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FA C U LT Y O F M E D I C I N E D e p a r tment of O ccu p ational S cience & O ccu p ational T h e r a p y

UNFOLDING COMMUNITY FROM HERE

2009 annual report


Table of Contents

Unfolding Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy 2009

4

Unfolding Learning Master of Occupational Therapy Student List Capstone Conference Fieldwork MOT Course List Graduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences Rehabilitation Sciences Online Program Student Award Recipients

7 8 9 12 14 17 20 22 24

Unfolding Gratitude Unfolding Continuing Professional Education Unfolding Community Staff List Faculty List OS&OT Tenure Track Faculty Clinical Faculty and Associate Members

26 27 30 33 33 33 34

Unfolding Research Featured Researcher Dr. Bill Miller Awards Grants Publications Presentations Professional Service Journal Reviewing

35 37 38 39 43 49 50 53


Seeing Beyond the Trees From Here


Unfolding Occupational Therapy and Occupational Science Tal Jarus, Head Welcome to the 2009 Annual Report of the Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy (OS&OT) in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of British Columbia. It was a year full of both individual and departmental successes.

“Unfolding Community” continues to be a main focus of our departmental energies. As the only Occupational Therapy program in British Columbia, we feel that OS&OT plays an important role in ensuring a vital and expansive community for all of our different stakeholders. With the establishment of our Strategic Plan as well as specific milestones, 2009 was a year of looking at and working towards our five defined goals for success and growth. All five of these areas have a component of community within them.

Our 2009 Capstone Conference was a resounding success. Held at the Chan Centre for the Performing Arts at UBC, it was a day showcasing the research projects of our graduating class. Over 200 guests enjoyed a day of podium and poster presentations, with a keynote address by Virginia “Ginny” Fearing. Thanks to funding from the Cedar Lodge Endowment, a second keynote was given by Victoria Maxwell, a one-woman show entitled “Funny… You Don’t Look Crazy” based on her experiences with bipolar disorder.

As we continue to grow and expand into our new role as a department, we at OS&OT are enjoying, watching, and participating as our Community Unfolds.

Learning Community Create an invigorating and sustainable learning community

Research Strengthen capacity for scholarly activity in occupation, participation and health Our faculty members continued to be on the forefront of research in their various areas of expertise. In 2009, 39 journal articles, 46 conference proceedings and abstracts, and five book chapters were produced from our department. OS&OT faculty participate in over $7 million worth of funded research projects of which almost $3 million is held as a Principal Investigator by one of our faculty. See the research section starting on page 35 for full details. Dr. Bill Miller, an Associate Professor at OS&OT, was the lead researcher on a successful CIHR Emerging Team grant. Working with researchers from across the country, Dr. Miller and his team will be examining power wheelchair use in older populations. See page 37 for more information on this exciting study.

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2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

We continue to support our four graduate programs, the Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT), and joint Research Graduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences (MSc/PhD), Master of Rehabilitation Sciences and Certificate in Rehabilitation Sciences (MRSc) shared with the Department of Physical Therapy. Summaries from each of these programs are contained within this report. We accepted a cohort of 48 bright students in to the MOT program this fall, bringing our total MOT student population to 96 students. The students bring with them a rich and diverse background which enlivens our learning community. See a report on the program later in this report. In May 2009 we celebrated with our first two PhD candidates, Jocelyn Harris and Dana Anaby from the Research Graduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences who were granted their doctorates. Both have gone on to pursue Post Doctoral Fellowships.


Unfolding Occupational Therapy and Occupational Science Tal Jarus, Head

We also completed a Continuing Professional Education Needs Assessment and Survey in 2009 – see page 27 for a full report of results. In 2010 we are developing and presenting a continuing education program addressing the educational needs of the clinical community based on the results of this survey. Expansion Develop a comprehensive and progressive plan for program expansion to meet the needs of British Columbians and beyond We continue to explore and work with various stakeholders to create capacity in the OT workforce in BC to meet the employment demands and health care needs of British Columbians. Challenging problems require strong teamwork and innovative solutions. We continued as educational consultants to the BC OT Workforce Planning Collaborative, pulling together national and provincial professional associations /organizations, employers and educators. This group continues to work with the province to ensure that health planning decisions are based on accurate human resource data, with the hope that this will affect the province’s analysis of the need for more occupational therapists. One of the possible solutions could then be an expansion in the number of funded seats for our MOT program. As another solution for alleviating the shortage of OTs in the province, OS&OT established its collaboration with McMaster University to offer the Occupational Therapy Exam Preparation (OTep) to internationally educated Occupational Therapists. A more detailed explanation of this program is contained later in this report.

People Invest in a culture of professional development and collegiality and launch a targeted plan to recruit and retain people of the highest calibre 2009 was a year of recognition and success for OS&OT faculty. Donna Drynan, our Academic Fieldwork Coordinator and Clinical Assistant Professor, was recognized as OT of the Year by the British Columbia Society of Occupational Therapists (BCSOT). Donna earned this prestigious honour for the work she has done to further fieldwork education and inter-professional practice. In addition, Donna also won the UBC Faculty of Medicine “Clinical Faculty Award for Excellence in Teaching“. These two awards recognize the excellence, dedication and creativity that Donna brings to OS&OT. Dr. Liisa Holsti was recognized for her expertise when she was nominated for and accepted the role of UBC Centre Leader for Canadian Child Health Clinician Scientist Program, a consortium of 17 child and youth research programs from across Canada, dedicated to training the next generation of clinician scientists. Dr. Susan Forwell was recognized by the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists with a President’s Medal for furthering the profession of Occupational Therapy. Dr. Catherine Backman received the Distinguished Scholar Award from the Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals (a Division of the American College of Rheumatology). We welcomed six visiting scholars in 2009: Sally Wyke, Director, Alliance for Self Care Research, Professor of Health

2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

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Unfolding Occupational Therapy and Occupational Science Tal Jarus, Head

and Social Care, Department of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Stirling, (United Kingdom); Professor Lindy Clemson, Department of Occupational Therapy at the University of Sydney (Australia); and Dr. Eleanor Schneider, Department of Occupational Therapy at Haifa University (Israel); Dr. Brian Dudgeon, Associate Professor, Division of Occupational Therapy, University of Washington (USA); Karen Beaulieu, Senior Lecturer, University of Northampton, (United Kingdom); Professor Michelle Clark, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology (Australia) Our Clinician Professional Development session “How to plan, prepare and deliver an effective and engaging class” was attended by 17 teaching clinicians. We value the time and expertise clinicians bring to our teaching program and strive to provide them with opportunities for growth as teachers. Outreach Advance the department’s visibility and reach at UBC, provincially, nationally and internationally I continue to travel around the province meeting with clinicians and practice leaders to continue to expand OS&OT’s collaboration and involvement in future planning, including

the Interior, the Island and the North. Specifically we met with stakeholders in the North to discuss the possibility of creating a rural stream for our MOT program. It is still in the early planning stages, but it is important that we continue to enfold these ideas into our large plans. OS&OT was very proud to produce three newsletters in 2009, especially as they seem to go viral, forwarded from clinician to clinician. We also developed a new logo as well as new promotional materials. In 2010 we will tackle our website, with a planned new look and architecture, to better communicate with our community and clinicians. Two of our faculty members traveled to China in 2009. Dr. Susan Forwell took part in a two week tour, co-organized by the CAOT and People to People. It was a very illuminating and successful trip. Michael Lee also traveled to China in the fall of 2009, as an expert, providing lectures and workshops in developing community mental health teams and psycho-social rehabilitation programs. Both trips resulted in new linkages and relationships with China. Much more information about our outreach activities are found on page 30.

2009 was a productive and fascinating year, as OS&OT continues to unfold and grow as a department and member of the vibrant community of clinicians, teachers, and stakeholders, in local, provincial and national arenas in occupational science and occupational therapy. Thankfully, there is never a dull moment!!

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2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report


unfolding learning

OS&OT is the home to 4 academic programs, the Master of Occupational Therapy (entry into practice program), the Research Graduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences (MSc/ PhD program shared with the Department of Physical Therapy) and two on-line programs, the Master in Rehabilitation Science (shared with the Department of Physical Therapy) and Graduate Certificate in Rehabilitation (shared with McMaster University and the Department of Physical Therapy). We are very proud to offer a diverse range of academic programs and experiences for students looking to begin their careers as Occupational Therapists and clinicians looking to either participate in research or inter-professional learning. The following pages detail our academic programs as well as demonstrate the diversity and successes of our students. Master of Occupational Therapy Program Occupational therapy is one of the health care disciplines that provides specialized rehabilitation services to maintain, restore or improve the ability of children, adults and older adults to perform the occupations of daily life, which may be impaired as a result of illness, injury, congenital or acquired disabilities, or social disadvantage. The OS&OT offers a Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT) program, which is a two-year professional master’s degree program. As our program is fully accredited by the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists, graduates are eligible to write the national licensing exam upon graduation. The Master of Occupational Therapy degree prepares graduates to be self-directed, lifelong learners, who consciously use theory, evidence and critical thinking skills to maintain, evaluate and improve their practice of occupational therapy. A professional master degree differs from a research-intensive degree in that it focuses on a professional knowledge base and clinical practice skills, and does not require a thesis. The MOT program integrates occupational therapy theory, research, and practice, and is designed to meet or exceed provincial and national standards of practice.1

1 Essential competencies of practice for occupational therapists in Canada, Association of Canadian Occupational Therapy Regulatory Organizations, (3rd ed), 2007; Profile of occupational therapy practice in Canada, CAOT, 2007; CAOT, Academic standards, 2005.

These standards include the ability to develop effective clientcentred occupational therapy based on valid assessment findings, use research evidence to make responsible clinical decisions, critique and evaluate the effectiveness of occupational therapy programs independently, demonstrate clinical reasoning and work collaboratively with interprofessional teams. The MOT program is consistent with goals in UBC’s vision statement, Place and Promise, and supports the vision and mission of the Faculty of Medicine at UBC. The program at UBC is the only occupational therapy program in British Columbia and one of the smallest of the 14 occupational therapy programs in Canada, admitting 48 students annually. Our MOT program’s ration of seats per province population is 1: 91,283, which is the highest among all provinces.2 Approximately one-third of BC’s occupational therapists were educated at UBC. Graduates are employed in both public and private sectors primarily in health care but also in other areas, such as schools, private practice, or social services. The academic component of the program is integrated with a strong fieldwork component, comprised of more than 1000 hours of practice in agencies throughout British Columbia, or, at the students’ request, elsewhere in Canada or internationally. Fieldwork is conducted in a variety of settings, including urban and rural placements, in public and private sectors, involving clients across the age span and with varying abilities with regard to mental and physical health status. Over 100 clinical faculty members and fieldwork educators contribute to fieldwork and classroom teaching (Page 34), ensuring that content is grounded in contemporary practice. Interprofessional education is one of the highlights of the MOT program. In preparation for future therapists to work collaboratively in a complex health context that values client centred practice, occupational therapy students participate in numerous interprofessional teaching and learning activities such as The Health Care Team Challenge™, interprofessional problem-based learning pilot, and interprofessional rheumatology module that foster their understanding and commitments to interprofessional practice. Interprofessional fieldwork placements are developed to further foster interprofessional 2 Based on 2008 data by the Association of Canadian Occupational Therapy University Programs (ACOTUP). 2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

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masters of occupational therapy

learning and collaboration opportunities. Innovative learning opportunities include community service learning, learning partnerships with practising therapists, participation in a provincial student design competition targeting assistive devices and technology, and mental health promotion initiatives on campus. The curriculum spans two calendar years (6 terms) following a baccalaureate degree in any field. Pre-requisites are 3 credits of gross human anatomy , 3 credits of social science, and 3 credits of behavioral science, as well as, 70 hours of volunteer services with persons with disabilities. Five curriculum themes are used to facilitate linkages between the individual courses and organize the curriculum: • • • • •

Theory and Practice (theory guiding practice) Health, Illness and Occupation (knowledge of health, illness and occupation;) Skills for Practice Evidence for Practice and Clinical Reasoning, and Professional Practice, and Fieldwork (integration through practice).

Further fostering content integration and students’ inquiry skills, case-based tutorials are offered throughout the two year curriculum. Facilitated by experienced faculty and clinical faculty members, students are exposed to a wide spectrum of clinical cases, and are required to work through clinical problems with peers in tutorial sessions. Students are encouraged to identify and define the problems, and to find evidence to support solutions identified.

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2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

At the end of the 24-month MOT program, students showcase their learning and research projects by hosting a Capstone Conference in August. It is a student-run conference, which is also a professional development opportunity for clinicians to learn about the cutting edge research activities that are relevant to their clinical practice (Page 12). In 2009, graduating students presented their research studies through podium and poster presentations at the Chan Center for the Performing Arts, and was well attended by therapists and faculties, peer students, family members of the graduating class and clinicians from the clinical community. Though our MOT program is one of the smaller programs in Canada, it is one of the best programs amongst all. A national exam evaluates competencies of all graduates from OT programs throughout Canada. UBC graduates consistently perform at or above the mean. Recent MOT cohorts exceeded the mean in all sections of the examination as well as the total score. To address the overall shortage of occupational therapists in Canada, the Department continues to work closely with the Government in providing consultations on best options to address this human resource concern. With support and effort from all stakeholders, we continue to generate excellent entry-level occupational therapists to meet the increasing health care demands and to better serve British Columbians.


mot student list

MOT 1 Laura Blackadar, University of Victoria, Environmental Studies & Writing, BA Sasha Bossley, University of British Columbia, Biology (Minor: Psychology), BSc Erin Brown, Simon Fraser University, Criminology (Minor: Psychology), BA Rachel Butcher, Simon Fraser University, Kinesiology, BSc Kimberley Butler, Queen’s University, History, BAH Emily Carley, University of Western Ontario, Biology, BSc Sarah Caswell, University of Victoria, Psychology, BA Ka Yan Chu, University of British Columbia, Kinesiology & Health Science, BHK Jordana Comazzetto, Thompson Rivers University, Animal Biology, BSc Thao Dao, University of British Columbia, Human Kinetics/Exercise Science, BHK Leah DeBlock, University of Alberta, Molecular Genetics, BSc Caitlyn DeBruyne, University of British Columbia, Human Kinetics, BHK Allison Dolan, University of Lethbridge, Exercise Science, BSc Naomi Dolgoy, McGill University, Psychology, BA Eva Gonzalez Rangel, Universidad La Salle, Physician and Surgeon , MD Daniel Hannaford, University of Alberta, Kinesiology, BSc Heidi Hatch, University of Victoria, Psychology, BSc Ewa Kowalska, University of Calgary, Community Rehabilitation & Disability Studies, BCR Kevin Leaker, University of British Columbia, Human Kinetics, BHK Melissa Lee, University of Victoria, Psychology, BSc Shannon Len, University of Regina, Adapted Physical Activity, BKIN Sean Lloyd, Vancouver Island University, Liberal Studies, BA An Luong, University of Alberta, Psychology, BSc Laura Lush, Simon Fraser University, Kinesiology, BSc Anneli Luts, Simon Fraser University, Psychology, BA Anne Marsden, University of Victoria, BA Mandy Martinig, Simon Fraser University, Psychology, BA Laura McClymont, University of Victoria, Psychology, BA Kimberly McMurtry, University of Calgary, Kinesiology, BKIN Jana Morton, University of Western Ontario, Biology (Minor: Environmental Science), BSc Michelle Newlands, Vancouver Island University, Sport, Health & Physical Education , BA Viara Nikolova, Simon Fraser University, Kinesiolgy, BSc Laura Radigan, University of Northern British Columbia, Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, BSc Anna Radomski, University of British Columbia, Psychology, BA Bronwyn Reelie, University of British Columbia, Human Kinetics, BHK Sarah Rinas, University of Victoria, Recreation & Health Ed, BA Katherine Schelesny, Simon Fraser University, Kinesiology, BSc Christie Slanina, University of Northern British Columbia, Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, BSc Chelsea Soles, University of British Columbia, Kinesiology & Health Science, BHK Melanie Souza, University of British Columbia, Kinesiology & Health Science, BHK Christine Symonds, University of British Columbia, Kinesiology & Health Science, BHK Karson Wong, University of British Columbia, Biology, BSc Silan Wong, University of British Columbia, Human Kinetics, BHK Vivian Wong, Queen’s University, Biology & Psychology, BA

2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

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mot student list

MOT 2 Sarah Atkinson, University of Victoria, Psychology, BSc Chelsea Bennie, University of British Columbia, Microbiolgy & Immunology, BSc Bailey Davies, Trinity Western University, Social Sciences , BA Laine Dawes, Simon Fraser University, Kinesiology, BSc Matthew Derouin, University of British Columbia, English Literature, BA Tracy Dietrich, University of British Columbia, Psychology, BA Shereen Ens, University of the Fraser Valley, Kinesiology, BSc Wayne Felder, University of Waterloo, Kinesiology, BSc Robin Frandsen, University of Saskatchewan, Psychology, BA Maeve Frost, University of British Columbia, International Relations, BA Mary Glasgow Brown, Simon Fraser University, Communications, BA Kelsey Green, Simon Fraser University, Psychology, BA Douglas Herasymuik, University of Regina, Psychology, BA Saudia Jabar, University of Waterloo, Kinesiology, BSc Tiffany Jones, University of British Columbia-Okanagan, Psychology, BSc Adi Keidar, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Education, BA, University of British Columbia, Education, M.Ed Karina Koczapski, University of Victoria, Art History, BA Kristen Krebs, McMaster University, Kinesiology, BKIN Maren Kristensen, University of British Columbia, Classical Studies, BA Laura Laidlaw, University of British Columbia, Human Kinetics , BHK Jeannette Lee, University of British Columbia, Music, BA Tracy Lermitte, Trinity Western University, Psychology, BA Jessica Leung, Queen’s University, Biochemistry, BSc Marsha Matheson, Simon Fraser University, Psychology, BA Kelsey McCloy, Simon Fraser University, Kinesiology, BSc Heather McDonald, Simon Fraser University, Psychology, BA Rebecca McDonald, University of Victoria, Biology, BSc Kathryn McKall, University of Alberta, Psychology, BSc Nicole Nadeau, University of Western Ontario, Health Sciences, BA HSci Kathryn Naus, University of Western Ontario, Physiology, BMSc Ashea Neil, University of British Columbia, Spanish, BA Sara Patenaude, University of Saskatchewan, Nursing, BSc Bobbi Pelletier, University of Saskatchewan, Kinesiology, BSc Meaghan Proctor, Trinity Western University, Human Kinetics, BHK Shannon Rolph, University of Western Ontario, Biology, BSc Erin Slack, Trinity Western University, Human Kinetics, BHK Kristina Smith, University of British Columbia, Psychology, BA Christopher Steller, University of British Columbia, Human Kinetics, BHK Marietta Tang, University of British Columbia, Interdisciplinary Studies, BA Ross Taylor, Lakehead University, Education, BA/BEd Tristan Thomas, University of British Columbia, Life Science & Earth Science, BSc Jacqueline Van den Dolder, Thompson Rivers University, Psychology, BA Alyson Young, University of Victoria, Psychology, BSc Nicole Van Lierop, University of Western Ontario, Psychology, BA Brittany Waters, University of Victoria, Psychology, BSc Natalie Wuitchik, University of Victoria, Psychology, BSc Alyson Young, University of Victoria, Psychology, BSc 10

2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report


mot students

Undergraduate Backgrounds 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

MOT1

MOT2

MOT 1 MOT 1 UBC‐V UBC‐O UVic SFU Trinity Ontario Other Canada International

MOT 2 MOT 2 UBC‐V UBC‐O UVic SFU Trinity Ontario Other Canada International

2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

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capstone conference

Capstone 2009: Putting Concept into Action Tom Grant The 2009 Capstone Committee had one main objective in mind when planning for the graduating conference: to continue to raise the bar of quality and professionalism of the conference, as has been done in each previous year, while maintaining the student-centered focus of the conference. This was the graduating class’s final opportunity to share with the occupational community the results of a year-long research project, infused with all the learning that had taken place over the course of the MOT program. It was also an opportunity to put into action our concept of the profession we have now entered. We tried to do this in a number of ways: the cover of the conference program was designed by a client of the Artworks Studio, and the lunch was made by H.A.V.E. café (Hope, Action, Values, Ethics) – a culinary program located in the downtown eastside of Vancouver, which aims to provide people with vocational skills and opportunities. We were fortunate to have secured a grant from UBC’s College of Health Disciplines, which allowed us to invite Victoria Maxwell to the conference as a keynote speaker. The night before the conference at a mental health awareness event, a mix of students, clinicians and general public enjoyed Victoria’s one-woman play “Crazy For Life” – her portrayal of life with bipolar disorder. At Capstone, she performed “Funny…You Don’t Look Crazy”. Film critics often claim that the latest romanticcomedy movie release will “have audiences both laughing and crying in the aisles”. Both of Victoria’s performances definitely achieved this feat. We were also honoured to have Ginny Fearing as a keynote speaker. As one of the leaders and visionaries in the field, her words of wisdom were not only useful for occupational therapy practice, but also had applications to life in general. She spoke of developing

professional practice models in Sophie’s Cosmic Café, and invited us all to join her scribbling ideas onto placemats. If more ideas were conceived this way, with equal doses of food, coffee, time, sincerity and humour, the world might be a better place. Throughout the day, graduating students presented their projects on a diverse array of topics (see below table), from the occupational benefits of Ikebana practice to the therapeutic use of Nintendo Wii in stroke rehabilitation. Judging from the feedback, the presentations were appreciated by the conference participants - a mix of faculty, clinicians, students and family. When all was said and done, the organizing committee felt like it had accomplished its objective and that the Class of 2009, as emerging clinicians, had shown a bright future for the occupational therapy profession. We were generously backed by BCSOT, Orion Health, Back in Motion, Fraser Health and other sponsors to help us achieve our objective for the conference. Capstone Conference 2010 is already being planned, so hopefully everyone will reconvene next year at the end of August, for another dose of inspiration - occupational therapy style.

The Graduating Class of 2009, at the Grad Tea immediately following the Capstone Conference.

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2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report


capstone conference

   

Students

Title

Jill Olson and Katie Quirk

A Pilot Study of the Behavioural Indicators of Infant Pain Scale with Preterm Infants Less Than 31 Weeks Gestational Age

Pamela Sun and Cheryl Hon

“It’s my responsibility”: The Occupational Engagement of Chinese Immigrant Parents of Children with Special Needs

Jesika Nagamori and Hanna Nagtegaal

Children’s Experiences in a School-Based Gardening Program

Jaclyn Cross and Jenny Simpson

Power mobility as an intervention for neglect post stroke: a pilot study

Rebecca Lam & Katarzyna Kozel

Exploring the Effectiveness of Employment Resources in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside

Allison Watters & Christine Pearce

Occupational Engagement and Meaning: The Experience of Ikebana Practice

Erika Martens and Brianne Samson

Exploring meaningful participation in activities from the perspective of children with cognitive disabilities

Carly Duggleby and Kimberley Stockman

Development of the Wheelchair Outcome Measure (WhOM) for Adolescent Clients

Tara Tretheway and Jen Hoekstra

Participation in Leisure: Comparing Parents’ and Children with Disabilities’ perceptions

Michelle Agon and Hazel Choi

Decision-Making Factors in Route-Planning for Power Wheelchair Users

Jen Alford and Sarah Laundy

Exploring Fatigue Among Individuals with a Neurological Condition in an Inpatient Rehabilitation Setting

Amy Richard

Experiences of Peer Support Workers as integrated Community Mental Health Team members

Tom Grant and Darlene Wolfe

Developing a Comprehensive Assessment of Fatigue in Spinal Cord Injury

Kristine Rasmussen and Kaitlyn Routledge

A Survey of Pediatric Assessments: Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Meningomyocele

Cheryl Sihoe & Michele Andersen

Visual Arts Programs and Adults with Dementia: The Lived Experience

Jennifer Chu & Nicole Henderson

Impact of Socioeconomic Status and Family Structure on Child Participation

Nigel Kam and Justyna Struzik

Is the Nintendo Wii Suitable for Stroke Rehabilitation?

Carley Billups and Frances Hawes

Feasibility of Occupational Therapy Interventions for Upper Limb Intention Tremor in Multiple Sclerosis

Tara Cairo and Holly Eno

Participation, satisfaction with life, and the environment post-stroke

Susan Armstrong and Holly Green

Retrospective Review of the Characteristics of Orally Feeding Tracheostomized Children 2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

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Unfolding Capacity Through Community

Academic Fieldwork Placements Fieldwork experiences are an essential part of the OS&OT MOT curriculum. Fieldwork is integrated into the academic program through professional practice courses, RSOT 519 (year one) and RSOT 549 (year two). Successful completion of fieldwork is required to pass these courses and to graduate from the program. To link classroom learning with fieldwork, clinic visits for observing or practicing clinical skills are incorporated into the year one professional practice course, serving as a bridge between academic and practice settings. Further, the first two fieldwork placements (4 days per week) are supplemented with an on-line clinical reasoning course, supporting integration of academic learning into clinical practice. Students complete 5 fieldwork placements, two in year one and three in year two. By the end of his/her occupational therapy education, each student has obtained a broad range of experience. Students complete one mental health placement focused in a psychiatric setting as distinguished from a placement focused on psychosocial issues, such as pain management or vocational rehabilitation, which are valued experiences but not substitutes for developing targeted practice skills in mental health. Another placement is completed with older adults, recognizing the increasing demand and opportunities for working with an aging population. The other three placements can occur in a clinical setting or in a hospital province-wide, nationally, or internationally, and are guided by students’ interests. Fieldwork education is completed only with designated fieldwork sites that have been approved according to the Canadian Guidelines for Fieldwork Education in Occupational Therapy (CGFEOT), which encompasses the Fieldwork Site Profile (FS-PRO) guidelines. In 2009, the OS&OT fieldwork program utilized approximately 90 approved fieldwork sites in British Columbia. Of them, 7 were new sites. 253 occupational therapists participated as fieldwork educators in 240 placements. In order to assure a reasonable balance of experiences for each student in 2009, 30 visits throughout British Columbia occurred to recruit sites and fieldwork educators, provide fieldwork educator workshops, and offer in-service education and support to fieldwork educators. Approximately 100 occupational therapists attended at least one of the 7 fieldwork educator workshops offered by UBC in locations across the province. 14

2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

To date, we are able to provide a wide range of fieldwork placements that meet the minimum requirements for hours, and are varied enough to meet each student’s learning needs. Achieving this is dependent on policies such as requiring each student to complete two placements outside the Vancouver Coastal Health region to better use offers throughout all five geographic health regions in BC, and encouraging students to take advantage of national and international fieldwork options. Maintaining and improving the number and variety of traditional fieldwork placements requires considerable effort. Individual clinician’s expertise, confidence and willingness to offer clinical placements varies considerably. There are also many external pressures in the current health care work environments in the province that impose real or perceived barriers to offering clinical experiences to students. This year we were able to develop new models of supervision. We had 9 placements where the model was 1 therapist: 2 students. We also developed 2 role emerging placement sites that could accommodate 6-8 students. These new sites are within new practice areas, such as non-government agencies providing a range of health and social services. Students are encouraged to broaden their experiences beyond the locally-offered placements and consider International Fieldwork Placements. Places where students have completed fieldwork include:, Africa, India, Israel, New Zealand, and the Caribbean. Several of these practicum opportunities were initiated by UBC occupational therapy students. Those students who take advantage of such opportunities are encouraged to share their experiences and acquired knowledge with classmates upon their return. In 2009 we had 4 students participate in international fieldwork. In addition, BC supported approximately 50 fieldwork placements for students from other programs in Canada. Fieldwork continues to be one of the cornerstones of the curriculum and training offered by OS&OT. As we continue to expand in student numbers, our need for quality fieldwork placement grows. We will continue to work together with the clinical community to provide new placement opportunities at the local, provincial, national and international levels.


2009 fieldwork placements

Placements by Clinical Practice  49 43 35 25 13

12

12

10

10

9

9

9

6

3

3

2

2

1

Placements by Region

Ratio of Physical Disability to Mental  Health Placements

6%

4%

2% 2%

5% VCHA 2%

23%

FHA

2%

VIHA IHA

PD MH

50%

10%

NHA Out of Province

Other

International Other Private Practice

75%

19%

Placements by Setting 93

90

86

31

26 11 2

Inpatient

Hospital

Community

Outpatient

Rehab Centre

Long Term Care

Forensic

2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

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2009 fieldwork placements

supporting growth From Here

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2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report


2009 mot program courses

RHSC 420, Elements of Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology (4 credits) Term 3 An introduction to the structure and function of the human nervous system. The course is offered to students in both Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy. It forms the foundation for subsequent assessment and intervention skills related to sensation, perception, cognition and motor performance. Instructor Team: Dr Tara Gaertner & Dr. Majid Alimohammadi RSOT 511, Fundamentals of Theory and Practice (3 credits) Term 1 Distributed learning approaches are used to examine occupational therapy core concepts, values and beliefs and their application to practice. The emphasis is on the client-centred occupational therapy process, and generic models that guide clinical reasoning. Facilitated small group tutorials integrate knowledge across occupational therapy courses, in case-based synthesis exercises. Instructor Team: Dr. Catherine Backman, Astrid St. Pierre, Janna Maclachlan, Kathy Harchard, Karen Mills, Pamela Chen Pomeroy RSOT 513, Health, Illness and Occupation (3 credits) Terms 1 and 2 A series of resource seminars and guest lectures from content experts present concepts of occupational science as a foundation for understanding occupation and its relationship to health. Includes critique of various models explaining illness and disability, and includes methods for acquiring biomedical information on common conditions and illnesses that impact occupational performance in clients of all ages. Instructor Team: Prof. Michael Lee, Dr. Sue Forwell, Dr. Lyn Jongbloed, Dr. Babak Shadgan, Dr. Akber Mithani, Fred Ott, Dr. David Irwin, Prof. Sandra Hale, Sue Kozak, Alison McLean, Dr. Jennifer Yau, Stephanie Zuk, Dr. Linda Li, Prof. Sue Stewart, Dr. Jon Fleming, Dr. Maureen O’Donnell, Dr. Majid Alimohammadi RSOT 515, Practice Skills and Therapeutic Procedures I (3 credits) Term 1 Labs and workshops provide opportunities to practice basic skills in preparation for introductory fieldwork. Because the evidence for practice techniques and approaches guide selection and application with individual clients, the course begins with basic search strategies and appraisal of health literature. Topics are congruent with theoretical concepts introduced in RSOT 511 (Theory and Practice), and include interpersonal communication, task analysis, selection of assistive and rehabilitative technologies, and adaptive strategies to enhance occupational performance of individuals across the life span. Instructor Team: Prof Donna Drynan, Rajni Dhiman, Joyce Ho, Helen Tam, Prof. Sandra Hale, Regina Casey, Debbie Field, Dr. Debbie Rand RSOT 519, Professional Practice I (10 credits) Terms 1-3 Students apply theoretical approaches, occupational analysis, and therapeutic procedures to the client-centred practice of occupational therapy. Discussions and debates in professional issues seminars focus on professional expectations, the nature of the client-therapist relationship, legal and ethical obligations, reflective practice, and ways to foster learning in the field. A series of clinic site visits and 11 weeks (5 weeks in Term 2, 7 weeks in Term 3) of supervised fieldwork experience in affiliated health agencies provide learning partnerships between students and practitioners, and opportunities to observe and work with occupational therapy clients. Instructor Team: Prof Donna Drynan, Prof. Michael Lee, Prof. Sandra Hale, Sharon Smith

2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

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2009 mot program courses

RSOT 521, Occupational Analysis, Activity and Participation (3 credits) Term 2 The synthesis and use of theoretical and occupational frameworks to analyze and enhance occupational performance and participation in everyday life. Case-based, small group tutorials integrate content all occupational therapy courses, and address occupational performance issues for clients of different ages, abilities, and circumstances. Building on term one content and fieldwork experiences, students progress to cases of “intermediate� complexity. Cases consider unique client characteristics/ contexts as they influence clinical reasoning, client-centredness, and selection of interventions such as culture, ethnicity, sexual orientation, language, literacy and poverty. Instructor Team: Prof. Michael Lee, Shalini Lal, instructors for RSOT 525 RSOT 525, Practice Skills and Therapeutic Procedures II (3 credits) Term 2 Building on the basic skills developed in RSOT 515, labs and workshops provide opportunities to practice increasingly complicated therapeutic procedures in preparation for fieldwork. Topics are selected to match theories and occupational analysis frameworks discussed in RSOT 521. Includes modules on selecting, administering and interpreting assessments of occupational performance and performance components; and planning and implementing occupational therapy interventions based upon psychosocial, biomechanical, neurorehabilitative and developmental theories and approaches. Instructor Team: Dr. Sue Forwell, Dr. Jill Zwicker, Joyce Ho, Carol Ng, Joanne Chisholm, Nicole Wilkins, Regina Casey, Prof Michael Lee RSOT 527, Evidence for Practice I: Research Paradigms and Methods (3 credits) Term 2 Seminars, independent study and small group discussion encourage students to explore the assumptions and principles of qualitative and quantitative research designs. Principles of occupational therapy tests and measures pertinent to their use in both practice and as outcome measures for rehabilitation research will be discussed. Elements of basic research designs for investigating and evaluating occupational performance and other issues relevant to occupational therapy practice will be introduced. Instructor Team: Dr Melinda Suto & Dr. Liisa Holsti RSOT 537, Evidence and Reasoning in Practice (2 credits) Terms 2 and 3 The exploration of theory, evidence and reasoning strategies to enhance practice and promote the development of skills essential for reflective practice. Comprising independent study and on-line learning, the course is concurrent with the introductory and intermediate fieldwork placements in terms 2 and 3, and promotes the integration of academic content with clinical practice. Students are encouraged to use the online discussions as a method of peer-support, peer-consultation, and peer-teaching during fieldwork. Instructor Team: Dr Bill Miller, Alison McLean, Prof. Mary Clark, Dr Ben Mortenson, Alison McLean RSOT 545, Practice Skills and Therapeutic Procedures III (4 credits) Terms 4-5 Laboratories, workshops and self-study sessions encourage synthesis of theory and practice approaches, and provide opportunities to demonstrate assessment and intervention skills consistent with the competencies required to enter practice. Psychosocial, developmental, neuro-rehabilitative, and biomechanical approaches are used individually and in combination to resolve complex occupational performance issues. Includes targeted interventions to address the needs of special populations, based on developmental stage, health status, and/or environmental circumstances (for example, the frail elderly). Instructor Team: Dr. Sue Forwell, Cheryl Sheffield, Dr. Cynthia Verchere, Gordon Ng, Carol Ng, Joyce Ho, Prof Michael Lee, Regina Casey, Prof. Min Trevor Kyi, Leslie Duran, Prof. Jodi Fisher, Patricia Mortenson, Dr. Melinda Suto, Prof Donna Drynan, Sue Reil, Stephen Epp, Jennifer Glasglow, Colleen McCain

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2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report


2009 mot program courses

RSOT 547, Evidence for Practice II: Project (6 credits) Terms 4-6 Lectures, online discussion and supported independent study will be used to provide students with experience in conducting occupational therapy research. Participation in a limited-scope research process will facilitate development of knowledge and skills necessary for conducting a research project or program evaluation. Under the supervision of academic and clinical faculty students will pose a research question relevant to occupational therapy theory or practice, identify a design, collect and analyze data and present the data in a research forum and report. Instructor Team: Dr. Ben Mortenson, Dr. Debbie Rand, Dr. Hugh Anton, Prof. Sandy Jagday, Andrew Neale, Andrew McFarlane, Maki Komori, Debbie Field, Dr. Ian Mitchell, Frieda Neudorf, Patricia Mortenson, Astrid St. Pierre, Shalini Lal, Dr. Catherine Backman, Prof. Donna Drynan, Dr. Sue Forwell, Dr. Liisa Holsti, Dr. Lyn Jongbloed, Dr. Bill Miller, Prof. Sue Stanton, Dr. Tal Jarus RSOT 549, Professional Practice II (18 credits) Terms 4-6 A combination of professional behaviour seminars, clinic visits, and professional practice in fieldwork settings foster integration of skills, knowledge and attitudes consistent with the Essential Competencies for occupational therapy in Canada. Maintaining a portfolio, seminars, guest speakers and mentors support students to develop the skills of a reflective practitioner. Selected seminar topics are held in conjunction with the Department of Physical Therapy, and other health professions students where possible. Includes 21 weeks of fieldwork in affiliated health and social service agencies (1, 7-week placement scheduled in term 4, and two, 6-week placements in Term 5). Opportunities for inter-disciplinary fieldwork, role-emerging fieldwork, and international fieldwork are available. Students progress from supervision to relative independence in the occupational therapy process. Instructor Team: Dr Catherine Backman, Bethan Everett, Kathy Corbett, Prof. Dawn Daechsel, Regina Casey RSOT 551, Societal and Environmental Influences on Practice (3 credits) Terms 5-6 A seminar addressing current legislative, socio-political, cultural and service delivery issues influencing occupational therapy practice and clients’ experiences. Participation in activities of daily living is not only influenced by the individual’s skills and resources, but also the policies, actions, and attitudes imposed upon them by the broader institutional, social, and cultural environments. Case-based tutorials continue to emphasize the integration of knowledge using cases and scenarios reflective of complex issues influenced by contextual factors often outside the control of individual clients or therapists as well as those in service delivery environments. Instructor Team: Dr Lyn Jongbloed, Dr. Catherine Backman, Prof. Donna Drynan, Christine Gordon RSOT 553, Developing Effective Rehabilitation Programs (3 credits) Terms 5 and 6) The application of approaches to effective design, marketing and evaluation of occupational therapy services and writing and responding to Requests for Proposals (RFPs). Instructor Team: Prof Sue Stanton, Prof. Mary Clark, and Patti Erlendson

2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

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RESEARCH GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN REHABILITATION SCIENCES

November 2009 Drs. Sharon Smith and Ben Mortenson

2009 was a historic year for the Research Graduate Programs in Rehabilitation Sciences! Our first 4 PhD graduates received their degrees in 2009, Dana Anaby and Jocelyn harris (May 2009) and Ben Mortenson and Sharon Smith (November 2009). Dana Anaby’s thesis focused on well-being from an occupational perspective and tested a conceptual model. She is now doing post-doctoral work at McMaster University. Jocelyn Harris’ thesis studied upper limb function in individuals with subacute stroke and she conducted a multisite single blind randomized controlled trial. She is now at the University of Toronto doing a post-doctoral fellowship. Ben Mortenson’s thesis explored the impact of wheelchairs on individuals in residential care. He currently holds a post-doctoral fellowship at Simon Fraser University. Sharon Smith examined the experience of spirituality and/or religion for individuals living with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. She is currently the executive director of Jacob’s Well. Congratulations to all of these new “Doctors”! We are incredibly proud of you and your hard work and dedication. In addition to our PhD graduates, five MSc degrees were granted. Amelia Payne examined histological characteristics of the vastus lateralis muscle in patients undergoing hip surgery. Amira Tawashy studied cardio-vascular fitness in individuals with cervical spinal cord injury. Jennifer Garden examined the reliability and validity of the Wheelchair Outcome measure. Marylyn Horsman documented the coping strategies of adults aging with cerebral palsy. Helia Sillem compared two carpometacarpal stabilizing splints for individuals with thumb osteoarthritis. Again, we are so pleased by the continued quality and level of excellence our graduates bring to their research and final defenses. The Research Graduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences is a shared graduate program between the OS&OT and the Department of Physical Therapy. Currently there are 14 students enrolled in the MSc program and 19 students in the PhD program. There has been a substantial increase in numbers of PhD students over the last three years; between September 2006 and September 2009, enrolment increased from 9 to 19 PhD’s. Reporting the process and outcomes of research projects at conferences, to stakeholders and in peer reviewed publications is an important part of knowledge translation and an essential part of the research process. During 2009 MSc and PhD students presented papers at 50 conferences and published 21 papers in peer reviewed journals such as: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, Journal of Neurological Physical Therapy, British Journal of Sports Medicine, Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Spinal Cord, Respiratory Medicine, WORK and PSR/RPS Express. Students in the MSc and PhD programs are talented individuals who are learning, contributing to knowledge in many areas, while leading balanced lives!

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2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report


Rehabilitation Science Online Programs

Accessible Graduate Studies In 2009 the online programs continued to refine its courses, attract expert facilitators and graduate learners who are recognized as valuable resources creating hubs of excellence in their workplace. Increasing Enrolments Both the Master of Rehabilitation Science (MRSc) and the Graduate Certificate in Rehabilitation (GCR) continue to grow. Enrolment for the September 2009 and January 2010 MRSc intakes were up 118% from the previous year and GCR intakes up 36% with a total enrolment increase of 77%. Approximately 70% of learners ‘test the waters’ in the GCR program and then apply for their master’s. The online environment allows learners to log in from anywhere in the world where they have access to the Internet. Although learners continue to come mainly from Canada we are broadening out to New Zealand, Australia, Hong Kong and the United States. Fifty-one percent of current MRSc learners are from BC and 37% from Metro Vancouver indicating that online learning is also appealing to those who prefer to save travel time by studying at home. OTs Represent One Third of the Growing Interprofessional Network The programs’ naturally occurring interprofessional representation includes many occupational therapists. At the end of 2009, there were 89 learners in the UBC programs with three clusters of learners: one third were OTs, one third were PTs, and the other third included athletic therapists, chiropractors, dietitians, kinesiologists, massage therapists, nurses and orthotists. By the November 2009 graduation, 18 learners had graduated from the MRSc program and 10 from the GCR. In 2010, 10 more will graduate with their MRSc to make a total of 28 since the inception of the program in 2005. Work- and Practice-Based Research Impacts Workplace At the end of 2009 a review of 18 research projects completed to date revealed the impact the program was having on rehabilitation practice. These projects are designed to create and test solutions to current challenges in providing rehabilitation services. For example five of these projects focused on practice enhancement exploring issues such as support to rural practice and cultural competence, and three focused on the ever-challenging issue of waitlists. Knowledge Transfer Connections to the workplace are an important design element of this research. Learners must have a workplace sponsor and often involve colleagues in the process. For example, in 11 out of the 18 projects, colleagues were research participants, and 8 out of 18 projects had work sponsors participating in the online proposal defence and final research presentations. Their participation reinforces the purpose of the workplace research, enables faster knowledge transfer, and promotes the valuable contribution these learners and graduates make to improving rehabilitation practice, and ultimately the quality of life of those they serve. MRSc graduates have also been successful in presenting their research at various national and international conferences. In 2009, Kathy Davidson had her paper titled: Piloting a points-based caseload measure for community based paediatric occupational and physiotherapists, accepted for publication in the Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy. The major project research completed by the 2009 graduates is listed below. The full abstracts are available on the program website at www.mrsc.ubc.ca.

Occupational Therapist Kathy Hatchard and Physical Therapist Kathy Davidson completed their master’s online and met for the first time at graduation despite living within 50 kilometers of each other in the Okanagan.

2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

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Rehabilitation Science Online Programs

From left to right: MRSc Grads from November 2009: Kathy Davidson, Karen Hurtubise, Elly Wray, Kathy Hatchard, Sue Stanton (program coordinator) and Twila Mills. Missing: Darlene Russell

November 2009 Graduates - Largest Graduating Class to date Kathy Davidson Piloting a points-based caseload measure for community based paediatric occupational therapists and physiotherapists Supervisor: Sandra Bressler Kathy Hatchard

Self-directing return to mainstream work following acute mental illness: Barriers, facilitators and educational needs Supervisor: Julia Henderson

Karen Hurtubise

Parents’ experience in role negotiation in the Family Centered Care Model of Infant Services at Alberta Children’s Hospital Supervisor: Lesley Bainbridge

Twila Mills

Therapists’ experiences using International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) with Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS) Supervisor: Chris Carpenter

Darlene Russell

Occupational therapy programs in acute care: Are we improving patient’s perceived occupational performance? Supervisor: Darene Toal Sullivan

Ellie Wray

Cultural competence in occupational therapy Supervisor: Patricia Mortenson

May 2009 Graduates Nancy Wellwood

Interdisciplinary Risk Assessment Outcome Measure: A Pilot Study Supervisor: Chris Carpenter

Colette Widmer Leu Use of standardized assessments for low back patients: Influence on clinical reasoning of physiotherapists Supervisor: Cheryl Beach

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2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report


Rehabilitation Science Online Programs

Embracing New Technologies Evaluating and incorporating new technologies into all aspects of our operations continues to be a high priority. Live Classroom which allows for real time interactions was used by our librarian Charlotte Beck to assist learners in doing electronic searches and using RefWorks. Our learners also help us to adopt new ways of providing information. Sean McIntosh from Guelph, Ontario took the various readings and course materials and converted them to audio files. He was then able to review these on his IPod while driving to and from work. We also launched a blog at http://blogs.ubc.ca/mrsc/ to relay news about our programs, our learners, our grads and our staff. Although we have several unique visitors reading our news, they continue to be shy in posting comments. In time, we hope this will change. As part of our 5th anniversary celebrations we will be starting our own history Wiki in which we will collectively gather facts and memories to record our first five years and future developments. Collaboration Makes it Possible Spearheaded by Sue Stanton, an Associate Professor in the Department of OS&OT, the online Master of Rehabilitation Science program continues to grow its network of faculty, instructors and major project supervisors. The following joined the team in 2009: Bonnie Baxter, Leslie Duran, Dale Graham, Julia Henderson, Patrician Mortenson, and Jenny Young. The online programs benefit from their affiliation with the Department of (OS&OT), and the Department of Physical Therapy and the ongoing support of Dr. Tal Jarus, Head of the Department of OS&OT and Dr. Jayne Garland, Head of the Department of Physical Therapy. Charlotte Beck provides essential library support for our online learners. Mary Clark takes on a variety of roles from marketing to program evaluation. Five of the program courses are offered in conjunction with the McMaster University’s School of Rehabilitation Science. The online programs could not run without administrative support. Both prospective and current learners comment frequently on the excellent support they receive from Administrative Manager Lois Nightingale. Michelle Mossing has taken on a greater role in training new facilitators to Vista, our course management system, and trouble shooting learners’ technical questions. We also recognize the assistance of the OS&OT manager Kathryn Lewis, and Information Systems Coordinator Jozef Adamov for his technical support. Plans for 2010 – Our 5th Anniversary We are five years young in 2010, many years wiser, and very proud of our graduates. As we celebrate our anniversary we will continue to increase enrolments and streamline operations to meet our cost-recovery goals and improve our programs. Specific projects will involve conducting impact research given that we will have close to 30 MRSc grads by the end of 2010. We also hope to move forward with our vision of collaborative research. Online learning broadens the opportunities for both interprofessional and ‘intercentre’ collaborations. We believe that common issues needing solutions can be examined in more depth when graduate learners from the same or different professions take on one piece of the puzzle as part of their workplace research. The results will be more rapid change and innovation that extends across professions, practice areas and system boundaries.

2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

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Student Awards

PhD Hana Al-Banay Ministry of Higher Education Sponsorship Program in Saudi Arabia 2008-2012 $43 000 per year Krista Best Four Year Fellowship 2009-2013 $16 000 per year Regina Casey CIHR Strategic Training Fellowship in Rehabilitation Research/Quality of Life $17 850 Bahareh Haj Ghanbara CIHR Strategic Training Fellowship in Rehabilitation Research/Quality of Life $10 000; International Partial Tuition Scholarship $3 000; BC Lung Fellowship $17 000; Graduate Student Initiative Funding $3 149 Jocelyn Harris CIHR Doctoral Fellowship 2007-2009 $50 000 per year; Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research Senior Graduate Student Award $10 500 Shalini Lal Four Year Fellowship 2008-2012 $11 000 per year; Pacific Century Graduate Scholarship $10 000, CIHR Strategic Training Fellowship in Rehabilitation Research/Quality of Life $17 850; Marpole Women’s Auxiliary Scholarship $3 000; WRTC Health Services Research Award $5 000 Lois Lochhead Graduate Student Initiative Funding $8 096 Meghan Lindsell NSERC Doctoral Award $17 500 Courtenay Pollock Graduate Entrance Scholarship $6 199

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2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

Bubblepreet Randhawa Disability Health Research Network Award $1 500 Marc Roig Josephine T. Berthier Fellowship 2008-2010 $16 000 per year; CIHR Strategic Training Fellowship in Rehabilitation Research/Quality of Life $17 850; BC Lung Fellowship in Rehabilitation Sciences $9 000 Paula Rushton CIHR Strategic Training Fellowship in Rehabilitation Research/Quality of Life $10 000; Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research Graduate Training Award 2008-2010 $14 000 per year; CIHR Doctoral Fellowship 2007-2010 $50 000 per year Sharon Smith SSHRC Doctoral Fellowship 2007-2009 $20 000 per year Mineko Wada Four Year Fellowship 2009-2011 $16 000 per year; CIHR Strategic Training Fellowship in Rehabilitation Research/Quality of Life $10 000 Domenic Zbogar CIHR Doctoral Fellowship 2008-2011 $30 000 Jill Zwicker Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research Senior Graduate Training Award 2008-2010 $20 000 per year


Student Awards

MSc Stephanie Glegg Graduate Entrance Scholarship $6199

Tom Grant: Sarah Brabyn Memorial Service Award: $2100

Sandra Hale CIHR Banting and Best’s Master’s Award $17500

Holly Green: JR Rehabilitation Graduate Service Award in Occupational: $1250

Alison McLean CIHR Master’s Fellowship $17500; Cordula & Gunter Paetzold Fellowship $6120

Frances Hawes: Janet Louise Berryman Scholarship in Medicine: $1925; COTF Future Scholar Award: $50

Robin Roots PFC Dominion of Canada Scholarship $4000; Canadian Arthritis Network Trainee Award $9000; Matching funds from Supervisor Dr. Linda Li $9000

Kelsey McCloy: Janet Louise Berryman Scholarship in Medicine: $1925

Brodie Sakakibara CIHR Banting and Best’s Master’s Award $17 500; Margaret Hood Scholarship $3000 Karen Suave University Graduate Fellowship $16000; Pacific Century Graduate Scholarship $10000

Heather McDonald: Harold James Russell Scholarship in Rehabilitation Sciences: $2300 Hanna Nagtegaal: UBC Rehabilitation Sciences Alumni Bursary: $2350 Kathryn Naus: University Graduate Fellowship: $17000

Rochelle Stokes Louise McGregor Scholarship in Neurorehabilitation $8000; Canadian Occupational Therapy Foundation J.V. Cook and Associates Qualitative Research Award $1500

Christine Pearce: BCSOT Alison Lapage Memorial Scholarship: $250; Rehabilitation Sciences Award: $500

Jeanie Zabukovec Graduate Student Initiative Award $4060

Sarah Rinas-Larson: Métis Health Careers Award: $6300

Masters of Occupational Therapy Susan Armstrong: Ken F. Fraser Memorial Scholarship: $1150

Shannon Rolph: Kievell Scholarship: $1000

Sarah Atkinson: JR Rehabilitation Graduate Service Award in Occupational: $1250 Jennifer Bennett: University Graduate Fellowship: $17000 Chelsea Bennie: University Graduate Fellowship: $17000 Carley Billups: Rehabilitation Sciences Award: $500; COTF Future Scholar Award: $50

Brianne Samson: UBC Rehabilitation Sciences Alumni Bursary: $2100 Graduating Awards Jennifer Alford: British Columbia Society of Occupational Therapists Book Prize: $75 Jaclyn Cross: Dr. Brock Fahrni Prize in Occupational Therapy: $100 Frances Hawes: Canadian Association of Occupational Therapy Book Prize: $100

Mary Glasgow Brown ICBC Scholarship in Occupational Therapy: $2500

2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

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Unfolding Gratitude

It is only through the ongoing support and commitment of our many supporters within the community that we are able to offer our students and stakeholders vibrant and diverse opportunities for learning and participation. For instance, 2009 donations to our student led Capstone Conference held annually in August enabled the rental of the Chan Centre, a larger, more conducive and celebratory venue. In 2009 we are pleased to acknowledge donations from the following supporters. Thank you all.

Individuals Catherine L Backman Linda Boronowski Alyssa Barrie Sarabjeet Kaur Charchun John Cobb Patricia Cottingham Sheila Cox Donna Drynan Deborah Dong Diane Dous Janice Duivestein Sharon Edwards Susan Forwell Liisa Holsti Tal Jarus-Hakak Lyn Jongbloed Karen Lachance Michael Lee

Bill Miller Bill Osten Jane Remocker Cheryl Snowden Melinda Suto Victoria Thomas Janice Wiebe Corporate British Columbia Society of Occupational Therapists Back in Motion Group CBI Health Group Functional Outcomes Orion Health Services OT Consulting/Treatment Services Ltd Provincial Paediatric Therapy Consulting Sense Ability Pediatric OT Inc Vancouver Coastal Health Authority Vancouver Island Health Authority

Donations of Expertise In addition to the financial contributions we gratefully accept each year, we also receive contributions from the many members of our clinical community who step forward to offer their time and energy to support our teaching and fieldwork programs. This year was no exception with clinicians volunteering their expertise both in and out of the classroom. In addition, clinical faculty members contributed to university and departmental committees and participated in our admissions interview process. We sincerely thank each of these extraordinary individuals for going the extra mile, giving back to our department, and mentoring the next generation of Occupational Therapists.

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2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report


Unfolding Continuing Professional Education

Our first step in planning additional Continuing Professional Education (CPE) for the occupational therapy community in BC was to understand your needs, interests and preferences. In the spring of 2009 we circulated a survey to Occupational Therapists around the province. We are pleased that 271 occupational therapists (OTs) responded to the survey and we thank them for their time. Below is a summary of the analysis of results with proposed directions. If you would like more details of the results, please contact Tal Jarus (tal.jarus@ubc.ca). Based on those results, we then worked with BCSOT, COTBC and other stakeholders to ensure that occupational therapists’ education needs are met. We want to see the profession grow in BC by creating an invigorating and sustainable learning community. Who Responded

Geographic Distribution of Respondents Lower Mainland Vancouver Fraser Valley Thompson/Ok. Northern BC East Kootenays 0

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Respondents represented all parts of the province. See Figure 1. The majority of the respondents work in the public sector (74.2%), full-time (67.5%) and directly with clients, mainly adults (70.8%) and/or older adults (63.1%). In general, practice areas reflect the profile of BC therapists as outlined in the Workforce Trends of Occupational Therapists in Canada, 2007 (2008). For example, most respondents work in general hospitals, extended or long-term care, outpatient care, or rehabilitation facilities (73.8%). The highest percentage of respondents described their area of practice as musculoskeletal (36.2%). Your educational Interests The greatest levels of interest were in the areas of Clinical Skills and New Assessment Tools. These were also considered the most urgent. Themes from the qualitative analysis reveal the greatest need to be in neuro-rehabilitation, specifically cognitive assessments for clients with dementia, brain injuries and serious mental illness. Other dominant themes included complex seating and dysphagia. Other areas of interest and urgency not directly related to clinical skills and assessment included: • Exchange of Research and practice information (knowledge translation), • Client Education Materials, • Quality Improvement Practices, • Supervision of Support Personnel, • Locating Evidence from Journal/Databases, and • The Canadian Model of Occupational Performance and Engagement (CMOP-E).

2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

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Unfolding Continuing Professional Education

Facilitators and Barriers to CPE The majority of respondents reported attended 4-5 continuing education events in the past 2 years with the in-services being the most common followed by attending courses or workshops (See Figure 2). The use of technology is increasing with over 50% using teleconferences, 28% using videoconferencing through their workplaces, and almost 13% doing online courses. The average comfort level for all of these was 5 where 1 was not being comfortable at all and 7 was very comfortable. Almost 95% have access to the internet at home and at work, with 43% rating their skill as intermediate and 35% as advanced. Employers can be considered facilitators among these respondents with 79.7% who reported receiving some time of financial remuneration for attending courses and almost 78.6% who reported receiving paid time off work to attend CPE events. In reviewing the qualitative remarks, the amount of remuneration and time off varies greatly so can be more helpful for some respondents than others. This can be seen in the responses to identifying barriers. The largest barrier reported was Finances (see Figure 3). The qualitative remarks confirm that those living outside the Greater Vancouver area, particularly those in the East Kootenays and the North find travel (or distance from Vancouver) to be the greatest barrier. Types of CE attended in past 2 years Attending inservices at my place of work Attending courses/workshops Attending local conferences Attending teleconferences (through my  Att di t l f (th h workplace) Participating  in special interest or study  groups 0

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Other Input In December 2008 the OT faculty invited opinion leaders to attend a round table to inform their strategic plan. One of the areas was Continuing Professional Education and an analysis of the ideas discussed at this station indicates that UBC must also consider the following trends when developing their CPE. Many of these are consistent with the results from the CPE survey. • • • • •

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Reduce barriers through teleconference/videoconference and web-based learning but with supports to ensure these are accessible. Collaborate with BCSOT, COTBC, and health authorities to create interprofessional education opportunities. Identify gaps and new developments as well as anticipate future needs driven by regulatory changes regarding continued competence and advanced scope, desire to advance occupational science, etc. Ensure knowledge translation including keeping faculty up-to-date with day-to-day practice challenges. Build a continuum of learning opportunities to support therapists throughout their careers, including a system to measure competencies.

2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report


Unfolding Continuing Professional Education

Connect current ‘hot topics’ to occupation by inviting dynamic speakers to present their new ideas and OTs to make the connections with occupational therapy and science. What’s Next? Working with others is imperative given the small OT community in BC. To this collaboration we have much to bring such as our knowledge in pedagogy (methods and practice of learning), occupational therapy theories and models, clinical knowledge and our skills in facilitating supportive online learning. We also plan to build on our successes such as the café series, Conversations on Occupation, which are held in Vancouver with podcasts available on our website. There is much to do if we are to realize our goal of creating an invigorating and sustainable learning community that is accessible to OTs throughout the province. We look forward to the challenges ahead and will keep you up-to-date on new opportunities. Many thanks again for your valued input. In 2010 we hosted a series of Continuing Professional Education workshops. The contents can be found on our website. Reference Canadian Institute for Health Information. (2008). Workforce Trends of Occupational Therapists. Ottawa, ON: Author.

Barriers to CPE 7% 10% 37%

Finances Time Travel

22%

Family Commitments Other

24%

2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

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Unfolding community

In 2009 OS&OT continued to build on the foundations of a strong community long established by our history, reputation, colleagues, and alumni. Through our strategic planning process we reaffirmed our goal to be a pillar of the Occupational Therapy community in British Columbia; supporting clinicians to grow as educators, to conduct research and to be life-long learners. Several approaches have been used to create, nourish and unfold this community. We continued to support the Cafe Scientifique series originally funded by the CIHR. In 2009 we hosted 4 cafes. Our Cafe held in conjunction with UBC Research Week, entitled “The Unhurried Family: seeking balance in our everyday lives” attracted over 60 attendees. Our second spring offering “Welcome to Reality: Occupations in Real and Virtual Environments” was also very popular. We held two cafes in the fall of 2009 ‘Social Capital, Health and Occupational Engagement” and “Mental Health Stigmas and Occupations: connecting the dots”. All of our cafes are inter-professional with speakers from at least two departments from UBC, and are free and open to the public. All of our cafes are available via podcast on our website. If you would like to be included on our mailing list, please contact osot.events@ubc.ca. We also continue to make the effort to be a provincial resource, and have reached out to clinicians across the province to sit on departmental committees. We have also travelled to many of the health authorities to meet with practice leaders and clinicians to ensure that we are meeting the needs of all. In 2009, we attended and presented at all of the Bridges conferences, met with representatives from the Northern Health Authority, the local school district and Child Development Centers in Prince George to discuss a rural stream for our MOT program, and made a short presentation at the BCSOT AGM. This year as well, we expanded our student recruitment to include booths at both the UNBC Health Sciences Career Fair and the UBC Okanagan Campus Career and Graduate School Fair. We hope that by recruiting from these areas, we will grow OT’s to return to these regions of the province. To address the specific learning needs of the internationally educated occupational therapists (IEOTs) in BC, OS&OT partnered with McMaster University and the College of Occupational Therapists of BC to launch a 15 week Occupational Therapy examination and practice preparation (OTepp) program. It ran from March to June with 10 participants. It was a project funded through the College by the Ministry of Health Services. Besides offering space, learning and teaching resources, the department also supported the OTepp instructional team with teaching and learning technology. To monitor the quality of the output of the OTepp program in BC, OS&OT also sat on the advisory committee of this project, and offered suggestions on ways to facilitate learning for the participants. Knowing the on-going needs to support IEOTs to integrate into Canadian occupational therapy workforce, the Department continues to explore options for sustaining programs such as OTepp to be delivered in BC.

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2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report


Unfolding community

In the fall of 2009 two of our faculty travelled to China, Dr. Susan Forwell, as part of the CAOT/People to People Delegation. Dr. Forwell spent a whirlwind two weeks in China visiting with University Heads and other leaders in the health professions. She presented upon her return to interested clinicians during Occupational Therapy Month. This presentation was at Vancouver General Hospital, with video links to Prince George and other regions as requested. Michael Lee was invited to China to work with stakeholders in the development of a community mental health teams and psychosocial rehabilitation. Mr. Lee travelled to Xiamen and Suzhou as well as Chengdu, where he lectured at the Southwest University for Nationalities and the West China Hospital, Sichuan University. During OT month in October, we provided copies of You, Me and My OT to current MOT students, who then took those books to schools and community centers to participate in story times. We then donated the copies of the books to the school or center libraries. In addition to being ambassadors for the profession, MOT students also initiated a mental health promotion project to build awareness within the University community about the importance of mental health and strategies to recovery from mental illness. Funded through UBC Equity Office, students, with the guidance of Michael Lee, collaborated with community partners to launch a Mental Health Awareness afternoon featuring speakers sharing their mental illness experience and recovery journey and community partners showcasing their resources. Dovetailed with the Capstone Conference, and funded through Cedar Lodge Endowment, students organized and presented “Crazy For Life� a one-woman show by Victoria Maxwell on combating stigma on mental illness. This show was open to the public and was well attended by a mix of clinicians, students and the general public. We hope through these events we can cultivate a healthier community in our campus. OS&OT continues to maximize its opportunities to strengthen and build ties within our community but also to build visibility of the profession and our Department through public events. We firmly believe that community is a cornerstone of all that we do, whether as occupational therapists, educators, researchers or clients, community brings us a sense of place like nothing else.

Unfolding Community, From Here.

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Unfolding community

Stretching perspectives FROM HERE


staff and faculty

Staff Jozef Adamov Sally Clark Rehana Frankland Julia Henderson Tracy Henderson Cynthia Hsieh

Information Systems Coordinator Graduate Secretary, Graduate Program in Rehabilitation Sciences Student Services Program Assistant Course Support Specialist Curriculum Assistant Research Grants Facilitator

Jean Hsieh Kathryn Lewis Lois Nightingale Heather Swallow Andrea Walus

Fieldwork and Clinical Faculty Secretary Administrative Manager Administrative Manager, Rehabilitation Sciences Online Program Departmental Assistant Administrative Manager (on leave December 2008 – September 2010)

Faculty Catherine Backman, PhD, OT(C), FCAOT Associate Professor

Lyn Jongbloed PhD, OT(C) Associate Professor

Susan Forwell PhD, OT(C), FCAOT Associate Professor

Bill Miller PhD, OT(C) Associate Professor

Liisa Holsti PhD, OT(C), OTR Assistant Professor

Sue Stanton MA, OT(C) Associate Professor

Tal Jarus PhD, OT(C) Dept Head & Associate Professor

Melinda Suto PhD, OT(C) Assistant Professor

Clinical Faculty Members Working in the Department Donna Drynan Med, OT(C) Clinical Associate Professor & Academic Fieldwork Coordinator

Michael Lee MBA, OT(C) Clinical Associate Professor & Curriculum Coordinator

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Clinical Faculty and Associate Members

Clinical Professor Christine Carpenter Ginny Fearing (Emeritus) Lynda McCloy Clinical Associate Professor R. Joy Anson Cathy Busby Mary Jo Clark Rene Corbett Dawn Daechsel Donna Drynan Jan Gauthier Min Kyi Michael Lee Dianna Mah-Jones Jillian Rihela Lori Roxborough Trish White Clinical Assistant Professor Darlene Arsenault Mariella Bozzer Sandra Bressler Patricia S Bustamante (Emeritus) Kim Calsaferri William Chan Irene Chappell Mary Clark Lori Cyr Janice Duivestein Patricia Erlendson Jodi Fischer Mary Ann Fulks Sandra Hale Mary Konkin Sonja Magnuson Margaret McCuaig Alison M.McLean Jane Millard Patricia Mortenson Andrew Neale Barbara Porter Brenda Robinson 34

2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

Cheryl Sheffield Astrid St.Pierre L. Joanne Stan Susan Stewart Phyllis Straathof Jill Zwicker Clinical Instrustor Sacha Arsenault Desiree Betz Heather Boyes Pamela Capern Sarabjeet Kaur Charchun Irene Cheung Mia Lisabeth Chin Jo-Anne Chisholm Alexis Davis Liza De Silva Rajni Dhiman Jody Edamura Debbie Field Cynthia Fraser Kent Friesen Laura Lynn Fulton Susan Garret Alison Gerlach Susan Leigh Gmitroski Teresa Green Sandra Haskett Julia Henderson Marc Landry Christine Le Faivre Deirdre Lee Carol Levy Sandra Leznoff Wendy Lintott Rona MacDonald Hilary MacInnis Margot MacKay Yenna Jung Mansfield Colleen McCain Barbara McNair Deborah Mills Karen Mills

Ben Mortenson Judi Moscovitch Marie Nelson Tracey Newlands Gretchen Olund Josephine Poon Tim Readman Janice Ritson Twyla Ross Kathleen A Scalzo Jennifer Selman Janet Shortreed Sarah Sinanan Les Smith Wendy Thompson Nancy Wellwood Adjunct Professors James Watzke (BCIT) Associate Members Hubert Anton (Rehabilitation Medicine) Andrew Chalmers (Medicine) Karen Hammell (Research Associate, OS&OT) Andrei Krassioukov (Rehabilitation Medicine) Heather McKay (Family Practice) Ian Mitchell (Computer Science) Karim Miran-Khan (Family Practice) John Oliffe (School of Nursing) Bonita Sawatzky (Orthopaedics) Andrea Townson (Rehabilitation Medicine) Theo Van Rijn (Rehabilitation Medicine)


unfolding research

CanDo Research Unit The CanDo Research Unit was created in 2007 and is comprised of many of the faculty members in the Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy. The goal of CanDo is to understand and promote human occupation through the design, discovery and dissemination of research. CanDo members have diverse research backgrounds including occupational therapy, rehabilitation medicine, epidemiology, community mental health, and educational studies. Together, the group plans departmental research initiatives and discusses opportunities for internal and external collaborations with academia and the community. Members also often meet to brainstorm ideas for upcoming funding opportunities, publications, and to discuss ongoing research projects. Individual members provide supervised research training to graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. Core Researchers Catherine Backman, Susan Forwell, Liisa Holsti, Tal Jarus, Lyn Jongbloed, Bill Miller, Susan Stanton, Melinda Suto.

CanDo also strives to transfer new knowledge to clinical and community settings, and have developed a number of tools for use in the field of occupational therapy. Such tools to measure body structure, function and symptoms, functional performance, and infant pain are only a few examples of how CanDo researchers are translating knowledge to action to help others experience the lives they want to live. Partnerships and Collaborations The CanDo Research Unit recognizes the importance of partnerships and collaborations to advance understanding of human occupation. Researchers currently engage with other academics and research networks, as well as the clinical and lay communities. Currently, active partnerships exist with scholars from diverse departments throughout UBC and Canada, including academics from Simon Fraser University, University of Victoria, University of Western Ontario, and the University of Montreal. CanDo also has a number of collaborations that extend beyond our borders, including scholars from the United States, New Zealand and Israel.

Research Funding The CanDo Research Unit has made exceptional contributions to occupational therapy and rehabilitation medicine through its innovative and groundbreaking research. Faculty members currently hold over $7.5 million of research funding, nearly $3 million as principal investigators. The majority of research funding is from Tri-Council granting agencies, with almost $5 million from CIHR and SSHRC. Areas of scientific inquiry include participation in occupations, functional outcomes, assistive technology, the experience of well-being, quality of life, fatigue, and health and social policy.

Graduate Students Graduate students participate in the CanDo unit to advance their skills and learning in a variety of research methodologies and theoretical perspectives. With assistance and supervision of core researchers, they participate in writing grants, preparing manuscripts for publication, and presenting their work in local, national and international forums.

Knowledge to Action CanDo researchers have garnered a reputation among the academic community for their excellence in research, largely through publications and scientific presentations. Just in 2009 alone, faculty published 39 peer-reviewed articles in reputable, high-impact journals, and presented at several national and international conferences and symposia, including the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapy National Conference (held in Ottawa June 2009), and the World Federation of Occupational Therapy Congress (held in Portugal May 2009).

• Sunshine Breakfast meetings are held monthly for idea generation and development. While these are a terrific way to start the day, they also allow for animated conversation on current issues and “out of the box” thinking. • CanDo business meetings are held monthly to manage infrastructure, set direction and to build networks. Repre- sentatives from CIHR and SSHRC have participated in these meetings, as well visiting scholars, the Associate Dean of Research, and Department Heads of other units at UBC. • Research Rounds are held a few times throughout the year to allow faculty to present on pending and ongoing research projects. These meetings have proven invaluable to obtain suggestions and feedback on future idea development.

Activities The CanDo Research Unit holds regular meetings to discuss research initiatives and ongoing projects.

2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

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unfolding research

OS&OT Research Stats for 2009 and Beyond

SSHRC

$208,000 $25,000 $100,000 $80,000 $280,000

$50,000

MSFHR

$1,000,000 $5,000

CIHR CIHR and Canadian Arthirtis Network

$30,000 $158,564

Canadian Arthritis Network

$240,000

BC & Yukon Heart & Stroke Foundation MS Society of Canada

$300,000

National MS Society BC Medical Services $825,600 $2,460,940

$370,000

$1,500,000

Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute Canadian Child Health Clinician Scientist Career Program Canadian Psychiatric Research Foundation Child and Family Research Institute Quebec Rehabilitation Research Network (REPAR) SCI Solutions Network UBC Faculty of Medicine

Total $ in Grants: $7,663,104 Total $ in Grants as PI: $2,929,201 Total $ in Tri-council Grants: $4,960,940 (CIHR: $3,960,940; SSHRC: $1,000,000) Total # of Publications (2009 only): 39 Journal Articles, 46 Conference Proceedings/Abstracts, 5 Book Chapters

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2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report


featured researcher

Bill Miller CIHR Emerging Team: CanWheel This year, OS&OT was delighted to learn that Dr. Bill Miller was awarded $1.5 million from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research for his emerging team grant, “Wheeled Mobility for Older Adults (WheeMOAT).” This 6-year, multisite project brings together a pan-Canadian team of 14 clinical researchers (i.e. occupational therapists, gerontologists, physicians) and basic scientists (i.e. engineers, computer scientists) to improve the mobility opportunities of older adults who use power wheelchairs. With the unprecedented support of community partners (i.e. advocacy agencies, federal and provincial decision makers, and industry), the research program addresses three basic questions: 1) How are power wheelchairs used now? 2) How can power wheelchairs be used better? and 3) How can power wheelchairs be better? The research program is broken into 5 key projects: Project I: “Evaluating the Needs and Experiences of Older Adults Using Power Wheelchairs” (Years 1-6) This qualitativestudy will utilize focus groups, in-depth interviews and observational studies to evaluate the effectiveness, impact, and relevance of wheeled mobility devices from the perspective of consumers, caregivers, health care providers, policy makers, and funding agencies. Project II: “The Natural History and Measurement of Power Mobility Outcomes”(Years 1-4). This project aims to describe the variation in power mobility over a two-year period among various cohorts of wheelchair users. Nested within this project is the psychometric testing of a toolkit of measures that will advance knowledge and understanding of essential outcomes for power mobility users. Project III: “Strategies and Platforms for Collaborativelycontrolled, Environmentally-aware Wheelchair Innovation” (Years 1-6). This project’s goal is to develop a smart power wheelchair. “Smart” is defined as a power wheelchair whose motion is mediated by a computerized system which is aware of the environment and can collaborate with the user to achieve mobility goals and avoid dangerous situations.

Project IV: “Activity and Status Monitoring System (Data Logger)” (Years 1-5). A data logger is a collection of sensors and a storage system attached to a wheelchair designed to record aspects of the wheelchair’s behaviour. This project will unify existing Canadian data logger projects to ensure that comparable data is collected by all platforms. The project will share best practices for working with data loggers, and to identify avenues for further development. Ultimately, the project will integrate data logging features into smart wheelchair prototypes. Project V: “Evaluation of the Safety, Efficacy and Impact of the Wheelchair Skills Program for Power Mobility Users and their Caregivers” (Years 4-6). The overall goal of this project is to address the gaps in our understanding of wheelchair skills training, particularly the safety and efficacy of such training for both powered wheelchair users and their caregivers, and the broad impact of skills training on health, function and social participation. These five projects will ultimately converge at the end of the six-year grant when the team will leverage their results into a new project to conduct a randomized controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of a new, collaboratively-controlled wheelchair, in combination with a wheelchair skills training program, using the outcome toolkit validated during the tenure of this grant. In the short-term, the enhanced understanding of the needs and values of power wheelchair users will result in less power wheelchair abandonment and improved satisfaction with social participation. In the medium-term (six years), this program of research will have created better skills training programs, thus promoting safer and longer use of power wheelchairs. Driven by iterative feedback from users, during this time the team will also have developed smart wheelchair technologies which, over the long-term will translate into increased accessibility to the technology, and safe power wheelchair use over longer periods of time.

2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

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research awards

Catherine Backman Distinguished Scholar Award. Association of Rheumatology Health.Professionals (A division of the American College of Rheumatology) Donna Drynan Outstanding OT of the Year Award. BC Society of Occupational Therapists. Clinical Faculty Award for Excellence in Teaching. UBC Faculty of Medicine. Michael Lee Certificate of Appreciation. Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists. Josephine Poon Certificate of Appreciation. Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists. Brenda Robinson Certificate of Appreciation. Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists. Jo-Anne Chisholm Certificate of Appreciation. Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists. Karen Mills Certificate of Appreciation. Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists. Susan Forwell Presidents’ Medal. Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists.

Dr. Catherine Backman receiving the Distiguished Scholar Award from Dr. Stan Cohen, Vice-President, American College of Rheumatology and Dr. Pamela Degotardi, President, Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals.

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2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report


REsEaRCH GRaNTs

Project Title: The Prevalence and Course of Fatigue after Acute Spinal Cord Injury Principal Investigator: H Anton Co-Investigators: W Miller; A Townson Granting Agency: BCMSF Period: 2008-2010 Total Amount: $39,000 Project Title: Comparison of two carpometacarpal stabilizing splints for individuals with osteoarthritis Principal Investigator: C Backman Co-Investigators: W Miller; H Selium Granting Agency: British Columbia Medical Services Foundation (BCMSF) Period: 2008-2010 Total Amount: $20,000 Project Title: Lessening the Big Squeeze: The Effect of the Trunk Release on ‘Interface Pressures of Individuals Seated in a High Fowler’s Position Principal Investigator: G Desharnais Co-Investigators: W Miller; J Boily; P Camp Granting Agency: VCHRI Team Grant Period: 2009 Total Amount: $50,000 Project Title: Faculty Development Initiatives Grants Development of an Interprofessional Preceptor Orientation Manual Principal Investigator: D Drynan Granting Agency: University of British Columbia, Office for Faculty Development and Educational Support, Faculty of Medicine Period: 2009 Total Amount: $5,000 Project Title: Interprofessional Problem-Based Learning Module for Five Health Science Disciplines Principal Investigator: L Eccott Co-Investigators: C Newton; M Lee; W Hall; A Greig Granting Agency: UBC Teaching and Learning

Enhancement Fund Period: 2009 Total Amount: $23,300 Project Title: Effect of an inpatient supplementary practice program on lower extremity function Principal Investigator: J Eng Co-Investigators: W Miller; P Brasher; A Dawson Granting Agency: Heart and Stroke Foundation of BC &Yukon Grant in Aid Period: 2009-2012 Total Amount: $450,600 Project Title: Measuring what matters in life: Patterns of role participation in arthritis Principal Investigator: M Gignac Co-Investigators: C Backman; Badley; Davies; Lacaille Granting Agency: CIHR Period: 2008-2010 Total Amount: $242,680 Project Title: Striking a balance: Spillover between arthritis, work and home Principal Investigator: M Gignac Co-Investigators: C. Backman; Badley; Beaton; Lacaille; Hofstetter Granting Agency: Network Centres of Excellence (NCE): Canadian Arthritis Network Period: 2008-2010 Total Amount: $50,000 Project Title: The effectiveness of a neuromuscular warm-up in decreasing biomechanical and neuromuscular risk factors for anterior cruciate ligament injury in female youth soccer players Principal Investigator: S Harris; R Celebrini Co-Investigators: W Miller; J Eng; D McIntyre Granting Agency: BCMSF (BCM06-0007) Period: 2008-2010 Total Amount: $49,800

OS&OT Faculty in bold and OS&OT students in italics

2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

39


research grants

Project Title: Breastfeeding Analgesia in Preterm Infants Principal Investigator: L Holsti Co-Investigators: R Barr; R Grunau; T Oberlander; J Weinberg Granting Agency: SickKids Foundation and CIHR Period: 2008-2010 Total Amount: $103,888

Project Title: Promoting mental wellness on campus: a student driven initiative on mental health education Principal Investigator: M Lee Granting Agency: UBC The Equity Office Period: 2009 Total Amount: $2,500

Project Title: Pain and Stress in Preterm Infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Principal Investigator: L Holsti Granting Agency: Faculty of Medicine- Establishment Grant Period: 2008-2010 Total Amount: $50,000

Project Title: Improving healthcare consumer effectiveness: An Animated, Self-serve, Web-based, Research (AnSWER) tool for people with early rheumatoid arthritis Principal Investigator: L. Li, P. Adam Co-Investigators: C Backman; Cox; Ho; Kopak; McGowan; Stacey; Townsend; Tugwell; Ventrella Granting Agency: CIHR Period: 2009-2011 Total Amount: $189,100

Project Title: Obesity and children with disabilities: An exploration of the built environment Principal Investigator: T Jarus Co-Investigators: J Pivik Granting Agency: Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research / HeRRO Period: 2008-2009 Total Amount: $5,000 Project Title: Social participation and quality of life outcomes for individuals with traumatic brain injury who attend at brain injury drop-in centres Principal Investigator: T Jarus; A McLean Granting Agency: Cedar Lodge Endowment, Vancouver Foundation Period: 2008-2010 Total Amount: $15,800 Project Title: Disability policy alliance: learning collaborative and equity coalition Principal Investigator: M McColl Co-Investigators: L Jongbloed; Aiken; Kobayashi Granting Agency: Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada - Community/University Research Alliance Period: 2009-2014 Total Amount: $50,000

40

2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

Project Title: Stigma and bipolar disorder: A consumer perspective on barriers and solutions Principal Investigator: E Michalak; M Suto Granting Agency: CIHR (Knowledge Translation - Meetings, planning and dissemination) Period: 2009 Total Amount: $10,250 Project Title: Stigma and discrimination in mood disorders Principal Investigator: E Michalak; M Suto Granting Agency: CIHR, (Neurosciences, Mental Health and Addictions - Meetings, Planning and dissemination) Period: 2009 Total Amount: $13,525 Project Title: Wellness and bipolar disorder: A narrative analysis of self-management strategies Principal Investigator: E Michalak; M Suto Co-Investigators: S Hale; R Hole; R Lam; L Yatham; A Young Granting Agency: BC Medical Services Foundation Period: 2008-2010 Total Amount: $49,764


research grants

Project Title: Evidence Based Rehabilitations: SCI Reviews Principal Investigator: W Miller; J Eng; R Teasell Co-Investigators: D Wolfe; A Townsend; J Hsieh; 5 others Granting Agency: SCI Solutions Network Period: 2009-2010 Total Amount: $150,000 Project Title: Natural History of Balance Confidence after Stroke Principal Investigator: W Miller Granting Agency: CIHR New Investigator Award Period: 2005-2010 Total Amount: $250,000 Project Title: Preuve de concept et validation d’un systeme d’acquisition de donnees des activites d’usagers de fauteuil roulant manuel Principal Investigator: F Routhier Co-Investigators: W Miller; P Boissy; P Archambault; C Guerette; D Dessureault; F Lafaso Granting Agency: Reseau provincial de recherche en adaptation-readaptation (REPAR) Period: 2009 Total Amount: $25,000 Project Title: SCIRE Outcome measures Toolkit Principal Investigator: W Miller Co-Investigators: D Wolfe; V Noonan Granting Agency: SCI Solutions Network Period: 2009-2010 Total Amount: $58,000 Project Title: Wheeled Mobility for Older Adults Principal Investigator: W Miller Co-Investigators: A Mihalidis; A Mackworth; L Demers; L Kirby; 10 others Granting Agency: CIHR Emerging Team Grant Period: 2010-2015 Total Amount: $1,500,000

Project Title: Wheeled Mobility for Older Adults Principal Investigator: W Miller Granting Agency: CIHR Team Planning Award Period: 2009 Total Amount: $10,000 Project Title: Ready to Roll? Wheelchair Mobility Issues in Residential Care Principal Investigator: W Miller; W Mortenson Granting Agency: Disability Health Research Network Video Project (MSFHR) Period: 2009 Total Amount: $5,000 Project Title: Western Pacific Regional Research Principal Investigator: P Reickmann Co-Investigators: S Forwell and collaborators Granting Agency: MS Society of Canada Period: 2009-2012 Total Amount: $300,000 Project Title: Community Partnerships for Health Professional Education Principal Investigator: A Towle Co-Investigators: B Godolphin; L Brainbridge; M Clauson; W Hall; S Murphy; D Fielding; M Lee Granting Agency: UBC Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund Period: 2009 Total Amount: $79,665 Project Title: ERAHSE-2 Principal Investigator: A Townsend, L. Li Co-Investigators: Adam, C Backman, Liang Granting Agency: Network Centres of Excellence (NCE): Canadian Arthritis Network Period: 2009-2020 Total Amount: $50,000

2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

41


Unfolding community

Inspired by Community FROM HERE


pUbLICaTIONs

Journal Articles Ali, M., Ashburn, A., Bowen, A., Brodie, E., Corr, CS.,

Deathe, A. B., Wolfe, D. L., Devlin, M., Hebert, J. S., Miller,

Drummond, A., Edmans, J., Gladman J, Jongbloed, L.,

in lower extremity amputation rehabilitation: ICF Activities.

Brady, M. (in press). VISTA-Rehab: Expansion of the virtual international stroke trials archive (VISTA) resource. Accepted July 2009, International Stroke Journal. Anaby, D., Jarus, T., & Zumbo, B. (in press). Psychometric evaluation of the Hebrew language version of the Satisfaction With Life Scale. Accepted April 2009, Social Indicators Research. Anaby, D., Jarus, T., Zumbo, B., & Backman, C. (in press). The role of occupational characteristics and occupational imbalance in explaining well-being. Accepted September 2009, Applied Research in Quality of Life. Anaby, D., Miller, W. C., Eng, J., & Jarus, T. (2009). Participation and subjective well-being in the elderly living with chronic conditions. Can personal and environmental factors explain participation of older adults? Disability and Rehabilitation, 31, 1275-1282. Auger, C., Demers, L., GĂŠlinas, I., Routhier, F., Mortenson,

W. C., & Pallaveshi, L. (2009). Selection of outcome measures Disabil Rehabil, 31, 1455-73. Del Fabro-Smith, L., Suto, M., Chalmers, A., & Backman, C. (in press). Belief in doing and knowledge in being: Mothers with arthritis. Accepted 2009, OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health. Ekegren, C., Miller, W. C., Celebrini, R., MacIntyre, D., & Eng, J. J. (2009). Agreement and validity of observational risk screening in evaluating dynamic knee valgus. Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy, 39, 665-74. Engel-Yeger, B., Jarus, T., Anaby, D., & Law, M. (2009). Difference in patterns of participation between youths with cerebral palsy and typically developing peers. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 63, 96-104. Forhan, M., & Backman, C. (in press). Exploring occupational balance (OB) in adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Accepted March 2009, OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health.

W. B., & Miller, W. C. (in press). Reliability and Validity of the Telephone Administration of the Wheelchair Outcome

Forwell, S. J. (in press). Clinical Approach to Identification

Measure (WhOM) for Middle-Aged and Older Users of Power

and Evaluation of Fatigue in Multiple Sclerosis. Accepted

Mobility Devices. Accepted December 2009, Journal of

2009, International Journal of MS Care.

Rehabilitation Medicine. Hammell Whalley, K., Miller, W. C., Forwell, S. J., Forman, Bart, O., Rosenberg, L., Ratzon, N., & Jarus, T. (in press).

B., & Jacobson, B. (2009). Managing fatigue following

Development and initial validation of the Performance

spinal cord injury: a qualitative exploration. Disability and

Skills Questionnaire. Accepted July 2009, Research in

Rehabilitation, 31(17), 1437-1445.

Developmental Disabilities. doi:10.1016/j.ridd.2009.07.021. Hammell Whalley, K., Miller, W. C., Forwell, S. J., Forman, Cuncic, C., Miller, W. C., Weger, L., & Wong, R. Y. M. (2009).

B. & Jacobson, B. (2009). Fatigue and spinal cord injury: a

Community Mobility of Older Patients following Acute

qualitative analysis. Spinal Cord, 47(1), 44-49.

Hospitalization. Canadian Journal of Geriatrics, 12, 80-83. Harris, J., Eng. J. J., Miller, W. C., & Dawson, D. (2009). Daudrich, B., Hurl, D., & Forwell, S. J. (in press).

A self-administered graded repetitive arm supplementary

Multidimensional Assessment of Tremor in Multiple Sclerosis:

program (GRASP) improves arm function during inpatient

A Useful Instrument. Accepted 2009, International Journal of

stroke rehabilitation: A multi-site randomized controlled trial.

MS Care.

Stroke, 40(6), 2123-8.

OS&OT Faculty in bold and OS&OT students in italics 2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

43


publications

Harris, S. R., Backman, C., & Mayson, T. A. (in press).

a spinal cord injury: a chart review. Spinal Cord. Advance

Comparative predictive validity of the Harris infant

online publication.

neuromotor test and the Alberta infant motor scale. Accepted August 2009, Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology.

Li, L. C., Adam, P., Townsend, A., Stacey, D., Lacaille, D., Cox, S., . . . Backman, C. (2009). Improving healthcare consumer

Hebert, J. S., Wolfe, D. L., Miller, W. C., Deathe, A. B.,

effectiveness: An Animated, Self-serve, Web-based Research

Devlin, M., & Pallaveshi, L. (2009) Selection of outcome

Tool (ANSWER) for people with early rheumatoid arthritis.

measures in lower extremity amputation rehabilitation: ICF

(Research Protocol). BMC Medical Informatics and Decision

Body Functions. Disabil Rehabil, 31, 1541-54.

Making, 9, 40.

Hill, M. R., Noonan, V. K., Sakakibara, B. M., Miller, W.

Mayson, T. A., Backman, C., Harris, S., & Hayes, V. E. (2009).

C., and the SCIRE Research Team. (2009) Quality of life

Motor development in Canadian infants of Asian and

instruments and definitions in individuals with spinal cord

European ethnic origins. Journal of Early Intervention, 31, 99-214.

injury: A systematic review. Spinal Cord. Advance online publication.

Mayson, T. A., Hayes, V. E., Harris, S. R. & Backman, C. (2009). Comparison of two methods of teaching early

Holmes, J., Bossers, A., Drynan, D., Gallagher, M. C.,

childhood professionals to score a developmental screening

O’Sullivan, C., Slade, A., . . . Polatajko, H. (in press). 1000

test. Journal of Allied Health, 38, 100-105.

Fieldwork Hours: Analysis of Multi-Site Evidence. Accepted 2009, Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy.

Mortenson, W. B., Noreau, L., & Miller, W. C. (2009). Predictors of Quality of Life after Spinal Cord Injury at 3- and

Holsti, L., & Grunau, R. E. (in press). Is sucrose the solution?

15- Months Post Discharge. Spinal Cord. Advance online

Considerations of sucrose for reducing procedural pain in

publication. doi:10.1038/sc.2009.92

preterm infants. Accepted December 2009, PEDIATRICS. Horsman, M., Suto, M., Dudgeon, B., & Harris, S. R. (2010)

Noonan, V., Miller, W. C., & Noreau, L. (2009) A review of

Ageing with cerebral palsy: Psychosocial Issues. Age and

instruments assessing participation in individuals with spinal

Ageing. Advance online publication. doi:10.1093/ageing/

cord injury. Spinal Cord, 47, 435-46.

afq018 Randhawa, B., Wong, S., & Drynan, D. (in press). Examining Hutchinson, B., Forwell, S. J., Bennett, S., Brown, T.,

the link between fieldwork and employment. Accepted 2009,

Karpatkin, H., & Miller, D. (2009) Towards a Consensus on

Occupational Therapy in Health Care.

Rehabilitation Outcomes in MS: Gait and Fatigue CSMC Consensus Conference. International Journal of MS Care,

* Rushton, P. W., Miller, W. C., Mortenson, W. B., & Garden,

11, 67–78.

J. (2010) What do individuals with spinal cord injury do in their wheelchairs and how satisfied are they with their

Karen, T., Jarus, T., & Fattal, A. (in press). Upper extremity

participation: a cross-sectional study. Spinal Cord. Advance

function and occupational performance in spastic CP

online publication.

children following lower extremity botulinum toxin injections. Accepted July 2009, Journal of Child Neurology.

St. Pierre, A., Khattra, P., Cender, L., Manzano, S., & Holsti, L. (in press). Content validation of the IMFC:CHD:  A tool to

Lee, A., Miller, W. C., Townson, A., Anton, H., and the F2N2

identify risk of malnutrition and feeding difficulties in infants

Research Group. (2009). Medication use is associated with

with congenital heart disease. Accepted 2009, Journal of

fatigue in a sample of community-living individuals who have

Pediatric Nursing.

44

2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report


publications

Sakakibara, B. M., Miller, W. C., Orenczuk, S. G., & Wolfe, D.L. (2009). A review of outcome measures screening for depression and anxiety in individuals with spinal cord injury. Spinal Cord, 47, 841-851. Advance online publication. doi:10.1038/sc.2009.93 Stokes, R., & Holsti, L. (in press). Paediatric occupational therapy: Addressing parental stress with the sense of coherence. Accepted August 2009, Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy. Suto, M., Murray, G., Hale, S., Amari, E., & Michalak, E. E. (in press) What works for people with bipolar disorder? Tips from the experts. Accepted November 2009, Journal of Affective Disorders. Suto, M. (2009). Compromised careers: The occupational transition of immigration and resettlement. WORK: A Journal of Prevention, Assessment and Rehabilitation, 32(4), 417-429. Wada, M., Backman, C., & Forwell, S. J. (in press). Theoretical perspectives of balance and the influence of gender ideologies. Accepted 2009, Journal of Occupational Science. Woolcott, J. C., Ashe, M., Miller, W. C., Shi, P., Marra, C., & PACC Research Group. (2009). Does physical activity reduce seniors’ need for health care?: A study of 24,281 Canadians. British Journal of Sports Medicine. Advance publication online. doi:10.1136/bjsm.2008.057216 Conference Proceedings/Abstracts Adam, P., Townsend, A., Backman, C., & Li, L. (2009, October). Communication in early rheumatoid arthritis: Building trust in the patient-physician interaction. Presented at the 15th Annual Qualitative Health Research Conference, Vancouver, BC. Adam, P., Townsend, A., Backman, C., & Li, L. (2009, October). Exploring the ways people with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) medically self-manage. Presented at the Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals Annual Scientific Meeting, Philadelphia, PA.

Albersheim, S. G., Johnson, K., Small, S., Holsti, L., Zarembo, M., & Hait, V. (2009, May). Advancing family-centered care in the NICU with facilitated care conferences. Presented at Pediatric Academic Society, Baltimore, MD. Ali, M., Ashburn, A., Bowen, A., Brodie, E., Corr, C. S., Drummond, A., Edmans, J., Gladman, J., Jongbloed, L., Brady, M. (2009, July). Rehabilitation Trials within the Virtual International Stroke Trials Archive: VISTA-REHAB. Poster presented at European Stroke Conference, Stockholm. Anaby, D., & Jarus, T. (2009, June). Beyond personality – the effect of occupation on subjective well-being and the role of core occupations. Presented at the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists National Conference, Ottawa, ON. Auger, C., Demers, L., Gélinas, I., Miller, W. C., Jutai, J., & Depa, M. (2009, July). Correlates of life-space mobility for middle-aged and older power mobility device users. Presented at the XIXth IAGG World Congress of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Paris, FR. Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging Supplement, 13(1), S431. Auger, C., Gélinas, I., Routhier, F., Mortenson, W. B., Miller, W. C., & Demers, L. (2009, June). Fidélité de la version canadienne française du wheelchair outcome measure (whom-f) par mode téléphonique. Poster presented at the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists National Conference, Ottawa, ON. Backman, C., Chalmers, A., Montie, P., & Lacaille D. (2009, October). Parenting experience of mothers with and without inflammatory arthritis. Presented at the Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals Annual Scientific Meeting, Philadelphia, PA. Bart, O., & Jarus, T. (2009, June). How do children with DCD participate and enjoy daily activities? Presented at the DCD VII International Conference, Baltimore, MD. Bundon, A., Hurd Clark, L., & Miller, W. C. (2009, October). “Something I Enjoy Doing and That I Can Do”: Older Adults with Multiple Chronic Conditions and the Meaning of Physical Activity. Presented at the 15th Annual Qualitative Health Research Conference, Vancouver, BC.

2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

45


publications

Cuthbert, D., Rumig, D., Jarus, T., & Anaby, D. (2009, April). Participation and life satisfaction among individuals with traumatic brain injury. Poster presented at the American Occupational Therapy Association Conference & Expo, Houston, TX.

Holsti, L., Deshpandey, A. K., Miller, W.C., & Albersheim, S. (2009, May). ’The Fathers’ Support Scale: Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (FSS:NICU): Initial development and content validation’. Presented at Pediatric Academic Society, Baltimore, MD.

Daudrich, B., Hurl, D., & Forwell, S. J. (2009, June). Multidimensional assessment of tremor in MS: A credible instrument. Poster presented at the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists National Conference, Ottawa, ON.

Jarus, T., Cairo, T., Eno, H., & Anaby, D. (2009, June). Participation, satisfaction with life, and the built environment post stroke. Poster presented at the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists National Conference, Ottawa, ON.

Drynan, D., Goffman, N., Lewis, J., & Sutherland, M. (2009, June). Fieldwork to real work: Does fieldwork influence employment eligibility? Presented at the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists National Conference, Ottawa, ON.

Jarus, T., Sutherland, N., Mireault, C., Patterson, J., Cheng, T., Miguel, T., . . . Anaby, D., & Law, M. (2009, May). Built environment, participation, and obesity in Canadian children with a disability. Poster presented at the 2nd National Obesity Summit (CON), Kananaskis, AB.

Drynan, D., Macleod, L., Kassam, R., & Neufeld, L. (2009, May). Supporting health care education in practice – Development of a web-based course. Presented at Collaborating Across Borders II: An International Dialogue on Interprofessional Health Education, Research, Policy and Practice, Halifax, NS. Drynan, D., Macleod, L., Kassam, R., & Neufeld, L. (2009, May). Preparing the next generation of preceptors: Development of a web-based resource for health care practitioners. Poster presented at Collaborating Across Borders II: An International Dialogue on Interprofessional Health Education, Research, Policy and Practice, Halifax, NS. Drynan, D., Mulholland, S., Bossers, A., Audette, B., Bedard, A., et al. (2009, June). Strategies and resources for working with students struggling in fieldwork. Presented at the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists National Conference, Ottawa, ON. Grant, T., Wolfe, D., & Forwell, S. J. (2009, June). Fatigue Assessment Battery for persons with Spinal Cord Injury. Poster presented at the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists National Conference, Ottawa, ON. Haddock, C., Suto, M., Hale, S., Hole, R., Amari, E., & Michalak, E. E. (2009, June). “It’s something that I manage but it is not who I am.” Reflections on self-management strategies and stigma in bipolar disorder. Presented at the Eighth International Conference on Bipolar Disorder. Pittsburgh, PA.

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2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

Li, L., Adam, P., Townsend, A., & Backman, C. (2009, October). ANSWER: An animated, self-serve, web-based research tool for improving shared decision-making in early rheumatoid arthritis. Presented at the 15th Annual Qualitative Health Research Conference, Vancouver, BC. Li, L., Adam, P., Townsend, A., & Backman, C. (2009, October). From aches and pains to timely treatment: A metasynthesis of help-seeking by people with arthritis. Presented at the 15th Annual Qualitative Health Research Conference, Vancouver, BC. Li, L., Townsend, A., Adam, P., & Backman, C. (2009, October). Crossing the threshold: Help-seeking for early symptoms in people with rheumatoid arthritis. Presented at the Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals Annual Scientific Meeting, Philadelphia, PA. Mayson, T. A., Harris, S. R., & Backman, C. (2009, September). Predictive validity of the Harris infant neuromotor test (HINT) and Alberta infant motor scale (AIMS) to the Bayley scales of infant development (BSID-II and BSIDIII). Presented at the American Academy of Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine Annual Meeting, Scottsdale, AZ. Mayson, T. A., Harris, S. R., & Backman, C. (2009, September). Concurrent and Predictive Validity of the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ). Presented at the American Academy of Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine Annual Meeting, Scottsdale, AZ.


publications

McLean, A., Anaby, D., & Jarus, T. (2009, June). Participation and physical function following traumatic brain injury. Presented at the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists National Conference, Ottawa, ON.

Rushton, P. W., & Miller, W. C. (2010, March). SelfPresentational Efficacy Among Wheelchair Users. Poster pesented at the 26th International Seating Symposium, Surrey, BC.

Michalak, E. E., Kreindler, D. M, Murray, G., Suto, M., Johnson, S., Amari, E., & Woolridge. N. (2009, June). Mood monitoring in bipolar disorder: A hand-held computer intervention. Presented at the Eighth International Conference on Bipolar Disorder. Pittsburgh, PA.

Rushton, P. W., & Miller, W. C. (2009, June). Development of an assessment to measure self-efficacy with wheelchair mobility. Poster presented at the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists National Conference, Ottawa, ON.

Miller, W. C., Auger, C., Mortenson, W. B., & Smith, C. (2009, June). Wheeled mobility in older adults: Wheeling into the future. . Presented at the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists National Conference, Ottawa, ON.

St. Pierre, A., Khattra, P., Cender, L., Manzano, S., & Holsti, L. (2009, June). Content validation of the IMFC:CHD:  A tool to identify risk of malnutrition and feeding difficulties in infants with congenital heart disease. Presented at the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists National Conference, Ottawa, ON.

Miller, W. C., Harris, S. R., Li, L., Feehan, L., MacIntyre, D. L., MacDonald, C., & the OSTEO-FX Research Team. (2009, July). Exercise prescription after osteoporotic vertebral fractures. Poster presented at the XIXth IAGG World Congress of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Paris, FR. Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging Supplement, 13(1), S434.

Shorter, C., Boronowski, L., & Miller, W. C. (2009, June). A pre-discharge home assessment screening tool - partnering for research. Presented at the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists National Conference, Ottawa, ON.

Miller, W. C., & Wong, R. Y. M. (2009, July). Functional independence following hospitalization in acutely ill older adults. Presented at the XIXth IAGG World Congress of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Paris, FR. Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging Supplement, 13(1), S431. Mireault, M., & Jarus, T. (2009, April). Obesity, environment and participation in children with a disability – can research inform therapists in improving their practice? Presented at the American Occupational Therapy Association Conference & Expo, Houston, TX. Mortenson, W. B., Miller, W. C., Backman, C., & Oliffe, J. (2009, July). Predictors of wheeled mobility in individuals in residential care. Poster presented at the XIXth IAGG World Congress of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Paris, FR. Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging Supplement, 13(1), S469. Negtegaal, M., Lo, R., MacKay, M., & Holsti, L. (2009, September). Levels of agreement between the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, 3rd edition, and other standardized developmental assessments for high-risk preterm infants. Presented at the American Academy of Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine Annual Meeting, Scottsdale, AZ.

Sillem, H., Backman, C., Miller, W. C., & Li, L.  (2009, September). Comparison of Two Carpometacarpal Stabilizing Splints for Individuals with Thumb Osteoarthritis. Presented at the American Society for Hand Surgery and American Society for Hand Therapists, San Francisco, CA. Stokes, R., & Holsti, L. (2009, October). Caregivers’ experiences of an interdisciplinary team process for their child with feeding and/or swallowing disorders.  Presented at the 15th Annual Qualitative Health Research Conference, Vancouver, BC. Suto, M., Michalak, E. E., & Hale, S. (2009, June). Wellness and bipolar disorder: Self-management strategies for healthy living. Presented at the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists National Conference, Ottawa, ON. Teasell, R., Eng, J., Wolfe, D., Townson, A., Miller, W. C., Connolly, S., Mehta, S., & Sakakibara, B. (2009, May). Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Evidence (SCIRE): Linking Health Research and Quality of Health Care for Ontarians. Presented at the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care’s Showcase. Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care’s Showcase, Toronto

2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

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publications

Townsend, A., Adam, P., Backman, C., Cox, S., & Li, L. (2009, October). Onset of rheumatoid arthritis and illness actions: Going to the doctor. Presented at the 15th Annual Qualitative Health Research Conference, Vancouver, BC. Townson, A., Eng, J., Teasell, R., Miller, W. C., Wolfe, D., Hsieh, J., . . . the SCIRE Research Team. (2009, September). Evaluating the Impact of the Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Evidence (SCIRE). Presented at the Congress on Spinal Cord Medicine and Rehabilitation, Dallas, TX. Westby, M. D., Carr, S., Kennedy, D., Brander, V., Bell, M., Doyle-Waters, M., & Backman, C. (2009, October). Postacute physiotherapy after primary total hip arthroplasty: A Cochrane systematic review. Presented at the Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals Annual Scientific Meeting, Philadelphia, PA. Wolfe, D., Hsieh, J., Teasell, R., Eng, J., Townson, A., Miller, W. C. , . . . Sakakibara B, & the SCIRE Research Team. (2009, September). Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation: An Evidence Based Review (SCIRE). Poster presented at the American Spinal Cord Injury Association Annual Conference, Dallas, TX. Wong, R. Y. M., & Miller, W. C. (2009, July). Prediction of adverse outcomes in acutely ill elderly patients after hospitalization. Presented at the XIXth IAGG World Congress of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Paris, FR. Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging Supplement, 13(1), S305. Yiu, J., & Miller, W. C. (2009, July). Longitudinal analysis of balance confidence in stroke survivors using a hierarchical linear model. Presented at the 9th International Conference of the International Society for the Quality of Life Studies, Florence, Italy.

Book Chapters Backman, C. (2009) Occupational balance and well-being. In C.H. Christiansen & E. Townsend (Eds.) Introduction to occupation: The art and science of living, 2nd ed. (pp. 231249). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson. Backman, C. (in press) Enabling performance and participation for persons with rheumatic diseases. In C.H. Christiansen (Ed.), Ways of living: Enabling participation in daily life, 4th ed. Bethesda, MD: AOTA Press. Backman, C., & Anaby, D. (2009) Research directions for advancing the study of life balance and health. In K. Matuska & C. Christiansen (Eds.), Life balance: Multidisciplinary theories & research (pp. 257-268). Thorofare, NJ: Slack, Inc & Bethesda, MD: AOTA Publications. O’Brien, A., & Backman, C. (in press). Rheumatoid arthritisIn. In K. Dziedzic & A. Hammond (Eds.), Rheumatology: Evidence-based practice for physiotherapists and occupational therapists. Philadelphia: Elsevier. Penman, M., Donnelly, C., & Drynan, D. (2009) Issue and possibilities using information and communication technology in fieldwork education. In L. McAllister, M. Paterson, J. Higgs, & C. Bithell (Eds.), Innovations in Allied Health Fieldwork Education: A Critical Appraisal. The Netherlands: Sense Publishers. Ratzon, N., & Jarus, T. (2009). Prevention of Workers’ Musculoskeletal Disorders: A Four-Stage Model. In I. Söderback (Ed.), International Handbook of Occupational Therapy Interventions (pp. 508-514). New York: Springer Science. Book Reviews Backman, C., & Li, L. (2009). Review: Occupational and physical therapy for children with rheumatic diseases, by G. Kuchta & I. Davidson (Eds.). Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 76, 37.

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2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report


pREsENTaTIONs

Tal Jarus “The influence of transitions on Occupational Performance.” Work Transitions in the 21st century: Advancing Occupational Justice, School of Occupational Therapy, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, June, 2009. “The Role of Objects in Motor Learning.” Café Scientifique, Welcome to Reality: Occupations in Real and Virtual Environments, OS&OT Department, UBC, Vancouver, BC, 2009. Susan Forwell “Not lost in Translation: Canadian Occupational Therapy in China.” International Occupational Therapy Day for the UBC Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, Vancouver, BC, October 2009. “Fatigue Management in Chronic Diseases.” Berlin Delegation MS Preceptorship Program for the UBC MS Clinic, Vancouver, BC, July 2009. “Fatigue in MS – Diagnosis and Treatment.” National Summit in Neurology for the UBC Division of Neurology & Teva Neurosciences, Vancouver, BC, April 2009. Lyn Jongbloed “Rehabilitation Trials within the Virtual International Stroke Trials.” Co-presented with Ali M, Ashburn A, Bowen A, Brodie E, Corr S, Drummond A, Edmans J, Gladman J, Kalra L, Langhorne P, Lees K, Lincoln N, Logan P, Mead G, Patchick E, Pollock A, Pomeroy V, Sackley C, van Vliet P, Walker M, Brady M, at the European Stroke Conference, July, 2009. Melinda Suto “Stigma and Mental Health.” Work Transitions in the 21st Century: Advancing Occupational Science for the School of Occupational Therapy, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, June 2009.

2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

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professional service

Internal Catherine Backman • Chair, Promotion & Tenure Committee OS&OT • Chair, Curriculum Advisory Committee, OS&OT • Co-Chair, Conversations on Occupational Café Serie OS&OT • Co-Chair, External Advisory Committee to Arthritis & First Nations research project led by Drs. Diane Lacille & Allen Lehman • Member, Faculty Committee, OS&OT • Member, Graduate Program Committee, Graduate Research Programs in Rehabilitation Sciences • Member, Reappointment Review, HS Robinson/Arthritis Society Chair • Member, President;s Advisory Committee to Reappoint the Dean, Faculty of Medicine • Mentor, Faculty of Medicine Mentorship Program, UBC • Internal Grant Review, Health Research Resources Office (HeRRO), UBC Donna Drynan • Director, College of Health Disciplines Practice Education Committee • Chair, Fieldwork Management Committee, OS&OT • Member, Faculty Committee, OS&OT • Member, Curriculum Committee, OS&OT • Member, Clinical Faculty Committee, OS&OT • Member, UBC Health Clinic Steering Committee

Tal Jarus • Chair, Faculty Committee, OS&OT • Chair, Clinical Faculty Committee, OS&OT • Chair, Promotion and Tenure Committee, OS&OT • Chair, Admissions Committee, OS&OT • Member, Curriculum Committee, OS&OT • Member, Web Development Committee, OS&OT • Member, Fieldwork Management Committee, OS&OT • Member, Graduate Program Committee, Graduate Research Programs in Rehabilitation Sciences • Member, Graduate Admission Committee, Graduate Research Programs in Rehabilitation Sciences • Member, Graduate Education, Faculty of Medicine • Member, Graduate Education Awards Committee, Faculty of Medicine • Member, Health Initiative Committee, Faculty of Medicine • Member, Faculty Executive, Faculty of Medicine • Member, Research Council, Faculty of Medicine • Member, Interprofessional Education Working Groups, Faculty of Medicine • Member, Council, College of Health Disciplines • Member, Interprofessional Research Forums, College of Health Disciplines

Susan Forwell • Chair, Fundraising Task Force for Research Chair in Community Integration • Member, Faculty Committee, OS&OT • Member, Curriculum Committee, OS&OT • Member, BC Rehabilitation Research Network KT Broker Advisory committee

Lyn Jongbloed • Chair, Graduate Research Programs in Rehabilitation Sciences (MSc, PhD) • Member, Faculty Committee, OS&OT • Member, Curriculum Committee, OS&OT • Chair, Awards committee, OS&OT • Member, Graduate Council, UBC • M Member, Graduate Education, Faculty of Medicine • Member, Graduate Education Awards Committee, Faculty of Medicine • Member, Graduate Medical Education Curriculum Committee, Faculty of Medicine

Liisa Holsti • Member, Research Graduate Awards Committee, OS&OT • Member, Faculty Committee, OS&OT • Member, Admissions Committee, OS&OT • Member, Curriculum Committee, OS&OT • Member, Graduate Program Committee, Graduate Research Programs in Rehabilitation Sciences

Michael Lee • Member, Faculty Committee, OS&OT • Member, Fieldwork Management Committee, OS&OT • Member, Curriculum Committee OS&OT • Member, Clinical Faculty Committee OS&OT • Member, Web Development Committee, OS&OT • Departmental Representative, Simulated Patient Technology

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2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report


professional service

• Departmental Representative, Library Advisory Committee, Life Sciences Libraries • Departmental Representative, Interprofessional Education Curriculum Committee, College of Health Disciplines • Department Representative, Awards Committee, College of Health Disciplines • Departmental Representative, Interdisciplinary Activities, • College of Health Disciplines William Miller • Member, Faculty Committee, OS&OT • Member, Curriculum Committee, OS&OT • Member, Promotion and Tenure Committee, OS&OT • Member, Graduate Admission Committee, Graduate Research Programs in Rehabilitation Sciences • Member, Nominating Committee, UBC Faculty of Medicine • Member, Mentorship Committee, UBC Faculty of Medicine • Associate Member, Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation • Associate Member, Centre for Clinical Epidemiology and Evaluation Sue Stanton • Coordinator, Rehabilitation Science Online Programs (UBC-McMaster Graduate Certificate in Rehabilitation and UBC Master of Rehabilitation Science) • Member, Faculty Committee, OS&OT • Member, Curriculum Committee, OS&OT • Member, Non-MD Curriculum Review Committee, Faculty of Medicine • Instructional Skills Workshop Facilitator, UBC Centre for Teaching and Academic Growth (TAG) • Facilitator, UBC Course Design Institute (TAG) Melinda Suto • Chair, Awards Committee, OS&OT • Member, Faculty Committee, OS&OT • Member, Graduate Admission Committee, Graduate Research Program s in Rehabilitation Sciences • Member, Graduate Program Committee, Graduate Research Programs in Rehabilitation Sciences

External Memberships and Offices Held Catherine Backman • Member, Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals • Member, Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists (CAOT) • Member, British Columbia Society of Occupational Therapists (BCSOT) • Member, Canadian Society of Occupational Scientists (CSOS) • Investigator, Canadian Arthritis Network (CAN) • Research Sceintist, Arthritis Research Centre of Canada (ARC) • Affiliated Investigator, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute (VCHRI) • Chair, Disciplinary Hearing Panel, College of Occupational Therapists of BC (COTBC) • Member, Technical Expert Panel, American College of Rheumatology Clinical Guidelines for the Management of Osteoarthritis • Member, Governance Task Force, Association of Canadian Occupational Therapy University Programs (ACOTUP) • Member, Local Host Committee, Canadian Arthritis Network Annual Scientific Meeting • International Advisor, 14th Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology (APLAR) Congress Donna Drynan • Member, Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists (CAOT) • Member, College of Occupational Therapists of British Columbia (COTBC) • Co-Chair, Practice Education Committee, British Columbia Academic Health Council (BCAHC) Sue Forwell • Member of the Board, Canadian Occupational Therapy Foundation (COTF) • President/President-elect/Past-president (2005-2010), Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists (CAOT) • Co-chair of the Scientific Task Force Review (2009-2010), CAOT

2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

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professional service

• Chair, ByLaws Committee, Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers (CMSC) • Member, International Society of Occupational Science (ISOS) • Member, Canadian Society of Occupational Science (CSOS) • Member, College of Occupational Therapy of British • Columbia (COTBC) • Member, British Columbia Society of Occupational Therapists (BCSOT) • Member, Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers (CMSC) • Member, World Federation of Occupational Therapists (WFOT) • Member, Health Care Advisory Counsel, Multiple Sclerosis Association of America Liisa Holsti • Member, Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists (CAOT) • Member, Canadian Society of Occupational Science (CSOS) • Member, College of Occupational Therapy of British • Columbia (COTBC) • Member, British Columbia Society of Occupational Therapists (BCSOT) • Member, International Association for the Study of Pain UBC Centre Leader, Canadian Child Health Clinician Scientist Program-CIHR Strategic Training Initiative • Pain in Child Health 2-CIHR Strategic Training InitiativeEvaluation and Mentorship Committee-Member Tal Jarus • Vice President, Executive Committee, Association of Canadian Occupational Therapy University Programs (ACOTUP) • Member, Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists (CAOT) • Member, Canadian Society of Occupational Scientists (CSOS) • Member, Canadian Occupational Therapy Foundation (COTF) • Member, College of Occupational Therapists of British • Columbia (COTBC) • Member, British Columbia Society of Occupational Therapists (BCSOT) • Member, The Israeli Association of Occupational Therapy (IAOT)

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2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

• Member, World Federation of Occupational Therapy (WFOT) • Member, American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) Lyn Jongbloed • Member, Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists (CAOT) • Member, College of Occupational Therapists of British Columbia (COTBC) Michael Lee • Member, Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists (CAOT) • Member, Canadian Society of Occupational Scientists (CSOS) • Member, College of Occupational Therapists of British Columbia (COTBC) • Member, British Columbia Society of Occupational Therapists (BCSOT) • Member, Psychosocial Rehabilitation Canada (PSR-BC) • Member, Board of Directors, Psychosocial Rehabilitation British Columbia Bill Miller • Member, Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists (CAOT) • Member, College of Occupational Therapists of British Columbia (COTBC) • Member, British Columbia Society of Occupational Therapists (BCSOT) • Scientist, Rehab Sciences Research Network. • Member, Community Integration Practice Network SCI Translation Network • Member, Canadian Association on Gerontology Sue Stanton • Member, Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists (CAOT) • Member, College of Occupational Therapists of British Columbia (COTBC) • Member, British Columbia Society of Occupational Therapists (BCSOT) • Member, Canadian Network for Innovation in Education (CNIE)


professional service / journal reviewing

• Member, International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (ISSOTL) • Member, Society of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education (STLHE) • Member, World Federation of Occupational Therapists (WFOT) Melinda Suto • Member, Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists (CAOT) • Member of Executive, Canadian Society of Occupational Scientists (CSOS) • Member, College of Occupational Therapists of British Columbia (COTBC) • Member, British Columbia Society of Occupational Therapists (BCSOT) • Member, Awards Committee, British Columbia Society of Occupational Therapists • Member, American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) • Member of Accreditation Team, Association of Canadian • Occupational Therapy University Program (ACOTUP) Journal Reviews Catherine Backman • Arthritis & Rheumatism (Arthritis Care & Research) • Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy • Journal of Rheumatology Susan Forwell • Journal of Occupational Science • International Journal of MS Care • Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry Liisa Holsti • Clinical Journal of Pain • European Journal of Pain • Pediatrics • Journal of Pediatrics • Pain • Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy • Canadian Journal of Nursing Research • Early Human Development • Biomed Central-Pediatrics

• Pain Research and Management • Journal of Pain and Symptom Management • American Journal of Perinatology • The Journal of Pain Bill Miller • Canadian Journal of Occupational therapy • Physical Therapy • Disability and Rehabilitation • Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation • American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation • Spinal Cord • Journal of Prosthetics and Orthotics • Physiotherapy Canada • Canadian Medical Association Journal • American Journal of Occupational Therapy Lyn Jongbloed • Journal of Managed Care Sue Stanton • Journal of Distance Education • Physiotherapy Canada Melinda Suto • American Journal of Occupational Therapy • Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy • Journal of Occupational Science Tal Jarus • Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy • Occupational Therapy Journal of Research Editorship Catherine Backman • Editorial Board, OTJR: Occupation, Participation & Health Susan Forwell • Sub-editor & treasurer, Journal of Occupational Science, • Association of the Journal of Occupational Science Inc. • Associate editor, International Journal of MS Care, • Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers & Rehabilitation • of Multiple Sclerosis.

2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

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journal reviewing

Bill Miller • Editorial Board, American Journal of Occupational Therapy • Editorial Board, Open Spine Journal Sue Stanton • Editorial Review Board, Journal of Distance Education Melinda Suto • Editorial Review Board, Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy Liisa Holsti • Editorial Board, Occupational and Physical Therapy in Pediatrics Grant Reviewing Catherine Backman • Strategic Training Grants Initiative, Panel D, Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) • China-Canada Joint Health Research Initiative, CIHR • American College of Rheumatology, Research & Education Foundation, Summer Student Preceptorships/Mentoring Awards, 2009-2011 • Heart & Stroke Foundation of Canada, Operating Grants, 2009 • VCHRI Team Grants, 2009 Susan Forwell • HeRRO Review Panel, University of British Columbia Liisa Holsti • B.C. Children’s Hospital Telethon Committee • Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research-Trainee Grants Review Committee • Vancouver Coastal Health Research Foundation- Team Grants Awards • 2008-present Canadian Institute of Health ResearchOperating Grant Competition- External Reviewer Bill Miller • Fellowship Review Committee, Canadian Instituted of Health Research (CIHR)

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2009 Department of OS&OT Annual Report

• Irish Health Foundation • Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research Fellowship Committee • Ontario Research Fund, Imaging and Health Techonologies Panel Conference Planning Susan Forwell • Co-organizer (2007-2009), Occupational Science 1-day stream (June 2009), hosted by the Canadian Society of Occupational Scientists in the national conference of the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists. • Reviewer, Occupational science stream, Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists Liisa Holsti • Co-Chair, Canadian Child Health Clinician Scientist National Symposium, Canadian Child Health Clinician Scientist Program • Member, International Conference Planning Committee, International Society of Infant Studies Other Donna Drynan • Faculty Mentor, CHIUS (student run health clinic in the DTES, Vancouver, BC) • Conference Abstract Reviews, Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists Liisa Holsti • External Examiner, Thesis Examining Committee, McGill University. • Co-Chair, Canadian Child Health Clinician Scientist National Symposium, Canadian Child Health Clinician Scientist Prgrogram Lyn Jongbloed • Member, Steering committee, consumer led research project, Vancouver Community Mental Health Services


Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy University of British Columbia T325 – 2211 Wesbrook Mall Vancouver BC V6T 2B5 www.ot.med.ubc.ca


Annual Report