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7 December 2020 | Vol. 99 No. 20

Reflecting on learning and leading in 2020 Real-life learning with GeoCity project

Student perspectives: life beyond Covid

Talanoa and vÄ build relationships


Kia ora koutou katoa W

elcome to the final Education Gazette for 2020. When I was wishing you “happy holidays” at the end of last year, it’s fair to say the word “pandemic” was nowhere in my mind. Even the most prescient among us could not have foreseen Covid-19, but the education response to the unprecedented events of 2020 has been a testament to the agility, creativity, and dedication of people in every part of our education system. When lockdown was announced in March, huge numbers of teachers participated in online workshops to help plan Home Learning TV and other distance learning supports. Printing companies, courier drivers, early learning and school staff worked around the clock to get learning packs delivered to students across the country. Schools and kura used the power of technology to connect into homes so that learners, with their whānau, could stay connected to each other and to their learning. Leaders, teachers and administrators found innovative ways to safely and successfully navigate each new challenge – right down to making sure the school kunekune pigs were kept well-fed while school sites were in lockdown! Covid-19 also shone a light on inequities and challenges faced by our communities and in education in particular. The digital divide was exacerbated for families with no devices or too few, poor or no connectivity, and lack of quiet or private spaces to study. Many schools and early learning services were a key source of information for community groups and government agencies about which families needed food delivered or other basic supports provided. Schools and early learning services are often seen as being at the heart of their communities, and this is more true than ever during difficult times. While there are ongoing and complex challenges still to deal with, one of the ways you can make the biggest difference is to continue to focus on growing strong connections with your learners, their families, whānau and communities. I’ve heard many examples of the ways that these connections were strengthened during Covid, and we’ve featured many stories in the Gazette this year about how schools and centres, Kāhui Ako and clusters have worked together and with others to support children’s wellbeing and get them back to their learning. I hope you are able to enjoy some restful and restorative time with family and whānau over the break. Thank you for everything you have done this year, and every best wish for 2021.

Nāku noa, nā Iona Holsted Secretary for Education

The Education Gazette office will be closed from Thursday 24 December. The office will re-open 9am, Monday 11 January to process all vacancies and notices submitted over the holidays. All articles and advertising queries will be answered after this date. Vacancies and notices will NOT be published online between 24 December and 10 January 2021.


her is the anxiety rangatahi are But the big issue that’s worrying feeling about falling behind academically. of our wharekura students, “The anxiety levels of our teenagers, have to work hard so their academic we’re all [kaiako Māori] going to pathways aren’t restricted. biggie, Māori tamariki are the ones “The equity issue for me is the A lot of their engagement most at risk [of not] entering university. on kanohi ki te kanohi. You can’t relies on body language, they rely at home, in a bedroom, trying to check what that looks like – if they’re just adds to their anxiety.” work things out on their own, it

Education Gazette  15 April 2020

if parents were essentia tautoko for tamariki, especially when principal, says his first thought Wayne, who is also the deputy how are we going to manage online lockdown was announced was, learning? brought forward as it gave them He was relieved to have the holidays devices. had internet andCOVID-19 time to find out which families people, so difficult just getting hold of “It was such a huge task; it was whole3 week.” what. It took AT aLEVEL documenting who hadLEARNING a with a community grant, leaving The principal bought 40 devices shortfall of just 80.

6

COVID-19

we are embedded learners, “We are kanohi ki te kanohi people, up north, we must go to the and up north here, especially of the list.” whānau. Communication is top

Support for educators during COVID-19

to this crisis can’t be one-size-fits-all, and each school will know their KŌRERO  6 May 2020 TUKUTUKU the best.” local community

Papa Hēmi Wi Epiha“The response

Putting wellbeing first

2020

to be the learning services will continue Liam says that schools and early the for education professionals during most important support network coronavirus crisis. is to stop that the top priority right now “We can’t lose sight of the fact those so important that we’re all having the spread of COVID-19. But it’s people to break up the isolation and make regular, deliberate interactions and as a team. It’s important schools feel that they are still connected to staff, offering advice about how centres are reaching out to their and encouraging them to access support wellbeing and connectedness says Liam. the different types of support available,”

Education unions share with Education Gazette the importance of teachers and prioritising their own mental health in helping wellbeing in order to be effective their students, whānau and communities.

Advocacy for wellbeing

their education unions can have on The biggest impact the teacher for through the crisis is to advocate members’ health and wellbeing can get a fair deal, so they know they those working in education to their families,” says Liam. continue to be paid and support

T

eachers will need to put on their own ‘oxygen masks’ before they can help their students, whānau and communities during the current COVID-19 crisis, says Jack Boyle, president of the PPTA (Post Primary Teachers Association). Over the past few years, the Ministry of Education has been working and alongside teacher unions PPTA NZEI Te Riu Roa to develop a Wellbeing Framework to better support teacher been planned wellbeing. The framework had the for school use early in 2020, however of COVID-19 crisis overtook the rollout the resource. Both education unions are focusing on providing advocacy; wellbeing, employment and professional advice to members during the crisis, say Jack and Liam Te Rutherford, the president of NZEI Riu Roa.

This issue:

7

Liam Rutherford

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Education Gazette  6 May

those that are in less secure work, “This is especially important for childhood, support staff and relief like many of our teachers in early contact with Government as they teachers. We’ve been in constant in education,” he says. work through how they are responding

What constitutes good at-home

learning?

Liam, teachers are dealing with Like the rest of Aotearoa, says working from home. Besides being multiple practical issues around be the main concern for teachers will able to support their families, a learning is going to look like, as expectations for what good at-home the role may feel they need to replicate well as supporting parents who of a teacher. this be a challenge. The response to “Managing the digital divide will local and each school will know their crisis can’t be one-size-fits-all, will be within their communities there community the best. But even levels of access,” he says. lots of varying needs and different

Resources and information

learning experienced by New Zealand says the quality of The Teaching Council of Aotearoa and wellbeing. The on teachers’ own mental health children and young people is dependent used to school closures, strategies in place as people get Council suggests having self-care of COVID-19. distancing from others as a result working from home and physical

Jack Boyle.

Vol. 99 No. 5

“The tried really hard.”

LEARNING AT LEVEL 3

24

Kia kaha

We will get through

this together

mua,2020 ka muri SpotlightKaon Here are some helpful resources:

30 March 2020 |

and values which provide resource includes case studies » Teaching Council NZ wellbeing and challenging times. an anchor to navigate difficult Professor Meihana wellbeing podcast episode featuring » Teaching Council NZ teacher of teachers taking care of Maguire about the importance Durie and psychologist Jacqui

Jack says the work done by sector Wellbeing leaders and the Ministry on the relevant. Framework now seems particularly

Scenes of a school at Alert Level 3 Education Gazette photographer Adrian Heke visits Newlands Intermediate in Wellington to capture what school life looks like at Level 3.

Students who are attending school at Level 3 are greeted by principal Angela Lowe.

10

Education Gazette  6 May 2020

gazette.education.govt.nz

Liam Rutherford.

nobody thought we would “When we built that framework, The themes that we thought be in lockdown in March 2020. a model of wellbeing which were really important point to around COVID-19. we are starting to see in communications is an absolutely That’s the idea that connectedness Making sure you nurture fundamental domain of wellbeing. is crucial to mental health – family, friendships, relationships in isolation,” says Jack. especially now that we are working employees can “It’s important that all of a school’s and those meaningfully engage with colleagues to teaching and learning. relationships that are fundamental needs links to Everybody within a school community mental wellbeing. If you information and support around important to talk to feel like you’re not coping, it’s really someone,” he says.

either subsidised or free sessions. that are signed up can access toolkit – teachers from schools » Core Education’s wellbeing it remotely. to help teachers, has a dedicated section on wellbeing » The Learning from Home website and young people. hauora/wellbeing of children parents and whānau guide the wellbeing resource. » The Education Hub has a teacher disaster recovery. specialising in pandemics and » Practical tips from a psychologist

11

8

Education Gazette  15 April

» Ideas to support working from

A group has been created by CORE Tautoko Education, He Kohinga Rauemi Kura and Support Resources for Schools,

home.

EY Centres. edSpace, This group can be accessed from a dedicated professional learning join to community which anyone can and connect with others, stay informed advice receive and share ideas, resources, and support. This is an opportunity for edSpace and create community members to curate resources to support teacher wellbeing learning. and the facilitation of distance – all This space is evolving every day contribute, educators are welcome to join, use or share. contact For more information, please online facilitator Tessa Gray.

TUKUTUKU KŌRERO  15 April

2020

Talking to tamariki about COVID-19

Resources for remote learning

9

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TUKUTUKU KŌRERO  6 May 2020

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Online support and community

Pandemic no match for Pacific pride

themselves and each other. and advice. » Ministry of Health resources tips on getting through COVID-19. » Mental Health Foundation’s around Covid-19. coping with stress and anxiety » Depression.org strategies for Auckland. paper from PPTA Tāmaki Makaura, » PPTA’s mental health and wellbeing through EAP at employees can attend counselling » School and Ministry of Education

Connectedness vital

2020

Editor Jude Barback reflects on the challenges of 2020 and discusses some key developments for the Education Gazette as it enters its 100th year of publication. COVID-19

Editor’s note

LEARNING AT LEVEL 3

Rolling out distance learning across Aotearoa

In this final issue for the year, we look at what some schools have learned from their Covid-19 experiences and how they intend to use this knowledge moving forward.

The roll-out of internet access, devices, materials and new home learning television channels will help children and young people all over New Zealand learn from home as part of the Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

L

for Millie earning will look rather different it will for and Rodie Whetu this term - as Aotearoa. tamariki and rangatahi around set for remote The Ngāruawāhia siblings are all at the ready. learning with desks and devices fit her Millie, 12, is pleased that she can learning around family time. with my “I like getting to spend more time skating and family, doing more bike rides and not seeing my walks and baking. But it’s hard work with friends and managing my school I love them!” little kids around – even though 9, Jonas, she adds. Millie is big sister to Rodie, 3, and Alba, 5 months.

PACIFIC FESTIVALS

Millie and Rodie are all set up for

learning from home.

TUKUTUKU KŌRERO  15 April gazette.education.govt.nz

Pandemic no match for Pacific Special COVID-19 Issue: Learning at a new levelpride The importance of staying connected

Education Gazette  15 April

12

No. 6 Vol. 99

TUKUTUKU KŌRERO  6 May 2020

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2

Mere Aria

Pacific festivals are not only a riot of colour, sound

Groups open

to everyone

Mere says that being involved groups helps her achieve in in cultural her schoolwork too because most studies, history, of her subjects – classical dance and English relating back – are about to her culture. There are 18 students in Mere’s some Fijian, others Samoan, cultural group, Chinese and Indian.

that all-import ant sense of belonging . The recent cancellation of Polyfest, due to the COVID-19 outbreak, only served to reinforce the significan ce of festivals to Pacific cultural and their families students and communities.

hen rangatahi at Auckland Girls’ Grammar received news that Polyfest, New Zealand’s biggest schools’ cultural event had tears were shed been cancelled, so many that some joked lawn would no the school longer need watering. The school had a whopping 400 students, more than 40 percent of the roll, perform at the nation’s flagship ready to and each of them cultural event, week in rehearsalshad spent up to 20 hours “I really felt for a since the start our seniors, our year. of the school Year 13s, as their performances were cancelled year (after the “The girls’ families last events of March 15), but I was so proud for the possibility had tried to prepare them I was so proud but there were of Polyfest being cancelled, of they took the a news. They were how teacher-in-cha lot of tears,” says Lily Stowers, able to understand that rge it was about group and cultural of the school’s Tongan staying safe and helping groups’ co-ordinator. their nanas and older family members to Lily has the formidable stay safe.” task of relationships Fijian group between students,managing leader Mere Aria, parents involved staff and 17, says that it’s not just the with the groups Māori, Tonga, excitement of Samoa, Fiji, Cook representing getting on stage and the India and the crowd cheering Islands, Niue, Philippines. that I love, it’s the feeling of being able to perform and being proud 4 of their culture. Education Gazette  30

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13

PACIFIC FESTIVALS

and taste, they also serve Making wellbeing as tethering Pacific anchors a priority learners to

ol of a scho December 2020 enesGazette | 7 ScEducation Level 3 at Alert the Bridging e digital divid

3

Education Gazette  6 May 2020

“It’s not just the excitement of on stage and getting the crowd cheering you love, it’s the on that I feeling of being able to perform, of being proud of my culture.”

W

2

2020

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2020

Fijian group

leader, Mere

Aria.

“Outside of the school and Pacific feel that people events, I judge us, that because we’re we Pasifika females, can’t do well at Polyfest we feel supported but here and are at home. by everyone, we

“It’s open to everyone, it’s a way for me share my culture to with other girls in touch with and keep my students to know own culture. I want Fijian a smaller group that just because we’re compared to shouldn’t silence the rest, that or stop us from our culture, in expressing fact for us to be louder. that’s an even bigger reason “When you’re from living in a Pākehā another culture and you’re is dominant and community, the Pākehā way you start to lose yourself a bit. “When we first left and for the most Fiji, we lived in Christchurch part the people lovely, but it there were was to back home. very white compared When we moved South Auckland, to more Islander I started to see kids, more brown kids, and that inspired me to express my culture more. I liked it more, I could relate to them a way I hadn’t in been able to with Pākehā kids. I could be myself and the Pasifika group became the thing I looked forward to most at school.

“It feels special, my family gets helping me to involved, get costumes and items together and my mum comes with me practice. My to weekend family dance, the music helped me work out the and the costumes; uncles did the one of my choreography aunty sewed and my mum’s the costumes.”

Identity central

4

10

Most of the students to learning at Auckland in their own Girls’ are, words, brown. The dominant ethnicities are Māori and Samoan each – Tongan – 23 percent (16 (six percent each), percent), Niuean, Indian South East Asian Cook Islands Māori and at five percent each.

Back to school:

lockdown Ka mua, ka muri: key reconnecting after Real-life learning inspired changes in 100th year by GeoCity project

Keeping ers Māori learnau and whān d connecte

ing What learn e from hom looks like

March 2020

1 June 2020 | Vol. 99 No. 8

Rolling out distance learning

2020 |

15 April 2020 | Vol. 99 Special Edition

2

6 May

At Witherlea School in Blenheim, for example, one student’s lockdown project inspired teachers to roll out a largescale GeoCity project spanning multiple curriculum areas. And at Hastings Girls' High School, the strong emphasis on hauora and wellbeing during lockdown has resulted in schoolwide transformational changes.

LEARNING AT LEVEL 3

COVID-19

“Last week I went to an international dinner. One of women’s the teacher at another women I met was a senior Auckland high the way she school and spoke to me left me feeling judged, as if very I couldn’t do well because ethnicity and of my where I go to school. But when I’m at my school group, I can be and involved with my cultural proud to be myself, to be someone I don’t have else.”

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TUKUTUKU KŌRERO  30

March 2020

5

Hauora top priority at Hastings Girls’ High School

Embracing the Pacific principles of talanoa and vā helped Sunnyvale School in Auckland to navigate its way through Covid-19, and the school has emerged stronger from the experience. We also present the perspectives of several diverse senior students. As they shrug off the disruptions of 2020 and prepare for next year, we wish them and all our students, teachers, school leaders and support staff a safe and happy holiday break.

14 What 2020 taught us: student perspectives

18

22

Talanoa and vā build Guide to Pacific resources relationships during Covid

7 December 2020 | Vol. 99 No. 20

On the cover

Reflecting on learning and leading in 2020 Real-life learning with GeoCity project

Student perspectives: life beyond Covid

Talanoa and vā build relationships

P10. Hauora and wellbeing for students and whānau were key focuses for Hastings Girls' High School during and after Covid-19 disrupted school life.

Regulars 31

Notices

40

Vacancies

24 Connecting rangatahi to employment opportunities in Ōpōtiki

26

30

Silver lining to Covid disruptions

Finding common threads in collaborative PLD

Key contacts

Published by

View us online

Reporter Joy Stephens reporter@edgazette.govt.nz

Education Gazette is published for the Ministry of Education by NZME. Educational Media Ltd. PO Box 200, Wellington.

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ISSN 0111 1582

The deadline for display advertising to be printed in the 8 February 2021 edition of Education Gazette is 4pm on Monday 25 January 2021.

Display & paid advertising Jill Parker 027 212 9277 jill.parker@nzme.co.nz Vacancies & notices listings Eleni Hilder 04 915 9796 vacancies@edgazette.govt.nz notices@edgazette.govt.nz Subscriptions eleni.hilder@nzme.co.nz

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We welcome your story ideas. Please send a brief outline – 50-100 words – to reporter@edgazette.govt.nz

TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 7 December 2020

1


COVID-19

“We are kanohi ki te kanohi people”:

Teachers can play a pivotal role in supporting children and young people to maintain healthy social connections, even during physical isolation.

The key message from the Ministry of Health is: He waka eke noa – We’re all in this together. The Ministry’s website states that, “It’s more important than ever to talk and listen, share stories and advice, and stay in touch with the people who matter to you.” For teachers, this means exploring ways to support students, especially those who would normally rely on face-to-face interactions to support their social and emotional needs. Children and young people need guidance

on how they can have healthy and safe social interactions online, including how to minimise any associated risks. As they do in class, teachers can continue to support students to strengthen their social connections by revisiting strategies for building positive relationships, and considering ways they apply these in an online environment. Ministry of Education’s Inclusive website has some useful resources to help teachers consider ways they can support and strengthen students’ relationships with peers. “It’s really important during this time to check in with our tamariki and rangatahi,” says Children’s Commissioner Andrew Becroft. “They look to their trusted adults for guidance on how to react to stressful events. We adults will be feeling a bit stressed, too, and that’s okay,” he says.

keeping Māori students connected during Covid-19

A recent article in The Spinoff provides some useful observations and tips to support children and young people during physical isolation.

Activities promote connections

Online learning can be set up to encourage children and young people to engage with their teacher, other students, their family, whānau or wider community. Ask yourself:

how educators are from kura all over Aotearoa about Education Gazette talks to people d during Covid-19. students and their whānau connecte working together to keep Māori

» How and when will I be available to my students for questions and conversations? » Am I continuing to provide sessions for my mentor/form class, and would it be tamariki meet online daily for karakia o Porirua, Kura Māori useful if thoset Te sessions encouraged social how the kura has adapted its routine ofsafe part It’sto connections, at 9.30am.how discussed have online interactions, or focused began. since lockdown on how to maintain wellbeing while on lockdown? after a few initial teething issues, says

Tumuaki Sophie Tukukino already with online learning. Students everyone is gaining confidence went into lockdown. had devices before the country gone out of their way to learn quickly. “We’ve had whānau that have of their commitment to their They’ve been nervous, but because out.” it worked they’ve tamariki, support from kaiako all over Aotearoa Sophie says the innovation and has been amazing.

It’s generous right across the motu. “Our kaiako Māori, they are really been really heart-warming.” kaiako are mainly using Seesaw, Sophie says for kura tuatahi tamariki, She says everyone is using and for kura tuarua, Google dashboard. ideas, to Te Kauwhata Reo for learning Zoom, and kaiako refer whānau kete. resource teaching a for as well as using it themselves arrived, for many tamariki, it felt She says when learning hard packs like Christmas. packs – I think the Ministry has “The thought that’s gone into those tried really hard.” her is the anxiety rangatahi are But the big issue that’s worrying feeling about falling behind academically. of our wharekura students, teenagers, our of levels “The anxiety have to work hard so their academic we’re all [kaiako Māori] going to pathways aren’t restricted. biggie, Māori tamariki are the ones “The equity issue for me is the A lot of their engagement university. entering not] [of risk most at on kanohi ki te kanohi. You can’t relies on body language, they rely at home, in a bedroom, trying to check what that looks like – if they’re just adds to their anxiety.” work things out on their own, it

LEARNING AT LEVEL 3

15 April 2020 | Vol. 99 Special Edition

10

Education Gazette  15 April 2020

Learning success comes down

to whanaungatanga

o Waikirikiri at Tūranga Nui ā Kiwa Meanwhile at Te Kura Reo Rua have access to internet and devices Gisborne, ensuring their students has been more challenging. their Abraham say money is tight in Teaching duo Anne and Wayne in the nearby forestry industry school community, with job cuts many whānau. on pressure putting extra financial of their food and essentials is the limit “For a lot of our parents, buying to support wifi or a device that’s income, they don’t have the finances than a text.” capable of doing anything more all of lockdown, kaiako gave away Anne says to help ease the burden the school’s kai. stuff, we distributed to our whānau “All the food we had, the KidsCan and just emptied out everything.” to collect children’s learning She says teachers also rang parents fast. Anne says some packs, because classes were emptying so the coast” to their papakāinga, whānau were heading “back up could offer a bigger bubble of grandparents and extended whānau if parents were essential workers. tautoko for tamariki, especially says his first thought when principal, Wayne, who is also the deputy how are we going to manage online lockdown was announced was,

brought forward as it gave them He was relieved to have the holidays devices. had internet andCOVID-19 time to find out which families people, so difficult just getting hold of “It was such a huge task; it was whole3 week.” what. It took AT aLEVEL documenting who hadLEARNING a with a community grant, leaving The principal bought 40 devices shortfall of just 80.

Education Gazette  6 May

we are embedded learners, “We are kanohi ki te kanohi people, up north, we must go to the and up north here, especially of the list.” whānau. Communication is top

Support for educators during COVID-19

to this crisis can’t be one-size-fits-all, and each school will know their KŌRERO  6 May 2020 TUKUTUKU the best.” local community

Papa Hēmi Wi Epiha“The response

gazette.education.govt.nz

gazette.education.govt.nz

gazette.education.govt.nz

6

COVID-19

learning?

to be the learning services will continue Liam says that schools and early the for education professionals during most important support network coronavirus crisis. is to stop that the top priority right now “We can’t lose sight of the fact those so important that we’re all having the spread of COVID-19. But it’s people to break up the isolation and make regular, deliberate interactions and schools as a team. It’s important feel that they are still connected to staff, offering advice about how centres are reaching out to their access to them and encouraging support wellbeing and connectedness says Liam. the different types of support available,”

Education unions share with Education Gazette the importance of teachers and prioritising their own mental health in helping wellbeing in order to be effective s. their students, whānau and communitie

Advocacy for wellbeing

their education unions can have on The biggest impact the teacher for through the crisis is to advocate members’ health and wellbeing can get a fair deal, so they know they those working in education to their families,” says Liam. continue to be paid and support

T

eachers will need to put on their own ‘oxygen masks’ before they can help their students, whānau and communities during the current COVID-19 crisis, says Jack Boyle, president of the PPTA (Post Primary

learning?

Liam, teachers are dealing with Like the rest of Aotearoa, says working from home. Besides being multiple practical issues around be the main concern for teachers will able to support their families, a learning is going to look like, as expectations for what good at-home the role may feel they need to replicate well as supporting parents who of a teacher. this be a challenge. The response to “Managing the digital divide will local and each school will know their crisis can’t be one-size-fits-all, will be within their communities there community the best. But even levels of access,” he says. lots of varying needs and different

learning experienced by New Zealand says the quality of The Teaching Council of Aotearoa and wellbeing. The on teachers’ own mental health children and young people is dependent used to school closures, strategies in place as people get Council suggests having self-care of COVID-19. distancing from others as a result working from home and physical Here are some helpful resources:

and values which provide resource includes case studies » Teaching Council NZ wellbeing and challenging times. an anchor to navigate difficult Professor Meihana wellbeing podcast episode featuring » Teaching Council NZ teacher of teachers taking care of Maguire about the importance Durie and psychologist Jacqui

Kia kaha

We will get through this together

Online support and community

A group has been created by CORE Tautoko Education, He Kohinga Rauemi Kura and Support Resources for Schools,

Pandemic no match for Pacific pride

themselves and each other. and advice. » Ministry of Health resources tips on getting through COVID-19. » Mental Health Foundation’s around Covid-19. coping with stress and anxiety » Depression.org strategies for Auckland. paper from PPTA Tāmaki Makaura, » PPTA’s mental health and wellbeing through EAP at employees can attend counselling » School and Ministry of Education either subsidised or free sessions. that are signed up can access toolkit – teachers from schools » Core Education’s wellbeing

Jack says the work done by sector Liam Rutherford. Wellbeing leaders and the Ministry on the relevant. Framework now seems particularly nobody thought we would “When we built that framework, The themes that we thought be in lockdown in March 2020. a model of wellbeing which were really important point to around COVID-19. we are starting to see in communications is an absolutely That’s the idea that connectedness Making sure you nurture fundamental domain of wellbeing. is crucial to mental health – family, friendships, relationships in isolation,” says Jack. especially now that we are working employees can “It’s important that all of a school’s and those meaningfully engage with colleagues to teaching and learning. fundamental are that relationships needs links to Everybody within a school community mental wellbeing. If you around support and information important to talk to feel like you’re not coping, it’s really someone,” he says.

Education Gazette photographer Adrian Heke visits Newlands Intermediate in Wellington to capture what school life looks like at Level 3.

What constitutes good at-home

Resources and information Jack Boyle.

Connectedness vital

Scenes of a school at Alert Level 3

those that are in less secure work, “This is especially important for childhood, support staff and relief like many of our teachers in early contact with Government as they teachers. We’ve been in constant in education,” he says. work through how they are responding

30 March 2020 |

Teachers Association). Over the past few years, the Ministry of Education has been working and alongside teacher unions PPTA NZEI Te Riu Roa to develop a Wellbeing Framework to better support teacher been planned wellbeing. The framework had the for school use early in 2020, however of COVID-19 crisis overtook the rollout the resource. Both education unions are focusing on providing advocacy; wellbeing, employment and professional advice to members during the crisis, say Jack and Liam Te Rutherford, the president of NZEI Riu Roa.

7

Liam Rutherford

Putting wellbeing first

2020

it remotely. to help teachers, has a dedicated section on wellbeing » The Learning from Home website and young people. hauora/wellbeing of children parents and whānau guide the wellbeing resource. » The Education Hub has a teacher disaster recovery. specialising in pandemics and » Practical tips from a psychologist

EY Centres. edSpace, This group can be accessed from a dedicated professional learning join to community which anyone can and connect with others, stay informed advice receive and share ideas, resources, and support. This is an opportunity for edSpace and create community members to curate resources to support teacher wellbeing learning. distance of facilitation and the – all This space is evolving every day contribute, educators are welcome to join, use or share. contact For more information, please online facilitator Tessa Gray.

Talking to tamariki about COVID-19

Resources for remote learning

Ka mua, ka muri Students who are attending school at Level 3 are greeted by principal Angela Lowe.

Education Gazette  6 May 2020

gazette.education.govt.nz

» Ideas to support working from

11

8

Education Gazette  15 April

home.

TUKUTUKU KŌRERO  15 April

2020

9

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TUKUTUKU KŌRERO  6 May 2020

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2020

Editor Jude Barback reflects on the challenges of 2020 and discusses some key developments for the Education Gazette as it enters its 100th year of publication. COVID-19

LEARNING AT LEVEL 3

COVID-19

LEARNING AT LEVE

Rolling out distance learning across Aotearoa The roll-out of internet access, devices, materials and new home learning television channels will help children and young people all over New Zealand learn from home as part of the Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

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for Millie earning will look rather different it will for and Rodie Whetu this term - as Aotearoa. tamariki and rangatahi around set for remote The Ngāruawāhia siblings are all at the ready. learning with desks and devices fit her Millie, 12, is pleased that she can time. family around learning with my “I like getting to spend more time skating and family, doing more bike rides and not seeing my walks and baking. But it’s hard work with friends and managing my school I love them!” little kids around – even though 9, Jonas, she adds. Millie is big sister to Rodie, 3, and Alba, 5 months.

PACIFIC FES TIVALS

Millie and Rodie are all set up for

learning from home.

TUKUTUKU KŌRERO  15 April gazette.education.govt.nz

Pandemic no match for Pacific Special COVID-19 Issue: Learning at a new levelpride 2

Rolling out distance learning

The importance of staying connected

Education Gazette  15 April

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hen rangatahi at Grammar recei Auckland Girls’ ved news that New Zealand’s Polyfest, biggest scho cultural even ols’ t had tears were shed been cancelled, so many that some joked lawn would no the school longer need watering. The school had a whopping 400 students, more than 40 percent of the roll, ready to perform at the natio and each of them n’s flagship cultural even t, had spent up week in rehea to 20 hours a “I really felt for rsals since the our seniors, our start of the scho year. Year 13s, as their perfo ol rmances were cancelled last year (after the “The girls’ famil events of Marc ies had tried h 15), but I was so prou to prepare them for the possibility d I was so prou of Polyf est being canc d of but there were they took the elled, a news. They were how teacher-in-char lot of tears,” says Lily Stow able to understand that ers, ge it was about group and cultu of the school’s Tongan staying safe and helping ral groups’ co-o their nanas and rdinator. older family members to Lily has the form stay safe.” idable task of relationships Fijian group between stude managing leader Mere Aria, nts, staff and parents invol ved with the 17, it’s says that not just the excit grou Māori, Tonga, ement of getti Samoa, Fiji, Cookps representing stage and the ng on India and the crowd cheering Islands, Niue Philippines. , that I love, it’s the feelin g of being able to perform and being prou d 4 of their culture. Education Gaze

ool schDecember a f o s Education Gazette | 7 e Scen ert Level 3 2020 at Al

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TUKUTUKU KŌRERO  6 May 2020

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“It’s not jus excitement t the of on stage and getting the crowd cheering yo u love, it’s the on that I fee being able to ling of perform, of being pro ud of my culture.” Mere Aria

Pacific festival s are not onl ya riot of colour, sound and tas te, they also ser Making wellbeing ve as anchor s tethering Pac ific learners a priority to that all-imp ortant sense of belonging . The recent cancellation of Polyfest, due to the COVID -19 outbreak, only served to reinforce the significanc e of cultural festivals to Pac ific students and their fam ilies and communities.

t learning

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Education Gazette  6 May 2020

PACIFIC FES TIVALS

Groups open

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2

2020

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2020

Fijian group

leader, Mere

Aria.

“Outside of the school and Pacif feel that peop le judge us, that ic events, I because we’re we can’t do well Pasifika fema les, at Polyfest we feel supported but here and are at home. by everyone, we “Last week I went to an inter national wom dinner. One of en’s the teacher at anot women I met was a senio r her Auckland the way she high school and spoke to me left me feelin judged, as if g very I couldn’t do well because ethnicity and of my where I go to school. But when I’m at my scho ol group, I can b and involved with my cult

to

everyone Mere says that being involved groups helps her achieve in in cultural her too because most of her subje schoolwork studies, histo cts – classical ry, dance and English – are relating back about to her culture. There are 18 students in Mere some Fijian, ’s cultural grou others Samo an, Chinese and p, Indian. “It’s open to everyone, it’s a way for me share my cultu to re with other girls and keep in touch with my students to know own culture. I want Fijian that just beca a smaller grou use we’re p compared to the rest, that shouldn’t silen ce or stop us from expressing our culture, in fact for us to be loude that’s an even bigger reaso n r. “It feels spec “When you’r ial, my family e from another gets involved, helping me to culture and you’r living in a Pāke get costumes hā e Identity cen and items toge and my mum is dominant and community, the Pākehā comes with me ther tral to learning way you start to lose practice. My to weekend Most of the stude yours famil elf “When we first a bit. nts at Auckland dance, the musi y helped me work out the in their own left Girls’ are, words, brown. c and the costu and for the most Fiji, we lived in Christchur uncles did the The mes; one of my ethnicities are ch part the peop choreography Māori and Samo dominant lovely, but it aunty sewed and my mum each was very white le there were an – 23 perce – Tongan (16 the costumes. ’s nt compared to back home ” (six percent each percent), Niuean, Indian . When we move South Auckland, d to South East Asian ), Cook Islands Māori and more Islander I started to see at five percent kids, more brow each. kids, and that n inspi express my cultu red me to it more, I could re more. I liked relate to them a way I hadn ’t been able to in with Pākehā kids. I could be myse lf and the Pasif ika group beca me the thing I looke d forward to at school. most une 2020 | Vol. 99 No. 8

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the Ministry relook at the timetabling Sophie says she would like to see with universities regarding entrance of the school year and also talk requirements.

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Vol. 99 No. 5

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ocial connections are key to wellbeing and it is ironic that we must be physically separated as we navigate our way through these challenging times. But with thoughtful use of digital platforms, teachers can support children and young people to stay socially connected with classmates and their wider school community.

Back to school:

gazette.education.govt.nz reconnecting afte r lockdown


EDITORIAL

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a mua, ka muri means ‘walking backwards into the future’, essentially looking to the past to inform the future. This is not only our final issue of the year, but the last issue before the Gazette enters its 100th year of publication. This milestone gives us an opportunity to reflect on the past 100 years of education in New Zealand and consider the direction we are taking as we move forward.

Celebrating 100 years The first issue of 2021 will include special interactive video experiences to explore the history and future of education in New Zealand. It will incorporate augmented reality technology to help bring the past and the future ‘to life’. We’ll include clear instructions for how to access these special features. We will also feature content over the course of next year that shares the perspectives of people and the rich histories of schools, kura and early learning centres around the country.

Reflecting on 2020

More online content Covid-19 also prompted us to explore new ways of delivering the Education Gazette and make better use of our online channels. The online-only issues published during Alert Levels 3 and 4 were well-received by the sector. This, and the increasing number of people signing up to the Gazette’s e-newsletter, YouTube channel, and Instagram account indicates a growing preference for accessing content online. As such, next year we will be reducing the number of printed issues to 16 per year (four per term) and delivering more quality content through our online channels.

Notices and vacancies Sector feedback has also indicated that most people prefer to search vacancies and notices online. So, from next year, gazette. education.govt.nz will be the go-to place for vacancy, notice and PLD listings.

Ka mua, ka muri is not only a fitting whakataukī for marking the Gazette’s centenary, but also feels appropriate when considering the challenging circumstances of 2020 and how they have informed how we do things going forward.

Larger vacancy and notice advertisements will still appear both in print and online, but the free listings will be published online only, meaning you don’t have to wait for an issue to search this section of the Gazette. This will be clearly signposted in the printed issue.

In reflecting back on 2020, it is timely to highlight some of the compelling stories that emerged throughout a difficult year. We heard about communities rallying together, about teachers and students embracing online learning, about efforts to look after one another’s wellbeing, and so much more. Thank you for sharing your stories.

Staying in touch Make sure you’re subscribed to our e-newsletter at gazette. education.govt.nz/alerts/sign-up-for-the-newsletter to access our centenary features, as well as all the latest content and vacancies online.

EL 3

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Doctor of Education Begin a professional doctorate, investigate an area you are passionate about and join a supportive group of peers. gazette.education.govt.nz

The Doctor of Education degree is: • specifically designed for working professionals in education and related fields • built on a cohort model where you learn with others under the guidance of experienced academics • supported with regular meetings for the first two years

Next cohort intake begins 1 March 2021.

For more information email educationadvice@canterbury.ac.nz

TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 7 December 2020

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STUDENT-LED LEARNING

Real-life learning inspired by GeoCity project 4

Education Gazette | 7 December 2020

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STUDENT-LED LEARNING

Nestled at the base of Blenheim’s Wither Hills is a city complete with a resort island and a shipwreck that has entranced and engaged a Year 5 and 6 class for two terms.

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hen tamariki from Room 89 at Witherlea School returned after the Level 4 lockdown, their teachers PJ Muir and Phoebe Quirk were inspired by the creativity of a student and his family who had built miniature model houses from templates they found online. “Before lockdown, our principal Andrea [Harnett] had said she didn’t want there to be any extra pressure on parents to be teachers, but that the focus should be on student-led learning and projects which let them explore and create,” says PJ. “They were so free and wide-ranging with their choices. During lockdown we would be getting dozens of emails a day of what they had researched or found out. We saw one of the kids with a house template and thought: ‘We could teach geometry through it’. “Phoebe and I were talking about the 3D houses after a meeting and saying: ‘we could do this, then we could do this...’. That’s when we said: ‘We could teach everything through this if we wanted to!” The result was Skylands: a GeoCity on a rainforest island, which takes up about 45 square metres in a breakout space at the school.

Curriculum links The learning helps students achieve in a number of curriculum areas, including literacy, numeracy, social sciences, arts, digital technology and global citizenship. “We don’t want people to look through the window and say, ‘Wow, they’ve spent two terms on an art project!’. We wanted to make sure that we were connecting with curriculum links really well because this was our first foray into a project-based piece of work,” says PJ. For the remainder of term 2 and all of term 3, the classes spent an average of two days a week working on the GeoCity project.

With a world of learning behind them: Angus, Millie (seated), Kavali, Phoebe Quirk, PJ Muir and Jai. gazette.education.govt.nz

Measurement, position and orientation came easily when the town was drawn and planned on a grid. “I would have thought we would have had to pull them out and do more workshops TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 7 December 2020

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STUDENT-LED LEARNING

before we encountered the grid. But we didn’t actually end up doing that at all. “We weren’t teaching them strategies to use, they were working out what strategies would be most sensible for them in that situation. I think that was really valuable – because that’s what real life is like,” says PJ.

What a town needs The two classes built Skylands from the ground up starting with a local field trip to investigate their local town and spaces. Questions were brainstormed, such as: What do you think a city has to have? What’s important about a city? What could the population of a town or city be? They researched the role of a council before forming their own local body, with each of the 57 students in the combined class having a role. There were two mayors (the class counsellors) and nine council committees, with a head of each committee who was responsible for more and paid more. “Two boys came to us and said: ‘We think we should have a bank’ and we asked them for a business proposal: Why do we need a bank?

“You’re not aiming for right or correct or perfect. It’s just your imagination because it’s what you create and there’s no right or wrong: it’s relevant learning.” PJ Muir What’s your job going to be? They went away and drafted a proposal about what that would look like, and why it was important. Then we thought we need a banking system and Phoebe found Banqer, which is perfect for this project,” says PJ. When discussing a health hub, the health committee met with the class’s town planners and discussed what space allocation would be required for a doctor, a dentist, a hospital. “There were a lot of them working out the references with the town planners. They decided the hospital needs to be close to the doctors and the bus stop. They wanted it close

to the library and the retirement village as well. They wanted a library because if there were people visiting, they thought it would be good to have somewhere to read and take books to people in hospital,” says PJ.

Financial literacy The children were ‘paid’ salaries and extra money for doing jobs around school. They learned about mortgages and automatic payments, were horrified when they learned the bank could take their house if a payment was missed, and gutted when they received their first power bills, say PJ and Phoebe. “Early on, some kids would say, ‘The property price is too much so I’m going to go in with a friend. That does mean that I’m going to have to negotiate what we are going to purchase together so it gives us a bit more money’,” says Phoebe. “Off they went, got their bank accounts up. If they were sharing a property, they split it 50/50 and had to work it out. We didn’t realise the maths was happening until we saw them doing the maths.

Caretaker Anthony Atyeo on the tools with Chey and Ash.

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Education Gazette | 7 December 2020

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STUDENT-LED LEARNING

Skylands GeoCity Mayors, Seth and James, check out their town.

“I would be listening to a group and they would say, ‘We want to buy this, it’s $112.50; you pay half, I’ll pay half’, and I would watch them split it. A lot of the time, I would think: ‘That’s not what I would teach you, because in my head, you’re not at that level. But look, you’re invested and doing it’,” she says.

Learning across the curriculum “You can’t emphasise enough the global citizen skills the children have learnt: communicating, negotiating, using their initiative and coming up with rules and laws for the town,” explains Phoebe. “We had one group of children who were doing the roading and they said, ‘We need the space for the roading. Is it all right if we make a rule where children can’t go over the boundaries of their property?’ “We said, ‘Let’s research it – is that what our council does?’ They found that we do that here. And they had their rulers out and were issuing warnings and fines for children and they followed it up the whole way through – like they just had responsibility, it was theirs,” she says. The children had to apply for jobs in the newly formed council and its committees and the teachers were very impressed with their applications. “The quality was mind-blowing. We were going through these applications and we couldn’t have taught what they did just knowing they had to get a job which they wanted. Capital letters and full-stops weren’t an issue because they had that investment,” says Phoebe. “They were going to each other in class and saying: ‘Could you please read over this and check it for me before I hand it in.’ They were proofreading each other’s work,” she says. “They would ask each other: ‘Do you have some more strengths that you can bring to it?’ It’s not just adults that are afraid of selfpromotion; students are exactly the same,” adds PJ.

Chance to shine Every child was engaged in the Skylands project and Phoebe and PJ say they saw some students in a new light. “We didn’t have children who disengaged from the project at all. We didn’t have to nurture our lower learners: the entry level for them was accessible. Often they were the ones who were just plugging the work – they’d say, ‘Yup, you give me a job and I will break it down and work it out’,” says PJ. Children who are normally lower achievers, who may not shine in the traditional style of classroom teaching, became role models, says Phoebe. gazette.education.govt.nz

Tips for teachers on getting started  » Be open to the possibilities: the best learning isn’t forced.  » Don’t think of the end product: it begins with something small – like a house.  » Trust that there is learning within your projects: teachers are experts at embedding the learning.  » Have confidence to have a go, even if you are having doubts.   » You won’t realise the learning that is happening until you reflect or listen to the children.  » Respond to the children’s enthusiasm and interests.  » Work collaboratively: there’s nothing better than having a colleague to bounce ideas around with and support you on the challenging days.

She gives the example of a student who struggles in many areas across the curriculum. That student became a role model, worked hard and had the freedom to choose to be extended.

the tour. We talk to kids about doing things that they love and it was like she realised: ‘Wow, I’ve just worked out what I love!’” says PJ.

As the project came to an end, the children developed and ran tours of Skylands, which were attended by every class in the school, as well as whānau who were invited to a learning showcase day.

The GeoCity project also saw children design a flag and a stamp with the assistance of library and resources specialist, Maree Turbitt.

“We had one girl who came back into the classroom after a tour and I have never seen light shine out of a child like I did this wee girl. She’s a very, very quiet child and she led

Expert advice and support

“Two children who were quite interested in art and design came up with a stamp design with Maree. Then they started emailing Denise, my mother-in-law, who works at NZ Post’s Stamps and Collectibles in Whanganui. TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 7 December 2020

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STUDENT-LED LEARNING

She told them what they needed to think about and so they emailed back and forward over a month fine-tuning their design; she printed them for them and they got a sheet of legal stamps,” says Phoebe.

Student kōrero  

The school’s caretaker, Anthony Atyeo, who has taken a year out from the NZ Police, threw himself into the project providing materials and helping students with the project. One day, he asked if he could talk to the children.

Many skills were learned such as applying for jobs, writing formal letters, scale, measurement, prioritising spending, loans, mortgages and banking.  

“He told them that for safety reasons they are missing lights and electricity and they need them. He gave us the materials and it became a big maths project because they had to measure out all the lights,” explains Phoebe. “He wrote them a letter about the rules and regulations about street lights and electricity; he is a policeman so he’s very official. He’d help the kids out, provide them with tools if they needed them, give them some tips and skills. He definitely invested himself and the kids were thrilled about that,” adds PJ.

Future plans The Skylands project grew from one template of a house organically and quickly. Both Phoebe and PJ say they could have kept it going and plan to do another GeoCity project in a year or so, possibly exploring an issue like sustainability. “The saddest thing about it is, I don’t think we had enough time. We could have kept going. If we were to do it again, we would start in term 1; I think it would set the year up beautifully,” says Phoebe. “The parents are very engaged in the school but they did get a bit sick of the GeoCity project. The feedback was, ‘Whatever you are doing, we’re hearing about it way too much at the dinner table’,” laughs PJ.

How does it end? The students from Room 89 have been saving money. At the end of the year, there will be an auction and they will be able to bid for their house, or maybe part of the resort island, or a square of sea if their funds have run out. “This is big-kid, play-based learning. You’re not aiming for right or correct or perfect. It’s just your imagination because it’s what you create and there’s no right or wrong: it’s relevant learning. “As teachers, we are just so aware that they need to be happy, they need to be loved. If they think that we think everything they do is ‘awesome’, then there’s no fear of getting stuff wrong and we have found that what they achieve is amazing,” says PJ.

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Education Gazette | 7 December 2020

Education Gazette sat down with some of the creators of Witherlea School’s Skylands GeoCity and asked them what they learned and liked about the project.  

Leia (Year 5) says the mathematics in the project was challenging, but it was fun doing maths while building the GeoCity.  “We had to figure out how many traffic lights had to be on each street and that involved a lot of maths. It was harder maths than we did in the classroom because you had to use your brain a lot more, but it was fun,” she says.  Ben (Year 6) learned about scale.   “I learned that you didn’t need a set of instructions to do something, you can do it just from your imagination and what you are seeing,” he says.  Oliver (Year 6) was one of the instigators of the banking system.  “I thought we needed a banking system, because instead of just learning about building, we could include maths. I learned a lot about designing things. Seth and I designed the cash using Canva. Sometimes it was quite hard with the technology,” he says. 

Learning life skills  The students agreed that they learned many social and life skills. For some, communication was the most challenging aspect of the project and they learned a lot about listening.  “I learned that you can’t have everything you want. When you listened to other people’s ideas, they were actually really good because they weren’t just the same as yours. Sometimes there’s a person who wants everybody to listen to them and they have great ideas, but then the shy person comes along and has good ideas as well,” says Morgan (Year 6).  Communication was ‘definitely’ the hardest part for James and Oliver (Year 6).   “It was a skill that I really learned and developed over the time we were doing GeoCity. I could communicate before, but I really learnt how to get it across to everyone, not just people in my friend group – because it’s really important,” says James.  “I had a really good idea and you tell everyone and they don’t quite agree with you and it doesn’t always go your way. Sometimes I would be a bit annoyed that my idea wasn’t chosen but I got over it,” adds Oliver.  “It was interesting to learn a lot of life skills like about money and creating houses. The most challenging thing was getting all my group together to do the building because sometimes there were arguments, but my group worked as a team,” says Ruruka (Year 6). 

Enjoyable and challenging  The children all enjoyed a different style of learning.  “I just really enjoyed the whole thing. It was quite challenging but also quite fun because we had to do everything ourselves; we had a bit of help from the teachers but not much,” says James, who says he wouldn’t get bored if GeoCity continued to be a big part of the class’s learning.  “I very definitely enjoyed getting to try new things and learning in a different way because I don’t think we would have done GeoCity if you didn’t have lockdown. I knew that it wasn’t just building: we were doing lots of different things like maths, writing and art,” says Leia.  Nathan (Year 6) agrees: “It didn’t feel like we were learning anything, even though we learned a lot.” 

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STUDENT-LED LEARNING

Taine manages mortgages and home loan repayments for the Skylands GeoCity Bank.

“I very definitely enjoyed getting to try new things and learning in a different way because I don’t think we would have done GeoCity if you didn’t have lockdown.” Leia (Year 5)

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TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 7 December 2020

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COVID-19

Hauora top priority at Hastings Girls’ High School Hauora and wellbeing are key facets of Hastings Girls’ High School’s Covid-19 preparedness plan and have resulted in schoolwide transformational changes.

Principal Catherine Bentley shares a laugh with a group of students.

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Education Gazette | 7 December 2020

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COVID-19

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ike most schools around Aotearoa with just days to prepare for the Alert Level 4 lockdown in March, planning for school closures and meeting the needs of students and whānau was turbo-charged.

All the school’s computers were loaned out and the school bought 30 cellphones, which were distributed to students. The school’s board agreed to fund wi-fi for some students.

The back part of the website was for staff: “Staff very quickly got au-fait with all sorts of tools that they could use and they started sharing those. We had PD blogs on the staff website, which became a bank of resources,” says Catherine.

“Early on, even before going into lockdown, we established that teaching and learning were going to come second to hauora. We knew that the teaching platform was going to be really different,” explains principal, Catherine Bentley.

“We never took the devices back. We made that decision from the outset that there’s no way we can give devices to girls for improved teaching and learning because of the pandemic and then take them back!”

All communications, including teaching and learning plans, were published on the website and the timetable was rebuilt every three days.

“For many of our girls, lockdown wasn’t going to be a pleasant experience, given some of the circumstances at home. It really did highlight the inequities for us.

With the potential threat of going into lockdown, the school bought the Seesaw app as a way of maintaining social connections between the school, students and whānau.

“When we went into lockdown, we put together an extensive plan – we had, and still have, a series of ‘buckets’ if we go into lockdown again. Some of the buckets include curriculum, communications, hauora. Each member of our crisis response team is responsible for leading a bucket,” she says.

“Before lockdown, we did staff training on setting up Google Classroom and using Seesaw and we then outlined our critical response plan for Covid.” says Catherine.

Connections essential Catherine says they knew they had to act quickly and their actions needed to centre around connections. “About nine days before lockdown,” she says, “we started building an at-risk register for our students and staff. We had already worked out who were going to be our most at-risk students. Part of that was to get a register of devices and address how we could stay connected.”

“Just two hours later, we were training the girls on how to use Seesaw, so they could touch base with their Akina coach [form teacher] each day.”

Focus on hauora The school’s website was collapsed and turned into a Covid-19 response plan platform, which included blogs keeping students and whānau regularly updated.

“We did this because we were getting voice from the students and staff all around their wellbeing,” says Catherine. “We had staff with their own families at home who were struggling and it was about keeping that lens on hauora. We were able to be really responsive to the needs of staff and because we were really open about getting feedback on the three-day timetable, very quickly we got buy-in and high trust from staff. “If it was going to work, we needed all staff on board. We had Seesaw groups set up for staff – checking their wellbeing as well as the students’.” With a focus on wellbeing for students and staff during lockdown, each student had just one block of time – about 80 minutes – for teaching and learning each day. The first block of the day – about 90 minutes – was set aside for Akina coaches to connect with the students in his or her group.

Hastings Girls’ High doesn’t have a BYOD policy, but within days the school was able to provide some form of connection for about 90 per cent of students, whether it was digital devices or connections through whānau or outside partners such as the Police or Pacific church groups.

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TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 7 December 2020

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COVID-19

The school's Uniting Through Kindness Day offered fun, food and community to students and whānau.

“ We made a decision early on that the focus had to be on maintaining hauora, so we would be really careful about how we shaped the teaching and learning.” Catherine Bentley “We continued like that through the entirety of lockdown. We made a decision early on that the focus had to be on maintaining hauora, so we would be really careful about how we shaped the teaching and learning.”

Return to school The school recognised that the return to school might be challenging for many of its 640 students and several measures were put in place to ease the transition. Return to school was staggered by year group and students in Years 11–13 spent the first week or so in kāhui kaupapa ‘bubbles’. “When the girls returned, they were greeted by staff, and given a lanyard which showed what kaupapa they were going to. We did the return a year group at a time. This was because we knew that many of the students would be very vulnerable given their experience of Covid and the implications that had on them and their whānau,” explains Catherine. “The focus of the return was that every single girl would have time with a teacher to unpack

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Education Gazette | 7 December 2020

their Covid story, to revisit their learning goal, to co-construct if their learning goal had changed and what steps we could put in place to support them moving forward.” Students opted into the kāhui groups based on a subject area to which they felt a strong affiliation. These included visual arts, maths and science, and a kāhui korowai for girls taking te reo Māori. The Pacific community was most worried about returning to school as they had seen the impact of the measles epidemic in Samoa: lalaga se fou – a kāhui kaupapa group was set up for these students. “We did the kaupapa to keep the students safe: the focus was on their hauora. The kaupapa groups were cross-curricular. Back at school, the girls were still working in their kaupapa. They still had access to – they still had access to all their other subjects but they were in a space that they connected with strongly – that was their space in the school. By the end of that first week, we had 98 per cent of our students return,” says Catherine.

Timetable transformed So popular were the kāhui kaupapa hubs that the school’s timetable has been reimagined. Monday to Thursday, classes have been reduced to three 90-minute blocks per day and on Friday students work in their kaupapa groups. “There’s been a lot of PLD to go from teaching a 50-minute lesson to teaching a 90-minute lesson. But the girls appreciate it. The whole rhythm of the school has slowed down. In 90 minutes, the girls can dig far deeper into a subject and have time to do the deeper thinking – they’re not rushing from one class to another. “Student feedback is that teachers often think they know what’s most important, but for students it’s not what’s most important for them. So girls in visual arts can work on a painting for the whole of Friday if they want; or they can do science. Staff run mini-workshops, or they might have one-to-one tutorials, but it’s not teaching as you imagine it,” says Catherine. The reimagined timetable has resulted in an increased number of senior cross-curricula courses being offered next year. There will be gazette.education.govt.nz


Mātua Carl Gibbons, academic dean, helps to prepare the hāngi for Uniting Through Kindness Day.

Students enjoy kāhui kaupapa » “We get to choose what we want to work on. We don’t have to work on a specific subject – we can work on whatever we like and still have the support from the right teachers.” » “It’s good independent time. It’s nice to work on your own for a whole day and work on what you want to work on.” an additional Engineering your future junior science and maths hub, which will provide a pathway for girls who are interested in health science or engineering. “That’s all come about because of the kāhui model,” says Catherine.

Community care With the focus on hauora, students at Hastings Girls’ High School felt well cared for and Catherine says that plans for a ‘Uniting Through Kindness’ day to celebrate a return to normalcy were fast tracked, with a feast for more than 800 people enjoyed by the wider school community. “After the first two weeks when we heard about some of the experiences and challenges some of the whānau were facing, we decided that we needed to fast-track our ‘HGHS Uniting Through Kindness’ day where we worked with Iwi. Whānau came on a Saturday afternoon: we had a hangi for 500 that the staff had prepared, Pasifika food for about 300. We had a real celebration. “We gathered a whole lot of bedding and warm clothes and we set up tables upon tables of clothes which had been donated and whānau came in and took whatever they needed. It was a really beautiful day,” she remembers.

Feeling prepared Catherine feels the school is well prepared should the country again go into higher levels gazette.education.govt.nz

of Covid management. When Auckland went into Level 3 in August, senior leadership at Hastings Girls’ High began planning for the possibility that their school could be closed the following week. “We started planning and put together the buckets and presented that to the staff on the Friday afternoon saying we may not be back on Monday. We’re all ready to roll. “If we had to go back into lockdown it would be pretty similar. We would reignite Seesaw, our critical response team would gather, we would put together the list of vulnerable students and staff again. The website would revert to being a response plan again and we would push people there so that would become the port for whānau to access information.”

The journey continues With a mantra of aiming high – ‘singing above the note’ – and putting the girls at the centre of everything the school does, Catherine acknowledges the key roles her staff play and says the future looks exciting. “The staff are incredible: they are innovative and courageous, because they are doing things that no-one else is doing and that’s really scary. “We were on a journey prior to Covid anyway: Akina has been with the school since its beginnings, but we have reshaped our curriculum to embody ‘akina’ – we have surged ahead.”


STUDENT VOICE

What 2020 taught us – student perspectives on life and learning during Covid-19

‘Beyond Covid’ video series The Education Gazette caught up with Ministerial Youth Advisory Group members Raiyan Azmi and Tara Shepherd to hear about their experiences of life and learning during Covid-19, and their aspirations for next year. Watch the video on the Education Gazette’s YouTube channel: youtube.com/edgazettenewzealand.

Raiyan.

Tara.

Also from the Education Gazette’s ‘Beyond Covid’ video series: » Building attendance and engagement in Whakatāne » Keeping connected with remote learning at Te Akau ki Pāpāmoa School

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STUDENT VOICE

Finding my way out of Covid-19 Year 12 student at Marist College in Auckland, Petra Po’uhila, gives an insight into how Covid-19 has affected her this year.

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e were the first Covid-19 school lockdown. We hit the media like white on rice. No warnings, no heads up, we were told to go home and stay home. My room became my shell, talking to my Mum through closed doors, meals on my own, Netflix parties in my room, TikToks with the mirror and groups chats with friends. It was fun at first, isolation didn’t seem so bad, no chores, sleep in every day and literally watched the world go by. But the creep was gradual, like when you are standing in the shallow end of the pool and walk towards the deep end, you know it’s getting deeper and you keep walking knowing that sooner or later your feet won’t touch the bottom. If you’re a good swimmer, it’s not so scary… but if you’re not, the panic sets in. 2020 was the year where everything was possible. It was my year, full of potential, senior things to do and prove, me and my friends planning many firsts – first senior ball, first school trip to Samoa, cultural leaders, our netball team, we had finally graduated into the senior world. We were excited, pumped and couldn’t wait to make our mark. But the creep now overwhelmed me. School became an option. Zooming was a new phenomenon, Google Classroom was the norm and then the excuses became verbal diarrhoea – sorry Miss, my mic’s broken; sorry Miss, my camera isn’t working; sorry Miss, I can’t hear you; sorry Miss, my wi-fi is playing up… ‘sorry Miss’ became regular

and wagging school in this virtual world was easy, tolerated and there were no consequences – or so I thought. Second lockdown was like prison; it was lonely, choking me, trapping me. I’m behind now. I can’t catch up. I can’t keep up… so I gave up. After two lockdowns and all the sleep I had, I felt more tired, more sleepy; the more work I needed to do, the more I retreated into my bed, into my cell. I missed normal. I missed hugs and kisses and holding hands. I missed catching the train. I missed massive hugs at the school gate. I missed tutor group. I missed loud laughter. I missed my teachers… even the ones I thought I didn’t like. I miss Tonga because my Nena is there and I miss my Nan, she is my comfort. I miss looking forward to Christmas and the family that converge at our house… that’s not happening this year. I miss my Dad and my brother and cry at all our cancelled plans… I have not hugged them since January… I miss them… I’m not myself without them. I miss our normal, boring regular life. And so what have I learned this year? I read something on social media that kinda sums it up: “I thought 2020 was going to be the year where I would get everything I wanted, instead it was the year I learned to appreciate everything I have.” (note. com) I know other students and families have it harder than I do. I know the struggle is real. I know what is happening around me, my friends, my family and my community. I know this year is painful, I know people are scared and the future unknown and

I also know my life could be harder, but it is not. I know that when my feet couldn’t touch the bottom, my family and my faith carried me and kept me afloat, teachers came to my rescue, texting me, checking in on me, giving me options, sending out search parties, kept me on track and didn’t let me go… even when I gave up, they didn’t. I know me and my friends looked to each other every day for safety. We held each other despite the distance and saved each other from the deep end of Covid-19.

Petra Po’uhila.

2020 has turned out to be that year none of us expected. That year where we have all been tested and as I write this, I continue to be grateful for what I have. Thank you to my God, family, friends and teachers for walking gently with me and never giving up on me. I am finding my way out, paddling slowly but surely because YOU were there lighting the path. My lesson learnt… PEOPLE and relationships, human connection, touch, hugs, tears and laughter makes a difference whatever the crisis, however dark – and in these unprecedented times, it is people, family, friends, teachers and strangers being kind, being human, showing up and turning up. Bring on 2021!

I missed normal. I missed hugs and kisses and holding hands. I missed catching the train. I missed massive hugs at the school gate. I missed tutor group. I missed loud laughter. I missed my teachers… even the ones I thought I didn’t like. Petra Po’uhila gazette.education.govt.nz

TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 7 December 2020

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STUDENT VOICE

Finding clarity and balance during lockdown Pāpāmoa College Year 13 student and head girl Grace Green reflects on the year that delivered challenges and opportunities for personal growth.

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doubt you would be able to find a teacher, parent or student who breezed through online learning. School in itself is stressful but trying to conquer dodgy wi-fi, hundreds of Google Classroom alerts and losing track of what day, week or month it is, is a whole other story. Year 13 is the year we all look forward too – finally we’re the big fish in a little pond! But this year has been pretty much as far from any of our fantasies as possible; a killer virus is literally the stuff of movies. Yet however many twists and Grace Green. turns 2020 took, you cannot deny the immense quantity (and quality) of life lessons we all learnt. My graduating class has had such a unique opportunity to understand ourselves, our learning needs and our values within life – all before leaving high school. I’m hoping that these learnings will give us a head start into the futures we have all been so worried about Covid-19 jeopardising. 

Finding a balance Working from home made me realise that in order to achieve academically I need to have a balance. I was so determined to keep on top of my schoolwork that I let everything else go. I prioritised my academics and leadership position over my friendships, family, dance and fitness. Academically I was thriving, but as an entire person I was starting to fall apart. It was a few weeks into our lockdown before I realised how important downtime is to learning – putting everything and anything into your

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school work doesn’t mean you’re going to do well or have the validation you need within your life. Happiness cannot be achieved by good grades alone; there needs to be a balance of time spent with loved ones, and a focus on wellbeing – physical, mental and emotional. I’m thankful that I was able to have this realisation before I totally fell apart or was out in the real world. The nature of our education system forces us to take time out from schoolwork through extracurriculars, community service and even simply lunchtime. By inherently protecting us from the threat of burnout, our system also keeps us sheltered. 

Learning needs and lockdown Working from home also taught (or rather forced) me to accommodate my learning needs in new ways. I have several learning disabilities, which gives me access to Special Assessment Conditions. I went into lockdown with the perception that working from home would remove many of the barriers I face daily and was unpleasantly surprised to find that it also removed many of the coping mechanisms I’ve been refining since pre-primary. I had to get creative. Lockdown wasn’t going anywhere but with my disabilities and no management plan, neither was I. Throughout lockdown I began to utilise technology in ways that I never felt I was ‘allowed’ to. I used close captions in my Google Meet classes. I used talk-to-text for essay writing, drafting and planning and I tried every font until I found the 'perfect' one. As I became more confident in my use of these tools, I became more confident in my abilities. Coming back into ‘normal’ classes, I still use what I learnt in lockdown to support myself and my learning needs; lockdown forced me to broaden my disabilities toolbox. I now have the skills to work collaboratively and independently, all while making accommodations for my disabilities. 

Lessons learned at home For the last 13 years of my life, my education has been carried out in the same environment: hundreds of students, obtrusive noises, intrusive colours and the ever-present and overwhelming smell of Lynx body spray. With time we have all become very accustomed to working in such chaos. The abrupt transition to quiet and calm home offices threw many of us off – even those of us who thought we would be more productive at home. The honest truth is that some of us thrived in these new environments while others fell desperately far behind. As students we were presented with new challenges. We were forced to understand what helps us learn best – is it watching videos? Class discussions? Research? From here we had to use what we learnt to help ourselves. When we aren’t all in the same room, we can’t rely on our teachers to take us through everything step by step. Although it was brutal, being forced out of the nest gave us the skills for self-empowerment within our learning. We had to actively engage in assignments, clearly ask for assistance when it was needed and most importantly, we learnt how our futures need to look in order for us to thrive. For me, I learnt that I work best alone, but also that before any independent work can be done, I need several thought-provoking conversations with my peers – I need inspiration and validation from others before I have the ability to proceed solo. Now knowing this, I am able to make my future study plans as specific to my needs as possible; I know, going into uni, that discussion groups and homework clubs will be of major assistance to the quality of my work.  gazette.education.govt.nz


STUDENT VOICE

am able to create career pathways that incorporate these values.

Lockdown wasn’t going anywhere, but with my disabilities and no management plan, neither was I. Throughout lockdown I began to utilise technology in ways that I never felt I was ‘allowed’ to.

Many of my peers also found this clarity in lockdown. When all the outside noise of the world was taken away, we were finally able to listen to our inner voices; they told us what we need in order to succeed and feel free. I truly believe that my graduating class knows ourselves and our deepest desires better than any other cohorts – and I believe that because of this we will all be guided towards career pathways that nourish our souls with all the nutrients it could possibly need. 

Grace Green

For me, lockdown fostered an immense amount of personal growth – however, through writing this piece I have been reminded of how truly privileged I have been with my experiences through Covid.

Taking time to reflect I once heard someone refer to the pandemic as a corona-coaster. If you can overlook the somewhat wretched pun, it becomes a great way of describing the emotional turmoil experienced nationwide. We were all scared, hopeful, bored, calm, frantic and isolated all at the same time. My normal life is so filled with academics, ballet, friends and work that I don’t have the time to slow down and contemplate my true emotions. In lockdown I was able to find the time to step back and accurately identify how I was feeling, but even more importantly, what was fuelling these feelings. Every day I sat down and asked myself what I value in life; ultimately, I had stripped it back to the simple things. I value laughter and the hubbub that large groups of people create. I value literature and the lessons it teaches us, just as I value passion and determination. When I’m surrounded by these my soul is nourished; through understanding this I gazette.education.govt.nz

Respecting different experiences

Some of my peers had to work six-day weeks to support their families. Some had to babysit their siblings all day every day. Some had unsafe or unpleasant living situations. Our international students went through the pandemic without their families. Some students lost thousands of dollars’ worth of deposits overseas. It's important to respect and acknowledge that each person had a different lockdown experience; compassion and leeway from both peers and teachers has become not just important but necessary in order for students to continue their education. I am thankful that throughout Covid-19 Alert Levels 3 and 4 my house was filled with learning, love and laughter. My heart truly goes out to those who had to choose between putting food or schoolwork on the table. TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 7 December 2020

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CULTURAL RESPONSIVENESS

Katie Pennicott at the school gate with Ariana and Laela.

“Our drive was whanaungatanga, connection: making sure that connection we had wIth our students and families was maintained every day and was reciprocal.” Katie Pennicott

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CULTURAL RESPONSIVENESS

Talanoa and vā build relationships during Covid Pacific principles of relationship-building and two-way dialogue helped an Auckland school support staff, students and families during the Covid-19 disruptions and closures.

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unnyvale School worked effectively with its school community during school closures under the leadership of principal Katie Pennicott (Ngāti Porou), who was appointed nine months before the Covid-19 lockdown. The student population of the Henderson school is 31 per cent Pacific nations, 29 per cent Māori, 18 per cent Pākehā and 22 per cent from other countries. Staff at the school are 25 per cent Pacific, 17 per cent Māori and 57 per cent Pākehā. Katie’s thesis for her recently completed Master of Education is about decolonising professional learning spaces and using existing systems and structures underpinned by cultural shifts to transform a school. Work to address this had begun before Covid-19 nationwide school closures.

“Our drive was whanaungatanga, connection: making sure that connection we had with our students and families was maintained every day and was reciprocal. So it wasn’t just the teacher saying, ‘Here’s some work, do it’. It was creating spaces where the children could do something with their family and upload it and where we would do something and the families could respond,” explains Katie.

“We only had two days before the lockdown so I had to be very directed about what I was doing. But over that process there was learning and growing around how these things that I was describing as Māori principles connected to the values of my Pacific people here and how we could embody that further. “In the first instance, I was focusing on whanaungatanga because that is our core school value and so everything that I was doing was grounded in that value. However, during that time, the concepts of the four aspects of talanoa (see box) were coming through in what we were doing. I’m not Samoan but those things were becoming apparent – the people here who are Samoan put those words on it.

Vā, talanoa, whanaungatanga Considering the vā (relational space) of staff, students and the community, Katie created a health and safety plan for the school. This plan included managing the health and safety of staff and students, and fulfilling the Ministry of Education’s requirements.

She explains that Brazilian theorist Paulo Freire writes about the pedagogy of the oppressed. The cultural beliefs and values of the oppressed culture, or the culture that is receiving the inequality, are embodied to drive cultural shift to bring about equity. “I use Māori concepts and principles in my work because that is how we drive cultural shifts. That way you bring that true sense of success and shift, because if we operate in the Euro-centric structures that we currently have in our system, we’re just going to perpetuate the same outcomes over and over. It’s about stepping away from those. “If you think about curriculum teaching and learning, that’s a kind of system, and then you think about cultural shifts: whanaungatanga [kinship between people] or talanoa [dialogue] are the cultural drivers that underpin the curriculum structure.

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Team leader and teacher May Gaseata with Cole.

TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 7 December 2020

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CULTURAL RESPONSIVENESS

“When we went into Alert Level 4 the first time, the first thing we did was to make sure that every person was acknowledged and communicated with in the ways that best suited them: whether a phone call, a Facebook message, a text, an email or a home visit,” says Katie. She explains it was very stressful for people, so the focus was on being open, responsive, helpful and using clear communication. Sunnyvale School used online tools and distance methods to have talanoa with staff and families during the lockdown period. “It was important to be consistent as one family might have five children across different classes, so it was important they are not trying to find several different ways to access the teacher and their learning,” says Katie.

Responsiveness vital Staff were given professional guidance in being responsive to the learning needs of the students and how important the contact with students would be over this time. “Talanoa and community are key elements to Pacific nations people and to be isolated could be a foreign concept, causing anxiety. Working in isolation from others could have led to disadvantaging the learning progress of students,” says Katie.

Teacher and ICT lead Sean Bishop with Ryda.

Parents contacted Katie regarding a number of technical issues, and she ensured that every query was followed up. This was important as it built strong communication lines with whānau and also gave teachers space to process and put into action their learning of online teaching, instead of attending to technical difficulties.

whanaungatanga as the basis of these meetings, there was a ‘no-agenda’ aspect and staff members were able to highlight their own criteria for discussion about their practice.

“We gave out every device in the school because we wanted people to have what they needed for that open communication. We also created our own supporting resources paper for the children if families requested it or we thought it would be helpful. I was on the phone just about 24/7 for that first week coaching people through it, as well as for other reasons,” she says.

Staff members reported that they felt fully supported by the principal as they supported students and whānau. Staff also commented on the coherence that was evident throughout the school environment and that this would make the transition back to classroom teaching smoother.

Reciprocity grew as some staff members looked for ways to show whanaungatanga. Staff took on responsibilities that were beyond their job expectations, including sourcing resources that students needed.

Support for staff The principal maintained ofa, māfana, maīle and faka’apa’apa (see box) in her interactions with staff, which enabled genuine talanoa to take place. At the beginning of the first lockdown, a timetable was developed to schedule a meeting with every staff member. With

They were also given an opportunity to discuss their own experience of moving into lockdown and any concerns or anxiety they had in providing education online.

Staff feedback Staff with Pacific heritage were asked for feedback after the lockdown alert levels were lifted: » “This principal develops the wellbeing of staff, students and whānau through effective communication, high expectations, providing challenge, celebrating progress, effectively resourcing and giving time for people to internally process discussions and put any learning into action. She does this in a way that shows the elements of ofa, maīle, māfana and faka’apa’apa.” » “As a first-year team leader, this was all new to me in terms of leadership and then having this epidemic hit. I had to learn how to guide my team through online learning, appraisals and team inquiries, whilst still leading them through PD. She supported me through all of this. She taught me how to awhi my team members through new learning whilst still respecting my mana. The vā between her and I was one of mutual respect, I never once felt as though she treated me like a first-year team leader. She believed in my ability to lead and respected the decisions that I made during lockdown.”

Successful strategies The strategies used during the first lockdown were so effective that by the second lockdown, the whole school community knew what to expect. “They came and got the devices and were straight into it the next day. In the second lockdown we also measured engagement weekly. I designed a tool for measuring that because our school leadership inquiry is around engagement. We saw the increase and regularity in engagement from the families,” says Katie. “Ever since both Level 3 lockdowns, I have been at the school gate every day for about two hours greeting, farewelling and talking with people. I used to do that from time to time but I felt that was really important that I was there to answer questions and just be there for people. I have just continued doing that because those relationships have been really strengthened through those conversations.”

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CULTURAL RESPONSIVENESS

Feedback and subsequent actions from school whānau and Pacific staff members show that Pacific people in the school community felt empowered as different aspects of vā were woven together to bring about mauri ora (life force) as an outcome for the school community. The leadership practice demonstrates that Raranga Mauri Ora can be practised effectively within education, using principles that are effective for Pacific nations people and Māori.

New way of being Prior to Covid, whānau hui were held at Sunnyvale School with teachers conducting deliberate talanoa whanaungatanga dialogues with the families of all of the 475 children at the school. “During lockdown I analysed those responses using grounded theory and thematic analysis. Out of that came our whole new way of being as a school: the underpinnings of our whole school local curriculum came through,” says Katie.

The key elements are: » Connect: about connecting with your identity, language, prior knowledge, experiences and each other. » Learn: learning and progress. » Create: innovation, creativity and expression. » Share: sharing your learning with your community, peers and others. “I was able to use our talanoa and whanaungatanga relationships to clearly communicate what they mean to our community and how we could apply that. Our whole strategic plan is now based on those four elements: our initiatives, curriculum, school reports, school vision are aligned with one of those four things,” says Katie. “The children use it too, so when they are going to do some learning, first they make their connections to what they already know, then they do some learning, then they create something and then they share it. It’s been a very powerful year for us. There’s real clarity and cohesion across the school about what we are doing.”

Key concepts Talanoa: conversation/discussion which includes participants discussing stories, metaphors and experiences to reveal the loto (heart and soul), of the communicator. It’s an effective nonlinear approach for Pacific and Māori, largely focused on face to face interactions, which relies on mutual respect where shared understandings are developed. Talanoa is developed through the four elements (in Tongan) of ‘ofa (love), māfana (warmth), māile (humour) and faka’apa’apa (respect). Vā: relational space which describes the connections between people and how they are strengthened. Whanaungatanga: kinship, close connections between people.

What’s it like to be a Kaitakawaenga? A Zoom session with Miriama Wilson Tuesday 15 December 4.00pm

Register for the session by emailing career.engagement@education.govt.nz Know any Māori secondary school students interested in supporting Māori whānau to succeed in education? Encourage them to register for this free zoom session with Miriama Wilson, to learn more about her mahi as a Kaitakawaenga.

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TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 7 December 2020

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PACIFIC EDUCATION

Guide to Pacific resources Are you looking for resources in Pacific languages? Here’s a quick guide to where to look for the resources published by the Ministry of Education.

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hen the Department of Education became the Ministry of Education in 1989, it immediately began to publish resources in Pacific languages for New Zealand schools. In the 30 years since, the Ministry has published hundreds of books, posters, DVDs and videos, and CDs and MP3 files for students in Pacific languages as well as school journals in gagana Sāmoa – plus curriculum guidelines, teacher support material, and teaching kits for teachers – and pamplets and other support material for families in Pacific languages and English. Among these resources is Epi Swan’s book Nonu (also published in gagana Tokelau as Ko te Nonu), the first book published for the Ministry of Education to be short-listed for a Children’s Book of the Year Award, and a set of over 100 Years 1–3 dual-language resources in five Pacific languages and English that recently won a SunPix Pacific Peoples Award. As you would expect, some of the earlier material is now out of print, but here’s where to look for what’s available at the moment. While this isn’t everything that’s available, these are the best places to start.

Early childhood to Year 13 guidelines Te Kaveinga o te Reo Māori Kūki ‘Āirani: The Cook Islands Māori Language Guidelines (item 34156) Ta‘iala mo le Gagana Sāmoa: The Gagana Sāmoa Guidelines (item 33411) Ko e Fakahinohino ki he Lea Faka-Tonga: The Tongan Language Guidelines (item 34154) Tau Hatakiaga ma e Vagahau Niue: The Niue Language Guidelines (item 34155) Gagana Tokelau: The Tokelau Language Guidelines (item 33395).

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Education Gazette | 7 December 2020

Early childhood

Years 7–10

The Pacific dual-language books for early learning are dual-language picture books to read to threeand four-year-olds. In five Pacific languages (and English), the series includes support material for kaiako and dual-language pamphlets for families, as well as eBook and audio versions. For more about these resources, go to the PELP section on the Te Whāriki TKI site.

Five Pacific languages are among the languages offered in the Learning Languages Series (LLS). These resources include resource kits for teaching the languages that include lesson plans, photocopy masters, CDs, and DVDs – and sets of readers at appropriate reading levels while on topics of interest to young teenagers.

Some of the Participation series and Tupu series early childhood resources in Pacific languages are still available. Go to Down the Back of the Chair and search by language.

Years 1–3 The Supporting Pasifika learners through dual language texts are resources for bilingual learners in junior classes. In five Pacific languages (and English), the series includes support material for teachers on crosslinguistic transfer of early reading skills and duallanguage pamphlets for families, as well as audio versions of many of the books. For more about these resources, go to the Literacy Online TKI site. Some of the Tupu junior class resources in Pacific languages are still available too, including Ko te Nonu (item 5731). Go to Down the Back of the Chair and search by language.

Years 4–6 Production has just commenced on new resources in gagana Sāmoa and lea faka-Tonga for bilingual classes, so watch this space. Selected Years 4–6 Tupu resources are still available in five Pacific languages through Down the Back of the Chair, some of which we’ve recently reprinted. Search by language and check in your resource room to see if you hold copies of back issues of Fōlauga, our school journal in gagana Sāmoa.

For more about these resources, go to the Learning Languages TKI site. A set of LLS readers in gagana Tokelau has recently been added. Some Years 7–10 Tupu resources are still available in five Pacific languages through Down the Back of the Chair. Search by language and check in your resource room to see if you hold copies of back issues of Fōlauga Ualoa, the school journal published in gagana Sāmoa at this interest level.

Years 11–13 Go to the NZQA website for NCEA resources for teaching and learning in Years 11–13: » » » »

Gagana Sāmoa. Lea faka-Tonga. Te reo Māori Kūki ‘Āirani. Vagahau Niue.

Action plans The Action Plan for Pacific Education 2020–2030 can be found on the Ministry of Education website.

Takiala Pasifika 2020–2023, the New Zealand Qualification Authority’s action plan can be found on the NZQA website.

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PACIFIC EDUCATION

Visit this article at Education Gazette online to find the links to these resources.

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TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 7 December 2020

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EDUCATION TO EMPLOYMENT

Connecting rangatahi to employment opportunities in Ōpōtiki With a community focused on enhancing manaakitanga, and a collective of like-minded professionals, Ōpōtiki is fast becoming a role model for small towns wishing to achieve educational success and successful employment outcomes for rangatahi.

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arlier in 2020, all Year 9 and 10 students at Ōpōtiki College were invited to attend an inaugural Aspirations Week. The week-long education to employment event saw students participating in a range of experiences around the Ōpōtiki community, opening their eyes to possible employment opportunities on their doorstep. The programme is aimed at Year 9 and 10 students as an incentive for students to stay at school, says Ōpōtiki College Aspirations coordinator Alison Waller. “We have noticed over the years that if we can keep our students into Year 11, then they will typically complete college with a minimum of NCEA Level 2. To ensure we give our students a reason to stay at school, we decided to focus on Year 9 and 10 students so they could have an idea of why they are really learning.” Ōpōtiki College principal Susan Impley is passionate about the programme. “We have a real vision to ignite and empower our rangatahi to create their future. Programmes such as Aspirations enable and embody this vision. “For the future we want every child to leave with a kete full of the qualifications, skills and personal attributes that gives them a quality pathway and demonstrates that they have dreamt it, explored it and activated it to thrive in life after secondary school,” says Susan.

Strong community support Engaging the wider community in such an initiative wasn’t difficult for Alison. Ōpōtiki is a small town with a predominantly Māori population, and there is a strong sense of cultural identity and a desire to support local communities. The initiative has been well supported by both the Whakaatu Whanaunga Trust and Whakatōhea Maurua. Anita Kurei-Paruru, an advisor for Whakatōhea Maurua Education Strategy, said the programme was well supported by whānau, hapū, Iwi and kura, and the relationships between these different groups, which had developed only recently, made the vision achievable. “One of Whakatōhea Maurua’s strategy outcomes, which we focused on in 2018, was Developing Partnerships and Relationships, and this

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Education Gazette | 7 December 2020

Visiting a mussel factory in Ōpōtiki.

came to the fore. This year we are focused on Quality Teaching, and this initiative truly exemplified the relationships our kaiako have with our community, and in some cases need to have with our community,” says Anita.

Varied programme In partnership with Alison, Anita put together a four-day programme, which was supported by the Ministry of Education. It included visits to the Whakatōhea Māori Trust Board, the dairy farm and mussel factory building site belonging to the local Iwi, Ōpōtiki Harbour, and Hayes Engineering. In addition, they attended presentations from local iwi artists Tangimoe Clay and Hee Collier and the local council’s workforce and administration support officer, Caitlin Papuni-McLellan. The students were also invited to Ōpōtiki District Council to share their insights for the development of an upgraded skate park and town development.

A unique ecosystem The relationships between the different groups quickly came to represent an ecosystem, described by Anita as “our community interreacting from developed partnerships and relationships within our dynamic environment”. gazette.education.govt.nz


Students visit a local dairy farm as part of Ōpōtiki College’s Aspirations programme.

EDUCATION TO EMPLOYMENT

“Our community got to meet our rangatahi, and our rangatahi got to see their community … in a teaching, organisational capacity, you get to see the ‘community’ through their eyes.” Alison Waller

“Within this ecosystem everyone works together in order to provide rangatahi with the opportunity to see the many taonga Ōpōtiki has to offer,” she says. Inspiring the programme and underpinning the vision of Aspirations is manaaki: giving, providing, allowing, sharing, enhancing and listening. “Support also comes from the District Council, who have a vested interest in ensuring that our students become responsible citizens and reliable ratepayers,” Alison adds.

Building on success The preliminary programme was deemed a success and both Alison and Anita are looking forward to the second Aspirations event. “Our community got to meet our rangatahi, and our rangatahi got to see their community.  Every day was a success – scary at first. But in a teaching, organisational capacity, you get to see the ‘community’ through their eyes. They get to hear from homegrown Ōpōtiki people, share their stories of challenges and successes,” says Anita. The kōrero of the rangatahi has also been taken into consideration for future events. “We acknowledge the rangatahi evaluations, and many of them responded saying: more doing and less talking,” adds Anita. The first stage of Aspirations was more of a hui where students listened to adults describing their roles, and how they gained employment; the second phase will be more practical. “The students will be selecting a project brief and working in teams to complete it with help from staff and adult mentors from across the local community,” says Alison. The main inspiration for the programme will continue to lie at the core of any future adaptations. “It’s all about getting rangatahi ready for the world of work. We’ve got so many jobs here in the Eastern Bay and it’s just getting their eyes open,” says Alison.

Specialised inquiry based programmes for language teachers As part of a cluster of New Zealand registered language teachers within your local area, guided by our language facilitators, you will develop the following skills over a year: • Enhanced capability in effective languages pedagogy • Reflection and review of current practice to better inform future practice • Delivery of sustainable languages programmes • Creation and use of effective resources At no cost to your school or kura.

Visit www.ilep.ac.nz/pld#Grow

“We are working together to fully utilise what we have here in Ōpōtiki and our surrounding district – our little town, the gateway to the Coast. “In growing our own, we look after our own – and the historical impact they too will have on our rohe.” gazette.education.govt.nz

TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 7 December 2020

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Silver lining to Covid disruptions Disruptions and closures due to Covid-19 have resulted in innovations and future preparedness in schools throughout Aotearoa.

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ducation Gazette spoke to three schools and found that while they adopted different strategies and initiatives, they all focused on connection, communication and keeping the focus on the students (and whānau) during the school closures earlier in 2020.

He tangata first

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Year 1–13 kura in Gisborne made sure that its 176 ākonga were safe and well fed, and extra support was available for those who needed it.

“We’re a kura kaupapa Māori, so the number one thing we look at is te ira tangata – the person. Our first concern wasn’t their learning, but that they were okay at home, that they had access to food and were going to be in a safe space,” says. Maria Sheridan, tumuaki of Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Ngā Uri a Maui. The kura had been in the first tranche of Lunches in Schools and turned this into ‘Dinner at Home’ twice a week during lockdown. “Afterwards whānau said having that one stress taken away, and knowing that other people were keeping an eye on them, made a big difference to how they felt and got through. We knew that our tamariki were sitting in homes that felt a bit better, which meant that learning could happen,” she says. Maria has been at Ngā Uri a Maui for 18 months and is passionate about digital technology, so the kura had already begun a journey to improve digital skills and capacity. Three weeks before the lockdown, when she saw the writing was on the wall, the school contacted whānau to see who needed devices and connectivity. By the end of the first week of lockdown, all ākonga had devices to work on. He kanohi ki te kanohi (face to face) is vitally important in kura Māori. Maria says that under tikanga, Māori ensure they give respect to each other by meeting face to face when they can. Operating in a virtual environment was very different for teachers and students and the day started with a karakia live on Facebook, which brought everybody together.

Hybrid programme It was made clear to the whole school community that ‘school as normal’ wouldn’t be happening. “We have multiple kids in whānau. Each day the teacher would be online live with their class for one hour, so if there was only one device, there was no fighting over that. We sent out guidelines with the sort of time that we hoped they would spend in their class time; when they would need some whānau support and when not.

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“We had Google Classroom set up as well. We had already started introducing our hybrid programme, combining Te Ao Māori with wānanga with matihiko (technology). There was a lot of upskilling teachers and quick learning, with us meeting in Zoom to get the best out of the time when they were home,” explains Maria. Digital content developed during and since lockdown will continue to be useful to teachers and students at the kura. “One of the interesting things is that there’s not a lot of stuff just sitting online for reo: other schools can just go online and find material in English. But everything we had to do, had to be in Māori, so there was a lot of work before and during lockdown, building that content and getting it out there. We had to build stuff so we stayed with who we are as Ngā Uri a Māui. “We did a lot of our podcasts, webinar sessions, our own little kiriata [films] that we designed that the kids were going to be able to go back and reference,” says Maria.

Prepared for future disruptions Should the country go into lockdown again, Maria says the transition will be much more natural as Google Classroom is being used throughout the kura at varying levels depending on age group; and the digital skills of staff and students are continuing to grow. “There are help sheets for whānau. Not everybody at home is technology literate to be able to deliver what we were hoping for: they didn’t know how to operate Zoom or Google Classroom or Flipchart or all the other things that we were using. We had to design the programme and learning materials for whānau as much as students.” Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Ngā Uri a Maui is growing, with 50 Year 1 students in the now 200-student school. This poses challenges for remote learning, but Maria says they are prepared. “If we had to deal with future disruptions across the board, we’d be way better prepared, but we have all these brand-new five-year-olds, so that would pose a totally different dilemma and difficulty if we were to go into lockdown again. The Year 1 teachers have been developing programmes since lockdown. New iPads are on order as the kura has grown and the help sheets for whānau are being fine-tuned. “I’m not saying that everything would be easy, but we would be much better prepared. We have our systems and processes. We know what we would run with and how we would run, so that would be much easier,” says Maria. gazette.education.govt.nz


Fairhaven School therapists, Molly and Nicole, delivered communication and sensory programmes via Zoom during Covid lockdown.

Rylan and Leila-May, two tamariki from Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Ngā Uri a Maui in Gisborne.

“We looked after our staff first and foremost, knowing that if they remained resilient, our students and their whānau would be better supported.” Diane Whyte

Connecting students with remote learning

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roadgreen Intermediate in Nelson found there was a disconnect between the paper packs of worksheets they sent home for students during lockdown and the student-centred way their students normally learn. Initially, 30 per cent of the school’s 580 students were working on paper, with some parents preferring their children to work this way rather than take part in digital learning, says principal Pete Mitchener. “Today we like the student to be at the centre of their learning. We like the learning to be around student inquiry or connectedness with the local curriculum so they are actively involved in their learning. What seemed to be apparent is that the paper packs were like giving them a worksheet back in time: like the old days of ‘turn to page 35 of chapter 6’. “Students were being asked to do work which they had no connection to and we found that there seemed to be more active participation and vibrancy with the students actively engaging online compared to the paper model,” he says. A key problem with paper-only remote teaching was pitching the learning, says Pete. gazette.education.govt.nz

“A teacher is very good at balancing right there and then whether to extend or support the student. When you can do that on the run as you do as a teacher, it’s great. But with a sheet, you might think they are working at a certain level, it was the baseline of doing enough to get by, rather than pulling out the finer details and threads. “During lockdown I was in and out of Google Classrooms and seeing the discussion between the teacher and student. Even then, the teacher was able to respond, ask them to share their writing, give them their next step and get the others to reflect. It’s very hard to create that environment with just a paper pack,” he says.

Ready for digital When the school looked at the possibility of a second nationwide lockdown in August, the percentage of students requesting paper packs had reduced to 10 per cent. “The idea was that if we went back into lockdown, the level of people on digital devices was going to be a lot higher. Initially some parents didn’t feel they quite had control of Google Classroom, so therefore their child wouldn’t. But by August, people said, ‘We’re ready for digital now, we understand what’s involved’. “Students who hadn’t done digital learning weren’t behind academically when they returned to school, there just was a difference in the child’s confidence around connecting with the class. TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 7 December 2020

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COVID-19

“When we came back some students had gone off on different inquiries and the other children were unaware of where the learning had gone. And, yes, the teacher was available for all the students, but the digital learning was a more relevant and current model,” explains Pete.

Potential of online platforms When Broadgreen Intermediate reviewed the first lockdown and looked at what a second lockdown would look like, they acknowledged that initially wellbeing, mental health and family connectedness were more important than schoolwork. But they also saw that the disruption caused by Covid gave Google Classroom and similar platforms a purpose and began working towards utilising their potential. “We made sure the teachers were doing an ongoing Google Classroom within their face-to-face classroom; the students were using Google Classroom as a tool and continuing to post work as a way to keep connectedness. Even though we had been a Google Classroom school before, it takes something like this to make people realise what we didn’t know and also how it operates in a remote environment,” says Pete.

Learning aligned The school is now prepared to ensure that remote learning – whether online or on paper – is more closely aligned to what is going on in the classroom, says Pete. “If we were lucky enough to have a day’s notice, we feel now that we would have the ability to grab the online learning and photocopy it off so it could be sent home with the child. The first time, they were all very much generic packs. “Now we would have current topics and programmes for each class. Even though as an intermediate, a lot of our curriculum is in sync, there’s variability within classes and different themes and topics. We want to be able to keep students connected and on task with what they are currently doing in the classroom so that they don’t disconnect,” he says.

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Realistic expectations Fairhaven School in Napier provides education for 76 students, aged 5–21, who have learning support needs, across one base school, a young adult transition centre, and four sites in local primary, intermediate and secondary schools. Principal Diane Whyte says the school closure was challenging initially but the message to staff and family was to have realistic expectations. “We looked after our staff first and foremost, knowing that if they remained resilient, our students and their whānau would be better supported. We made a hauora tree where the lead team were connected with different teachers and then the teachers with their support staff and we made sure we had up to date contact lists for each student. “Each teacher phoned, Facebook messaged or Zoomed the parents to find out initially what would work for them. Communication was key. “For our staff with little children, I said: ‘I’m not expecting you to be in contact with families every day, you need to look after yourself’ and because they felt they had the permission to look after themselves, that supported their resilience and I think that was a big reason why they did such a fabulous job,” says Diane.

Learning packages With very little notice before the lockdown, learning packs were put together for each student. A core package contained paints, glitter, glue and things teachers thought would engage each student. “The amazing thing was every staff member had their cars out and delivered them and we could do the same again. Our local supplier is brilliant: we were able to order during lockdown. They sent loads of gazette.education.govt.nz


COVID-19

things to our office staff’s home when school was closed: paints, slime, glitter, balloons, paper, pens pencils, feathers – all sorts of sensory things. “We made sure there were good learning opportunities and activities parents could easily do with their kids. But it was just being available that made the difference. Because our teachers in particular, knew their families so well, they made the kind of contact that would work for each family,” explains Diane. Teachers were upskilled so everybody could connect online,” says deputy principal Heather Rickerby. “We worked through the holidays and did PLD with our staff through Zoom meetings on ClassDojo (www.classdojo.com). We managed to get nearly all of our parents signed up for that by sending them information – it was an easy way for our teachers to connect and then teachers were able to post differentiated activities for each student that parents could do with their children,” she says.

Sharing online Most students at Fairhaven School had not previously engaged in online learning, so one staff member was tasked with scouring the internet and educational sites to find content and activities that would work for and engage students. Deputy principal Sioned Oliver explains there were interactive stories or stories especially written for students with intellectual disabilities. “Some were around Covid or mental health for students. There were other practical websites where parents could make play dough or slime or activities they could do at home with their children. There were websites which helped parents with coping strategies. “Through the regular Zoom meetings, staff also shared ideas with each other about what worked with each student and that was really helpful,” says Sioned. Keeping activities simple was the best thing to do, says Diane. “One of the activities was for them to find four things that were red or green and take a photo and for those who could, to write about it and post it. Families had fun together, sharing the photos with their teachers, and the students enjoyed seeing their work and the teacher’s responses on ClassDojo,” says Diane.

Communication and relationships While the remote learning for Fairhaven School’s students had to be practical and hands-on, Diane says that connecting online was also important. “When whānau connected with Zoom, the look on the kids’ faces when they finally got to see their teacher was incredible – they were so excited. We learnt a huge amount from that and the fact that connectedness was so important. We felt really privileged as well, because we were being invited into their homes and I think our communication and relationship with whānau really grew,” says Diane. Parents’ understanding of what their children are capable of also grew, says Heather. “By having their young ones home so much and engaging with sensory activities, some of our parents were very surprised with some of the things our students could do. That’s been good for our teachers because they now have stronger connections to their families and we are getting a lot more feedback from parents through the digital platform,” she says.

Ready for future disruptions Students returned to Fairhaven School at Level 2, but because many are quite vulnerable, Level 3 precautions were kept in place: social distancing, minimal contact between the satellite units and all out-ofschool trips were stopped, explains Diane. “So our therapy team started to do online therapy, which was incredible. They were Zooming into the classroom and support staff and teachers would be supporting the students to do whatever the learning or therapeutic opportunity was. “During lockdown itself, our therapy team put together resources, videos of sensory learning and fun things for the kids so they also stayed connected,” she says. The school is ready for any future disruptions. “We have drafts of what each alert level will look like in our school: communications are ready to go; learning packs are ready, and we know that we could have the packs out within an hour,” says Diane.

Tailor-made, curriculum-based education sessions at Stardome Observatory & Planetarium • Programme includes: Matariki, Astronomy, Maori Astonomy, Our Solar System, Space Exploration & Technology • Recognised LEOTC provider • Programmes for Y0 – Y13 • Located on Maungakiekie, One Tree Hill in Tamaki Makaurau

Call 09 624 1246 to talk to one our Science and Astronomy Educators or to book your visit email education@stardome.org.nz

gazette.education.govt.nz

TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 7 December 2020

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PLD

Finding common threads in collaborative PLD A Motueka Kāhui Ako finds common goals spark new connections and ways to collaborate on a PLD journey framed on relationship-based learning.

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he Motueka Kāhui Ako began its PLD journey in 2018 to work with Cognition Education on what effective relationshipbased learning looks like. It’s been a journey with “a few forks” in it as the PLD has shifted from a broad start to more specific areas of focus, says Motueka High School principal John Prestidge, who took over as Kāhui Ako lead at the start of 2020. The initial group of 13 primary schools and one secondary school were significantly spread out geographically and differentiated by differences in their specific priorities. However, all the schools could see benefits in working together on effective teaching strategies where teaching relationships could help drive better outcomes for their learners.

Promoting learning for all The PLD drew on Dr Russell Bishop’s work ‘Teaching to the North East Corner’ and how schools and teachers can respond to diverse groups of students and develop teaching practices that promote learning for everyone. “We started with a holistic and more general approach,” says John. “I initially thought it was a broad brush but in retrospect it was a good move. “It gave us a clear, common framework for what effective teaching and learning looks like. We have the vocabulary and descriptors – all the teachers know what the north east corner means and looks like in their classrooms,” he says. Around the time John picked up leadership of the Kāhui Ako, teachers were starting to look for more differentiation and specificity so they could strengthen the connections of the Kāhui

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Education Gazette | 7 December 2020

E hara taku toa i te toa takitahi Engari he toa takitini My strength is not that of an individual But that of the collective. Ako’s activities and PLD to particular priorities of their own schools. “So, thinking about what came next and how to make our approach a sustainable one, we… asked the questions: what is the place of the Kāhui Ako? How does it support the schools’ strategic plans? What are the common things in the strategic plans?”

Looking at commonalities The Kāhui Ako looked at the commonalities across its schools by going to their strategic plans to find where they could collaborate to the greatest effect, says John. “We found three very connected key themes: Effective Teaching, Kāhui Ako Ki Motueka Kaupapa (Local Curriculum) and Coherent Pathways.” These themes have since generated about 16 specific professional learning groups (PLGs) each, covering development areas such as

‘Developing a collection of local stories across the Kāhui Ako’ to ‘Using digital technology to enhance classroom practice’ to ‘Maths PD across the Kāhui Ako and progressions Y1–13’. The working model has seen good buy-in with the link to schools’ strategic plans, says John. “However, although we have seen progress there is still some way to go until we can say these actions have measurable effects or outcomes in the classroom. We are tracking forward. “What staff like and enjoy is talking to other professionals in an area where they have some connection, whether that is through students’ shared needs or teachers sharing what is working (or not) for them. They’ve enjoyed working on common objectives.”

Challenges and benefits There are some challenges – different schools can have different starting points – but there have been practical benefits. “Because of our Kāhui Ako PLD, our maths department reached out and connected with teachers of maths in primary schools. The English department has sat with leaders in primary schools and collaborated on the use of the e-asTTle writing and reading assessment tool,” says John. With about 14 early learning services now joined up with the Kāhui Ako, the potential for links to grow is even greater. “The goal of a Kāhui Ako is made real when you can identify some shared goals – the connections come to the forefront and grow in ways you may not have imagined.” gazette.education.govt.nz


NOTICES

Classroom resources

Contents

Classroom resources Conference / AGM Jubilees and reunions Projects and programmes Student competitions and scholarships Other Professional learning and development (PLD)

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Notices

Notices from any agency outside the Ministry of Education are published at the Ministry’s discretion. The Ministry does not accept responsibility for the information contained in such notices.

Reminder

Education Gazette Tukutuku Korero is the official medium for the Ministry’s notices, so staff are expected to read the ‘Official notices’ section.

Booking deadlines for paid print notices Booking for 8 February closes 4pm, Monday 25 January. Booking for 1 March closes 4pm, Monday 15 February. Submit your notice online at: gazette.education.govt.nz Listings sent by email will not be accepted.

From Rio to Rotorua: Toitoi Creates Connections Across Cultures Toitoi Media Ltd Toitoi and Latin America CAPE have partnered to create a multilingual app in English, Spanish and Brazilian Portuguese that showcases stories, poems and art by young New Zealanders about the vibrant cultures of Latin America. The app can be downloaded for free and is available on all platforms. Readers can listen to the stories and poems in translation, tap to hear individual words and spellings and even record their own narration. The writing and artwork is accompanied by teacher support materials with ideas for exploring the languages and cultures of Latin America. Download the app and digital resources at www.toitoi.nz/explore. Ref#: 1HAEDA

Conference / AGM NARTAM Hui-ā-Tau 2021 ki Te Tai Rā Whiti (Hāpaingia Te Reo) NARTAM (National Association of Resource Teachers Advisory Māori) Ka tū te Hui-ā-Tau 2021 nō NARTAM (National Association of Resource Teachers Advisory Māori) i te marae o Pukemokimoki, Maraenui; Ahuriri, te 22 o Poutūterangi 3pm. Kō te wātaka rārangi, tono mai ki te hekeretari, Donna Moses-Heeney; waea (021) 534 730; (06) 864 5819 te kura o Hatea-a-rangi; Tokomaru Ākau rānei. The Annual General Meeting of NARTAM will be held 22 March 2021 at 3pm, Pukemokimoki Marae, Maraenui, Napier. Agenda details are available from the secretary, Donna Moses-Heeney; ph (021) 534 730 or (06) 864 5819 Hatea-a-rangi School, Tokomaru Bay. Ref#: 1HAEpf

Utaina! A Hui About Learning and Exploring Science in Te Reo Māori

The views expressed in Education Gazette and Gazette Online are not necessarily those of the Ministry of Education. The Ministry and Education Gazette in no way endorse, approve or accept responsibility for any product or service advertised in this publication or for any website referred to. Organisations wishing to advertise, display website URLs, or have website links in Education Gazette or Gazette Online must assume responsibility for ensuring their material is appropriate. However, Education Gazette staff will check all websites mentioned in the online and print versions of the publication to one level past their introductory homepage to avoid links to inappropriate or offensive content. Staff are reminded that Education Gazette is the official medium for the Ministry’s notices and they are expected to read the Official Notices.

gazette.education.govt.nz

Te Ohu Rauemi Pūtaiao, University of Otago Utaina! is a one-day symposium to bring together educators and researchers interested in science education in te reo Māori. It intends to create a friendly environment to discuss ideas and challenges related to delivering science topics in te reo Māori, as well as hearing about the latest research on this kaupapa. It will be held in Dunedin and via Zoom, on Friday 22 January 2021. For more information, please go to: tiny.cc/utaina. Ref#: 1HAEJW

Jubilees and reunions St Clair School 125th Anniversary Celebrations St Clair We invite present and past pupils, staff, families and friends who have attended St Clair School to join in the celebrations for the 125th anniversary at Queen’s Birthday weekend, 2021. Events will include a cocktail evening with live music, a formal lunch, performances and more. Costings and details to come. Contact and details of the event will be available through our St Clair Facebook page and any queries to Chanel Gardner at 125years@stclair.school.nz. Spread the word and keep an eye out for details to come. Ref#: 1HAEFW

Waimauku School Centenary Celebrations Waimauku School Waimauku School is celebrating its centenary from 18 March 2021 and is encouraging all past pupils, teachers and staff to be part of the celebrations. Celebrations will be a mix of evening events which are ticketed and age restricted, to a family picnic day at school which will be open to the community. Contact details and registrations can be found on Waimauku School’s webpage www.waimauku.school.nz. Ref#: 1HAEyR

Projects and programmes Learn an Asian Language Online – Chinese, Japanese, Filipino (Tagalog) and Korean VLN Primary School Students are invited to participate in VLN Primary language classes in Semester One 2021. » Whole class or small group participation welcome. L1–2 NZC beginners and extension classes. » 5-week language and culture taster available. » The Philippines language (Tagalog) is taught by senior students from Rosmini College – there is no cost to participate*. » Korean classes are sponsored by the Korean Education Centre and there is no cost to participate*. Teachers are welcome to learn alongside their students. *Conditions apply. Enrolments close 22 February 2021, classes start 8 March 2021. Find out more about these programmes and register here: https://tinyurl.com/y4jmsmfa. Ref#: 1HAE5m

Secondary Teachers to Pilot New Peace Education Curriculum NZ Centre for Wellbeing and Resilience Interested senior secondary teachers to be involved in a 10 week Pilot Programme in term 1, 2020 of a new multimedia peace education program for senior school students aged 15–18. The programme consists of videos and activities that help students discover their own inner resources and strengths. The content of each theme is presented with 20-30 minutes of short videos and time for activities, discussion and reflection. The Peace Education Programme supports educational standards for social and emotional learning competencies, in particular the competencies of self-awareness and self-management. The programme is used in a variety of subject areas. Information: www.wellbeingresilience.co.nz. Ref#: 1HAEQp

Showquest 2021 Rockquest Promotions Showquest is a stage-based performance that showcases elements of art, music, dance, drama, culture and technology. These shows are held in professional venues around Aotearoa from Tai Tokerau/Northland–Murihiku/Southland. Showquest is supported by the Ministry of Education, Rockshop and ZM. Rockquest Promotions are passionate about building confidence and developing the leaders of tomorrow. This platform is open to all schools and ākonga in Aotearoa from Y1–13. These mini-spectaculars include a theme, soundtrack and lighting as well as optional components such TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 7 December 2020

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PROFESSIONAL LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT NOTICES as LED video wall content, wearable art, costuming, makeup, live music and props. Registrations close 12 March 2021.  For further information: www.showquest.nz Ref#: 1HAEXD

Showquest Presents OnScreen Rockquest Promotions Showquest presents OnScreen. OnScreen is a short film competition open to all high school students around Aotearoa – it’s brand new for 2021! OnScreen is supported by the Ministry of Education and ZM. OnScreen is all about building confidence and developing the leaders of tomorrow. This platform encourages entries to be strongly student-led. Each film must be no more than 5 minutes in length and must follow one of the four briefs for 2021. Let your imagination run wild with location filming, original soundtrack, editing, costume, makeup and much more! Registrations close 30 July 2021. For further information: www.showquest.nz. Ref#: 1HAEX1

Showquest Presents Toi 2021 Rockquest Promotions Showquest presents Toi, a wearable art competition for student designers in collaboration with World of WearableArt. Toi is all about building confidence and developing the leaders of tomorrow. Toi is supported by the Ministry of Education, World of WearableArt and ZM.  Students can exhibit their larger than life creations at a live Showquest event around Aotearoa. You can choose to be inspired by one of our three design briefs: Aotearoa, Futuristic and Excessive Accessories or enter our Open section. Registrations close April 9, 2021. For further information: www.showquest.nz. Ref#: 1HAEWs

The Global Competence Certificate AFS Intercultural Programmes New Zealand The NZ GCC is a 4–6 week course consisting of 18 online modules and 4 ‘in-person’ dialogue sessions facilitated via Zoom. Participants will be equipped with lifelong global ‘power skills’: collaboration, critical thinking, problem solving, open-mindedness, cross-cultural communication, and flexibility. These skills will enable our rangatahi to thrive in multicultural and global environments, work effectively on diverse teams and being active community members. AFS New Zealand is offering scholarships for students to take part in a web-based intercultural learning programme in 2021. Get your students involved! For more information visit www.afs.org.nz/ or contact our education executive Logan Byrne at logan.byrne@afs.org. Ref#: 1HAEbQ

VLN Primary School – Online Programmes Semester 1 2021 VLN Primary School Registrations are invited from schools wishing to participate in the VLN Primary School programmes in Semester 1 2021. Prepare to participate now! Online programmes include: Te reo Māori, kapa haka, NZ sign language, digital technologies, integrated programmes, maths and science, literacy, creative arts and a variety of language and culture beginner and extension options. Enrolments close 22 February 2021, classes start 8 March 2021.

32

Education Gazette | 7 December 2020

Find out more about our online programmes and how to register here: https://tinyurl.com/y2wvswwr. Ref#: 1HAE5X

Please direct any enquiries to welovemaps@cartography.org.nz. Ref#: 1HADab

Student competitions and scholarships

Other

2021 National Youth Jazz Competition Tauranga

Co Theatre Physical Ltd ‘Monarch’ is a touring theatre show that mixes vivid characters, comedy, physical theatre and story. ‘Monarch’ follows Lea, a young girl studying the importance of butterflies so she can present a speech at school. Her Grandma is a butterfly scientist who works to protect monarchs in her area. BUT a greedy city planner threatens to destroy the butterfly winter home! A claustrophobic caterpillar, famous scientists, a time machine and a battle to save the butterfly winter home! Lea develops confidence to overcome her fears and uses her voice to make change. Speech writing, butterfly survival, intergenerational partnerships, change makers. For further information: cotheatrephysical.co.nz/ school-shows/monarch. Ref#: 1HAEeu

Tauranga Jazz Society Inc The 2021 43rd National Youth Jazz Competition sees secondary student big-bands and combos compete for coveted Tauranga Jazz Society trophies and prizes. The competition is judged by the very best jazz educators in the country and features workshops and opportunities for students to attend key performances by some of New Zealand’s best jazz exponents. The competition is embedded in the National Jazz Festival programme and provides opportunities for student bands to perform at the wider festival. Registrations are online at: www.nationalyouthjazz. org.nz/registration Ref#: 1HAEET

AgriKids NZ Regional Finals NZ Young Farmers The AgriKidsNZ Regional Finals include competing in teams of three in eight different modules based on all aspects of the primary industries. It is all about getting your hands dirty and having fun with friends! You don’t have to be from a farm to have a go! The competition is open and free to all. Spots do fill up fast so get in quick! For more information: www.trybooking.com/nz/ events/landing?eid=3560&bof=1. Ref#: 1HAETU

FMG JR Young Farmer of the Year 2021 New Zealand Young Farmers Testing practical and theoretical knowledge, FMG Jr Young Farmer of the Year inspires personal growth, development leadership and showcases all the opportunities available in the ag sector through hands on experience. The top five point scoring teams move from the preliminary round, to the ‘face off’ – an FMG Young Farmer of the Year style quiz. The winner and runner up at each regional final advance through to the Grand Final in Christchurch in July, where they will face off against 14 other teams. The winning duo will be crowned FMG Junior Young Farmers of the Year. Information: www.teenag.co.nz/welcome-to-teenagand-fmg-junior-young-farmer-of-the-year. Ref#: 1HADtC

NZ Children’s Map Competition 2021 NZ Cartographic Society Entries are now open for the NZ Children’s Map Competition 2021 with a submission deadline of 12 March 2021. “A map of my future world” competition theme Four age categories: 13–15 years, 9–12 years, 6–8 years, under 6 years. Winning entries in each category (1st, 2nd, 3rd places) receive sponsor prizes. The school of the 1st place winners in each age category receives a LINZ laminated topographic wall map centred on the school! The NZ Children’s Map Competition is organised by the NZ Cartographic Society. Please visit: www.cartography.org.nz/events/ childrens-map-competition for further information and entry forms.

Monarch – Children’s Theatre, Primary School Touring Show

Special U18 ANZAC Rowing Regatta in 2022 in Malta

Malta ANZACS Be part of history and join the Malta ANZAC U18 Rowing Regatta reuniting Australia and NZ in Malta for the first time since WWI (1914–1918) remembering the 58,000 wounded ANZACs from the Gallipoli camp disembarked in Malta for treatment, remember buried ANZACs in Malta. For more details, please contact John via email: malta.anzacs@gmail.com Ref#: 1HAEm6

Early learning PLD New Zealand (nationwide) Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded Beginners Guide to e-asTTle (Online) Ref#: 1HAExo

InterLEAD » Residential Programme – Investing In Leadership Capital 2021 Ref#: 1HAF4f

Lancewood Education » James Nottingham – Enhancing Dialogue To Deepen Learning​(teacher-only day) Ref#: 1HAE2x » James Nottingham – Leadership, Challenge and Collective Efficacy (leadership-only day) Ref#: 1HAE30

Safe for Children » Live Online Course – Child First Aid Ref#: 1HAEno » Live Online Course – Child Protection Training Ref#: 1HAEnr

Senior Teacher » Creating a Strong Feedback Culture in Your Team Ref#: 1HAEQD » Creating a Strong Feedback Culture in Your Team – 2 Consecutive Evenings Ref#: 1HAEPi » Māori Assessment Methods – 2 Consecutive Evenings Ref#: 1HAEQK gazette.education.govt.nz


PROFESSIONAL LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT NOTICES » Te Tiriti-based Practice Ref#: 1HAEPc » Te Tiriti-based Practice Ref#: 1HAEPm » Understanding and Cementing Bicultural Practice Ref#: 1HAEPp

Northland Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Mathss Workshops Ref#: 1HAExe

Learning Network NZ » Wellbeing Matters – Join Nathan Wallis/Kathryn Berkett and Pio Terei Ref#: 1HAEie

Auckland Children’s Autism Foundation » ASK Autism Professional Development – Sensory Issues Ref#: 1HADc7 » ASK Professional Development – Understanding Autism Ref#: 1HADc1

CORE Education » Coaching and Mentoring Ref#: 1HAEkU » Critically Reflective Conversations Ref#: 1HAEjy » Everyday Leadership in Action: An Early Years Approach Ref#: 1HAEkA » Growing Others: Mentoring and Coaching Ref#: 1HAEjf » Implementing Te Tiriti o Waitangi in Learning Communities Ref#: 1HAEjc » Inclusion and Equity with Universal Design for Learning Ref#: 1HAEkN » Learning Through Play Ref#: 1HAEjp » NZ History: Tāmaki Makaurau Focus Ref#: 1HAEj_ » Online Design for Human Connection Ref#: 1HAEjR » Making Sense of Tapasā Ref#: 1HAEjm » Social and Emotional Competence: Implementing He Māpuna te Tamaiti Ref#: 1HAEk1 » Strengthening Teacher Aide Practice Ref#: 1HAEk_ » Te Reo Manahua Māori Ref#: 1HAEkm » Te Reo Puāwai Māori Ref#: 1HAEkf » Te Whakamānawa: Developing Cultural Competencies in Learning Communities Ref#: 1HAEkX » Te Whāriki: Assessment Ref#: 1HAEkR » Te Whāriki: Curriculum Design Ref#: 1HAEkK » Ten Trends: Drivers of Change Shaping our Future Ref#: 1HAEkD

» Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Maths Workshops Ref#: 1HAExe » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Writing Workshops Ref#: 1HAExM

Wellington CORE Education

Future Learning Solutions, Centre for Educational Leadership

Evaluation Associates Ltd

» Open-to-learning™ Leadership Ref#: 1HAEQ3

Learning Network NZ » Wellbeing Matters – Join Nathan Wallis/Kathryn Berkett and Pio Terei Ref#: 1HAEie

New Zealand Feuerstein Forum » Feuerstein Cognitive Enhancement Programme Workshops for Teaching Thinking Ref#: 1HAEnM

Senior Teacher » Implementing Tātaiako – Auckland Venue Ref#: 1HAEQ1 » Journey with Tapasā – Auckland Venue Ref#: 1HAEPv

Sustainable Coastlines » Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme Ref#: 1HAD4K

Using Technology Better » Google Admin Console Training – Education Ref#: 1HAEQo

Waikato Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Maths Workshops Ref#: 1HAExe » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Writing Workshops Ref#: 1HAExM

Learning Network NZ » Wellbeing Matters – Join Nathan Wallis/Kathryn Berkett and Pio Terei Ref#: 1HAEie

Bay of Plenty Sustainable Coastlines » Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme Ref#: 1HAD4K

Gisborne Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Mathss Workshops Ref#: 1HAExe

Taranaki Sustainable Coastlines » Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme Ref#: 1HAD4K

Manawatu/Whanganui Evaluation Associates Ltd

» NZ History: Pōneke Focus Ref#: 1HAEjX

» Ministry-funded e-asTTle Writing Workshops Ref#: 1HAExM

Marlborough Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Maths Workshops Ref#: 1HAExk

Learning Network NZ » Wellbeing Matters Queenstown – Join Nathan Wallis/Kathryn Berkett and Pio Terei Ref#: 1HAEio

Tasman/Nelson Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Maths Workshops Ref#: 1HAExe

Canterbury CORE Education » Courageous Conversations Ref#: 1HAEjU » NZ History Ref#: 1HAEjN

Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Maths Workshops Ref#: 1HAExk » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Writing Workshops Ref#: 1HAExM

impactED » Local Curriculum Through Game Design (Rubber Duck Awards) Ref#: 1HAE56 » Minecraft Education Edition Hui – Christchurch Ref#: 1HAEsK » Using Gamefroot to Share Canterbury Stories (Rubber Duck Awards) Ref#: 1HAE5C

InterLEAD » Supporting Social and Emotional Competence – Half-day Workshop Ref#: 1HAEWA

Learning Network NZ » Wellbeing Matters Queenstown – Join Nathan Wallis/Kathryn Berkett and Pio Terei Ref#: 1HAEio

Little Kiwis Nature Play » Nature Play Conference 2021 Ref#: 1HAD2R

New Zealand Feuerstein Forum

» Ministry-funded e-asTTle Writing Workshops Ref#: 1HAExM

» Feuerstein Cognitive Enhancement Programme Workshops for Teaching Thinking Ref#: 1HAEnM

Evaluation Associates Ltd

The Team Building Company

Sustainable Coastlines

» Ministry-funded Developing Expertise in Using e-asTTle Workshop Ref#: 1HAExr

» Building and Maintaining a Connected and Collaborative Team Ref#: 1HACyj

gazette.education.govt.nz

» Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme Ref#: 1HAD4K TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 7 December 2020

33


PROFESSIONAL LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT NOTICES Otago Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Maths Workshops Ref#: 1HAExk

Southland Learning Network NZ » Wellbeing Matters Queenstown – Join Nathan Wallis/Kathryn Berkett and Pio Terei Ref#: 1HAEio

Primary / intermediate PLD New Zealand (nationwide) Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded Beginners Guide to e-asTTle (Online) Ref#: 1HAExo

Family Planning New Zealand » Navigating the Journey of RSE Ref#: 1HADcc

Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEMQ » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEMu » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEMx » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEN6 » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEN9 » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEPW » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAENF » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAENM » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAENT » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAENZ » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAENh » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAENo » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAENu » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEP3 » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEP9 » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEPJ » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEPb » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEPe » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEPo

Kohia Centre, University of Auckland » Online: An Introduction to the New Zealand Curriculum for Overseas Trained Teachers Ref#: 1HAEvy

34

Education Gazette | 7 December 2020

» Online: How to Enhance Your Practice Utilising the Google Suite Online Platform Ref#: 1HAEw4 » Online: Number Talks & Building a Love of Maths, with Sarah Tohill Ref#: 1HAEw7 » Online: Play-based Learning; Unpacking the How and What to Learning Through Play Ref#: 1HAEwG

Lancewood Education » James Nottingham – Enhancing Dialogue to Deepen Learning​(teacher-only day) Ref#: 1HAE2x » James Nottingham – Leadership, Challenge and Collective Efficacy (leadership-only day) Ref#: 1HAE30

Safe for Children » Live Online Course – Child First Aid Ref#: 1HAEno » Live Online Course – Child Protection Training Ref#: 1HAEnr » Live Online Course – Strategies for Challenging Behaviour in Children 10+ Years Ref#: 1HAEnk

Senior Teacher » Te Tiriti-based Practice Ref#: 1HAEPc » Te Tiriti-based Practice Ref#: 1HAEPm » Understanding and Cementing Bicultural Practice Ref#: 1HAEPp

Te Whai Toi Tangata: Institute of Professional Learning, University of Waikato » Mentoring – It’s More Than Just Showing Them Where the Pool Key Is! Ref#: 1HAEih » Teacher Aide PLD Workshops Online Ref#: 1HAEGs

Northland Edushop » An Introduction to Numicon Ref#: 1HAEzX » Teacher Aide Introduction to Numicon Course Ref#: 1HAEz_

Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Maths Workshops Ref#: 1HAExe

Learning Network NZ » Effective Writing for Underachieving Students, Murray Gadd Ref#: 1HAEho » Wellbeing Matters – Join Nathan Wallis/Kathryn Berkett and Pio Terei Ref#: 1HAEie

Auckland Children’s Autism Foundation » ASK Autism Professional Development – Sensory Issues Ref#: 1HADc7 » ASK Professional Development – Understanding Autism Ref#: 1HADc1

CORE Education » Coaching and Mentoring Ref#: 1HAEkU » Critically Reflective Conversations Ref#: 1HAEjy » Designing Online Learning Ref#: 1HAEji » Digital Technologies: Rigorous and Real (Session Two) Ref#: 1HAEk4 » Digital Technologies: Rigorous and Real (Session One) Ref#: 1HAEjv » Everyday Leadership in Action: An Early Years Approach Ref#: 1HAEkA » Games-based Learning Practice Ref#: 1HAEki » Growing Others: Mentoring and Coaching Ref#: 1HAEjf » Hangarau Matihiko Ref#: 1HAEk7 » Implementing Te Tiriti o Waitangi in Learning Communities Ref#: 1HAEjc » Inclusion and Equity with Universal Design for Learning Ref#: 1HAEkN » Innovative Learning Practice Ref#: 1HAEkc » Learning Through Play Ref#: 1HAEjp » Making Sense of Tapasā Ref#: 1HAEjm » Measuring Success in an Online Environment Ref#: 1HAEjs » NZ History: Tāmaki Makaurau Focus Ref#: 1HAEj_ » Online Design for Human Connection Ref#: 1HAEjR » Strengthening Teacher Aide Practice Ref#: 1HAEk_ » Te Reo Manahua Māori Ref#: 1HAEkm » Te Reo Puāwai Māori Ref#: 1HAEkf » Te Whakamānawa: Developing Cultural Competencies in Learning Communities Ref#: 1HAEkX » Te Whāriki: Assessment Ref#: 1HAEkR » Te Whāriki: Curriculum Design Ref#: 1HAEkK » Ten Trends: Drivers of Change Shaping our Future Ref#: 1HAEkD

Edushop » Teacher Aide Introduction to Numicon Course Ref#: 1HAEaQ » Teacher Aide Introduction to Numicon Course Ref#: 1HAEaT » Teacher Aide Introduction to Numicon Course Ref#: 1HAEi_

Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded Developing Expertise in Using e-asTTle Workshop Ref#: 1HAExr » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Maths Workshops Ref#: 1HAExe » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Writing Workshops Ref#: 1HAExM gazette.education.govt.nz


PROFESSIONAL LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT NOTICES Future Learning Solutions, Centre for Educational Leadership » Growing Great Leaders™ Level 1 Ref#: 1HAEPk » Growing Great Leaders™ Level 2 Ref#: 1HAEPu » Open-to-learning™ Leadership Ref#: 1HAEQ3

Kohia Centre, University of Auckland » 2021 Mentor Teacher Programmes Ref#: 1HAEvs » An Introduction to Primary Maths in the New Zealand Curriculum Ref#: 1HAEvX » Building Resilience and Mental Wellbeing for Teachers and Students Ref#: 1HAEv_ » Starting Off in a New Entrant Setting, with Jo Williams Ref#: 1HAF1o

Learning Network NZ » Effective Writing for Underachieving Students, Murray Gadd Ref#: 1HAEho » Wellbeing Matters – Join Nathan Wallis/Kathryn Berkett and Pio Terei Ref#: 1HAEie

Les Mills » BORN TO MOVE Leadership Programme Ref#: 1HADtR

Maths Development » Making Maths Count Series of Six Full-day Workshops 2021 Ref#: 1HAEqb » Maths Leadership Made Easy Workshops 2021 Ref#: 1HAEqW

New Zealand Feuerstein Forum » Feuerstein Cognitive Enhancement Programme Workshops for Teaching Thinking Ref#: 1HAEnM

PCT Beginning Teachers » First Year PCT Manukau Programme for Teachers who Teach 0–3 Year Students Ref#: 1HAEwD » First Year PCT Manukau Programme for Teachers Who Teach Y4–8 Students Ref#: 1HAEwv » Second Year PCT Manukau Programme for Teachers Who Teach Y0–3 Students Ref#: 1HAEwR » Second Year PCT Manukau Programme for Teachers Who Teach Y4–8 Students Ref#: 1HAEx4

Primary Mathematics Association (Auckland)

» Primary Mathematics Association (Auckland) One Day Seminar 2021 Ref#: 1HAEzC

S&L Publishing Limited » A Balanced Reading Programme – Reviewing the Approaches Ref#: 1HADkC » Developing an Effective Writing Programme Ref#: 1HADk9

Senior Teacher » Implementing Tātaiako – Auckland Venue Ref#: 1HAEQ1

Sustainable Coastlines » Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme Ref#: 1HAD4K

Using Technology Better » Google Admin Console Training – Education Ref#: 1HAEQo

Waikato Edushop » Teacher Aide Introduction to Numicon Course Ref#: 1HAEaW

Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Maths Workshops Ref#: 1HAExe » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Writing Workshops Ref#: 1HAExM

Learning Network NZ » Effective Writing for Underachieving Students, Murray Gadd Ref#: 1HAEho » Wellbeing Matters – Join Nathan Wallis/Kathryn Berkett and Pio Terei Ref#: 1HAEie

S&L Publishing Limited » Embedding Oral Language Across the Curriculum Ref#: 1HADv9

Te Whai Toi Tangata: Institute of Professional Learning, University of Waikato » Hamilton: Primary Year 1 PCT (0–4) Workshop Series Ref#: 1HAEDm » Hamilton: Primary Year 1 PCT (5–10) Workshop Series Ref#: 1HAEDy » Hamilton: Primary Year 2 PCT (0–4) Workshop Series Ref#: 1HAEEA » Hamilton: Primary Year 2 PCT (5–10) Workshop Series Ref#: 1HAEED » Teacher Aide PLD Workshops in Hamilton Ref#: 1HAEGm

Bay of Plenty Learning Network NZ » Effective Writing for Underachieving Students, Murray Gadd Ref#: 1HAEho

S&L Publishing Limited

» A Balanced Reading Programme – Reviewing the Approaches Ref#: 1HAEXQ » Supporting Students to Edit their Writing Ref#: 1HAEXT

Te Whai Toi Tangata: Institute of Professional Learning, University of Waikato » Tauranga: Primary Year 1 PCT (0–8) Workshop Series Ref#: 1HAECK » Tauranga: Primary Year 2 PCT (0–8) Workshop Series Ref#: 1HAEE7 » Teacher Aide PLD Workshops in Tauranga Ref#: 1HAEGi

Gisborne Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Maths Workshops Ref#: 1HAExe

Hawke’s Bay Cooper McKenzie Ltd » Lester Flockton’s Taking the Lead Seminars Ref#: 1HAEmb

Taranaki Edushop

» Teacher Aides Course: How to Help Learners Struggling with Mathematics Ref#: 1HAEic

Sustainable Coastlines

» Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme Ref#: 1HAD4K

Manawatu/Whanganui Cooper McKenzie Ltd » Lester Flockton’s Taking the Lead Seminars Ref#: 1HAEmb

Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Writing Workshops Ref#: 1HAExM

Wellington CORE Education » NZ History: Pōneke Focus Ref#: 1HAEjX

Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Writing Workshops Ref#: 1HAExM

Marlborough Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Maths Workshops Ref#: 1HAExk

Learning Network NZ » Wellbeing Matters Queenstown – Join Nathan Wallis/Kathryn Berkett and Pio Terei Ref#: 1HAEio

Tasman/Nelson Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Maths Workshops Ref#: 1HAExe

Sustainable Coastlines

InterLEAD

» Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme Ref#: 1HAD4K

» Developing Outstanding Middle Managers (2 x One-day Workshops) Ref#: 1HAF29

For full professional learning and development (PLD) listings see gazette.education.govt.nz/notices gazette.education.govt.nz

TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 7 December 2020

35


PROFESSIONAL LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT NOTICES Canterbury CORE Education » Courageous Conversations Ref#: 1HAEjU » NZ History Ref#: 1HAEjN

Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Maths Workshops Ref#: 1HAExk » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Writing Workshops Ref#: 1HAExM

impactED » Local Curriculum Through Game Design (Rubber Duck Awards) Ref#: 1HAE56 » Minecraft Education Edition Hui – Christchurch Ref#: 1HAEsK » Using Gamefroot to Share Canterbury Stories (Rubber Duck Awards) Ref#: 1HAE5C

InterLEAD » Developing Outstanding Middle Managers (2 x One-day Workshops) Ref#: 1HAF2J

Learning Network NZ » Wellbeing Matters Queenstown – Join Nathan Wallis/Kathryn Berkett and Pio Terei Ref#: 1HAEio

Little Kiwis Nature Play » Nature Play Conference 2021 Ref#: 1HAD2R

New Zealand Feuerstein Forum » Feuerstein Cognitive Enhancement Programme Workshops for Teaching Thinking Ref#: 1HAEnM

S&L Publishing Limited » A Balanced Reading Programme – Reviewing the Approaches Ref#: 1HAEXQ » Book Clubs and Reciprocal Reading Ref#: 1HAEXW » Developing an Effective Writing Programme Ref#: 1HADk9

StoryWays Literacy Ltd » Storytelling to Accelerate Oral Language and Learning Across the Curriculum Ref#: 1HADVb

Sustainable Coastlines » Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme Ref#: 1HAD4K

Otago Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Maths Workshops Ref#: 1HAExk

InterLEAD » Developing Outstanding Middle Managers (2 x One-day Workshops) Ref#: 1HAF26

36

Education Gazette | 7 December 2020

S&L Publishing Limited

Kohia Centre, University of Auckland

» A Balanced Reading Programme – Reviewing the Approaches Ref#: 1HADkC » Developing an Effective Writing Programme Ref#: 1HADk9

» Online: An Introduction to the New Zealand Curriculum for Overseas Trained Teachers Ref#: 1HAEvy » Online: How to Enhance Your Practice Utilising the Google Suite Online Platform Ref#: 1HAEw4 » Online: Number Talks & Building a Love of Maths, with Sarah Tohill Ref#: 1HAEw7 » Online: Play-based Learning; Unpacking the How and What to Learning Through Play Ref#: 1HAEwG

Southland InterLEAD » Developing Outstanding Middle Managers (2 x One-day Workshops) Ref#: 1HAEhG

Learning Network NZ » Wellbeing Matters Queenstown – Join Nathan Wallis/Kathryn Berkett and Pio Terei Ref#: 1HAEio

Area / composite PLD New Zealand (nationwide) Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded Beginners Guide to e-asTTle (Online) Ref#: 1HAExo

Family Planning New Zealand » Navigating the Journey of RSE Ref#: 1HADcc

Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEMQ » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEMu » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEMx » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEN6 » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEN9 » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEPW » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAENF » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAENM » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAENT » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAENZ » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAENh » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAENo » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAENu » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEP3 » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEP9 » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEPJ » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEPb » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEPe » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEPo

Lancewood Education » James Nottingham – Enhancing Dialogue to Deepen Learning​(teacher-only day) Ref#: 1HAE2x » James Nottingham – Leadership, Challenge and Collective Efficacy (leadership-only day) Ref#: 1HAE30

Safe for Children » Live Online Course – Child First Aid Ref#: 1HAEno » Live Online Course – Child Protection Training Ref#: 1HAEnr » Live Online Course – Strategies for Challenging Behaviour in Children 10+ Years Ref#: 1HAEnk

Te Whai Toi Tangata: Institute of Professional Learning, University of Waikato » Mentoring – It’s More Than Just Showing Them Where the Pool Key Is! Ref#: 1HAEih

Northland Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Maths Workshops Ref#: 1HAExe

Learning Network NZ » Effective Writing for Underachieving Students, Murray Gadd Ref#: 1HAEho » Wellbeing Matters – Join Nathan Wallis/Kathryn Berkett and Pio Terei Ref#: 1HAEie

Auckland Children’s Autism Foundation » ASK Autism Professional Development – Sensory Issues Ref#: 1HADc7 » ASK Professional Development – Understanding Autism Ref#: 1HADc1

CORE Education

» Coaching and Mentoring Ref#: 1HAEkU » Critically Reflective Conversations Ref#: 1HAEjy » Designing Online Learning Ref#: 1HAEji » Digital Technologies: Rigorous and Real (Session Two) Ref#: 1HAEk4 » Digital Technologies: Rigorous and Real (Session One) Ref#: 1HAEjv » Everyday Leadership in Action: An Early Years Approach gazette.education.govt.nz


PROFESSIONAL LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT NOTICES Ref#: 1HAEkA » Games-based Learning Practice Ref#: 1HAEki » Growing Others: Mentoring and Coaching Ref#: 1HAEjf » Hangarau Matihiko Ref#: 1HAEk7 » Implementing Te Tiriti o Waitangi in Learning Communities Ref#: 1HAEjc » Inclusion and Equity with Universal Design for Learning Ref#: 1HAEkN » Innovative Learning Practice Ref#: 1HAEkc » Measuring Success in an Online Environment Ref#: 1HAEjs » NZ History: Tāmaki Makaurau Focus Ref#: 1HAEj_ » Online Design for Human Connection Ref#: 1HAEjR » Strengthening Teacher Aide Practice Ref#: 1HAEk_ » Te Reo Manahua Māori Ref#: 1HAEkm » Te Reo Puāwai Māori Ref#: 1HAEkf » Te Whakamānawa: Developing Cultural Competencies in Learning Communities Ref#: 1HAEkX » Ten Trends: Drivers of Change Shaping our Future Ref#: 1HAEkD

Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded Developing Expertise in Using e-asTTle Workshop Ref#: 1HAExr » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Maths Workshops Ref#: 1HAExe » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Writing Workshops Ref#: 1HAExM

Future Learning Solutions, Centre for Educational Leadership » Growing Great Leaders™ Level 1 Ref#: 1HAEPk » Growing Great Leaders™ Level 2 Ref#: 1HAEPu » Open-to-learning™ Leadership Ref#: 1HAEQ3

Kohia Centre, University of Auckland » 2021 Mentor Teacher Programmes Ref#: 1HAEvs » An Introduction to Primary Maths in the New Zealand Curriculum Ref#: 1HAEvX » Building Resilience and Mental Wellbeing for Teachers and Students Ref#: 1HAEv_ » Starting Off in a New Entrant Setting, with Jo Williams Ref#: 1HAF1o

Learning Network NZ » Effective Writing for Underachieving Students, Murray Gadd Ref#: 1HAEho » Wellbeing Matters – Join Nathan Wallis/Kathryn Berkett and Pio Terei Ref#: 1HAEie

Les Mills » BORN TO MOVE Leadership Programme Ref#: 1HADtR

New Zealand Feuerstein Forum » Feuerstein Cognitive Enhancement Programme Workshops for Teaching Thinking Ref#: 1HAEnM

Primary Mathematics Association (Auckland) » Primary Mathematics Association (Auckland) One Day Seminar 2021 Ref#: 1HAEzC

Sustainable Coastlines » Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme Ref#: 1HAD4K

Using Technology Better » Google Admin Console Training – Education Ref#: 1HAEQo

Waikato Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Maths Workshops Ref#: 1HAExe » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Writing Workshops Ref#: 1HAExM

Learning Network NZ » Effective Writing for Underachieving Students, Murray Gadd Ref#: 1HAEho » Wellbeing Matters – Join Nathan Wallis/Kathryn Berkett and Pio Terei Ref#: 1HAEie

Te Whai Toi Tangata: Institute of Professional Learning, University of Waikato » Hamilton: Primary Year 1 PCT (0–4) Workshop Series Ref#: 1HAEDm » Hamilton: Primary Year 1 PCT (5–10) Workshop Series Ref#: 1HAEDy » Hamilton: Primary Year 2 PCT (0–4) Workshop Series Ref#: 1HAEEA » Hamilton: Primary Year 2 PCT (5–10) Workshop Series Ref#: 1HAEED » Hamilton: Secondary Year 1 PCT (9–13) Workshop Series Ref#: 1HAEEK » Hamilton: Secondary Year 2 PCT (9–13) Workshop Series Ref#: 1HAEER

Bay of Plenty Learning Network NZ » Effective Writing for Underachieving Students, Murray Gadd Ref#: 1HAEho

Sustainable Coastlines » Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme Ref#: 1HAD4K

Te Whai Toi Tangata: Institute of Professional Learning, University of Waikato » Rotorua: Secondary Year 1 PCT (9–13) Workshop Series Ref#: 1HAEEN » Rotorua: Secondary Year 2 PCT (9–13) Workshop Series Ref#: 1HAEEU » Tauranga: Primary Year 1 PCT (0–8) Workshop Series Ref#: 1HAECK » Tauranga: Primary Year 2 PCT (0–8) Workshop Series Ref#: 1HAEE7

Gisborne Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Maths Workshops Ref#: 1HAExe

Hawke’s Bay Cooper McKenzie Ltd » Lester Flockton’s Taking the Lead Seminars Ref#: 1HAEmb

Taranaki Sustainable Coastlines » Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme Ref#: 1HAD4K

Manawatu/Whanganui Cooper McKenzie Ltd » Lester Flockton’s Taking the Lead Seminars Ref#: 1HAEmb

Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Writing Workshops Ref#: 1HAExM

Wellington CORE Education » NZ History: Pōneke Focus Ref#: 1HAEjX

Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Writing Workshops Ref#: 1HAExM

Marlborough Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Maths Workshops Ref#: 1HAExk

Learning Network NZ » Wellbeing Matters Queenstown – Join Nathan Wallis/Kathryn Berkett and Pio Terei Ref#: 1HAEio

Tasman/Nelson Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Maths Workshops Ref#: 1HAExe

InterLEAD

» Developing Outstanding Middle Managers (2 x One-day Workshops) Ref#: 1HAF29

For full professional learning and development (PLD) listings see gazette.education.govt.nz/notices gazette.education.govt.nz

TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 7 December 2020

37


PROFESSIONAL LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT NOTICES Canterbury CORE Education » Courageous Conversations

Ref#: 1HAEjU » NZ History

Ref#: 1HAEjN

Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Maths Workshops

Ref#: 1HAExk » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Writing Workshops

Ref#: 1HAExM

impactED » Local Curriculum Through Game Design (Rubber Duck Awards)

Ref#: 1HAE56 » Minecraft Education Edition Hui – Christchurch

Ref#: 1HAEsK » Using Gamefroot to Share Canterbury Stories (Rubber Duck Awards)

Ref#: 1HAE5C

InterLEAD » Developing Outstanding Middle Managers (2 x One-day Workshops)

Ref#: 1HAF2J

Learning Network NZ » Wellbeing Matters Queenstown – Join Nathan Wallis/Kathryn Berkett and Pio Terei

Ref#: 1HAEio

Little Kiwis Nature Play » Nature Play Conference 2021

Ref#: 1HAD2R

New Zealand Feuerstein Forum » Feuerstein Cognitive Enhancement Programme Workshops for Teaching Thinking

Secondary PLD New Zealand (nationwide) CORE Education » Coaching and Mentoring Ref#: 1HAEkU » Critically Reflective Conversations Ref#: 1HAEjy » Designing Online Learning Ref#: 1HAEji » Digital Technologies: Rigorous and Real (Session Two) Ref#: 1HAEk4 » Digital Technologies: Rigorous and Real (Session One) Ref#: 1HAEjv » Games-based Learning Practice Ref#: 1HAEki » Growing Others: Mentoring and Coaching Ref#: 1HAEjf » Hangarau Matihiko Ref#: 1HAEk7 » Implementing Te Tiriti o Waitangi in Learning Communities Ref#: 1HAEjc » Inclusion and Equity with Universal Design for Learning Ref#: 1HAEkN » Innovative Learning Practice Ref#: 1HAEkc » Measuring Success in an Online Environment Ref#: 1HAEjs » Strengthening Teacher Aide Practice Ref#: 1HAEk_ » Te Reo Manahua Māori Ref#: 1HAEkm » Te Reo Puāwai Māori Ref#: 1HAEkf » Te Whakamānawa: Developing Cultural Competencies in Learning Communities Ref#: 1HAEkX » Ten Trends: Drivers of Change Shaping our Future Ref#: 1HAEkD

Ref#: 1HAEnM

Evaluation Associates Ltd

Sustainable Coastlines

» Ministry-funded Beginners Guide to e-asTTle (Online)

» Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme

Ref#: 1HAD4K

Otago Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Maths Workshops

Ref#: 1HAExk

InterLEAD » Developing Outstanding Middle Managers (2 x One-day Workshops)

Ref#: 1HAF26

Southland InterLEAD » Developing Outstanding Middle Managers (2 x One-day Workshops)

Ref#: 1HAEhG

Learning Network NZ » Wellbeing Matters Queenstown – Join Nathan Wallis/Kathryn Berkett and Pio Terei

Ref#: 1HAEio

38

Education Gazette | 7 December 2020

Ref#: 1HAExo

Family Planning New Zealand » Navigating the Journey of RSE Ref#: 1HADcc

Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEMQ » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEMu » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEMx » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEN6 » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEN9 » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEPW » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAENF » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAENM » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAENT

» Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAENZ » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAENh » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAENo » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAENu » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEP3 » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEP9 » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEPJ » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEPb » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEPe » Future Learning Solutions – Centre for Languages Ref#: 1HAEPo

Kohia Centre, University of Auckland

» Online: How to Enhance Your Practice Utilising the Google Suite Online Platform Ref#: 1HAEw4

Lancewood Education » James Nottingham – Enhancing Dialogue to Deepen Learning​(teacher-only day) Ref#: 1HAE2x » James Nottingham – Leadership, Challenge and Collective Efficacy (leadership-only day) Ref#: 1HAE30

Safe for Children

» Live Online Course – Child First Aid Ref#: 1HAEno » Live Online Course – Child Protection Training Ref#: 1HAEnr » Live Online Course – Strategies for Challenging Behaviour in Children 10+ Years Ref#: 1HAEnk

Northland Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Maths Workshops Ref#: 1HAExe

Learning Network NZ » Wellbeing Matters – Join Nathan Wallis/Kathryn Berkett and Pio Terei Ref#: 1HAEie

Auckland Children’s Autism Foundation » ASK Autism Professional Development – Sensory Issues Ref#: 1HADc7 » ASK Professional Development – Understanding Autism Ref#: 1HADc1

CORE Education » NZ History: Tāmaki Makaurau Focus Ref#: 1HAEj_ » Online Design for Human Connection Ref#: 1HAEjR

Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded Developing Expertise in Using e-asTTle Workshop Ref#: 1HAExr » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Maths Workshops Ref#: 1HAExe gazette.education.govt.nz


PROFESSIONAL LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT NOTICES » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Writing Workshops Ref#: 1HAExM

Bay of Plenty Sustainable Coastlines

Canterbury CORE Education

Future Learning Solutions, Centre for Educational Leadership

» Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme Ref#: 1HAD4K

» Courageous Conversations Ref#: 1HAEjU » NZ History Ref#: 1HAEjN

» Growing Great Leaders™ Level 1 Ref#: 1HAEPk » Growing Great Leaders™ Level 2 Ref#: 1HAEPu » Open-to-learning™ Leadership Ref#: 1HAEQ3

Kohia Centre, University of Auckland » Building Resilience and Mental Wellbeing for Teachers and Students Ref#: 1HAEv_ » What’s With the New Draft Science Standards? Ref#: 1HAEwK

Learning Network NZ » Wellbeing Matters – Join Nathan Wallis/Kathryn Berkett and Pio Terei Ref#: 1HAEie

Les Mills » BORN TO MOVE Leadership Programme Ref#: 1HADtR

New Zealand Feuerstein Forum » Feuerstein Cognitive Enhancement Programme Workshops for Teaching Thinking Ref#: 1HAEnM

Primary Mathematics Association (Auckland) » Primary Mathematics Association (Auckland) One Day Seminar 2021 Ref#: 1HAEzC

Sustainable Coastlines » Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme Ref#: 1HAD4K

Using Technology Better » Google Admin Console Training – Education Ref#: 1HAEQo

Waikato Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Mathss Workshops Ref#: 1HAExe » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Writing Workshops Ref#: 1HAExM

Learning Network NZ » Wellbeing Matters – Join Nathan Wallis/Kathryn Berkett and Pio Terei Ref#: 1HAEie

Te Whai Toi Tangata: Institute of Professional Learning, University of Waikato » Hamilton: Secondary Year 1 PCT (9–13) Workshop Series Ref#: 1HAEEK » Hamilton: Secondary Year 2 PCT (9–13) Workshop Series Ref#: 1HAEER

Te Whai Toi Tangata: Institute of Professional Learning, University of Waikato » Rotorua: Secondary Year 1 PCT (9–13) Workshop Series Ref#: 1HAEEN » Rotorua: Secondary Year 2 PCT (9–13) Workshop Series Ref#: 1HAEEU

Gisborne Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Mathss Workshops Ref#: 1HAExe

Hawke’s Bay Cooper McKenzie Ltd

» Lester Flockton’s Taking the Lead Seminars Ref#: 1HAEmb

Taranaki Sustainable Coastlines » Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme Ref#: 1HAD4K

Manawatu/Whanganui Cooper McKenzie Ltd

» Lester Flockton’s Taking the Lead Seminars Ref#: 1HAEmb

Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Writing Workshops Ref#: 1HAExM

Wellington CORE Education » NZ History: Pōneke Focus Ref#: 1HAEjX

Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Writing Workshops Ref#: 1HAExM

Marlborough Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Mathss Workshops Ref#: 1HAExk

Learning Network NZ

Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Mathss Workshops Ref#: 1HAExk » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Writing Workshops Ref#: 1HAExM

impactED » Local Curriculum Through Game Design (Rubber Duck Awards) Ref#: 1HAE56 » Minecraft Education Edition Hui – Christchurch Ref#: 1HAEsK » Using Gamefroot to Share Canterbury Stories (Rubber Duck Awards) Ref#: 1HAE5C

InterLEAD » Developing Outstanding Middle Managers (2 x One-day Workshops) Ref#: 1HAF2J

Learning Network NZ » Wellbeing Matters Queenstown – Join Nathan Wallis/Kathryn Berkett and Pio Terei Ref#: 1HAEio

Little Kiwis Nature Play » Nature Play Conference 2021 Ref#: 1HAD2R

New Zealand Feuerstein Forum » Feuerstein Cognitive Enhancement Programme Workshops for Teaching Thinking Ref#: 1HAEnM

Sustainable Coastlines » Sustainable Coastlines Litter Intelligence Education Programme Ref#: 1HAD4K

Otago Evaluation Associates Ltd » Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Maths Workshops Ref#: 1HAExk

InterLEAD

» Wellbeing Matters Queenstown – Join Nathan Wallis/Kathryn Berkett and Pio Terei Ref#: 1HAEio

» Developing Outstanding Middle Managers (2 x One-day Workshops) Ref#: 1HAF26

Tasman/Nelson Evaluation Associates Ltd

Southland InterLEAD

» Ministry-funded e-asTTle Reading and Maths Workshops Ref#: 1HAExe

» Developing Outstanding Middle Managers (2 x One-day Workshops) Ref#: 1HAEhG

InterLEAD

Learning Network NZ

» Developing Outstanding Middle Managers (2 x One-day Workshops) Ref#: 1HAF29

» Wellbeing Matters Queenstown – Join Nathan Wallis/Kathryn Berkett and Pio Terei Ref#: 1HAEio

For full professional learning and development (PLD) listings see gazette.education.govt.nz/notices gazette.education.govt.nz

TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 7 December 2020

39


VACANCIES

Contents

General 40 Guidance and careers 40 Early learning 40 Primary and intermediate (Years 1-8) » Mātauranga Māori 43 » Teachers 43 » Senior leadership 45

Area / composite (Years 1-15)

» Resource teacher 46 » Mātauranga Māori 46 » Teachers 47 » Middle leadership 48 » Senior leadership 48

Secondary (Years 7-15)

» Mātauranga Māori 48 » Teachers 48 » Middle leadership 49 » Senior leadership 49

Equal Employment Opportunities (EEO)

The State Sector Act 1988 and the Human Rights Act 1993 ensure that equal employment opportunities apply to recruitment. EEO principles should be applied to every part of the recruitment process ie the development of the job description, the person specification, the advertisement and the appointment process. These principles enable people to apply for jobs without their chances being reduced by factors irrelevant to the requirements under consideration. Refer to the appropriate collective agreement for the conditions of service applicable to the position advertised. Employers also have to meet safety checking requirements under the Vulnerable Children Act 2014 when recruiting.

Booking deadlines for paid print vacancies Booking for 8 February closes 4pm, Monday 25 January 2021. Booking for 1 March closes 4pm, Monday 15 February 2021. Submit your vacancy online at: gazette.education.govt.nz See full listings online for closing dates. Listings are removed from the website after the closing date. Listings sent by email will not be accepted.

General

Northland Waitangi Treaty Grounds Educator (Mātauranga Māori – digital learning) Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADmQ Educator (digital learning) Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADqT

Auckland Rotoroa Island Trust Lead educator – Rotoroa Island, Auckland Part-time, contract Ref#: 1HAExX

Guidance and careers Auckland Kristin School

School counsellor Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEzb

Bay of Plenty Bethlehem College Counsellor Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAF3i

Bear Park Childcare, Mairangi Bay Early childhood educator Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE5_

Bear Park, Mt Eden

Qualified and registered educator Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEhh Qualified and registered head teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEhT

Beginnings Early Learning Centre ECE centre manager Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEyD

Birkenhead Point Montessori Preschool

ECE qualified art teacher Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEBX ECE qualified teacher (Montessori if possible) Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEqC

Bizzy Kidz Childcare

Head teacher: salary scale K2 – Northland Kindergarten Association Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAF2o

Care-A-Lot Childcare Centre

Comrie Park Kindergarten

Childsplay Unlimited, Kingsland

Northland Anne West Kindergarten

Teacher: salary scale K1 – Northland Kindergarten Association Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEui

Mini Miracles Educare Claudelands Qualified ECE teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADAG

Mokopuna O Moerewa Early Childhood Centre Qualified ECE teacher–pouako Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEs0

Mokopuna ki Whau Valley Early Childhood Service Qualified ECE teacher–pouako Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEs9

Session facilitator Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADfb

Auckland ACG Strathallan Preschool Centre Qualified ECE teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADNr Education Gazette | 7 December 2020

Early childhood teacher Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEwF

Early learning

Parklands Playcentre

40

Akoranga Childcare Centre

ECE teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEZA

Qualified early learning educator Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEti

Qualified / registered teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAELs

Childsteps Early Learning Centre Infants / toddlers teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADt9

Fantails Childcare – Country Qualified teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAD9_

Fantails Childcare – Estate In-training and qualified teachers Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEYA

Fantails Childcare – Silverdale Qualified teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEYG

Giraffe ELC

Head teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE3m Head teacher (2 positons) Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEds Qualified ECE teachers gazette.education.govt.nz


Early learning Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEdv Qualified ECE teachers Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE3p

VACANCIES

Little Sparks Educare

Plum Tree Preschool, Millwater

Preschool teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEB_

Qualified early childhood toddlers teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADSR

Hand and Hand Early Learning Centre, Kumeu

Lollipops Auckland Central Certificated ECE teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEs_

Pupuke Early Education Centre

Montessori teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAD4n

Kiddie Academy Early Learning Centre

Lollipops Lynfield

Qualified ECE teachers Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEdm

Kids Forever Christian Preschool Qualified certified ECE teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADrM

Kids’ Kampus (2000) ECE qualified teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADp3

Kidz & Crayonz Early Learning Centre 3rd year / final year ECE in-training teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADWv

Kimberley Childcare, Greenlane Head teacher O2s Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE8f

Kindercare Learning Centre, Albany Babies teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEub

Kingsway Pre-School, Red Beach Qualified ECE teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAESR

Lincoln Road Childcare & Kindergarten Qualified ECE teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEpr

Little Guys Learning ECE centre manager Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEY6

Little Kiwis Early Learning Centre Registered and certified teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADkK

Little Moas Early Learning Centre Qualified kaiako Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAENm

Little One’s Garden Early Education Centre ECE certifcated teacher Part-time, LTR Ref#: 1HAEcp ECE certificated teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEcm Early learning educators Part-time, LTR Ref#: 1HAEjC

gazette.education.govt.nz

ECE certified teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEb4 Team leader – infants and toddlers Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEav

Love and Joy Early Learning Centre Qualified early childhood teacher (several positions) Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEte Qualified early childhood teachers Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEMW

Magical Years Childcare Centre Registered ECE teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADvx

Mairangi Bay Preschool Qualified teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAF1i

Merryland Childcare Centre Qualified teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADmu Teacher U2s Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEfm

Molly’s Preschool Kaiako and co-learner Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADMT

Nature’s Explorers Kindergarten Qualified ECE teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEex

Naval Community Daycare, Calliope House Early learning educator Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEp9

New Shoots Children’s Centre, Hillcrest

Head teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEwQ

Reach for the Stars Early Learning Centre Experienced qualified teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEYW

Small Fries Christian Childcare Centre Qualified O2 teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE3X Teachers Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE9y

Smith Childcare ECE registered teacher (infants and toddlers room) Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEBG

Star Educare ECE centre manager Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEUM Qualified ECE teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADy4

Talented Tots Early Childhood Centre Qualified early childhood teachers for infants and toddlers room Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADYU

Te Atatu South Childcare Centre Toddlers teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAF2k

The Junction Early Learning Centre Qualified early childhood teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEt6

The Learning Space Passionate Pikler practitioner Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEky

The Village Early Learning Centre

Qualified registered teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADwe

Qualified head teacher – infants Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEJ_ Qualified head teacher – toddlers Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEJi Qualified kaiako Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEJm

Pikopiko Learning

Three Bears New Lynn Childcare

Teachers Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEkx

Nurture Early Learning, Red Beach

Qualified team leader Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEj4

ECE teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE0i TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 7 December 2020

41


VACANCIES

Early learning

Tiny Explorers Early Learning Centre ECE, primary or teacher-in-training Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEEc

Tiny Voices, Hobsonville

Experienced preschool team leader Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADUW Preschool team leader Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEDK

Tipu Montessori School Early childhood teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADEs

Toki Explorers

ECE, primary or teacher-in-training! Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEE_

Treetops ELC, Pukekohe Certificated infants room teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADg6

Wellsford Preschool Education Centre Early childhood teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAF5A

Young World Childcare Centre Qualified teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADmb

Waikato BestStart, Frankton

Early learning qualified, infants and toddlers teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAD_b

Central Kids Kindergartens, Mercury Bay Kindergarten teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAF2Q

Central Kids Kindergartens, Rushton Road Kindergarten head teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAF2M

Crackerjacks Preschool Team leader – juniors Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEmG

Creators on Grandview Teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAErZ

Elim Early Learning Centre, Cambridge Early childhood teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEZ_

Fountain City Montessori, Tawa Street Team leader babies (Montessori) Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEv6

42

Education Gazette | 7 December 2020

Grasshoppers Early Learning Centre

Nature’s Cove Early Learning Centre

Registered, experienced preschool teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEvU

Qualified teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE6W

Hatchlings ECE

New Shoots Children’s Centre, Tauranga

Qualified and registered ECE teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEU4

Kauri Learners Early Education, Whitianga Qualified early childhood educator Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEsM

Little Minds Early Learning Centre Qualified and certified early childhood teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEbZ

Qualified toddlers teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACx7

Te Puke Free Kindergarten Head teacher – Inspired Kindergartens Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEp4

Gisborne Gisborne Hospital Childcare and Education Centre

Mercury Bay Preschool (2018)

U2 registered teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADus

Passionate and qualified ECE teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADnG

Waiapu Kids – Te Hapara Whānau Aroha

Mini Miracles Educare, Claudelands Team leader Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADWD

The Forest ECE Forest leader – registered teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEuN

Bay of Plenty Above and Beyond Education and Care Qualified early childhood educator Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEvJ

Above and Beyond, Tauriko Qualified early childhood educator Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEvF Qualified early childhood educator Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEv3

Awhi Educare @ Glenholme ECE qualified, registered, infant superstar Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADW9

Beginnings and Beyond Quality Preschool Early learning educator Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACxY

ECE teacher Full-time, permanent, relocation reimbursement allowance Ref#: 1HAEVR

Hawke’s Bay Happy Days Child Care Centre Infants and toddlers early childhood teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEy0

Tiny Voices, Napier Qualified and registered teacher / team leader Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEEZ

Manawatu/Whanganui Central Kids Kindergartens – Te Ara Mātauranga Kindergarten teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAF2T

Footsteps Adventist Preschool Early childhood educators (2 positions) Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADZK

Wellington Arakura Kindergarten Kindergarten teacher Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEwp

Blue School

Qualified, registered U2s teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEA0

Manager Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEDJ Qualified and registered teacher Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEDQ

Little Pipi Early Childhood Centre

Busy Beez Childcare Centre

Coastlands Preschool

Experience pepi teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADN3 Unqualified / In-training pepi teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAF23

Early learning educator Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAECW Early learning educator Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEC9 gazette.education.govt.nz


Primary and intermediate Y1-8 Teachers Co Kids Thorndon Qualified ECE / primary registered teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEgU

Dyer Street Kindergarten Kindergarten teacher Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEnF

Elim International Kids Early Childhood Centre Centre manager Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEY1

Farmhouse Preschool and Nursery Certified early childhood teacher Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADwm

Gracefield Early Childhood Centre Certified early childhood teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEEM

Kidlywinks Childcare Centre Teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEr7

Kiwi Kids Childcare Centre Head teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEgi

Millie’s House Centre manager Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEZD

Naenae Kindergarten Kindergarten teacher Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEtp

South Wellington Montessori School Registered Montessori assistant Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADoK

Tasman/Nelson Star Early Learning ECE teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAF0e

The Children’s Garden Caregiver / teacher (kaiako) Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEgf

Y Kids Early Learning Centre Teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEuW

West Coast Westport Early Learning Centre Early childhood education teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEue gazette.education.govt.nz

Canterbury Blossoms Early Learning Centre Qualified teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADHo

Buttercups Preschool, Dallington Qualified early childhood teacher O2s Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADMJ

Kindercare Learning Centres, Sawyers Arms Transition to school teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEYK

Learning Curves Montessori, Redwood Early childhood teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HACz1

Mozarts ECE qualified teacher O2 Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEmQ

Sydenham Community Preschool ECE teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADnA

Waitaki Valley Preschool Kaiako Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADTF

Otago Balclutha Kindergarten Teacher – South Otago Kindergarten Association Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEzh

BestStart Arrowtown Qualified teacher Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEuM

Edna McCulloch Kindergarten Teacher – Oamaru Kindergarten Association Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEXe

Gems Rata Teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAE0e

Goldfields Kindergarten Teacher – South Otago Kindergarten Association Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEzk

Kanuka Corner Early Childhood Centre Infants and toddlers kaiako Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEor

Montessori Children’s House, Wanaka Registered early childhood teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEqx

VACANCIES

Queenstown Preschool and Nursery ECE certificated kaiako Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADw3

Skiwiland, Coronet Peak Kaiako early learning educator Full-time, permanent, Q1, Q2, Q3 Ref#: 1HADxX

Waitaki Valley Preschool Centre manager Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAF3W

Southland Riverstones Early Learning Centre Qualified and registered kaiako Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEgk

Weka Pre-School Early childhood teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE_Z

Primary / intermediate Y1–8 Mātauranga Māori Northland Hikurangi School Leader te reo immersion Full-time, permanent, 1PMU + 1FTU + PTSA + MITA Ref#: 1HAEvR

Manawatu/Whanganui Foxton School Scale A teacher / kaiako rumaki Y1–4 Full-time, fixed-term, MITA Ref#: 1HAEn3 Scale A teacher/ kaiako rumaki Y5–8 Full-time, fixed-term, MITA Ref#: 1HAEn6

Teachers Northland Kaeo School Y2–3 teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAF1X

Auckland ACG Parnell College Teacher / tutor – primary / music Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEzR

ACG Strathallan

Teacher / tutor – Spanish Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEV9

Belmont Intermediate Music teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAE6T

Bombay School New entrant teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAF11 TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 7 December 2020

43


VACANCIES

Primary and intermediate Y1-8 Teachers

Clevedon School

Scale A teacher – new entrant Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEmi

Dairy Flat School Teacher Y3–4 Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEt_

Destiny School

Y1–2 teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADxy

Edmund Hillary School

Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAF0A

Paeroa Christian School Y3–5 teacher Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAESv

Rototuna Junior High School Y7–10 dance teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAF5J

Te Wharekura o Te Kaokaoroa o Patetere

Teacher Y4–5 Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAD72

Y1–4 teacher Full-time, fixed-term, MITA + HPTSA Ref#: 1HAEr0

Green Bay Primary School

Waikino School

Scale A teacher (2 positions) Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEfc

Learning coach Full-time, permanent, 1MU Ref#: 1HADqZ

Kelston Intermediate

Bay of Plenty Bethlehem College

Scale A teachers (3 positions) Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADNy

Manurewa East School Learning support coordinator Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEQQ

New Lynn School

Counsellor Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAF3m NE–Y1 teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEq7

Hawke’s Bay Ohuka School

Teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEb1

Principal release teacher Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEsb

Panmure Bridge School

Omakere School

Class teacher Full-time, fixed-term, PTSA Ref#: 1HAF03

Teacher Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEm7

St Heliers School

Taranaki Eltham School

Teacher Y7 or Y8 Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEMJ Teacher Y7–8 Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAELx

Te Hihi School Y7–8 teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEgX

Timatanga Community School Junior classroom teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAE9R

Viscount School Y3–4 and Y7–8 teachers (2 positions) Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEUZ

Yendarra School Teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEnR

Waikato Korakonui School Scale A Y3–4 teacher

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Education Gazette | 7 December 2020

Teacher – middle school Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEm1

Marfell School Scale A teacher Part-time, LTR Ref#: 1HAEv7

Manawatu/Whanganui Coley Street School Learning support coordinator Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HABH5

Glen Oroua School Classroom teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEzU

Makuri School Principal release / Y1–3 junior teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEts

Mangatainoka School Classroom teacher – various year levels Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAE27

Mangaweka School Teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAF57

Mount Biggs School Y7–8 teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEe1

Wellington Avalon School

Teacher junior school (2 positions) Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAETp

Bellevue School, Newlands

0.44 trainee Reading Recovery teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAF1e

Evans Bay Intermediate Counsellor Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAE0K Scale A teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADzm Scale A teacher (0.6 position) Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAE04

St Patrick’s School, Masterton Teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAF1b

Taita Central School

Te reo Māori / te ao Māori teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADsM

West Coast Blaketown School Teacher senior class Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEqk

Canterbury Allenvale Special School and Residential Centre Scale A teacher Full-time, fixed-term, SDA Ref#: 1HAEuR

Loburn School

Teacher Y3–6 Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEm3

St Patrick’s School, Waimate Principal release Y4–8 Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEtW

Tinwald School

Teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEZJ

Otago Weston School Y7–8 teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAF54

gazette.education.govt.nz


Southland Aparima College Y7–8 homeroom teacher Full-time, fixed-term, HPSTA Ref#: 1HAEu3

Senior leadership Northland Te Kāpehu Whetū (Teina)

Principal

Strathmore School Tokoroa We are a small contributing school of 134 students located in Tokoroa, one hour south of Hamilton and 45 minutes north of Taupō on SH1. We are looking for a professional leader who sets high standards and has a proven track record of leadership. The Board has established the following key criteria for this position: • Suitably experienced in leadership within schools

Pouhere – principal Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAF0J

• A visionary leader with experience in leading change and improving student outcomes

Whangarei Heads School

• Ability to manage and resolve conflict effectively and calmly

Principal U3 Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEv0

Auckland Parnell School Learning leader Full-time, permanent, 2MU Ref#: 1HAEe4

Waikato Korakonui School Leader of learning (deputy principal) Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEzK

Strathmore School Principal Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAF5Q

• Passionate about teaching and learning, positive, with high expectations of themselves and others • Is open, approachable and has high emotional intelligence • Collaborative, consultative, flexible and enthusiastic about the role • Proven track record of outstanding curriculum leadership and pastoral care • Has a track record of improving student learning outcomes for all learners, especially priority learners (Māori, Pasifika, special needs) • Demonstrates the principles of Te Tiriti o Waitangi, is culturally aware and embraces diversity • Ability to build strong relationships with staff, children, parents, BOT and the community • Fully committed to being involved in the life of the school and strengthening the school’s wide range of extra curricula activities • Able to demonstrate competence in the areas of property, finance, personnel and health and safety and has practical skills to manage the everyday running of a school • Enthusiastic, energetic, highly visible and prepared to lead from the front. This position commences 3 May (start term 2). Applications close 12 February. To receive an application pack, please contact the BOT appointment secretary, Donna Hartley, dhartley@strathmore.school.nz ph (07) 886 9765

Hawke’s Bay Poukawa School Principal U3 Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEy7

Manawatu/Whanganui Colyton School

Principal – Whangarei Heads School U3, Year 1 – 8. Roll of approx. 120 Commencing term 2 2021

Principal U3 Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAF16

Whangarei Heads School - situated at the beautiful coastal/rural Whangarei Heads, 30 km from the Whangarei CBD.

Halcombe Primary School

Whangarei Heads School is in a unique coastal/rural setting, close to city amenities and is the heart of the community.

Principal U4 Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEKm

We have a strong set of values that reflect community aspirations. Positive relationships and a sense of belonging, open communication and a focus on wellbeing are cornerstones of our school. We value innovative and ‘hands-on’ learning experiences for our children supported by quality teaching. Environmental sustainability is an important focus for us.

We are looking for a principal who: has strong interpersonal skills to build great relationships, is collaborative; and can demonstrate strong leadership for staff, children and the community. Our new principal will be enthusiastic, energetic, highly visible and prepared to ‘muck in’ We would welcome your visit to the school. Please phone Paula on 09 434 0844 to arrange a visit. The Board welcomes applications from new and experienced leaders. Applications close at 12:00 noon on Monday 8 February 2021. The position commences on 3 May 2021 or as negotiated.

Te Kapehu Whetu Teina

Principal - Pouhere Seeking an inspirational academic and operational leader to take us forward as a designated character Kura. Who provides: » Commitment to te reo Māori and our designated character » A pastoral care system within a Māori framework » Commitment to student-centred, evidence-based decision making » Outstanding relationship management across a broad range of stakeholders » An innovative curriculum and e-learning environment for 21st century learners Applications close 22 December. Please email your CV and covering letter to r.tautari@mokonz.co.nz

gazette.education.govt.nz

An application pack is available online at www.educationgroup.co.nz If you have any queries please contact Tanya Prentice or David Ellery at admin@educationgroup.co.nz or phone 09 920 2173.

TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 7 December 2020

45


VACANCIES

Area/composite Y1-15 Mātauranga Māori

Waiouru School Principal U3 Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAF19

Wellington Karori West Normal School

Deputy principal – SENCO and learning support Full-time, permanent, 6MU + NSA Ref#: 1HAEZe Deputy principal – curriculum and assessment Full-time, permanent, 6MU + NSA Ref#: 1HAEUJ

Silverstream School Principal U5 Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAExQ

Marlborough Tua Marina School

Southland Waianiwa School

Waitaria Bay School

Waihopai School

Principal U3 Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEL7

Principal U1 Full-time, permanent, IA Ref#: 1HAEoG

Canterbury Bluestone School Principal U6 Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAF4A

St Peter’s School, Beckenham Principal – Catholic Primary Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAF1p

Principal Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEnJ

Principal U5 Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAF1J

Area / composite Y1–15 Resource teacher Auckland Blind and Low Vision Education Network NZ Teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAF43 Teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAF3x

Mātauranga Māori Bay of Plenty Te Wharekura o Ngāti Rongomai Kaiako – kura tuatahi – new entrant Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEmr

U3 Principal An exciting opportunity is available at our rural U3 school for a permanent principal. We are a proud rural school with great community and whānau connections. We seek a dynamic leader with the vision and passion to continue to work with our enthusiastic learners and teaching team. Our principal needs to embrace our vision and develop it further, have an excellent curriculum knowledge and understanding of current educational practice, along with the flexibility to manage a rural school. The applicant will need experience in leadership roles, be encouraging, motivational and empower a team of committed and skilled staff. We are looking for someone who is inspiring, respectful and who is an excellent communicator. They will be culturally inclusive, relational and embrace our diverse community. A great sense of humour is essential. This position will start at the beginning of Term 2 2021 Applications close 4pm- Friday 29th January Pack available see online listing ref# 1HAEy7

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Education Gazette | 7 December 2020

gazette.education.govt.nz


Bluestone School Principal

Teachers Northland Excellere College Junior college teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAERG

TKKM o Pukemiro Kaiwhakahaere Y1–6 kaiako Full-time, fixed-term, 2MU + MITA Ref#: 1HAEY9 Registered Scale A Y1–6 kaiako Full-time, permanent, MITA Ref#: 1HAEXu Scale A Y1–6 kaiako Full-time, fixed-term, MITA Ref#: 1HAEXh

Timaru, a safe and highly attractive place in which to live, play and be free from the pressures of city living. With Caroline Bay on the doorstep, Aoraki Mt Cook to the west and the gorgeous Mackenzie country in between, there is so much to do here when school’s out! We are looking for a collaborative and innovative leader to inspire creative and lifelong learners. We have a proud ERO record and a school that is functioning effectively. Our community has said they want their new Principal to be • Friendly, approachable, visible and interactive • Kind, caring, fun, helpful and with a sense of humour

• • •

Experienced in school leadership Respectful of all and appreciative of diversity Able to motivate and inspire staff and students to be the best they can be

This is a real opportunity for an educational leader who wants to grow and thrive in a team environment. Have a look at our website to read about us - http://bluestone.school.nz/ and check out the opportunities Timaru could provide you at https://southcanterbury.org.nz/ Applications close February 22nd. For an information pack contact Neil Wilkinson at wilkinson899@gmail.com

TKKM o Te Rawhiti Roa Wharekura maths kaiako Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEKi

Auckland Destiny School Y7–8 teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADy1

Waikato Lake Taupo Christian School Teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAF3Z

Waihopai School, Invercargill

PRINCIPAL (U5)

Empowering Learning Whakamana Akoranga

Ako ngātahi tātou, tohea tonu mō te hiranga Learning Together, Striving for Excellence Are you ready to lead Waihopai School? The Board of Waihopai School is looking to appoint an inspirational leader to build on our success, to start Term 2, 2021. Established in 1879, we have become one of the most prominent, contributing primary schools in Invercargill. Our learners thrive within The Waihopai Way which derives from the core values of Resilience, Kindness, Honesty, Respect, Inquiry and Curiosity. With a growing roll approaching 400 learners from diverse ethnicities, we are a Decile 8 state school that also offers a fee-paying programme for international students. Our Park Syndicate for children with physical and cognitive disabilities is a Southlandwide resource now designated as a special programme by the Ministry. We are a well-resourced school, proud of our dedicated staff team and fully committed to providing the very best academic, sporting and cultural learning environment for our engaged and appreciative school community.

OUR NEW PRINCIPAL • You are an accomplished school leader, passionate about seeing every student achieve their true potential and unashamedly determined to make the school the very best it can be • You will set high personal standards and lead by example. You enjoy being visible, collaborative and approachable yet will address the key issues directly and be prepared to make the tough decisions when necessary • An influential communicator, you are always keen to explore new teaching practices and will keep yourself and your team up to speed with current thinking and trends in education • Colleagues would describe you as consistent, resilient, open-minded, student-centric, results-driven, uncompromising over core values, offering a great sense of humour and always a real pleasure to work with.

APPLY NOW. Closing Date for Applications 5.00pm Monday 1st February 2021 Contact Jane Parkinson at Blackcat Education for an Application Pack on jane@blkcat.co.nz For a confidential chat, contact Andrew Harris on 021 0296 9891. Also please visit www.waihopai.school.nz and our website www.blackcateducation.co.nz Thank you for your interest, we look forward to hearing from you.


VACANCIES

Secondary Y7-15 Teachers

Teacher Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEuZ

Tongariro School Teacher Y1–2 Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEws

Bay of Plenty Murupara Area School

New entrant teacher – Nīoreore Learning Hub Full-time, permanent, HPSTA Ref#: 1HAEy6

Wellington TKKM o Te Rito

Pouako – whānau wehi, tamariki Tau 1–2 Full-time, permanent, MITA Ref#: 1HADJy

Marlborough Rai Valley Area School Teacher Y7–10 Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAF3Q

Canterbury Haeata Community Campus

Home economics and food technology teacher, secondary school Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEpX

Middle leadership Bay of Plenty Murupara Area School

Y7–10 hub leader karangaranga Full-time, permanent, 2MU + 1MMA + HPTSA Ref#: 1HAEy3

Senior leadership Waikato Tongariro School

Assistant principal Y9–13 Full-time, permanent, 3MU Ref#: 1HAEwi

Secondary Y7–15 Mātauranga Māori Auckland Kia Aroha College

Kaiako (2 positions) Full-time, permanent, MITA Ref#: 1HAEUh

Teachers New Zealand (nationwide) Crimson Global Academy Biology specialist Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEVh Chemistry specialist Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEW9 Economics specialist Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEWM Economics specialist Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEWF

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Education Gazette | 7 December 2020

English (literature) specialist Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEWT Geography specialist Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEWb History specialist Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEWe Mathematics specialist Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEWh Physics specialist Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEWo Physics specialist Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEWk

Northland Bream Bay College Art teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAF34

Dargaville High School

Assistant teacher of English Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEyT Learning support teacher and SENCO Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEyW

Otamatea High School Mathematics teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEc4

Auckland ACG Parnell College Teacher / tutor – PE Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAETQ

Auckland Grammar Teacher of te reo Māori Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAF59

Avondale College

Health and physical education teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEcA History teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEk3 Science teacher (employment-based teacher training (EBTT) Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEk6 Social sciences teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEc7

Crimson Global Academy Business specialist Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEVr English specialist Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADuJ History specialist Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADuQ Maths specialist Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HADuZ

De La Salle College Science teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEVF

James Cook High School

Teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAELA Teacher of DTE (digital technology) Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEX4 Teacher of DVC (design and visual communication) Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAF3D Teacher of DVC (design and visual communication) Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEA3 Teacher of business studies Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADwC Teacher of physical education (PE) Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAELG Teacher of English / dance and drama Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAELK

Kristin School

Health and physical education teacher Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEsC

Marcellin College

English teacher. Tagged. Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HADre

Mt Roskill Grammar

HOD workshop technology teacher – hard materials Full-time, permanent, 1MU Ref#: 1HAEa_ PE and health teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEiR

Pakuranga College Mathematics teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAF3M Technology teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAF3F

Rodney College

Physical education teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAExJ

Tamaki College

TiC health teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEpm

Waikato Rototuna Junior High School Y7–10 dance teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAF5F

Thames High School

Teacher of English Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEeh Teacher of history and social studies Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEeo gazette.education.govt.nz


Secondary Y7-15 Senior leadership Teacher of mathematics / statistics Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEcW

Waikato Diocesan School For Girls Physical education and health teacher Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAF4J

Bay of Plenty Bethlehem College Counsellor Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAF3i

Otumoetai College

Business studies teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEfX Special needs physical education teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEfK Special needs teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEfN

Rotorua Boys’ High School Teacher of mathematics Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEXc

Tauranga Boys’ College HOD geography Full-time, permanent, 1MU Ref#: 1HAEe_

Tauranga Girls’ College Spanish teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAF4K

Western Heights High School

Digital technologies and business studies teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAF31

Hawke’s Bay Iona College

Y7–8 teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAF2Z

Manawatu/Whanganui Palmerston North Girls’ High School English teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEeK

Rangitikei College

St Patrick’s College, Kilbirnie

Wakatipu High School

Upper Hutt College

Middle leadership

Religious education teacher. Tagged Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEzF Teacher of science and biology Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEms

Wainuiomata High School

VACANCIES

Teacher of health and physical education Full-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAExT

Auckland Mt Roskill Grammar

Integrated learning teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAF1F

PE and health assistant HOD Full-time, permanent, 1MU + 1MMA Ref#: 1HAEiK

Wairarapa College

Tangaroa College

Canterbury Waimate High School

Senior leadership

HOL technology Full-time, permanent, 2MMU + 2MMA Ref#: 1HAEfD

Technology teacher Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEwc

Science and chemistry teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAF1T

Wellington St Catherine’s College, Kilbirnie Principal / Tumuaki Full-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEym

Otago St Hildas Collegiate PE / health teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEhp

Waitaki Boys’ High School Teacher-in-charge–art Full-time, permanent, 1PMU + 1MMA Ref#: 1HAErX

For full details of these vacancies, search the job listings online at gazette.education.govt.nz

St Catherine’s College, Wellington

Principal / Tumuaki Integrated multicultural Catholic Girls School Y9-13, U4, Decile 6 Tēnā koe, talofa, kumusta. St Catherine’s College is a small school with a big heart and even bigger potential. Our vision is to nurture and empower young women to become active and creative learners equipped with skills and strong Catholic values of mercy, wisdom and social justice. Are you an ambitious leader who is ready to do the mahi and make our school the first choice for Catholic girls in Wellington? We aim to become the greatest little college in the Capital city. You will be an an outstanding leader who will strive for excellence in education and be a role model for our vibrant and diverse school whānau. You will prepare our rangatahi for the future and motivate them to take pride in their college and to be the best they can be.

You will put the principles of Te Tiriti o Waitangi into practice as we continue our work to ensure Māori students achieve as Māori and all students leave our school as exceptional Treaty partners. As a visionary and inspirational leader of staff, you will demonstrate a thorough understanding of current approaches to effective teaching and learning. A willingness and ability to participate in the religious instruction appropriate to the Special Character of the school is a condition of employment. For more information, see www.stcatherinescollege.school.nz/ and email chris.perry@scc.school.nz for an application pack. Applications close on Sunday, 10 January 2021.

Drama teacher Part-time, permanent Ref#: 1HAEzp

TKKM o Tupoho

He kaiako-Pūtaio (Kaupae 2 – Te Hiringa) Full-time, permanent, 1MU + MITA Ref#: 1HAEwf

Wellington St Catherines College, Kilbirnie Music itinerant teacher – vocal Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEy_ Science and maths teacher Part-time, fixed-term Ref#: 1HAEyX gazette.education.govt.nz

TUKUTUKU KŌRERO | 7 December 2020

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