt.nz Listings sent by email will not be accepted.

From Rio to Rotorua: Toitoi Creates Connections Across Cultures Toitoi Media Ltd Toitoi and Latin America CAPE have partnered to create a multilingual app in English, Spanish and Brazilian Portuguese that showcases stories, poems and art by young New Zealanders about the vibrant cultures of Latin America. The app can be downloaded for free and is available on all platforms. Readers can listen to the stories and poems in translation, tap to hear individual words and spellings and even record their own narration. The writing and artwork is accompanied by teacher support materials with ideas for exploring the languages and cultures of Latin America. Download the app and digital resources at www.toitoi.nz/explore. Ref#: 1HAEDA

Community involvement Showquest 2021 Launch Rockquest Promotions Ltd Showquest has launched a trio of programmes for creative students around Aotearoa. Students Y1-13 can enter Showquest – mini Broadway stage shows, and Toi – a wearable art spectacular in collaboration with World of WearableArt. Budding high school filmmakers can enter OnScreen, a digital short film challenge. Showquest and Toi events will be running in 12 regions from May–July 2021, and OnScreen is held in term 3. Showquest is committed to providing accessible events that celebrate diversity, and provide ākonga with unique experiences in the arts. Registrations of interest now open at www.showquest.nz or contact events@showquest.nz for a free infomation pack! Ref#: 1HADUp

Conference / AGM Utaina! A Hui About Learning and Exploring Science in te reo Māori

The views expressed in Education Gazette and Gazette Online are not necessarily those of the Ministry of Education. The Ministry and Education Gazette in no way endorse, approve or accept responsibility for any product or service advertised in this publication or for any website referred to. Organisations wishing to advertise, display website URLs, or have website links in Education Gazette or Gazette Online must assume responsibility for ensuring their material is appropriate. However, Education Gazette staff will check all websites mentioned in the online and print versions of the publication to one level past their introductory homepage to avoid links to inappropriate or offensive content. Staff are reminded that Education Gazette is the official medium for the Ministry’s notices and they are expected to read the Official Notices.

gazette.education.govt.nz

Te Ohu Rauemi Pūtaiao, University of Otago Utaina! is a one-day symposium to bring together educators and researchers interested in science education in te reo Māori. It intends to create a friendly environment to discuss ideas and challenges related to delivering science topics in te reo Māori, as well as hearing about the latest research on this kaupapa. It will be held in Dunedin and via Zoom, on Friday 22 January 2021. For more information, please go to: tiny.cc/utaina. Ref#: 1HAEJW

Jubilees and reunions St Clair School 125th Anniversary Celebrations St Clair We invite present and past pupils, staff, families and friends who have attended St Clair School to join in the celebrations for the 125th anniversary at Queen’s Birthday weekend, 2021. Events will include a cocktail evening with live music, a formal lunch, performances and more. Costings and details to come. Contact and details of the event will be available through our St Clair Facebook page and any queries to Chanel Gardner at 125years@stclair.school.nz.

Spread the word and keep an eye out for details to come. Ref#: 1HAEFW

Projects and programmes Learn Digital Technologies online with the VLN Primary School VLN Primary School Small group or whole class participation. Teachers are welcome to access resources / sessions alongside their students. Digital technologies beginner to extension: » Develop computational and algorithmic thinking » Explore different types of code and start with block-based coding Digital citizenship » Learn digital literacy skills and knowledge about safety in the digital environment » Support available to integrate with class crosscurricular learning Web design » Learn how websites and the internet work » Create websites using Google Sites Enrolments close 22 February 2021, classes start 8 March 2021. Find out more about this programme and register here: https://tinyurl.com/y5as2d38 and https://tinyurl. com/y47t335z. Ref#: 1HAE5i

Ma Petite Planète – Digital Escape Game in French French Embassy in New Zealand This year, for Novembre Numérique (Digital November), the French Embassy presents an original digital escape game created by Alliance Française Wellington! The materials for the digital escape game are available on the Alliance Française webpage. The activity is based on five key threats to biodiversity including overfishing, deforestation and plastic in the oceans. The target age group is 5-10 years old and the activity will take about 1–1½ hours. For statistical purposes, we would love to know if you use the activity with your class in November and what you think about it. For further details: hazel.ryan@diplomatie.gouv.fr Ref#: 1HACNj

Secondary Teachers to Pilot New Peace Education Curriculum NZ Centre for Wellbeing and Resilience Interested senior secondary teachers to be involved in a 10 week Pilot Programme in term 1, 2020 of a new multi-media peace education programme for senior school students aged 15–18. The programme consists of videos and activities that help students discover their own inner resources and strengths. The content of each theme is presented with 20–30 minutes of short videos and time for activities, discussion and reflection. The Peace Education Programme supports educational standards for social and emotional learning competencies, in particular the competencies of self-awareness and self-management. The programme used in a variety of subject areas. For furrther information: www.wellbeingresilience.co.nz. Ref#: 1HAEQp TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 23 November 2020

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PROFESSIONAL LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT NOTICES VLN Primary School – Online Programmes Semester 1, 2021 VLN Primary School Registrations are invited from schools wishing to participate in the VLN Primary School programmes in Semester 1, 2021. Prepare to participate now! Online programmes include: Te reo Māori, kapa haka, NZ sign language, digital technologies, integrated programmes, maths and science, literacy, creative arts and a variety of language and culture beginner and extension options. Enrolments close 22 February 2021, classes start 8 March 2021. Find out more about our online programmes and how to register here https://tinyurl.com/y2wvswwr. Ref#: 1HAE5X

Student competitions and scholarships 2021 National Youth Jazz Competition Tauranga Tauranga Jazz Society Inc The 2021 43rd National Youth Jazz Competition sees secondary student big-bands and combos compete for coveted Tauranga Jazz Society trophies and prizes. The competition is judged by the very best jazz educators in the country and features workshops and opportunities for students to attend key performances by some of New Zealand’s best jazz exponents. The competition is embeded in the National Jazz Festival programme and provides opportunities for student bands to perform at the wider festival. Registrations are online at: www.nationalyouthjazz.org.nz/registration. Ref#: 1HAEET

Doc Edge Schools Student Short Documentary Competition Doc Edge Schools Doc Edge Schools are seeking submissions for our Student Short Documentary Competition! If you know any students who have completed or will complete a short documentary between 15 January 2020 and 15 January 2021, please do encourage them (or help them) to submit via the film freeway link below before 15 January 2021. Doc Edge Festival – FilmFreeway https://filmfreeway.com/DocEdgeFestival or contact matthew@docedge.nz. Ref#: 1HACr1

FMG JR Young Farmer of the Year 2021 New Zealand Young Farmers Testing practical and theoretical knowledge, FMG Junior Young Farmer of the Year inspires personal growth, develops leadership and showcases all the opportunities available in the ag sector through hands on experience. The top five point scoring teams move from the preliminary round, to the ‘face off’ – an FMG Young Farmer of the Year style quiz. The winner and runner up at each regional final advance through to the Grand Final in Christchurch in

July, where they will face off against 14 other teams. The winning duo will be crowned FMG Junior Young Farmers of the Year. For further Information: www.teenag.co.nz/welcome-to-teenag-and-fmgjunior-young-farmer-of-the-year. Ref#: 1HADtC

» Te Tiriti-based Practice

NZ Children’s Map Competition 2021

» Understanding and Cementing Bicultural Practice

NZ Cartographic Society Entries are now open for the NZ Children’s Map Competition 2021 with a submission deadline of 12 March 2021 Competition theme: “A map of my future world” Four age categories: 13–15 years, 9–12 years, 6–8 years, under 6 years. Winning entries in each category (1st, 2nd, 3rd places) receive sponsor prizes. The school of the 1st place winners in each age category receives a LINZ laminated topographic wall map centred on the school! The NZ Children’s Map Competition is organised by the NZ Cartographic Society. Please visit: www.cartography.org.nz/events/ childrens-map-competition for further information and entry forms. Please direct any enquiries to: welovemaps@cartography.org.nz. Ref#: 1HADab

Early learning PLD New Zealand (nationwide)

Ref#: 1HAEPc » Te Tiriti-based Practice

Ref#: 1HAEPm » Understanding and Cementing Bicultural Practice

Ref#: 1HAEPN Ref#: 1HAEPp

Tabitha Leonard » The Learn Culture Club

Ref#: 1HAEFA

Auckland Children’s Autism Foundation » ASK Autism Professional Development – Sensory Issues

Ref#: 1HADc7 » ASK Professional Development – Understanding Autism

Ref#: 1HADc1

Future Learning Solutions, Centre for Educational Leadership » Open-to-learning™ Leadership

Ref#: 1HAEQ3

Kohia Centre, University of Auckland

Ako Space

» Energise – Sleep and Fatigue Workshop, with Dr Mary Miller

» Supporting Children’s Healthy Emotional Development with PACE

Ref#: 1HAD0P

Ref#: 1HACWL

Little Kiwis Nature Play

Lancewood Education

» Linking the Curriculum and the Outdoor Classroom

» James Nottingham – Enhancing Dialogue to Deepen Learning​(Teacher only day)

Ref#: 1HAE2x » James Nottingham – Leadership, Challenge and Collective Efficacy (Leadership only day) Ref#: 1HAE30

Senior Teacher » Creating a Strong Feedback Culture in Your Team

Ref#: 1HACoG

Senior Teacher » Implementing Tātaiako – Auckland Venue

Ref#: 1HAEQ1 » Journey with Tapasā – Auckland Venue

Ref#: 1HAEPv

Sustainable Coastlines

Ref#: 1HAEQD » Creating a Strong Feedback Culture in Your Team – 2 Consecutive Evenings

» Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme

Ref#: 1HAEPi

Ref#: 1HAD4K

» Implementing Tātaiako

Ref#: 1HAEPA » Internal Evaluation/Self-review for Early Childhood Services – 2 Consecutive Evening Sessions Ref#: 1HAEPG » Journey with Tapasā

Ref#: 1HAChL » Māori Assessment Methods – 2 Consecutive Evenings

Bay of Plenty Sustainable Coastlines » Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme

Ref#: 1HAD4K

Taranaki Sustainable Coastlines

Ref#: 1HAEQK » Supporting Social and Emotional Competence in Early Learning: A Practical Implementation

» Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme

Ref#: 1HAEPU

Ref#: 1HAD4K

For full professional learning and development (PLD) listings see gazette.education.govt.nz/notices 36

Education Gazette | 23 November 2020

gazette.education.govt.nz


PROFESSIONAL LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT NOTICES Manawatu/Whanganui The Team Building Company » Building and Maintaining a Connected and Collaborative Team

Ref#: 1HACyj

» Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Ref#: 1HAENT » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAENZ » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

» ASK Professional Development – Understanding Autism

Ref#: 1HADc1

Future Learning Solutions, Centre for Educational Leadership

Ref#: 1HAENh » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

» Growing Great Leaders™ Level 1

Ref#: 1HAENo » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

» Growing Great Leaders™ Level 2

Ref#: 1HAEN0

Ref#: 1HAENu » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

» Open-to-learning™ Leadership

impactED

Ref#: 1HAEP3 » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Canterbury 4Es Consulting » Implementation of the Professional Growth Cycle

» Local Curriculum Through Game Design (Rubber Duck Awards)

Ref#: 1HAE56

Ref#: 1HAEP9 » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

» Using Gamefroot to Share Canterbury Stories (Rubber Duck Awards)

Ref#: 1HAEPJ » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Ref#: 1HAE5C

Ref#: 1HAEPb » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Little Kiwis Nature Play

Ref#: 1HAEPk Ref#: 1HAEPu Ref#: 1HAEQ3

Kohia Centre, University of Auckland » Energise – Sleep and Fatigue Workshop, with Dr Mary Miller

Ref#: 1HAD0P

Les Mills » BORN TO MOVE Leadership Programme

» Nature Play Conference 2021

Ref#: 1HAEPe » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Ref#: 1HAD2R

Ref#: 1HAEPo

Little Kiwis Nature Play » Linking the Curriculum and the Outdoor Classroom

Ref#: 1HADtR

Sustainable Coastlines

Lancewood Education

» Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme

» James Nottingham – Enhancing Dialogue to Deepen Learning​(Teacher-only day)

Ref#: 1HAD4K

Ref#: 1HAE2x

S&L Publishing Limited

» James Nottingham – Leadership, Challenge and Collective Efficacy (Leadership-only day)

» A Balanced Reading Programme – Reviewing the Approaches

Primary / intermediate PLD New Zealand (nationwide) Ako Space

Ref#: 1HAE30

Senior Teacher » Implementing Tātaiako

Ref#: 1HAEPA

» Supporting Children’s Healthy Emotional Development with PACE

» Journey with Tapasā

Ref#: 1HACWL

» Te Tiriti-based Practice

Family Planning New Zealand » Navigating the Journey of RSE

Ref#: 1HADcc

Ref#: 1HAChL Ref#: 1HAEPc

Ref#: 1HAEMx » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEN6 » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEN9 » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Senior Teacher » Implementing Tātaiako – Auckland Venue

Ref#: 1HAEQ1

Sustainable Coastlines Ref#: 1HAD4K

» Understanding and Cementing Bicultural Practice

Ref#: 1HAEPp

» Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Ref#: 1HADk9

Ref#: 1HAEPm

» Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Ref#: 1HAEMu

» Developing an Effective Writing Programme

» Te Tiriti-based Practice

» Understanding and Cementing Bicultural Practice

» Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Ref#: 1HADkC

» Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme

Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEMQ

Ref#: 1HACoG

Ref#: 1HAEPN

Tabitha Leonard » The Learn Culture Club

Ref#: 1HAEFA

Te Whai Toi Tangata: Institute of Professional Learning, University of Waikato » Teacher Aide PLD Workshops Online

Ref#: 1HAEGs

Auckland

Waikato S&L Publishing Limited » Embedding Oral Language Across the Curriculum

Ref#: 1HADv9

Te Whai Toi Tangata: Institute of Professional Learning, University of Waikato » Hamilton: Primary Year 1 PCT (0–4) Workshop Series

Ref#: 1HAEDm » Hamilton: Primary Year 1 PCT (5–10) Workshop Series Ref#: 1HAEDy » Hamilton: Primary Year 2 PCT (0–4) Workshop Series

Ref#: 1HAEPW » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Children’s Autism Foundation

Ref#: 1HAENF » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

» ASK Autism Professional Development – Sensory Issues

Ref#: 1HAEEA » Hamilton: Primary Year 2 PCT (5–10) Workshop Series

Ref#: 1HAENM

Ref#: 1HADc7

Ref#: 1HAEED

For full professional learning and development (PLD) listings see gazette.education.govt.nz/notices

gazette.education.govt.nz

TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 23 November 2020

37


PROFESSIONAL LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT NOTICES Ref#: 1HAEGm

Area / composite PLD

Bay of Plenty Sustainable Coastlines

New Zealand (nationwide) Ako Space

» Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme

» Supporting Children’s Healthy Emotional Development with PACE

Ref#: 1HAD4K

Ref#: 1HACWL

Te Whai Toi Tangata: Institute of Professional Learning, University of Waikato

Family Planning New Zealand

» Teacher Aide PLD Workshops in Hamilton

» Tauranga: Primary Year 1 PCT (0–8) Workshop Series

Ref#: 1HAECK » Tauranga: Primary Year 2 PCT (0–8) Workshop Series

Ref#: 1HAEE7

» Navigating the Journey of RSE

Ref#: 1HADcc

Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Ref#: 1HAEMQ » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Tabitha Leonard » The Learn Culture Club

Ref#: 1HAEFA

Auckland Children’s Autism Foundation » ASK Autism Professional Development – Sensory Issues

Ref#: 1HADc7 » ASK Professional Development – Understanding Autism Ref#: 1HADc1

Future Learning Solutions, Centre for Educational Leadership » Growing Great Leaders™ Level 1

Ref#: 1HAEPk » Growing Great Leaders™ Level 2

» Teacher Aide PLD Workshops in Tauranga

Ref#: 1HAEMu

Ref#: 1HAEGi

» Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Taranaki Sustainable Coastlines

» Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

» Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme

Ref#: 1HAEN6

Kohia Centre, University of Auckland

» Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Ref#: 1HAEN9

» Energise – Sleep and Fatigue Workshop, with Dr Mary Miller

» Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Ref#: 1HAD0P

Ref#: 1HAD4K

Canterbury impactED » Digital Technologies MiEE Hui

Ref#: 1HAEMx

Ref#: 1HAEPW » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAENF

Ref#: 1HACZp

» Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

» Local Curriculum Through Game Design (Rubber Duck Awards)

» Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Ref#: 1HAENM

Ref#: 1HAEPu » Open-to-learning™ Leadership Ref#: 1HAEQ3

Les Mills » BORN TO MOVE Leadership Programme

Ref#: 1HADtR

Sustainable Coastlines

Ref#: 1HAE56

Ref#: 1HAENT

» Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme

» Using Gamefroot to Share Canterbury Stories (Rubber Duck Awards)

» Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Ref#: 1HAD4K

Ref#: 1HAE5C

Ref#: 1HAENZ » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Little Kiwis Nature Play

» Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Waikato Te Whai Toi Tangata: Institute of Professional Learning, University of Waikato

Ref#: 1HAENh

» Nature Play Conference 2021

Ref#: 1HAENo

Ref#: 1HAD2R

» Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

S&L Publishing Limited

» Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

» Developing an Effective Writing Programme

Ref#: 1HADk9

StoryWays Literacy Ltd » Storytelling to Accelerate Oral Language and Learning Across the Curriculum

Ref#: 1HAENu Ref#: 1HAEP3 » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Ref#: 1HAEP9 » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Ref#: 1HADVb

Ref#: 1HAEPJ » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Sustainable Coastlines

» Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

» Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme

» Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Ref#: 1HAD4K

Ref#: 1HAEPo

Otago S&L Publishing Limited

Ref#: 1HAEPb Ref#: 1HAEPe

Lancewood Education » James Nottingham – Enhancing Dialogue To Deepen Learning​(Teacher only day)

» Hamilton: Primary Year 1 PCT (0–4) Workshop Series

Ref#: 1HAEDm » Hamilton: Primary Year 1 PCT (5–10) Workshop Series Ref#: 1HAEDy » Hamilton: Primary Year 2 PCT (0–4) Workshop Series Ref#: 1HAEEA » Hamilton: Primary Year 2 PCT (5–10) Workshop Series Ref#: 1HAEED » Hamilton: Secondary Year 1 PCT (9–13) Workshop Series Ref#: 1HAEEK » Hamilton: Secondary Year 2 PCT (9-13) Workshop Series Ref#: 1HAEER

Ref#: 1HAE2x

Bay of Plenty Sustainable Coastlines

» Developing an Effective Writing Programme

» James Nottingham – Leadership, Challenge and Collective Efficacy (Leadership only day)

» Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme

Ref#: 1HADk9

Ref#: 1HAE30

Ref#: 1HAD4K

» A Balanced Reading Programme – Reviewing the Approaches

Ref#: 1HADkC

For full professional learning and development (PLD) listings see gazette.education.govt.nz/notices 38

Education Gazette | 23 November 2020

gazette.education.govt.nz


PROFESSIONAL LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT NOTICES Te Whai Toi Tangata: Institute of Professional Learning, University of Waikato » Rotorua: Secondary Year 1 PCT (9–13) Workshop Series

Ref#: 1HAEEN » Rotorua: Secondary Year 2 PCT (9–13) Workshop Series Ref#: 1HAEEU » Tauranga: Primary Year 1 PCT (0–8) Workshop Series Ref#: 1HAECK » Tauranga: Primary Year 2 PCT (0–8) Workshop Series

» Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Ref#: 1HAEN9 » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Ref#: 1HAEPW » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Ref#: 1HAENF

Les Mills » BORN TO MOVE Leadership Programme

Ref#: 1HAENM

Ref#: 1HADtR

» Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Ref#: 1HAENT » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Ref#: 1HAENZ » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Ref#: 1HAENh

Taranaki Sustainable Coastlines

» Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Ref#: 1HAD4K

Ref#: 1HAENo » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Ref#: 1HAENu » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Ref#: 1HAEP3

Canterbury impactED

» Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

» Digital Technologies MiEE Hui

» Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Ref#: 1HACZp » Local Curriculum Through Game Design (Rubber Duck Awards)

Ref#: 1HAD0P

» Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Ref#: 1HAEE7

» Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme

Kohia Centre, University of Auckland » Energise – Sleep and Fatigue Workshop, with Dr Mary Miller

Ref#: 1HAEP9 Ref#: 1HAEPJ » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Sustainable Coastlines » Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme

Ref#: 1HAD4K

Waikato Te Whai Toi Tangata: Institute of Professional Learning, University of Waikato » Hamilton: Secondary Year 1 PCT (9–13) Workshop Series

Ref#: 1HAEEK » Hamilton: Secondary Year 2 PCT (9–13) Workshop Series Ref#: 1HAEER

Bay of Plenty Sustainable Coastlines

Ref#: 1HAE56 » Using Gamefroot to Share Canterbury Stories (Rubber Duck Awards)

Ref#: 1HAEPb

» Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme

» Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Ref#: 1HAD4K

Ref#: 1HAE5C

» Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Little Kiwis Nature Play

Ref#: 1HAEPe Ref#: 1HAEPo

» Nature Play Conference 2021

Lancewood Education

Ref#: 1HAD2R

» James Nottingham – Enhancing Dialogue To Deepen Learning​(Teacher only day)

Sustainable Coastlines » Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme

Ref#: 1HAD4K

Secondary PLD New Zealand (nationwide) Ako Space » Supporting Children’s Healthy Emotional Development with PACE

Ref#: 1HACWL

Family Planning New Zealand » Navigating the Journey of RSE

Ref#: 1HADcc

Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Ref#: 1HAEMQ » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEMu » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

Ref#: 1HAE2x » James Nottingham – Leadership, Challenge and Collective Efficacy (Leadership only day)

Te Whai Toi Tangata: Institute of Professional Learning, University of Waikato » Rotorua: Secondary Year 1 PCT (9–13) Workshop Series Ref#: 1HAEEN » Rotorua: Secondary Year 2 PCT (9–13) Workshop Series

Ref#: 1HAEEU

Ref#: 1HAE30

Taranaki Sustainable Coastlines

Tabitha Leonard

» Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme

» The Learn Culture Club

Ref#: 1HAEFA

Auckland Children’s Autism Foundation » ASK Autism Professional Development – Sensory Issues

Ref#: 1HADc7 » ASK Professional Development – Understanding Autism

Ref#: 1HADc1

Future Learning Solutions, Centre for Educational Leadership

Ref#: 1HAD4K

Canterbury impactED » Digital Technologies MiEE Hui

Ref#: 1HACZp » Local Curriculum Through Game Design (Rubber Duck Awards) Ref#: 1HAE56 » Using Gamefroot to Share Canterbury Stories (Rubber Duck Awards) Ref#: 1HAE5C

Little Kiwis Nature Play

» Growing Great Leaders™ Level 1

» Nature Play Conference 2021

Ref#: 1HAEPk

Ref#: 1HAD2R

» Growing Great Leaders™ Level 2

Ref#: 1HAEPu

Sustainable Coastlines

Ref#: 1HAEMx » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages

» Open-to-learning™ Leadership

» Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme

Ref#: 1HAEN6

Ref#: 1HAEQ3

Ref#: 1HAD4K

For full professional learning and development (PLD) listings see gazette.education.govt.nz/notices

gazette.education.govt.nz

TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 23 November 2020

39


VACANCIES

Contents

General 40 Guidance and careers 40 Early learning 40 Primary and intermediate (Years 1-8)

» Resource teacher 45 » Mātauranga Māori 45 » Teachers 45 » Senior leadership 46

Area / composite (Years 1-15)

» Mātauranga Māori 47 » Teachers 47 » Senior leadership 47

Secondary (Years 7-15)

» Mātauranga Māori 47 » Teachers 47 » Middle leadership 49 » Senior leadership 49

Equal Employment Opportunities (EEO)

The State Sector Act 1988 and the Human Rights Act 1993 ensure that equal employment opportunities apply to recruitment. EEO principles should be applied to every part of the recruitment process ie the development of the job description, the person specification, the advertisement and the appointment process. These principles enable people to apply for jobs without their chances being reduced by factors irrelevant to the requirements under consideration. Refer to the appropriate collective agreement for the conditions of service applicable to the position advertised. Employers also have to meet safety checking requirements under the Vulnerable Children Act 2014 when recruiting.

General

New Zealand (nationwide) New Zealand Qualifications Authority

NZQA service moderator Part-time, contract Ref#: 1HADvK

Northland Waitangi Treaty Grounds

Educator (Mātauranga Māori – digital learning) Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADmQ Educator (digital learning) Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADqT

Bay of Plenty Tauranga Moana Resource Teachers: Learning and Behaviour

Tauranga Moana RTLB Full-time, permanent, 1MU + SDA Ref#: 1HAE6i

Guidance and careers Northland Okaihau College

Guidance counsellor Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEHy

Whangarei Girls’ High School

McAuley High School Guidance counsellor Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAE9A Head of health and guidance Full-time, permanent, 1MU + 1MMA Ref#: 1HAE0f

Waikato Melville High School Head guidance counsellor Part-time, permanent, 1MMU Ref#: 1HAENA

Hawke’s Bay Havelock North High School Guidance counsellor Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADw6

Wellington Wellington High School and Community Education Centre Guidance counsellor Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEMC

Early learning Northland BestStart, Maunu Village

Guidance counsellor Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEN3

Qualified teacher Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEHv

Auckland Alfriston College

Bream Bay Kindergarten

Guidance counsellor Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADou

0.5 teacher: salary scale K1 – Northland Kindergarten Association Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE8Q

Deadlines for vacancies

Copy for 7 December 2020 closes 4pm, Friday 27 November 2020. Submit your vacancy online at: gazette.education.govt.nz See full listings online for closing dates. Listings are removed from the website after the closing date. Listings sent by email will not be accepted.

Secondment opportunity 2021 with the Raranga Matihiko | Weaving Digital Futures programme Te Papa is seeking two Learning Specialists to support our Raranga Matihiko | Weaving Digital Futures programme. Raranga Matihiko delivers innovative digital technologies curriculum learning to those with limited digital learning opportunities. This role will contribute to the development of our learning programmes for ākonga in English medium and Māori Medium contexts. You will empower our learners through weaving digital technologies curriculum learning with Te Papa’s collections, exhibitions and resources by designing and facilitating meaningful learning experiences, resources and products for ākonga. This role is a full time (40 hours) fixed term contract to 18 December 2021 to help Te Papa deliver Raranga Matihiko | Weaving Digital Futures programme. This is an ideal year long experience for a teacher secondment. Bring your classroom skills and insights, learn new skills in an innovative context and then return to school refreshed and energised for 2022. For more information on the programme, check our website rarangamatihiko.com For more information on the positions, check the Te Papa website: https://www.tepapa.govt.nz/about/jobs

40

Education Gazette | 23 November 2020

gazette.education.govt.nz


Early learning

VACANCIES

Little Gemz Childcare

BestStart, Onslow Road

Dreamcatchers Preschool

Early learning teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAD11

Qualified teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADaF

Qualified ECE teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACeA

Mini Miracles Educare, Claudelands

BestStart, Papakura

Dynamic Kids, Onehunga

Qualified ECE teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADAG

Qualified teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEGv

Parklands Playcentre

BestStart, St Lukes

Session facilitator Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADfb

Selwyn Park Kindergarten Teacher: salary scale K1 – Northland Kindergarten Association Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEFr

Auckland ACG Strathallan Preschool Centre Qualified ECE teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADNr

Amber Early Learning Centre Early childhood qualified and certificated teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADFp

Angels Childcare, New Lynn Certified or provisional toddlers teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HACTG

Bear Park Childcare, Mairangi Bay Early childhood educator Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE5_

Bear Park Herne Bay Early Childhood Education Centre Qualified infants and toddlers teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACQy

Bear Park, Hobsonville Point Centre director Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HACR1

BestStart, East Tamaki Road Qualified teacher – infants Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEHi

BestStart, Glen Eden Qualified teacher Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEG_

BestStart, Great North Road Qualified teachers Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADa0

BestStart, Onehunga Head teacher / assistant manager Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEGA gazette.education.govt.nz

Qualified teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEGN

BestStart, Waiuku Assistant manager / head teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADaM

BestStart, Wattle Downs Centre manager Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADaJ

Birkenhead Point Montessori Preschool ECE qualified art teacher Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEBX

Bright Sparks Childcare, Henderson Qualified / registered or third year in-training teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAD2Y

Brilliant Minds Early Childhood Centre Early childhood educator Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACdD

Childsplay Unlimited, Kingsland Qualified / registered teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAELs

Childsteps Early Learning Centre Infants / toddlers teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADt9

Cosmo Kids Qualified ECE teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACop

Cozy Corner Educare Qualified early childhood teachers (2 positions) Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACLX

Creative Kids

ECE teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADDk

Eduplay Childcare, Otahuhu ECE teacher and room leader Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADyk

Fantails Childcare – Country Qualified teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAD9_

Fetu Aolele Multicultural ECE Service Early learning educator Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE4k

Giraffe ELC Centre manager Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACrP Head teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE3m Qualified ECE teachers Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE3p

Hand and Hand Early Learning Centre, Kumeu Montessori teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAD4n

Kiddie Garden Learning Corner ECE qualified, registered teacher / head teacher (2 to 5-year-olds) Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACkE

Kids Forever Christian Preschool Qualified certified ECE teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADrM

Kids’ Kampus (2000) ECE qualified teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADp3

Kidz & Crayonz Early Learning Centre

Qualified early childhood teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACpS

3rd year / final year ECE in-training teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADWv

Cuddly Kiwis Childcare, Papatoetoe

Kimberley Childcare, Greenlane

Registered ECE educator Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACXV

Head teacher O2 Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE8f

Devonport Community Creche

Kindercare Learning Centres, Grey Lynn

Teacher Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADVv

Toddlers teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADdv TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 23 November 2020

41


VACANCIES

Early learning

Koru Kindy

Naval ECE – Tamariki House

Teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACNH

Head teacher / professional leader Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACNf

Learning Tree, Silverdale

Nurture Early Learning, Red Beach

Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEEc

Tiny Voices, Hobsonville

Qualified and registered Infants and toddlers teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACqj

Qualified registered teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADwe

Experienced preschool team leader Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADUW Preschool team leader Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEDK

Lil’ Champs Early Learning Centre

Penguins School of Early Learning

Tipu Montessori School

Early childhood educator – qualified and registered Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACvP

Qualified ECE teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADyv

Little Earth Montessori, Remuera

Plum Tree Preschool, Millwater

Early childhood teacher / Montessori guide Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACo_

Qualified early childhood toddlers teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADSR

Little Feet Childcare Centre, Yates Rd

Pohutukawa Kindergarten, Glendowie

Early childhood teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADEs

Toki Explorers

ECE, primary or teacher-in-training! Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEE_

Treetops ELC, Botany Junction

Early learning educators (multiple positions) Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACU5

Teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACKz

Qualified teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADio

Little Kiwis Early Learning Centre

Rising Stars Henderson Early Childhood Centre

Treetops ELC, Pukekohe

Registered and certified teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADkK

Little Moas Early Learning Centre Qualified kaiako Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAENm

Little Sparks Educare Preschool teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEB_

Love and Joy Early Learning Centre Qualified early childhood teachers Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEMW

Magical Years Childcare Centre Registered ECE teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADvx

Manurewa Early Discoveries Centre ECE centre manager Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACd1

Merryland Childcare Centre Qualified teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADmu

Michael Park Kindergarten Kindergarten teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE9e

Molly’s Preschool Kaiako and co-learner Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADMT

Mt Royal Early Learning Centre Registered ECE or primary trained teacher Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACMV

42

Education Gazette | 23 November 2020

Qualified and registered U2 teachers Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACnd

Small Fries Christian Childcare Centre Qualified O2 teacher Full-time, permanent

Ref#: 1HAE3X Teachers Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE9y

Star Educare

Certificated infants room teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADg6

UNITEC Early Learning Centre Kaiako – toddlers Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACnP

Young World Childcare Centre Qualified teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADmb

Qualified ECE teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADy4

Waikato Apakura Te Kakano Early Learning Centre

Talented Tots Early Childhood Centre

Early learning team lead Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEM3

Qualified early childhood teachers for infants and toddlers room Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADYU

The Village Early Learning Centre Qualified head teacher – infants Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEJ_ Qualified head teacher – toddlers Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEJi Qualified kaiako Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEJm Qualified kaiako – infants Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACP4 Unregistered kaiako Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACQ_

Three Bears New Lynn Childcare ECE teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE0i

Tiny Explorers Early Learning Centre ECE, primary or teacher-in-training

BestStart, Frankton Early learning qualified, infants and toddlers teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAD_b

Country Creche Childcare Centre Team leader U2 Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADNR Untrained or teacher-in-training Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADNX

Country Kidz Qualified early childhood teacher or 3rd year in-training Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAChH

Curious Cubs City Early Learning Centre Preschool teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE8m Qualified teacher – babies room Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAE91 gazette.education.govt.nz


Early learning Teacher in training for toddlers room Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE94

Curious Cubs Early Learning Centre Qualified teacher O2 Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE8p

Grasshoppers Early Learning Centre Preschool ECE registered teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE6N

Grow Early Education Teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HACvY

Kindercare Learning Centres, Flagstaff Early childhood teacher Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADJN

Kindercare Learning Centres, Massey Babies teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAD6D

Lets Grow Early Learning Centre Qualified registered early childhood teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACg_

Mercury Bay Preschool (2018) Qualified ECE teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADnG

Mini Miracles Educare, Claudelands Team leader Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADWD

New Shoots Children’s Centre, Matamata Centre director Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAECM

Ngatea Early Learning Centre ECE – head teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACkG

The Meadows Early Learning Centre Qualified nursery and preschool teachers Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADS4

Turangi Kindy Registered teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACZ2

Bay of Plenty Amber Early Learning Centre

Beginnings and Beyond Quality Preschool Early learning educator Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACxY

Coastlands Preschool Qualified, registered U2s teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEA0

Lilliput Preschool Qualified early childhood teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAE2Z

Little Pipi Early Childhood Centre Experience pepi teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADN3

Little Sweethearts Montessori, Historic Village ECE registered teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADi7

Nature’s Cove Early Learning Centre Qualified teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE6W

New Shoots Children’s Centre, Tauranga Qualified toddlers teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACx7

Gisborne Gisborne Hospital Childcare & Education Centre Inc U2s registered teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADus

VACANCIES

Taranaki ABC Educare

ECE qualified and certified infants and toddlers teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADpN

Sophia Preschool ECE fully or provisionally registered teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAC_V

Tawhiti Kindergarten Teacher Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEPs

Manawatu/Whanganui All About Kidz Childcare ECE qualified registered kaiako Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADXm

Cloverlea Kindergarten Head teacher – Ruahine Kindergaten Association Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEEk

Dannevirke Central Kindergarten Teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE8M

Eden Christian Kindergarten Qualified teacher Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADSr Qualified teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADPc

Footsteps Adventist Preschool Early childhood educators (2 positions) Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADZK

Holyoake Kindergarten

Whare Amai Early Learning Centre

Teacher – Ruahine Kindergarten Association Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEEh

Early learning educator Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAENe

Kindercare Learning Centres, Palmerston North

Hawke’s Bay Chuckles Learning Centre Early childhood qualified educator Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADCD

Taokotaianga Apii Kuki Airani Early Childhood Centre Infants and toddlers qualified teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACrD

Te Kōpere

Early childhood teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HABe1

Little Monkeys at Home Visiting teacher / kaiako Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACZy

Matariki Rudolf Steiner Kindergarten Early learning kindergarten teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADt3

Smart Start Care and Education Centre

Early childhood qualified and certificated teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADFi

Head kaiako Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADth

Awhi Educare @ Glenholme

Tiny Voices, Napier

Te Aroha Noa Early Childhood Centre

Qualified and registered teacher / team leader Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEEZ

Early childhood centre leader Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADoJ

ECE qualified, registered, infant superstar Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADW9 gazette.education.govt.nz

Qualified ECE teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEJ7

TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 23 November 2020

43


VACANCIES

Early learning

Wellington BestStart, Cornwall Street Qualified teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEFk

BestStart, Kaiwharawhara Head teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEFu

BestStart, Totara Park Qualified teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEFo

Blue School Manager Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEDJ Qualified and registered teacher Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEDQ

Busy Beez Childcare Centre Early learning educator Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAECW Early learning educator Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEC9

Farmhouse Preschool and Nursery Certified early childhood teacher Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADwm

Gracefield Early Childhood Centre Certified early childhood teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEEM

Kindercare Learning Centres, Aotea

Te Kainganui Early Education Centre Qualified early learning kaiako Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACS1

Marlborough BestStart, Springlands Centre manager Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADgK Qualified teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADgG

Renwick Kindergarten Teacher – Marlborough Kindergartens Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADyo Teacher 0.8 Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADJF

Renwick Preschool and Childcare Centre Qualified teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADcA

Tasman/Nelson Greenwood Kindergarten Early childhood teacher – Nelson Tasman Kindergartens Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADFN

Hira Rural Kindergarten Early childhood teacher – Nelson Tasman Kindergartens Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADFR

Tapawera Kindergarten

Babies teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAAbY

Early childhood teacher – Nelson Tasman Kindergartens Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEG3

Kindercare Learning Centres, Johnsonville

Canterbury Ako Rolleston

Early childhood teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEJF

Toddlers space kaiako Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEAR

Kindercare Learning Centres, Tawa

Blossoms Early Learning Centre

Early childhood teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEJJ

Qualified teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADHo

Nettie Riley Kindergarten

Buttercups Preschool, Dallington

Kindergarten teacher – Hutt City Kindergartens Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE6y

Qualified early childhood teacher O2s Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADMJ

Rainbow Early Learning Centre

Cashmere Early Learning Centre

Early childhood registered teacher Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE0T

Early childhood kaiako Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADCb

South Wellington Montessori School

Fundamentals, Marshland

Registered Montessori assistant Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADoK

Preschool teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAD5L

44

Education Gazette | 23 November 2020

Kindercare Learning Centres, Aidanfield Transition to school teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADys

Learning Curves Montessori, Redwood Early childhood teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACz1

Nestled Early Learning Centre Centre manager Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEB9

Sydenham Community Preschool ECE teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADnA

Waitaki Valley Preschool Kaiako Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADTF

Otago Gems Rata Teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAE0e

Green Island Kindergarten Teacher – Dunedin Kindergartens Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAELp

Kelsey-Yaralla Kindergarten Head teacher – Dunedin Kindergartens Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEL_

Queenstown Preschool and Nursery ECE certificated kaiako Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADw3

Skiwiland, Coronet Peak Kaiako early learning educator Full-time, permanent, Q1, Q2, Q,3 Ref#: 1HADxX

Wakari Kindergarten Teacher – Dunedin Kindergartens Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAELm

Southland Balfour Playcentre Session facilitator Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAD_4

Kew Pacific Island Early Learning Centre Registered early childhood teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACLR

Little Ones Early Learning Centre Early learning kaiako Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACgt gazette.education.govt.nz


Primary and intermediate Y1-8 Teachers Woodhouse Early Learning Centre Qualified teacher Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADg9 Qualified teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADQ6

Primary / intermediate Y1–8 Resource teacher Auckland Manurewa East School Resource teacher of learning and behaviour (several positions) Full-time, permanent, 1MU + SDA Ref#: 1HADLX

Takapuna School Resource teacher: literacy Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEDZ

Wellington Bellevue School, Newlands RTLB Full-time, permanent, 1MU + SDA Ref#: 1HADv7

Canterbury Oceanview Heights School Resource teacher learning behaviour Full-time, permanent, SDA + 1PU Ref#: 1HADsc

Mātauranga Māori Auckland Otahuhu School Team leader Y4–6 Māori bilingual hub Full-time, permanent, 2MU + MITA Ref#: 1HADxp

Manawatu/Whanganui TKKM o Te Atihaunui-A-Paparangi Kaiako pūmau Full-time, permanent, MITA Ref#: 1HAE14

Teachers Northland Dargaville Primary School 0.4 Scale A teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAE7F

Kaitaia Intermediate Y7-8 Scale A teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE9r

Tautoro School Y4–5 teacher Full-time, fixed-term, MITA + PTSAR Ref#: 1HAE7c Y6–7 te reo teacher Full-time, fixed-term, MITA + PTSAR Ref#: 1HAE7f gazette.education.govt.nz

Auckland ACG Parnell College Teacher / tutor - English / psychology Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HACZ4

ACG Strathallan Primary teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADQ3

Belmont Intermediate Music teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAE6T

Destiny School Y1–2 teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADxy

Edmund Hillary School Teacher Y4–5 Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAD72

Henderson Valley School Scale A teacher Y3–4 Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HACU_

Kelston Intermediate Scale A teachers (3 positions) Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADNy

King’s School, Remuera Scale A / senior teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEBA

Manukau Christian School Teacher – upper primary Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADXh

Manurewa East School Learning support coordinator Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEQQ

Marcellin College Y7–8 teacher. Tagged Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAED6

Mulberry Grove School Scale A teacher Y5-8 Full-time, permanent, IA + SIA Ref#: 1HAE5r

Panmure Bridge School Class teacher Y4 Full-time, fixed-term, PTSA Ref#: 1HADPR

Rangeview Intermediate Materials and food technology teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADee Teachers of mathematics and/or integrated literacies (2–3 positions) Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADeh

VACANCIES

Remuera Intermediate Intermediate school teacher Y7 or 8 Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADtk

Rongomai School Scale A teacher Y1–2 Full-time, fixed-term, PTSA Ref#: 1HAENX Y1–3 Māori enhancement class Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADN1

Sancta Maria Catholic Primary School Music teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAD1v

Sandspit Road School Teacher Y4–8 Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADhr Teacher Y4–8 Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADhZ

Sir Edmund Hillary Collegiate Middle School Y8 Scale A teacher Full-time, permanent, 1FTU Ref#: 1HAE0s

St Heliers School Teacher Y7 or Y8 Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEMJ Teacher Y7–8 Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAELx Y7 teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADZR

St Joseph’s School, Orakei Teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADry

Te Matauranga Classroom teacher, senior area Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADqW Junior school teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAE4b

Te Papapa School 0.4 SENCO 0.6 release teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAE5U Release teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAE5R

Timatanga Community School Junior classroom teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAE9R

Wellsford School NE–Y1 teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAELr TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 23 November 2020

45


VACANCIES

Primary and intermediate Y1-8 Teachers

Woodlands Park School Scale A teacher – junior school Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEHu

Waikato Horahora School, Cambridge

Manawatu/Whanganui Mangatainoka School Classroom teacher - various year levels Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE27

Papatawa School

Junior teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADsR

0.4 principal release teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAECo

Kinohaku School

Taitoko School

Principal release teacher 0.3 Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADM_

Scale A teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HACx8

Maihiihi School

Woodville School

Primary Scale A teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HACZN

Waikino School Learning coach Full-time, permanent, 1MU Ref#: 1HADqZ

Waitakaruru School Teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADvX

Bay of Plenty Kawaha Point School Teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADj_

Nukuhou North School Scale A teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAELi

St Mary’s Catholic School, Rotorua Classroom teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEHm

Waikite Valley School Teacher – junior / middle / senior / bilingual Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAD7G

Scale A teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADne

Wellington Douglas Park School Learning support coordinator Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADfy

Evans Bay Intermediate Counsellor Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAE0K Scale A teacher Full-time, permanent

Ref#: 1HADzm Scale A teacher (0.6 position) Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAE04

Fraser Crescent School

Scale A teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAE8v

Oceanview Heights School Scale A teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADsZ

Waipara School Scale A teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAE7v

Whītau School Scale A classroom teacher Full-time, permanent, 1PMU Ref#: 1HAEH7

Otago Five Forks School Scale A teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAE2h

Southland St John’s Girls’ School, Invercargill Y4 teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEF3 Y6 teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEF6

Senior leadership Auckland Pukekohe Hill School

Teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAECZ

Deputy principal Full-time, permanent, 5MU + 2FTMU Ref#: 1HADmZ

Taita Central School

Sunnynook School

Te reo Māori / te ao Māori teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADsM

Deputy principal Full-time, permanent, 4MU Ref#: 1HADw4

Marlborough Renwick School

Te Uho O Te Nikau Primary School

Scale A teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADmy

Te Pā Wānanga – kaiako Full-time, permanent, 1MU + MITA Ref#: 1HADpb Teacher – junior school Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEAv

Hawke’s Bay Heretaunga Intermediate

West Coast Blaketown School

Gisborne Potaka School

Mayfield School

Y8 teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEKc

Teacher Y7–8 Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADw_

Peterhead School

Maruia School

Deputy principal Full-time, permanent, 5MU Ref#: 1HAE9i

Wellsford School Classroom teacher / team leader Full-time, permanent, 1.5MU Ref#: 1HAELW

Wentworth Primary Head of primary Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADtA

Waikato Maramarua School

Scale A teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADyh

Teacher Part-time, permanent, IA Ref#: 1HAEKM

Principal / tumuaki U2 Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEK0

Taranaki St Patrick’s School, Kaponga

Canterbury Little River School

Bay of Plenty Te Kura o Torere

Scale A teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAELF

46

Education Gazette | 23 November 2020

Y2–3 teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAE5J

Principal / tumuaki Full-time, permanent, MITA Ref#: 1HACjz gazette.education.govt.nz


Secondary Y7-15 Teachers Hawke’s Bay Maraenui Bilingual School, Napier Kaihautū – associate principal Full-time, permanent, MMA + MITA Ref#: 1HADzv

Manawatu/Whanganui Halcombe Primary School Principal U4 Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEKm

Kairanga School Deputy principal Full-time, permanent, 2PMU Ref#: 1HAELk

Wellington Karori West Normal School Team leader Y5–6 Full-time, permanent, 2MU + NSA Ref#: 1HACk5

Marlborough Havelock School Deputy principal Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACpV

Tua Marina School Principal U3 Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEL7

Canterbury Waimate Centennial School Principal U4 Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADT6

West Melton School Tumuaki | Principal Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADPW

Whītau School

Teachers Northland Broadwood Area School Teachers of junior school Y3-4, Y5-6 (2 positions) Full-time, permanent, MU + MMA + MITA Ref#: 1HACsK

TKKM o Te Rawhiti Roa Kaiako Tau 2 Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACvX Wharekura maths kaiako Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEKi

Auckland Destiny School Y7–8 teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADy1

Iqra School Junior class teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADrT Junior class teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADrQ

Tyndale Park Christian School Intermediate teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADLU Primary teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADLR

Auckland Iqra School Senior teacher Y7 Full-time, permanent, 1U Ref#: 1HADrF

Otago The Catlins Area School Principal U3 Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADdK

Secondary Y7–15 Mātauranga Māori Bay of Plenty Te Wharekura o Ngāti Rongomai Kaiako - wharekura MPA / hākinakina Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEE0

Teachers Auckland ACG Parnell College

Auckland International College

Gisborne Te Waha O Rerekohu Area School

Taranaki Patea Area School

Principal, U3 Full-time, permanent, Isolation allowance Ref#: 1HADfA

Y3-4 classroom teacher Full-time, permanent, HPTSA Ref#: 1HAE47

Southland Otama School

Manawatu/Whanganui Te Kura o Ngapuke Pouako (2 positions) Full-time, permanent, MITA Ref#: 1HAEE1

Wellington TKKM o Te Rito Pouako - whānau wehi, tamariki Tau 1–2 Full-time, permanent, MITA Ref#: 1HADJy

Northland Te Kura o Te Kao

West Coast Karamea Area School

He kaiako Tau 4–7 Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEFv

Secondary English teacher Full-time, permanent, HPPA + IA Ref#: 1HAEGR

gazette.education.govt.nz

Senior leadership

Teacher Full-time, permanent, MITA Ref#: 1HACqE

Otago Waitaki Valley School

Mātauranga Māori

Experienced junior teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEJD Reading Recovery teacher, junior Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEJG

Teacher / tutor physics Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADiN

Scale A teacher Y1–3 Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEAG

Area / composite Y1–15

Canterbury Haeata Community Campus

Waikato Te Wharekura o Manaia

Junior team leader Full-time, permanent, 2MU Ref#: 1HAE4f

Principal / teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE0b

VACANCIES

Y10 English for senior secondary studies course teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HACtE

Avondale College Assistant director of English Full-time, permanent, 2MU + 1MMA Ref#: 1HADxJ Biology teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADxC English and media studies teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADxQ English teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADxM English teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADxF Spanish teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEMF

Crimson Global Academy English specialist Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADuJ History specialist Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADuQ TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 23 November 2020

47


VACANCIES

Secondary Y7-15 Teachers

Maths specialist Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADuZ

De La Salle College Director of mission. Tagged position Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE3x

James Cook High School Teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAELA Teacher of DVC (design and visual communication) Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEA3 Teacher of business studies Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADwC Teacher of physical education (PE) Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAELG Teacher of workshop technology Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADJC Techer of English / dance and drama Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAELK

King’s College Head of learning centre Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEF_

Marcellin College English teacher. Tagged. Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADre Y7–8 teacher. Tagged Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAED6

McAuley High School

Physical education teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HACtV Reading specialist for Y7–8 Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HACtY

St Peter’s College, Epsom Design and visual communications teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADbX History / geography / social studies teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADah

Tangaroa College PE and health teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAENr

Waiuku College Teacher of technology (workshop) Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAE4T

Wentworth College

Computer science and digital technology teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE4e

Waikato Huntly College Mathematics teacher – including senior mathematics Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADeA

Melville High School Special needs teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEN7 Commerce / maths teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAENG

Nga Taiatea Wharekura

Technology teacher / specialist Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAENN

Kaiako Mātai Ahupūngao/Matū rānei (science – physics or chemistry) Full-time, permanent, MITA Ref#: 1HAEGe

Mt Roskill Grammar

Paeroa College

Physics teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEDc

Social science teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAE8i

Northcote College

Putaruru College

Itinerant music teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEHG Teacher of physical education and health Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEFX

Physical education / health teacher Full-time, fixed-term, HPTSA Ref#: 1HADq7

Taumarunui High School

Piano tutor Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEB6

Advisor teacher Y11–13 Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADjR Outdoor education teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADj1

St Paul’s College, Ponsonby

Tokoroa High School

English teacher for senior levels Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HACtg

Teacher of all subjects Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAELD

Rosehill College

Tuakau College Te reo Māori Full-time, permanent, MITA Ref#: 1HAECe

Waikato Diocesan School For Girls Teacher of mathematics and junior science Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEJc

Bay of Plenty Opotiki College Kaiārahi: Maurua Full-time, permanent, 2MU+ 1MMA + MITA Ref#: 1HADtb

Otumoetai College Food technology, soft materials technology, hospitality teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAECJ

Rotorua Boys’ High School Teacher of English Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADWh

Tauranga Boys’ College

Head of media studies. Regraded, no actual vacancy Full-time, permanent, 1MU Ref#: 1HAEMy Science teacher – physics Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEN4

Tauranga Girls’ College Hospitality teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAENk

Western Heights High School Commerce teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEKu Homeroom teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEL3

Gisborne Campion College English teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADiA

Hawke’s Bay Central Hawke’s Bay College English teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADyW

Flaxmere College Teacher digital technology Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEDD

Hastings Boys’ High School English teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE0v Mathematics teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE11

For full details of these vacancies, search the job listings online at gazette.education.govt.nz 48

Education Gazette | 23 November 2020

gazette.education.govt.nz


Secondary Y7-15 Senior leadership Karamu High School Teacher of mathematics Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEKs

Lindisfarne College Teacher of learning enhancement classes Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAELy

Napier Girls’ High School Biology / science teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE5b

Tamatea High School Junior homeroom teacher Y9 Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE77

Wellington St Catherine’s College, Kilbirnie Music itinerant teacher – guitar Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADvk

St Oran’s College TiC geography Full-time, permanent, 1MMA Ref#: 1HAE5K

Upper Hutt College English and social sciences teacher. Regraded Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE9x Science teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEKA Science teacher. Regraded, no actual vacancy Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEKG Science – physics teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAELf Social sciences and pathways teacher. Regraded Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE9u

Wairarapa College

Learning support coordinator Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADk4

Whitby Collegiate Geography, social sciences and religious education Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADbf Mathematics and calculus teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADb4

Marlborough Marlborough Boys’ College Alternative education teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEP0

Marlborough Girls’ College Maths teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEAy Maths teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEAs gazette.education.govt.nz

Canterbury Burnside High School Mathematics teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEJZ

Hornby High School ESOL/English teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEBf

Mairehau High School ESOL teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEDG

Southland Aparima College Senior mathematics teacher Full-time, permanent, HPSTA, MMA (negotiable) Ref#: 1HADLo Y7–8 teacher Full-time, fixed-term, HPSTA Ref#: 1HADLx

Middle leadership Auckland Avondale College Assistant director of mathematics Full-time, permanent, 2MU + 1MMA Ref#: 1HAENx

Glendowie College Kaiarahi Full-time, permanent, 3SU Ref#: 1HAELc

King’s College HOD mathematics Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADnK

VACANCIES

Senior leadership Auckland Glendowie College Deputy principal Full-time, permanent, 7SU + 1SMA Ref#: 1HAELN

Papatoetoe High School Deputy principal Full-time, permanent, 7PSU Ref#: 1HAENW

Waikato Hamilton Boys’ High School Assistant principal – curriculum Full-time, permanent, 5MU + 1MMA Ref#: 1HADss

Manawatu/Whanganui Manawatu College Principal Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEHc

Wellington Paraparaumu College Deputy principal Full-time, permanent, 7MU + 1SMA Ref#: 1HAEQ_

Otago Waitaki Girls’ High School Assistant principal Full-time, permanent, 5MU + 1MMA Ref#: 1HADw1

For full details of these vacancies, search the job listings online at gazette.education.govt.nz

Tangaroa College HOL digital technology Full-time, permanent, 2MMU + 2MMA Ref#: 1HAEJM HOL te reo Māori Full-time, permanent, 2MU + 2MMA Ref#: 1HAEKr

Bay of Plenty Edgecumbe College Head of science Full-time, permanent, 2MU Ref#: 1HADgm

Hawke’s Bay Napier Girls’ High School HoLA English Full-time, permanent, 3MU + 1MMA Ref#: 1HADsm

Wellington Upper Hutt College TiC supported learning unit (ORS-funded students) Full-time, permanent, 1MU + 1MMA Ref#: 1HAE5h

Otago Otago Girls’ High School HOD health and physical education Full-time, permanent, 2MU Ref#: 1HAEEJ

LINDISFARNE COLLEGE

Teacher of Learning Enhancement Classes Part Time, Fixed Term Lindisfarne College seeks a teacher to work within the Learning Enhancement Department, planning and delivering the content of our Growth and Progress (GAP) programme. The programme includes focused small group/class remediation work targeted to individual learning profiles. The ideal candidate will have experience using a diverse range of learning strategies and will have a strong understanding of technologies and assessments that support learners in Years 9-13.

Part Time, Fixed Term Start Date: 01/02/2020, End Date: 08/12/2021, FFTE up to 0.6

Applications close 1 December. Applications are to be submitted to www.lindisfarne. school.nz/About-us-2/Employment-at-Lindisfarne

TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 23 November 2020

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