Issuu on Google+

Self-Study Findings

    

Chapter: 4

             

WASC: March 2011 Pictured Event: NJROTC   E C R   

108| P a g e  

ECR: Home of Academic and Athletic Excellence


Organization: Vision and Purpose, Governance, Leadership and Staff, and Resources  

  

   

Chapter: 4-A

             

WASC: March 2011 Pictured Event: ECR Students in Action   E C R   

109| P a g e  

ECR: Home of Academic and Athletic Excellence


Chapter 4­A:  Organization: Vision and Purpose, Governance,  Leadership and Staff, and Resource   

Focus Group Leaders Lisa De Rubertis ........................................................................... English  Jason Kinsella .............................................................................  English 

Group Members Dave Fehte ..................................................................... Administration  Fernando Delgado ................................................ Business/Technology  Cathy Davis ........................................................... Career/Technical Ed.  Farrell Buchanan  .................................................................... Classified  Eric Choi ...................................................................................... English  Dara Everett ................................................................................ English  Denise Leonard ..................................................... English (transferred)  Laura Miller ............................................................... Foreign Language  Regina Goad .................................................................. Health/Life Skill  Billy Ramirez .................................................................. Health/Life Skill  Rahim Hassanali ............................................................................ Math  Sue Schuster .................................................................................. Math  Cory Haeker ................................................................................. Parent  Ian Kogan ............................................................................................ PE  Josh Lienhard ..................................................................................... PE   Fred Beerstein ............................................................................ Science  Liz Forsberg ................................................................................ Science  Jake Lin ....................................................................................... Science  Connie Highberg ............................................................... Social Studies  Paul Delbick ..................................................... Special Ed. (transferred)    E C R   

Steve Kingery ........................................................................ Special Ed.   110| P a g e  


Carlos Chavarria ........................................................................ Student  Shelly Badal ............................................................................... Student  Naomi McCoy .............................................................. Support Services  Carmen Sesma ............................................................ Support Services  Doug Blemker .................................................... Visual/Performing Arts  Sue Freitag ........................................................ Visual/Performing Arts  Galene Martinez ................................................ Visual/Performing Arts   

  E C R   

111| P a g e  


A­1.  To  what  extent  does  your  school  have  a  clearly  stated  vision  or  purpose  based  on  its  student  needs,  current  educational  research,  and  the  belief  that  all  students can achieve high levels?  To what extend is the school purpose supported by the governing board and the central  administration and further defined by the expected school wide learning results and the  academic standards?  Summary of Findings:  El Camino has a clearly stated vision which was developed collaboratively with input from all  stakeholders. Our vision is based on the belief that every student can learn and perform at a  high  level  on  both  formal  standardized  tests  and  informal  assessments.  All  El  Camino  students are expected to learn beyond the classroom and become productive members of  society.  The faculty attends conferences and trainings where they learn about current and  effective  educational  practices.  They  share  these  with  the  rest  of  the  faculty  and the  teachers then apply these best practices when relevant and appropriate. The El Camino Real  High  School  vision was updated  and  revised  by  the  focus  groups  based  on  student  needs  from  data  analysis  on  various  standardized  assessments,  research,  and  teacher  observations.  El  Camino's  purpose  is  in  line  with  that  of  Local  District  1  and  LAUSD  whose  own  Mission  Statement supports El Camino’s mission: “The teachers, administrators, and staff of the Los  Angeles Unified School District believe in the equal worth and dignity of all students and are  committed  to  educate  all  students  to  their  maximum  potential."  El  Camino's community  honed  the mission  statement  to  specifically  support  El  Camino's  ESLRs  and  academic  standards.   As  El  Camino  prepares  to  become  an  independent  charter  school,  the  school  is  confident  that  the  governing  board  will  continue  to  support  the  current  vision,  mission,  and  beliefs  and support the school’s efforts to achieve the Expected School‐wide Learning Results for all  students.  

  E C R   

112| P a g e  


Findings  El Camino Vision  Our  vision  is  that  El  Camino  Real  High  School students will be:  • • • • • • •

Evidence in Support of Findings   •

Self‐directed/Self‐reliant  Collaborative  Complex/Critical Thinkers  Ethical  Lifelong learners  Technologically literate  Personally accountable and  responsible   

• • • •

Vision  Statement  posted  in  every  room and office  Focus groups agendas  Student Council Agenda  Peer College Counselor Agenda  School Site Council Agenda 

El Camino Mission Statement  •

Our  mission  was  created  in  a  collaborative  manner  with  input  from  all  stakeholders.  This  statement  reflects  our  commitment  to  prepare  our  students  to  be  productive  members  of  the  21st  century.     The mission of El Camino Real High School  is to educate our diverse student body by  developing  students’  talents  and  skills  so  they  will  succeed  in  a  changing  world,  value and respect themselves and others,  and  make  a  positive  contribution  to  our  global society.  

• • • • • • •

El  Camino  Mission  posted  in  every  room and office  Mission Statement  Focus groups agendas  Student Council Agenda  Peer College Counselor Agenda  School Site Council Agenda  Student Council  Charitable projects 

     

                E C R   

113| P a g e  


Findings  El Camino Beliefs  The El Camino Mission Statement is  supported by the beliefs that:  • •

• •

All students can learn  Students must be prepared to  successfully transition from  school to post‐secondary  education, career preparation,  and employment  Student success is a team effort  shared by students, parents,  teachers, administrators, and  classified staff  Students are valued members of  the school community  The school community has the  responsibility for establishing and  maintaining a safe, clean  environment conducive to  learning 

Evidence in Support of Findings • • • • •

El  Camino  Beliefs  posted  in  every  room and office  Focus groups agendas  Student Council Agenda  Peer College Counselor Agenda  School Site Council Agenda   

ECR ESLRs   Our  Expected  School‐wide  Learning   Results  (ESLRs)  were  developed  to  support  ECR's  Beliefs  in  the  development  of  every  student  both  academically  and  as  a  productive  member of society.  

• • • • •

ECR ELSRs posted in every room and  office  Focus groups agendas  Student Council Agenda  Peer College Counselor Agenda  School Site Council Agenda 

In order to succeed in a changing global  community,  all  ECR  students  will  demonstrate:  • • •   E C R   

Literacy, Numeracy, and  Appropriate/Effective  Communication Skills  Critical Thinking and Problem‐ Solving Skills  Perseverance to Explore and  Achieve Career, Education, and  114| P a g e  


Findings  • • •

Evidence in Support of Findings

Individual Goals  Academic, Personal, and Social  Responsibility  Respect for Themselves, Others, and  the Environment  Effective, Appropriate, and Ethical  Use of Technology to Support the  ESLRs 

Research Based Instruction  ECR  staff  members  are  highly  trained  individuals  who  employ  the  most  current  research  based  educational  models  to  maximize  student  achievement. 

• • •

Professional Development Agenda  Department Meeting sign in  Gifted  /  GATE  /  AP  /  Specialized  learning conferences 

Administrative  Meeting  Agenda,  Local District 1  Conference  registration  and  proof  of attendance  

    The  Administration  is  trained  monthly  on  various  educational  practices  (data  analysis,  teacher  evaluation,  and  teacher  training).  Regular  Professional  Development  meetings  provide  an  opportunity to train all teachers and to  discuss  school‐wide performance  and  our  expectations  of  the  school  as  a  whole.  Teachers  are  mandated  to  attend  Gifted  education  conferences  in  their  subject  areas.  In  department  meetings,  faculty  members  hold  subject‐specific  discussions  and  analyze  the  data  to  inform  their  teaching.      

             

  E C R   

115| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings

  Teachers  utilize  various  educational  techniques  to  maximize  student  understanding.   These  techniques  include,  but  are  not  limited  to,  differentiated  instruction,  scaffolding,  SDAIE,  Cooperative  groups,  Socratic  seminars, and project based learning. 

Teacher lesson plans 

     

District Support   

El Camino Real High School is affiliated  with  Local  District  1  (LD1).  LD1  is  one  of  eight  local  districts  that  comprise  LAUSD.  The  LAUSD  superintendent  guides  the  entire  school  district  and  reports  to  the  board  of  education.    El  Camino  is  directly  supervised  and  supported  by  a  Principal  Leader/Director  who  himself  is  supervised  by  the  Local  District  1  Superintendent. 

• • • •

Local District 1 Agenda  Literacy Coach Meeting Agenda  Teacher  Conference  attendance  approval  Field Trips attendance approval        

 

School Governance  El  Camino  is  governed  by  the  school  site  council  and  by  the  administrative/leadership  team.    The  school site council meets monthly and  has  representatives  from  all  stakeholder  groups.  Day‐to‐day  decisions  are  addressed  by  the  administrative  team.    The  ELAC  committee  meets  approximately  once  a  month  and  makes  decisions  about  the  direction  of  the  English  Learners  program.  All groups are committed to  supporting the school’s purpose and to  the  achievement,  by  all  students,  of  the  Expected  School‐wide  Learning  Results.    E C R   

  • • •

School Site Council agenda  ELAC meeting agenda  Administrative staff meetings 

116| P a g e  


Findings  Local District 1 Instructional  Trainings  With  the  support  of  LAUSD,  Local  District  1  used  to  have  regular  subject  specific  teacher  trainings  with  model  lesson  plans  for  all  core  subjects.   However, with recent budget cuts, the  district  has  not  held  these  meetings  and  the  ECR  staff  hopes  they  will  be  reinstated. 

Evidence in Support of Findings   • •

Local District 1 Calendar   Local District 1 training agendas  

• •

Local District 1 Calendar   Local District 1 training agendas  

     

In  addition  to  the  professional  trainings for teachers and Instructional  Coaches,  the  district  also  holds  monthly administrative trainings. 

   

                   

  E C R   

117| P a g e  


A­2. To what extent does the governing board have policies and bylaws that are  aligned  with  the  school’s  purpose  and  support  the  achievement  of  the  Expected  School­wide  Learning  Results  and  academic  standards  based  data  driven  instructional decisions for the school?  To what extent does the governing board delegate implementation of these policies to the  professional staff?  To  what  extent  does  the  governing  board  monitor  results  regularly  and  approve  the  single  action plan and its relations to the Local Education Agency plan?  Summary of Findings:  El  Camino  Real  High  School  developed  the  school’s  Mission,  Vision,  Beliefs,  and  ESLRs  collaboratively  involving  all  stakeholders.    They  are  aligned  and  supported  by  Los  Angeles  Unified  School  District  and  California  State  Department  of  Education.  Data  analysis  is  becoming an integral part of directing our rigorous, standards‐based instructional program.  El Camino Real High School uses a LEARN style school governance board.  This council meets  approximately  once  a  month  and  consists  of  representatives  from  all  stakeholders.   Members include the principal and an assistant principal, two teachers, one classified staff  member, three parents and two students.  This council addresses the concerns and needs of  the school including policy changes and/or adopting new policies when necessary.    Since  the  previous  WASC  process,  many  of  the  subcommittees  were  dissolved  for  various  reasons  including  the  achievement  of  WASC  goals  and  the  creation  of  small  learning  communities  (academies).  For  example,  many  of  the  duties  of  the  mid‐range  student  committee were taken over by individual academies. Budget cuts impacted the Technology  Committee  since  there  was  no  money  to  purchase  any  new  technology.  However,  the  LEARN  Council  was  maintained.    All  issues  regarding  on‐site  governance  that  we  had  autonomy over were brought before the LEARN Council. The rest of the policy matters were  communicated to us from LAUSD and Local District 1 which had to be implemented per our  compliance  requirements.  During  the  2010‐2011  school  years,  El  Camino  has  experienced  significant reductions in the budget that resulted in quite severe personnel cuts which has  made  these  meetings  difficult.  When  we  convert  to  a  Charter  school,  El  Camino  staff  and  administration  will  reinstate  these  committees  and  continue  our  on‐site  council  (LEARN)  meetings.      E C R   

118| P a g e  


Findings  Policies Supportive of Academic  Standards and ESLRs  Teachers  meet  regularly  by  departments  to  discuss  needs  and  student  performance.    Core  subject  teachers  use  data  from  the  District  Periodic  Assessments  to  determine  pace  and  inform  instruction.  Teachers  also  share  best  practices  with  one  another  during  these  meetings. 

Evidence in Support of Findings      •

Department meeting agenda 

   

 

 

  To  help  students  struggling  with  passing  the  CAHSEE,  El  Camino  holds  the  CAHSEE  Bootcamp  and  CAHSEE  preparation  classes.    A  certificated  teacher  instructs  students  in  Math  and English afterschool twice a week. 

• •

 

    In  order  to  meet  many  of  our  ESLRs  not  directly  related  to  academics,  El  Camino provides every Freshman with  a  student  handbook  and  curriculum  guide.    The  policies  in  the  student  handbook  are  reviewed  and  revised  by the School Site Council.  

  E C R   

CAHSEE Bootcamp schedule  CAHSEE Preparation class flier 

  • •

ESLRs  Student handbook 

 

119| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings  •

All  seniors  are  required  to  complete  a  service  learning  project  as  a  graduation  requirement.    Students  participate  through  their  government/economics courses.  

Delegation of Policies  El  Camino  Real  High  School  is  monitored directly by Local District 1  (LD1).    LD1  carries  out  and  enforces  LAUSD, State and Federal mandates.   El  Camino  receives  curricular  and  instructional mandates and guidance  from  LD  1  through  professional  development and personnel support.   Site level delegation includes support  from  administrators,  department  chairs,  Instructional  Coach,  and  office support personnel. 

• •

Student Information System  (SIS)  Lesson plans  Student projects 

    • •

LD1 Memos  Professional Development  agenda

• •

Single Action Plan  ELAC agenda 

         

 

Monitoring the Single Action  Plan  The  Single  Action  Plan  is  not  applicable  to  El  Camino  in  the  same  manner  compared  to  the  typical  LAUSD  high  school.    El  Camino  has  only EL funding remaining and it is a  categorical  fund.    The  Single  Action  Plan  is  monitored  by  the  administrative  team,  the  EL  Coordinator, and ELAC.  

  E C R   

   

 

            120| P a g e  


A­3.  To  what  extent  based  on  student  achievement  data,  does  the  school  leadership  and  staff  make  decisions  and  initiate  activities  that  focus  on  all  students  achieving  the  expected  school­wide  learning  results  and  academic  standards?  To what extent does the school leadership and staff annually monitor and refine  the single school­wide action plan based on analysis of data to ensure alignment  with student needs?  Summary of Findings:  El  Camino’s  leadership  and  staff  annually  study  the  results  of  the  state‐wide  standardized  assessments.  At the beginning of the school year, CST, CELDT and CAHSEE data are analyzed  and  disaggregated  to  ensure  the  needs  of  every  student  are  being  met.   The  core  subject  departments,  Science,  Math,  English  and  History,  review  district  periodic  assessment  data  with their respective administrator to assess their progress in meeting the state standards.   Other departments are made aware of this data and trained to assist these students in their  core  classes  within  their  department.   The  single  school‐wide  action  plan  is  monitored  by  the  school  site  council,  the  administrative  team,  and  the  ELAC  committee.    Every  three  years,  El  Camino  conducts  a  major  self‐analysis  based  on  the  action  plan  of  the  previous  WASC report.   

Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  In  order  to  improve  CST  scores  and  student  learning  as  written  in  El  Camino’s  ESLRs,  we  offer  the  following  activities:  AP  courses  (22  Courses  with  40 sections) for sophomores and upper  classmen, Honors and AE classes for all  grade  levels,  College  Fair,  Economic  Summit,  Pi  Day,  CAHSEE  Intervention  classes  for  seniors,  after  school  math  tutoring,  Intervention  Coordinator,  PALS, BRC, PETs, 

• • • • •

Master Program  College Office Records  School Calendar  CAHSEE Intervention Schedule  Tutoring  

    E C R   

121| P a g e  


Findings    This  year  El  Camino  worked  with  the  District to create an after school online  learning  program.   Students  needing  credit  recovery  can  use  the  computer  lab  or  can  do  the  work  from  home.   Progress  is  monitored  through  weekly  checks with the program coordinator. 

Evidence in Support of Findings  •

Coordinator Records   

   

  Students  needing  to  make  up  credits  can  also  take  Adult  School  classes  that  are offered on campus. 

Adult School Schedule 

• •

Master Program  Academy Records 

            The  number  of special  programs has  increased and  existing  academies  have  greater  student  participation.  These  academies provide closer monitoring of  student achievement.      Incoming  ninth  grade  students  identified  by  the  middle  school  as  needing  extra  intervention  have  been  able  to  enroll  in  a  summer  program called  the  summer  transition  program  (Bridges  Program).   Students  were able to enroll  in remedial  English  and  math   classes  to  increase  their  academic  skills  and  prepare  them  for  success  in  high  school.  This  program  is  currently  on  hiatus  due  to  recent  budget cuts. 

 

• • •

Summer School Master Program  Transition Program Records  Cumulative records 

 

    E C R   

122| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  In  an  effort  to  allow  more  students  to  have  access  to  Advanced  Placement  classes,  El  Camino  has  offered  a  summer  bridge  program  to  prepare  students for these rigorous classes.  This  program  is  also  suspended  due  to  budget cuts. 

Summer School Master Program 

• •

Tutoring Program Schedule  Friends of El Camino Records 

PETs Sign‐In Sheets 

       

  In order to meet our identified need for  student tutoring and to make up for the  lack  of  District  funding,  Friends  of  El  Camino has provided funds for tutoring  programs.      The  Peer  Education  Tutors  (PETs)  program  began  this  year  to  provide  another  avenue  to  increase  student  achievement. 

   

      In  response  to  parental  input,  the  freshman  orientation  process  was  expanded to two meetings, each with a  different  agenda.   Topics  covered  included  academic  and  behavioral  expectations,  safe  school  plan,  graduation  requirements,  specialized  academies, and student activities.  

Freshman Orientation Agendas         

 

  E C R   

123| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  The  College  Office  expanded  College  Knowledge  nights  to  include  ninth  and  tenth  grade  sessions  to  help  reach  our  goal of preparing all students for college  eligibility. 

• • •

College Office Announcements  College  Office  visitations  to  9th  grade classes  College Office records 

Counselors  utilize  standardized  test  data  and  past  grades  as  some  of  the  criteria for placing students into classes. 

School Information System 

   

 

El  Camino’s  Instructional  Leadership  Team  includes  administration,  department  chairs,  coordinators,  counselors,  and  instructional  coaches.   This group meets monthly and monitors  instructional  reform  based  on  our  academic  needs  and  discusses  budgetary  concerns  related  to  these  needs.        API, AYP, and CAHSEE data are analyzed  by  staff  in  professional  development  and department meetings. 

• •

• •

Professional Development Agendas  Department Meeting Agendas 

  In  an  effort  to  maintain  high  English  scores,  El  Camino  decided  to  continue  the  Silent  Sustained  Reading  and  Writing  Across  the  Curriculum  Programs. 

• •

Bell Schedule  Instructional  Coach  Memos  to  Teachers  Student Work  Observations 

   

  E C R   

 

School Calendar  Meeting Agendas       

• •

124| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  Ninth  grade  students  who  have  been  identified  as  reading  below  grade  level  are  enrolled  in  the  Developing  Readers  and  Writers  (DRW)  program  with  the  goal  of  reaching  grade  level  proficiency  by the end of the year. 

• •

Master Program  DRW Data 

• •

Master Program  Special Education Coordinator 

• •

CAHSEE Class Flier  Sign‐In Sheets 

• • •

Periodic Assessments  www.lausd.net  Staff Directory 

Intervention Records 

    Students in the Special Day Program can  enroll  in  an  Algebra  Readiness  Class  in  order  to  gain  the  skills  necessary  for  success in Algebra I.      To  ensure  that  all  students  progress  towards  graduation,  El  Camino  offers  CAHSEE preparation classes and CAHSEE  Boot Camp.      Teachers of the core academic subjects  have  been  instructed  in  the  use  of  periodic  assessments  and  in  the  use  of  data  analysis  to  meet  the  instructional  needs  of  students.   The  District’s  new  My  Data  program  has  made  access  to  data easier than in the past. 

       

  In  the  last  two  years,  El  Camino  has  added  an  Intervention  Coordinator  and  a  Bridge  Coordinator.   The  Bridge  Coordinator  works  with  students  with  IEPs  and  both  coordinators  provide    E C R   

  125| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

strategic  intervention  for  students  in  need.      In  response  to  student  achievement  gap  data,  El  Camino  has  used  two  programs  that  target  Hispanic  and  African‐American students.  El Camino  used  a  program  called  The  Village  to  target  African‐American  students.   Students  attended  assemblies  and  follow‐up  sessions  that  stressed  the  importance  of  an  education  and  taking pride in their accomplishments.  El  Camino  implemented  a  similar  program  called  La  Familia  to  target  Hispanic  students.   Although  an  achievement  gap  still  exists,  both  groups  have  improved  in  their  test  scores. 

• • •

Assembly Announcements  Descriptions of Programs  CST Data     

 

 

Single School‐Wide Action Plan  

The School Site Council in conjunction  with the English Learner Advisory  council (ELAC) and administration  monitor and modify the Single Plan for  Student Achievement.   

School Site Council Agenda 

     

  E C R   

126| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  The only Federal monies we receive are  for the EL program.  El Camino receives  a  small  budget  due  to  the  few  EL  students  at  El  Camino.  About  120  students  were  enrolled  in  the  Fall  Semester.   The  EL  Coordinator  holds  eight  meetings  during  the  year  to  discuss  program  and  budgetary  information  with  the  parent  group.      Progress towards completing the WASC  Action Plan items was monitored by the  School  Site Council,  school  subcommittees,  and  staff.   The  three‐ year  accreditation  visiting  team  evaluated school progress in meeting its  goals and determined that no additional  recommendations are needed. 

• •

School budget  EL  Coordinator  schedule  for  parent  meetings 

• • •

School Site Council Agendas  WASC Report  WASC Schedule 

     

   

 

 

  E C R   

127| P a g e  


A­4. To what extent does a qualified staff facilitate achievement of the academic  standards  and  the  expected  school­wide  learning  results  through  a  system  of  preparation, induction, and ongoing professional development?  Summary of Findings:  El Camino Real High School has a professional and experienced teaching staff.  All teachers  are  considered  highly  qualified  as  judged  by  NCLB  standards  and  nine  are  National  Board  Certified (NBC). All teachers are CLAD certified and employ scaffolding methods to enhance  achievement  for  all  students.  Teachers  participate  in  at  least  21  hours  of  required  professional  development  per  year  and  many  attend  additional  conferences.    When  necessary,  new  teachers  receive  support  and  guidance  from  various  sources  such  as,  mentor  teachers  (NBC  teachers),  administrators,  department  chairs  and/or  veteran  teachers.   

Findings  Professional Development  The district provides the school with  at  least  fourteen  professional  development  days.  On  these  days,  students  are  released  early  and  teachers  meet  in  the  afternoon;  administrators  facilitate  these  meetings.    This  development  time  totals  21  hours.    Professional  development  topics  in  recent  years  have  included  articulation  with  the  feeder middle school, analysis of CST  data,  Best  Teaching  practices,  research‐based  findings  about  education,  and  Writing  Across  the  Curriculum. 

  E C R   

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  • •

District Bulletin/Calendar  Professional  Development  Agendas 

     

128| P a g e  


Findings    Most years the district has funded an  extra  twelve  hours  of  professional  development  time  prior  to  the  beginning  of  the  school  year.    This  time  takes  the  form  of  voluntary  “buy back” days and consists of full‐ day  or  half‐day  professional  development activities. 

Evidence in Support of Findings  •

Buy Back Day Agendas 

• •

Conference Attendance Forms  Certificates of Completion 

Conference attendance forms 

       

  Teachers  of  Advanced  Placement  classes are required to attend annual  training  to  stay  abreast  of  the  most  current testing trends.      Although the District no longer funds  conference  attendance  beyond  AP  training,  teachers  have  continued  to  attend  various  conferences  and/or  workshops.    Examples  of  such  participation  include  Princeton  Molecular  Biology  training  by  one  of  our  science  teachers,  Humanitas  teacher participation in a philosophy  retreat, and attendance at a national  journalism  conference by  one  of  our  CEA teachers. 

 

 

  E C R   

129| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings  • Local District 1 Training Agendas  • Local District 1 Calendar 

Local  District  1,  in  conjunction  with,  LAUSD,  provides  periodic  training  in  the  core  subjects.  For  example,  LAUSD  in  collaboration  with  California  State  University  has  developed  a  reading  and  writing  program  for  juniors  and  seniors;  Local  District  1  provided  specific  training  to  implement  the  program  in the classroom.  

Highly Qualified Staff 

    •

All  teachers  at  El  Camino  are  highly  qualified  as  judged  by  NCLB  standards.  Forty three teachers hold  advanced degrees and nine teachers  are National Board Certified (NBC).  

School Survey 

      El  Camino  has  a  veteran  teaching  staff.    In  a  survey  administered  in  Spring  2010,  73%  of  the  faculty  indicated that they have been at the  school at least six years.     All  academic  teachers  teach  in  their  credentialed  subject  area.  Six  teachers  of  elective  classes  teach  at  least  one  period  out  of  their  credential  area,  but  have  received  a  district waiver due to their expertise  and/or  professional  experience  in  the subject.    E C R   

•            

School Survey 

  Master Program/School records   

130| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  The  Assistant  Principal,  Student  Counseling Services, in collaboration  with  Department  Chairs,  organizes  the  master  program  to  meet  the  needs of all El Camino students. 

  Master Program 

           

  All of the teachers at El Camino have  received  CLAD  certification  or  its  equivalent.     In  the  years  when  El  Camino  had  a  group  of  new  teachers,  the  school  held  new  teacher  meetings  at  least  once  a  month.  Administrators  and  NBC  teachers  would  lead  these  sessions and topics would include El  Camino  protocol  and  traditions,  calendar  of  events  including  report  card  schedule,  discipline  in  the  classroom,  and  discussions  and  demonstration  of  best  teaching  practices.  We have not hired many  new teachers recently.  When a new  teacher  is  hired,  he/she  receives  individual  support  from  the  instructional  coach,  NBC  teachers,  administration,  and  department  colleagues.  All  new  teachers  participate in the Beginning Teacher  Support  and  Assistance  (BTSA).  In  addition,  new  teachers  are  mentored  in  their  departments  by  veteran teachers.    E C R   

  • District records        • •  

New Teacher Meeting agenda  School Records 

131| P a g e  


Findings    All  teachers  hired  by  LAUSD  are  processed  by  the  district  in  a  procedure  that  includes  background  checks  and  verification  of  qualification.    The  district  requires  that  all  new  teachers  attend  a  40‐ hour  training  session  before  beginning teaching in the classroom. 

Evidence in Support of Findings  •

District Records 

                 

 

  E C R   

132| P a g e  


A­5.  To  what  extent  are  leadership  and  staff  involved  in  ongoing  research  or  data­based  correlated  professional  development  that  focuses  on  identified  student learning needs?  Summary of Findings:  The  leadership  and  staff  at  El  Camino  take  part  in  ongoing  research  and  data‐based  professional  development.    The  use  of  data  analysis,  SDAIE  strategies,  and  small  learning  communities  has  been  part  of  recent  District  emphasis.    Teachers  meet  at  least  fourteen  times  per  year  in  large  group  and  small  group  meetings  to  engage  in  discussion  of  instructional practices.  In addition, administrators attend monthly Local District meetings to  discuss  research‐based  best  practices.    Members  of  the  Instructional  Team  also  attend  monthly  on‐campus  meetings  led  by  the  principal.    The  Instructional  Coach  also  receives  district training and trains El Camino teachers based on this information.   

Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  LAUSD  provides  twenty  one  hours  of  professional development time split up  over  fourteen  days  throughout  the  year.   Past  topics  have  included  data  analysis,  SDAIE  methodologies,  writing  across  the  curriculum,  special  education,  and  small  learning  communities.      The  math,  English,  social  studies,  and  science  departments  implement  District  mandated,  standards‐based  periodic  assessments.   They  have  received  professional  development  on  the  analysis  of  data  that  results  from  these exams. 

• •

LAUSD Professional Development  Schedule  Professional Development Agendas    

Periodic Assessment Schedule         

  El  Camino  administrators  receive  research  based  professional  development  through  monthly  Local  District One trainings.  Recent sessions  have  focused  on  using  data  to  drive  instruction and using SDAIE methods.    E C R   

• •

Local District One Calendar  Meeting Agendas 

 

133| P a g e  


Findings    The  instructional coach  receives  research  based  professional  development  from  the  District  to  use  at  the  school  site  and  holds  training  sessions  for  math  teachers  based  on  CST released questions.  

Evidence in Support of Findings  •

Coaching Logs 

    

  The instructional coach assists teachers  to  align  curriculum  with  state  standards,  to  close  the  achievement  gap  for  struggling  students,  and  to  improve instruction for all students. 

Coaching Logs  

   

  Staff  members  have  always  been  encouraged to attend conferences and  training opportunities to increase their  ability to meet student learning needs.   Due  to  budget  cuts,  the  District  has  recently  frozen  funds  for  conference  attendance  with  the  exception  of  mandated  advanced  placement  conferences.  However,  there  is  a  process in place for teaschers to apply  to  attend  conferences  and  workshops  making an exception to this policy.    Members  of  the  science  department  have  attended  training  sponsored  by  AmGen,  Baxter  Laboratories,  and  the  National  Park  Service.   Several  have  also attended and/or presented at the  annual  District‐sponsored  science  teachers’ conference.   

  Conference Approval Forms 

• •

Certificates of Completion  Conference Program 

                     

        

 

  E C R   

134| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  The  Developing  Readers  and  Writers  (DRW) teacher is provided with several  professional  development  opportunities  each  year.   The  training  focuses  on  research  based  strategies  to  bring  low‐level  English  students  up  to grade level. 

Meeting Agendas        

  AVID  teachers  receive  annual  training  in  tutoring  strategies,  Cornell  note  taking  methods,  and organizational  skills. 

AVID Training Announcements         

  Social  Studies  teachers  have  received  training  in  creating  and  implementing  the  Service  Learning  requirement  for  graduating  seniors.   Many  have  also  been  trained  to  run  the  International  Economic  Summit  Project.   This  is  an  intense  program  requiring  student  groups  to  act  as  countries  involved  in  international  trade  and  culminates  with a report, a project, and economic  trade  activities,  which  the  entire  student body attends. 

• • •

Economic Summit Training  Teacher lesson plans  Student projects/presentations  

Humanitas Records 

         

  Most teachers in the Humanitas program  have  received  specialized  training  through  the  Los  Angeles  Educational  Partnership  in  interdisciplinary  instruction,  developing  thematic  units,  creating  and  evaluating  end‐of‐unit  writing  prompts,  philosophy,  science,  and  art  integration.  Many  of  our  Humanitas  teachers  also  lead  these  trainings at various conferences.     E C R   

     

135| P a g e  


Findings    Arts  teachers  attend  conferences  including  CETA  (California  Educational  Theatre  Association)  and  district  offered  professional  developments.   These  annual  conferences  train  teachers  in  production,  technical,  and  acting  techniques.   The  drama  teacher  heads up professional development for  the  district  and  offers  many  other  teachers  training  in  how  to  run  a  program. 

Evidence in Support of Findings  • •

Conference Approval Forms  Professional Development  Agendas/sign‐in sheets

   

                       

  E C R   

136| P a g e  


A­6.  To  what  extent  are  the  human  material,  physical,  and  financial  resources  sufficient and utilized effectively and appropriately in accordance with the legal  intent  of  the  program(s)  to  support  students  in  accomplishing  the  academic  standards and the expected school­wide learning results?  Summary of Findings:   El Camino has aligned resources with identified areas of need.  Even in the face of dwindling  resources,  we  have  managed  to  maintain  strong  support  for  student  achievement  as  evidenced  by  our  increasing  API  score  and  high  CAHSEE  pass  rate.    All  students  have  textbooks and our science labs are appropriately equipped.  Students have opportunities for  enrichment and intervention and we are always looking for ways to increase achievement.   

Findings  Human Resources  El  Camino  has  funded  positions  to  provide  extra  services  to  support  the  academic achievement of all students.                   

  E C R   

Evidence in Support of Findings  • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Intervention Coordinator  Bridge Coordinator  Testing Coordinator  Technology Coordinator  Special Education Coordinator  Special Education Assistants  Instructional Coach  Work Experience Coordinator  School Psychologist  AVID Coordinator  Humanitas Coordinator  CEA Coordinator  AVID Tutors  GATE Coordinator  Online Learning Coordinator  EL Coordinator  Bilingual Assistant   Campus Security Aides  AP Coordinator 

137| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

El  Camino  Real  has  a  full  time  college  counselor  who  is  available  to  assist  students  with  all  aspects  of  the  college  application process.  In addition, we have  a part‐time College Office assistant.  This  is essential for our student population. 

  El  Camino  has  formed  partnerships with  community  organizations  and  businesses. 

• •

College Counselor  College Office Assistant 

• • •

Pierce College  Los Angeles Film School  Fashion Institute of Design and  Merchandise  Amgen  National Resource Conservation  Service  Engineers Council of San Fernando  Valley 

   

• •

 

  Recent  professional  development  time  has been spent on using data analysis to  drive instruction. 

Professional development agendas   

Material and Physical Resources  Funds  are  allocated  according  to  State  and District guidelines. 

• •

ELAC  Title II funds 

• •

Perkins Grant  Specialized  Secondary  Grant 

      El  Camino  has  written  and  received  several grants to provide extra resources  to  our  students  including  equipment,  field  trips,  and  job  shadowing  opportunities. 

  E C R   

Program 

138| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  After  school  programs  for  CAHSEE  preparation offer additional support for  students.    Zero  period  offerings  increased  scheduling flexibility in meeting student  achievement goals.    School  facilities  are  adequate  for  our  instructional  and  extracurricular  programs.   The  District  supports  efforts  to  upgrade  and  maintain  the  school.   Since  the  last  accreditation  report,  the  tiles were replaced in the main building,  new air conditioning was installed in the  “S” building, and a new chiller unit was  installed  for  the  main  building.   We  currently  have  projects  to  add  a  campus‐wide fire alarm/smoke detector  system,  to  redesign  several  rooms  and  outdoor  spaces  for  our  small  learning  academies,  to  upgrade  restrooms,  and  to seismically retrofit the gym building. 

• •

Tutoring Logs  Announcement Fliers 

Master Program 

LAUSD Maintenance and Operations 

Computer Rooms 

Friends of ECR Records 

             

  The  computers  and  monitors  in  three  computer  labs  have  been  replaced  and  the computers in an additional lab have  had memory upgrades.    The  Friends  of  ECR  parent  group  has  provided  funds  to  purchase  additional  nursing  days,  technology  equipment,  field  trips,  support  for  Academic  decathlon,  robotics,  and  provide  tutoring programs.   

  E C R   

 

   

139| P a g e  


Findings    The  number  of  small  learning  academies  has  increased  and  existing  academies  have  greater  student  participation. 

Evidence in Support of Findings  •

LAUSD Bulletin 1600 Report 

LAVA records 

   

El  Camino  has  added  an  after‐school  online credit recovery program.   

 Areas of Strength  1. El Camino Faculty members are a cohesive unit and cooperate with one another to  enhance student achievement.   2. El  Camino  is  characterized  by  a  culture  of  high  expectations  and  academic  excellence.  3. Student leadership / involvement is a valued component of the school.  4. The  school’s  mission,  vision  and  ESLRs  were  developed  collaboratively  with  all  stakeholders.  5. Community  and  local  businesses  support  academic  programs  and  academic  achievement.  6. Decision making is collaborative and becoming more data driven.  7. Resources  from  LAUSD  and  Local  District  1  support  the  vision  and  the  overall  program of El Camino. 

Areas of Growth  1. There  is  a  need  for  more  data  driven  professional  development  to  inform  instruction.  2. Improved interdisciplinary coordination to enhance the overall academic program is  needed.  3. Continue to encourage community and parental participation.  4. Provide  more  support  to  freshmen  to  improve  their  high  school  experience  and  thereby reduce the failure rate.  5. Explore ways such as converting to a Charter School to increase funding sources for  various core and desired programs.    E C R   

140| P a g e  


Standards-Based Student Learning: Curriculum

 

Chapter: 4-B

               

WASC: March 2011 Pictured Event: Academic Achievement at ECR   E C R   

141| P a g e  

ECR: Home of Academic and Athletic Excellence


Chapter 4 ­ B: Standards­based Student Learning: Curriculum  

Focus Group Leaders Yvonne Halski  ...........................................................Assistant Principal  Suki Dhillon ...................................  Science / Intervention Coordinator 

Group Members Kathleen Nicholson ..............................................  Business Technology  Kris Kinney ............................................................................... Classified  Marta Marguiles ...................................................................... Classified  Particia Estrin .............................................................................. English  Lissa Gregoria .............................................................................. English  Ian McFarlin ................................................................................ English  Melinda Owen ............................................................................. English  Wendy Strickland ........................................................................ English  Mariellen Webster ...................................................................... English  Frank Wymond ............................................................................ English  Rosa Freedman ......................................................... Foreign Language  Caroline Jones ........................................................... Foreign Language  Steve Kalan .................................................................. Health / Life Skill  Steven Burstein ........................................................................... Library  Gary Asarch ................................................................................... Math  Setareh Bahri ................................................................................. Math    E C R   

142| P a g e  


Hector Lopez ................................................................................. Math  Janette Pacitti................................................................................ Math  Jackie Keene ................................................................................ Parent  Shelly Marshall ................................................................................... PE  Annie Darakjian .......................................................................... Science  Manisha Chase .......................................................................... Student  Myra Dang ................................................................................. Student 

  E C R   

143| P a g e  


Standards-Based Student Learning: Curriculum  B­1.  To  what  extent  do  all  students  participate  in  a  rigorous,  relevant,  and  coherent  standards­based  curriculum  that  supports  the  achievement  of  the  academic  standards  and  the  expected  school­wide  learning  results?  [Through  standards­based learning (i.e., what is taught and how it is taught), the expected  school­wide learning results are accomplished]. Summary of Findings:   El  Camino  Real  High  School  students  participate  in  a  rigorous,  relevant,  and  coherent  standards‐based curriculum that supports the achievement of the academic standards and  the  Expected  School‐Wide  Learning  Results  (ESLRs).   El  Camino  achieves  these  goals  by  offering  numerous  courses  at  varied  levels  to  engage  students  of  all  abilities.  All  core  departments meet to develop pacing plans, share best practices and analyze the data from  the  CST,  API, LAUSD  Periodic  Assessments  to  inform  their  teaching.  The  purpose  of  these  meetings is to improve our curriculum alignment and adherence to the California standards  and our Expected School‐wide Learning Results (ESLRs). LAUSD annually requires schools to  certify that all courses use state approved texts, all students are issued textbooks, and that  the school has adequate equipment for students in science classes.     The  Assistant  Principal  of  Student  Counseling  Services  (APSCS)  works  with  department  chairs to create a master schedule that provides students with equal access to all classes.  El  Camino  has  also  increased  its  focus  for  creating  early  awareness  of  both  graduation  requirements  and  college  entrance  requirements  to  encourage  more  students  to  take  AP  and honors courses. El Camino strives to continue the high participation rate in the AP and  honors classes through vertical teaming and college counseling. The introduction of online  courses  offered  through  the  Los  Angeles  Virtual  Academy  (LAVA)  program  helps  students  successfully complete their academic program and offers many students a second chance at  graduating  on  time.  Other  programs  include:  Humanitas,  Special  Education  inclusion,  Advancement  Via  Individual  Determination  (AVID),  RTI  (formerly known  as  Read  180),  English as a Second Language (ESL), Math‐Science Academy, and Careers in Entertainment  Academy (CEA).                E C R   

144| P a g e  


Findings  English/Language Arts 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

• • • • •

     Common lesson plans/exams   Essays  Periodic Assessments  District led teacher training   CST scores 

• • •

Computer lab sign‐up  Computer inventory  PowerPoint presentations 

  The  English  department’s  rigorous,  relevant,  and  coherent  standards‐based  curriculum  is  founded  on  District‐ designed units of instruction and periodic  benchmark  assessments.  As  a  result,  the  department  is  consistently  implementing  the  district’s  pacing  plan,  adopted  texts,  and  quarterly  assessments;  ECR  has  begun to see improvement in CST scoring.    Teachers  increasingly  incorporate  technology  into  daily  lessons  to  provide  students  with  a  relevant  21st Century  curriculum.  El  Camino  Real  has  a  computer  lab  that  is  used  by  English  teachers. In  addition,  teachers  use  PowerPoint  and/or  document  cameras  for lesson presentations and daily reading  checks.    Students  are  required  to  use  technology  for  their  own  presentations  for  group  projects.  Students  in  all  English  classes  are  required  to  write  at  least  one  research paper with online research being  one  criterion.  Teachers  also  use  laptop  computers  to  deliver  lessons  that  successfully  engage  their  students.  The  Read  180  program  utilizes  computers  to  develop individual literacy skills.    Our full‐time Instructional Coach supports  teachers and helps insure that the district  curricula are implemented and all English  Content  Standards  are  met.  Also,  she  provides  professional  development  to  support student achievement. 

 

             

• • •

 

PowerPoint presentations  Video projects  Read 180 curriculum 

Professional Development agendas 

 

  E C R   

145| P a g e  


Findings  English as a Second Language    The teacher of English Language Learner  (EL) students works with the bilingual  office to make sure she is utilizing  instructional techniques, such as, SDAIE  strategies, that enable these students to  access the full curriculum. All of our  teachers have authorization to teach EL  students, many of whom are in  Sheltered classes which also increase  their opportunity to access the  curriculum.      The  District  monitors  the  progress  and  achievement  of  English  Learners  through  uniform  assessments.  Our  part‐time  English  Language  Learner  Coordinator  attends  monthly  meetings  that  inform  her  of  the  latest  Federal,  State,  and  District mandates and policies. 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

• • • •

      Specially Designed Academic  Instruction in English (SDAIE)  Concept Mapping  Student work  Graphic organizers        

 

Local District 1 professional  development meetings 

  

  

Mathematics    The  department  teachers  ensure  that  they  provide  every  possible  academic  opportunity  to  maximize  higher‐level  critical‐thinking  skills  and  experiences  that allow students to not just meet but  exceed the standards.    Algebra  1  and  Geometry  teachers  administer three District assessments per  year.  The results from these assessments  are  then  analyzed  by  the  individual  teachers  and  in  department  meetings  then adjustments are made to the pacing  plans.   In  addition,  Geometry  teachers  require students justify their responses to  a specific question in writing.    E C R   

• •

• • • • •

      State Content Standards  Class Lessons   

Periodic Assessments  Department meeting agendas  Common lesson plans  Writing prompts  Department exams 

146| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  A  key  component  in  fostering  curricular  development  is  strategic  planning  and  improvement,  specifically  in  reference  to  the  CAHSEE  and  CST.  To  target  areas  of  need  teachers  have  created  worksheets  addressing areas of student weaknesses.    The  math  department  has  expanded  its  available courses that include four honors  and  three  Advanced  Placement  class  sections. This includes allowing 9th grade  students  to  enroll  in  Algebra  2  if  they  have  already  passed  the  prerequisite  courses.  

• • •

CAHSEE data  Lesson plans  CST data   

Master Program 

• • • • •

     State Content Standards  Conference agendas  Seminar agendas  Department meeting agenda  MyData 

 

Science    In  order  to  guarantee  that  all  students  receive  a  rigorous,  standards‐based  instruction,  the  science  department  members  attend  seminars  and  conferences  that  help  them  apply  differentiated strategies in the classroom,  enhance  student  performance,  and  support  student  endeavors.  The  department  meets  to  create  common  curriculum  pacing  plans  and  to  analyze  District  Periodic  Assessment  data  for  areas of weakness.  

        

    The  science  department  offers  fourteen  Honors  classes  and eight Advanced  Placement  (AP)  classes  some  of  which  have  multiple  levels.  These  courses  expose students to college‐level curricula  and  better  prepare  them  for  university  work. The Honors and AP program meets  the  needs  of  highly  motivated  students  and those interested in pursuing a career  in science.       E C R   

• •

Master Program  AP audit 

147| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  Science  teachers  use  a  variety  of  experiences,  instructional  strategies,  and  technology  to  instruct  students.   In  addition,  lab  equipment  has  been  updated  with  the  following:  electrophoresis  kits  (biotechnology),  electronic  scales,  pH  meters,  Lab‐Pro  computer‐based  lab  kits  for  the  AP  biology course, digital thermometers, and  micro‐pipettes. 

  E C R   

Projects  Inquiry‐based experiments    Discussion groups  Lab groups  PowerPoint presentations  Demonstrations  Laboratory inventory 

• • •

State Content Standards  Course curriculum  Master Program 

       

Social Studies    The social studies department provides a  rigorous  and  relevant  standards‐based  curriculum  aligned  with  ECR’s  ESLRs  and  State  Content  Standards.  Courses  promote  critical  thinking  through  assignments  such  as  research  papers,  position  papers,  and  student  debates.   The  department  designed  the  curriculum  to  promote  greater  student  comprehension  of  text  and  content.  The  department  course  offerings  meet  the  needs of students of all abilities.       Department  members  participate  in  ongoing professional development to use  teaching  strategies  to  better  align  its  curriculum  with  the  changing  needs  of  students.   Data  analysis  of  student  performance  on  assessments  is  a  regular  practice  during  department  meetings.   Currently,  Social  Studies  teachers  are  working  on  creating  a  curriculum  based  on thematic units.    

• • • • • • •

     

       

• • • • •

Professional Development agenda Department meeting agenda  Periodic Assessment data  CST data  AP test results 

 

148| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  Students  work  in  groups  to  research  and  present  projects  to  their  peers.   Technology  is  an  integral  part  of  these  presentations.   All  students  are  required  to  write  essays  and  take  department  assessments  which  include  short  answer  and open‐ended questions.    Service  Learning  is  a  district  graduation  requirement.   The  department  has  modified  its  curriculum  to  address  this  need  and  fosters  civic  responsibility.   Students  participate  in  state‐wide  mock  elections  and  the  International  Economic  Summit.  The  Economic  Summit  guides  students  to  examine  individual  economic  situations  of  the  Global  economy.  Through  "trading,"  students  create  alliances  and  address  global  problems.  This  exercise  teaches  students  how  macro‐economic  systems  operate  and  what their indicators are.    World Languages and Cultures     Teachers in this department use common  assessments  while  adhering  to  the  California  Foreign  Language  Standards  to  ensure  that  all  students have  access to  a  rigorous,  relevant,  and  coherent  curriculum.       Members  of  the  Department  attend  conferences  and  workshops  which  help  them  remain  current  in  the  field  of  second language acquisition.  

  E C R   

• • • • •

Group projects  PowerPoint presentation  Video presentations  Computer lab sign‐in  Department assessments 

• •

District policy  International Economic Summit 

State Content Standards 

• • •

Professional Development agendas  Conference agendas  Workshop agendas 

 

 

 

149| P a g e  


Findings    Gifted  students  and  those  interested  in  mastering  a  foreign  language  enroll  in  Advanced  Placement  classes.   Our  students  score  higher  than  the  national  average  on  the  AP  examinations.  Students  with  special  needs  receive  effective  differentiated  instruction  that  take  into  account  their  Individualized  Education Programs (IEPs).     The  department  also  addresses  cultural  standards  through  film,  music,  art,  literature,  food,  travel,  and  correspondence.  In  addition,  there  are  French and Spanish Clubs to which all ECR  students  have  access.  The  department  incorporates  technology  to  enhance  learning and keep students engaged.         Department  members  confer  on  professional  development  days  in  order  to maintain uniform standards and pacing  plans.  

Physical Education    The Physical Education department offers  a  standards  based  program  intended  to  develop  skills  in  specific  team  and  individual  sports  as  well  as  a  life  long  fitness routine.  

Evidence in Support of Findings  • •

Master Program  Student IEPs 

• • • • •

DVDs / CDs  Computer lab sign‐in  Skype  PowerPoint  Document camera 

• •

Department meeting agendas  Lesson plans 

State Content Standards 

                 

 

 

           

    The  classes  are  aligned  by  grade  level,  and rotate through a variety of units over  the  course  of  the  year.   Some  of  these  units  are  volleyball,  soccer,  and  basketball.       E C R   

 

Lesson plans 

150| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  In addition to a well‐rounded curriculum,  many  scholastic  team  sports  programs  are  offered  for  both  male  and  female  students.      The  Physical  Education  program  was  rated  Excellent  in  compliance  with  the  Excellence  in  Athletics  program  sponsored  by  the  University  of  Southern  California.   The  program  measures  safety  and compliance in school sports.      In addition to regular PE, El Camino offers  Adaptive  PE  for  special  education  students  requiring  extra  intervention  as  stipulated  by  their  IEPs.   Students  may  also fulfill their PE requirement by joining  marching band, drill team, NJROTC, or an  athletic team.   

Visual Arts    The  Visual  Arts  Department  provides  a  wide  variety  of  courses  from  the  introductory  level  to  the  AP  level.   The  curriculum is accessible to students of all  abilities and supports academic classes.     Student  Portfolios  help  students  build  upon  skills  as  they  progress  throughout  the  year(s).  The  Visual  Arts  curriculum  prepares  students  for  college  admission  and supports them in pursuing careers in  the arts. 

  E C R   

Athletics list 

USC athletics rating 

• •

Master Program  IEPs 

Master program 

• • •

Student work  Lesson plans  Course description 

 

 

   

   

   

151| P a g e  


Findings    In addition to traditional assessments, the  Visual  Arts  Department  uses  a  variety  of  strategies  that  provides  students  access  to  the  content  standards.  These  strategies  include:  rough  sketches,  original  works  based  on  personal  experiences,  cultural  and  environmental  concerns,  and  historical  styles.   Students  also  use  visuals  that  accompany  verbal  and  written  instructions.  Projects  based  on real world applications allow students  an  opportunity  to  create  something  that  is  relevant.   Projects  include  packaging  design,  business  cards,  logos,  Children’s  books  etc.   Student  works  are  exhibited  annually  in  the  Melody  of  Words  literacy  fair and other school events.   

Performing Arts    All  students  have  access  to  the  performing  arts  which  support  the  academic  curriculum.  Students  enroll  in  the  program  according  to  their  interest  and  there  are  various  levels  which  make  the  program  accessible  to  students  of  all  abilities.    Students  showcase  their  talent  in  City  Band  &  Drill  Championships,  DTASC  Drama  Festivals,  All  State  Jazz  Competitions,  Dick  Van  Dyke  Performance,  Disneyland  Performance,  new  local  business  openings,  elementary  school  performances,  Play  and  Musical  Performances,  The  Big  Event,  One–Act  Play  Evening,  Vocal  and  instrumental  ensemble performances, Murder Mystery  Dinner, Comedy Sportz Nights and Dance  Performance.      E C R   

Evidence in Support of Findings  • • •

Student projects  Student art exhibits  Melody of Words Program  

• •

Master Program  State Content Standards 

• • • •

City events  State events  Community events  School events 

 

     

152| P a g e  


Findings    Teachers continue to educate themselves  through  conferences  and  workshops  to  sharpen their skills to reach the maximum  number of students.   

Evidence in Support of Findings  Conference agendas  Workshop agendas 

• •

Course Outlines  State Content Standards 

 

Wood Working 

   

  The  wood  working  program  provides  students  with  relevant  projects  that  introduce  students  to  safety  instruction,  project  planning,  use  of  tools  and  finishing  techniques.  Course  content  is  aligned  with  the  California  State  Standards  and  prepares  students  for  introductory level jobs in many trades.         Wood  Working,  in  addition  to  preparing  students  for  vocational  careers,  supports  English  language  and  mathematics  standards. 

     

• • • • •

Business Technology     Business  technology  courses  measure  student  achievement  by  performance‐ based  evaluations.  Most  curricular  assignments  are  comprised  of  concrete,  computer‐generated  projects  that  support ISTE's  National  Education  Technology Standards.    

• •

     • • •

Writing Across the Curriculum  Silent Sustained Reading  Safety tests  Project Planning and Assembly  Student projects 

Posted Standards  Student Work  Course Outline 

   

 

 

  E C R   

153| P a g e  


Findings    Students  in  the  Introduction  to  Computers  classes  are  rigorously  tested  on  their  knowledge  of  the  Microsoft  Office Suite programs Word, PowerPoint,  and  Excel.  Students  also  demonstrate  their  knowledge  of  these  programs  by  creating  class  presentations,  posters,  newsletters,  essays,  cover  letters,  and  various business reports. Class curriculum  includes  a  project  to  research  and  develop  findings  regarding  the  purchase  of various computer systems.      Web  Development  and  Internet  Publishing students create web pages and  entire  web  sites  using  current  web  standards,  written  in  XHTML  and  CSS.  Students  in  these  classes  also  take  tests  that require them to apply concepts they  have learned in new contexts.      New  Media  students  create  animations  using MIT's Scratch and Carnegie Mellon's  Alice  programming  environments.  Animation  projects  include  tutorials  (students  create  a  tutorial  on  how  to  accomplish  a  task),  stories  (students  compose  a  storyboard  with  a  narrative,  then  teach  themselves  the  programming  skills  necessary  to  realize  it),  and  a game  which  will  require  almost  constant  user  interaction.   

  E C R   

Evidence in Support of Findings 

• •

Student generated PowerPoint  Presentations that incorporate  multi‐media  Oral Assessments  Student Projects  

• •

Student developed websites  Lesson plans / rubrics 

• • •

Story boards  Student created interactive games  Programming assessments 

 

 

 

154| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  AP  Computer  Science  students  create  dozens  of  object‐oriented  programming  classes  that  are  part  of  larger  and  larger  scale  applications.  They  also  modify  classes  and  create  new  classes  for  the  GridWorld  case  study,  and  a  large‐scale  application  provided  by  the  College  Board.    Students  in  Web  Development,  New  Media,  and  AP  Computer  Science  work  with  teacher‐developed  curricula  reflecting current industry best practices,  helping  students  to  be  familiar  with  common  "shop  standards"  in  naming  conventions,  commenting  of  code,  and  group coding. Bound text books are used  no  more  than  50%  of  the  time  in  these  courses  so  that  the  curriculum  can  maintain  currency.     Some  of  the  curricula  in  these  courses  allow  for  individualized pacing and customization.   

Family & Consumer Studies    El  Camino  Real  High  School  Family  and  Consumer  Studies  courses  are  both  engaging  and  challenging.  Students  must  apply  knowledge  and  skills  in  reading,  writing,  math,  science,  art  and  social  studies  as  well  as  current  technology  in  the  context  of  life  management  and  career  preparation.  Students  are  evaluated  on  performance,  competence  and  acquired  skills  related  to  the  California  Career  Technical  Education  standards  established  with  the  help  of  community  members,  post‐secondary  educators and employers.  

  E C R   

• Programming architecture frame  work  • Course Syllabus  • Analyze, design, code, and test  software    

• Class Curricula  • Texts  • Lesson Plans 

      • • • • • • •

           

Culinary food labs  Meal planning  Evaluation of  Nutritional guidelines  Create  site  plans  &  floor  plans  (Interior Design)  Written assessments  Oral reports  Quizzes 

155| P a g e  


Findings  Health/Life Skills    All  in  coming  9th grade  students  are  required  to  take  one  semester  of  Health  and  one  semester  of  Life  Skills.   The  curriculum  for  both  subjects adheres  to  course objectives as mandated by LAUSD,  The  State  of  California,  and  National  Health/Life Skills Standards.      The  department  works  collectively  to  create  a  rigorous  curriculum  that  is  engaging  with  activities  for  all  modalities  at  various  levels.   Students  are  taught  to  deal  with  issues  that  are  emotionally  difficult  and  sometimes  "awkward",  for  example,  grief,  body  image,  death,  and  disease.  To  ensure  students  feel  empowered,  classes  are  structured  with  group  discussions  and  work  is  project  based.   Students  are  assessed  by  these  means  and  also  by  traditional  modes  of  assessments.   

Evidence in Support of Findings        • • •

 

NJROTC    NJROTC  aligns  its  lessons  and  expectations  to  supplement  required  subjects to meet State Content Standards  and  El  Camino’s  ESLRs.  The  curriculum  is  reviewed  regularly  to  ensure  that  it  is  engaging, relevant and rigorous.   

LAUSD Standards  State Content Standards  National Content Standards 

• • • • •

Lesson plans  Group work and presentations  Classwork/homework  Quizzes and tests  Socratic Method 

Course curriculum 

               

    The  NJROTC  Physical  Training  curriculum  supplements  State  Standards  in  Physical  Education.  All  Cadets  are  prepared  to  take  the  state  fitness  test.    NJROTC  Physical  Training  team  does  this  by  participating  in  daily  activities  and  competing  in  state‐wide  competitions  in    E C R   

• •

 

State Content Standards  Presidents Fitness Challenge  Guidelines 

156| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

running relays, push‐ups, and sit‐ups.  

  The  NJROTC  Academic  curriculum  supplements  State  Standards  in  Social  Studies  and  Science.   Cadets  study Naval  History  dating  from  early  western  civilization  through  the  1990's.   In  addition,  Nautical  Sciences  such  as  Maritime  Geography,  Oceanography,  Meteorology,  Astronomy  and  Physical  Sciences  supplement  the  Standards  in  Science.     The  NJROTC  Military  Drill  curriculum  teaches  students  discipline  and  teamwork.   They  are  assessed  upon  the  basic  drill  card  that  the  ECR  NJROTC  drill  teams use to compete with other schools  in statewide competitions.  By the end of  the  year  they  are  proficient  in  unarmed  and armed basic drill   

 

  E C R   

State Content Standards  Lesson Plans  Naval Science textbooks 

• • • •

Basic Unarmed Drill Card  Basic Armed Drill Card  Cadet Reference Manual  Cadet Field Manual 

• •

State Content Standards  Approved textbooks 

 

 

Special Education    Special  day  classes  are  aligned  with  the  state  standards.  These  students  receive  rigorous  and  relevant  instruction  using  state approved textbooks.  

• • •

     

   

157| P a g e  


Findings  Resource  students  spend  85  ‐  100%  of  their  school  day  in  general  education  classes.  These  students  participate  in  the  learning  academies  such  as,  Avid  and  Humanitas  and  are  provided  with  all  the  rigorous  instruction  within  the  various  academic  areas.  These  students  are  enrolled  in  academic  classes  at  all  levels  which  include  regular,  honors,  and  AP  Classes.       All  students  in  the  special  education  programs  have  goals  and  objectives  to  help  them  achieve  academic  standards  and  expected  school  wide  results.  These  goals  and  objectives  are  reviewed  annually  and  modified  if  necessary.  The  instructional  programs  available  to  our  students  include,  Special  Day  Program  (SLD), Resource Program (RSP), Emotional  Disturbed  (ED),  Inclusion  Program  and  General Education Support.       Special  Education  students  are  mainstreamed  into  elective  classes,  physical  education  and  academic  classes  per their IEP. RSP students have access to  the Learning Center and may be enrolled  in  a  Resource  Elective for  more  intensive  support  in  ELA  and  Algebra.  All  RSP  students  spend  the  majority  of  the  day  enrolled in general education classes.   

Career Planning  Ninth  grade  students  complete  a  career  interest  inventory  as  part  of  their  Life  Skills  class.   These  inventories  help  students  and  counselors  create  an  appropriate  four‐year  plan  based  on  student goals.    E C R   

Evidence in Support of Findings  • • •

Master program  Class rosters  Student programs 

• • •

Teacher logs  IEPs  Special Education Calendar 

• •

Master Program  Class Rosters 

 

 

   

     

• Career inventory 

158| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

   The  School‐To‐Career  committee  meets  monthly  and  plans  the  annual  Career  Expo.   The  committee  has  worked  with  the  Chamber  of  Commerce  and  the  Rotary Club to provide presenters from a  wide  array  of  local  businesses.   Students  meet  with  the  business  representatives  and  fill  out  a  career  exploration  worksheet. 

• • •

Meeting Notes  School Calendar  Career Expo Information Sheets 

             

  El  Camino  had  a  program  called  Road  to  Your  Future  in  which  guest  speakers  would  come  in  monthly  and  present  information  about  their  careers  during  lunchtime  assemblies.   As  student  interest  in  this  program  decreased,  the  academies began to offer their own guest  speaker  programs.   For  instance,  the  Careers in Entertainment Academy had a  documentary  filmmaker,  a  prop  master,  and an actor speak to the students.    The  Work  Experience  Coordinator  helps  students  find  jobs  and  monitors  their  progress.   The  coordinator  also  meets  with  the  students  weekly  in  a  classroom  setting  to  discuss  career  options,  skills,  and resources. 

• • •

Assembly Fliers  Academy Records  Speaker Logs 

       

 

Work Experience Records 

        

 

Variety of Programs    Students  have  access  to  over  twenty  Advanced Placement subjects, many with  multiple  classes  offered.   El  Camino  also  has  Honors  classes  in  eleven  different  subjects.   Students  who  are  not  quite  ready  for  these  courses  can  take  Academically  Enriched  (AE)  courses.   Students  also  have  access  to  community  college  classes  through  Pierce  College,  some of which are taught at El Camino.    E C R   

        •

         

Master Program 

 

159| P a g e  


Findings    El  Camino  has  five  interest‐based  academies.   Students  can  enroll  in  the  Math/Science  Academy,  Humanitas,  Art  and  Design  Academy,  Careers  in  Entertainment Academy, and AVID.  Each  of  these  programs  offers  a  personalized  environment  that  provides  extra  support  for students to reach their goals.    To  help  students  meet  their  personal  extracurricular  goals,  El  Camino  has  almost  80  student‐run  clubs  on  campus.   With  a few exceptions,  they  meet  during  lunch and all have a faculty sponsor.  We  have  clubs  that  address  cultural  identity,  religion,  leadership,  community  charity,  hobbies/interests,  career  goals,  and  academics.      El Camino offers a wide range of electives  to  provide  all  students  with  a  more  enriching  experience  that  supports  the  core  subjects.   Examples  of  this  are  computer  science,  journalism,  woodworking,  yearbook,  visual  and  performing  arts,  culinary  arts,  graphic  design, sewing, and student government. 

  E C R   

Evidence in Support of Findings  •

Master Program 

Club List 

Master Program 

 

 

 

160| P a g e  


B­2.  Do  all  students  have  equal  access  to  the  school’s  entire  program  and  assistance  with  a  personal  learning  plan  to  prepare  them  for  the  pursuit  of  their  academic, personal and school­to­career goals?  Summary of Findings:    El  Camino  Real  High  School  is  committed  to  providing  all  students  access  to  a  rigorous  academic program in which they have every opportunity to graduate with a diploma while  meeting University of California’s A‐G requirements for admission, which also qualifies them  to  apply  to  other  universities  of  their  choice.   In  addition,  El  Camino  is  committed  to  assisting  all  students  to  develop  and  pursue  their  personal  and  career  goals  with  a  well‐ rounded education.  To  this end, counselors provide students with class  placement forms,  feedback  from  teacher  recommendations,  GPA,  and  standardized  test  scores.   They  also  create Individual Graduation Plans, explain A‐G requirements, and make students aware of  college  admission  information  and  resources  available  on  campus  through  the  college  office.  Students needing extra assistance have access to many intervention resources.     Throughout  high  school,  all  students  have  the  opportunity  to  explore  and  discuss  career  goals and options.  Upperclassmen also have access to work experience opportunities.  The  counseling  staff  presents  the  breadth  of  elective  choices  and  the  five  academies  (Math/Science,  Art  and  Design,  AVID,  Humanitas,  and  CEA).   Most  of  our  students  participate  in  some  form  of  extracurricular  activity,  be  it  sports,  music,  arts,  technology,  performing arts, film making, leadership, or activities through one of the almost 80 campus  clubs. 

                             E C R   

161| P a g e  


Findings  Counseling/Support Services     The  counseling  staff  completes  Individualized  Graduation  Plans  with  each student twice a year.  Students  also receive a copy of their unofficial  transcript.  This  information  is  also  made  available  to  the  parents  /guardians.          The  counseling  staff  refers  students  needing  intense  intervention  to  the  Intervention  Coordinator  and  MFT  (Marriage  and  Family  Therapy)  Interns. 

Evidence in Support of Findings        • • •

Individualized Graduation Plan  Unofficial Transcripts  Counseling Records 

          •

Counseling Office Records 

Student Handbook at ecrhs.net 

Program Planning Sheets 

Request to See Counselor Forms 

 

    Students  have  access  to  the  online  Student  Handbook  which  describes  school  programs  and  their  requirements. 

 

    Program  Planning  Sheets  include  courses  required  by  grade  level  and  elective  courses  available  to  all  students.      The  counseling  staff  is  available  to  parents  and  students  to  answer  questions  about  graduation  requirements  and  the  different  programs offered on campus. 

 

 

  E C R   

162| P a g e  


Findings    The  counselors  and  departments  articulate with feeder middle schools  in  order  to  serve  them  more  effectively.   Even  before  students  enter El Camino, counselors travel to  local  middle  schools  to  inform  them  of  their  educational  opportunities  and  to  begin  programming  them  for  the  fall  semester  of  their  freshman  year.      The  college  counselor  provides  students  with  information  about  college  admission,  financial  aid,  and  scholarships.   She  arranges  visits  from  university  representatives  and  hosts evening assemblies for parents  and  students  on  a  wide  range  of  college‐related topics. 

Evidence in Support of Findings  • •

School Calendar  Programming Sheets 

    

• • •

College Office records  College Office Newsletter  School calendar 

• •

Meeting agendas  Peer Counselor Logs 

Orientation Meeting Agenda 

   

    Peer  college  counselors  receive  training  from  the  college  counselor  and assist students and parents with  college questions. 

 

    At  new‐student  orientation  meetings,  parents  and  students  are  made  aware  of  the  academic,  extracurricular,  and  support  programs available at El Camino.   

  E C R   

163| P a g e  


Findings  Intervention   

Evidence in Support of Findings   

Students  who  are  having  difficulty  meeting  graduation  requirements  have access to Student Success Team  (SST)  intervention.   A  multi‐ disciplinary  team,  the  SST  evaluates  students  with  academic  and/or  behavioral  problems,  and  identifies  effective  interventions,  strategies,  and  alternatives  needed.  SST  meetings  can  involve  parents,  students,  administrators,  deans,  counselors, the school nurse, and the  school psychologist.      The  Intervention  Coordinator  meets  with  students  requiring  intense  intervention.   He  holds  student  and  parent  conferences  to  discuss  the  options  available  to  the  student  and  family. 

Student Success Team Notes 

Intervention Coordinator Records 

• • •

Deans’ Office Records  Intervention Coordinator Records  Treatment Center Records 

• •

CAHSEE Class Fliers   Student Sign‐In Sheets 

 

    The  Deans’  Office  and  Intervention  Coordinator  work  directly  with  the  Tarzana  Drug  Treatment  Center  for  those  students  caught  with  drug  paraphernalia.   Students  can  be  self  referred  or  be  referred  by  a  parent  or a staff member.    To  help  students  achieve  their  academic  goals,  El  Camino  offers  CAHSEE  preparation  classes.  These  consist  of  after‐school  classes  in  the  fall and spring semesters. In addition,  12th grade  students  who  have  not  passed the CAHSEE, must attend the  CAHSEE  Boot  Camp,  an  intensive  math  and  English  review  given  one    E C R   

         

 

164| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

week prior to the CAHSEE test. 

  Many  teachers  volunteer  their  time  at  lunch,  nutrition,  and  after  school  to  provide  tutoring  for  their  students.   We  also  have  a  peer  tutoring  program  that  began  this  year. 

• • •

Classrooms  Math Tutoring Flier  Peer Tutoring Schedule 

Online Learning Records 

 

    Online  credit  recovery  courses  are  offered  to  those  students  who  are  short  of  graduation  requirements  or  credits. 

    

 

Special Education    El Camino is committed to providing  special  education  students  access  to  all  programs  and  giving  them  assistance  through  an  IEP  that  identifies  their  needs  as  well  as  personal  and  academic  goals.   Special  education  students  are  mainstreamed  into  elective  classes,  physical  education  classes,  and  academic  classes  per  their  IEP.   RSP  students have access to the Learning  Center  and  may  be  enrolled  in  a  Resource Elective for more intensive  support.   All  RSP  students  spend  the  majority  of  their  day  enrolled  in  general education classes.      The DOTS Coordinator assists special  education students in learning about  career options. 

  E C R   

      • •

IEPs  Student Schedules 

DOTS Records 

                       

 

165| P a g e  


Findings    The  Adaptive  P.E.  program  provides  physical  education  and  fitness  benefits  to  students  unable  to  participate  comfortably  in  the  general program 

Evidence in Support of Findings  •

Adaptive P.E. Curriculum 

    Academy Records 

 

  Partnerships    In  an  effort  to  help  students  meet  a  wide  variety  of  academic,  career,  and  personal  goals,  El  Camino  has  formed  partnerships  with  several  organizations.   The  Fashion  Institute  of  Design  and  Merchandising  works  with  the  Art  and  Design  Academy.   AMGEN  worked  with  the  biotechnology  class.   Humanitas  works  with  the  Los  Angeles  Educational  Partnership  to  provide  professional  development  for  the  teachers.   The  Los  Angeles  Film  School  works  with  the  Careers  in  Entertainment  Academy.   The  biology  program  works  with  the  National  Park  Service  and  the  Robotics  team  works  with  local  engineers. 

 

 

  E C R   

166| P a g e  


B­3. To what extent are students able to meet all the requirements of graduation  upon completion of the high school program?  Summary of Findings:     El Camino Real (ECR) is committed to graduating all students on time.  Our counselors work  diligently  to  keep  all  students  and  their  parents  informed  of  the  necessary  requirements.   This  process  begins  prior  to  students  even  attending  their  first  day  of  instruction  as  freshmen.  In a response to student records (fail rates) and interviews, ECR discovered that  freshmen were having a difficult time transitioning into high school.  This drove El Camino’s  conversation with feeder middle school. The middle school communicates which skills are  taught to their students and El Camino makes them aware of the skill sets students need in  order  to  be  successful  in  high  school.  This  exchange  has  been  highly  beneficial  to  both  schools.  Our  academies,  such  as,  AVID,  Humanitas,  Math/  Science,  and  CEA  are  open  to  freshmen  and  they  may  apply  according  to  their   interest;  these  smaller  programs  make  them  more  comfortable  and  motivate  them.  In  addition,  they   are  not  locked  into  the  Academies and can move into a different one after  a conference with their counselor.  El  Camino  has  created  a  supportive  environment  over  the  past  several  years.   The  Deans  work  with  students  more  frequently  by  counseling  them,  as  is  evidenced  by  a  drastic  decrease in the suspension and opportunity transfer (transferring to another school) rates.   This  has  helped  improve  the  attendance  rate  and  has  kept  students  in  their  classes.   An  Intervention  Coordinator's  position  was  created  to  actively  seek  out  and  work  with  struggling students to keep them on track for graduating on time. With the assistance of the  counselors  and  Deans,  a  student  who  has  fallen  behind  in  credits  is  referred  to  the  Adult  School,  Miguel  Leonis  Continuation  High  School,  West  Valley  Occupational  Center,  or  the  online  credit  recovery  courses.  The  Testing  Coordinator tracks  students  who  have  not  passed  the  CAHSEE,  and  the  effectiveness  of  this  program  is  reflected  in  our  participation  and pass rates.  As  a  result  of  the  efforts  of  the  students,  staff,  and  parents,  El  Camino  is  successful  at  getting  students  to  meet  all  graduation  requirements  upon  completion  of  the  high  school  program.  El Camino’s  2009 graduation rate was 91.4%. A recent three‐year average shows  that  52%  of  El  Camino  graduates  completed  all  courses  required  for  UC  and/or  CSU  entrance.    This  is  above  the  district  average  of  40%  and  the  state  average  of  35%.    El  Camino’s  CAHSEE  pass  rate  for  tenth  grade,  first‐time  test  takers  is  90%  for  both  English  Language Arts and Mathematics.        E C R   

167| P a g e  


Findings  Counseling Services    Prior  to  students  entering  El  Camino,  every  incoming  freshman  and  his/her  parents  are  made  aware  of  the  graduation  and  A‐G  requirements.  All  students confer with their counselors,  at least twice a year. Counselors meet  with  seniors  more  frequently,  especially  if  they  are  having  difficulty  with  requirements  for  graduating.  Counselors not only hold conferences  but  also  have  contracts  for  these  students  to  complete  their  required  coursework.  Parents  of  students  who  are  behind  credits  are  informed  in  writing,  telephone  and  personal  conferences.  

  All  sophomores,  juniors  and  seniors  have  an  Individualized  Graduation  Plan (IGP).  Freshmen make their IGPs  in their Life Skills class. Freshmen who  are failing two or more courses by the  ten and fifteen week progress reports  are  referred  to  the  Intervention  Coordinator  who  works  with  these  students and their IGPs.    To  make  coursework  more  accessible  to  all  students  and  provide  flexibility,  in  the  Fall  semester  of  2010,  El  Camino  began  offering  on‐line  courses  via  Los  Angeles  Virtual  Academy  (LAVA).  Through  this  program  students  mainly  recover  credits.    E C R   

Evidence in Support of Findings   

      Counseling office logs 

                                             • •

IGP logs  Intervention Coordinator  

LAVA roster 

 

   

168| P a g e  


Findings    ECR  collaborates  with  El  Camino  Real  Community  Adult  School  to  provide  after  school  courses  for  students  behind  in  credits  or  wanting  to  get  ahead.      For  students  aspiring  to  get  the  college experience, ECR partners with  Pierce  Community  College  to  offer  classes on campus after school.      

Evidence in Support of Findings

  E C R   

Adult School course offerings 

Pierce College course offerings 

 

 

Partnerships    El Camino partners with Miguel Leonis  Continuation  High  School  and  West  Valley  Occupational  Center.   In  extreme cases, students far behind in  credits  are  referred  to  Miguel  or  WVOC.   These  students  are  then  allowed to reenter and graduate with  their  classmates  once  they  have  recovered their credits.                              

      • •

Miguel Leonis Referral records  WVOC referral records 

 

169| P a g e  


Findings  College Counselor   

Evidence in Support of Findings      

El  Camino’s  college  counselor  meets  with  all  seniors  to  discuss  their  post‐ high  school  goals.  Students  receive  information  and  guidance  to  achieve  their  goals  for  attending four  year  universities or two‐year colleges.  The  college  counselor  meets  students  in  their Life Skills class to discuss college  requirements  including  the  A‐ G requirements.   In  addition,  she  holds  regular  meetings  at  lunch  and  after  school  in  which  representatives  from  various  universities  and  other  post‐secondary institutions meet with  groups  of  students  and  potentially  their  parents.  The  college  counselor  begins  counseling  students  from  the  time  they  are  sophomores  and  juniors.  Some  of  the  routine  information  is  distributed  by  Peer  College Counselors.   

• •

College Counselor Agenda  Invited University Guest list 

 

CAHSEE Intervention   

     

ECR  offers  CAHSEE  intervention  courses  for  those  seniors  who  are  experiencing  difficulty  passing  the  test.  The  classes  are  offered  twice  a  week  prior  to  each  CAHSEE  test.   Students  requiring  extra  intervention  are  recommended  for  the  CAHSEE  Boot  Camp.    These  students  are  individually summoned by the Testing  Coordinator  and  Intervention  Coordinator  to  motivate  and  discuss  the logistics of class attendance.    

• •

CAHSEE Intervention rosters  Testing coordinator records 

                       

  E C R   

170| P a g e  


Findings  Special Education Students   

Evidence in Support of Findings      

Special  Education  Students  are  supported  as  stipulated  by  their  IEPs  to  meet  all  requirements  for  graduation.   The  Special  Education  coordinator  assists  the  Special  Education  administrator  in  collaboration  with  the  Special  Education teachers and aides to meet  the  needs  of  their  students  as  stated  in  their  IEPs.   In  addition,  El  Camino  employs  a  full  time  School  Psychologist  and  other  itinerant  district personnel to support students.   

• • • • •

Tutoring Programs    Peer  tutoring  is  available  to  students  four  days  a  week  (Mondays,  Tuesdays,  Wednesdays,  and  Thursdays)  in  all  core  academic  subjects.  In  addition,  many  teachers  voluntarily  provide  tutoring  during  lunch, nutrition, and after school.   

  E C R   

Counselor logs  IGP  Student IEPs/ Section 504 plans   Paraprofessionals assignments  Speech  and  language  development  professional visitation log 

      • •

PETs schedule and sign‐in sheet  Classrooms 

 

171| P a g e  


Areas of Strength 

1. El Camino provides a variety of AP and Honors courses to meet the needs of all high  achieving students.  2. El Camino students are well prepared for post‐secondary goals.  3. El  Camino  offers  a  variety  of  academic  courses  at  various  levels  ranging  from  Sheltered to AP.  4. El Camino offers a myriad of electives that are valuable and meet student interests.  5. Special programs such as, Avid, Humanitas, Math/Science Academy, CEA,   Art and  Design, address the needs of students with specific interests. 

Areas of Growth  1. Increase flexibility in the master schedule (zero period and 7th period) to meet the  needs of students.  2. Reinstate  lost  AP  classes  such  as,  Music  Theory,  Statistics,  Spanish  Literature,  and  French Language.  3. Offer elective/enrichment courses during summer school.  4. Offer more intervention programs to help students achieve grade level standards. 

  E C R   

172| P a g e  


Standards-Based Student Learning: Instruction Chapter: 4-C

WASC: March 2011   E C R   

Pictured Event: Quality Instruction at ECR 173| P a g e  

ECR: Home of Academic and Athletic Excellence


Chapter 4­C:  Standards­based Student Learning: Instruction   

Focus Group Leaders Shukla Sarkar ..............................................................................  English  Natasha Zwick ............................................................................. English 

 

Focus Members  Dean Bennett  ..........................................................Assistant Principal  Alan Berman ................................... Business/Technology (Transferred)  Melissa Charters ................................................... Career/Technical Ed.  Shirin Kennedy ........................................................................ Classified  Linda Kitay ............................................................................... Classified  Gina Lane ................................................................................ Classified  Karen Jones ................................................................. English (Retired)  Nicole Salottolo ........................................................................... English  Randy Van Leeuwen .................................................................... English  Norma Brooks ........................................................... Foreign Language  Fabiana Cavelaris ...................................................... Foreign Language  Jon Beckerman .............................................................. Health/Life Skill  Jesus Aguilera ................................................................................ Math  Ramon Diaz ................................................................................... Math  Keon Lee ........................................................................................ Math  Lori Locurto ............................................................. Math (Transferred)    E C R   

174| P a g e  


Michael Tasman ............................................................................ Math  Janice Fordham ........................................................................... Parent  Kevin Williams .................................................................................... PE  Mark Sakaguchi .......................................................................... Science  Gail Turner‐Graham ................................................................... Science  Michele Greene ................................................................ Social Studies  Daniel Pressburger ........................................................... Social Studies  Mary Hammond .................................................................... Special Ed.  Lisa Huffaker ......................................................................... Special Ed.  Lily Liu .................................................................................... Special Ed.  Susan Sims ............................................................................. Special Ed.  Rijenea Appling ......................................................................... Student  Shadi Saadati ............................................................................. Student  Doug Coleman ....................................... Support Services (Transferred)  Peggy Langdon ............................................. Support Services (Retired)  Sandy Rubalcaba ......................................................... Support Services  Ken Hoffman ............................... Visual/ Performing Art (Transferred) 

 

  E C R   

175| P a g e  


Standards‐Based Student Learning: Instruction   C­1. To what extent are students involved in challenging learning experiences to  achieve the academic standards and the expected school­wide learning results?  Summary of Findings:    El Camino Real High School students receive a challenging and enriching learning experience  that  enables  them  to  achieve  the  state  academic  standards  and  Expected  School‐wide  Learning  Results.  Our  school  offers  a  variety  of  classes  including  Honors,  Advanced  Placement (AP), English as a Second Language (ESL), Developing Readers and Writers Course  (DRWC),  also  known  as  Read  180,  Special  Education,  Advancement  Via  Individual  Determination (AVID), Gifted and Talented Education (GATE), and vocational classes (Wood  shop,  Graphic  Design)  in  addition  to  the  general  education  course  of  study.  Students  of  diverse  backgrounds  and  abilities  have  equal  access  to  a  rigorous  curriculum.  Recently  an  online credit recovery program, LAVA, was instituted. Intervention programs are in place to  ensure  that  our  students  achieve  the  academic  standards  and  Expected  School‐wide  Learning  Results.  Before  the  beginning  of  every  semester,  department  chairs  collaborate  with  the  counseling  office  to  assure  that  the  master  schedule  meets  the  needs  of  all  students.  Great  progress  has  been  made  in  the  integration  of  special  needs  students  into  the  mainstream  curriculum.  Teachers  accommodate  these  students  with  extra  time  for  completion of tests and homework, modify curriculum as needed, and provide preferential  seating.  Several  classes  include  Resource  teachers  who  collaborate  with  the  classroom  teachers  to  ensure  their  students'  success.  Some  classes  have  aides  providing  one‐on‐one  assistance. Sheltered classes are offered in English, social studies, mathematics, and science  to assist English Language Learners (EL) to achieve the content standards and to help them  transition into mainstream classes. All certificated staff members hold a CLAD credential or  its  equivalent,  thus  all  faculty  members  at  ECR  have  had  academic  training  in  SDAIE  methods  which  help  improve  the  instruction  for  all  students.  In  addition,  more  students  with  disabilities  are  now  included  in  general  education  classes,  with  continued  support  provided  by the  resource  room,  four computer  labs,  and  monitoring  by  resource  teachers  within a collaborative classroom environment. Special Education classes prepare students to  meet the expectations outlined in the Individualized Education Programs (IEP).  Students are aware of standards and daily lesson objectives. Our ESLRs, Mission and Vision  statements  are  displayed  in  poster  forms  in  all  classrooms.  English,  mathematics,  science,  social  studies,  health,  and  foreign  language  departments  use  state‐approved  textbooks  whose    contents  reflect  the  California  content  standards.  In  compliance  with  Williams 

  E C R   

176| P a g e  


legislation, all students are able to take home textbooks from all core classes.  Our survey  indicates  that  100%  of  students have  a  textbook  they  could  bring  home  for  mathematics,  science, social studies, health, and English classes.   

Findings  Science Department    The  Science  Department  comprises  of  skilled  teachers  who  provide  a  rigorous  and  relevant  standards‐ based  curriculum.  Teachers  use  professional  development  time  to  analyze  the  LAUSD  Secondary  Periodic  Assessments  for  Biology  and  Chemistry.  The  department  meets  regularly  to  outline  and  examine its goals by analyzing data  to guide instruction and pacing.       The  department  chairperson  regularly leads seminars at the local  universities,  CSUN  and  UCLA.  He  shares  the  contents  of  these  seminars  with  his  colleagues  at  El  Camino  who,  in  turn,  incorporate  the information into their teaching.  Science  teachers  use  a  variety  of  strategies,  alternative  assessments,  and  analytical  projects;  many  of  these  are  learned  at  conferences  and  during  professional  development  to  promote  student  success.  Among  these  are  laboratory  experiments  which  are  an essential component of studying  science.             E C R   

Evidence in Support of Findings      • • • •

California Framework   Professional Development Agendas   District Periodic Assessment  exams/data  Department meeting agendas 

 

• • • • •

Department meeting agendas   Conference Agendas   Lesson Plans   Tests, quizzes   Lab reports   

177| P a g e  


Findings    Science  teachers  effectively  use  technology  during  their  lessons.  Chemistry  teachers  share  their  lessons, lecture notes electronically  to  ensure  all  students  are  taught  the  same  standard‐  based  curriculum at more or less the same  pace.      The  science  department  offers  varied  and  rigorous  courses  that  challenge  and  interest  students  of  all  abilities.  These  courses  include:  AP  classes  in  four  subjects,  honors  courses  in  three  subjects,  many  required  science  courses,  and  electives such as Robotics, Genetics,  Environmental  science,  and  Physiology.      The  science  teachers  are  highly  qualified  and  bring  varied  life  and  professional  experiences  which  provide  an  educational  experience  that  is  both  enriching  and  relevant  to  our  students.  Students  are  regularly  engaged  in  lab  experiments  and  relevant  demonstrations.   

Physical Education (P.E.)    The  P.E.  Department  uses  various  methods to teach students a variety  of physically challenging activities.    

  E C R   

Evidence in Support of Findings  • • • • •

E‐pads   Vodcasts   Web pages  Document cameras   Wiki Notes 

• •

Master Program  Lesson plans 

• • • • •

Lab reports   Demonstrations   Visual, audio, kinesthetic,  collaborative hands‐on activities   Technical writing   Laboratory experiments 

Lesson plans 

 

        

178| P a g e  


Findings    Once a week all students are required  to  demonstrate  cardiovascular  endurance.  Every  three  weeks  students  are  taught  and  expected  to  master  a  new  activity.  These  may  include,  but  are  not  limited  to:  basketball,  tennis,  softball,  and  soccer.  The  department  also  takes  pride  in  keeping  in  touch  with  changing  trends  in  physical  activities  that  our  students  enjoy.  Two  years  ago  we  incorporated  "The  Wave”,  a  two‐wheel  skateboard  that  the  students thoroughly enjoy. The goal is  to  teach  students  that  physical  activities  are  both  enjoyable  and  important to leading a healthy life.      In  addition  to  challenging  our  students physically, students need to  meet  their  academic  goals  as  well.  Students must earn a minimum GPA  to  be  eligible  for  athletic  teams.   All  students  regularly  participate  in  Sustained  Silent  Reading,  Writing  Across  the  Curriculum,  as  well  as  writing  letters  to  our  troops  (Operation Gratitude).      PE  teachers  and  coaches  often  collaborate  with  teachers  of  academic  classes  to  monitor  progress of their students. 

Evidence in Support of Findings  • • •

Daily Running   Teacher Guided Lesson plans   Equipment 

• • •

Writing across the Curriculum   Sustained Silent Reading   Letters to deployed troops 

Teacher notes 

  Master Program 

   

 

    The  adaptive  P.E.  programs  accommodate  students  with  special  physical needs 

   

  E C R   

179| P a g e  


Findings  English/Language Arts 

Evidence in Support of Findings     

  The  English/Language  Arts  Department  offers  students  a  challenging,  learning  experience  that  gives  them  the  opportunity  to  achieve  the  academic  standards  and  the  Expected  School‐wide  Learning  Results.  The  teachers  review  units,  model  activities,  use  rubrics,  and  post  samples  of  benchmark  essays  and  research  papers.       9th  and  10th  grade  English  classes  incorporate  district  designed  lesson plans. 12th grade Expository  Composition  classes  utilize  lesson  plans  and  thematic  units  created  by  California  State  University  in  order  to  better  prepare  our  students  for  higher  education.  At  every  grade  level,  students  read  core  works  that  are  culturally  relevant,  meritorious  works  of  literature.  Students  write  a  minimum  of  three  graded  essays  per  course  per  semester.      

  E C R   

• • • • • •

Cooperative group work   Frequent class discussions   Small group discussions   Drafts, peer editing, and revisions   Teacher‐ Created  Assessments   Written Assessments  

Think/ Pair Share/Whole Class  Discussion   Teacher‐ Created  Assessments   Projects   Periodic Assessment Data   Gist statements   Graphic Organizers  Core Works list 

   

• • • • • •

180| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

Programs such as PowerPoint,  Inspiration and others are used in  the computer labs and classrooms  to promote student interest, ability,  and academic rigor. The Developing  Readers and Writers Course  (DRWC) uses technology  such as  computers, voice recorders, and  other tools to increase literacy for  students scoring “basic” and “far  below basic” on the California  Standards Test.  Students in the 11th and 12th  grades who have not passed the  CAHSEE are placed in intervention  courses where they receive  extended test preparation in  addition to the core curriculum.  Members of the English  Department teach CAHSEE  intervention programs such as Boot  Camp, an intensive intervention  course during the instructional day  one week prior to the CAHSEE in  the Spring and in the Fall, and after‐ school preparation programs.   

PowerPoint Presentations  

Webquest and Quizstar for  Teachers   Webs.com  

• • • • • • • •

Research projects (MLA format)   Computer Lab log   Exposing all students to high level  Textbooks  Equipment  Lesson plans  CAHSEE  Boot Camp Rosters   CAHSEE Boot Camp Sign‐in 

• • •

SDAIE methods   Projects   Assignments  

  Differentiated instruction is used to  increase students’ understanding of  the content standards and Expected  School‐wide Learning Results. 

                       

 

    E C R   

181| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  Students in 9th and 10th grade  classes use a readers/writers  notebook to provide reading,  thinking, and writing practice.  Multicultural, high‐interest texts are  provided to students in order to  increase interest in the subject  matter while emphasizing analytical  and cognitive skills. Students  regularly synthesize material from  various sources to write papers.  More often than not, there is an oral  component to this exercise.   

English as a Second Language ESL   

  E C R   

 The  English  as  a  Second  Language  (ESL)  program  at  El  Camino  Real  High  School  consists  of  one  class  with  a  two‐period  block.   Students  receive  direct  instruction  using  the  Hampton‐Brown  Highpoint  program.   This  program  provides  standards‐based  instruction  with  specialized  instructional  strategies  to meet the needs of each language  level  in  the  classroom.  To  provide  students with a challenging learning  experience, they  are  placed  at correct instructional levels, based  on assessments  done  when  they  first  enter  the  classroom  using  the  Diagnostic  and  Placement  Inventory,  provided  by  the  Highpoint  program.  During  the  semester, they work in small groups  and  receive  direct  instruction  in  language  development  and  communication,  concepts  and  vocabulary,  reading  strategies  and  comprehension,  literary  analysis,  critical  thinking  skills,  speaking,  listening, viewing, and representing, 

• • • • • • • •

Student Texts  Graphic Organizers   Anticipation guides   Individual/Group projects   Models, posters, videos,  supplemental texts    Oral report   Reader’s/Writer's Notebook  Research paper 

    • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Read 180 Data  DRWC Classroom         High Point prepared exams   Lesson plans   Various modes of teacher created  tests  Projects (individual)   Models, posters, videos           Oral presentations/ assessments   High Point textbooks/workbook   Student portfolios   Writing and research project   Semantic & scaffolding programs   PowerPoint presentations   Student Information System (SIS)  data                       182| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings  • • •

and  writing.   Students  are  assessed  throughout  the  semester  using  selection  tests  for  each  reading  piece,  unit  tests  in  standardized  format,  language  acquisition  assessments,  and  writing  assessments.  Students  in  this  program  are  highly  successful.  A  third  of  them  progress  to  10th  grade  regular  English  classes  every  year.  Additionally,  students  in  other grades progress to their grade  level in mainstream English classes.  

• • •

Mathematics   A  rigorous,  relevant,  and  standards‐based  curriculum drives  instruction  of  mathematics.  The  results  have  been  impressive:  El  Camino  students  continue  to  improve  even  with  budget  and  program  cuts.    El  Camino  has  increased  the  number  of  students  scoring  in  the  proficient  or  advanced  levels  every  year  since  2006,  with  45%  of  ECR  students  scoring  at  proficient  or  advanced  level  on  the  2010  CST.      The  teachers  consistently  analyze  data  from  district  Periodic  Assessments to inform instruction.   

Student portfolio   High Point assessments   California English Language  Development Test (CELDT) data   LAUSD student records   Counselor Individualized Education  Plans (IGP) for students.   Master program             

    California Framework   Department/ Content Area meeting  minutes   CST data 

• •

Department meeting agendas   Periodic  Assessment data  

• •

                 

         

  E C R   

183| P a g e  


Findings    Teachers  use  technology  to  enhance  their  teaching.  In  addition  to  graphing  calculators,  students  use  Carnegie  software  to  facilitate  their  learning.  One  of  the  teaching  techniques  includes  the  use  of  personal  white  boards  for  instant  teacher feedback.    El  Camino  counselors  are  aware  of  their  students’  abilities  and  place  them  accordingly.  Students  struggling  in  geometry  may  take  Advanced Applied Math while those  looking for a greater challenge may  take  Calculus.  AP  Calculus  students  (AB  and  BC)  score  far  above  the  national  average  and  the  passing  rate  has  been  100%  for  the  last  several years.    Students  participate  in  various  mathematics competitions and fare  very  well.  Teachers  oversee  these  competitions  and  encourage  students  to  enter  these.   For  example  CML,  ASM  and  NAMAC  competitions  are  held  on  a  regular  basis.  Students  seeking  a  challenging  math  experience  sign  up  through  the  PETs  program  to  tutor  their  peers  at  lunch  time.  Math‐Science  Academy  students  participate  in  Pi  Day  when  they  compete  to  memorize  the  maximum number of digits in Pi. 

Evidence in Support of Findings  • • •

Personal White Boards  LCD Projectors  PowerPoint Presentations 

• • •

Counseling office records  Master Schedule   AP scores  

           

         

• • •

• •

California Math League (CML)  American Scholastic Math(ASM)  National American Math Association  Competition‐‐10th and 12th grades  (NAMAC)  Pi Day  PETs 

 

  E C R   

184| P a g e  


Findings  Social Studies  

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  The  department  uses  a  variety  of  teaching  strategies  designed  to  help  students  achieve  the  content  standards  and  ESLRs.  Teachers  implement a number of instructional  strategies  that  they  learn  in  professional  development  and  at  a  variety of conferences sponsored by  organizations  such  as,  the  Museum  of  Tolerance,  History  Alive,  and  the  California Department of Education.    Students  participate  in  the  Mock  Trial  program  and  regularly  win  awards  in  competitions.   Another  highly  successful  activity  is  the  Economic Summit in which groups of  students become experts on various  countries.  Prior  to  the  event,  for  seven  weeks,  students  prepare  by  researching  and  discussing  international  trade,  finance,  and  banking  issues.  At  the  International  Economic  Summit  groups  of  students  who  are  “experts”  on  various  countries,  showcase  that  country's  characteristics.  Students  make  models,  serve  food,  provide  music, and dress up in the country's  costumes. This event is presented to  the entire school and teachers bring  students  to  experience  this  wonderful  event  that  serves  as  a  rare  exposure  to  various  cultures  and fosters understanding. 

• • • •

    Department meeting agendas   Lesson plans   Conference agendas   Professional Development agendas 

                • • • • • • • • •

Mock Trial briefs   Research papers   Essays   Position papers   Student debates  Photographs   Portfolios   Artifacts   Invitation/ announcement/agenda       

 

  E C R   

185| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  Social  Studies  department  uses  strategies  such  as  SDAIE,  differentiated  instruction,  graphic  organizers,  oral  presentations,  simulations,  projects,  quizzes,  term  papers  and  teacher  generated  examinations.      Since  2008‐09,  the  department  has  begun  implementing  the  LAUSD  mandated  Periodic  Assessments.  Teachers  use  data  from  these  assessments  to  inform  their  instructional  practice.  However,  prior  to  the  development  of  these  assessments,  the  social  studies  department  had  created  and  continues  to  refine  its  own  lessons  that are aligned to the standards and  ESLRs.  The  Social  Studies  department meets regularly to share  best practices. 

World Languages and Cultures    The World Languages department has  worked  diligently  to  create  a  nurturing  and  academically  challenging  environment.  The  department  adheres  closely  to  a  standards‐based  curriculum  as  designated by the State of California.  The standards are implemented at all  levels  to  provide  rigorous,  relevant,  and coherent instruction. 

 Lesson plans 

• • • •

Assessment data   Department meeting agendas   California Framework  Department lessons 

Content Standards 

                                      

 

  E C R   

186| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  Advanced  Placement  courses  are  offered  for  both  university  credits  and to enhance learning. All teachers  take  current  training  to  remain  abreast  of  research  and  advances  in  foreign  language  acquisition.  Differentiated  instruction,  strict  pacing,  monitoring  and  feedback  of  standards  assure  all  students  receive  the  support  they  need  for  academic  success.  The  department  meets  regularly  to  share  best  practices  and  to  continue  to  track  the  effective  methods  that  make  our  students  successful.  

• • • • • •

During  the  two  years  they  take  a  foreign  language,  students  grow  to  appreciate different cultures and also  have the opportunity to validate their  own  culture  through  various  projects  and  presentations.  These  projects  include  music,  food,  and  celebration  of  holidays  such  as,  Dia  de  los  Muertos,  and  special  programs  on  historic  days.  Students  research  and  learn  about  artists  such  as  Rivera,  Kahlo, Botero and Picasso.  In several  classes  the  culminating  project  is  the  Family  Tree  in  which  the  student  explores  his/her  own  heritage.  In  addition to the classroom experience,  students  participate  in  school‐wide  organizations,  French  Club,  National  French  Honor  Society  and  Foreign  Film  Club.  Interested  students  also  take an annual trip to France. 

• • • • •

Conference agendas   Professional Development agendas  AP rosters/scores  SDAIE/Scaffolding   Repetition/review   Department meeting agendas 

         

   

  E C R   

Oral presentations/ assessments    Posters/graphic organizers   Projects/group assignments   Family Tree Projects  Club list 

                          

187| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  The  Expected  School‐wide  Learning  Results  (ESLRs)  are  supported  by  emphasis  on  written  and  oral  communication  which  provides  the  opportunity  for  problem  solving  and  critical  thinking.  Teachers'  expectations  regarding  work  habits  encourage students to persevere and  take  responsibility  for  their  own  actions. 

• • • • • • • •

Directions   Written assessments   Quizzes/ exams   Letters to parents   Daily warm‐up activities   Grammar review   Master Program              A‐G requirements 

Teachers  help  students  internalize  and  master  the  material  by  incorporating  technology.  Students  give  PowerPoint  presentations,  use  digital and video cameras for projects  and work in the computer labs.     

• • • •

Computer lab sign‐ups   Student‐created digital media   Audio‐visual Equipment   Presentations 

   

  World  languages  are  not  yet  required  for  graduation,  however,  our program is very large (48 classes  and  9  teachers)  as  college  bound  students need two or more years of  foreign  language  for  admission;  many  students  also  take  foreign  language  even  though  they  are  not  planning  to  attend  college  right  away.  These  highly  academic  electives promote critical thinking as  students  progress  toward  proficiency. 

• Master Program 

    E C R   

188| P a g e  


Findings  Health and Life Skills    All  freshmen  are  required  to  take  both  Life  Skills  and  Health  courses.  The Health and Life Skills Department  provides  a  challenging  learning  experience  that  is  relevant  and  necessary  to  succeed  as  adults.   Through  differentiated  instruction  and alternative assessments, students  receive  a  rigorous,  standards‐based  curriculum  that  is  both  engaging  and  useful. 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

• • •

      District guidelines   State Health Standards  Lesson plans 

• •

  Department meeting agendas  Lesson plans 

• •

Individual Graduation Plan  Student Handbook 

 

  Health  and  Life  Skills  teachers  collaborate  during  department  meetings  and  share  best  practices.  The  department  follows  state  standards  to  guide  instruction.  In  order  to  provide  much  needed  support  for  freshmen,  teachers  employ  a  variety  of  educational  strategies  that  include  SDAIE  and  Concept  Mapping,  oral  and  visual  presentations, and cooperative group  work.  These  practices  ensure  all  students  have  access  to  a  rigorous  and relevant instructional experience. 

              

  Life  Skills  students  are  taught  that  they  are  accountable  for  the  choices  they make, with an emphasis on skills  essential  to  succeed  in  an  academic  environment  as  well  as  in  the  workplace.  Students  are  required  to  create  their  four‐year  high  school  plan  and  identify  their  goals.  As  a  result  of  these  exercises,  students  become  aware  of  their  options  and  opportunities.    E C R   

     

189| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  The  College  counselor  visits  the  classes  to  inform  students  of  the  graduation  requirements, A‐G  requirements,  available  scholarships,  and other opportunities. Students are  surveyed  to  better  assess  their  aptitudes  and  interests.  Class  activities  teach  students  interpersonal  skills,  cultural  sensitivity, and conflict resolution. 

• •

College office record  Career surveys 

• • • • • • • • • •

Life Skills curriculum  State Content Standards   Question and answer sessions   Debates   Group projects   Projects   Independent research projects   Models, posters, videos   Oral presentations/ assessments   Posters, audio‐video presentations  

  The  Health  course  emphasizes  the  development  of  concepts,  attitudes  and  skills  necessary  to  make  healthy  choices.  The  topics  covered  are:  personal  health,  consumer  and  community  health,  injury  prevention  and  safety,  effects  of  alcohol,  tobacco,  and  other  drugs,  nutrition,  environmental  health,  family  living,  individual  growth  and  development,  and  communicable  and  chronic  diseases.  Some  aspects  of  human  reproduction  and  sexually  transmitted  diseases  are  also  covered.   

Visual Arts  All students are required by LAUSD to  take ten credits of either a Visual Art  or Performing Art.  Students  interested in the arts may choose  from a broad array of class offerings  that go beyond LAUSD requirements.  

   • •

LAUSD requirements   State Arts Standards 

       

 

  E C R   

190| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  The  Visual  Arts  Department  uses  a  variety  of  strategies  that  give  students  access  to  the  content  standards.  These  strategies  include:  rough  sketches,  original  works  based  on: personal experiences, cultural and  environmental  concerns,  and  historical  styles.  Students  use visual  aids  that  accompany  verbal  and  written instructions.  

• • • • •

  Oral reports   Projects (posters, models, videos,  pop‐up books)   Portfolios for college admission   Portfolios for AP credit   Group projects  

     

    Students'  works  are  exhibited  annually  in  the  Melody  of  Words  literacy  fair  that  includes  several  local  LAUSD  schools  and  the  community.  Students  participate  in  the school‐wide writing program and  Sustained Silent Reading. They enter  in  the  annual  California  State  University  at  Northridge  Art  exhibit  and  The  Big  Event  which  showcases  student art. To maintain a relevancy  to  the  real  world,  the  Visual  Arts  Department  incorporates  skills  used  in the business world. 

• • • • •

Writing Across the Curriculum Essays Packaging design projects   Business card design and print   Written assessments (Career essay  project)   Logos, Children's books 

 

Performing Arts  The  Performing  Arts  Department  provides  all  students  with  challenging  learning  experiences  to  achieve  or  exceed  the  content  standards and expected school‐wide  learning results. 

        • •

State Art Standards   ESLRs poster 

    E C R   

191| P a g e  


Findings    Teachers  use  a  variety  of  instructional  strategies  to  ensure  understanding of academic content.      Performing Arts students participate  in  field  tournaments,  concerts,  and  parades.  Play  production  stages  full  length  plays  in  both  Fall  and  Spring  semesters;  each  is  a  public  performance for the community.   

Evidence in Support of Findings  • • •

Scaffolding   Differentiated instruction  Written and oral assessments 

• • •

Programs   Parades/festivals   Playbills/brochures   

• • •

Master Schedule  Drama Competitions/Festivals  Photos of sets 

• • •

Lesson Plans   Course Syllabus   Concerts 

     

   El  Camino  offers  an  array  of  challenging courses for students with  prior dramatic experience who desire  to  sharpen  their  fundamental  theatrical skills in acting, pantomime,  and  improvisation.  Also,  for  the  less  experienced student, El Camino offers  training  in  fundamental  skills  of  theater  arts.  All  students  study  pantomime,  improvisation,  voice  and  diction,  interpretive  techniques,  creation  of  character,  and  projection  of  ideas  and  emotions.  Students  also  learn  set  building  and  other  stage  craft.  Second  semester  students  participate  in  the  production  of  one‐ act plays. 

        

    Choir,  Camerata,  and  Band  students  also  perform  several  times  throughout  the  year.  They  have  concerts  and  compete  in  local  festivals.   

  E C R   

192| P a g e  


Findings  Business Technology    The  Business  Technology  Department  uses  tailored  lessons  which  consist  of  virtual and hands‐on project. 

Evidence in Support of Findings   

  The Introduction to Computers course prepares students with the necessary skills to complete the advanced computer  technology courses, while preparing them  to integrate technology in their core classes. 

• • •

Adobe Flash‐Virtual assessments  Interactive video tutorials  Online  quizzes‐with  instant  review  and student feedback 

• •

PowerPoint Oral Presentations  Print/photo Software  i.e. Indesign  and PhotoShop‐integrates with  school newspaper, and Yearbook  development  Group projects 

  •

Graphic  Design,  funded  by  the  Regional  Occupation  Program,  is  a  180‐hour certified program. Students  participate  in  various  industry  competitions, in which ECR has taken  first place several times. 

• •

Independent research projects  Models, posters, videos  Audio‐visual presentations  Student Logo's, Newsletter 

  

 

Students gain an understanding of the print industry, internet media, the visual arts, design principles, typography, and color theory. Students must solve a specific problem for the client, creating a design that is original and communicates a message to a  designated audience. Students design logos, newsletters and brochures. 

  E C R   

  • • •      

Master program  Competition awards  Student created projects 

 

193| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  Students learn to illustrate, scan and  manipulate  digital  images.  They  use  computer  applications  used  in  the  industry  including  Adobe  Illustrator,  Photoshop  and  InDesign  to  apply  design  skills  to  the  projects  presented in class.  

• • • •

Wood Working   

       •

All students taking wood working are  required  to  complete  projects  that  are  challenging  that  support  core  subject standards and ESLRs.          The  class  includes  many  different  levels of woodworkers. It is designed  as  a  "hands‐on  learning"  class  for  both  beginning  and  advanced  students.   All  students  gain  real  world knowledge that is relevant and  applicable  to  careers  in  woodworking.       Students  learn  basic  skills  in  planning,  assembling,  and  finishing  projects.   Assignments  include  cabinet  making,  display  tables,  chess/checker  boards,  intricate  art  boxes, and pens. 

Class Lessons and Observations  Student projects  Class syllabus  Projects 

Wood Shop Standards             

  • •            

Course outline  Classroom Projects 

     • •

Class syllabus  Projects 

     

  

  E C R   

194| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  Wood  Working  participates  in  the  campus‐wide  literacy  program  in  which  students  research  and  write  about  specific  careers  in  the  woodworking/construction  field.  In  addition,  students  are  also  required  to  write  essays  and  research  papers  that  examine  specific  and  relevant  topics.  

• • • • •

Silent Sustained Reading  Writing across the Curriculum  Teacher Designed Quizzes  Student Essays  Student created projects 

 

Family & Consumer Studies  (FACS)    All FACS teachers utilize the State of  California Career Technical Education  (CTE) standards to plan coursework.   

    •

Lesson Plans    

• • • •

Student portfolios  Designed based instruction  Student‐created lesson plans  Collaborative learning Groups 

 

Fashion  Courses  in  this  CTE  career‐pathway  offer  hands‐on  instruction  to  train    students  to  use  industry‐standard  equipment  to   create  garments.  Students  become  experts  in  using  sewing  machines,  sergers  and  other  equipment  to  produce  and  alter  clothing.   

  E C R   

        

195| P a g e  


Findings  Students  are  evaluated  according  to  the  effectiveness  of  the  work.  The  teachers  in  the  fashion  program  collaborate  with  Fashion  Institute  of  Design and Merchandising (FIDM) to  offer  and  plan  opportunities  for  students  interested  in  pursuing  a  career  in  the  field  of  design  and  merchandising.  This  pathway  serves  as an introduction to careers into the  retail industry. 

Interior Design    Students  in  the  Interior  Design  course utilize the same techniques as  professional  interior  designers  to  create  storyboards  and  floor‐plans.  Special  emphasis  is  placed  on  the  proper  use  of  measurement,  color  theory, and employable skills.     

Evidence in Support of Findings  • •

Field Trips Student Projects 

• •

Class lessons  Projects 

• •

  Curriculum  Classroom Observations  C‐CAP Competitions 

                 

 

           

 

Culinary Arts  

  E C R   

The Culinary Arts career pathway is a  practical, hands‐on  course  in  which  students  learn  both  basic  culinary  arts  skills   as  well  as  exotic  cuisine.  Students  learn  to  follow  recipes  and  complicated  methods  involved  in  various  types  of  cooking.  Students  who  participate  in  the  Advanced  Culinary  course  receive  special  skills  training  from  the  Career  in  Culinary  Arts  Program  (C‐CAP).   These  students are eligible to participate in  city‐wide  competitions  which  can  lead  to  scholarships  for culinary  arts  colleges.   

•    

196| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  Family and Consumer Studies classes  support  the  core  subjects,  such  as  math  and  science,  as  they  use  measurements  and  weights  to  produce a product. English Language  Arts  skills  are  supported  as  students  communicate/express  their  ideas  and respond to both oral and written  assessments. 

• • •

Writing across the Curriculum  Sustained Silent Reading  Class assessments 

  

 

 NJROTC 

       

   The  NJROTC  instructors  believe  the  mission of the program is to instill in  the  cadets  the  value  of  citizenship,  service  to  the  United  States,  personal  responsibility  and  a  sense  of  accomplishment.  The  department  achieves  this  by  challenging  the  students physically and mentally.       NJROTC  integrates  concepts  and  standards  from  other  disciplines.  All  cadets  are  physically  challenged  to  meet  the  P.E.  standards  to  pass  the  Fitnessgram.   Reading  and  writing  skills  are  developed  by  studying  scientific  topics  such  as  oceanography  and  weaponry.   In  addition,  cadets  study  current  and  past military history.     In  order  to  value  citizenship  to  the  United States, all cadets are required  to  perform  a  minimum  of  twenty  hours of community service. 

• • •

Course objectives  Department meetings  Fitnessgram results 

Student volunteer logs 

 

     

  E C R   

197| P a g e  


Findings    Computers  are  available  in  the  classroom  to  provide  students  further  opportunities  to  research  future  goals  and  to  prepare  for  and  take standardized exams 

Special Education     The  department  works  diligently  with  every  facet  of  students'  education  to  assist  them  in  achieving  state  standards  in  all  classes  and  expected  school  wide  learning  results.  The  instructional  programs  available  to  students  include:  • • • • •

Special day program (SLD)  Resource programs (RSP)  Emotionally disturbed (ED)  Inclusion program  General education support.      Special  education  students  are  mainstreamed  into  elective  classes,  PE, and academic classes as per their  Individualized Education Plans (IEPs).  RSP  students  have  access  to  the  learning center and may be enrolled  in  a  resource  elective  for  more  intensive  support  in  English  and  Algebra. All resource students spend  the  majority  of  the  day  enrolled  in  general education classes. 

Evidence in Support of Findings  •

 Student projects 

• • • • • •

California State Content Standards  Master program  Teacher logs  Class rosters  Special education office records  Student IEPs 

 

   

                   

  

  E C R   

198| P a g e  


Findings     All  special  education  classed  are  aligned  to  State  and  District  standards.  General  education,  English,  Mathematics,  Science,  Life  Skills,  Health,  and  Social  Studies  curricula  are  implemented  in  the  special day classes. 

Evidence in Support of Findings  • •

State Content Standards  Course descriptions 

             

     General  education  teachers  collaborate  with  the  special  education  department  in  the  implementation  of  Individualized  Education  Plans  (IEPs)  and  provide  students  access  to  rigorous  and  relevant instruction.    

  E C R   

• •

IEP Records  Lesson Plans 

           

199| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

     ECR  has  53  collaborative  classes  in  which  a  variety  of  teaching  formats, including  co‐teaching,  parallel teaching, team  teaching are  used  to  assist  all  students  in  maximizing  their  potential  for  success in the classroom. El Camino  Real  has  31  English  collaborative  and  22  Math  collaborative  classes  for  the  resource  students  which  make  collaboration  of  teaching  styles  and  strategies  possible.  Special  Education  students  participate  in  LAUSD  district  designed  lessons  and  assessments. In  both  mainstreamed  and  Special  Education  classrooms,  methods such as Socratic Seminars,  Readers/Writers  notebooks,  SDAIE  strategies  and  other  team  collaborations  help  the  students  relate  to  each  other  while  focusing  on  the  curriculum. Special  education students also have access  to  community  college  classes  on  campus  and  after  school  online  classes  for  credit  recovery.  Many  students  are  enrolled  in  vocation  education classes, computer graphic  design, and web design. 

• • • • •

Master Program  Collaborative class schedule  Pierce College course list  WVOC course list  Online class roster 

 

  E C R   

200| P a g e  


C­2.  To  what  extent  do  all  teachers  use  a  variety  of  strategies  and  resources,  including  technology  and  experiences  beyond  the  textbook  and  the  classroom,  that  actively  engage  students  emphasize  higher  order  thinking  skills,  and  help  them succeed at high levels?  Summary of Findings:   The  faculty  at  El  Camino  Real  High  School  continuously  searches  to  provide  students  with  rigorous,  relevant  enrichment  opportunities  that  go  well  beyond  the  traditional  textbook  and classroom experience. Students can participate in one of our interest‐based academies  such as, Math/Science Academy and the Careers in Entertainment Academy.  In addition to  projects,  students  stage  plays,  publish  a  school  newspaper,  produce  short  films,  create  shows based on poetry, arrange original music and engage in other creative endeavors; all  of this is done under faculty guidance and support. Students interact with guest speakers,  participate  in  field  trips,  attend  performances,  and  collaborate  on  various  events  and  projects. Students are involved in almost 80 official clubs and organizations that boast more  than  1,500  members.  In  addition,  there  are  over  20  different  athletic  teams  of  various  levels:  Frosh/Soph.,  JV,  and  Varsity. These  opportunities  offer  a  variety  of  experiences  that  help produce more well‐rounded and more confident students. Our highly successful Academic  Decathlon team brings in experts from both the school and from outside; the coaches stay  with  the  team  well  beyond  the  regular  school  hours  for  special  instruction  as  well  as  for  regular  study  sessions.  The  faculty  strongly  believes  in  enriching  the  lives  of  not  only  our  students  but  the  community.   All  students  are  strongly  encouraged  to  join  one  of  many  charitable  organizations  at  El  Camino  such  as  Smile  Train,  Young  Hearts  Mended,  Taboo,  Interact,  and  Co‐exist. In  addition  to  these  experiences,  the  faculty  consistently  searches  for  more  partnerships  and  attempts  innovative  ways  to  engage  students  that  go  beyond  the  textbook and the classroom           

    E C R   

201| P a g e  


Findings  English Language Arts     The  English  Department  explores  a  variety  of  beyond  the  textbook  and  classroom  experiences  to  promote  higher  order  thinking  skills  to  help  students  succeed  at  higher  levels.  To  make  literature  more relevant  to  their  students,  English  teachers  often  take  their  fifth  and  sixth  period  classes  to  theatrical  productions  on  campus.   English  teachers  in  Humanitas  and  Art  and  Design  Academy  take  students  on  field  trips  to  vocational  schools;  these  experiences  emphasize  future  opportunities  and  relevance  of  what  they  are  studying.  English  teachers  regularly  take  their  classes  to  the  library  and  the  computer  lab  for  research and MLA format training.        Three  English  teachers  regularly  take  students  to  Europe  on  educational  tours in the summer.      To encourage students to further their  English  studies,  El  Camino  Real  offers  many electives.  Students apply newly‐ acquired skill sets as they participate in  the  school  newspaper,  The  King's  Courier; students have also toured the  newsrooms  and  printing  facilities  of  local  newspapers.  El  Camino  Journalism  students  regularly  receive  awards  in  national  competitions.  ECReality,  a  News  video  production,  promotes  investigative,  analytical,  and  critical  analysis  of  school  news  and  current events. 

  E C R   

Evidence in Support of Findings       • • • • • •

 Shakespeare performance    Play production schedule   Field trip logs   Library sign in   Computer lab sign in   Summer reading list 

Trips to France and England 

• • • • • • • • •

Master Program   Counseling office records  School newspaper  Journalism competition records  ECReality website  PowerPoint   Student videos  Field trip logs  Awards     

                   

 

202| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  • • • • • • •

Students  engage  in  Socratic  Seminars,  create projects,  and reports that show  knowledge  of  standards  and  ESLRs.  Students’  reports  incorporate  technology  to  present  their  findings,  such  as,  on  Victorian  England  or  in  "Live  with  an  Author."  AP  students  research the American Dream concept  after the AP exam, score original music  for poetry, attend the Jane Austen Ball  at  UCLA,  read  independently  for  the  summer  reading  program,  write  their  Personal  Statements  for  UC  application,  research  writers'  lives  and  works for term papers. Several English  teachers  sponsor  charitable  organizations such as Smile Train, as a  way  of  encouraging  their  students  to  participate in serving the community.  

• • • •

Independent Research Papers   Models, Posters,   Audio‐visual presentations   Live with an author/poet research papers  Oral presentations/ assessments     Group projects   Use of poetry to create original musical  scores (ex: AP Lit: Lord Byron's "She  Walks in Beauty")  Student documentaries  Little Tokyo/link to Manzanar  Melody of Words (Community Literacy  Fair)  Community Service/Club meeting  schedule 

 

English as a Second Language  (ESL)     The  English  Second  Language  (ESL)  program at El Camino Real High School  consists of one class with a two‐period  block.   Students  receive  direct  instruction  using  the  Hampton‐Brown  Highpoint  program.   This  program  provides  standards‐based  instruction  with specialized instructional strategies  to  meet  the  needs  of  each  language  level  in  the  classroom.   In  order  to  place  students  at  the  correct  instructional  level,  students  are  assessed  when  they  first  enter  the  classroom  using  the  Diagnostic  and  Placement  Inventory,  provided  by  the  Highpoint program.  Students are then  CONT.  placed  into  group  levels  –  1A,  1B, 2A, 2B, 3, or 4 – in which they will  work throughout the semester.  During    E C R   

    • • • • • • • •

Hampton Brown High Point Application    Lesson plans   Specialized language acquisition  strategies  High Point assessments  Small group activities  Writing samples  Student projects  Exit tests for the next level 

 

203| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

the semester, they work in these small  groups  to  receive  direct  instruction  in  language  developments  and  communication,  concepts  and  vocabulary,  reading  strategies  and  comprehension,  literary  analysis,  critical  thinking  skills,  speaking,  listening,  viewing,  and  representing,  and  writing.   When  students  pass  the  semester with a C or better, they move  on to the next language level.   

Mathematics  The  El  Camino  Real  math  department  uses many tools that support and help  students  go  beyond  the  textbook  and  classroom.  Technology  is  incorporated  into  math  classes  when  necessary.   Teachers  use  on‐line  videos  regularly  for  presenting  information.  Students  use on‐line text books and worksheets.  The  department  believes  that  appropriate use of technology engages  students and makes the material more  accessible.  Various projects are used as an integral  part  in  all  math  classes  to  enrich  the  curriculum.  When  appropriate,  students  are  exposed  to  real  world  situations  to  apply  their  math  skills.   Economic  (personal  and  national)  situations  and  architecture  are  two  fields  that  are  used  to  reinforce  concepts  students  learn.   Out  of  class  experiences  include  the  measurement  of  lengths  and  angles  of  objects  on  campus  and  at  home.   Differentiated  and  layered  instructions  enable  all  students  to  experience  success  in  mathematics.    E C R   

     • •

Internet research   Online material 

• • • • • • • • • •

Web Quest  Written assessments   Oral reports   Individual/group projects    Skits, songs, models, posters, videos   PowerPoint presentations   Audio‐video presentations   Math Contests   Research projects   Pi Day  

        

   

204| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings  •

Students  use  graphing  scientific  calculators  whenever  appropriate.   These  calculators  are  used  to  process  graphs of equations and help students  understand  the  tendencies  of  certain  types of functions. 

  

Science 

      

The  science  department  strives  to  create  an  experience  that  goes  beyond the textbook by enriching the  curriculum.  To meet all state content  standards,  teachers  use  the  course  textbook  as  a  guideline  and  a  reference  book  for  students  to  have  at home as a learning aid.  Technology  is  regularly  used  in  the  classroom  to  make  the  information  more  accessible.  Students actively participate in labs in  all  science  classes.  In  self‐directed  groups,  students  are  required  to  present their research to the class.  Speakers  are  invited  to  present  their  research  and  laboratory  experiments  to  bring  real  life  experiences  to  the  classroom.   El  Camino  offers  a  Math  and  Science  Academy  for  students  with  an  aptitude  for,  and  interest  in,  the  sciences.   In  addition,  students  may  choose from many science electives.      Students  participate  on  field  trips  to  local  universities,  national  parks,  and  Magic  Mountain.   These  events  enrich  the  science  experience  beyond  the  classroom  and  promote  higher  level  thinking  while  engaging  the  students  in highly  enjoyable  activities.   These  enriching and varied experiences allow  the  teachers  to  use  a  wide  range  of    E C R   

Graphing scientific calculators 

        

• • •

Course websites  Podcasts  Document cameras and laptops  

      

• • •

Labs Projects (models, poster boards, Power  Point)  Persentations 

Speaker logs

Counseling records

 

  

• • • • • • •

Field trip logs Physics Day Magic  Mountain  Ecohelpers  Baxter  CSUN, UCLA, Moorpark College  Short answer assessments  Group projects  Research essays  205| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

assessments  to  check  for  understanding  at  different  levels  than  traditional tests.   

Social Studies   The  Social  Studies  Department  enhances  student  experience  beyond  the textbook and classroom. Students  are  engaged  in  projects  that  make  them  go  beyond  the  traditional  historical  topics  and  content  standards.   Projects  include  student  created  videos,  debates,  a  5‐minute  radio  show,  Mock  Trials,  Model  UN,  Urban  Planning  and  role‐playing  based  on  historical  events.  To  be  more proactive in the political process  and  appreciate  the  government  systems,  students  are  required  to  write  to  public  officials  regarding  important  social  issues  and  encouraged  to  work  for  political  candidates.   Eighty to  a  hundred  students  work  as  poll  workers  for  each election.   The  Social  Studies  Department  incorporates  technology  in  the  curriculum while meeting the ESLRs to  engage  students.   All  Social  Studies  students  are  required  to  research  topics  on  the  internet  for  essays  and  presentations.   While  teachers  use  PowerPoint  presentations  for  day  to  day  information,  students  are  required to work in groups and create  their  own  PowerPoint  presentations  as well.     E C R   

• • • • • • • • •

    Student debates   Oral reports   Group projects   Posters   Oral presentations/ assessments   Mock Trial briefs   Model UN  Role playing  Poll worker logs  

• • • •

Computer lab sign‐in   PowerPoint presentations   Audio‐video presentations   Research papers  

                   

                  

206| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  To  provide  real  world  applications,  guest  speakers  are  regularly  invited  to  speak  and  hold  discussions  with  students.   Speakers  in  the  past  have  included  individuals  from  Brooks  Institute,  FIDM,  Westwood  College,  The  Art  Institute,  and  Le  Cordon  Bleu.  Students  also  research  the  stock  market,  prepare  individual  investment  portfolios, and present their gains and  losses.   The culminating project for all  seniors  is  the  International  Economic  Summit.  This project includes research  the culture, history and economics of a  chosen country.    The Social Studies Department is proud  of  the  community  service  experiences  in  which  El  Camino  students  participate.   Although  LAUSD  mandates  that  all  students  fulfill  a  service‐learning  requirement  prior  to  graduation,  our  students  take  this  farther  than  the  minimum  requirement.   There  are  over  a  dozen  community/cultural  clubs  that  work  directly  with  various  charitable  organizations. 

• • • • •

  Guest speaker logs   Student investment portfolios   Service Learning records   Service Learning coordinator records  Economic Summit photos/artifacts  

• •

Community service records/lesson plans  Club List 

• • •

Master Program  Lesson plans  School calendar 

              

    

    For students seeking a greater challenge  may  take  one  or  more  Advanced  Placement  courses.  El  Camino  offers  seven  AP  courses  in  Social  Studies.  To  assist these students, teachers regularly  hold  AP  review  sessions  after  school  and  lunch.  Plus  teachers  hold  mock  AP  examinations  in  the  Spring  to  better  prepare the students.    E C R   

  

207| P a g e  


Findings    In  the  past,  social  studies  students  would  take  field  trips  to  the  Van  Nuys  Courthouse,  Museum  of  Tolerance,  Ethnic  LA,  USC  Economic  Summit,  and  the  Getty  Museum  to  experience  history  in  forms  other  than  as  described  in  texts.  However,  due  to  budget  cuts  and  policy  mandates,  Social  Studies  students  now  only  attend Ethnic LA, Peterson Automobile  Museum and Law Day. During Law Day,  students  participate  in  a  mock  trial  at  the  County  Court  House  and  have  the  opportunity to interact with judges and  law enforcement personnel. 

World Languages & Cultures     This  department  works  diligently  to  provide  opportunities  for  students  to  experience  content  beyond  the  traditional textbook.      The  cultures  for  both  Spanish  and  French  speaking  countries  are  presented  to  students  in  a  variety  of  ways.  Students  from  Spanish  and  French  speaking  homes  play  an  integral  part  in  bringing  relevance  to  the course. Based on the knowledge of  their  food,  music,  traditions,  personal  experiences,  oral  traditions,  customs,  and holidays these students effectively  transport  the  class  well  beyond  the  textbooks.   

  E C R   

Evidence in Support of Findings  •

Field trip records  

     

   • •

Lesson plans  Group projects  

• • •

Models, posters  Food  Share time (bringing personal things) 

208| P a g e  


Findings    The  World  Languages  and  Cultures  department  involves     students  in  a  number  of  culturally  relevant  events  on campus such as, Dia de los Muertos,  Cinco  de  Mayo,  Food  tasting  etc.  Students do projects on famous artists  such  as  Rivera,  Kahlo,  Botero,  Picasso  etc.  Additionally,  projects  include  music  and  musical  instruments  typical  of  the  culture  being  studied.  Spanish  and  French  clubs  offer  access  to  culturally  relevant  experiences  to  all  students,  not  just  those  enrolled  in  these  classes.  There  is  educational  travel  opportunity  to  France  once  a  year.  Both  students  and  teachers  use  technology  in  the  classroom  as  they  present projects as well as lessons via  PowerPoint.  Students  also  create  digital  camera  projects,  and  use  the  computer  labs  on  campus.  All  teachers  use  audio/visual  media  which  go  beyond  the  textbook  to  engage students 

Evidence in Support of Findings  • • • • •

 

• • •

Correspondence   Photographs   Computer lab records/ logs  

         

  

Health & Life Skills 

  E C R   

• •

  Computer lab records/logs   Audio‐video presentations 

  

Students  correspond  with  French  teens  by  letter,  email,  and  social  networking  in  French.  Students  also  use VOIP (an application like Skype) in  class  and  in  club  to  speak  to  French  teens in real time.  

All  Freshmen  are  required  to  take  Health and Life Skills.  Teachers in this  Department  provide  an  enriching  curriculum  that  challenges  and  engages  students.  Resources  include  recent  reading  materials  from  periodicals and the internet. 

Dia de los Muertos, Cinquo de Mayo,  Food tasting ( school calendar of events)  Student projects  Foreign Film Club  Holiday awareness  Teacher itinerary     

   • • •

Counselor records   Lesson plans   In‐class selection of current periodicals 

       209| P a g e  


Findings    Critical  thinking  is  emphasized  with  regard  to  reliability  of  news  reports  and  analysis  of  current  events.  Students  also  do  research  projects.  These  skills  are  transferred  to  the  students’ core subjects as well.  Teachers  bring  in  speakers  who  are  experts in the field and this is a great  resource  for  the  students.  Teachers  have  compiled  an  extensive  list  of  speakers  and  use  their  expertise  effectively.    In  the  Life  Skills  class,  students  are  required  to  monitor  their  four‐  year  high  school  plan  and  create  a  career  pathway. Students learn basic banking  and  managing  checking  and  savings  accounts.  In  addition,  students  participate  in  research  projects  that  teach  them  to  make  fiscally  responsible decisions. 

Evidence in Support of Findings  • • • •

Peer discussions/observations   Research projects   Individual and group projects   Presentations (oral, models, posters,  videos)  

• • • •

Posters  Schedule  Lesson plans  Speaker logs 

• •

Student work  Simulated checkbooks 

   

              

Physical Education Department   The  P.E.  department  uses  standards‐ based instruction for all students that  goes  beyond  the  physical  aspects  of  mastering  a sport.   P.E.  classes  rotate  and introduce new activities every six  weeks.   P.E.  teachers  attend  conferences  to  learn  new,  effective  techniques  to  engage  students.  All  students  are  taught  the  benefits  of  making  healthy  life  style  choices.  Teachers  also  promote  character  building and self‐esteem. 

  E C R   

• • • • •

Course outlines   Outdoor activities   Conference agendas   Professional Development agendas  Student (group/team) research projects   Student presentations 

        

210| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  El  Camino  Real  has  over  twenty  competitive  sports  teams,  most  of  which  have  varsity  and  junior  varsity  levels.  Some  sports  have  separate  Frosh‐Soph  levels.  Teams  travel  off  campus  and  host  other  teams  for  competitive  matches.  The  coaches  instruct  students  in  ethics,  sportsmanship,  and  they  emphasize  effective interpersonal skills.  

• • •

Visual Arts      The Visual Arts Department uses a  variety of instructional strategies  engage and challenge students to go  beyond the traditional textbook.    Student  work  from  the  ceramics,  drawing,  photo,  painting,  film/television  and  digital  imaging  classes is placed in a designated Visual  Arts  display  case  on  a  regular  basis  near a main entrance/exit point.    As a motivation for all students, an art  gallery  of  student  work  is  set  up  during Back to School Night and Open  House.  Exceptional  student  work  is  displayed at community events. 

  To  engage  and  motivate  students,  Film  and  Television  students  participate  in  industry  competitions,  run a website and utilize YouTube.  AP  students maintain portfolios. 

  E C R   

Sports list  Sports schedule   Lesson plans 

  •

Lesson plans 

      • • • •

Oral presentations/assessments   Models, posters, videos   Class (personal/group) projects   Display cases 

• • • •

CIF Records  Back to School Night   Parent Conference Night   Open House 

• • • • • • •

Displays of student work   The Big Event Art exhibit   Otis College Scholastic Art Awards   CSUN (Fall/Winter) Art Show   Audio‐video presentations   Student Portfolios   YouTube 

     

211| P a g e  


Findings  Some  typical  visual  arts  learning  experiences  that  do  not  involve  textbooks  and  attempt  to  answer  the  student's needs and interests are:  

Evidence in Support of Findings  • • • •

Student work  Lesson plans  Writing across the Curriculum  Melody of Words 

  •

• • • • •

• •

design posters and advertisements to  promote school activities like drama  productions   design packaging to sell products   illustrate personal stories without text   attend and critique/share current art  exhibitions   create travel posters that promote  cultures outside the United States   Illustrate a children's story that  teaches a lesson on values on children  should learn   design/illustrate a postage stamp that  commemorates an event or person   design a foreign postage stamp that  commemorates something important  from another culture   read a current event article and create  an illustration that depicts what the  article is saying   find a passage from literature that  describes a character and create a  illustration based on the description   professional artist and post‐secondary  art colleges are frequently invited to  share with our art classes   student artwork is displayed at school  and in the community  

Students  enhance  their  visual  and  artistic  interpretive  kills  through  observational  drawings  of  their  environment,  self‐portraiture,  and  still  life. 

  E C R   

212| P a g e  


Findings  Performing Arts 

Evidence in Support of Findings    

   In  addition  to  classroom  instruction  and activities the El Camino Performing  Arts programs challenge their students  to achieve their maximum potential by  showcasing  their  talent  at  special  school  and  community  events.   This  process  may  include  set  design  and  construction,  costume  design,  advertisement  and  promotion,  and  fiscal management of events.    

• • • • • • • • • • • •

City Band and Drill Championships   New local business openings   Elementary school performances   Open House and Back to School Night   School concerts and plays   DTASC Festivals   The Big Event   All State Jazz Competitions   Dick Van Dyke Performance   Disneyland Performance   Murder Mystery Dinner   Comedy Sportz Nights 

The  Performing  Arts  department  develops  performances  that  require  tremendous  dedication  by  the  staff,  students  and  parent  groups.   For  example,  the  sets  that  are  built  for  plays/drama  require  both  expertise  and time commitment from the parent  group  and  the  faculty  advisor.  Music  and  Choir  teachers  practice  well  beyond  the  school  day  for  community  performances  and  competitions.  Teachers and students spend hundreds  of  hours  rehearsing  and  making  sets  and  costumes  for  school  plays  and  for  drama competitions.  

• • •

Field trip logs   Fall and Spring Plays   Shakespeare Festival and other Drama  competitions  

 

                         

Business Technology 

   

 

  E C R   

The  Business  Technology  department  continues  to  expand  its  use  of  technology  in  the  classroom  to  enhance  student  learning  beyond  the  textbook  by  incorporating  projectors,  cameras and online lessons. Instructors  and  students  alike  keep  up  with  the  latest in technological development by  supplementing textbook  readings  with  resources from  the  Web,  to  non 

• • • • • •

Student Created gaming programs &  Websites  Web Based research   projects  Awards won for Web  Development  Wall street Simulations  Online‐ review/quiz resources  Moodle: a content management system  for staff and students to share resources 

  213| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

conventional  reference  material  including    Internet  Publications,  Community  Business  Journals  and  Professional Magazines. 

  From  Keyboarding  to  AP  Computer  Science  courses,  students  use  web‐ based  tools  to  create  projects,  do  research  and  other  assignments.  Students also create original solutions  to  real‐world  and  non‐academic  problems using animation and object‐ oriented  programming  in  New  Media  and  AP  Computer  Science  using  web  and  teacher‐supplied  (non‐text)  resources.      In  web  development,  students  create  sites  following  content  standards  using XHTML and CSS resources which  are found on the Web. Thus students  do not depend only on textbooks and  are able to keep up with the latest in  Web development.  

  E C R   

Teacher lesson plans 

 

               

Wood Working     The  wood  working  program  provides  students  with  several  relevant  projects.  Under  a  partnership  with  NJROTC,  the  students  build  wooden  airplanes.  Students,  as  they  are  building  the  airplane,  learn  aviation  terminology.  While  working  on  large  personal  projects,  students  research  careers which use the skills learned in  this course. 

• • • • •

ALICE‐Open source application created by  the Carnigie Foundation  Student projects  Class presentations/ demonstrations  Models  Group projects  Oral presentations / assessments 

   • • •

Student work  Lesson plans  LAC training 

 

214| P a g e  


Findings  Students also work with LAPD to build  wooden  toys  for  needy  children  during  the  Christmas  Holidays.  Students  produced  over  100  toys  for  children  in  the  community.  Students  enrolled  in  Wood  Working  support  the  core  subjects  by  participating  in  the  school‐wide  literacy  program.   In  addition,  students  learn  to  use  their  math  skills  in  a  more  practical  application. 

Evidence in Support of Findings  • • • •

                 

Family & Consumer Science 

   

  This  department  offers  a  host  of  enriching  experiences  that  relate  to  students'  lives  and  demonstrate  practical applications of their skills. 

  E C R   

Field trip logs 

   

  Students  in Culinary  Arts  courses  engage  in  menu  planning  and  food  laboratory  experiences;  students  also  participate  in  FHA‐Hero  competitions  (cake  decorating,  salad  preparation,  and table setting) and perform well. 

  In  addition  to  the  traditional  curriculum,  in  the  Careers  with  Children  course,  students  create  a  layette project; students also plan and  prepare  nutritious  meals  for  young  children. 

Student work Writing across the Curriculum  Student drawings  Student models 

• • •

Student presentations  Student portfolios  Student projects 

          •

Student projects 

             

215| P a g e  


Findings  In  the  Parenting  Course  students  participate  in  a  project  called  Ready  or  Not  Tot  in  which  they  simulate  parenting  with  a  newborn  infant  model. They "care" for this model and  gain  an  understanding  of the  challenges of parenting in real life.    Our fashion and clothing classes teach  students  to  make  quilt  blocks,  sketching, mood boards which visually  display the mood and feel of a piece.  They  also  take  part  in  the  annual  fashion  show  on  campus  and  make  costumes  for  school  plays.  Students  contribute  to  charitable  causes,  such  as,  Pajama  Project  which  supplies  needy children with new pajamas and  books  to  read  at  bed  time.  They  also  participate  in  clothing  recycling  projects.    Interior  design  students  create  color  theory  collage,  decorate  the  ultimate  teenage  bedroom,  make  floor  plans,  and  design  Children's  bedrooms.  Students  also  do  a  Famous  artist  project. 

  E C R   

Evidence in Support of Findings  • •

Student parenting project  Student project 

      • • • •

Student work  Projects  Student Presentations  Documentation of charitable  contributions 

• •

Floor plans  Student projects 

                 

         

216| P a g e  


Findings  Naval Science‐NJROTC 

Evidence in Support of Findings    

   The  NJROTC  department  provides  students  with  a  varied  instructional  experience  that  goes  far  beyond  the  traditional  textbook.  Students  take  part  in  projects,  discussions  and  debates.  They  lead  activities,  which  include  student  P.E  drills,  video  reviews,  manual  count  of  arms  and  military formations. Former cadets and  recruiters  work  with  our  students  to  inform  them  about  job  opportunities  and  higher  education  options  that  are  available to NJROTC students.    Students  have  opportunities  to  take  part in community projects, field trips,  and  other  real  world  experiences.  NJROTC  students  attend  the  Navy‐ sponsored  field  meets,  basic  leadership  courses  and  the  leadership  academy to get a better understanding  of  life  in  the  Navy.  Other  field  trips  include  visits  to  the  USS  Midway,  UCLA,  as  well  as  Damage  Control  and  Fire  Fighting  School.  Experienced  student cadets lead these events. 

  NJROTC students are active community  members.  Students  march  in  a  variety  of community parades, and are invited  to local elementary and middle schools  to  celebrate  special  events.  The  students  are  also  the  color  guard  for  the  community  based  Veterans  of  Foreign  Wars,  and  Military  Order  of  World  Wars.   Students  also  volunteer  their  services  during  campus  CONT.    E C R   

• • • • • • • •

Projects  Student drills  Video reviews  Oral presentations/ assessments  Presentations  Models, posters, videos  Group projects  Speaker logs 

• •

Community service logs/hours  Field trip logs 

• • • • • •

School calendar/schedule  Cadets perform  Pass in Review  Personal inspection  Armed and unarmed drill  School calendar 

             

                   

  

217| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

events  such  as  Back  to  School  Night,  Open  House,  athletics,  graduation,  NJROTC Blood Drive, and many others.    NJROTC  students  are  required  to  complete  a  student  portfolio.  As  a  culminating  assignment,  students  organize  a  spring  awards  banquet  to  acknowledge  Joint  Unit  Management  System  (JUMS)  records,  their  service  to  the  community,  NJROTC  achievements, physical fitness results,  and academic accomplishments.      AMI (Annual Military Inspection):  Each  year,  one  active  duty  Naval  Officer  must  evaluate  our  NJROTC  unit  according  to  a  Chief  of  Naval  Education  and  Training  Instruction  (CNET) checklist. This includes:  • Formal interview where the students  demonstrate the NJROTC unit goals  and areas that are in need of  improvement.  • An inspection of the students  (uniform and appearance).  • Performances from the drill team,  color guard, and unarmed drill team. 

• • • • •

  Student portfolios  Team exhibitions  Award ceremony  Command briefing  Space inspection 

 

• •

Equipment inspection  Instructors provide performance  evaluations with area manager with  evaluators’ assessment.  

   

  E C R   

218| P a g e  


Findings  Special Education     Special  education  uses  a  variety  of  strategies  and  resources  to  engage  students in higher level thinking skills  to  help  them  succeed.  The  department  employs  SDAIE,  differentiated  instruction,  alternative  curriculum,  graphic  organizers,  kinesthetic activities, role playing, and  cooperative  learning.  Students  research topics that interest them and  extend  what  they  are  learning  in  school.  They  read  books  outside  the  texts and write reports on them. They  also  write  essays  for  the  school‐wide  literacy  program.  Students  have  access  to:  the  computer  lab,  DOTS,  West  Valley  Occupational  Center  (WVOC),  and  Pierce  Community  College.  Students  also  participate  in  community  activities  through  the  social  studies  department,  and  Service  Learning  Project.  Students  receive  additional  support  through  more  intensive  instruction,  resource  collaborative  teaching  in  English  and  mathematics  classes,  and  resource  electives.  

  E C R   

Evidence in Support of Findings     • • • • • •

Daily/ long term lesson plans  Individualized Education Plans(IEPs)   Computer lab sign in  Library sign in  DOTS logs  RSP class rosters 

                 

219| P a g e  


Findings   Support Personnel     A  full  time  College  Counselor  provides  all  the  support  students  need  in  entering  four‐year  universities  and  two‐year  colleges.  The  college  office  holds  several  conferences,  grade‐specific  meetings,  parent  meetings,  and  it  is  open  every  day  to  support  students  regarding  college  admission  requirements,  scholarships,  financial  aid,  and  other  related  topics.  The  Work  Experience  and  DOTS  coordinators  help  students  earn  work  experience  credits  and  provide  job/internship  opportunities  for  students.  These  opportunities  are  available  through  partnerships  with  local  community  colleges,  businesses,  the  West  Valley  Occupational  Center,  and  the  Regional  Occupational  Program  Center  (ROP).  These  job/internship  opportunities  are  available  in  a  variety  of  fields  that  include:  Architecture,  Engineering,  Business  Education,  Graphic  Design,  Home  Economics,  Industrial  classes,  and  automotive programs.    Students  who  are  on  track  for  entering  a  four‐year  college  are  encouraged  to  participate  in  college  enrichment  programs.  They  are  also  encouraged  to  take  community  college  courses  after‐school and  on  Saturdays, offered by Pierce College.  The  College  Office  invites  a  number  of  guest  speakers  from  the  various  colleges  and  universities  to  meet  with students.    E C R   

Evidence in Support of Findings        • • • • • •

College Office records   College Office calendar  Work Experience Coordinator records  Career Fair records  Job board  Work Experience Website job postings  

• •

Pierce College enrollment  Speaker log  

 

220| P a g e  


Areas of Strength       

1. El Camino teachers are highly qualified and dedicated to their profession.  2. Teachers volunteer their time outside of class: tutoring, bringing in resources such  as grants and speakers.  3. The staff and administration have high expectations of students.  4. Teachers use a variety of instructional strategies and assessments.  5. Teachers encourage students to be creative through project‐based assignments.  6. Core departments implement common pacing plans and assessments.    

Areas of Growth  1. Improve the use of technology in the classroom.  2. Explore programs to provide more real life applications and beyond the classroom  opportunities such as, Internships.  3. Explore the use of more inter‐departmental teachings such as, Humanitas and AVID.  4. Increase Vertical Teaming to prepare students for the next level.  5. Use data to ensure that the Master Program meets student needs. 

    

  E C R   

221| P a g e  


Standards-based Student Learning: Assessment and Accountability Chapter: 4-D

WASC: March 2011   E C R   

Pictured Event: Melody of Words 222| P a g e  

ECR: Home of Academic and Athletic Excellence


Chapter  4­D:    Standards­based  Student  Learning:  Assessment  and  Accountability  

Focus Group Leaders Dave Hussey  .............................................................Assistant Principal  Cameron Maury .........................................................................  English 

  

Focus Members  Jim Pulliam ........................................................ Business / Technology  Jeff Edmonds ........................................................................... Classified  Derek Elizondo ........................................................................ Classified  Heidi Crocker‐Maury ................................................................... English  Kotaro Mukasa ............................................................................ English  Donald Tseng ............................................................................... English  Daniel Kim ................................................................. Foreign Language  Sylvia Neuah ............................................................... Foreign language  John Dalsass .................................................................................. Math  Shirley Hargrove .......................................................................... Parent  Michael Consoletti ........................................................................ ROTC  Gary Goodeliunas ....................................................................... Science  James Delarme ................................................................. Social Studies  Vince Orlando .................................................................. Social Studies 

  E C R   

223| P a g e  


Mark Pomerantz .............................................................. Social Studies  Dave Roberson ................................................................. Social Studies  Glenn Short ................................................................ Special Education  John Wasser ............................................................... Special Education  Jacob Burman ............................................................................ Student  Morgan Hawes .......................................................................... Student  Richard Yi .................................................................... Support Services  Slyvia Yi ........................................................................ Support Services  Shelly Mark...................................................... Visual / Performing Arts   

  E C R   

224| P a g e  


D­1.  To what extent does the school use a professionally acceptable assessment  process to collect, disaggregated, analyze and report student performance data  to the parents and other stakeholders of the community?   Summary of Findings:    El Camino Real High School (ECR) uses professionally acceptable assessment processes to  collect,  disaggregate,  analyze,  and  disseminate  student  performance  data  to  all  stakeholders.  State  and  district‐mandated  tests,  including  the  California  State  Standards  Test (CST), California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE), and the California English Language  Development Test (CELDT), are administered, and the results are made available to faculty  members,  students,  parents  or  guardians,  and  the  community.  The  faculty  as  a  whole  disaggregates  and  analyzes  the  data  during  Pupil  Free  Days  in  the  fall,  and  continues  the  process during Professional Development Days throughout the school year.     

El Camino regularly reports student progress to the parents, to the community and to the  students:  1. Most teachers post their grades on‐line (on teachers' websites, Making the Grade,  or ISIS).  2. Students and parents may view their current report cards and attendance any time  by signing on to LAUSD's Family Module program.  3. For students with disabilities, there are initial, annual, and three‐year IEPs and exit  IEPs.  4. Senior  letters  and  progress  reports  are  mailed  to  parents  to  inform  them  of  their  child’s progress towards graduation.  5. The  electronic  marquee  in  front  of  the  school  communicates  information  to  the  community about ECR's programs and achievements.  6. All teachers have e‐mail and voice mail accounts to receive messages from parents.  7. Every five weeks, parents receive Progress Reports/ Report Cards.   8. Teachers  and  parents  communicate  through  personal  conferences,  phone  conferences, and e‐mail.  9. The District informs the community of school data through the School Accountability  Report Card (SARC).  10. Teachers notify counselors if a student has been absent for three consecutive days.  11. 504 meetings and SST (Student Success Team) meetings are held regularly.  12. Parents are informed of report cards, absences, and important events via ConnectEd  (automated phone service).    E C R   

225| P a g e  


Findings  Assessment Data Provided to  Students     El  Camino  students  and  their  parents  are  notified  of  their  performance  on  State  and  District  assessments.   CST  results  of  the  school  are  announced  through  various  media.  An  individual  student's  score  is  placed  in  his  /her  cumulative  records.  Students  must  pass  the  California  High  School  Exit  Examination  (CAHSEE)  in  order  to  graduate.  Parents  are  notified  of  their  student's  scores  for  both  CST  and  CAHSEE.  Students  receive  scores  and  data  after  District  Periodic  Assessments  in  the  core  subjects  as  part  of  their  classroom  exercise.  The  counselors  give  students  their  Individual  Graduation  Plan.    AP  scores  are  mailed  to  students  in  the  summer  and    PSAT  scores  distributed  to  students through the college office       

Performance Data Provided to  Faculty    Overall  performance  on  state  and  district  assessments  (AYP,  API,  CELDT  and  CAHSEE)   is  discussed  and  analyzed  in  general  staff  meetings  in  terms  of  student  performance  by  demographics.  This  is  followed  by  department  meetings  where  instructors  analyze  student  performance  data  from  MyData.   This  site is managed by LAUSD, and data is  disaggregated  for  teacher  use;  teachers  also  use  data  from  the  periodic  assessments.  Findings  from  these  department  meetings  are  used   to create a road map for pacing plans,    E C R   

Evidence in Support of Findings        • • • • • • • • • •

CST Data  LAUSD Periodic Assessment Data  PA announcements  Parent newsletter  CAMEO  PSAT  AP Diagnostic Results  Counselor records  CHASEE results  ISIS 

  

     • • • • • • • •

Professional Development Agenda  CST Data  CAHSEE Data  Fitness Gram Data  CELDT Data  Advanced Placement Exam results  LAUSD Periodic Assessment Data  Department meeting agenda 

  

226| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

curricular  adjustments,  and  teaching  practices:  all  aspects  that  influence  instruction.  Due  to  the  small  number  of students enrolled in EL classes (155),  the administrator and EL teacher meet  to  discuss  the  growth  of  these  students.   

Performance Data Provided to  Counselors  El  Camino  Counselors  receive  student  performance  data  on  all  standardized  tests (CAHSEE, CST, CELDT and AP).  In  addition,  they  access  student  grades  after  each  grading  period.   They  use  the  data  to  counsel  students,  adjust  their  Individualized  Graduation  Plans  and  place  students  in  appropriate  classes to ensure their success. During  counseling  department  meetings,  members  make  decisions  about specific cases.   

Student Performance Data  Provided to Parents    El  Camino  real  High  School  reports  student  progress  to  parents  every  five  weeks.   In  addition,  a  web  based  application  allows  students  and  their  families  to  check  grades,  attendance,  and  individual  assignments  at  any  time.  School‐wide results for the CSTs  are  published  in  the  local  newspapers  and  on  the  internet.  Student  performance records are maintained in  student  cumulative  records  to  which  parents  have  access.   ECR  publishes  school  wide  results  in  the  Parent  Newsletter.  Parents are notified of the  overall  progress  of  the  school  during  Back  to  School  Night  and  Open    E C R   

      • • • • • • • • • • •

Professional Development Agenda  CST Data  CAHSEE Data  Fitness Gram Data  CELDT Data  LAUSD Periodic Assessment Data  Department meeting agenda  IGP  PSAT results  Advanced Placement Exam results  SIS Grades 

           • • • • • • •

Family Module  LA Times, Daily News  LAUSD.net, ecrhs.net  Cameo  LAUSD Periodic Assessments  Back to School Night  Open House  

     

227| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

House. Parents  may  request  CONT.  parent‐teacher  or  parent‐counselor  conferences at any time.   

Performance  Data  Provided  to  Community    CST, API, and AYP results are published  in  newspapers  and  on  the  internet.  CAHSEE results are also available from  these sources. This data is  available on  the  California  Department  of  Education  website.   LAUSD  sends  a  year‐end  report  to  each  household  detailing  El  Camino  Real  High  School's  data through the School Accountability  Report Card.    

      • • • •

LA Times, Daily News  LAUSD.net, ecrhs.net, cde.gov  School marquee  SARC Report 

     

 

  E C R   

228| P a g e  


D­2.  To  what  extent  do  teachers  employ  a  variety  of  assessment  strategies  to  evaluate  student  learning?   To  what  extent  do  students  and  teachers  use  these  findings  to  modify  the  teaching/learning  process  for  the  enhancement  of  the  educational progress of every student?  Summary of Findings:    Teachers  at   El  Camino  Real  High  School  use   various  assessment  strategies  to  evaluate  student  learning.  Teachers  use  the  data  from  these  findings  to  inform  their  teaching  to  maximize  learning  for  all  students. Test  data  from  LAUSD  (MyData)  and  the  State  of  California are analyzed, discussed and reviewed by faculty and staff to enhance the school’s  instructional program and each department’s program. Through this process critical areas of  academic need are identified and departments and individual teachers take steps to ensure  progress  in  these  areas.  Based  on  LAUSD  preiodic  assessments,  many  departments  have  developed  curriculum  or  pacing  guides,  in  order  to  better  align  instruction  with  California  academic  standards  and  the  school  ESLRs.  Teachers  use  in‐class  and  District‐mandated  assessments to drive their instruction. Analysis of student performance data demonstrates  that   students  at  El  Camino  are  making  progress  toward  achievement  of  the  academic  standards  and  the  ESLRs.  However,  as  some  subgroups  are  not  performing  at  their  target  levels,  El  Camino  continues  to  modify  the  teaching/  learning  process  to  better  serve  the  needs of all our students.  

Findings  Mathematics 

Evidence in Support of Findings     

  The  Math  department  begins  every  year  by  reviewing  CST,  CAHSEE  and  AP  data.   These  standardized  assessments  allow  department  members  to  monitor  the  progress  of  their  students.   District  Periodic  Assessments  give  teachers  access  to  more current data which allows them  to inform their teaching. 

• • • •

CST data  CAHSEE data  Periodic Assessment data  AP Results 

• • •

Classwork,   Homework,   uizzes and tests 

     

    In  addition  to  standardized  tests,  the  math department uses many informal  assessments  such  as,  classwork  and  quizzes.      E C R   

229| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

Department  tests  provide standardization  of  both  content  and  pacing    The  department  takes  pride  in  voluntarily  offering  tutoring  before  school,  after  school,  nutrition  and  lunch  for  those  students in need of extra support. 

• •

Department tests  Classroom Observations 

• •

UCLA diagnostic assessment  Department final 

    The Math department also administers a  diagnostic  assessment.   The  test  is  sent  to  UCLA  for  analysis.   The  department  ends every semester with  common final  examinations,  to  ensure  that  all  students master the necessary concepts   to move to the next level.   Science     Science  teachers  meet  by  subject  specific groups at the start of each year  to  create  a  common  pacing  plan  based  on  the  previous  year’s  LAUSD  Periodic  Assessments.   CST  data  is  also  used  to  validate the pacing plan.         Classroom  assessments  are  done  in   various  modes  which  give  students   multiple  opportunities  to  master  the  concepts  and  succeed  in  meeting  State  Content Standards.   

     • • •

CST/CAHSEE data  Periodic Assessment data  AP results 

• • • • •

Class quizzes and unit exams   Laboratory Work  Group projects/science  experiments  Oral and visual presentations  Research essays 

• •

Lesson plans  Research essays 

   

    Most  Biology  and  Chemistry  teachers  use  the  department  Periodic  Assessment  Project  as  a  method  for  re‐teaching.   Students  analyze  their  own  results  and  thereby  actively relearn/review  specific  concepts.     E C R   

 

230| P a g e  


Findings  Social Studies 

Evidence in Support of Findings       

  Social  Studies  teachers  employ  a  variety  of  assessments   to  evaluate  student  understanding  and  performance.  Some  of  these  are  teacher‐created  assessments  which  include:  classwork,  homework,  quizzes, chapter tests, and unit tests.  These  assessments    provide  timely  feedback  to  the  students.  Students  are  assessed   through  written  responses  both  in  essay  form  and  as  short  answers.  In  addition,  assignments  are  linked  to  assessments such as, research essays,  presentations (PowerPoint, video and  oral),  individual  and  group  projects.  Teachers  also  use  other  methods  such  as,  Socratic  Circle,  Jigsaw  activities, and peer activities to assess  their  students.  Students  are  given  review  time  for  more  authentic  assessment.      

• •

Teacher created assessments  Student work 

                                      

    During  2008‐2009,  LAUSD  started  using  Periodic  Assessments  for  Social  Studies.   Teachers  use  data  from  these tests to better prepare students  for  the  CST.  Students  are  also  given   the opportunity for self evaluation.     

• •

Periodic Assessment data  CST data 

 

World Languages and Cultures A variety of oral and written  assessments are used in foreign  language classes daily.  These  assessments appeal to all styles of  learning including kinetic, auditory, and  sensory learners.      E C R   

     •

 Oral Assessments:  o skits  o oral presentations  o acting out commands  o listening to tapes  Written Assessments:  o quizzes and compositions  231| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

ESL   The English as a Second Language (ESL)  program  at  El  Camino  Real  High  School  consists  of  one  class  with  a  two‐period  block.   Students  receive  direct  instruction  using  the  Hampton  Brown Highpoint  program.   This  program  provides  standards‐based  instruction with specialized instructional  strategies  to  meet  the  needs  of  each  language  level  in  the  classroom.   In  order  to  place  students  at  the  correct  instructional level, students are assessed  when  they  first  enter  the  classroom  using  the  Diagnostic  and  Placement  Inventory,  provided  by  the Highpoint program.   Students  are  then  placed  into  group  levels  –  1A,  1B,  2A, 2B, 3, or 4 – in which they will work  throughout  the  semester.   During  the  semester,  they  work  in  these  small  groups  to  receive  direct  instruction  in  language  developments  and  communication,  concepts  and  vocabulary,  reading  strategies  and  comprehension, literary analysis, critical  thinking  skills,  speaking,  listening,  viewing,  and  representing,  and  writing.   Students  are  assessed  throughout  the  semester  using  selection  tests  for  each  reading  selection,  unit  tests  in  standardized  format,  language  acquisition  assessments,  and  writing  assessments.   When  students  pass  the  semester with a C or better, they move  on to the next language level.                 E C R   

• • • • •

    Highpoint textbook  Diagnostic and Placement  Inventory  Lesson Plans  Selection Tests  Master Program 

232| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

 

English   

Teachers  in  the  English  department  use  a  variety  of  assessment  strategies  to  evaluate student learning. Students and  teachers  use  these  findings  to  modify  the  teaching/learning  process  for  the  enhancement  of  the  educational  progress  of  every  student.  While  re‐ teaching  and  modification  of  teaching  occurs  regularly,  we  often  find  that  the  whose  comprehension  students  improves  are  the  motivated  students.  This  is  particularly  true  with  essay  writing.  Many  English  teachers  break  down  the  process  for  students  at  all  levels,  do  practice  activities,  and  even  write  essays  together  as  a  class.  Most  students  will  eventually  grasp  the  concept  of  essay  structure,  but  those  who struggle receive continued support.  We  continue  to  address  that  problem  every  year  with  more  motivational  strategies,  more  practice,  and  more  individual  attention,  even  as  our  class  size increases. 

• • • • • • • •

Multiple‐choice tests  Timed essays  Short analytical responses  PowerPoint presentations  Original  compositions  (poetry,  songs, art)  Speeches  Peer‐evaluation  Self‐evaluation 

                 

 

Health and Life Skills    Teachers  use  classwork,  homework,  quizzes, tests  and  projects  to  assess  student  performance.   All  Health  assessments are aligned to the National  and California State Content Standards.   Student  performance  is  used  to  adjust  and  modify  the  curriculum  to  re‐teach  students when necessary.     

     • •

Class Lessons and Observations  State Content Standards 

       

  E C R   

233| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  Cooperative group learning is an integral  aspect  of  these  courses  in  order  to  provide  students  peer  support  with  difficult concepts.  Both pre‐assessments  and  class  discussions  are  used  to  prepare students for upcoming lessons.    

• • •

Pre‐assessments  Peer to peer review  Class lessons 

NJROTC  NJROTC uses a variety of assessments to  monitor the progress of the cadets.  The  results  of  these  formative  and  summative  assessments  are  used  to  provide feedback to promote the overall  growth  of  the  cadets.   The  academic  curriculum supplements state standards  in  Social  Studies,  Science,  Mathematics,  and  English.   The  instructors  evaluate  progress  in  these  areas  in  many  ways  including  teacher  created  assignments,  projects, quizzes, and tests.  

  • • •

Classroom assessment  NJROTC Curriculum  Classroom assignments 

          

       Cadets  are  also  evaluated  in  the  physical  education  and   military  drill  components of the curriculum.  In P.E.,  students  must  meet  state  standards  and  must  ultimately  pass  the  FitnessGram  test.   To  evaluate  military  drill,  the  instructors  use  the  basic  drill  card  that  is  used  in  statewide  competitions. 

• • •

Physical Education Activities  FitnessGram Test  Drill card 

 

  E C R   

234| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  NJROTC  cadets  must  also  complete  ten  hours  of  community  service  each  semester  through  NJROTC  organized  events.   

Physical Education    The  PE  Department  uses  a  variety  of  methods to evaluate student learning.   Both written and physical assessments  are used with pre‐tests and post‐tests  to  evaluate  student  performance.   Class  evaluations  and  student  performance  on  the  FitnessGram  guide  instruction  and  teachers  modify  lessons based on these data.        Students on a daily basis participate in  stretching,  upper  body  strength  and  abdominal  exercises.   Once  a  week  all  students  are  assessed  on  their  cardiovascular  endurance.  Students  requiring  extra  support  are  graded  on  improving  their  individual  time.  All  students  take  written  tests  on  safety,  rules  and  general  knowledge  of  the  sport  during  their  rotation.   Group  participation is an integral component  of every PE class.   

Visual Arts     The  Visual  Arts  department  serves  students  of  all  grades  levels,  skills  and  abilities.   We  take  pride  in  working  closely  with  Special  Education,  EL,  and  Gifted  students  all  in  the  same  classroom.        E C R   

Community Service Logs 

• • •

Lesson plans  Class assessments  FitnessGram results 

   

          • • • •

Daily warm‐ups  Cardiovascular endurance test  Weight training test  Skills test 

 

     •

 Master Program 

             

235| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  The  department  employs  non‐ traditional  assessment  strategies  to  evaluate  student  learning  for  this  diverse  population.   Based  on  performance,  teachers  modify  the  assessment  to  a  student's  ability  and  degree  of  improvement.  The  department  discusses  and  modifies  the  curriculum as necessary. 

• • •

Variety of  student projects  One‐on‐one guidance  Department agendas 

    

Performing Arts   In  conjunction  with  conventional  evaluations,  students  direct  plays  and/or  scenes,  write  original  scripts,  and  perform  and  produce  a  variety  of  plays  and  musicals.  Most  of  these  activities  are  cooperative,  group  assignments.  Several  of  these  assignments  are  used  in  various  competitions  in  which  students  participate. 

  • •

Student performances  Student work 

Student performances  Classroom observation  Student performances 

    

    Choir  students  are  evaluated  on  a  daily  basis  on  classroom  performance  and  periodically  on  larger  performances.   Corrective feedback occurs immediately  in both cases. 

• •

 

 

  E C R   

236| P a g e  


Findings 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  Marching  band  students  are  directed  and assessed by the instructor and their  peers. Drum majors and section leaders  cooperatively  teach  and  assess  student  performances  and  rehearsals.  Outside  judges  evaluate  the  band  during  six  competitions  in  which  Marching  band  participates.  El  Camino  also  hosts  a  competition which involves the students  in  organizing   the  event.  The  instructor  also  uses  this  activity  to   evaluate  students.   

• •

Competition Schedule  Competition Program 

In each of the performing arts, teachers  modify the teaching/learning process by  assessing  student  ability  in  either  performance or production and redirect  them  to  achieve  success.   Students  follow  the  criteria  set  by  the  instructor  which  reflect  the  standards  for  conduct  and performance. 

Classroom observations 

• •

Student projects    Online  quizzes  (instant  student  feedback)  Models    Net‐Op  Group projects   Objective / hands on examinations 

 

   

Business Technology    Teachers  use  varied  assessment  data  to analyze  and  modify  instruction.  Strategies include collaborative projects,  hands‐on  examinations,  oral  presentations,  and  data  driven  instruction.  Teachers  modify  instruction  by  using  guided  /  modeled  lessons  utilizing  technology  to  re‐enforce  student  learning. Weekly  traditional,  online, and modeled quizzes are used as  a measure of concept mastery.     E C R   

   

• • • •

237| P a g e  


Findings  Wood Working 

Evidence in Support of Findings 

  The  Woodworking  Program  employs  a  variety of assessments.  The majority of  the  projects  are    hands‐on    and  have  practical  applications  and  are  assessed  by the instructor accordingly. 

• • • • • •

    Teacher observation  Student work  Lesson plans    Writing across the Curriculum  Student drawings  Student projects 

Students  are  assessed  at  various  stages  of  learning  as  they  plan,  assemble,  and  finish  projects.  Some  of  these  projects  are:  cabinet  making,  display  tables,  game  boards  for  chess,  art  boxes,  and  pens.   Students  are  also  assessed  in  their  ability  to  think  critically  as  they  create  projects  in  partnership  with  NJROTC,  make  toys  for  needy  children  in  partnership  with  LAPD.  Students  make  decisions regarding the appropriateness  of  the  products  they  make  for  each  need.  Students  are  also  assessed  as  they  respond  in  writing  for  one  of  their  assignments  is  a  research  paper  in  the  field  of  wood  working.  They  participate  in  the  school‐wide  literacy  program,  Writing  across  the  Curriculum.  Assessment  of  all  projects  and  assignments are modified to fit the field  of  woodworking  and  to  enhance    the  teaching/learning  process  of  the  students.            

  E C R   

238| P a g e  


Findings  Family & Consumer Studies (FACS)  The  FACS  department  utilizes  a  variety  of  assessment  strategies  to  evaluate  learning.   A  typical  FACS  class  may  contain students of varying abilities and  ages.     Authentic  assessments  in  the  FACS  courses  include:  Foods  lab  exercises,  restaurant  projects,  Ready‐or‐Not  Tot  infant  simulation,  pre‐school  lesson  plans,  fashion  illustrations,  custom  apparel  construction,  fashion  mood  boards, interior design storyboards and  floor  plans.  Other  assessments  include  safety  tests,  chapter  tests,  student  presentations  (including  PowerPoint),  class  notebooks  and  portfolios.  Teachers  modify  their  lessons  for  students  with  different  needs; such  as  students  with  Limited  English  Proficiency, special needs students and  gifted students.    Teachers  use  data  from  class  assessments  to  modify  and  re‐teach  concepts as necessary. 

Special Education     Special  education  uses  a  variety  of  assessment  strategies  and  resources  to  engage students in higher level thinking  skills  to  help  them  succeed.  CST  data  and  Periodic  Assessments  are  used  to  evaluate  students'  progress,  their  strengths  and  areas  of  need.  Students  are  required  to  research  topics  that  interest them and extend what they are    E C R   

Evidence in Support of Findings        • • • • • •

Lesson plans  Class projects  Class assessments  Portfolios  Student notebooks  State Content Standards                         

Class assessments and lessons     

 

        • • • • • • • • •

Daily/ long term lesson plans  SDAIE  Differentiated instruction  Alternate curriculum  Graphic organizers  Kinesthetic activities  Role playing  Cooperative learning  DOTS logs  239| P a g e  


Findings  learning  in  school;  they  read  books  outside  the  texts  and  write  reports  on  them.  In  addition,  students  have  access  to:  the  computer  lab,  DOTS  hours  at  West  Valley  Regional  Occupational  Center  (WVOC),  Pierce  Community  College,  community  activities  and  Service  Learning  Project through  the  Social  Studies  department.  A  select  few  students,  as  per  their  IEP,  are  on  the  Alternate  Curriculum  and  receive  extra  assistance  from  an  Inclusion  Specialist.  Students  receive  additional  support  through  more  intensive  instruction  in  the Learning Lab, resource collaborative  teaching  in  English  and  CONT.  mathematics  classes,  and  resource  elective classes. Peer assistance and self  evaluation  are  helpful  in  assessing  student progress. 

  E C R   

Evidence in Support of Findings  • • • • • • •

Computer lab sign in  Library sign in  CST Data  Periodic Assessments  Peer assistance  Self evaluation  RSP class rosters 

           

240| P a g e  


Chapter 4