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EASTERN The Magazine of Eastern University

FALL 2019

rooted


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our future. Dear Alumni and Friends,

It is an honor to introduce this issue of EASTERN magazine. (You will find an extended letter from President Matthews on page 6!) During my time as University Chaplain, I have had the privilege of watching 26 classes of graduating students root themselves at Eastern and then launch out into the world. Many of you sat in my office and shared about your dreams and your journeys, and now you are serving around the world in such rich and powerful ways. It makes me smile to think of the ways you have grown and developed.

Jeremiah 17:7-8 talks about how those who trust in the Lord are like trees with deep roots that sustain and give life, especially during difficult seasons of heat and drought. Whatever season you are in today, I encourage you to draw on your roots. Remember the ways God has been faithful in the past, and trust that he will continue to produce fruit through your life in the future.

May God bless you in this next season as we enter 2020 together!

In Christ,

Joseph B. Modica, University Chaplain

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C O N T E N T S

16 JUST MERCY Alumnus Bryan Stevenson's New York Times bestseller, Just Mercy, is becoming a feature length film. He reflects on the movie in this exclusive Q & A.

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ROOTED 6

F E AT U R E 16

I M PA C T 22

ACA D E M I C S 26

AT H L E T I C S 28

ALUMNI

22 ANCHORED IN THE SPIRIT An interview with the dean of Palmer Theological Seminary explores Eastern's roots as a seminary as well as the timeless values that are continuing to shape Palmer's future.

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20 LOVE BEYOND THE BARS Alicia Michaels is President of Eastern's Prison Ministry. Her weekly visits to a juvenile detention facility are teaching her what it means to love well.

06 ROOTED TO GROW As we prepare to celebrate our 95th birthday, President Matthews reflects on how Eastern's strong legacy is empowering our future. Enjoy photos showcasing how Eastern's roots of Faith, Reason, and Justice have been woven throughout the years. ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT / MICHAEL THOMAS, MBA ’18, PSYD Editor IN Chief / KELLY GODDARD Creative Director & Lead Designer / DANIEL PEIRCE Photographer & Cover Photography / ELYSE GARNER ’13 ASSOCIATE EDITOR & CONTENT PRODUCER / ALLY (HOLMES) ROSARIO '14 Designer / ALAINA MOSSO ADDITIONAL PHOTO & ILLUSTRATION CREDITS / ROG AND BEE WALKER FOR EJI (TOC, 18)

26 ATHLETIC HIGHLIGHTS MAC realignment impacts Eastern. Senior javelin thrower earns All-America honors. Pruessner takes over Men's Basketball.

JASON JAMES (14, 36) BETH PERKINS (16) JAKE GILES NETTER, © 2019 WARNER BROS (17) Please send comments or article suggestions to: media@eastern.edu Alumni news should be sent to: alumni@eastern.edu Palmer Seminary alumni news should be sent to: palmeralum@eastern.edu PUBLISHED BY Marketing and Communications at Eastern University ONLINE AT eastern.edu/MAGAZINE


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Tend the B y A l ly ( H o l m e s ) R o s a r i o ’ 1 4 ONE OF THE FIRST COMMANDS given to humankind in Genesis was to “tend the garden.” While directed at Adam in the Garden of Eden, education major and aspiring theologian Dan Main ’23 has certainly taken this charge to heart. His desire is to live a lifestyle reflective of this responsibility, with his hands in the dirt and his head in the Word. Dan’s deep appreciation for gardening has provided him with a very tangible and tactile way of experiencing God’s grace, presence, and partnership. “Just like plants have several basic needs in order to grow, like soil, sunlight, and water,” Dan muses, “so does our faith.” Dan is currently tending to 14 dorm room plants, including his greatgrandmother’s zebra plant, as well as his favorite, a little cutting of jade. But Dan’s dreams for earthkeeping extend far beyond the four walls of his Guffin dorm room. “My dream is to create a community garden where people can rest in God’s creation, tend the soil, and support a local food bank with the produce,'' he shares. “I think that people experience God in a lot of different ways, and one of those ways is by watching things grow and having a part in that,” Dan reflects, continuing his deep comparison between faith and foliage. “For us to be truly ‘rooted’ beings, we need to spend time reading Scripture and talking with God, as well as fellowshipping with our Christian community, and appreciating God's presence through nature, worship, and other people. These are the water and sunlight for our faith. Eastern has provided me with a place where I continually feel rooted and where I have been able to grow in my faith more than I ever could have imagined.”

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F E A T U R E

ROOTED TO

B y P r e s i d e n t R o n a l d A . M at t h e w s , D M A

I F E A S T E R N W E R E A T R E E , what would our roots be? Ask many people in our

community and they would quickly reply, “Faith, Reason, and Justice.” These three words, known as Eastern’s motto, encompass our core values as a university. Since our founding in 1925, we have been inspired by our faith, passionate about learning, and committed to making a difference locally and globally. Over the last 95 years, these roots have given life to many branches and an abundance of fruit. The university currently supports 7 academic colleges and over 160 programs, encompassing diverse areas of study including theology and ministry, the sciences, social work, business, health and nursing, education, music, and liberal arts. And the fruit — well, that is my favorite part. It is the life-changing impact our students, alumni, faculty, and staff make in the world around them through their various spheres of influence.


Like any healthy tree, Eastern has deep, extended roots that sustain us and help us continue to grow. As we stand on the horizon of 2020, we have been reviewing, assessing, and praying about Eastern’s vibrant future. Our roots are strong, and our core values remain the same. However, successful institutions — like healthy

T R A N S I T I O N A L P L A N I M P E R AT I V E S 1 2

trees — adapt, improve, and grow, especially when their surroundings change. And for the landscape of higher education in the United States, change is undeniable. Changes in the

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Articulate EU’s role and responsibility in Christian higher education. Increase student enrollment, progression, and completion. Move from a position of institutional stress to institutional stability. Create a culture of philanthropy within the EU community for institutional advancement.

marketplace have created a demand for new programs to equip students for new jobs. Changes in technology have led to an increased desire for online programs and

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Nurture and advance a culture of excellence in teaching and learning.

creative ways of learning. And changes in the economy

I invite you to explore this plan in depth on our website.

have heightened the importance of providing affordable

Make note of the ways that we desire to position

education for our students and families.

ourselves to best serve this next generation of students.

However, the need for transformative Christian higher

Our plan includes timely and exciting, Board-approved

education is greater than ever. This generation is hungry

investments in campus improvements, including

for a life of impact — a life infused with purpose and

residence halls, athletic facilities, and more.

mission. Living is not just about jobs and purchases. It’s

As we look ahead, we must also continually take the

about making a difference in the world — and that is the

time to look back. Our roots give life to our future. So as

heartbeat of Eastern University.

we prepare to celebrate our 95th birthday on March 19,

We are energized by the opportunity to create innovative

2020, we have gathered photos from over the years to

ways of providing a new generation of students with

reflect on the ways Faith, Reason, and Justice have been

Christian education that is transformative, inventive, and

woven throughout our history.

affordable.

The same God who causes trees to grow is at work in

Prayer and examination have led us to develop a 3-year

Eastern — guiding, nourishing, and strengthening us.

transitional plan, which will position us for a longer-

I look forward to the fruit of the next generation.

term strategic plan. Our transitional plan outlines 5 imperatives that we have identified as key action steps for Eastern over the next 3 years.

Watch a video of President Matthews sharing about the Transitional Plan at eastern.edu/transitionalplan.

EASTERN’S STRONG LEGACY EMPOWERS OUR FUTURE. 7


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THEN & NOW: FAITH 9

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Eastern has always provided opportunities for students to both grow in faith and turn that faith into action. Through meaningful worship, small groups, classroom conversations, service learning, and living in a close-knit community, students at Eastern throughout the years have discovered more of God and who they were created to be.

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THEN & NOW: REASON 9

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At Eastern, passionate, caring professors challenge students to think deeply, holistically, and critically, while coaches inspire character formation through athletics. These mentors encourage students to use their gifts to make a meaningful impact on the world.


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THEN & NOW: JUSTICE 9

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With a heart for bringing God’s kingdom to earth in tangible ways, Eastern has always been a launch pad for action inspired by faith. Students serve both locally and internationally through ministries that impact a wide range of needs, including homelessness, poverty, malnutrition, prison, education, and children in need.

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I M P A C T

JUST MERCY AN INTERVIEW WITH

BRYAN STEVENSON ’81 B y A l ly ( h o l m e s ) R o s a r i o ’ 1 4 a n d K e l ly G o d d a r d


“MERCY IS JUST WHEN IT IS ROOTED IN HOPEFULNESS AND FREELY GIVEN.” BRYAN STEVENSON ’81 , JUST MERCY

As he said goodbye to his time at Eastern

The book also recounts the birth of the Equal

University, political science graduate Bryan

Justice Initiative, an organization founded by

Stevenson ’81 never dreamed that the next

Stevenson that is committed to ending mass

generation of Eastern students would be

incarceration and excessive punishment in the

reading his New York Times Bestseller in

United States, challenging racial and economic

their classes, let alone grabbing popcorn and

injustice, and protecting basic human rights

watching a special screening of his book-

for the most vulnerable people in American

turned-movie. His focus was on the pursuit of a

society (source: EJI website).

law degree and the burning passion to make a difference as a human rights lawyer.

“Each of us is more than the worst thing we’ve ever done,” Stevenson compellingly pens.

Fresh out of Harvard Law, Stevenson found

Readers are challenged to not only seek the

himself faced with an overwhelming task:

restoration of justice, but the restoration of

navigating the intricate web of the United States

humanity itself.

Criminal Justice system. In one of his early cases, Stevenson worked with a man sentenced to death row for a murder lacking substantial condemning evidence. He found himself both troubled and disturbed by this verdict, which seemed to represent an unbalanced interplay between justice and mercy.

And now, Stevenson’s audience extends beyond “readers” to include “viewers” as well. This Christmas season, Just Mercy will become a feature length film. The film, produced by Warner Bros., will star Michael B. Jordan as Stevenson, and will include other big names such as Jamie Foxx and Captain

“The true measure of our character is how we

Marvel’s Brie Larson. Just Mercy is scheduled

treat the poor, the disfavored, the accused, the

for a limited release starting on December 25

incarcerated, and the condemned,” Stevenson

before it officially hits theaters on January 10.

’81 writes in his book, Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption. This #1 New York Times Bestseller explores many of Stevenson’s earlier cases and his experience as a young,

In anticipation of the film, we interviewed Bryan Stevenson and asked him to share a bit more about the film and his work through EJI.

African American lawyer and social justice activist practicing in Montgomery, Alabama.

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Q A F E A T U R E

with Bryan Stevenson ’81

I WANTED TO EXPOSE READERS TO THE HUMANITY OF THOSE WE CONDEMN AND INVOKE MY

Q: What excites you about Just Mercy becoming a movie?

Q: What do you hope people will take away from the movie?

BELIEF THAT 'JUST MERCY' IS

BRYAN:

BRYAN:

GIVEN TO THE UNDESERVING,

I'm excited for the stories of some of my

I'm hoping viewers will walk out of the theater

clients to reach a larger audience, many of

with an awareness that we need to reform

whom have never read the book or thought

our system, improve reliability and fairness,

about mass incarceration, the death penalty,

eliminate bias and racial discrimination, and

or the reliability of our system. We can't fix the

re-think the death penalty.

WHICH IS ITS POWER."

problems I've seen for three decades without greater awareness, which I'm hoping the film can achieve.

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Q: What is the significance behind the title Just Mercy? BRYAN: The title expresses my observation that our

Q: What steps can Eastern students and alumni take to help overcome injustice in our country? BRYAN:

criminal justice system has become deficient

Eastern students and alumni can play an

with regard to compassion and mercy. We have

important role in overcoming injustice. We

mandatory sentencing laws that are extreme

need to identify and expose injustice when we

and harsh. We don't put crimes in prison, we

see it and hold those responsible accountable.

put people in prison and people are always

We need to advocate intentionally for more

more than just their crimes. I wanted to expose

hope, mercy, and compassion as those are

readers to the humanity of those we condemn

the attributes of a system that is just and fair.

and invoke my belief that “just mercy” is given

We need to become educated about who

to the undeserving, which is its power.

makes the decisions in our community. Who is your local prosecutor? What do they stand

Q: What inspired you to start the Equal Justice Initiative?

for? And finally, people need to get involved

BRYAN:

convicted.

and support organizations providing services to the formerly incarcerated and wrongly

I was moved by the absence of legal resources available to poor and condemned prisoners at

Learn More About

the start of my career. I met people literally dying for legal assistance and wanted to

The Movie: justmercy.eji.org

respond.

Eastern’s new Prison Education Program: eastern.edu/prisoned Eastern’s Criminal Justice programs: eastern.edu/socialtransformation

SPECIAL EASTERN U SCREENING J U ST M E RCY MONDAY, DEC. 9 TH

7:30 PM @ REGAL UA KING OF PRUSSIA e a s t e r n . e d u / j u s t m e r cy

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I M P A C T

Cultivating Connections through Prison Ministry By Alicia michaels ’19

THE DOOR BUZZES as we are ushered onto the floor of the juvenile detention facility. We leave behind our phones, pass through metal detectors, and watch our bags being searched. As we walk down the familiar corridor, the thought continually crosses my mind: These kids are kids, just like us. I came to Eastern as a youth ministry major, but after reading Bryan Stevenson’s Just Mercy as one of our required texts, I was enthralled and became very passionate about prison ministry. Eventually, I decided to switch my major to criminal justice when I caught myself trying to apply my understanding of the issues in our justice system to all the projects in my otherwise unrelated classes. I quickly joined Eastern’s Prison Ministry at the beginning of my freshman year, and soon held a position of leadership. Luckily for me, I can still use what I learned in my youth ministry classes in the juvenile detention center we serve in!

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Prison Ministry’s mission is to advocate for and

Ingrained in us from the start, Eastern’s core values

educate others about criminal justice through

of Faith, Reason, and Justice have proven to be the

proximity to those who are impacted by our

deep roots of our ministry. Out of this core stem

justice system. Our goal is not just to educate and

additional integral roots of compassion, empathy,

advocate, however; it is also to serve. Currently, we

service, love, passion, and humility. These offshoots

serve youth typically aged 12-17 in the Lancaster

are crucial in initiating restorative justice.

County Youth Intervention Center who frequently have experienced deep trauma and long for hope.

Through Prison Ministry, we as students can help bring healing to the offender, the victim, and the

On a typical Friday night, we spend some time

community. But this restoration doesn’t happen

playing basketball, volleyball, or other team games

apart from proximity. Intimately understanding the

together at the center. Afterward, we spend time on

needs of each party is critical before true restorative

the unit in Bible study and fellowship. These Bible

justice and healing can happen. Restorative justice

studies tend to be open and honest discussions

is a representation of loving each other well, just

about how we all relate to faith. We establish a non-

like Christ. This means looking at each person

judgmental posture in our conversations, and the

saying, “I see you. I hear you. You aren’t forgotten. I

kids really respond to that.

see your hurt. Let’s fix it together.”

But before we arrive at the facility, we spend time

Prison Ministry has helped me cultivate deeper

preparing for these interactions on campus. Leading

levels of empathy and patience for all of those

up to our weekly trips, we come together and pray

around me. I think the biggest thing I’ve learned

for these kids, prepare goodie bags, write letters,

is that the stigmas and biases we hold separate

and plan our night. We don’t want to be serving

us from making authentic connections with God’s

purposelessly, ignorantly, or ineffectively, so we

creation. At the end of the day, humans are humans

educate ourselves and others about the systemic

and have the same needs for love, care, connection,

problems and what our roles in restoration can be.

and redeeming grace, regardless of their situation.

“At the end of the day, humans are humans and have the same needs for love, care, connection, and redeeming grace, regardless of their situation." 21


A C A D E M I C S

The Roots of

HOPE B y A l ly ( H o l m e s ) R o s a r i o ’ 1 4


EMPOWERMENT, GRIT, AND HOPE stem from the heart of Esperanza.

Hunting Park, Philadelphia. Through Eastern University and Esperanza’s

What started as a local initiative back in 1986 has quickly become one

joint mission to provide faith-centered education and restorative justice

of the leading voices for Latinos in America. For over 30 years, the

to our communities and beyond, a vibrant partnership was formed and

Esperanza family has supported the next generation of Latinos, provided

The Nueva Esperanza Center for Higher Education took root. Four years

solid, affordable Christian education through Esperanza College, and

later, NECHE celebrated their first cohort of 20 students enrolling in the

advocated for the underserved people in the Hunting Park section of

fall of 2000, and five years later, took on the name Esperanza College.

North Philadelphia. The organization is tangibly living out the biblical mandate to serve and advocate for “the least of these” (Matthew 25:40). With over 500 employees and a $51 million annual operating budget, it is hard to imagine the seedling that Esperanza once was.

As Esperanza looks to the future, Rev. Cortés is full of enthusiasm for how Esperanza’s current initiatives will continue to bring hope to Hunting Park. Some of the many exciting plans include: •

Founder, President, and CEO of Esperanza. Raised in Spanish Harlem, Rev. Cortés was nurtured by a loving family firmly planted in the Latino faith community. To his dismay, he was quickly awakened to the reality

Preserving and developing affordable housing on a larger scale through a Community Land Trust

It all began with a dream in the heart of Reverend Luis Cortés, Jr., now •

Building new schools and growing Esperanza’s existing ones

Creating performing arts spaces, STEM education pipelines, and

that many others surrounding him faced: a lack of economic stability

community education and organizing mechanisms (such as a

and the absence of hope for the future. He dreamed of change for his

community newspaper)

community.

chance,” Rev. Cortés firmly believes. His hope and vision were both simple and profound: to develop communities of opportunity in which

transformative experiences through solid education within the community.

Investigating the gaps in healthcare services in the neighborhood and determining how Esperanza can fill those gaps

chances could be taken and narratives of hope could be rewritten to inspire advocacy, strengthen voice, champion justice, and deliver

Developing new tracks at Esperanza’s schools to streamline young people into technology careers

“A person has to believe that they have a chance in order to take a

Developing robust partnerships that will be necessary for longterm success

“I’m excited about where Esperanza’s growth is taking us, as we work to

In 1996, Rev. Cortés met with Dr. David Black, Eastern University's 8th

make our neighborhood a place where the city’s development and growth

President, to discuss his vision and desire for the Latino community in

benefits everyone,” shares Rev. Cortés. The legacy of Esperanza is truly a testament to the incredible strength of vision empowered by grit. What started as a seed of opportunity has blossomed into a deep root system of hope penetrating the heart of North Philadelphia and beyond.


A C A D E M I C S

Anchored in the Spirit

Reflections on the History & Future of Palmer Theological Seminary An Interview with Dean David Bronkema B y K e l ly G o d d a r d I F YO U A R E FA M I L I A R W I T H T H E H I S TO R Y O F E A S T E R N U N I V E R S I T Y, you will know that our story began with the founding of Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary in Rittenhouse Square. Over time, a college with a wide array of academic disciplines grew out of the seminary and relocated to its current home in St. Davids. While the seminary remained in Philadelphia for many years, it was eventually reunited with the college and now shares the same campus. In 2005, it was renamed in honor of its longest-serving president, Gordon Palmer. Roots matter — and Eastern’s roots as a seminary are a special part of our history. As the seminary enters its 95th year, we asked David Bronkema, Dean of Palmer Seminary, to reflect with us on Palmer’s rich history and future.

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Q: Why was Palmer founded? DAVID: Palmer was founded by a group of six men in 1925 who wanted to buck the tide of theological polarization in the 1920s between conservatism and progressivism. Self-defining as “conservative” in terms of the fundamentals of the faith, which focused on the love of the Bible as God’s word, the

for theological education in these changing times because of the trust they have in us and our values. Among other things, this has led us to creating our Master of Theological Studies in Latino/a Ministries in Spanish, certificate and degree programs in Spanish, and our fully online Master of Divinity that will launch this spring.

church, and the importance of denominations, schools, and missions, they were also progressive around issues of women in ministry and engaging the forces of science. It is not an accident that the founding motto was “The Whole Gospel for

Q: What excites you as you look toward Palmer's future? DAVID: What excites me most is seeing how our faculty,

the Whole World.”

staff, students, and alumni are following the promptings of the Spirit in putting forth and pursuing their ideas and

Q: What have been Palmer's core values throughout its history? DAVID: I think there have been three main core values. First

dreams, both large and small, for the Seminary, seeing those come to fruition, and the loving and diverse community in which all of this is rooted.

is the continuing blend of being conservative and progressive

There is such a vibrancy and buzz around not only the new

at the same time; being anchored in a conservative approach

programs that I mentioned above, but also around so many

to the Bible and a progressive application of Biblical

other things like the two weekly chapels we now have,

teaching. Second, and tied to the first, is being excited about

reviving the Holy Land Trip, the various activities planned and

discussing, debating, and dialoguing differences of ideas,

carried out by Student Assembly, and alumni proposing an

and doing so with love. Third is our love for our students and

“alumni chaplain” process to implement in the near future.

alumni, and especially their own unique journeys of spiritual formation. This value can especially be seen by the addition in the late 1980s of three words to our motto: “The Whole Gospel for the Whole Word Through Whole Persons.”

I feel like we are just getting started in terms of what God has planned for us, and we are already being wonderfully blessed! I can’t wait to see what else is in store.

Q: What are some ways Palmer is currently adapting to changing times by applying its timeless values to new initiatives?

Anchored in

DAVID: I think that these times make our timeless values

even more important, because the extreme polarization in our society places a ton of pressure on people to take extreme

views and makes them fearful of dialogue. What we’ve been

focusing on in the last few years is prayerfully discerning how we go about providing access to the theological education that we offer to those who have difficulty accessing it, many times precisely because of polarized situations, as around the issue of theological education for women. This means being very attuned and responsive to partners and potential partners who approach us with specific needs

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A T H L E T I C S

Athletic

Highlights

Spring

By dan mouw

( F r o m l e f t t o r i g h t: H a s s a n M a c k e y ’ 2 1 , G r a n t F i s h e r ’ 2 0 , Tay l o r C r o w n ’ 2 0 )

MAC REALIGNMENT IMPACTS EASTERN

Eastern was one of three schools directly influenced by the change.

Eastern joined the Middle Atlantic Conference in 2008. Since that

Freedom with Stevens Institute of Technology, FDU-Florham, Delaware

time the Eagles have competed in most sports in the MAC Freedom. In

Valley, DeSales, and the three Wilkes-Barre Area members. Eastern will

Women’s Golf, Track and Field, Cross Country, and Men’s Volleyball, the

move into what was the Commonwealth with Lebanon Valley, Messiah,

Eagles compete against all of the MAC schools.

Alvernia, Albright, York, Stevenson, Hood, and Widener.

With York College slated to join in 2020, the membership elected to

The change, which will start in the fall of 2020, will bring an end to

pursue realignment to have nine teams on both sides of the conference.

some historic rivalries, but will reduce the amount of travel time and

With that change, there was also a desire to become more efficient with

give the Eagles three league opponents within a 45 mile radius.

travel and to minimize missed class time.

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Lycoming College and Arcadia University will move into the MAC


FISHER EARNS ALL-AMERICA HONORS

PRUESSNER TAKES OVER MEN'S BASKETBALL

At the Division III National Track and Field Championships in

With Eric McNelley taking on leadership of the Athletic

Geneva, Ohio, senior javelin thrower Grant Fisher ’20 broke the

Department, Eastern Men’s Basketball picked up a new leader for

200-foot mark and became Eastern University’s first male track and

the future. Dan Pruessner joined McNelley’s staff this past fall and

field All-American.

made an immediate impact. As the Associate Head Coach, he took

Fisher came to Eastern as a baseball pitcher and threw out of the

on many of the day-to-day tasks of running the program.

bullpen for the Eagles for four years. In the spring of 2018, he threw

Despite losing two-time all-conference forward Victor Peña ’20

both javelin and baseballs. With his baseball eligibility done, Fisher

to a midseason injury, Eastern Men’s Basketball reached the MAC

returned in the spring of 2019 to take a final class to complete his

Freedom Tournament for the third year in a row. When it came

degree and to compete.

time for McNelley to step away, Pruessner was the obvious choice.

He earned a spot at Nationals with a 60.36 meter toss early in the

He took over program leadership on March 1, 2019.

year. He won a MAC Championship with a 59.14 meter effort. He

“Coach Pruessner will continue to move the program forward,”

popped a 61.05 meter toss on his first attempt. That mark turned

McNelley said. “He has a great commitment to Christian education

out to be enough for fifth place and a spot on the podium.

and understands how to use basketball to develop young men.

Nicole Weenink ’21, Kierra Zack ’19, and Evan Wildermuth ’22 also joined Fisher in competing at Nationals.

I will miss being on the sidelines, but having Dan in place makes this move a little easier.”

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A L U M N I

Alumni Class Notes

Eastern Alumni Class Notes

1950 S Victor Tupitza ’55, AB/BD ’58 shares this about his time at Eastern and beyond: “The graduating classes in the 40s - 60s were distinctive in this regard: They consisted of veterans of WWII and were pre-min students. Not a vet, I was also headed for seminary. I was accepted at Penn State as a journalism major, but had always had an interest in the church. I was first published nationally as a 13-year old

1955.” Vic had a pastorate at FBC Manayunk,

T. Mennemeyer, Joseph E. Schumacher, Jesse

was in the communication department for the

B. Milby, Dennis Wallace) published, Costs and

ABC/USA, and then in a similar office with

Effectiveness of Treating Homeless Persons with

the Baptist Joint Committee on Religious

Cocaine Addiction with Alternative Strategies,

Affairs in Washington. His retirement after

has been assigned the “Excellence in Mental

11 years was followed by a 2-year term doing

Health Policy & Economics Research Award” in

communications for the DC Baptist Convention.

2019. This award was presented to them at a

He finally retired to the pews at Calvary BC in

ceremony on March 29, 2019. She thought some

DC. He was blessed to have had the support

of his old pals might like to know the work goes on!

of his wife, Sarah, at his side from college to retirement, a 64-year stretch.

while in Shriner's children's hospital and was

Robert Plimpton ’63 retired from active church music in the summer of 2018 and entered a retirement community, Fredericka Manor, just

Next, while in high school I covered school

1960 S

sports and bowling as a reporter for our Erie

Sally (Lynn) Milby ’60 shares this about her

substitute engagements and free-lance recitals,

Daily newspaper. From there, I thought of

husband Jesse Milby ’62: While Jesse passed

particularly at the Organ Pavilion in Balboa Park,

this as my career. Faith changed those plans

away in 2017, it is noteworthy that the last

where he is Civic Organist emeritus.

when Eastern accepted me for the class of

publication that he and his colleagues (Stephen

asked to write about how we spent our days.

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south of San Diego, CA. He is active in his local church, and does a limited number of


Allen Bujno ’65 has just published a book titled,

was able to vacation with the 4 of them in

to walk for 6 months. She had to relearn how to

"Why Did He Bother? A Pastor's Account of

Washington DC. She has had many professional

drive a car and it was more than 2 years before

God's Abundant Mercy, Love, and Grace" - it's

accomplishments throughout the years which

she could walk without assistive devices.

available on Amazon.com.

have included: being Associate Professor

Since relocating to Sedona, AZ three years ago, Charles Blum ’66 has kept active in SinoUS relations and other public policy issues. In addition to his ongoing business activities, he participates in the local Foreign Policy Association chapter, facilitates discussions at the Yavapai College Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, and volunteers with Better Angels. He and his wife, Patricia, are volunteer naturalists at Red Rock State Park, the environmental education center in Arizona.

in the School of Nursing & Health Sciences at La Salle University, teaching graduate level pathophysiology and pharmacology, co-authoring Pathophysiology: Introductory Concepts and Clinical Perspectives, and becoming a Certified Registered Nurse Practitioner with experience as a Hospitalist Nurse Practitioner. Joan is still active in a Baptist Church and has taught Sunday School for children for more than 25 years. She is currently teaching the College/Career Sunday School class. There were so many faculty

Susan Lee (Trotter) Cianci ’66 is working

who were supportive and encouraging, but

for the Trump team, where they have 1,700

she remembers Biology classes with Dr. Gary

members in their group. She asks us to

E. Parker and Chemistry with Dr. Signorino

pray for America.

and Dr. Piersma. If not for Eastern, she never

Judith Daniels ’69, MAR ’74 shares that God blessed her by allowing her to adopt 2 teenage girls in 1981. She has been blessed with 8 grandchildren and 6 great grandchildren. After serving as the Minister of Christian Education in

Karen Long ’69 is a grandmother of 3 (ages 16, 15, and 2). She was a medical editor/manager at the National Board of Medical Examiners in Philadelphia for 32 years. The faculty that most made an impact on her was Dr. Wesley Ingles DD ’58 who encouraged her to become an editor instead of a writer! He certainly knew where her talents lay! If not for Eastern, she never would have come to call the Philadelphia area her home nor raised her family in this area full of history. Something her classmates would be surprised to know is at the age of 60, she learned that she has an excellent first soprano voice! The big question she’s pondering at the moment: “How can our country become a truly unified nation, with hate and racism banished?”

would have had wonderful lifelong friends that

In November of 2011, Joseph Mahoney ’69 and

have been beside her with life's successes and

Cheryl (Shinn) Mahoney ’70 moved from NJ

challenges. Something her classmates would be

to NH to be closer to their daughters and their

surprised to know is in January 1998, she was

families who moved to New England in 2005.

in a serious motor vehicle accident and unable

After Joe’s retirement in July 2001, it

PA, DE, IL, and MI, she was able to retire from ministry in 2002. There are too many faculty and staff that impacted her life especially after the death of her mother in 1966. The faculty encouraged her to continue her education knowing that she was now legally responsible for raising her younger siblings. If not for Eastern, she never would have completed her education. Something her classmates would be surprised to learn is that she attended Eastern on the Hero Scholarship from the city of Philadelphia since her father was a city fireman who was injured at a fire and died from his injury in 1957. The big question she’s pondering at the moment: “How much love my Heavenly Father has for me that He would give up His one and only Son to pay the price for my sins.” Joan (Parker) Frizzell ’69 has one daughter who has given her 4 grandchildren. She

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A L U M N I made sense to join them and was a decision

infantry, served as Battalion Adjutant. He went

summer staff employment opportunities at the

that they have never regretted. They also made

into the Inactive Reserve when they moved

American Baptist Assembly (now known as

a decision not to downsize - but to upsize - as

to Asia. Thanks to Chase Bank, he has visited

the Green Lake Conference Center) through

they enjoy having family and friends come

6 Continents, 29 countries, 43 states, and

their student staff recruiter. Something her

and stay with them! The faculty that had an

Puerto Rico (not all bank related). From 1984

classmates would be surprised to know is she

impact on Joseph was Dr. J. Russell Andrus

to present, he resumed his involvement with

finally retired in June of 2018. Her last job was

DD ’73 (Professor of Economics and Business

the Boy Scouts of America. Lastly, he has not

as a part-time, as needed, employee of an area

Administration and former US State Department

smoked since June 12, 1997! The big question

appraiser. There was not one day on the job

employee) who introduced him to the world

he’s pondering at the moment: “How long will it

when she did not learn something new.

of economics and business. Joe changed his

take to finish my model train layout?”

major from mathematics to economics and became Eastern's first student to graduate with an economics degree. Within a month of graduation, he was hired by the Chase Manhattan Bank and he eventually retired from JP Morgan Chase after 43 years of service. Joe says he will always be indebted to Dr. Andrus for his encouragement and preparing him for what would be a long and satisfying profession. If not for Eastern, he never would have met his wife nor been a father and grandfather. Something his classmates would be surprised to know is that from 1969 to 1984 he served in the US Army National Guard and the US Army Reserve, attained the rank of Major of

Susan (Todd) Skogland ’69 is a retired

Alice (Daffinee) Perez ’69 and her husband,

medical librarian. The faculty that made an

Didier Herbert Perez, are having a great 50th

impact on her was Dr. Linnea Lindborg. Her

year of marriage! In September 2018 they

enthusiasm and support were very helpful to

traveled to Europe to explore Amsterdam. In

her, especially as she considered and took her

early June they traveled to Dallas, TX for the

Junior year abroad in France.

Daffinee Family (with relatives from TX, WI, CA, and NY) reunion and later in June traveled to Cape Cod for the Perez Family (with four generations of relatives from MA, GA, MT, MD, and WI) reunion. They celebrated their 50th Wedding Anniversary in July in Green Lake, WI, where they met in the summer of 1968 and have lived for more than 45 years. If not for Eastern, she never would have learned about the 1968

John Zehring ’69 and his wife, Donna (Taber) Zehring ’69 celebrated their 50th Anniversary in August 2018. They met in high school and came to Eastern together. They have 5 grandchildren and are enjoying retirement in a beautiful rural area in MA, and at their summer cottage in ME. John retired after 2 decades in higher education and 2 decades as a Senior Pastor in UCC churches. He is also the author of more than 40 books. Donna retired from a teaching career in Adult Education and Literacy promotion. Many faculty made an impact on John’s life like Aaron Gast, Glenn Koch BD ’56, ThM ’59, Howard Buss, Tony Campolo ’56, BD ’60, ThM ’61, Gene Beardsley, Robert Shinn ABThB ’50, and Ernest Ackley. For Donna, it was Gene Beardsley who taught her to write. If not for Eastern, John never would have been grateful for an outstanding liberal arts education and Donna never would have persevered to earn her MDiv. Something their classmates would be surprised to know is that John is a drummer in jazz and swing bands and that Donna enjoys watercolor and acrylic painting and has a current membership as a Master Gardener in two states, one of them being Rhode Island! The big question John is pondering at the moment: “How can the church continue to thrive in an era when memberships are declining?”

E A S T E R N

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SAVE THE DATE! for Eastern's second annual Day of Giving in honor of our founding on March 19, 1925. Last year we raised $166,737 together to support student scholarships, department initiatives, and areas of need at the university. We are looking forward to another great year. Stay tuned for more details!

1970 S Rev. Earl (Bud) Russell, Jr. ’72, MDiv ’75 In 2012, Bud retired after 40 years of pastoral ministry in Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, and

Joseph Culin ’75 retired in July 2019 after 36

Nancy (Follett) Hammond ’78 is semi-retired

years in the College of Agriculture, Forestry &

after 9 years teaching at the Champlain Valley

Life Sciences at Clemson. During that time he

Christian School in Vergennes, VT. She will

held positions of faculty member, department

continue part-time at CVCS as a one on one tutor.

chair, and associate dean of research.

Congratulations to Jeanne Marie (Wamsley)

Delaware. Bud had been teaching English

After departing from 18 years of government

Beaumont ’79, whose new play, Asylum Song,

Composition at Delaware State University for

to work in the private sector, E. Steven

had its premiere production off Broadway at

the past seven years. He also manages the

Emanuel ’76 has decided to go back to

HERE Arts Theater in Manhattan in June 2019.

regional website and several social media

government in an IT leadership role. While the

platforms for the American Baptist Churches

private sector provided a great education for 3

of Pennsylvania and Delaware. Recent summer

years, it was clear that public service remains

travels with his wife Carol (Murr) ’75 have

a gene that needed to be stimulated again. As

included several trips abroad and a 10-week

such, Steve chose to agree to take the role as

cross-country camping trip. They are leading an

the City of Newark's IT Executive.

entourage to the Oberammergau Passion Play

Pamela Powell ’79 has retired after 33 years of service as photo archivist of the Chester County Historical Society in West Chester, PA. She is also celebrating 25 years of marriage with Ronald Maurer. The couple enjoys working around their home and garden, family history,

Paul Bailey ’77, DMin ’94 and Phyllis

and traveling. Reflecting back on her time

(Holbrook) Bailey ’77 have 3 grown children

at Eastern, Pamela found the most valuable

John Preston ’74 is a sports columnist for

and 5 grandchildren. Phyllis is retired and Paul

experiences to be the Biology Department

the South Marion Citizen and West Marion

teaches a public speaking course each semester

trip to the Florida Everglades, drama club

Messenger in Dunellen, FL. John is retired and

at the local community college. He is also in his

productions, and of course the Writing Program.

living in Ocala, FL with his 3-legged dog, Spike.

9th year at Eastwood Baptist Church.

and tour of Italy in 2020.

31


A L U M N I 1980 S

1990 S

The Unitarian Universalist Association (UUA)

Art Salvagno ’97 extends the following words,

announced in June that Cynthia "CB" Beal ’84

“Thank you Eastern in helping mold me into the

received the 2019 Angus H. MacLean Award for

man I am today. Throughout the years I've come

Excellence in Religious Education.

across many proud Eagles who have shared

For the past 27 years, Paula Jo (King) Atlansky ’85 has been teaching English at James Logan High School in Union City. For the past two years she has also been teaching Life Skills, a course that encourages students to believe in their innate worthiness, reflect on values and beliefs, and set goals that are in alignment with their gifts, talents, and dreams. Over four years ago, she began a two pronged program leading to a Master's degree in Conscious Studies and a Spiritual Leadership ministerial licensing program. She will graduate this June and plans to pursue a focus ministry as her next career when she retires from teaching.

during my early years of patrolling the West Philadelphia streets for the Philadelphia Police Department’s 19th District. Graduating from Eastern helped me attain my position as a child

1990s

music and leading worship at various area

William P. Levesque ’91 / July 17, 2019

churches, combined with my work experience, led my wife and I to found Battle4Children

Barry D. Hill ’97 / April 19, 2019

for child advocacy organizations which provide

Daryl S. Thompson ’99 / June 1, 2019 2000s Steven L. Harberts, DD ’06 / April 1, 2019 Samuel V. Falcinelli x’09 / March 30, 2019 2010s

beautiful Florida and travels around the world!

FA C U LT Y / S TA F F

She also volunteers with the Quilts Of Valor Foundation (QOVF.org). She shares that her graduation from Eastern was one of her life goals!

2000 S Jennifer Behm-Lazzarini ’01 was thrilled to be time as a mentor. She will be on again one more

World Relief and World Renew (formerly

time in the season and then the finale. Jen was

CRWRC), Nick returned to Boise, Idaho and

the winner of season 2’s Masterchef.

A L U M N I

Shelley R. Leaphart-Williams, MEd ’99 / May 25, 2019

Roany M. Rondon, AA’16, x’19 / June 6, 2019

in the field of Relief and Development with

/

Gail (Bilotti) Macrine ’97 / May 18, 2018

Cindy (Hetrick) Manfre ’99 has retired to

on the first two episodes of Masterchef, this

E A S T E R N

John L. Arnett ’96, MBA ’01 / April 12, 2019

Battle4Children has raised thousands of dollars

Nick Armstrong ’89, After 23 years of working

settle in the greater Boise area.

Brenda L. Wolfe, MBA ’94 / December 12, 2011 Marie Louise Bonner, MS ’96 / September 21, 1999

to serve as Superintendent in the Cumberland-

volunteers with refugee families that came to

Barbara Marte, ’94 / June 29, 2019

Charities 8 years ago. Over those years,

endeavors. Congratulations, Art!

Partners, to help mobilize, train, and connect

Gregory W. Christopher ’77 / April 21, 2019

years in law enforcement. My love for Christian

overwhelming support during the special

started a non-profit, Glocal Community

Ronald L. Evans ’76 / April 16, 2019

James P. Jacklitch ’79 / March 7, 2019

the Philadelphia Inquirer for his philanthropic

UMC in Leonardtown, MD for 11 years.

1970s

where I retired from after spending 14 of my 36

the election, he wrote: “Thank you for your

Conference. John was the pastor of First Saints

Joyce (Heller) Hickling ’69 / July 7, 2019

Arlan M. Bond ’79 / May 1, 2019

human trafficking.” Art was recognized by

Hagerstown District of the Baltimore-Washington

Charles W. Soltis ’62 / April 6, 2019

abuse investigator for their Special Victims Unit

the Pennsylvania Senate. In an article after

On July 1, 2019, John Wunderlich III ’86 began

Samuel E. Markley, Jr. ’57 / April 17, 2019 Milton P. Ryder ’59 / March 30, 2019

Ronald D. East, Sr. x’62 / June 11, 2017

services, to child victims of sexual abuse and

owe that victory to you.”

William "Bill" H. Fox, III ’56 / January 29, 2017

music. I attended Eastern’s main campus

election in May for the 33rd District seat in

is unprecedented for a political outsider and I

M. Patricia (Ling) Magdamo ’53 / April 19, 2016

1960s

trauma-specific therapy, as well as related

setting mandate of nearly 70% of the vote. This

1950s

their musical talent or interest in Christian

Douglas Mastriano ’86 won a special

election in May, where you gave me a record-

EASTERN UNIVERSITY ALUMNI IN MEMORY BY CLASS YEAR:

David Brewer, MBA ’02, PhD ’15 started in April 2019 as the MBA Director at Anderson University. His wife, Rose (Langmesser) Brewer, MDiv ’02, directs SEED Livelihood Network,

James E. Sease III - Former Adjunct Professor / March 30, 2019


the economic development ministry of the

Specialist, then served as Information

Adrian Suryajaya ’15 will be attending

Free Methodist Church.

Technology Manager and Director of

Temple University–James E. Beasley School

Information Technology.

of Law this fall.

"outstanding member of South Jersey" on the

Congratulations to Kali Ann (Fairchild) Gibson

Abbie Storch ’16 graduated from Yale in 2018

floor of the US House of Representatives by

’12 who received first place in the PRME

with a master's degree in religion and literature

Congressman Jeff Van Drew at the beginning

Chapter UK and Ireland Writing Competition!

and currently works as a publishing assistant at

of April. Rob is an associate professor at

Her essay explored the development and use of

Yale University Press and a research assistant

Wilmington University, founding pastor

Social Entrepreneurship within the neo-liberal

to Harold Bloom.

of Bethany Grace Community Church in

context. Her essay was published on their

Bridgeton, NJ, and is quite involved in his local

website this June.

Robin Weinstein ’03 was recognized as an

community, especially as the founder and president of the M25 Initiative, a non-profit dedicated to empowering and equipping the local church community to help the poor. Dena (Pauling) Cipriano ’05, earned a Management of Nonprofit Organizations degree in summer 2019 from Case Western

Betsy (Arnesen) Isley ’14 is a Contact Representative for the Bureau of Land Management in Boise, ID.

Ivanna Wade ’16 will be pursuing a Master’s in Biomedical Science this fall at Rowan University. The national board of directors of Ten Thousand Villages has announced the appointment of Gordon Zook PhD ’16 as chief executive

Steve Sampurna ’14 earned a Master’s in

officer of Ten Thousand Villages. Zook holds

Biology from Cabrini University and is a scientist

a PhD in organizational leadership from

at Eurofins Lancaster Laboratories.

Eastern University in St. Davids, Pennsylvania, and brings more than 20 years of leadership

Reserve University in Cleveland, OH. Dena

Congratulations to Matthew Sharayko ’14 who

also founded her own marketing company, Erie

recently graduated from Jefferson University

Shore Integrated Solutions, LLC.

with a Master of Science in Industrial Design.

David (DJ) Gross, DO ’05, along with his

Kim Fuhr ’15 is working as a Field Technician at

(MCC) in India and, prior to that, was co-

wife and 4 children have moved to Dalton,

US Geological Survey in Hilo, HI.

country director for MCC in Bangladesh and

experience to the CEO position. During the past several years, Gordon served as co-country director for Mennonite Central Committee

GA. DJ joined Associates in Orthopedics and Sports Medicine after recently completing his orthopedic foot and ankle fellowship in Columbus, OH. Kevin Padworski, DMA ’08 earned his doctorate of musical arts in choral conducting and literature in May 2019 and is the newly appointed Director of Vocal Music at Colorado Academy in Denver, CO.

2010 S Rebecca (Coppola) Hessenauer ’10 and Robert Hessenauer ’13, MA ’18 were married on June 11, 2017. They celebrated the birth of their daughter Juliette in July of 2018. Garden Spot Communities of New Holland, PA promoted Andrew Dietzel ’11 to Chief Information Officer. Dietzel joined Garden Spot in 2004 as their Information Technology

33


A L U M N I Haiti. In addition, Gordon has worked as a commercial division manager for a US-based manufacturing company and as a senior loan officer at a farmer credit cooperative. Gordon has knowledge in strategic sales planning, international development, leadership development, and executive-level financial management. Kathryn Bloodworth ’17 is the Head technician at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in MD. Victoria (Farina) Stacey ’17 married Trevor Stacey ’18 on May 26th, 2019.

PA L M E R S E M I N A R Y A L U M N I IN MEMORY BY CLASS YEAR:

Kadeem Colburn ’18 will be starting a Master’s

1940s

in Bioethics and post-bac program at Duquesne

Douglas A. Clark, MDiv ’43 / May 7, 2018

University this fall. Jesse Lall ’17 recently married Matia Jones and moved to San Bernardino, CA. He will be attending the University of Redlands this fall to pursue his MA in Music Composition. He is pursuing his dream of being a film composer just a little east of LA.

Allen G. Watkins, MDiv ’75 / March 13, 2018 William E. Stone, MAR ’76 / May 7, 2018 Betty M. (Sharp) Neilan, MDiv ’77 / July 30, 2018 Karen V. Hadley-Dike, MDiv ’79 / September 5, 2018

Glenn E. Camper, BD/MDiv ’47 / January 10, 2018

1980s

Paul W. Lewis, BD ’47 / July 25, 2018

William H. Gray, III, DD ’80 / July 1, 2013

George W. Lynch, BD ’47 / May 6, 2018

R. Bruce Woolever, MDiv ’81 / May 26, 2019

Jane Gahs Wilson, MRE ’47, DD ’75 / January 19, 2018

W. Richard "Dick" Foster, DMin ’82 / August 19, 2018

James “Bryant” Wright, AB ’47, BD ’49 / February 16, 2019

Paul W. Henry, Sr. ESCM ’85 / May 3, 2018

Ruth E. (Harkness) Hosley, MRE ’49 / March 26, 2016

Robert A. Wilson, MDiv x’85 / August 27, 2018

1950s Margaret B. “Peggy” (Fountain) Taylor, MRE ’51 / April 21, 2017

William M. Norris, ESCM ’87 / July 28, 2013 Thomas C. Short, DMin ’87 / August 1, 2018 Carl A. Malmgren, DMin ’88 / March 3, 2019

William R. Belli, BA ’52, BD ’54, MDiv ’78 / April 16, 2018

Gaelyn Lyons ’17, biochemistry BS grad, has

1990s

Margaret (Robb) Dabback, BSM ’52, MRE ’54 / March

Joan Hoins-Hand x’94 / February 23, 2018

accepted the invitation to enter the Biomedical

6, 2018

John “Scott” Hopson, DMin ’94 / July 11, 2014

Sciences PhD program at Penn State Hershey.

Dwayne “Ax” Axworthy, BD ’54, MDiv ’73 / April 28, 2018

Vincent C. Coles, Sr., MDiv ’95 / February 27, 2018

M. Patricia (Ling) Magdamo ’53, MRE ’55 / April 19, 2016

Kenneth L. London, DMin ’95 / May 25, 2018

Britta Lokken ’18 will be starting a new position

Evelyn Gean (Laney) Holbrook, MRE ’56 / August 11, 2018

Alden A. Gaines, DD ’97 / April 17, 2018

as BMA II at GlaxoSmithKline.

Donald A. Scofield, BD ’56 / April 18, 2018

Gerald Love, ESCM ’97 / February 19, 2019

Mardean “Dean” R. Moyer, BD ’57 / April 4, 2019

C. Thomas Hast, MDiv ’98, DMin ’04 / June 28, 2018

Caitlin McDonald ’18 is starting her Master’s

Benjamin E. Nevin, BD ’59 / April 5, 2019

in Bible and Theology this fall at Columbia

1960s

Cynthia R. Swogger, MDiv ’03 / July 25, 2019

International University and is working at the

John E. Gustavsen, MDiv ’61 / May 11, 2018

Stanley A. Miller, MDiv ’04 / April 17, 2018

Charles G. Detwiler, Jr., MDiv ’62 / October 18, 2017

Lawrence T. Sherwood, MTS ’04 / July 31, 2016

West Palm VA Hospital.

David H. Sisson, BD ’62 / August 19, 2018

Hannah Anderson ’19 is employed at MPD Chemicals in Ambler, PA and will be pursuing a Master’s in Chemistry at Villanova University. Matt Cradduck ’19 will be starting dental school this fall at the University of Maryland. David Seldow ’19 will be attending the University of Vermont this fall for a Master’s in Animal Science and Veterinary medicine and will be doing research on calf cryptosporidiosis.

E A S T E R N

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2000s

A L U M N I

Harvey P. Kelley, BD ’63 / April 21, 2018

2010s

Robert V. Crawford, BD ’64 / April 20, 2018

Charles H. Schrader Jr, ESCM x’14 / April 7, 2019

Manly M. Moulton, Sr., BD ’64 / August 13, 2017

Karen A. Sellers, MDiv ’15 / July 27, 2019

Edwin W. Richardson, Jr. BD ’64 / June 28, 2013

Raul LeDuc, MTS ’17 / August 2, 2019

Daniel F. Cline, BD/MDiv ’66 / July 13, 2018 Arthur A. Fuller, MDiv ’67 / August 24, 2018 1970s J. Lester Graybill, THM ’70 / April 27, 2018 David M. Roth, MDiv ’72 / May 28, 2019 Charles E. Booth, MDiv ’73 / March 23, 2019 William R. Thomas, MDiv ’75 / August 6, 2019 Kenneth L. Hoard, MDiv ’75 / April 6, 2019

FA C U LT Y/ S TA F F/ B O A R D M E M B E R S David N. Cousins - Former Adjunct Professor / April 13, 2019 Gerald I. Gingrich - Former Adjunct Professor for College and Seminary / July 3, 2018


Palmer Alumni Class Notes

1950 S

1990 S

2010 S

Hays Wiltshire BD ’58 has been the senior

Willie Robinson MDiv ’93, DMin ’06, and his

Kim Warfield MTS ’10 was sworn in as a Kent

pastor of the First Presbyterian Church in

wife, Michelle, have been at Mt. Pleasant Baptist

County, Delaware Deputy Sheriff on June 3,

Harbor Beach, MI for about 8 years.

Church in Twin Oaks, PA since 2007. Under

2019. She comes to Kent County Levy Court

Pastor Robinson’s leadership, Mt. Pleasant has

as a retired law enforcement officer from the

expanded following a multi-million-dollar capital

New York City Police Department, where she

campaign that helped the church reposition itself

was a detective in the Chief of Detectives

in the community and beyond, as the church

Investigations Unit and led the detective squads

has attracted online viewers from around the

in delivering their investigative cases.

1980 S Oklahoma Baptist University presented the Herschel H. Hobbs Award for Distinguished Denominational Service to K. Marshall

Williams Sr. MDiv ’81, senior pastor of Nazarene Baptist Church of Philadelphia on June 10, during the Southern Baptist Convention annual meeting in Birmingham, AL. For more

world. Former Philadelphia Eagles running back, the Rev. Dr. Herbert Lusk, Sr., pastor of Greater Exodus Baptist Church in North Philadelphia preached at the 12th Pastoral Anniversary on Sunday, May 19, 2019.

Steven Handzel MDiv ’11 was recently approved for ordination as an elder. He serves at Marshallton United Methodist Church. Allen Keller MDiv ’14 was recently approved for ordination as a deacon. He serves as a

than 35 years, Williams has served as pastor

James Stone DMin ’94 is now one of the co-

of Nazarene Baptist Church. He served as

pastors of the United Baptist Church of Scriba.

a missionary with Sports Ambassadors, a

He has served as pastor of several churches in

basketball evangelism ministry team, which

central and upstate New York, and was Director of

Eric Carr MDiv ’18 was recently approved for

toured the Philippines, Hong Kong, Tokyo, and

Mental Health for the Syracuse Rescue Mission. He

ordination as an elder. He is currently serving

five countries in Africa. He has also served as

is currently serving as chaplain at the Hutchings

Midtown Parish in Philadelphia, PA.

an adjunct chaplain and Bible expositor for the

Psychiatric Center, and is a Life and Leadership

Philadelphia Phillies, Eagles, and 76ers. He has

Coach. Jim enjoys spending time with his children

been president of the Baptist Convention of

and grandchildren, as well as meeting new people

Pennsylvania/South Jersey, president of the

and exploring new places. He loves to learn and

State Convention Presidents Fellowship of the

gain new perspectives and insights. His passion

Southern Baptist Convention, and president of

is to help people discover their gifts, clarify their

the National African American Fellowship, SBC.

direction, move forward to reach their goals, and

He currently serves as vice president of The

grow personally and spiritually as they seek and

Georgia E. Gregory Interdenominational School

following God’s leading and grow closer to Him.

of Music, Nazarene Community Development

His goal is to help people trust God and enjoy life.

Corporation, and No More Excuses Ministries. He is the director of community outreach for the prestigious Germantown Academy of Fort Washington, PA, and a founding trustee of The Community Partnership School in North

chaplain at DuPont Hospital for Children and Appalachian Service Project.

Marilyn Marsh MTS ’18 became Esperanza College’s Executive Dean on July 22, 2019. She came to Esperanza College from Publicis Healthcare Solutions, where she served as National Sales Director. In that role, she was recognized as one of the top 100 women in her industry globally who are inspiring role models to others through vision, dedication, and action. Prior to her current position, Ms. Marsh served in several management roles with Merck & Co.

David Michel MTS ’99, MDiv ’01 graduated with a PhD in Theology, Ethics, and the Human Sciences, awarded by Chicago Theological Seminary on May 17, 2019.

Philadelphia.

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E A S T E R N

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Eastern | Fall 2019  

EASTERN, the magazine of Eastern University, supports our mission to provide a Christian higher education for those who will make a differen...

Eastern | Fall 2019  

EASTERN, the magazine of Eastern University, supports our mission to provide a Christian higher education for those who will make a differen...