Page 1

Student / Community

Profile & Supporting Data and Findings

Chapter: 1

WASC: March 2011 Woodland Hills, CA 91367 E C R   

20| P a g e  

ECR: Home of Academic and Athletic Excellence


Chapter I: Student/Community Profile and Supporting Data and Findings  Community Description  El Camino Real High School (ECR), a comprehensive four‐year high school, founded in 1969,  is the western most campus of the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD). The school is  located  in  the  west  San  Fernando  Valley,  approximately  20  miles  north  of  downtown  Los  Angeles.    The  school  colors  are  dark  blue,  light  blue,  and  camel  and  the  school  mascot  is  the  “Conquistadores”.   In  2009,  El  Camino  was  named  a  California  Distinguished  School  by  the  California Department of Education.  The  El  Camino  campus  is  comprised  of  the main building (A, B, and C hallways),  the performing arts building (D building),  the bungalows (T, Z, and H classrooms),  the  shop  building  (S  classrooms),  the  multipurpose room (Anderson Hall), the  gym,  and  the  P.E.  area.    Included  in  these  buildings  are  the  Parent  Center,  the library, the College Office, computer  labs,  and  a  theater.  The  school  is  also  home  to  Miguel  Leonis  Continuation  High  School  and  the  Reseda‐El  Camino  Community  Adult  School.    The  main  student  gathering  area  is  the  central  grassy  area  bordered  by  the  main  building and Anderson Hall known as the  “quad”. It is here that the school holds pep rallies, concerts, music on the quad, activity sign‐ ups, and Senior Awards Night.    The  most  significant  change  to  occur  at  El  Camino  since  the  last  WASC  visit  has  been  the  submission  of  our  application  to  become  an  independent  charter  school.    We  have  every  reason to anticipate our application will be accepted and expect notification in March 2011. 

E C R   

21| P a g e  


Family and Community Trends  El  Camino  serves  3565  students  from  the  local  communities  of  Woodland  Hills,  West  Hills,  and Canoga Park.  We also have approximately 120 students who ride the bus to school as  part  of  a  voluntary  integration  program.    Many  of  our  students  are  from  middle  to  upper  class families employed primarily in professional, executive, and managerial positions.  73%  of  our  parents  report  having  at  least  some  college  education.    As  a  result,  the  community  expects  a  great  deal  from  El  Camino.    In  conjunction  with  these  expectations  is  an  exceptional level of parent involvement and support for the school.  Since the school does  not  qualify  for  Title  I  funding  from  the  federal  government,  ECR  relies  on  local  support  to  supplement  its  academic  enrichment  programs,  school  support  services,  co‐curricular,  and  extra‐curricular offerings.  For example, in the 2009‐2010 academic year, our parent group  wrote  a  grant  that  allowed  us  to  paint  the  exterior  of  our  main  building  and  upgrade  the  planter in front of the school.  This parent group, the Friends of ECR, volunteers thousands of  hours  and  raises  approximately  $50,000  annually.    We  have  used  this  money  to  pay  for  additional nursing hours, to supplement classroom materials, to fund field trips, to provide  tutoring  programs,  to  buy  emergency  supplies,  and  many  other  items.  Our  parents  also  individually  donate  their  time  and  money  to  support  the  myriad  of  activities  offered  at  El  Camino  such  as  band,  drama,  robotics,  athletics,  journalism,  and  academic  decathlon.  In  1995,  the  stakeholders  at  El  Camino  agreed  that  the  school  would  become  a  LEARN  (Los  Angeles  Educational  Alliance  for  Restructuring  Now)  community.    Although  LEARN  has  not  existed  for  years,  El  Camino  continues  to  use  LEARN‐style  governance  model  that  provides  input from all stakeholder groups.   

Parent and Community Organizations   Parents  provide  input  for  establishing  school  wide  goals,  examining  student  results,  and  allocating  resources.    In  addition  to  the  school  site  council,  parents  also  participate  in  the  Parent  Teacher  Student  Association  (PTSA),  Friends  of  ECR,  English  Learner  Advisory  Committee (ELAC), the Mid‐Range Student Committee, the School to Career Committee, and  participated as focus group members in the WASC self study. The community and parental  support, along with a dedicated, professional staff, and focused students, lead to high levels  of achievement in both academic and extra and co‐curricular areas.  Our students score well  above state averages on state mandated standardized tests as well as on AP exams and SAT  tests.    El  Camino  Real  High  School  consistently  scores  above  the  District  average  on  the  Academic Performance Index (API) and this year (2010) our score is 798, an improvement of  25  points.    In  2009‐2010,  El  Camino  was  recognized  as  the  highest  performing  comprehensive high school in LAUSD.  Our athletes and athletic teams have won numerous  league and city championships. We have also earned the top position or the second position  in  Robotics  (one  world  championship  and  two  state  championships),  Science  bowl,  and    E C R   

22| P a g e  


Envirothon. Our  performing  arts  students,  technology  students,  and  academic  decathlon  students  consistently  win  top  recognition  at  city,  state,  and  national  competitions.    In  the  spring  of  2010,  our  academic  decathlon  team  won  the  state  and  national  titles.    This  is  a  record  setting  sixth  national  championship  for  our  school.    We  are  very  proud  of  our  students and of the trust we have earned from the parents and community. 

School/Business Relationships  El  Camino  enjoys  positive  working  relationships  with  many  businesses.    The  school  works  with  the  Rotary  Club  and  the  Woodland  Hills  Chamber  of  Commerce  to  put  on  an  annual  Career  Expo.    In  2009‐2010,  the  Los  Angeles  Film  School  formed  a  partnership  with  the  Careers in Entertainment Academy.  The Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising has  been working with the Art and Design Academy since its inception over six years ago.  Amgen  has provided training and equipment for the biotechnology teacher and class.  The Tarzana  Drug Treatment Center offers weekly on‐campus drug counseling sessions.  The Humanitas  Academy  works  closely  with  the  Los  Angeles  Education  Partnership.    In  addition,  countless  local businesses support the newspaper, athletic teams, and activities through advertising. 

WASC Accreditation History  El  Camino  Real  High  School  was  awarded  a  full  six‐  year  accreditation  by  the  Western  Association  of  Schools  and  Colleges  (WASC)  for  2004‐2011  accompanied  by  a  District  requested  mid‐term  review.    The  Superintendent  at  the  time  would  not  allow  schools  to  have  a  six‐  year  term  without  a  three  year  review.    In  1998  El  Camino  received  a  six‐year  accreditation with a mid‐term review. 

School Purpose  During the Focus on Learning process, our stakeholders reviewed and made changes to our  Mission,  Vision,  Beliefs,  and  Expected  School‐wide  Learning  Results  (ESLRs).    While  only  minor changes were made to the Mission, Vision, and Beliefs statements, our stakeholders  made several changes to the ESLRs.  We added “numeracy” to the set of skills our students  should have to reflect the importance of mathematics in their school careers.  In addition to  career goals, we added education and individual goals to one of our statements to show that  there  is  more  to  a  student’s  high  school  life  than  just  preparing  for  a  career.    In  order  to  reflect an awareness of our impact on the planet, we added an environmental component to  the ESLRs.  We added the word “appropriate” in two places to show that it is not enough to  be able to use a skill, but that students need to use them wisely.  

E C R   

23| P a g e  


Los Angeles Unified School District Mission Statement  The teachers, administrators, and staff of the Los Angeles Unified School District believe in  the  equal  worth  and  dignity  of  all  students  and  are  committed  to  educate  all  students  to  their maximum potential. 

El Camino Real High School Mission Statement  The  mission  of  El  Camino  Real  High  School  is  to  educate  our  diverse  student  body  by  developing  students’  talents  and  skills  so  they  will  succeed  in  a  changing  world,  value  and  respect themselves and others, and make a positive contribution to our global society. 

El Camino Real High School Vision Statement  Our vision is that El Camino Real High School students will be:  • • • • • • •

Self‐directed/Self‐reliant Collaborative  Complex/Critical Thinkers  Ethical  Lifelong learners  Technologically literate  Personally accountable and responsible 

El Camino Real High School Statement of Beliefs  At El Camino Real High School we believe:  • • • • •

All students can learn  Students  must  be  prepared  to  successfully  transition  from  school  to  post‐secondary  education, career preparation, and employment  Student success is a team effort shared by students, parents, teachers, administrators,  and classified staff  Students are valued members of the school community  The  school  community  has  the  responsibility  for  establishing  and  maintaining  a  safe,  clean environment conducive to learning.     

    E C R   

24| P a g e  


El Camino Real High School Expected School­wide Learning Results  In order to succeed in a changing global community, all ECR students will  demonstrate:  • • • • • •

E C R   

Literacy, Numeracy, and Appropriate/Effective Communication Skills  Critical Thinking and Problem‐Solving Skills  Perseverance to Explore and Achieve Career, Education, and Individual Goals  Academic, Personal, and Social Responsibility  Respect for Themselves, Others, and the Environment  Effective, Appropriate, and Ethical Use of Technology to Support the ESLRs 

25| P a g e  


Status of School in Terms of Student Performance   Has ECR met Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) for the past two years?  El  Camino  Real  High  School  has  not  met  its  AYP  for  the  past  two  years.    In  2008‐2009  academic year we met 21 out 22 criteria and in the 2009‐2010 academic year we met 18 out  of 22 criteria. 

Is ECR  under  the  II­USP  (Immediate  Intervention­Underperforming  Schools  Program)?  El Camino Real is not classified as an underperforming school and therefore not subject to II‐ USP mandates.  

Does ECR take part in the Federal Comprehensive School reform (CSR) program?  ECR  does  not  take  part  in  the  CSR  program.  This  program  only  serves  and  targets  high‐ poverty and low‐achieving schools, especially those receiving Title I funds. Since the school  fails to meet these prerequisites the school is exempt from program participation.  

Is ECR  associated  with  any  outside  providers  or  external  evaluators  that  are  currently working with the school?  El Camino does not have imposed conditions that require such a service.   

Has ECR been through any audit process?  El Camino has never been identified as requiring an auditing procedure 

Does ECR have either a corrective action plan or joint intervention agreement?  ECR  does  not  have  a  corrective  action  plan  or  joint  intervention  agreement  since  the  program is designated for low performing schools. 

What are state and federal imposed deadlines for evidence of growth in student  achievement for the entire school  Under  NCLB,  EL  Camino  is  under  the  same  rigorous  deadlines  as  other  public  schools  receiving  federal  funds.  Therefore  AYP  and  API  mandates  set  by  the  state  and  federal  educational committees are imposed and adhered to by the school.    E C R   

26| P a g e  


Is the school a Title I school?  El Camino Real High School, which enrolls about 3,565 students, has a small percentage that  participates in  the free and  reduced  lunch  program  and  therefore does not  qualify  for any  Title I Categorical Funding. For a school to qualify as a Title 1 school it must have at least 40  percent  of  its  students  participating  in  the  program,  El  Camino  Real  High  School  has  19  percent participation. 

Enrollment   El Camino has maintained a steady population of approximately 3500 students over the past  five  years.    Our  Spring  2010  enrollment  was  3468  students  (48%  female,  52%  male)  representing a combination of 2690 local students (78.8%), 106 traveling students who are  part of the District’s voluntary integration, public choice, and capacity adjustment programs  (3.1%),  and  there  are  616  students  with  special  permits  (18%).    The  majority  of  students  attending on special permits are part of the District’s open enrollment program.  Enrollment  has  decreased  from  a  high  of  4033  students  in  the  2004‐2005  school  year.    The  primary  reason  for  this  reduction  is  the  construction  of  new  schools  in  Los  Angeles  and  the  East  Valley, allowing students who used to voluntarily travel to ECR to attend their home schools.   Additionally, the district sent many students to another local high school to help maintain its  population.                            E C R   

27| P a g e  


Student Enrollment by Grade Level and Sex  Spring 2010  Female  Percent  Male  Grade  Enrolled  Percent  Population  Female  Population  Level  9  936  27  463 49 473  10  883  26  401 45 489  11  868  26  441 51 425  12  781  23  373 48 441  Total  3468    1678 48 1790 

Percent Male  51 55 49 56 52

*Source: Student Information System 

Student Enrollment by Grade Level and Sex  Spring 2009 Grade  Female  Percent  Male  Enrolled  Percent  Level  Population  Female  Population  9  894  26  414 46 480  10  927  27  470 51 457  11  871  25  404 46 467  12  789  23  426 54 363  Total  3481    1714 49 1767 

Percent Male  54 49 54 46 51

*Source: Student Information System 

Grade Level  9  10  11  12  Total 

Student Enrollment by Grade Level and Sex  Spring 2008  Female  Percent  Male  Enrolled  Percent  Population  Female  Population  861  25  443 51 418  874  25  408 47 466  821  24  431 52 390  935  27  489 52 446  3491    1771 51 1720 

Percent Male  49 53 48 48 49

*Source: Student Information System 

E C R   

28| P a g e  


Ethnicity El  Camino  has  an  ethnically  diverse  student  body  with  an  average  of  52%  white  and  a  combined minority population of 48%.  Although the white population makes up half of the  student  body,  it  is  a  diverse  group  in  itself.    Students  in  this  collective  white  population  consist  of  Eastern  European,  Russian,  and  Middle  Eastern  students  with  a  large  number  of  students representing both Jewish and Muslim groups.   

Student Body Demographics 2500 2000 1500 1000 500 0 2004‐05

2005‐06

2006‐07

African American

A.I./ Alaskan

Asian

2007‐08 Filipino

Hispanic

2008‐09 Pacific Islander

2009‐10 White

SOURCE:  CDE Report 

Student Enrollment by Ethnicity 

Year

African American

A.I./ Alaska n

#

%

#

%

09-10

252

7.2

26

08-09

256

7.3

07-08

237

06-07

Asian %

Hispanic

#

%

#

0.7

361 10.3 90

2.6

24

0.7

340

6.6

21

266

7.1

05-06

329

04-05

323

E C R   

#

Filipino

White Total

#

%

#

%

869

24.7 10

0.3

1839

52.3

3513

126 3.6

868

24.7

9

0.3

1832

52.1

3514

0.6

366 10.3 131 3.7

875

24.5

8

0.2

1894

53.1

3569

21

0.6

381 10.2 127 3.4

918

24.6 13

0.3

1972

52.9

3727

8.2

19

0.5

434 10.8 141 3.5 1034 25.7 11

0.3

2049

51.0

4017

8.0

17

0.4

465 11.5 124 3.1 1048 26.0

0.2

2047

50.8

4033

9.7

%

Pacific Islande r

9

29| P a g e  


Special Programs   Gifted and Talented Education  Approximately  30%  of  El  Camino’s  students  are  identified  as  gifted  and/or  talented.    We  offer a variety of activities to challenge these students.  We have 33 AP and honors courses,  many with multiple sections.  Students can concurrently enroll at Pierce Community College  to  take  advanced  course  offerings  and  about  ten  Pierce  classes  are  taught  on  El  Camino’s  campus.    Over  200  students  participate  in  California  Math  League  contests  and  about  300  participate  in  American  Scholastic  Math  Association  contests.    El  Camino  developed  a  biotechnology  course,  a  robotics  course,  and  an  after‐school  engineering  academy.    Students  can  compete  in  our  academic  competitive  teams  including  Science  Bowl,  Engineering  team,  Envirothon,  and  the  previously  mentioned  Robotics  team  and  Academic  Decathlon.  We also have a full time college counselor who helps these students, and all of  our students, reach their post high school goals. 

Gifted/Highly Gifted Students  Total Gifted Percent of Population population 1019 29.4% Feb 2010 1039 27.0% Feb 2009 1219 34.9% Feb 2008 SOURCE: Gifted Coordinator Records 

E C R   

30| P a g e  


Special Education  For the last three years, the Special Education Department has seen a significant increase in  the number of students enrolled. In addition to the Emotionally Disturbed (ED) classes that  have  been  increasing  in  the  last  four  to  five  years,  the  most  recent  increase  is  due  to  the  open enrollment program. Twenty to thirty percent of the open enrollment students are in  Special  Education.  El  Camino  offers  sixteen  special  day  class  courses  that  cover  the  entire  range  of  regular  education  core  classes.    We  also  offer  fifty‐three  collaborative  classes  for  students  in  our  resource  program  involving  six  resource  teachers  and  seven  Special  Day  teachers. Collaborative teaching pairs the resource teacher with a regular education teacher.  This  allows  both  teachers  to  work  more  directly  with  students  and  serve  them  more  effectively.  ECR takes pride in providing a rigorous educational program for all its students  and strives to keep all students in at least one regular education class.  350

Special Education Population

300 250 200 2009

150

2010 100

2011

50 0 Students with an IEP (Special  Education)

Students in Special Day  classes

Students in at least one  general education class SOURCE: Student Information System 

Year 2010-11 2009-10 2008-09 E C R   

Special Education Population Students with an IEP Students in Special (Special Education) Day classes 313 120 209 76 190 72

Students in at least one general education class 312 (99.6%) 208 (99.5%) 190 (100%)

31| P a g e  


AVID Program  El  Camino’s  Advanced  via  Individual  Determination  (AVID)  program  puts  students  in  an  academic,  regularly  scheduled  elective  class  in  each  year  of  school.  The  three  main  components  of  the  program  are  academic  instruction,  tutorial  support,  and  motivational  activities.  Students learn proper note taking methods, use writing as a tool of learning, learn  inquiry  methods  and  effectively  participate  in  collaborative  groups.  AVID  targets  underrepresented  minority  students,  many  of  whom  will  be  the first  from  their families  to  attend a four‐ year university.  Approximately 200 students are enrolled in AVID and eleven  teachers  are  specially  trained  to  teach  in  this  program.    Recent  AVID  classes  have  a  graduation and college admission rate of 100%. 

Humanitas The  Humanitas  Academy  at  El  Camino  offers  an  academically  enriched,  interdisciplinary,  community  service  oriented,  writing‐  based  curriculum  that  helps  students  develops  skills  necessary for academic success.  It is a four‐ year program in which students share the same  teachers who work together to develop thematic units of study in the different disciplines.   Approximately 300 students participate in the program and it is open to all students.  Eleven  specially  trained  teachers  are  in  the  program,  one  of  whom  has  been  a  highly  effective  coordinator of  this  program  for  several  years.    100%  of  the  seniors  enrolled  in  Humanitas  graduate from ECR and over 95% go on to attend college. 

Math/Science Academy  This four‐ year program is designed for high level math and science students and pairs them  with  the  same  teachers  for  two‐year  cycles.    Upon  completion  of  this  program,  students  have  taken  AP  Calculus,  AP  Biology,  AP  Chemistry,  AP  Physics,  and  several  honors  classes.   This  program  also  develops  camaraderie  by  sponsoring  events,  such  as,  Pi  Day.  The  new  biotechnology and engineering courses are also a part of the academy with Amgen being a  community partner.   

Art and Design Academy  This  program  partners  with  the  Fashion  Institute  of  Design  and  Merchandising  (FIDM)  and  the  current emphasis  in the  academy  is  fashion design.    Students  may  take  this elective  in  which they learn to design and make costumes for our school plays and create clothing and  accessories  from  the  drawing  board  to  the  finished  product.  The  academy  invites  guest  speakers and takes students on field trips related to their subject area including a trip to the    E C R   

32| P a g e  


main campus  of  FIDM.  Our  students  regularly  win  drama  awards  for  their  theatrical  costumes and they showcase all of their work in an annual fashion show. 

Careers in Entertainment Academy  The  Careers  in  Entertainment  Academy  (CEA)  is  in  its  third  year  and  grew  out  of  a  state  Specialized Secondary Program (SSP) grant.  The program is comprised of a series of elective  classes  that  will,  by  2011‐2012,  span  grades  nine  through  twelve.  The  idea  behind  the  program is to provide students the opportunity to learn the behind‐the‐scenes aspects of the  entertainment  industry.    We  have  developed  two  new  courses  for  the  program,  Broadcast  Journalism  and  Introduction  to  Filmmaking.  The  teachers  in  the  academy all  have  previous  entertainment  industry  experience  and  have  used  their  connections  to  create  an  advisory  Patron of the Arts group composed of current members of the industry.   Our relationship  with Pierce College allows the students have access to entertainment industry related classes  on El Camino’s campus.  In addition, the academy has partnered with the Los Angeles Film  School to provide field trips, guest speakers, and internship opportunities 

Student Enrollment by Academy Year 

AVID

CEA

Fashion/Design

Humanitas

Math/Science

Fall 2010  Fall 2009  Fall 2008 

201 229  235 

132 77  114 

17 17 20

270 302 328

340 321 266 SOURCE: Student Information System 

English Learners  The  English  Learners  (EL)  population  at  El  Camino  has  been  steadily  decreasing  over  the  years from a high of 589 in 1997 to our current (Spring 2010) low of 135. We believe a major  reason  for  this  trend  is  the  opening  of  new  schools  in  downtown  Los  Angeles  and  the  subsequent  decrease  in  the  number  of  students  being  bused  to  El  Camino.  Our  AYP  data  indicates that English Learners, although a small group, are of a significant concern as they  have not met the proficiency criteria. In 2009‐2010, the linguistic distribution of EL students  was:  Spanish  51.9%,  Farsi  16.3%,  Hebrew  12.6%,  Korean  3.7%,  Mandarin  3.0%,  Arabic  and  Russian 1.5% each.  The remaining 9% was comprised of eleven other home languages.  In  September  2010,  19  students  were  enrolled  in  ESL  classes.    The  number  of  students  re‐ designated over the last three years has remained fairly constant.       E C R   

33| P a g e  


Year 2009‐2010  2008‐2009  2007‐2008 

ESL Population  FEP 1063 1094 1104

EL 135  153  187 

R‐FEP 31 44 33

% Reclassified 20% 24% 14% SOURCE:  SARC Report 

1200

1104

1094

1063

1000 800 600 400 187 200

153

135 33

44

31

0 EL

FEP 2007‐2008

R‐FEP

2008‐2009

2009‐2010

Distribution by Grade Levels  Spring 2011  Grade  GRADE 9  GRADE 10  GRADE 11  GRADE 12  Total 

ESL 1 

ESL 2 

ESL 3 

ESL 4 

1 0  2  1 

0 2  2  2 

1 0  1  2 

1 2  1  0 

4

6

4

4

SOURCE:  Student Information System    

E C R   

34| P a g e  


Attendance   El  Camino  Real  High  School  traditionally  has  one  of  the  highest  attendance  rates  in  the  District  and has  been recognized  in  the  past for this  accomplishment.  Our  attendance  rate  has  increased  over  the  past  few  years  to  about  94%.    While  we  are  proud  of  this  rate  of  attendance,  we  continue  to  strive  for  improved  student  attendance.    In  the  2005‐2006  academic year, El Camino instituted phase one of the district‐mandated Integrated Student  Information  System  (ISIS).    The  ISIS  system  is  an  internet‐based,  period‐by‐period  student  attendance reporting program.  Teachers, counselors, administrators, and even parents have  real‐time access to our students’ daily attendance records.    In order to increase our period‐by‐period attendance, we run random tardy sweeps and the  Deans keep track of repeat offenders.  The teachers notify counselors if a student is absent  from their class for three consecutive days.  The counseling staff, along with the intervention  coordinator, works with parents and students to improve attendance and make sure these  students are on track to graduate.   

Year 2009‐2010  2008‐2009  2007‐2008  2006‐2007 

School Attendance Rates  Stability Rate Transiency  Rate 91% 13% 88% 18% 89% 15% 88% 17%

Daily Attendance 94%  94%  94%  93%  SOURCE: SARC Report 

Suspension and Expulsion Rates   The  staff  at  El  Camino  works  diligently  to  create  a  nurturing,  yet  disciplined,  learning  environment  for  students  and  adults.    Our  school  police  officer  works  with  our  campus  security  aides,  Deans,  Intervention  Coordinator,  and  administrators  to  provide  supervision  and intervention.  We have a zero tolerance policy regarding drugs and fighting and this has  proven to be a strong deterrent for our students.  The zero tolerance policy calls for some  form of mandatory discipline to occur when a student is in possession of drugs or weapons  or  is  involved  in  an  act  of  violence.      Our  teachers  feel  empowered  to  discipline  in  their  classes instead of sending students to the Deans’ office for every infraction.  However, when  teachers do send their students, the Deans are supportive and highly effective.  Two years  ago,  we  brought  in  the  Tarzana  Drug  Treatment  Center  to  the  campus  to  provide  free  counseling to our students with drug and alcohol problems. This group continues to help our  students regularly in the Parent Center on campus.  We also instituted a new program called    E C R   

35| P a g e  


Peer Active Listeners (PALs).  This program recruits students who are guided by one of our  Deans to mentor and provide a safe environment for students to speak about their personal  problems.  This change in our approach to discipline has worked well in conjunction with the  District’s positive behavior support plan. As a result, our suspension rate has remained low  and  the  average  number  of  days  per  suspension  has  steadily  decreased.    In  addition,  the  number  of  opportunity  transfers  has  decreased  dramatically  from  forty‐eight  in  2005‐2006  to thirteen in 2009‐2010. Only two students in the past three years have been recommended  for expulsion due to serious discipline issues.   

Suspension Rate  Year 

AI/Alsk

Asian

Filipino

Pac Isl. 

Black

Hispanic

White

Total

Avg # Days 

2009‐10 2008‐09  2007‐08  2006‐07 

0 1  4  4 

10 16  7  15 

0 0  4  7 

0 0 1 2

27 42 34 34

59 62 85 90

95 122 94 148

191 243  229  300 

1.12 1.18 1.41 1.54

SOURCE: SARC report 

Suspension Rate AI/Alsk

Asian

Filipino

Pac Isl.

Black

Hispanic

White

148 122 90

85

95

94 62

34 15 4

7

2

2006‐07

42

34 4 7 4 1 2007‐08

59 27

16 1

10 0 0 2008‐09

0

0 0 2009‐10

  E C R   

36| P a g e  


Expulsion Rate  Year  AI/Alsk  2009‐10  0  2008‐09  0  2007‐08  0  2006‐07  0 

Asian 0  0  0  1 

Filipino 0  0  0  0 

Pac Isl. 0 0 0 0

Black 0 0 0 0

Hispanic 0 0 0 1

White 1 0 1 1

Total 1  0  1  3 

Expulsion (Rate) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 SOURCE: SARC report 

Opportunity Transfers  Year  2009‐10  2008‐09  2007‐08  2006‐07 

A.I./Alaskan 0  0  0  1 

Asian 2  2  0  0 

Filipino 0 0 1 2

Pac Isl 0 0 0 0

Black 2 1 2 5

Hispanic 10 4 4 15

White 5  7  8  14 

Total 19 14 15 37

SOURCE: SARC report

E C R   

37| P a g e  


Socioeconomic Status  Our population receiving free or reduced meals has remained constant at around 18%.  This  does not qualify us for Title I funding and makes us the only high school in the District with  this distinction.  Of the approximately 2200 parents who indicated an education level, 73%  have at least some college experience and 48% have at least a bachelor’s degree.   

Year 2010 2009 2008

ECR Students Receiving Free or Reduced Meals  Number of Students Percent of Students 652 18.8% 660 18.9% 617 17.7% *SOURCE: Student Information System 

Description of the Safety Conditions, Cleanliness and Adequacy of School  Facilities  El Camino Real High School strives to maintain a safe, healthy, nurturing, and orderly campus  for  our  students  and  staff.    We  have  adequate  classroom  space  on  campus  and  all  of  our  teachers  teach  in  their  own  room  which  allows  organizational  efficiency  plus  teachers  are  able to use resources, such as projectors, much more effectively.  Although in the past few  years  we  have  lost  three  custodial  positions  due  to  budget  cuts,  our  remaining  twelve  custodians are able to keep the facilities clean. We also receive effective support from the  Local  District  One  maintenance  staff.   Recently  our  fire  alarm  and  air  conditioning  systems  were  updated.  We  have  also  had  significant  improvements  done  in  the  stadium  where  an  artificial turf field and rubber track surface have been added. El Camino is also working with  LAUSD  and  Architects  of  Achievement  to  help  redesign  several  classrooms  and  outdoor  spaces for our Academies.  The school and community place great emphasis on campus security.  We have two full‐time  Deans and an Intervention Coordinator.  Our five campus security aides assist in monitoring  the campus before and after school,  and during lunch and nutrition breaks. In addition, the  District provides a full‐time School Police Officer who works cooperatively with the campus  aides,  administrators,  and  Deans.    All  visitors  must  sign  in  at  the  school’s  office  to  receive  proper  authorization  to  be  on  campus  and  they  must  display  their  visitor’s  pass  as  long  as  they are on campus.  El Camino’s three‐volume School Safety Plans are revised annually and  are  reviewed  by  the  School  Safety  Committee.    Major  emergency  drills  are  held  once  per  semester and the school has added sixteen security cameras to help monitor activity on the  campus.     E C R   

38| P a g e  


Staff There  are  140  certificated  staff  members  at  ECR.    Of  these,  138  are  permanent,  two  are  probationary, and no teachers hold an emergency credential.   There are seven teachers who  spend  part  of  their  day  teaching  elective  courses  outside  their  credentialed  areas.    The  district approved them to teach these electives based on their professional expertise. All of  our teachers are credentialed by the state and hold CLAD certificates. Several staff members  have  received  special  recognition  and  awards  for  their  accomplishments.  All  El  Camino  teachers are highly qualified as determined by NCLB. Nine have earned their National Board  Certification  (NBC)  and  thirty  eight  plan  to  earn  their  NBC  in  the  near  future.    Sixty  six  teachers and administrators hold Master’s degrees.  El Camino serves as a student teacher  training  site  for  California  State  University  Northridge  (CSUN)  and  Pepperdine  University.   Many  teachers  are  involved  in  implementing  programs  and  grants  such  as  those  involved  with the Careers in Entertainment Academy, the Math/Science Academy, the Art and Design  Academy, and the Humanitas Academy.  Several of our teachers have presented at annual  regional and state conferences and have been readers of Advanced Placement Exams.  Our  staff turnover rate is low with about 75% of the teachers having been here at least six years.   The  ethnic  composition  of  certificated  staff  members  is  69.5%  White,  17.0%  Hispanic,  9%  Asian, 3% African American, and 1.5% American Indian. The staff is 52.5% female and 47.5%  male.  In addition, twenty one of our teachers are graduates of El Camino.  El Camino staff  show confidence in the quality education delivered by ECR as they enroll their own children  here.  More than 47% of faculty and staff currently have, have had, or will have their children  attend ECR. 

Number of Certificated Staff and Classified staff  Certificated Assignments by Department  Business/Computers  4 Industrial Education Counselors  5 Mathematics Deans  2 NJROTC English  23 Physical Education ESL*  1 Science Family  and  Consumer  2 Social Studies Studies  Foreign Language  9 Special Education Health/Life Skills  5 Visual/Performing Arts  Classified Staff  69 Administrators

2 15 2 7 11 16 14 7 5

SOURCE: Student Information System 

E C R   

39| P a g e  


Number of Qualified Personnel for counseling and other pupil support services and  substitutes  Counseling,  Pupil Support Services, & Substitutes   Counselors  Literacy Coach 

4 1 

Bridge Coordinator  Library Media  Specialist 

1 1 

College Counselor  Intervention  Coordinator  Deans Nurse

1 1 half‐time

Parole Officer  School Psychologist 

5.0 days/week  5.0 days/week 

School Police Officer  Counseling Interns 

Deaf & Hard of  Hearing Specialist 

1.0 day/week 

Speech/Language Specialist 

1.0 day/week

DOTS (Vocational)  Coordinator  Visually Impaired  Specialist  Occupational  Therapist  Occupational  Inclusionist 

5.0 days/week 

LRE Counselor 

1.0 day/week

1.0 day/week 

Physical Therapist 

2.0 days/month

2.0 days/month 

Inclusion Facilitator 

2.0 days/week

1 day/month 

Adapted P.E.  Teacher 

5.0 days a week for  one period 

2 1 (The District has  cut her position to 2  days/wk.)  5.0 days/week 2‐3days/week

SOURCE: School records 

               

E C R   

40| P a g e  


Staff Tenure at El Camino  Range  1 to 5 years  6 to 10 years  11 to 15 years  16 to 20 years  21 to 25 years  26 or more years 

Percent of Staff  27%  39%  16%  8%  5%  4%  *SOURCE: Staff Survey  

Staff Tenure 8%

5%

27%

4%

1 to 5 years 16%

6 to 10 years 11 to 15 years 16 to 20 years 21 to 25 years 39%

26 or more years

 

Attendance Rates for Teachers  Year Rate 2009‐2010 93.5% 2008‐2009 92.7% SOURCE: School Records 

E C R   

41| P a g e  


Content of Staff Development and Participating Numbers  LAUSD mandates 21 hours of professional development over fourteen days throughout the  academic  year.  In  addition,  we  usually  have  12  hours  of  professional  development  before  the  school  begins  in  the  fall.  This  year  (2010)  we  were  fortunate  to  have  20  hours  of  professional  development  in  the  months  of  August  and  September.  During  professional  development  days before  school  begins,  approximately  two hours  are  dedicated  each  day  for teachers to prepare their lessons and their rooms.  Our professional development focuses on the following areas:  • Data‐driven analysis to improve our teaching: In this category, we analyze various tests 

and assessments to examine both our successes and our areas of weakness. We take  the English, Mathematics, Social Studies and Science departments to our computer lab  to  analyze  data.  The  data  is  also  analyzed  in  departments  to  determine  a  specific  course of action for improvement. We have done this with periodic assessments, CST  and other standardized tests.     • School program improvement: We also regularly consider improvements in our school  program. We held staff development meetings regarding small learning communities,  such  as  the  creation  of  our  various  academies  and  freshman  houses.  Most  of  these  academies  have  been  successfully  implemented  such  as  Humanitas,  AVID,  the  Math‐ Science  Academy,  and  the  Careers  in  Entertainment  Academy.    The  freshman  houses  proved to be problematic and lasted only two years.      • Best practices: We regularly share best practices of teaching both in departments and as 

a whole  faculty.  Faculty  members  demonstrate  and  explain  what  works  in  their  classrooms  and  expose  the  faculty  to  various  teaching  methods,  techniques,  and  activities.  For  example,  on  one  occasion  teachers  demonstrated  how  to  use  various  graphic organizers and how these organizers can be adapted for different subjects.     • Articulation  with  feeder  Middle  School:  This  exercise  helps  both  the  middle  school 

prepare its students for high school and clarifies our expectations of the incoming 9th  grade students.  We usually have an initial meeting with both staffs and then break out  into  department  groups.    In  addition,  our  principal  attends  monthly  Instructional  Cabinet meetings with the principals of all the schools in our complex and shares this  information at our faculty meetings.    • Literacy: In this area, we focus on our school‐wide Writing across the Curriculum essay 

program, our  Sustained  Silent  Reading,  and  various  other  topics  presented  by  the  Literacy/Instructional Coach.    • School related information:  The entire staff is made aware of the testing schedule, how 

to use our voicemail system, ISIS grading system, ISIS family module, update on Special    E C R   

42| P a g e  


Education and  testing  procedures.    We  also  share  school‐specific  information  that  is  important in terms of awareness, morale, and continuance of our sense of community.     • Self‐study: Focus on Learning: In 2010, our staff development has focused on examining 

what we do as a school in all its aspects. In our five focus groups and our many home  groups, we analyze the school's program and environment in their entirety. 

Student Participation in Co­Curricular Activities  El  Camino  Real  High  School  offers  a  wide  variety  of  extra‐curricular  and  co‐curricular  activities.  We currently have almost 80 clubs that meet primarily at lunch (see appendix for  the club list).  Each club is required to have a faculty sponsor and it is a testament to our staff  that we can support this many organizations.  The clubs cover a range of interests including  community  service,  religion,  the  arts,  and  hobbies.    The  clubs  are  involved  in  countless  fundraising  and  charitable  activities.    The  student  leadership  program  (Student  Council)  is  also  very  active  and  sponsors  such  events  as  Homecoming,  Blood  Drive,  Welcome  Back  Parade,  and  Lip  Sync.    Because  the  size  of  the  school  can  be  intimidating  to  incoming  freshmen,  we  advise  them  to  join  activities  to  get  more  comfortable  on  campus.    Clearly,  they have been listening to this advice.    Besides  the  clubs,  we  have  many  other  extra‐curricular  opportunities.    We  have  a  school  newspaper,  a  yearbook,  and  a  broadcast  journalism  program.    The  performing  arts  department offers two levels of choir, four instrumental music programs, and several theater  and dance groups.  We have many academic teams such as Academic Decathlon, Envirothon,  Science Bowl, and Quiz Bowl.  Our students can be peer counselors or college counselors.  If  our  students  have  an  interest  that  is  not  addressed  by  the  school,  they  are  encouraged  to  start their own club.    At  El  Camino,  we  have  over  20  different  athletic  teams,  each  with  at  least  two  levels  (JV,  Varsity).    In  2009‐2010,  745  student‐athletes  participated  in  the  athletic  program.    The  student‐athletes must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and, as a school rule, may have no  more  than  one  unsatisfactory  mark  in  cooperation.    El  Camino  has  won  approximately  70  team  city  championships,  numerous  individual  city  championships,  and  two  state  championships. 

E C R   

43| P a g e  


School Financial Support  El  Camino  Real  High  School  is  not  a  Title  I  school,  therefore  we  do  not  receive  any  supplemental  federal  funding  or  grants.    Our  total  budget  for  2009‐2010  is  15.5  million  dollars including payroll, maintenance, and all student instructional programs.  The programs  and services at the school are provided by a combination of general, categorical, and special  grant funds.  While we have lost several funding sources since the last WASC accreditation,  in  the  last  two  years  we  have  received  special  funding  from  the  superintendent  which  enabled us to retain seven positions out of twenty one that we lost.    The following funds are still directly administered by the site:   

Program Total  English Learners Program $82,000 Gifted and Talented Education $35,700 Instructional Materials $98,000 Student Integration $6,700 Special Education $3,200 EXPENDITURES PER PUPIL  $6,200 SOURCE: SARC Report / School Budget   

Program Funding Allocation 3% 1%

English Learners  Program

36%

Gifted and Talented  Education Instructional  Materials

44%

Student Integration Special Education

16%

  E C R   

44| P a g e  


The above  funding  represents  approximately  half  of  what  we  received  during  the  2004‐ 2005  school  year.    We  were  fortunate  in  2009‐2010  to  receive  three  grants  that  helped  relieve our budget shortfall.  Specialized Secondary Program (SSP) Grant ......................................  $100,000  Perkins Grant......................................................................................... $56,000  AmGen Grant ........................................................................................ $50,000  In addition to the above resources, we have partnered with the Fashion Institute of Design and  Merchandising,  the  Los  Angeles  Film  School,  and  the  National  Park  Service  to  provide  extra  opportunities for our students.  We have also used funds from The Friends of ECR parent group  to  provide  extra  nursing  time  and  after‐school  tutoring  programs  in  math  and  science.

E C R   

45| P a g e  


Student Performance  Academic Performance Index (API)  The  Academic  Performance  Index  (API)  is  an  annual  measurement  of  the  academic  achievement  and  progress  of  schools  in  California,  with  scores  ranging  from  200  to  1000,  with  a  statewide  target  of  800.    In  2010,  our  API  of  798  was  one  of  the  top  scores  in  the  district and was the top score for a non‐magnet or non‐charter comprehensive high school.   This score was a 25 point improvement over our 2009 API of 773 and is a 72 point increase  over our 2004 API of 726.  Two of our subgroups have reached the target score of 800, and  all  other  subgroups  have  seen  increases  in  their  scores.    Hispanic/Latino  students  scored  735,  surpassing  their  target  score  of  719  by  16  points.    African  American  students  scored  734, surpassing their target score of 660 by 74 points.  Asian students scored 871 which was  an increase of 30 points.  Students who are White, not of Hispanic origin, scored 822 which  was an increase of 21 points.  Our Socioeconomically Disadvantaged students scored 736,  exceeding  the  target  score  of  712  by  24  points.    Students  with  Disabilities  scored  541,  exceeding the target score of 534 by seven points.  Our English Language Learners scored  647,  which  was  a  seven  point  increase,  but  they  missed  their  target  score  by  one  point.   Data is considered insignificant for Filipinos, Pacific Islanders, and American Indian/Alaskan  Natives, as the number of these students enrolled at El Camino is too few.   

School Academic Performance Index (API) Growth Report  2009‐2010 Sub‐Group  Entire School  African American  American Indian  Asian  Filipino  Hispanic  Pacific Islander  White  Socioeconomically  Disadvantaged  Students  w/Disabilities  English Learners 

Numerically Significant  N/A  YES  No  YES  No  YES  No  YES  YES 

API Base  773 653 ‐ 841

Growth Target  5 7 ‐ ‐ ‐ 5 ‐ ‐ 5

Actual Growth  25  81  ‐  30  ‐  21  ‐  21  29 

Met Target

714 ‐ 801 707

API Growth  798 734 ‐ 871 820 735 ‐ 822 736

YES

520

541

14

21

YES

YES

640

647

8

7

NO

YES YES N/A N/A N/A YES N/A N/A YES

Source: CDE   

E C R   

46| P a g e  


Sub‐Group Description 

School Year 2008­2009   Number  API  API  Growth Significant  Base  Growth  Target 

WHOLE SCHOOL  AFRICAN  AMERICANS  AMERICAN  INDIANS  ASIANS  FILIPINOS  HISPANICS  PACIFIC ISLANDERS  WHITES  SOCIOECON  DISADVTGD  STDNTS  W/  DISABLTS  ENGLISH LEARNERS 

Actual Growth 

Met Target 

N/A

768

774

5

6

Yes

Yes

642

648

8

6

No

No

N/A

Yes No  Yes  No  Yes 

858

843

685 ‐ 797

714 ‐ 802

6 ‐ 3

‐15   29  ‐  5 

N/A N/A Yes N/A Yes

Yes

685

708

6

23

Yes

Yes

512

528

14

16

Yes

Yes

625

641

9

16

Yes *Source: CDE   

Sub‐Group Description 

School Year 2008­2007  Number  API  API  Growth  Significant  Base  Growth  Target 

Actual Growth 

Met    Target 

African American    American  Indian  or   Alaska Native   Asian 

Yes

623

643

9

20

Yes

No

Yes

849

858

A

9

Yes

Filipino   Hispanic or Latino   Pacific Islander 

No Yes  No 

671

685

6

14

Yes

White  Socioeconomically  Disadvantaged   English Learners 

Yes

778

796

5

18

Yes

Yes

670

685

7

15

Yes

Yes

613

625

9

12

Yes

Yes

453

512

17

59

Yes

Students  with  Disabilities 

   

E C R   

47| P a g e  


Subgroup

API Growth Scores for Numerically Significant Subgroups  2007‐2008 2008‐2009 2009‐2010 

African American 

643

648

734

Asian

858

843

871

Hispanic

685

714

735

White

796

802

822

Socioeconomically Disadvantaged  English Learners 

685

708

736

625

641

647

Students Disabilities 

512

528

541

760

774

798

Overall Score 

with

Source: California Department of Education 

API Growth Scores for Numerically Significant Subgroups 1000 900 800 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0

2007‐2008 2008‐2009 2009‐2010

     

E C R   

48| P a g e  


State Wide / Similar School Rank  El Camino’s school ranking was an eight for 2007‐2008 and 2008‐2009 and is a seven for the  2009‐2010 school year.  Our similar school ranking was a two in 2007‐2008 and was a three  for the past two years.  While we are proud of our accomplishments, we realize that we need  to keep striving for improvement. 

Year 2005‐2006  2006‐2007  2007‐2008  2008‐2009  2009‐2010 

Recent API Scores for El Camino Real High School  Statewide  Base Score  Growth Score Increase  Rank  736  737  1  7  741  748  7  7  748  768  20  8  768  774  6  8  773  798  25  7 

Similar Schools Rank  2  2  2  3  3  Source: CDE 

API Growth Scores 798

774 768

748 737

2005‐2006

2006‐2007

2007‐2008

2008‐2009

2009‐2010

  E C R   

49| P a g e  


California Standards Test (CSTs)  The  California  Standards  Test  (CST)  is  a  measure  of  student  performance  in  relation  to  the  state  content  standards as  reported by  performance  level.    El  Camino’s  2010  English scores  show an increase in proficient and advanced students from 66% in 2008 to 67%.  At the same  time, the percent of Below Basic (BB) and Far Below Basic (FBB) students has decreased from  16%  to  12%.    Our  2010  Math  data  shows  an  increase  in  proficient  and  advanced  students  from 41% to 45% compared to 2008 levels and a decrease in BB/FBB students from 29% to  28%.    Science  data  for  2010  showed  an  increase  in  proficient  and  advanced  students  over  2008 figures, growing from 43% to 54%.  During the same time, the number of BB and FBB  students dropped from 30% to 20%.  Finally, our 2010 Social Science scores show an increase  in proficient and advanced students from 42% to 53% and a decrease in BB and FBB from 31%  to 24%.  CST Scores by Subject  Subject   

%  Far Below Basic & Below Basic 07‐08  08‐09 09‐10

07‐08

%  Proficient & Advanced 08‐09  09‐10

English

16%

17%

12%

66%

62%

67%

Math

29%

31%

28%

41%

41%

45%

Science Social Studies 

30% 31% 

27% 33%

20% 24%

43% 42%

46% 46% 

54% 53% SOURCE: Mydata 

El Camino’s CST scores by ethnicity show an increase for all statistically significant subgroups  over  a  three‐year  period  in  each  of  the  core  subjects.    African‐American  students  had  the  highest average percent increase in the core subjects with a 17.5% improvement.  They were  followed  by  Hispanic  students  (9.75%  increase),  White  students  (7%  increase),  and  Asian  students (6.25% increase).  All groups also showed a decline in the percent of Below Basic and  Far  Below  Basic  students.    African‐American  students  had  the  biggest  average  decrease  (14.75%),  followed  by  Hispanic  students  (10%),  White  students  (3.5%),  and  Asian  students  (2.5%).    In  each  of  the  core  subjects,  Asian  and  White  students  had  the  highest  percent  of  proficient and advanced students.  In Science and Social Science, African‐American students  outscored  Hispanic  students.    In  Math,  Hispanic  students  did  better  than  African‐American  students  and  in  English  both  groups  had  the  same  percent  of  proficient  and  advanced  students.   

  E C R   

50| P a g e  


CST: English Language Arts     Subgroups  African   American  Asian  Hispanic  White 

% Far Below Basic/Below Basic  2007‐08  2008‐09  2009‐10 

% Proficient/Advanced  2007‐08  2008‐09  2009‐10 

33%

32%

21%

43%

46%

54%

9% 25% 

12% 24% 

6% 17% 

76% 46% 

71% 47% 

12%

14%

11%

70%

69%

79% 54%  72%    *Source: Mydata  

CST: ELA % Proficient / Advanced 80% 60% 40% 20% 0%

African  American

Asian 2007‐08

Hispanic 2008‐09

White

2009‐10

CST: ELA % Far Below Basic / Below Basic 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% African  American

Asian 2007‐08

Hispanic 2008‐09

White

2009‐10

  E C R   

51| P a g e  


CST: Mathematics    Subgroups  African   American  Asian  Hispanic  White 

% Far Below Basic/Below Basic  2007‐08  2008‐09  2009‐10 

% Proficient/Advanced  2007‐08  2008‐09  2009‐10 

51%

44%

40%

15%

28%

29%

15% 39%  25% 

21% 42%  27% 

15% 37%  24% 

56% 28%  45% 

56% 30%  45% 

63% 32%  49%  *Source: Mydata  

CST: Mathematics  % Proficient/Advance 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% African  American

Asian 2007‐08

Hispanic 2008‐09

White

2009‐10

CST: Mathematics % Far Below Basic / Below Basic 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% African  American

Asian 2007‐08

Hispanic 2008‐09

White

2009‐10

  E C R   

52| P a g e  


CST: Social Studies    Subgroups  African   American  Asian  Hispanic  White 

%  Far Below Basic/Below Basic  2007­08  2008­09 2009­10

% Proficient/Advanced  2007­08 2008­09  2009­10

51%

51%

40%

26%

27%

40%

19% 46%  27% 

22% 46%  28% 

14% 36%  21% 

55% 26%  49% 

67% 30%  52% 

66% 38%  59%  SOURCE: Mydata 

CST: Social Studies‐ % Proficient / Advanced 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% African  American

Asian 2007‐08

Hispanic 2008‐09

White

2009‐10

CST: Social Studies‐ % Far Below Basic / Below Basic 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% African  American

Asian 2007‐08

Hispanic 2008‐09

White

2009‐10

 

E C R   

53| P a g e  


CST: Science    Group  African   American  Asian  Hispanic  White 

% Far Below Basic/Below Basic  2007­08  2008­09 2009­10

% Proficient/Advanced  2007­08 2008­09  2009­10

53%

56%

28%

18%

23%

48%

15% 47%  24% 

19% 36%  22% 

13% 27%  18% 

65% 24%  49% 

61% 32%  52% 

69% 39%  61%  SOURCE: Mydata 

CST: Science‐ % Proficient / Advanced 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% African  American

Asian 2007‐08

Hispanic 2008‐09

White

2009‐10

CST: Science‐% Far Below Basic / Below Basic 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% African  American

Asian 2007‐08

Hispanic 2008‐09

White

2009‐10

E C R   

54| P a g e  


Grade Level Proficiency Scores:  In  2009‐2010,  ninth  grade  students  at  El  Camino  had  the  highest  percentage  of  students  scoring in the advanced and proficient ranges across all subject areas.  Tenth grade students  had  the  next  highest  percentage, followed  by eleventh  graders.    In  English,  75.6%  of  ninth  graders  were  advanced  or  proficient  compared  to  64.1%  for  sophomores  and  59.4%  for  juniors.  In  Math,  55.9%  of  freshmen  were  advanced  or  proficient  compared  to  41.7%  and  32.0%  of  sophomores  and  juniors.    In  science,  77.3%  of  freshmen  were  advanced  or  proficient compared to 58.5% of sophomores and 31.5% of juniors.  In social studies, 63.7%  of ninth graders were advanced or proficient compared to 50.5% of tenth graders and 51.8%  of eleventh graders. 

Grade Level Proficiency Scores 2009‐2010  English

Math

9th Grade 

10th Grade

11th Grade

9th Grade

10th Grade 

11th Grade

Advanced

40.7%

37.6%

30.9%

17.1%

11.3%

11.9%

Proficient

34.9%

26.5%

28.5%

38.8%

30.4%

20.1%

Basic

17.3%

22.3%

22.4%

26.2%

30.9%

26.2%

Below Basic  Far  Below  Basic 

4.9%

8.9%

8.1%

15.3%

21.2%

31.5%

2.3%

4.6%

10.0%

2.5%

6.3%

10.3%

SOURCE: Mydata  

E C R   

55| P a g e  


CST Scores‐ English Far Below Basic Below Basic Basic Proficient Advanced 0.00%

5.00%

10.00% 15.00% 20.00% 25.00% 30.00% 35.00% 40.00% 45.00% 11th Grade

10th Grade

9th Grade

 

CST Scores‐ Math Far Below Basic Below Basic 11th Grade

Basic

10th Grade 9th Grade

Proficient Advanced 0%

5%

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

35%

40%

45%

        E C R   

56| P a g e  


9th Grade  Advanced  53.4%  Proficient  23.9%  Basic  16.8%  Below  2.1%  Basic  Far  Below  3.7%  Basic 

CST Scores by Grade Level  Science 10th Grade 11th Grade 9th Grade 33.1% 13.7% 35.1% 25.4% 17.8% 28.6% 24.5% 32.7% 24.3% 8.1%  16.6% 6.6% 8.9% 

19.1%

Social Studies  10th Grade  11th Grade 24.5%  22.1% 26.0%  29.7% 22.9%  20.6% 7.9%  9.5%

5.4%

18.8%

18.1%

SOURCE: Mydata     

CST Scores: Science Far Below Basic Below Basic Basic Proficient Advanced 0.00%

10.00%

20.00%

11th Grade

30.00%

10th Grade

40.00%

50.00%

60.00%

9th Grade  

E C R   

57| P a g e  


CST Scores: Social Studies Far Below Basic

Below Basic

Basic

Proficient

Advanced 0.00%

5.00%

10.00% 11th Grade

15.00%

20.00%

10th Grade

25.00%

30.00%

35.00%

40.00%

9th Grade  

California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE)  El Camino students perform very well on the CAHSEE.  The school offers after‐school CAHSEE  preparation  classes  in  English  Language  Arts  (ELA)  and  Math.    We  also  offer  an  intensive  program  called  CAHSEE  Boot  Camp  that  pulls  seniors  out  of  their  classes  to  participate  in  CAHSEE preparation two weeks prior to the exam.  Over the last three years, almost 92% of  tenth grade, first time test takers passed the English Language Arts (ELA) portion of the exam  and almost 90% passed the Math portion.  Each of our ethnicity subgroups did well on the  exam,  with  none  scoring  lower  than  83%.    Our  non‐socioeconomically  disadvantaged  students,  socioeconomically  disadvantaged  students,  and  Re‐designated  Fluent  English  Proficient (RFEP) students also all performed well on the exam, with none scoring lower than  83%.  Our Special Education students and English Learners had Math pass rates of 60% and  62%, respectively.  The same two groups had English pass rates of 56% and 46%.          E C R   

58| P a g e  


Group All Students  Female  Male  African American  American Indian  Asian  Filipino   Hispanic/Latino  Pacific Islanders  White  Students with  Disabilities  EL  RFEP  Socioeconomically  Disadvantaged  Not  Socioeconomically  Disadvantaged 

CAHSEE Results for Tenth Grade Students  (First Time Test Takers) English Language Arts Mathematics  March  March  March  March  March  March  2008  2009  2010  2008  2009  2010  92%  93% 90% 89% 90%  90% 95%  95% 94% 91% 91%  92% 89%  92% 88% 87% 89%  89% 82%  88% 86% 65% 80%  91% NA  NA NA NA NA  NA 97%  98% 96% 99% 99%  97% 91%  100% 91% 87% 100%  97% 89%  89% 85% 82% 83%  83% NA  NA NA NA NA  NA 94%  95% 93% 92% 92%  92% 51% 

62%

56%

40%

47%

60%

63% 95% 

63% 95%

46% 86%

66% 89%

52% 94% 

62% 90%

87%

87%

83%

80%

84%

85%

95%

96%

96%

94%

94%

94%

SOURCE: CDE   

E C R   

59| P a g e  


CAHSEE Results for 10th Grade Students (First time test takers) Mathematics 2010

English 2010 94% 96%

Not Socioeconomically Disadvantaged 85% 83%

Socioeconomic Disadvantaged

90% 86%

RFEP EL

46%

62% 60% 56%

Students with Disabilities

92% 93%

White Pacific Islanders

0 0 83% 85%

Hispanic/Latino Filipino

97% 91%

Asian

97% 96%

American Indian African American Male Female All Students

0 0 91% 86% 89% 88% 92% 94% 90% 90%

     

E C R   

60| P a g e  


In a study of the graduating class of 2010, we found that in March 2008, 89% of our tenth  grade, first time test takers, passed the Math portion of the CAHSEE and 92% passed the ELA  portion.  Over the course of the following year, 166 eleventh graders took the math portion  of  the  CAHSEE  and  48%  passed.    In  ELA,  121  eleventh  graders  took  the  exam  and  55%  passed, leaving about 40 students needing to pass math in their senior year and 30 students  needing  to  pass  ELA.    After  the  November  2009  administration  of  the  CAHSEE,  fewer  than  twenty seniors still needed to pass one or both portions of the exam.  By graduation in June  2010, sixteen students remained that did not pass one or both parts of the CAHSEE.  Eleven  of the sixteen had IEPs.  The five regular education students all passed the ELA portion of the  CAHSEE. 

Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)  The  Federal  No  Child  Left  Behind  (NCLB)  Act  requires  that  all  schools  and  districts  meet  the following AYP criteria:  • • • •

Participation rate  on  the  state’s  standards‐based  assessments  in  English‐Language  Arts (ELA) and Mathematics  Percent  proficient  on  the  state’s  standards‐based  assessments  in  ELA  and  Mathematics  API as an indicator  Graduation Rate 

In the  2009‐2010  school  year,  El  Camino  surpassed  the  participation  requirement  of  95%  with all subgroups.  Our API growth of 25 points exceeded the growth target of five points  and our API score was 798, our highest score to date.  Graduation data for 2009‐2010 on the  California Department of Education (CDE) website was not available, but we have recently  averaged  a  NCES  defined  graduation  rate  of  91%.    Overall,  El  Camino  met  18  out  of  22  criteria.    Four  of  our  subgroups  did  not  meet  the  percent  proficient  targets.    Hispanics,  Socioeconomically  Disadvantaged  students,  and  English  Learners  did  not  meet  their  ELA  targets and English Learners did not meet their mathematics target.  In the 2008‐2009 school year, El Camino also met the participation, API, and graduation rate  criteria.    We  met  21  out  of  22  criteria,  with  only  English  Learners  not  meeting  their  ELA  target.  In the 2007‐2008 school year, El Camino met 22 out of 22 criteria.        E C R   

61| P a g e  


Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)   Criteria   Made AYP  AYP Criteria met  ELA  Participation  Rate  Math Participation  Rate  ELA  Percent  Proficient  Math  Percent  Proficient  API  Graduation Rate 

2007­2008

2008­2009

2009­2010

Yes

No

No

22 out of 22 

21 out 22 

18 out of 22 

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No*

No**

Yes

Yes

No***

Yes Yes 

Yes Yes 

Yes Yes  * English Learners 

** Hispanic, English Learners, Socioeconomically Disadvantaged  *** English Learners  SOURCE: CDE 

                    E C R   

62| P a g e  


Percent Proficient ‐ Annual Measurable Objectives (AMOs) 

Percent Proficient – English Language Arts 

School-wide African American Asian Hispanic White Special Ed. English Learners

2007-2008 Target = 33.4% % at or above Met AYP proficient Criteria 68.4 Yes 33.9 Yes 80.6 54.3 76.4 17.2 33.9

Yes Yes Yes Yes yes

2008-2009 Target = 44.5% % at or above Met AYP proficient Criteria 67.1 Yes 51 Yes 77.3 56.4 70.9 16.7 36.2

Yes Yes Yes Yes No

2009-2010 Target = 55.6% % at or above Met AYP proficient Criteria 67.7 Yes 63.5 Yes 73.6 50.2 75 15.5 26.4

Yes No Yes No No SOURCE: CDE     

Growth Targets: 

2008

2009

2010

          E C R   

63| P a g e  


Percent Proficient – Mathematics 

School-wide African American Asian Hispanic White Special Ed. English Learners

2007-2008 Target = 32.2% % at or above Met AYP proficient Criteria 68.1 Yes 25.9 Yes

2008-2009 Target = 43.5% % at or above Met AYP proficient Criteria 69 Yes 43.1 Yes

2009-2010 Target = 54.8% % at or above Met AYP proficient Criteria 70.2 Yes 56.1 Yes

89.2 54.8 74.2 15.6 42

86.5 56.2 73.8 19.7 44.2

84.7 54.5 76.7 23.9 44

Yes Yes Yes Yes yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes* Yes No No

*Passed using a two year average   SOURCE: CDE   

 

Growth Targets: 

2008

2009

2010

 

E C R   

64| P a g e  


California English Language Development Test (CELDT) Assessment results  El  Camino’s  CELDT  assessment  results  from  the  2009‐2010  school  year  show  that  90%  of  the  students  scored  at  the  Intermediate  level  or  higher.    Over  the  past  three  years,  an  average  of  89% of students tested scored at this level.  In 2009‐2010, fourteen out of 134 students tested  had scores that put them in the Early Intermediate category.  In the past two years, there have  been no students scoring at the Beginning level. 

California English Language Development Test (CELDT)  Performance Level  2007‐2008 2008‐2009 2009‐2010 Advanced  8%  10% 13%  Early Advanced  41%  41% 40%  Intermediate  37%  40% 36%  Early Intermediate  12%  9%  10%  Beginning  2%  0%  0%   Total Number Tested  167 140 134  SOURCE: CDE            

CELDT: 2009‐2010 Beginning 2% Early  Intermediate 12%

Intermediate 37%

Advanced 8%

Early Advanced 41%

  E C R   

65| P a g e  


Local Assessments   At El Camino we have an intervention program to address the needs of ninth grade students  who  did  not  earn  a  C  in  eighth  grade  English  and  who  also  scored  Far  Below  Basic  on  the  standardized  test.  The  class  uses  Scholastic’s  READ  180  program,  with  whole  group  instruction,  small  group  instruction,  instructional  software,  and  independent  reading.  The  Scholastic  Reading  Inventory  is  administered  at  the  beginning  of  the  school  year.  This  assessment  provides a baseline reading level for initial placement, for intervention grouping,  and to meet and measure growth over time. Continuous monitoring takes place throughout  the year, so that the teacher can address content areas that may need additional focus for  certain students. This is accomplished through small groups that are fluid and may change on  a daily or weekly basis, or as needed.  The READ 180 program also provides continuous diagnostic assessments on daily or weekly  basis  in  the  areas  of  comprehension,  vocabulary,  fluency,  phonics/word  study,  and  spelling/encoding. These daily assessments diagnose strengths and weaknesses and provide  data  for  grouping  for  targeted  instruction.  Progress  monitoring  continues  on  the  instructional  software, using  the  Skills  tests.  These  assessments  measure  the acquisition  of  the READ 180 Book skills taught in whole and small group settings.   Data from the August 2010 administration of the SRI shows that eight students are currently  reading at or below a sixth grade level. The SRI will be administered a second time at the end  of the semester to see if students have made progress from the beginning of the year.  The Los Angeles Unified School District mandates the use of periodic assessments in each of  the four core subject areas. In science there are tests for biology, chemistry, and physics. In  Math, there are tests for algebra I, geometry, and algebra II. There are tests for world history  and U.S. history in social studies and there are tests in English for grades nine and ten. Each  subject  has  three  to  four  tests  per  year.  The  district  provides  the  assessments  and  has  a  contract  with  CoreK12  to  score  the  multiple  choice  portions  of  the  exam.  On  some  tests,  there  is  a  full  length  essay  and  a  short  response  section  that  the  teachers  evaluate.  Once  CoreK12 scores the tests, including the scores from the essays, teachers can view the results  online.  These  tests  are  formative  in  nature  and  are  designed  to  help  teachers  evaluate  student  learning  on  various  skills  and  standards.  Teachers  use  this  data  to  reflect  on  their  teaching  and  discover  what  standards  have  to  be  re‐taught.  The  departments  also  meet  periodically to review and analyze this data and to decide if changes in the curriculum are in  order.    E C R   

66| P a g e  


As part  of  the  literacy  policy  at  El  Camino,  we  have  a  program  called  Writing  Across  the  Curriculum. In this program, teachers in all subject areas have their students write one essay  per semester based on a topic that has been studied. These essays follow the essay format  that the students learn in English classes.  The essays are graded by the teacher and are then  submitted  to  our  Instructional  Coach  for  review.  The  coach  has  sample  prompts  that  the  teachers  may  use  and  she  helps  develop  scoring  rubrics  for  the  teachers.  We  began  this  program to better prepare our students for both standardized tests and for college, where  students write essays not only in English classes but in all subject areas. Also, research shows  that writing is a highly effective learning mode. This program has aided our students’ written  ability and has, in turn, improved their CAHSEE and other standardized test scores.  

SAT, ACT, and PSAT  With  LAUSD  funding,  El Camino  is  able  to  administer  the  PSAT  to  all  tenth  grade  students.   Ninth and eleventh grade students are encouraged to take the test also, although they have  to  pay  for  it.    Since  the  2008‐2009  school‐year,  we  have  had  several  students  qualify  for  National  Merit  Scholar  recognition;  this  includes  five  Hispanic  scholars,  two  Black  scholars,  31  commended  scholars,  and  eleven  National  Merit  semi‐finalists.    According  to  California  Department of Education records 56% of El Camino seniors took the SAT in 2009‐2010.  In  2009‐2010,  the  average  SAT  score  for  El  Camino  students  was  1608  out  of  2400.    Our  average for the  past  three  years  is  1584.    El  Camino’s  overall  score and  the  scores  in each  subsection are above the state and national averages.  Far fewer students (about 19%) take  the ACT, but have a similar rate of success as the SAT results.  In 2009‐2010, the average ACT  score at El Camino was 24.5 out of 36.  Our three year average is  23.7 and is higher than the  state and national averages.     

National  State  El Camino 

Verbal 501  501  527 

SAT and ACT Scores  2009‐2010 Math 516 516 547

Writing 492 500 534

ACT Scores 21.1 22.2 24.5 SOURCE: CDE         

E C R   

67| P a g e  


National State  El Camino 

Verbal 501  500  521 

SAT and ACT Scores  2008‐2009 Math Writing 515 493 513 493 533 530

ACT Scores 21.1  22.2  23.9  SOURCE: CDE 

National  State  El Camino 

Verbal 502  499  513 

SAT and ACT Scores  2007‐2008 Math Writing 515 494 515 498 528 520

ACT Scores 21.1  22.2  22.7  SOURCE: CDE 

ACT Scores 2007‐2010 25 24 23 22 21 20 19 2007‐08

2008‐09 National

State

2009‐10 El Camino

 

E C R   

68| P a g e  


SAT 2007‐2010 07‐08 Writing 07‐08 Math 07‐08 Verbal 08‐09 Writing El Camino

08‐09 Math

State 08‐09 Verbal

National

09‐10 Writing 09‐10 Math 09‐10 Verbal 460

470

480

490

500

510

520

530

540

550

560

Advanced Placement Test Results  In  fall  2010,  twenty  two  of  our  staff  members  teach  in  the  AP  program  and  we  offer  40  sections  of AP  classes  in  22  different  subjects.    The  teachers attend  annual  conferences  to  share  teaching  strategies  and  strengthen  their  skills  and  knowledge  of  the  tests  which  do  change with time.  As previously mentioned El Camino’s AP scores are among the highest in  the District and are higher than the national average.  In the 2009‐2010 academic year, 610  students  sat  for  1110  examinations  in  24  subjects.    72%  of  all  examinees  received  passing  grades of 3 or better.  In each of the last two school years, approximately one‐third of our  graduating seniors took and passed at least one AP exam while at El Camino.              E C R   

69| P a g e  


2009­10 2008­09  2007­08 

ECR Advanced Placement Exams  Number  Number  of   Pass  of  Subjects  Exams  Rate Students  Taken  610  1110  24  72% 667  1218  25  67% 671  1220  25  68%

Graduating Class  Summary  31%  35%  33% 

* The Graduation Class Summary shows what percentage of twelfth‐graders scored a 3 or higher at any point in their  high school years.  *Source: College Board 

Advanced Placment Results 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 2007‐08

2008‐09 Pass Rate

2009‐10

Graduating Class Summary  

 

E C R   

70| P a g e  


A­G Requirements  All  El  Camino  students  are  enrolled  in  A‐G  required  courses  except  a  few  of  our  special  education students who are in an algebra readiness class.  The most recent graduation data  available  is  from  2006  through  2009  and  shows  that  an  average  of  52%  of  El  Camino  graduates completed all courses required for U.C. and/or C.S.U. entrance.  This is above the  district average of 40% and the state average of 35%.    El Camino Graduate Rate Completing All Courses Required for U.C. and/or C.S.U. Entrance 

 

2006‐2007 2007‐2008  ECR  District  State  ECR  District  State  Grads  Grads  Grads  Grads  Grads  Grads 

African American  Asian  Hispanic  White  All  Students 

2008‐2009 ECR  District  State  Grads  Grads  Grads 

31.2

41.5

26.5

14.8

22.4

23.3

37.7

40.2

26.8

82.9

78.4

59.8

51.1

55.8

59.2

77.8

73.7

59.3

44.3 70.0 

41.1 62.6 

25.2 39.5 

17.3 39.3 

21.7 37.1 

22.5 39.8 

42.9 62.0 

43.1 58.7 

25.5 40.5 

62.9

47.3

35.5

34.7

26.3

33.9

57.7

46.8

35.3

*SOURCE: Mydata     

El Camino Graduate Rate Completing All Courses  Required for U.C. and/or C.S.U. Entranc 90 80 70 60

African American

50

Asian

40

Hispanic White

30

All Students 20 10 0 ECR GradsDistrict GradsState Grads ECR GradsDistrict GradsState Grads ECR GradsDistrict GradsState Grads

  E C R   

71| P a g e  


Students Taking Algebra by Grade Level  In the Fall 2010 semester, all of the regular education students at El Camino were enrolled in  Algebra I or a higher level math class.  In the past three years, the only students enrolled in  algebra readiness were in our special education program (55 students).   

Algebra I Enrollment by Grade Level Fall 2010    9th Grade 10th Grade 11th Grade 12th Grade  Total Number of Students  562 124 26 8  720 Percentage of Students  78% 17% 4% 1%  100% SOURCE: Student Information System      

Algebra 1 Enrollment  by Grade Level

10th Grade 17%

9th Grade 78%

12th Grade 1%

11th Grade 4%

     

E C R   

72| P a g e  


Report Card Analysis  At El Camino we periodically analyze the data from student report cards, especially after the  twenty week report cards are issued.  Data from the last three semesters indicates that the  D/F  rates  for  each  department  have  remained  fairly  consistent.    The  Math,  Science,  and  Special  Education  departments  had  the  highest  D/F  rates  and  the  Visual/Performing  Arts  (VPA) and Physical Education departments had the lowest rates.  

D and F Grade Distribution Averages by Department   

Spring 2010  Fall  2009  Spring  2009 

Adv. Applied  Technical  Art 

English /ESL

Foreign Language 

17 % 

18%

16%

16%

16%

18%

22%

16%

18%

19%

Health /  Life  Math  Science 

PE

Science

Social Studies 

Special Education 

VPA

31%

14%

24%

15%

24%

11%

13%

34%

12%

28%

16%

21%

10%

25%

33%

13%

21%

14%

27%

13%

*SOURCE: Student Information System  

Visual & Performing Arts Special Education Social Studies Science PE

Spring 2009 Fall 2009

Math

Spring 2010

Health / Life Science Foreign Language English/ESL Adv. Applied Technical Art 0%

5%

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

35%

40%

  E C R   

73| P a g e  


Completion Rates  The  most  recent  data available  from the  California  Department  of  Education  is  from 2008‐ 2009.    Our  2009  graduation  rate  based  on  the  NCES  definition  was  91.4%.    The  average  graduation rate from 2006‐2009 was 90.3%.  Each year we have met the AYP graduate rate  criteria.  In the last two years, we have had the funding to hire an intervention coordinator  who works closely with students who are falling behind in their credits.  He works especially  closely with seniors and their parents to develop a plan for success.  Although the counseling  loads  for  each  of  our  counselors  has  increased  dramatically  over  the  past  few  years,  they  continue  to  be  an  invaluable  resource  for  students  requiring  extra  guidance.    All  students  have Individualized Graduation Plans and meet with their counselor several times per year to  track  their  progress  towards  graduation.    Students  who  have  fallen  behind  have  access  to  Adult School classes on our campus, our online learning program, and students that need a  different  learning  environment  can  enroll  in  our  continuation  school,  Miguel  Leonis  Continuation High School. 

Graduation Rates  El Camino District

State

2008‐2009

91.4

69.6

78.6

2007‐2008

92.4

72.4

80.2

2006‐2007

87.0

67.1

80.6 SOURCE: CDE  

Graduation Rates 100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 2006‐2007 Graduation Rates El Camino

2007‐2008 Graduation Rates District

2008‐2009 Graduation Rates State

  E C R   

74| P a g e  


In 2010, 88% of El Camino’s graduates planned to attend college.  Of this total, 11.4% of our  graduates  will  attend  the  Universities  of  California,  14.3%  will  attend  the  California  State  Universities,  53.6%  planned  to  attend  community  colleges,  and  the  remainder  will  attend  private  or  out  of  state  universities.  2.0%  of  the  graduates  stated  they  will  attend  a  vocational  school,  1.7%  plan  to  enlist  in  the  military  services,  and  1.6  %  plan  to  enter  the  workforce directly from high school.   

El Camino Class of 2010 Exit Survey  Options  Student Response  Community College  53.6%  California State University  14.3%  University of California  11.4%  Out of State Four‐Year University 5.7% California Private  3.3% Vocational School  2.0% Military  1.7% Employment  1.6% Other  1.6% Out of State Community College 0.3% Did Not Respond  4.6% SOURCE: College Office Records                       

E C R   

75| P a g e  


El Camino Class of 2010 Exit Survey Student  Response

53%

14%

5% 2% 2% 2%

2%

3%

6%

11%

0%

Community College

California State University

University of California

Out of State  Four‐Year University

California Private

Vocational School

Military

Employment

Other

Out of State  Community  College

Did Not Respond

 

E C R   

76| P a g e  


Physical Fitness Report  From 2006‐2009, an average of 75.3% of ninth graders who took the FitnessGram test met  the Healthy Fitness Zone criteria in at least five out of six categories.  Our students generally  had  the  most  success  with  abdominal  and  trunk  strength.    In  2009,  students  were  most  challenged by aerobic capacity as measured by a one mile run, but still scored in the Healthy  Fitness Zone 73% of the time.   

California Physical Fitness Report  Category  2009‐2010 2008‐2009 Percent  Meeting  HFZ  in  6  out  of  6  58%  48.2  criteria  Percent  Meeting  HFZ  in  5  out  of  6  26%  29.7  criteria  Percent  Meeting  HFZ  in  Aerobic  84%  72.9  Capacity  Percent  Meeting  HFZ  in  Body  74%  77.6  Composition  Percent  Meeting  HFZ  in  Abdominal  92%  95.7  Strength  Percent  Meeting  HFZ  in  Trunk  93%  96.8  Extensor Strength  Percent  Meeting  HFZ  in  Upper  Body  86%  81.6  Strength  Percent Meeting HFZ in Flexibility 94.0 88.0

2007‐2008 2006‐2007 51.5 

41.3

25.8

29.3

77.1

69.7

78.1

80.3

92.0

91.2

93.1

91.9

83.1

82.9

90.5

79.1 SORCE: Mydata    

     

E C R   

77| P a g e  


Perception Data   Ninety percent of El Camino students are proud to be students here.  They feel that people  of  all  backgrounds  are  treated  fairly  at  school  (79%)  and  that  the  school  does  not  allow  teasing  or  name‐calling  (69%).    Our  students  feel  supported  academically.    They  feel  that  they can go to an adult at school if they need help with homework (91%).  85% believe that  the courses they are taking are helping to prepare them for college and 89% feel that their  teachers in the core subject areas believe they can do well.  Eighty percent of our students  planned to complete a four‐year or graduate degree.  Most students feel that adults on campus know their name (72%) and care if they are absent  (62%).  Our students feel safe in their classrooms (96%) and on school grounds (93%).  Most  feel  that  gangs  (90%)  and  bullying  (78%)  are  not  problems  on  campus.    The  majority  of  students  feel  that  cafeteria  and  lunch  areas  are  clean  (68%)  and  that  the  other  areas  of  campus are clean (78%).    Most  of  our  parents  feel  welcome  at  the  school  (84%)  and  feel  that  their  child  is  safe  on  school grounds (86%).  They feel that the office staff treats them with respect (81%) and that  their culture is respected (81%).  A smaller majority (60%) feels that any problem they have  will be solved quickly.  Seventy four percent feel that there are opportunities to participate  in  councils/parent  organizations,  but  overall  only  61%  feel  that  there  are  opportunities  for  involvement at the school.   

E C R   

78| P a g e  

Chapter 1  

Accreditation Report-Chapter 1

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you