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EXECUTIVE FORWARD THINKING FOR ACADEMIES, FEE PAYING AND FREE SCHOOLS

MEDIA INFORMATION Brought to you by EDEXEC


What is Independent Executive?

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dExec published the first monthly magazine of its kind almost 10 years ago and today our growing family of publications stand firm as champions for anyone in a business, financial or management role in education. Independent Executive, in association with EdExec, is a magazine that champions leadership in the 21st century independent school. ‘Independent’ no longer carries the same, easily defined meaning as it has in previous years. The 21st century independent school, can be fee paying or state funded, can be housed in one of Britain’s auspicious, ivy-clad towers, a state of the art school of the future, or even an old church hall. The face of the independent school has changed, and will

continue to change. But what all independent schools have in common, is that their evolving role within the education sector is changing and is seeing increased competition, so now more than ever, they need to be on top of their game. Fee paying schools have to stay one step ahead and to do so, ICT and state-of-the art facilities are fundamental. On the other hand, newly independent state-run schools under the academy and free schools scheme will be looking to find out how they can use their newfound independence to their advantage and bursars and school business leaders will be at the forefront here. With such a wide-ranging and growing remit, independent bursars demand a focused publication that will support their role exclusively; an easy-to-use


management magazine to cover everything the modern bursar encounters, along with news and analysis relating to the changes in the changing education sector. Our strapline, “Independent thinking for independent schools”, drives everything that makes us unique and leading in this sector. We feature a host of editorial content to help decision-makers in the independent sector choose the right options to ensure they do best by their pupils. From case studies, to in-depth sector analyses, quick tips to news, Independent Executive has all the information the modern independent school leader needs to make those decisions, whether they be financial, managerial or strategic in nature. The growth in independent schools, whether

that be fee paying, academy or free schools, means an increased opportunity for educations suppliers – a bigger client base and a requirement for schools to be better than their independent neighbours equates to a much bigger opportunity – the only challenge is finding a route into the decision-maker audience.That’s where Independent Executive comes in. We garantuee a captive audience for your marketing message. We have a dedicated team of education journalists in-house – no competing magazine can better that – and as they’re an in-house team, their focus is always on the best content for the bursar audience. All our editorial content is original and written or commissioned by them and it’s their job to stay close to our bursar audience to ensure what we deliver editorially is valuable to the reader.


Why Independent Executive? ABOUT THE MAGAZINE Independent Executive is a publication filled with solutions-led, need-to-know articles; easy to follow ‘how to’ guides on all aspects of school management; updates and analysis from the education sector; legal updates and advice on purchasing everything from ICT, catering and dorm furniture to stationery, printing and minibuses.

THE READERS Bursars, business managers, finance directors, heads and governors in independent schools. We have a very specific focus on the business management aspects of school leadership.

CIRCULATION  Approximately 2,000 academies and wouldbe academies with approved applications  Approximately 2,500 fee-paying independent schools, this includes more than 98% of UK schools.


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ndependent Executive is a unique proposition. It’s a focused publication for a focused audience, a management agenda magazine, with relevant and useful information covering the whole role of the independent bursar. EDITORIAL IS NEVER SOLD, IT’S WRITTEN FOR THE AUDIENCE AND NOT THE SECTOR SUPPLIERS. We make no apologies for that, as the more people that read it the more beneficial it is to everyone. The role of school business manager is all-encompassing and at EdExec, the editorial is equally diverse, covering all aspects of the multifaceted profession. Independent schools are an important and complex area and in line with our company ethos of focused reading for focused audiences, deserve full recognition with a title of its own. Independent bursars face different challenges to those in the state sector, and they don’t have the support of state funding, Academies are new and evolving and such can really benefit from up to date news, analysis and information about their sector as it happens. INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS ARE BUSINESSES, THEY ARE MORE EXPOSED TO ECONOMIC CHANGES. As a result they must have a more strategic outlook; with “best practice” and “best value” being their watch words. Fee-paying school bursars are well established in their roles; this in-depth, strategic approach is valuable to bursars with busy roles and growing remits. THERE IS A DIFFERENCE BETWEEN KNOWING WHO YOU NEED TO REACH, AND REACHING THEM EFFECTIVELY , and at Independent Executive, we ensure our on-target and meaningful editorial delivers a captive audience to our advertising partners. Association with this publication in front of this captive audience is a crucial marketing vehicle for reaching the independent sector. This makes your marketing spend work harder, by not only hitting the relevant people, but ensuring it’s placed within a framework that is extremely effective.


The Magazine MARKETING AND BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Independent Executive looks at ways you can differentiate your indepdendent school and promote its unique qualities. The section on marketing and business development features analyses on recent trends in independent education and their impact on the financial and business strategies of readers. The section also contains general advice articles on effective marketing techniques and business development strategies.

FINANCE AND FUNDRAISING From setting budgets and monitoring cash flow to overseeing spending in all areas and raising income from new resources, finance remains a central part of the bursar’s role, particularly in the fee-paying private sector. We look at advice on everything related to money, accounts and finance systems in schools. We also look at fundraising techniques, how to improve your alumni relations, as well as unusual ways of raising money and how to attract private investors.

HR & LEGAL As with any private business, keeping up with changes to employment law, company law, health & safety rules and a range of other regulations can be a full-time job for independent schools – and essential without the support of the local authority. We make it easier for bursars by highlighting key recent or upcoming changes and explaining how schools should prepare or react to them.

ESTATES, SERVICES AND RESOURCES In this section we cover how to get the best value from resources and the ins and outs of running effective services, from catering and gardening to cleaning, whether the school chooses to outsource, use managed services or work in-house. We analyse trends and innovations in school estates from day-to-day facilities management to funding and managing large builds,

ICT MATTERS With most modern households having more than one laptop, tablet, or smart phone, parents parents expect their children’s school to be leading the way with the latest technology and hardware. ICT Matters is a dedicated section that covers ICT specifically for private schools. It’s an integral part of Independent Executive, as it’s a key area of development for independent schools. The EdExec team’s expert knowledge here really allows us to help our readers lead the way in this area.


THE FACTS

Independent Executive is a management magazine for forward-thinking financial leaders of independent schools. MODERN INDEPENDENT SCHOOL BURSARS are much more than just fee-chasing bean counters: they are involved with strategic development, legal compliance and overseeing large capital projects, alongside the traditional purchasing and budgeting role – not forgetting the evergrowing expectation for the latest ICT equipment and software. With such a wide-ranging and growing remit, INDEPENDENT BURSARS DEMAND A FOCUSED PUBLICATION that supports their role exclusively and that’s what what Independent Executive delivers. The term ‘independent’ has taken on a much broader meaning with recent changes to the education sector and Independent Executive brings together the common themes and challenges facing fee paying private schools, state-maintained academies, faith and free schools to produce a high-end publication that helps leaders in these schools be ahead of their game and the best in their field.

FREQUENCY Bi-monthly

CIRCULATION Approx 4,500* *Contact us for the most up-to-date circulation figures

READERSHIP

Both the hard copy magazine and the e-based bulletins provide an excellent finger on the pulse of developments in the education sector STEPHEN MORALES, BUSINESS MANAGER, WATFORD GRAMMER SCHOOL FOR GIRLS

Bursars, financial directors, SBMs. headteachers and governors at independent schools.

ESTABLISHED September 2011

OUR USP The only independent management magazine to address the issues of financial leaders of modern independent schools – from private schools to academies.


The EdExec Strategy what makes us Our approach is different to other media companies: our publications are all about highly targeted, original and useful content. We understand our market, which puts us in the best position to know how partnering with us will work for you.

Because we want you to keep coming back.


EDITORIAL

PEOPLE POWER We have a team of unique, talented and innovative individuals, who deliver marketing solutions that break the mould and go that extra mile. You’re in good hands! Our role is to facilitate good communication across what is acknowledged to be a key purchasing audience within the education sector. Our audience is by far the most important point of influence for education supplies and services, but, because they are extremely busy people with varied roles, it’s often difficult for suppliers to get their messages through without strong marketing vehicles. This is where our high-quality, focused publications come in.

Our editorial is written by a team of in-house journalists who understand our readers intimately and deliver valuable need-toknow content that specifically meets their needs in a way that best suits them – all of which is original, targeted and second to none. Because of our long-standing status in the sector, we have an immense and loyal readership who read and interact with our magazines and websites regularly, so we know they are a captive audience. INDEPENDENT, OBJECTIVE EDITORIAL

The way we work editorially is paramount to the success of our magazines. Our editorial is totally objective and we feel that if we use our editorial pages to include supplier-driven content, it dilutes the value of our editorial to the reader, which in turn dilutes the value of the magazine in the readers’ eyes. The reason school business managers read our magazine is down to the focused, original and relevant content we produce for them. VALUE TO THE ADVERTISER

To ensure our independent editorial content is not overshadowed, we also keep our percentage of ad pages at a low 30%. This also means that the advertisements that do appear are not competing with too many other advertisements, which can only be a good thing for you! Of course, there are ways for suppliers to get involved in editorial, for example by suggesting case studies or offering opinion as an expert commentator within a feature, however we leave that to the discretion of our editorial team. Our main aim is to ensure our pages are read, regularly and intently, which in turn guarantees that your marketing message is being seen and absorbed in and around that.

DESIGN & PRODUCTION All our products feature strong, easily recognisable designs that reflect and enhance the editorial quality. Their cutting edge and contemporary design ensure they stand out from the crowd and encourage the reader to pick them up and read them.

SALES Our view is that a true partnership will always benefit both parties. We care about building strong relationships with our clients; really understanding their businesses and their marketing objectives; and then finding the most effective ways to meet them.We are specialists in our fields,and we have way more to offer than simply space on a page. Our publications provide a strategic,effective and proven marketing channel for our clients,which enables us to offer you a true media solution.

While others talk – we deliver. A media solution that really works is the core of what we do... and the key to your success!


Online EDEXEC.CO.UK WHAT DOES IT DO?

We have maintained a website alongside Education Executive since the magazine’s launch in 2004 and we have seen it go from a resource in support of the magazine to a popular news website in its own right. Decision-makers in schools come to edexec.co.uk for news, bringing them stories relevant to the role of the bursar and business manager on a daily basis. They also stay on the site for the fantastic quality analysis and resources we provide for them.

SOCIAL MEDIA WE DON’T JUST TWEET… WE SHAPE THE CONVERSATION

Social media is at the heart of what we do online, it not only helps us keep our finger on the pulse of what’s happening in the education community and the stories that affect the role of our readers, but it also helps us become conversation shapers. We understand that interacting online is not just about speaking to readers – it’s also about hearing what they have to say to us.

BLOGS AND DISCUSSIONS WE’RE NOT JUST HELPFUL, WE’RE RESOURCEFUL

Combined with our top drawer news analysis, we publish blogs authored by everyone from readers to policy-makers. Our website also boasts a comment section under every news story so our readers can let us know what they think about what’s going on. Combined with our regular surveys and competitions, this has established Edexec.co.uk as a crucial resource for anyone interested in the business of education.

EMAIL COMMUNICATION STAY IN TOUCH WITH EE WEEKLY

Every week, we send out the ‘EE weekly’ news round-up email to our 8,500 email addresses that have signed up to receive it. Content often relates back to web news stories, but it can also point to editorial items in an up-coming issue. While email is an excellent method of driving response, it’s vitally important your message is conveyed in a way that ensures that its relevant and stands out in a crowded inbox. We have advertising opportunities in EE Weekly to help you ensure your message is delivered to and read by the decision-makers in schools who matter


THE FACTS

EdExec is taking the lead when it comes to B2B publishing – by continuously looking for ways to better engage with our readers. THE WAY PEOPLE COMMUNICATE HAS EVOLVED and more importantly this has shaped how people buy. To be effective in the marketplace, a company needs to be forward-looking and innovative. We offer a range of digital inclusions that, combined with our print offering, will drive engagement with decision-makers at schools, FURTHER BUILD YOUR BRAND and help generate a valuable response.

UNIQUE VISITORS Approx 9,000 visitors a month

A RESPONSIVE AUDIENCE

We have developed an audience across our magazines and websites that loves to get its opinion across and engage with our content.

READERSHIP Bursars, financial directors, SBMs. headteachers, governors, ICT managers, and people interested in the business of education in general.

ESTABLISHED September 2004

OUR USP The only independent managment website to address the business of education.

FIND US ON: http://twitter.com/edexec http://Facebook.com/edexec http://linkedin.com http://youtube.com/edexec


Opportunities for you WEB/PRODUCT NEWS Do you have news that our readers might be interested in? Web advertorials are a fantastic way to get your message across. They sit nestled into the content on the front page of the website and are known to generate a substantial response.

DISPLAY ADVERTISING, BANNERS AND BUTTONS Web buttons and banners are a great way to catch the reader’s eye, whether its helping them associate your company with our brand or driving them to your website. Our audience is responsive and always interested in offers and info that help them in their role.

SURVEYS/COMPETITIONS We regularly run competitions and surveys on Edexec.co.uk – it’s a great way to keep people coming back to the site. We often run them on behalf of companies looking to get some direct response from our audience.

EMAIL MARKETING With over 8,500 readers signed up to receive regular news updates from EdExec in their inbox, email marketing is a great way to get them reading information from third parties too. Our key watch word is ‘relevance’ – we make sure the people who want our emails get them and work hard to make sure that we only send them things they are really interested in, this makes them some of the most responsive readers in the B2B market.

EE WEEKLY There are opportunities to take out a product news slot on our EE Weekly email, which is a great way to get info to our readers and get them clicking through to your website.

SOLUS EMAILS This is where we send out an email to our database on your behalf. A crucial part of any marketing mix, this turns branding into response. We only send out a few emails a month, we don’t over saturate our audience and they stay responsive.

VIDEO/PODCASTS We host videos on the front page of EdExec.co.uk (all linked to our YouTube channel) and we can include your video in this prime spot. We also produce podcasts that are hosted on the website and YouTube. These can consist of an interview or an overview of what your doing in the sector. They are another great way to engage with our audience.

BLOGS Along with the thoughts and opinions of our editors on the issues affecting our readers we regularly produce blogs in conjunction with companies who want to provide a resource for our readers, second to none in getting your message across to our audience, who aren’t reserved in giving you feedback. We also provide the opportunity to sponsor our blogs, associating your brand with our content.


9,000 visitors a month

circa

4,000 Twitter followers and growing

8,500

subscribers to our weekly emails.


Stand out from the crowd At IMS, we turn typical business-to-business publishing concepts on their head. Our philosophy is that B2B publishing should be as polished and cutting-edge as its consumer counterparts. To ensure your marketing messages stay fresh with high impact, we constantly strive to find new and creative ideas.


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THROW OUT INSIDE FRONT COVER – THREE PAGES The inside front cover has the ability to out from the magazine into an eye-catching double-page spread where you get three pages of coverage to use for adverts, advertorials or a combination of the two. It’s very high impact and a great way to make a splash!

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THROW OUT IN CORE OF MAGAZINE – FOUR PAGES This follows the same principle as the fold-out front cover but is placed in the core of the magazine and rolls out to the right. It starts with a double page spread (DPS) in the magazine followed by a double-sided page folding out from the magazine. Very effective when used as a reply mechanism or promotional offer.

VENDOR PROFILES Designed to fit with the style and feel of the magazine, a vendor profile looks like an Independent Executive feature but it is paid for, so it is your space to use as a platform to communicate strategic messages about your organisation or perhaps the details of a new campaign or promotion. It’s a great way to make our readers sit up and take notice.

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ne of the key buzzwords at RICOH VENDOR PROFILE this year’s Bett Show was the VIRTUAL REALITY cloud. This was not a result While virtualised systems are similar to cloud of the weather over London’s computing, the latter is essentially an Olympia, but a reflection of evolution of the former. “Virtualisation the hot topic that is cloud creates a type of in-district or in-school computing and moving school ICT services cloud,” explains Bob Moore, education onto a virtual platform. This surge in interest business development director at Dell. “It will for cloud systems looks set to continue, with be easier to move to the cloud from a highly recent research from analyst Gartner virtualised environment. In some cases there suggesting the number of organisations using are cost and scalability advantages to the on-demand, access anywhere computing is cloud over virtualisation.” He adds that When it comes to providing a package of for its customers, Ricoh realises set to risesupport to 43% within four years. schools that are virtualised are perfectly that one size does not fit all. UK channel head Steven Hastings explains how the Cloud new computing is about connecting a placed to make the most of the cloud. Ricoh Reseller Partner Programme, due to roll out in August, embraces this idea variety of devices and endpoints, such as Beswick suggests that most schools will servers, PCs or mobile device, via the internet virtualise in an attempt to reduce their costs so they can all work together. Steve Beswick, and reliance on servers, adapting this to senior director for education at Microsoft UK include to cloud-based systems as and when explains: “The cloud provides access to your they want and need them. “The joy of the stuff, such as your essential data, safely and cloud is that a school can go at their own when you want it, from any device. [It also] speed,” he says. “It’s not cloud or nothing, provides IT delivered as a standardised it’s a school’s choice and virtualisation is a service where you only pay for what you use.” step into managing a schools infrastructure Beswick adds that cloud computing is less in the cloud.” of a technical phenomenon, but more of an economic one, given that in education, the cloud provides flexibility and security to A HOST OF BENEFITS teachers, students and parents. One of the main incentives for schools to Janie20Chesterton, business development move to the cloud will be the potential director for education at Northgate Managed financial savings. Beswick says there are Services, says cloud computing is an evolution considerable cost-saving implications. “Free and combination of technologies, such as or low-cost email is an obvious part of this, utility computing, convergence technologies but there are other savings that come from and virtualisation, which enables resources to buying, running, maintaining and replacing be accessed anytime, anywhere over the less hardware and also sometimes needing internet, without the need for on-site servers. fewer software licences.” UPDATE PRACTICE of cloud, FOCUS ON UPDATE ON There are differentIN types which HELP DESK There are also knock-onIN PRACTICE savings thatFOCUS can fall broadly into two categories: public and be made through a transfer to a cloud private. “Big names like Microsoft, Google, system, which could benefit a school in other “There is no doubt that cloud computing offers virtually Facebook and Salesforce.com, have helped to areas. According tolimitless, Gartner research, 70% of cost effective ICT resources on demand” create awareness of the public cloud,” says IT spend goes on routine maintenance or Chesterton. “Google mail, documents and what’s already in place. “Remove some of apps are all examples of widely adopted that and the possibility opens up for real Cloud computing is one of the buzzwords in ICT at the public cloud services for use investment in the future,” says Beswick. moment.–Ininitially the first of a two-part series, at Matthew Jane explores what this means and what the advantages are home but more and more educational The amount of money that can be saved to schools organisations are looking to take advantage will depend on the school and the various of these cloud services.” different factors such as the number of users, VIRTUAL REALITY

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rom its position as a leading technology provider with the largest multifunction printers (MFPs) market share in Europe, Ricoh’s success results from thriving and strategic partnerships with key stakeholders, generating reciprocal growth. This model is fundamental to the future direction of Ricoh and underpins its Reseller Partner Programme, which launches next month. The programme stems from the desire to extend this philosophy of mutual gain based on long-term working relationships, while recognising that each reseller partner has varying needs and therefore requires a different level of support. “We wanted to differentiate between resellers,” explains UK channel head Steven Hastings, “but without splitting them into a hierarchy, with level one, two and three or gold, silver and bronze, whereby the level resellers achieve is based purely on the financials they generate. “We wanted to have different partner levels that would have equal weight with us, and that would reflect the type of company those resellers are. It was clear that the programme should be based on the recognition that not every reseller or VAR works in the same way. Some will require certain services of Ricoh whereas others will need something different. We can then tailor the support we offer according to different needs.” Under the programme, resellers are assigned as Approved, Preferred or Solutions partners, following a full assessment and discussion of their fleet and service requirements. Solutions partners – These will be resellers who are aiming to provide a full solution and additional services for their customers over and above the core distribution channel through:  Ricoh’s full, comprehensive managed print services package  A potential to offer a balanced deployment of printers alongside MFPs  Access to other parts of the Ricoh organisation, for example software solutions  Specific, closed-off bid programmes. Preferred partners – Typically, these resellers will focus their businesses on selling lower value boxes in higher volumes by:  Building up fleets and maximising their customers’ printer businesses  Maintaining focus on transactional sales rather than managed services  Accessing Ricoh’s alternative incentives and solutions.

HEAD IN THE CLOUD

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ne of the key buzzwords at this year’s Bett Show was the cloud. This was not a result of the weather over London’s Olympia, but a reflection of the hot topic that is cloud computing and moving school ICT services onto a virtual platform. This surge in interest for cloud systems looks set to continue, with recent research from analyst Gartner suggesting the number of organisations using on-demand, access anywhere computing is set to rise to 43% within four years. Cloud computing is about connecting a variety of devices and endpoints, such as servers, PCs or mobile device, via the internet so they can all work together. Steve Beswick, senior director for education at Microsoft UK explains: “The cloud provides access to your stuff, such as your essential data, safely and when you want it, from any device. [It also] provides IT delivered as a standardised service where you only pay for what you use.” Beswick adds that cloud computing is less of a technical phenomenon, but more of an economic one, given that in education, the cloud provides flexibility and security to teachers, students and parents. Janie Chesterton, business development director for education at Northgate Managed Services, says cloud computing is an evolution and combination of technologies, such as utility computing, convergence technologies and virtualisation, which enables resources to be accessed anytime, anywhere over the internet, without the need for on-site servers. There are different types of cloud, which fall broadly into two categories: public and private. “Big names like Microsoft, Google, Facebook and Salesforce.com, have helped to create awareness of the public cloud,” says Chesterton. “Google mail, documents and apps are all examples of widely adopted public cloud services – initially for use at home but more and more educational organisations are looking to take advantage of these cloud services.”

While virtualised systems are similar to cloud computing, the latter is essentially an evolution of the former. “Virtualisation creates a type of in-district or in-school cloud,” explains Bob Moore, education business development director at Dell. “It will be easier to move to the cloud from a highly virtualised environment. In some cases there are cost and scalability advantages to the cloud over virtualisation.” He adds that schools that are virtualised are perfectly placed to make the most of the cloud. Beswick suggests that most schools will virtualise in an attempt to reduce their costs and reliance on servers, adapting this to include to cloud-based systems as and when they want and need them. “The joy of the cloud is that a school can go at their own speed,” he says. “It’s not cloud or nothing, it’s a school’s choice and virtualisation is a step into managing a schools infrastructure in the cloud.”

the condition and scale of the existing IT infrastructure and the level of service that will be adopted. Chesterton says that, with cloud being a relatively new concept in education, there are few concrete examples of exact cost savings. “However, there is no doubt that cloud computing offers virtually limitless, cost effective ICT resources on demand,” she says. “The cloud helps remove the reliance on capital expenditure as organisations simply pay their provider for what they use. The transparency and predictability of costs will enable school business managers to plan their budgets more effectively.” She adds that the associated operating and management savings will help to generate long-term cost reductions. There are also benefits in terms of the environmental savings associated with cloud systems. “Cloud services are also credited with reducing the carbon footprint of institutions, which stands to reason as large data centres will be much more efficient than each education institution, right down to

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achieved through meeting with the reseller to discuss their needs and prospective areas for mutual growth, with the potential to become a Preferred or Solutions partner. Approved partner status gives resellers access to a dedicated portal through which they can download images and specifications. To meet the varying requirements of reseller partners, Ricoh has developed a number of MPS solutions under the banner of Ricoh Click. Click is a very straightforward yet profitable offering, giving end-users the security of a contract period of up to five years supported by 1,000 technicians throughout the UK. “The end-user chooses the type of contract they want, what type of call out they want and the duration of the contract,” explains Hastings. “We put that in place with the end-user via the reseller and pay a rebate on that contract over its full term, which can vary between one and five years.” Another option is Click Lite, a slightly different MPS offering based on a fixed two-year contract. Rather than receiving a rebate on a quarterly basis throughout the contract term, they receive an upfront payment at the offset. “In essence, a Solutions partner will typically engage with a longer-term MPS contract – like that offered by Click – to offer as broad a solution to their customer as possible,” Hastings adds. “Our Click Light solution, however, may be more suitable for our Preferred partners. The Partner Programme and the initiatives available through it reflect that there are different companies working in different ways to similar ends. The concept is to look at what all of our customers require from us, rather than telling them: ‘This is what you get.’” In addition to a comprehensive managed print service, Solutions and Preferred partners have access to a bid programme that allows them to put in specific bids for ranges that will be closed off for them. With the programme rolling out next month, the Ricoh team is currently engaged in extensive discussions with its existing resellers. Solutions and Preferred partners will be confirmed and announced to coincide with the programme’s launch. While fundamentally, resellers that work closely with Ricoh will generate more business and become more profitable, the paradigm shift behind the programme means the support underlining their growth is not based on a finite measure of how much business they do. As Hastings concludes: “It’s more a relationship than simply a buyer/supplier set up. Elsewhere in the Ricoh family group, we’ve provided that kind of service very well – an accomplishment that has led us to the position of MFP supplier with number one market share in Europe.” DS

JULY 2011 www.dealersupport.co.uk

These can be horizontal, vertical, double- or single-page, running across the bottom or along the outside edge of the page. Banners can run in multiples of three, five, eight or just on their own, on consecutive pages or scattered throughout the magazine – a great alternative to standard page advertising for brand recognition.

the condition and scale of the existing IT infrastructure and the level of service that will be adopted. Chesterton says that, with cloud being a relatively new concept in education, there are few concrete examples of exact cost savings. “However, there is no doubt that cloud computing offers virtually limitless, cost effective ICT resources on demand,” she says. “The cloud helps remove the reliance on capital expenditure as organisations simply pay their provider for what they use. The transparency and predictability of costs will enable school business managers to plan their budgets more effectively.” She adds that the associated operating and management savings will help to generate long-term cost reductions. There are also benefits in terms of the environmental savings associated with cloud systems. “Cloud services are also credited with reducing the carbon footprint of institutions, which stands to reason as large data centres will be much more efficient than each education institution, right down to

Cloud computing is one of the buzzwords in ICT at the moment. In the first of a two-part series, Matthew Jane explores what this means and what the advantages are to schools

Partnering for success

www.dealersupport.co.uk JULY 2011

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When it comes to providing a package of support for its customers, Ricoh realises that one size does not fit all. UK channel head Steven Hastings explains how the new Ricoh Reseller Partner Programme, due to roll out in August, embraces this id

primary schools, running their own growing bank of servers,” says Beswick. “Providing a cloud service is similar to the provision of electricity for a school; it is a service that is needed regularly but in a flexible way for everyone.” Other advantages include the pay-per-usage model that enables schools to immediately add or reduce numbers as needed, or add more capacity during peak times. “This is of particular importance to a school, as they cannot be sure how many students they will have year-on-year or they might have guest students from other schools or adult learning centres,” explains Chesterton. “Schools are constantly innovating, looking for more ways to engage their students through technology. The flexibility of cloud will enable schools to respond quickly if they need to run pilots or add new software or applications.” Cloud computing is an exciting development for schools. The potential to improve provision of service without increasing costs or carbon footprint will be one that the education sector will increasingly consider.

Next month we look at the different ways the cloud can be used and the security issues surrounding it.

A HOST OF BENEFITS

One of the main incentives for schools to move to the cloud will be the potential financial savings. Beswick says there are considerable cost-saving implications. “Free or low-cost email is an obvious part of this, but there are other savings that come from buying, running, maintaining and replacing less hardware and also sometimes needing fewer software licences.” There are also knock-on savings that can be made through a transfer to a cloud system, which could benefit a school in other areas. According to Gartner research, 70% of IT spend goes on routine maintenance or what’s already in place. “Remove some of that and the possibility opens up for real investment in the future,” says Beswick. The amount of money that can be saved will depend on the school and the various different factors such as the number of users,

BANNER ADVERT UPDATE

VENDOR CASE STUDIES Written and designed by EdExec, a vendor case study is an

effective way to get company messages and services in front of our readers. Featuring a school and their business or ICT manager in an interview style, it allows you to really promote your services in a meaningful and interesting way. Case studies are one of the best read parts of our magazine, great for exposure.

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VenDor cASe STuDy JUNIOR LIBRARIAN

VenDor cASe STuDy JUNIOR LIBRARIAN

Using engaging technologies to develop independent motivated readers and learners for life

Playing the system

As schools across the country are faced with the dilemma of improving literacy

School: Clifton Green Primary School Type: 3-11 mixed, community school lA: York pupilS: 350 librAriAn: Carolyn Godfrey

Proof of this investment can be found in the fact that pupils are regularly borrowing from the school’s 16,000 books, taking out as many as 4,742 this year alone, revealing that independent reading is popular with both boys and girls, as well as the fact that Godfrey’s lunchtime library club is so oversubscribed she has to turn children away. When ICT Matters caught up with Godfrey in between lessons, she divulged her secret to keeping on top of her pupils’ reading habits: a robust software system in her library.

All systems go Every child at Clifton Green from nursery to Year 6 has a weekly library session when they are encouraged to check at least one book out. Using Junior Librarian software by Micro Librarian Systems, pupils can check their own books out with mproving literacy has emerged as a top priority for the a barcode scanner, which not only keeps a register of which government, with Education Secretary Michael Gove books are on loan to which children, as expected of any library recently recommending children read as many as 50 borrowing system, but it also integrates with Clifton Green’s books a year. While promising statistics show that schools network, so it can be accessed around the school for primary schools have made impressive gains in staff to log into in all classrooms and also boasts a number of improving literacy standards, educators are faced with interactive elements too, such as a pupil book reviewing the added challenge of cuts to local authority-run library feature. services and restricted When budgets are budgets that inevitably lead to limited, schools need to busier staff and less face time A good library system will help you keep ensure their pupils are with a librarian. How can track of resources so you know what you’ve getting the most out of their schools achieve the balance of got when you have less money in your budget library. A library improving reading skills while running a more streamlined for your library and you’re not then spending management software system like this not only organisation? it on things you don’t need helps raise the profile of a Carolyn Godfrey is one school’s library and teaching assistant/librarian resources, but it gives the who may have found the school leaders tangible data on the reading habits of their answer. She admits to wearing many hats at her busy 3-11 pupils, which can be organised by categories like gender and mixed, community primary school and hardly finds time to year group. This information can then be used to improve pause between teaching children, acting as the school’s teaching in the classroom and also takes the guesswork out of librarian for five hours a week and running a weekly lunchtime stocking libraries, thus ensuring librarians’ budgets go as far library club. as possible. While maintaining a very busy schedule, Godfrey and her As we near the end of the academic year, Godfrey prepares colleagues manage to instil the joy of reading into the minds to do this very thing. “In June we do an annual stock take of her pupils with so much success that her school – Clifton through Junior Librarian and that helps us keep tabs on where Green Primary in York – accomplished an ‘excellence’ in everything is,” she explains. “It’s also a time to collate English from Ofsted, which the watchdog said was thanks to the evidence of a previous year to see what resources its “investment in the enjoyment of reading”.

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have been well-used or not and then we can target our stock purchasing.” This is particularly valuable for updating library resources with a short use-by date – like geography and ICT books, the information in which becomes out-dated very quickly as the world changes. “In our library’s computer section, texts that are 10-15 years old can be very out-of-date,” Godfrey adds, “so we will look at the year they were put on the library system and if we have the money, we can replace them.” Money is undoubtedly an issue in many schools these days, but those looking to make cost-effective investments in their library would be well-advised to consider software that helps them target their limited resources. “[A good library system will] help you keep track of resources so you know what you’ve got when you have less money in your budget for your library,” Godfrey confirms. “You’re not then spending it on things you don’t need.” For schools keen to boost literacy among their pupils, a robust library system is just the start and getting children interested in reading requires a school-wide effort. “It all adds evidence to the availability of giving children different opportunities to read – sadly it doesn’t track how much they actually read,” quips Godfrey. “But having books around that are not just for study and are there for fun will certainly help.” As her demanding schedule beckons, Godfrey leaves us with one poignant final comment: “In five hours a week, I certainly couldn’t do all that I do as a librarian if I didn’t have a system like this one.”

for more information: mLS tel: 0161 449 9357 email: info@microlib.co.uk Website: www.microlib.co.uk

13,000

schools and counting... Our systems offer integration with your MIS and VLE, link with Active Directory for single sign-on and are designed to help you raise the profile of your library and resources.

Telephone: +44 (0) 161 449 9357 Email: info@microlib.co.uk www.microlib.co.uk

sector NEWS

Sector news is brought to you by Free banking for schools supported by local specialist relationship managers Lloyds TSB Commercial - well educated banking

FUNDING FORMULA DEBATE School leaders welcomed a government consultation on a new funding formula launched in April that could see the £35bn spent on schools every year distributed more fairly. As it stands, the school funding system is based on calculations more than six years old and creates large variations in how much money similar schools in different parts of the country receive. Under this new system schools in similar circumstances with similar intakes of pupils would receive similar levels of funding. Additional funding would be provided to support deprived pupils, with the pupil premium being the first step. A new formula would also aim to be clear and easy for parents, schools and the public to understand and support a diverse range of school provision, including academies and free schools. The Association of School and College Leaders has long asked for a reform of the funding system, arguing that one that allows for a variation of up to £1,000 per pupil between similar secondary schools should not be allowed to continue. “A continuation of the current ‘spend plus’ methodology would actually increase the level of unfairness in school funding, making this review absolutely essential,” general secretary Brian Lightman commented. Russell Hobby, general secretary of the National Association of Head Teachers, agreed, saying a new formula should allow school leaders to plan over the long term and that there was a need to think carefully about how small schools would be protected.

DIARY 15-17 June 2011 Seizing Success 2011: The National College’s Annual Leadership Conference Birmingham 16 June 2011 NASBM’s Converting to an Academy Greater Manchester 21 June 2011 Kent County Council Schools Trade Exhibition Maidstone 27 June – 1 July Lloyds TSB National School Sport Week Nationwide

june 2011 www.edexec.co.uk

STORY OF THE MONTH

PICTURE STORY

Over half (51%) of school leaders have reported a reduced school budget for 2011, according to a survey by school leadership service provider The Key. There was a marked difference between the primary and secondary sectors, with only 17% of secondary leaders reporting an increased budget, compared with 40% in primary and 38% in special schools. Of those schools facing reduced budgets, 47% of respondents admitted they were considering reducing staff numbers as a way to offset the loss, while even more were looking at reducing building maintenance and ICT provision. School leaders said that the pupil premium would not create any large financial gains as this was offset by the loss of other income streams, such as the Ethnic Minority Achievement Grant. The impact of reduced local authority (LA) services will be felt across the majority of schools, with 88% of those surveyed stating that support services have been reduced. Of those respondents, over half (60%) plan to compensate by asking school staff to take on tasks previously handled by the LA. Another cultural shift was that 30% are planning to increase the use of private sector companies to fill the gap in provision, which will have an impact on administrative staff in schools. Some respondents said the changes in their situation would lead to increased collaboration between schools in their locality, and that they would share resources previously provided by the LA. Worryingly, only 28% of school leaders surveyed said they were confident about commissioning services for their schools, 46% had some experience but would like more, while 26% have no experience. The National Association of Head Teachers has predicted that 12,000 jobs will be lost this year as a result of budget cuts. “Job losses are clearly on the horizon,” confirmed general secretary Russell Hobby. “We fear that worse is yet to come, as inflation erodes constricted budgets.”

STATS& FACTS

INBRIEF

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sector

PRIVATE SCHOOLS

SCHOOL LEADERS FACE REDUCED BUDGETS

Applications to open free schools in September 2012 opened last month. For the first time, the Department for Education will consider applications from people who want to set up 16-19 free schools, schools that cater specifically for children with special educational needs, and schools that offer alternative provision (for example pupil referral units).

As schools across the country are faced with the dilemma of improving literacy under restricted budgets, ICT Matters speaks to Carolyn Godfrey, the librari at York’s Clifton Green Primary School, JULY 2011 the www.dealersupport.co.uk she prepares annual stock take, to f out how a library management system ensuring value for money in her school library

CASE 20 STUDY

Order your free pupil librarian badges Go to www.microlib.co.uk/badges Available for a limited period only

sector FUNDING WATCH

FOCUS ON

HELP DESK

Playing the system under restricted budgets, ICT Matters speaks to Carolyn Godfrey, the librarian at York’s Clifton Green Primary School, as she prepares the annual stock take, to find out how a library management system is ensuring value for money in her school library

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SPONSORSHIP Advertisers have the opportunity to brand or sponsor a feature or section. We choose our sponsorship partners very carefully because as a valued EdExec partner, it follows that we’re also endorsing their brand. Placed on very targeted editorial sections of the magazine it’s a en extrenmelyt stategic and pretigious way to promote your brand. Something a bit different, a bespoke sponsorship position aligns you with the magazine’s message.

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A growing number of private educational establishments are turning to debt collection agencies to help collect fees in arrears. One leading debt collection agency, Daniels Silverman, has seen a 35% increase in schools and colleges signing up to its service in the last 12 months. The firm’s director, Tracy Burgess, blames the dip in fees paid on increased economic uncertainty putting pressure on household finances, causing parents to fall “quickly and unexpectedly” into financial difficulties. “Schools are left with terms’ worth of unpaid fees and are struggling to manage their own financial planning as a result,” she said, which can put the institutions’ futures at risk.

Sector news is brought to you by

School: Clifton Green Prima School Type: 3-11 mixed, community school lA: York Free banking for schools suppor pupilS: Lloyds350 TSB Commercial - well ed librAriAn: Carolyn Godfrey

CURRICULUM

Alex Linklater, aged six, enjoys some reading time at Tesco Kensington. Schools across the UK can now use Tesco for Schools & Clubs vouchers collected this year towards a range of best-selling children’s books.

What we learned this month

Academy applications have reached new heights. A record-breaking 1,070 schools have applied to be an academy since June 2010, 647 of which have been accepted and 384 have already converted, bringing the total number of academies open to 658, including the ones opened under Labour.

They said... While unqualified teachers earning £21,000 per year or less will get a small pay increase, school support staff are hit with a pay freeze…Secretaries, meals staff, cleaners and caretakers are the lowest paid school staff and deserve to be treated better Jon Richards, Unison’s senior national officer for education, responding to the government’s u-turn on a £250 pay increase for school support staff

As the Department for Education reviews the national curriculum, suggestions for reform come from the British Heart Foundation, which wants to see all students taught emergency life support (ELS) skills, and the Food for Life Partnership, which says learning how to cook should be required of all children over the age of five. Director of the Food for Life Partnership, Libby Grundy, advised that children be taught the practical skills of food growing and that the DfE should ensure every school has the space to create a food-growing garden. “If practical cooking lessons are to be increased across Key Stages 1 to 3, it is essential that appropriate teacher professional development is put in place, as well as any additional capital funding necessary for facilities and equipment for food teaching,” she commented.

SUPPLY TEACHERS

Supply teachers are more in demand as restricted school budgets put pressure on the prospect of permanent staff. A study from Giant Group shows that just eight per cent of supply teachers now spend 90 days or more without work, compared with 13% surveyed last year. MD Matthew Brown commented: “As pressure on education budgets continue to intensify, schools are keeping a very close eye on their budgets. With staffing costs under scrutiny it may be more cost-effective for schools to respond to sudden spikes in workload by making greater use of contingency staff.” Despite budget cuts, schools are still under immense pressure to raise standards. “Some schools rely on teaching assistants to cover for staff absences, but supply teachers are fully qualified and often very experienced teachers who can bring significant benefits to the classroom,” Brown added.

www.lloydstsb.com/schoolsbanking | 0800 681 6078 www.edexec.co.uk june 2011

FUNDING WATCH

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ST

FUNDING FORMULA DEBATE mproving literacy has emerged as a top priority for

SCH RED

School leaders welcomed a government government, with Education Secretary Michael Gov consultation on a new funding formula recently recommending children read as many as 5 launched in April that could see the £35bn books a year. While promising statistics show that spent on schools every year distributed more primary schools have made impressive gains in fairly. As it stands, the school funding system improving literacy standards, educators are Over faced w is based on calculations more than six years hal the old added challenge ofvariations cuts to local library and creates large in howauthority-run much survey by services restricted moneyand similar schools in different parts of the prim budgets that inevitably leadthis to new system the country receive. Under budget, c busier staffinand less face time with similar schools similar circumstances Of t A good library sy withintakes a librarian. How canreceive similar levels of pupils would consider track of resource of funding. Additional funding be reducing schools achieve the balance ofwould providedreading to support deprived with the got when you hav Sch improving skills while pupils, pupil premium being the first step.for A new was offse running a more streamlined your library a formula would also aim to be clear and easy The organisation? it on things you d for parents, schoolsisand schools, Carolyn Godfrey onethe public to understand and support a diverse range of responde teaching assistant/librarian school provision, including academies and handled who may have found the free schools. The Association of School and Ano

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