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W I N T ER 2019 I SSU E

O N V I E W TH ROUG H M AY 27, 2019

HEARD MUSEUM MEMBERSHIP MAGAZINE


BOARD OF TRUSTEES John Melamed James R. Huntwork Patricia K. Hibbeler Leland W. Peterson David M. Roche

Chair Vice-Chair Secretary Treasurer Dickey Family Director and CEO

Stephen R. Lewis Marigold Linton John F. Lomax Janis Lyon Robert Meyer Scott Montgomery Susan H. Navran Scott H. O’Connor William G. Ridenour Don Smith Sue Snyder Guild President Christy Vezolles David Wilshin

LIFE TRUSTEES Kay Benedict Howard R. Berlin James T. Bialac Dr. George Blue Spruce, Jr. Herbert J. Bool Robert B. Bulla F. Wesley Clelland, III Norma Jean Coulter Alice (A.J.) Dickey Robert J. Duffy Mary G. Hamilton Barbara Heard Joel P. Hoxie Mary Hudak Dr. Thomas M. Hudak Richard L. Johnes

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EARTHSONG Allison Lester Caesar Chaves Willow Senjamin Deborah Paddison Sarah Moore

Membership Manager Creative Director Marketing Manager Copy Editing Graphic Design

COVER: Josef Albers, Luminous Day, 1947-52. Oil on Masonite, 27.9 x 54.6 cm. The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, Bethany, Conneticut. © 2018 The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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The Heard Museum is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization incorporated in the State of Arizona. Exhibition, event and program funding provided in part by the Arizona Commission on the Arts, the Arizona Humanities Council, the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Phoenix Office of Arts and Culture.


DIRECTOR’S LETTER

The trustees, staff and Heard Museum Guild are in full swing as we head into high season with the opening of two major exhibitions and our most iconic event, the Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair & Market. There are extraordinary experiences awaiting our membership this winter, and they are unique to the Heard Museum.

David M. Roche Dickey Family Director and CEO

Feb. 1 marks the opening of Josef Albers in Mexico, which explores the little-known connection between Albers’ iconic Homage to the Square and Adobe series of paintings and pre-Columbian architecture. We’re honored to be working with the Guggenheim Museum, which organized the exhibition, and to be its sole North American venue outside of New York City. This exhibition continues our mission-driven effort to explore intersection. Nearly 20 years ago, the Heard Museum opened the exhibition Remembering Our Indian School Days: The Boarding School Experience. It quickly grew in stature and reputation to become a legitimate landmark. After two decades, however, the original exhibition required some updating to reflect the lessons that it inspired. Away From Home: American Indian Boarding School Stories opens Feb. 23 and represents the Heard Museum’s ongoing commitment to sharing these powerful and expanding stories with our visitors. We’re proud of our leadership in presenting this hidden chapter in American history that continues to profoundly impact American Indian communities today. On March 2, the Heard Museum Guild, our outstanding and deeply dedicated volunteer force, will transform our eight-acre campus into a sea of white tents for the annual Indian Fair & Market. A world-class array of jewelry, textiles, pottery, beadwork, paintings, photography and more will be available for sale, representing the work of more than 600 artists from American Indian and Alaska Native tribes and Canadian First Nations. The Fair is both the signature event run by the Guild and the largest annual event held at the Heard, with more than 10,000 guests expected to attend from all over the world. There is something for everyone, and it’s an extraordinary opportunity not only to meet the artists, but also to check out the “state of the art.” We look forward to seeing you at the Heard Museum this winter and thank you for your support, which makes all of this possible.

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earth song HEARD MUSEUM MEMBERSHIP MAGAZINE

W I N T ER 2019

WHAT'S INSIDE VIEW

EXHIBITIONS ON DISPLAY

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Josef Albers in Mexico

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Away From Home: American Indian Boarding School Stories

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Becoming a Phoenix Indian Brave

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Away From Home Exhibition Symposium

READ 20

Artist Books Distinguish the Heard Museum Library

GO + DO

EVENTS

22 Calendar 24

Member Exclusives

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World Championship Hoop Dance Contest

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61st Annual Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair & Market

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Signature Artists Featured in the Heard Museum Shop

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Student Art Show & Sale

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Second Saturdays

DINE + SHOP 35

Gotta Have It!

TRAVEL + LEARN 36

Explore With the Guild

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Guild Classes

EXPERIENCE 38

Moondance Highlights

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Member Event Highlights

GIVE 43

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Maie Bartlett Heard Society Luncheon Honoring the Generosity of Betty Van Denburgh


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O N V I E W TH ROUG H M AY 27, 2019

BY LAUREN HINKSON ASSOCIATE CURATOR, COLLECTIONS, SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM, NEW YORK

A visit to the Guggenheim’s collections warehouse in 2008, shortly after I began my tenure at the museum, sparked the initial idea

for the exhibition Josef Albers in Mexico. While viewing conceptual

photography in the collection, one of our art preparators brought my attention to the museum’s holdings of Josef Albers’s photographs

and photocollages. Rarely shown and the least understood aspect

of Albers’s practice, the works were revelatory. In the ensuing years,

the excitement of this discovery led me to the Josef and Anni Albers

Foundation in Bethany, Connecticut. I had the opportunity to view hundreds of the photographs and collages Josef Albers made from

the 1930s to the 1960s as well as little-known early paintings and

works on paper. Here, the exhibition began to take form.


ALBERS’S ENCOUNTERS WITH PRE-COLUMBIAN MONUMENTS WERE CRUCIAL FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF HIS MOST ICONIC SERIES THE HOMAGE TO THE SQUARE (1950-76).


VIEW Josef Albers is one of the 20th century’s most important artists and thinkers. Born in Germany in 1888, he studied at the Bauhaus and eventually became a professor there. Albers pioneered a quintessentially modern aesthetic based on rigorous explorations of form, material, and color. After the closure of the Bauhaus, he left his home country in 1933 and took a position as head of the painting department at Black Mountain College in North Carolina. Later, he led the design department at Yale University, mentoring generations of artists and influencing many more. His color theory handbook Interaction of Color (1963) remains a seminal work in the field. From the 1930s through the 1960s, he and his wife, the artist Anni Albers, took repeated trips to Mexico and other Latin American countries. The aim of Josef Albers in Mexico is to reveal how these experiences—especially Albers’s encounters with pre-Columbian monuments— were crucial for the development of his most iconic series, the Homage to the Square (1950-76). The Alberses visited several sites repeatedly over the years, and Josef took hundreds if not thousands of black-and-white photographs with his Leica camera of the pyramids, shrines, and sanctuaries at archeological sites in Oaxaca and the Yucatán. From Mitla to Teotihuacán, Tenayuca to Monte Albán, these sites sparked a creative outpouring,

Left: Josef Albers (1888-1976), Homage to the Square, 1969. Oil on Masonite, 40.4 x 40.3 cm. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Gift, The Josef Albers Foundation, Inc., 1991 Top: Josef Albers (1888-1976), Governors Palace, Uxmal, 1952. Gelatin silver print, 11.6 x 17 cm; 12. 7 x18.1 cm. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Gift, The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, 1996 Above: Josef Albers (1888-1976), Platform of the Eagles, Chichén Itzá, 1952. Gelatin silver print, 17.7 x12.7 cm. The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, Bethany, Connecticut, © 2018 The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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reinvigorating his paintings and stimulating new experiments in photography that, until now, have rarely been on view because Albers did not exhibit these works himself during his lifetime. Through his close attention to ancient architecture, Albers developed new modes of seeing the modern world.

Top: Josef Albers (1888-1976), Tenayuca I, 1942. Oil on Masonite, 55.9 x 96.5 cm. The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, Bethany, Connecticut, © 2018 The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York Above: Josef Albers ( 1888-1976), Detail of stonework, Mitla, ca. 1937. Gelatin silver print, 24.7 x 17.7 cm. The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, Bethany, Connecticut, © 2018 The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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The formal influence is apparent in comparisons between works such as Luminous Day (1947-52) and Albers’s photographs of the ancient Mayan ruins at Uxmal in the Yucatán. But the exhibition is also an opportunity to examine how the artifacts and monuments of non-Western cultures became touchstones for modernist art. On his first trip to Mexico, in 1935, Josef Albers remarked in a letter to Vassily Kandinsky, a former colleague at the Bauhaus, that “Mexico is truly the promised land of abstract art, for here it is thousands of years old.” I believe Albers’s photography offers a kind of Rosetta stone for interpreting how his overall body of work bridges the temporal divide between ancient forms and modernist abstraction. His images are more than just documentation of the temple complexes. Albers’s photos also register an experience of historical time; he returned again and again to certain sites such as Mitla, capturing a process by which ancient monuments were being excavated for modern visitors.


VIEW Josef Albers (1888-1976), Prismatic II, 1936. Oil on wood composition panel, 45.7 x 48.3 cm. The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, Bethany, Connecticut, © 2018 The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Anni and Josef Albers often traveled by car through the American Southwest on their journeys to Mexico. Indeed, scholars have suggested the paintings of the Variant/Adobe series (1946-66) are inspired not just by the adobe dwellings of Mexico, but also those of New Mexico, where the Alberses stopped en route to Mexico City. It is fitting that visitors to the Heard Museum, situated in this breathtaking Arizona landscape, will have the opportunity to experience the Mexican roots of Albers’s paintings and his deep

respect for ancient cultural forms. On one of his many trips to Monte Albán, Albers described the ruins of that archeological site as an ‘ongoing progression of magnificence.’ It was an experience that left an indelible impression on him and his artistic practice. I hope to share some of that magnificence in this exhibition and the richly illustrated catalogue. To ‘open eyes’ as Albers would say, to the least known aspect of his practice and to reveal new understanding of those familiar paintings of nested squares.

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Curator and Author, Lauren Hinkson ASSOCIATE CURATOR, COLLECTIONS, SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM, NEW YORK

Josef Albers in Mexico by Lauren Hinkson, brings together photographs, photo collages, prints and significant paintings from the Variants/Adobe (1946–66) and Homage to the Square (1950–76) series from the collections of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation. Two scholarly essays, an illustrated map and vivid color reproductions of paintings and works on paper illuminate this littleknown period in the influential artist’s practice. Catalogues will be available for purchase both online at heardshop.com or in person at Books & More. Presenting Sponsors of Josef Albers in Mexico: The Diane and Bruce Halle Foundation Virginia M. Ullman Foundation Top: Curator, Lauren Hinkson at the presentation of Josef Albers in Mexico, Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice, Italy.

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Additional Support by


COMING APRIL 5, 2019 Navajo, Late Transitional Textile, 1890-1910. Handspun wool, aniline dye, 85 x 59 inches. Collection of Carol Ann Mackay


view

AWAY

FROM

HOME

AMERICAN INDIAN BOARDING SCHOOL STORIES

Since opening in 2000, Remembering Our Indian School Days: The Boarding School Experience has become one of the Heard Museum’s most visited and impactful exhibitions. As the first major, national exhibition about the history of Indian boarding schools in North America, it played a significant role in educating the public and advancing research. Nearly 20 years later, the exhibition will reopen as Away From Home: American Indian Boarding School Stories on Feb. 23, featuring major updates, interactive technology and new scholarship.

Before and After portraits of Zie-wie Davis (Sioux), age 15, one of the first Native American girls to arrive at Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute. William Larrabee, photographer, Hampton University Archives, Hampton, Virgina. RC125(7)2.1.3&4.

We sat down with the exhibition staff and team to discuss this momentous project. Following are excerpts from a dialogue with David M. Roche, Dickey Family Director & CEO; Janet Cantley, Exhibition Curator; John Bulla, Deputy Director & COO; Melissa Simmons, Exhibitions Manager; and Dan Hagerty, Director of Strategic Development and Programs. The new installation of this exhibition is made possible by:

Generous support provided in memory of Alice Brown Fleet (Creek/Seminole/Cherokee)

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National Endowment for the Humanities


Janet Cantley: After almost two decades we felt the need to refresh the physical aspects of the exhibition and augment the content to bring it up to the present. We wanted to address some of the questions visitors had as they left the exhibition, like: Are there American Indian boarding schools today? Can you tell us more about specific schools, like Haskell, Intermountain or Stewart Indian School? What about American Indian boarding schools in Alaska? Guests also asked for information about well-known people who attended boarding schools, such as Jim Thorpe (Sac and Fox) and Billy Mills (Sioux). They also wondered about the legacy of the schools and the impact that the boarding school era has on Native people today. Q: Was there a primary challenge or concern? David M. Roche: Remembering Our Indian School Days: The Boarding School Experience had touched so many lives and was near to the hearts of many. The need to update the exhibition was undeniable, but to do so in a way that rightfully honored this landmark was a challenge. It was also essential that we not lose the emotional impact of the original exhibition; that emotion created empathy, which is the most effective way to educate our visitors about this complicated history. Janet, the curatorial and design teams, and the advisors have a done an excellent job navigating these challenges, and the result is an exhibition that we believe respects the past, brings the scholarship into the present and remains deeply affecting for our visitors. John Bulla: New audio and video upgrades, highresolution graphics, LED lighting and modern interactive technologies have all been at the top of our list as a means to enhance our storytelling. Melissa Simmons: For an exhibition that was only supposed to last two to five years, it had held up remarkably well, but it desperately needed a refresh. We wanted a way to incorporate into the exhibition more of the content that our Advisory Panel had identified and

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Q: What led to the decision to update this critically important exhibition?

Sewing basket, c. 1904, Raffia, embroidery hoop, commercial cotton cloth, vegetal fiber. Gift of Marion S. and David W. Ellis. 4897-1 a&b

the questions our visitors were asking. Unfortunately, the existing technology did not allow for that. Q: Once the decision was made to update the exhibition, how did you approach this complicated project that spanned more than 100 years of American history? Cantley: To start, we brought in scholars, authors and teachers of American Indian education and Indian boarding school history. They formed an Advisory Panel, with whom we met on several occasions to discuss what to retain and what to change. They helped us formulate the “Big Questions” for each part of the exhibition—questions like What is education and how do we learn? Why did the United States government develop American Indian boarding schools? Who went to these institutions? What changed over time, and in what ways? What has been the impact of American Indian boarding schools? and How do we tell an authentic, accurate, all-encompassing and balanced history of this very complex and nuanced and personal story? Simmons: I turned to the notes and drawings from the original exhibition design team. They had done the initial research and had the conceptual ideas that visitors were familiar with that gave me the basic design framework. Our team also did its own research into how the original exhibition was impacting the visitor—we conducted special evaluations and focus groups. This valuable information

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gave us insight into which parts of the exhibition worked and which ones needed rethinking.

Q: What are the challenges in renovating a 20-year-old exhibition within an older gallery of this size?

Dan Hagerty: The original exhibition had been awarded a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, and so we were very pleased when we received a grant to begin the review and planning process. Based on the success of that planning process, we felt well-positioned to pursue a larger Implementation Grant from the NEH in 2016, and we were thrilled that our grant was approved. Not only did we receive a grant in the amount of $250,000, but we were also the only private 501(c)(3) institution in the entire state to receive an NEH grant in that funding cycle! We are also very proud that the NEH took two additional steps: they selected the museum’s grant package to be shared online as an example of a strong funding proposal (check it out at neh.gov), and, this project was selected from among hundreds to be part of “NEH on the Road,” a series of nationally-traveling exhibitions.

Bulla: Most of this exhibition’s infrastructure had to be upgraded or replaced. We have taken the proper care and time to make sure all of the new construction and finishes built into this remodeled exhibition are to the highest standard and quality. We also have had the opportunity to improve on the occupancy safety features and accessibility accommodations. All of these enhancements will positively influence the visitor’s experience of this exhibition.

The outstanding success we experienced at the NEH helped inspire support from others as well, and Away From Home is the beneficiary of a portion of a major $5 million gift made by an anonymous donor in 2017­—the largest gift ever made to the Heard Museum.

Above: Phoenix Indian School campus, c. 1900. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC 75-PA-1-2.

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Q: With many important objects and narratives already in the Boarding Schools exhibition, what is being retained from the original? What needed to be changed? Cantley: We knew going into the planning for the exhibition update that certain things were to remain. The immersive experience is essential to building empathy. So the iconic barber chair, for example, continues as a symbol of assimilationist policy: the cutting of hair and erasing all traces of Native identity, to be replaced by mainstream dress, beliefs, language and values. Simmons: For me, the important pieces to keep were the feelings and emotions that the original exhibition gave visitors. The feeling of the early-1900s classroom was an important part to keep, but at the same time I wanted it to go further, to feel even more immersive. I looked to enhance the exhibition with even more objects, graphics and immersive elements to better tell the story.


Q: Were there any new stories that came to light because of this project?

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Cantley: One example started with the donation of a basket from Marion and David Ellis, who live near Carlisle, Pennsylvania. Their relatives had been part of the Outing program, where students were sent to work for local families and businesses for the summer. Along with the basket, they donated a photograph taken in 1904 of two young women feeding chickens. Written on the back of that photograph was: “2 girls from Carlisle Indian School. One an Eskimo Annie Cooglilok [Coodlalook]. Quincy-Wertz home—1904-05.” We knew of the Carlisle Indian School Digital Resource Center at Dickinson College, and we searched their scanned student records from the National Archives. That set us on an exciting journey to learn a good deal about Annie Coodlalook, the owner of the basket, and how it had been left with the Ellis family. You will see a wonderful collection of photographs and the full details of this story in the updated exhibition. Q: When this exhibition reopens on Feb. 23, what are you most excited about visitors encountering? Simmons: I’m excited for visitors to travel to this place and time that we have created. I think that the more impactful design will help visitors to remember the story, enrich their learning experience and tell others about it. The boarding school story is such an important part of our history as Americans, and this exhibition is the best way we can tell that story. Cantley: I hope that our visitors’ journeys through Away From Home will be emotionally and educationally rewarding—seeing new art, hearing new voices, learning about tragedies and triumphs experienced by boarding school students, and recognizing the impact that American Indian boarding Sschools continue to have on Indigenous identities and lives. Bulla: I look forward to to the visitors recognizing familiarity with this beloved exhibition, but also exploring all of the new, powerful content developed by our curator and Advisory Panel. I am also excited for those familiar with the exhibition to experience all of the new finishes and refined details that completes the immersive journey of one of the most important exhibitions in our 90-year history.

Top: Portrait of Cracking Wing (Mandan), 1881 from Fort Berthold, North Dakota, who arrived at Hampton Normal School, 1881. He died there in 1884. Frances Benjamin Johnston, photographer, Hampton University Archives, Hampton, Virginia. RC125(6)1.15.9 Above: Barber chair in Remembering Our Indian School Days: The Boarding School Experience, 2000 – 2018. Craig Smith, photographer.

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Becoming a Phoenix Indian Brave

BY PATTY TALAHONGVA | C URATOR, PHOENIX INDIAN SCHOOL VISITOR CENTER AND BOARDING SCHOOL ADVISORY PANEL One thing I clearly remember upon arriving on the campus of the Phoenix Indian School was that it was hot and there were a whole lot of Greyhound and Trailways busses parking back-to-back with students running off them yelling to one another, happy to once again be reunited at boarding school.

Dorm life was crowded, with four girls to a room with two bunk beds. We turned our footlockers on end to make a nightstand. Our drawers were built into the walls, and we all shared one large bathroom down the hall. Today, nearly 40 years later, I still keep in touch with two roommates.

As a child, I remember coming to the campus to visit relatives who were attending P.I. I didn’t pay much attention to the layout of the campus then, but I do recall where the football field was because we watched many games there as family members played on the field.

On weekends we could earn a little cash by going on an “outing.” The Outing Program was designed in part to give the students a chance to build their industrial skills, because that was the first true nature of these government-run boarding schools for Indians. In the beginning we weren’t encouraged to attend college; instead the boys learned trades to help build the budding towns and cities. The girls learned skills so they could cook, clean and take care of the townsfolks’ homes. Our outing program reflected this idea. Anyone in Phoenix could drive up to our dorms on Saturday mornings and simply check out a student, take them home to work for the day, pay them and return them back to campus. I got so lucky when the woman who came to hire me turned out to be a Valley celebrity. Acquanetta Ross became my friend, and I would go with her on weekends, supposedly to clean, but mostly we shopped and she treated me to lunch in fancy restaurants.

Now, as a student, I would become very familiar with the campus, each dorm, the classrooms, the workshop areas and, of course, the dining hall. My experience at Phoenix Indian was unique to me. My younger sister Rosalie and I had to figure out how to get along with so many people from tribes we had never known before. I remember thinking Quechan Indians were so exotic! We quickly learned to call each student by her correct tribe. For instance, you shouldn’t confuse Utes with Ute Mountain Utes! The Ute Mountain Utes brought their drum and would play on weekends, the pounding resonating across the campus. That was the year I first heard 49 songs. The guys would sing and incorporate any girl’s name into the song, often teasing her in the process. It was both and honor and an embarrassment to hear your name in their song.

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Because every boarding school was operated on a military base model, each student had a work-detail assignment they had to do each month. I learned how to buff floors to a nice high shine, because the military likes shiny objects. I also spent many mornings helping in the kitchen, making hundreds of pieces of toast for our breakfast.

I got my first job as a journalist at Phoenix Indian and my stories appeared in the Phoenix Gazette’s, “Teen Gazette” edition. We were paid by column-inch, with bonus pay for photos, surveys and front-page stories.


I really reflected on my personal experience and thought about what it was like for those students who came before me and how hard it was in the beginning when they couldn’t speak their languages and their hair was cut.

Former students carved their names and made drawings in the bricks adorning Memorial Hall at Phoenix Indian School. Photos provided by Patty Talahongva.

I also got a job at the Phoenix Veterans Hospital, which was located behind my dorm. I was 16 and performing EKG tests on patients. Cheerleading was also a part of my experience at P.I., and I ended up being an exchange student to San Diego as well. As an advisor to the Heard Museum’s boarding school exhibit, I really reflected on my personal experience and thought about what it was like for those students who came before me and how hard it was in the beginning when they couldn’t speak their languages and their hair was cut. That didn’t happen to me, but I could empathize with their loneliness, fear and even some anger about being at a boarding school. Certainly each student had a unique experience, and it wasn’t all bad. The opposite is also true: it wasn’t all good. In my year at P.I., one of my close friends was stabbed to death on campus. The school did not provide counseling for us, but they did provide a bus to the student’s reservation for anyone who wanted to go to the funeral. I chose to not go. A few weeks later another classmate was stabbed, but survived. We were chastised by the staff because these crimes would reflect badly on the school. Again, I don’t recall having any emotional support to deal with these tragedies.

Being at P.I. matured me in many ways. I had always been pretty independent, but this experience really showed me I could rely on my own wits and figure things out. Of course, at the time, I had no idea that I was part of a larger effort by the federal government to wipe away our reservation lands and assimilate us. Now, looking back, it’s with a mix of pride, sorrow and rolling on the floor with laughter! That’s what makes Indians so resilient, in my opinion: we can laugh at anything. Please, when you go through the exhibit, know that the first few classes of boarding school students faced a situation that was unimaginable. And then, slowly, things got better. In the end, there were other hardships the students faced, but as always, the students showed strength, resiliency, and integrity. We are proud today to say we attended Phoenix Indian School.

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Exhibition Symposium Feb. 23

AWAY FROM HOME: AMERICAN INDIAN BOARDING SCHOOL STORIES

Students posing at entrance to Chemawa Indian Training School, near Salem, Oregon, c. 1885 Credit: Harvey W. Scott Memorial Library, Pacific University Archives 1583; RC125(9):2.2.1

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Away From Home: American Indian Boarding School Stories is the reinstallation of the long-running “Boarding School Exhibit” at the Heard Museum. Since opening in 2000, Remembering Our Indian School Days: The Boarding School Experience has become the Heard Museum’s most thematically powerful exhibition. Over the past two decades interest in American Indian boarding schools and scholarship about the subject has increased. It is a story that must continue to be shared and one that is central to remembering the nation’s past and understanding its present.


VIEW Child

Lomawaima

McCleave

Reyhner

Presenters Brenda Child, Ph.D., (Red Lake Ojibwe), professor and chair, Department of American Studies, University of Minnesota K. Tsianina Lomawaima, Ph.D., (Mvskoke/ Creek nation, unenrolled), Distinguished Scholar of Indigenous Education, Center for Indian Education, and professor in the School of Social Transformation, Arizona State University Christine Diindiisi McCleave, M.A. (Turtle Mountain Ojibwe), executive officer, National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition

Roessel

Talahongva

Symposium Schedule FEBRUARY 23 | 9 A.M. TO 12:30 P.M.

Moderated by K. Tsianina Lomawaima Legacies of American Indian Boarding Schools • The Boarding School as Metaphor Brenda Child • Places of Memory: Phoenix Indian School Patty Talahongva New Directions in American Indian Education

Jon Reyhner, Ed.D., professor, Department of Educational Specialties, Northern Arizona University

• Understanding and Addressing Ongoing Trauma Christine Diindiisi McCleave

Charles M. Roessel, Ph.D., (Diné), President, Diné College

• American Indian Boarding Schools What Went Wrong and What is Going Right Jon Reyhner

Patty Talahongva, (Hopi), curator, Phoenix Indian School Visitor Center

• Self-Determination as a School Improvement Strategy Charles M. Roessel

TICKETS Admission is free and open to the public. Online or on-site registration is required. Attendance is limited to 250 people. For more information, visit heard.org.

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read

Artist Books Distinguish the Heard Museum Library BY MARIO NICK KLIMIADES LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES DIRECTOR AND BETTY MURPHY LIBRARIAN

Within the Billie Jane Baguley Library and Archives are collections that set it apart from other museum libraries. One cornerstone is the Native American Artists Resource Collection while another is its collection of Native American artist books. Although early Westernstyle books by Native Americans go back centuries with the creation of Mesoamerican codices, stories on hides and cloth, and Plains ledger book drawings, the phenomenon of Native artists making contemporary artist books has barely a 40-year history. With the advent of modern Native artist books, the quest was on to identify these special creations.

The definition and scope of artist books vary; fundamentally, an artist book is a book made by an artist in a single or limited edition. According to the 2018 Getty publication, Artists and Their Books, Books and Their Artists, “artists’ books are those conceived, designed, and made by artists themselves explicitly (if not exclusively) as autonomous creative endeavors.” A rare exhibition on Native American artist books, Illustrious: American Indian Artists’ Books and Illustrations, was curated by Janet Cantley in 2010 at Heard Museum North Scottsdale. Literature on the topic is scant as well. The only known publication on Native American artist books is Tracy Dietzel’s fine art publication In Search of Native American Artists’ Books published by Artzteid Press in 1992. Dietzel’s research for the book was based in part on the holdings of the Heard Museum Library and documents the history of Native American artist books during the 20th century.

Kay WalkingStick, Talking Leaves, Reader spread of pages 20-21. Gift of artist, RC165(7):1

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Following the 1991 fine art exhibition, Shared Visions: Native American Painters and Sculptors in the Twentieth Century, the Library turned its attention to acquiring this new and sometimes avantgarde artform of artist books. One notable addition came when Kay WalkingStick donated her autobiographical artist book, Talking Leaves, to commemorate the 2000 expansion of the Library and Archives. Talking Leaves, which is the most written about and celebrated Luzene Hill, Gosdayi Digahltisdohdi Gayesadvi, Title page with cloth carrying case. Gift of Norman L. Native American artist book, became Sandfield Charitable Fund of the Dallas Jewish Community Foundation Library Fund, RBK:PM784.H55 2015 the signature artist book of the The last two artists are especially noteworthy since they Library’s collection. This masterwork, made in 1993, is represent 21st century Native artists. The first is Luzene massive and comprised of a series of gouache paintings Hill who addresses Cherokee folklore and language of images and commentary. WalkingStick states that in her artist book, Gosdayi Digahltisdohdi Gayesadvi. this book “could be titled ‘Quotes From Otherwise This 2015 work written in Cherokee and published by Intelligent Art Types’ or ‘Made in White America,’ SpeakEasy Press is about “Spearfinger … a terrible but it is called ‘Talking Leaves’ for Sequoyah, who monster that lived in the mountains … what she liked made the paper leaves speak in our Native language, best was to eat the livers of Cherokee children.” The Cherokee.” Another significant addition came in work is accompanied by a spoken word recording of the 2011 when funds raised by the Heard Museum Guild full Cherokee tale. The entire artist book is issued in a Library Book Sale & Treasure Market allowed an artist cloth carrying case with leather ties. book to be commissioned from Dallin Maybee. He The second artist is Jacob Meders whose book, Catching created Beniiseiht, which recounts a Northwest folk Birds in Maidu Myth, incorporates selected texts by tale beautifully told on ledger paper and bound with folklorist William Shipley with masterful drawings a beaded cover. Other notable artists represented in by Meders. The 2009 work was published by the Press the artist book collection include Fritz Scholder, Joe of the Red-Tailed Hawk in Arizona. According to Fedderson, Alan Michelson, Alfred W. Yazzie, Debra the book’s colophon, “This book was handcrafted to Magpie Earling, Edgar Heap-of-Birds, Frank R. honor the Maidu culture and those who have worked LaPena, Luzene Hill, and Jacob Meders. to preserve it … All illustrations have been provided by the artist/printmaker … printed in an edition of twenty”. The beauty, artistry and creativity of these Native artists are demonstrated in their artist books. For a unique and innovative experience, you are encouraged to visit the Library to view the richness of these works. Jacob Meders, Catching Birds in Maidu Myth, Reader spread with Hummingbird (plate 252). Gift of Heard Museum Guild Library Fund, RBK:E99.M18M434 2009

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go + do

This calendar is accurate as of Feb. 1, but we are always planning more events. Check heard.org or our Facebook Page for the most up-to-date information.

FEBRUARY 9 | SATURDAY

14 | THURSDAY

20 | WEDNESDAY

9 A.M. TO 5 P.M.

6 TO 8 P.M.

9 TO 11:30 A.M.

29TH ANNUAL WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP HOOP DANCE CONTEST

HEARD ’S MEMBERS VALENTINE’S DAY EVENT

GUILD MEETING

Heard Museum Amphitheater

Central Courtyard

see page 26

see page 24

10 | SUNDAY

16 | SATURDAY

9 A.M. TO 5 P.M.

11:30 A.M. TO 1 P.M.

29TH ANNUAL WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP HOOP DANCE CONTEST

SCENE AND HEARD FILM SERIES: JOSEF AND ANNI ALBERS: ART IS EVERYWHERE (DOCUMENTARY)

Steele Auditorium

Heard Museum Amphitheater

Steele Auditorium

9:30 TO 10:30 A.M.

see page 26

see page 25

MUSEUM YOGA

Steele Auditorium

23 | SATURDAY 9 A.M. TO 12:30 P.M. SYMPOSIUM: AWAY FROM HOME: AMERICAN INDIAN BOARDING SCHOOL LEGACIES

see page 18

Heard Museum Campus

MARCH 1 | FRIDAY

9 | SATURDAY

20 | WEDNESDAY

5:30 TO 8 P.M.

9:30 TO 10:30 A.M.

9 TO 11:30 A.M.

BEST OF SHOW: HEARD MUSEUM GUILD INDIAN FAIR & MARKET

MUSEUM YOGA

GUILD MEETING

Heard Museum Campus

Steele Auditorium

10 A.M. TO 4 P.M.

23 | SATURDAY

Heard Museum Campus see page 28

2 | SATURDAY 9:30 A.M. TO 5 P.M. 61ST ANNUAL HEARD MUSEUM GUILD INDIAN FAIR & MARKET

Heard Museum Campus see page 28

3 | SUNDAY 9:30 A.M. TO 4 P.M. 61ST ANNUAL HEARD MUSEUM GUILD INDIAN FAIR & MARKET

Heard Museum Campus see page 28

SECOND SATURDAY: FINE ART MARKETPLACE

Heard Museum Campus see page 33 11:30 A.M. TO 1 P.M. SCENE AND HEARD FILM SERIES: UNCONQUERED. ALLAN HOUSER AND THE LEGACY OF ONE FAMILY & THRESHOLD: PRESTON SINGLETARY’S GLASS ART

Steele Auditorium see page 25

16 | SATURDAY 11 A.M. TO 1 P.M. MEMBERS PICNIC

The Farm at South Mountain see page 25

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9:30 TO 10:30 A.M. MUSEUM YOGA

Heard Museum Campus

29 | FRIDAY 5:30 TO 8 P.M. STUDENT ART OPENING RECEPTION

Heard Museum Campus see page 32


4 | THURSDAY

11 | THURSDAY

17 | WEDNESDAY

HOME: NATIVE PEOPLES IN THE SOUTHWEST SHORTCOURSE

HOME: NATIVE PEOPLES IN THE SOUTHWEST SHORTCOURSE

9 TO 11:30 A.M.

Monte Vista Room

Monte Vista Room

see page 37

see page 37

5 | FRIDAY

12 | FRIDAY

6 TO 10 P.M.

11 A.M.

FIRST FRIDAY: EXHIBITION OPENING COLOR RIOT!

LAS GUIAS ORIENTATION

6 | SATURDAY

13 | SATURDAY

1 P.M.

9:30 TO 10:30 A.M.

EXHIBITION LECTURE SERIES: COLOR RIOT!

MUSEUM YOGA

Steele Auditorium

see page 37

Heard Museum Campus

GO + DO

APRIL GUILD MEETING

Steele Auditorium

20 | SATURDAY 10 A.M. TO 2 P.M. APPRAISAL DAY

Steele Auditorium

27 | SATURDAY 9:30 TO 10:30 A.M. MUSEUM YOGA

Heard Museum Campus

10 A.M. TO 4 P.M.

28 | SUNDAY

SECOND SATURDAY: KATSINA MARKETPLACE

11 A.M. TO 4 P.M.

Steele Auditorium and Central Courtyard

Heard Museum Campus

DIA DEL NIÑO

see page 33

MAY 3 | FRIDAY

11 | SATURDAY

18 | SATURDAY

6 TO 10 P.M.

9:30 TO 10:30 A.M.

1 P.M.

FIRST FRIDAY: FREE MUSEUM ADMISSION!

MUSEUM YOGA

EXHIBITION LECTURE SERIES: JOSEF ALBERS IN MEXICO

Heard Museum Campus

Heard Museum Campus

Heard Museum Campus

10 A.M. TO 4 P.M.

10-13 | FRIDAY - MONDAY HOPI ARTS, HOPI CULTURE

SECOND SATURDAY MARKETPLACE: BOOKS & BEATS

see page 36

Central Courtyard see page 33

25 | SATURDAY 9:30 TO 10:30 A.M. MUSEUM YOGA

Heard Museum Campus

11:30 A.M. TO 1:00 P.M. SCENE & HEARD FILM SERIES: BLOOD MEMORY

Steele Auditorium Featuring a dialogue with Sandy White Hawk (Sicangu Lakota) see page 25

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We our members All members are invited to be our date for Valentine’s Day. Once again, we’ll have live music by Martha Gonzalez featuring three special guest musicians, in collaboration with ASU Gammage. Martha, a Grammy Award-winning singer/songwriter for East LA rock band Quetzal, will perform classic Mexican ballads in our Central Courtyard. Delightful bites will be provided by one of our preferred caterers, Atlasta, as well a special tour of Josef Albers in Mexico highlighting the relationship between Josef and Anni Albers. Let us know if you are able to accept our date by kindly calling 602.251.0209 x6406 or emailing members@heard.org before February 12, 2019.

Haute Photography

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Scene and Heard Film Series

GO + DO

Member Exclusives

JOSEF AND ANNI ALBERS: ART IS EVERYWHERE FEB. 16 | 11:30 A.M.

UNCONQUERED: ALLAN HOUSER AND THE LEGACY OF ONE APACHE FAMILY THRESHOLD: PRESTON SINGLETARY’S GLASS ART Haute Photography

MEMBERS’ LOUNGE

MARCH 9 | 11:30 A.M.

BLOOD & MEMORY MAY 11 | 11:30 A.M.

Every First Friday and Second Saturdays Members enjoy exclusive access to complimentary refreshments in our Members' Lounge, located in the Pritzlaff Courtyard.* Look for the icon for corresponding dates and times in the calendar, pgs. 22 - 23 *location subject to change depending on the weather

Josef Albers In Mexico

HEARD MUSEUM CELEBRATES OUR MEMBERS WITH A PICNIC AT THE FARM AT SOUTH MOUNTAIN On Saturday, March 16, the Heard Museum welcomes all museum members to a special Members’ Picnic at The Farm at South Mountain! As the Heard Museum nears its 90th anniversary season, we are thrilled to partner with The Farm and its onsite catering company, Santa Barbara Catering, for a special day to thank museum members and celebrate the special connection between The Farm and the Heard Museum. We hope our members will bring their whole family for a day of fun activities, games, outdoor exploration and outstanding food. RSVP to members@heard.org or call 602.251.0209 x6403

GREAT CONVERSATIONS: EXHIBITION LECTURE SERIES FEB. 2 | 1 P.M. MAY 18 | 1 P.M. The Exhibition Lecture Series is made possible by support from Drs. Kathleen L. and William G. Howard. Above: Anni Albers, Josef Albers, Mitla, 1956. Gelatin silver print. The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, Bethany, Conneticut. © 2018 The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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go + do 29th Annual Heard Museum World Championship

Hoop Dance Contest Join us February 9 and 10, 2019, for one of the most exciting and popular events of the year—the 29th Annual World Championship Hoop Dance Contest! Over the course of two thrilling days, top American Indian and Canadian First Nations Hoop Dancers will compete in four divisions for the prestigious World Champion title and cash prizes. The art of hoop dance honors the cultural traditions from multiple Indigenous communities that first employed hoop dance as a healing ceremony. Today, hoop dance is shared as an artistic expression to celebrate, share and honor Indigenous traditions throughout the U.S. and Canada. Over the years, the art of hoop dance has grown, incorporating new and creative designs and intricate footwork while still respecting the fundamentals of hoop dance, a form of tribal dance that sets itself apart. Each dancer presents his or her own variation of the intertribal hoop dance, weaving in aspects of tradition and culture. Individual routines use as few as four to as many as 50 hoops, which are manipulated to create a variety of designs including animals, insects, and globes.

EVENT DETAILS February 9 – 10 | Saturday – Sunday Saturday, Feb. 9 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (gates open 8:45 a.m.; grand entry 9:30 a.m.) Sunday, Feb. 10 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (gates open 8:45 a.m.; grand entry 9:30 a.m.) Cost per day: Heard Museum members: $12* Adults: $18 Seniors (65 and older): $15 American Indians: $12 Children age 4–12: $7.50 Children 3 and younger: Free

Signature Sponsor:

VIP Pass (includes access to the Circles of Giving Tent): $65 2-DAY PASS : $30 Includes museum admission.

Sponsored by Sanderson Ford Additional support provided by Lightning Boy Foundation, The Duncan Family, and The Jay Kahn Memorial Fund

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*Members at the Supporter level and above, and all Circles of Giving members, receive complimentary tickets to the event. Please refer to heard.org/membership for corresponding quantities at your level.


GO + DO


go + do 61st Annual Heard Museum Guild

Indian Fair & Market A message from 2019 Fair Chair, Anna Flynn Experience American Indian culture including art, music, dancing, demonstrations and storytelling. More than 600 top American Indian artists will offer beautifully handmade artworks in the following categories: basketry, jewelry and lapidary, paintings/drawings/graphics/photography, personal attire, pottery, Pueblo carvings, sculpture, weavings and textiles, and diverse arts (including quill- and beadwork). Pieces are available at many price points. Hospitality has been the byword since the first Fair in 1959. Each day, more than 300 Heard Museum Guild volunteers work behind the scenes to execute the plans laid months earlier to ensure that the artists’ and guests’ experiences are memorable. Net proceeds from the Fair support the mission and programs of the Heard.

Fashion Show during the Best of Show reception. Photo: Caesar Chaves, Heard Museum

BEST OF SHOW RECEPTION Friday, March 1, 5:30 to 8 p.m. Tickets: $75 Members/$100 non-members heard.org/fair/tickets

Don’t forget to pick up your copy of the official 2019 Indian Fair & Market Guide!

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A highlight of Fair weekend! Join us and be among the first to see the winning art and meet the artists. Preview fashions designed by Fair artists as models walk the Heard Museum’s own catwalk. Bid on art in the Silent Auction. Relax under the twinkling lights in the historic courtyard while enjoying hot and cold small plates, dessert, a no-host bar and music compliments of Canyon Records.


GO + DO

61ST ANNUAL HEARD MUSEUM GUILD INDIAN FAIR & MARKET Saturday, March 2, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Early bird admission for museum members only at 8:30 a.m.) Sunday, March 3, 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Price per day (includes Fair and museum admission): Museum members: $15 (limit 2) General admission: $20 Students, active and retired military with ID, and American Indians with tribal ID: $10 (no online sales) Children 16 and under: Free Tickets: heard.org/fair, 602.252.8840, museum admissions and Fair entrance.

Apache Crown dancers. Photo: Carli Krueger, Heard Museum

FAIR SWAG

Zoe Urness

Jacob Meders’ (Mechoopda Maidu) original work of art (above) will be featured on the 2019 Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair & Market merchandise. His penand-ink drawing of a hummingbird illustrates a connection to the Southwest, as well as the Maidu culture. Meders lives in Phoenix, is an educator at Arizona State University, and is primarily known as a printmaker.

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go + do

Signature Artists Featured in the Heard Museum Shop GAIL BIRD (SANTO DOMINGO)/ YAZZIE JOHNSON (NAVAJO) Husband-and-wife team Gail Bird and Yazzie Johnson are among two of the top American Indian jewelers in the country. Mostly self-taught silversmiths, Bird and Johnson have been making jewelry together since 1972. They are primarily known for their beautifully crafted thematic belts, but they also produce jewelry including necklaces and earrings. Both jewelers are heavily influenced by their own cultures as well as the many cultures around the world, and they conduct research by sketching and photographing designs that inspire them. Gail Bird and Yazzie Johnson will be in the Shop only during the evening of Best of Show, March 1. Check the official map for their booth location on Saturday & Sunday.

ORELAND JOE (NAVAJO/UTE) Oreland Joe Sr. is worldrenowned for his work in stone and bronze sculptures. He has also established a foundation of historical ledger works in the form of oil paintings. His works can be found in private, corporate and museum collections in the United States and abroad.

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CLARK TENAKHONGVA (HOPI) GO + DO

Clark Tenakhongva is a Hopi katsina doll carver born in Keams Canyon, AZ and raised in the Third Mesa village of Hotevilla. Tenakhongva started off as a painter, but soon became interested in carving, taking his inspiration from family members and other artists. He started carving old style katsina dolls particularly after seeing katsina dolls by Manfred Susunkewa from the 1980’s. He entered his first show in 1994 at the Heard Museum and won a first-place ribbon. From the Rabbit clan, Tenakhongva draws rabbit tracks on each piece as his distinctive signature.

KENNETH JOHNSON (MUSCOGEE CREEK/ SEMINOLE) Kenneth Johnson began creating jewelry in 1988, when he apprenticed with Choctaw metalsmith Johnson Bobb. Since then, he has been independently refining his skills to the level of expertise that he is known for today. Johnson currently integrates state-of-the-art CAD/CAM technology into his design process to continue his evolution as a Native metalsmith. Johnson’s signature style of contemporary jewelry incorporates Southeastern motifs and the melding of old and new methods and techniques. His elaborate and ornate gorgets (multi-tiered crescent-shaped necklaces) with ancient Mound Builder symbols and 19th century Seminole patchwork designs overlaid with coins illustrate his propensity for complexity and detail.

BO JOE (NAVAJO/UTE) Bo Joe has been surrounded by tradition and art his entire life. During his early childhood he was exposed to sculpture, painting and music, influences that solidified the foundation for his creativity. Bo Joe is an accomplished jeweler. His work represents his traditional Navajo and Ute culture, and circulates within museum and gallery markets across the United States.

TERRY DEWALD A member of the Antique Tribal Art Dealers Association (ATADA), Terry DeWald has extensively studied and lectured about historic Southwest and California basketry, as well as contemporary Tohono O’odham and Apache basketry. He is the author of The Papago Indians and Their Basketry. DeWald will have a special inventory of baskets available to purchase throughout the Fair weekend.

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go + do

Student Art Show & Sale BY JANE PRZESLICA | STUDENT ART COORDINATOR, HEARD MUSEUM GUILD

The Heard Museum Guild invites you to the 33rd Annual American Indian Student Art Show & Sale, March 29 through April 1. Join us as we continue the Guild’s tradition of promoting art creation and art education among American Indian youth. The Student Art Show & Sale (SASS) features the artwork of American Indian students in grades 7-12, from across the United States. In 2018, 400 artists participated in the SASS, representing 24 schools and entering more than 450 pieces of artwork. SASS is a juried event with ribbons and cash prizes distributed in 13 categories and two age divisions.

Andrew Honahnie (Hopi) Age 18, 2018 Student Art Show Participant, Katsinas, Computer Generated Art, 2018

Teachers have a lot to say about their students’ involvement in the 2018 SASS ... “My kids love to participate in this show! They like the opportunity to show off their work, sell it, win a prize, and see other students’ work!” “The show is an opportunity for our students to have their work seen in a large venue. We are a school in a very remote location and we are glad to have a place to have the work viewed and put up for sale.” “The Student Art Show & Sale is a respected show and we are proud to be involved with it.”

Students are also given the opportunity to exhibit and sell their artwork that includes traditional and fine art, such as katsina dolls, pottery, baskets, jewelry, beadwork, textiles, paintings, photos, and computer-generated art. Students received $15,000 from artwork sales during the 2018 event. When you support today’s student artists, you support tomorrow’s master artists. The Student Art Show & Sale is free and open to the public. Learn more about SASS and how you can get involved at heardguild.org 33RD ANNUAL HEARD MUSEUM GUILD 2019 AMERICAN INDIAN STUDENT ART SHOW + SALE March 29 - April 1 MEMBERS -ONLY OPENING NIGHT SILENT AUCTION & SALE Friday, March 29, 5:30 to 8 p.m. Kindly RSVP to 602.251.0209 x 6405 or members@heard.org OPEN TO THE PUBLIC Saturday, March 30, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, March 31, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, April 1, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

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GO + DO Haute Photography

Second Saturdays Join us for our upcoming Second Saturday programs! You’ll meet and be able to purchase art from leading Indigenous artists in an intimate marketplace setting in our Central Courtyard. We’ll also have live performances and make-and-take art activities for families to enjoy. Free and open to the public.

FINE ART MARKETPLACE MARCH 9 | 10:00 A.M.

KATSINA MARKETPLACE APRIL 13 | 10:00 A.M.

BOOKS & BEATS MAY 11 | 10:00 A.M. Haute Photography

Generously supported by

and performances supported by

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NEW MENU ALERT! Be sure to visit the Courtyard CafĂŠ starting Feb. 1 to try the new menu items inspired by Josef Albers in Mexico.

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shop DINE + SHOP

GOTTA HAVE IT!

STERLING SILVER BEADS WITH TURQUOISE & CORAL PENDANT by Doug Nava (Taos Pueblo) $1800

MINIATURE POTTERY by Joseph Lonewolf (Santa Clara Pueblo) $850 to $1950

MULTI-STONE EARRINGS WITH ONYX, CORAL, AND TURQUOISE by Chris Pruitt (Laguna Pueblo) $860

Photos: Megan Richmond, Heard Museum

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travel + learn

EXPLORE WITH THE GUILD

HOPI ARTS, HOPI CULTURE MAY 10-13

In conjunction with Tohono Chul in Tucson, we will travel to northern Arizona to visit the Hopi mesas, where culture and tradition are rooted in the land. We will meet silversmiths, potters, basket weavers and katsinam carvers working in both historical and contemporary ways who will share with us their art, their lives, and their rich cultural heritage. Departure over the Mother’s Day weekend will improve our chances of witnessing the very special celebrations that may be taking place in many of the villages. The itinerary will be posted when available.

CHACO CANYON AND MESA VERDE OCTOBER 6-11

Travel with us to Colorado to explore Chaco Culture National Historical Park, the center of an ancient world. Chaco is an International Dark Sky Park and home to the famed Chaco Canyon.We will visit this mysterious canyon and surrounding areas to explore the architecture, culture, and history of the ancestral Puebloans who called this home. We will then head to New Mexico to Mesa Verde National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site that features some of the bestpreserved Ancestral Puebloan archeological sites. The itinerary and registration form will be posted when available.

For more information about any of the Heard Museum Guild trips and to reserve your space, contact travel@heardguild.org. The Heard Museum Guild not only provides its members a wide variety of volunteering options at the museum, but Guild members also join together on regional journeys designed to better acquaint them with Native culture, art, and history. Join the Guild and travel with us! Visit heardguild.org/travel-with-us/.

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TRAVEL + LEARN

GUILD CLASSES LAS GUIAS TRAINING Enrollment is NOW OPEN for the Heard Museum Guild’s docent training program, Las Guias. ORIENTATION April 12, 2019 | 11 a.m. COURSE DATES October 2019 – April 2020

The next training course for the Guild’s Las Guias docent program will begin in the first week of October and conclude in April 2020. Classes will be held one morning per week from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.; the curriculum includes classroom instruction, hands-on training, a mentorship program and field trips. An orientation meeting will be held on April 12 at 10:30 a.m. Advance registration is required. With your enrollment in our highly respected docent training program, you will learn more about American Indian art, culture and history as well as help the Heard Museum continue to enjoy worldwide renown and respect as the preeminent museum for the presentation, interpretation and advancement of American Indian art. Class size is limited to 20 individuals on a first-come, firstserved basis, so please email museumeducation@heardguild.org to reserve your spot in our docent training program.

HOME: NATIVE PEOPLES IN THE SOUTHWEST SHORTCOURSE Thursdays, April 4 & 11 Monte Vista Room Fee: $45

Come meet the peoples who have lived and thrived in the Southwest from Prehistoric to current times. This two-session course, led by instructor Linda Hefter and facilitator Phyllis Manning, will include an exciting overview of the land, culture, and history of both the ancient peoples of the Southwest and the federally recognized tribes who call Arizona and New Mexico home today. Session Two on April 11 will include an introduction to the Native American Fine Art Movement and a bonus Highlights Tour of the Heard Museum. Whether you have lived in the desert for years or are new to the Southwest, don’t miss this opportunity to deepen your understanding and appreciation of this special place we all call Home. To register, email Phyllis Manning at shortcourse@heardguild.org.

We look forward to seeing you as a new Las Guias member! Photo: Craig Smith, Heard Museum

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experience more EVENT HIGHLIGHTS MOONDANCE GALA

Moondance Honorees Joy and Howard Berlin with Jan Hendler

MOONDANCE GALA | OCTOBER 27, 2018 On Saturday, October 27, 2018 guests from around the world enjoyed our annual Moondance gala which was paired with the opening of our original exhibition, Yua: Henri Matisse and the Inner Arctic Spirit. This year’s event was co-chaired by Heard Museum trustee Janis Lyon and life trustee Carol Ann Mackay, and honored renowned Hopi lapidary artist Verma Nequatewa / Sonwai, and longtime museum patrons and leaders Howard R. and Joy M. Berlin. Throughout the evening guests were treated to special performances and details that highlighted elements in the exhibition, including an unforgettable program by the Nunamta Yup’ik Singers and Dancers. We are pleased to report that this year’s event raised a record-breaking $750,000 in support for the museum’s exhibitions and programs! Photos: Haute Photography

Heard Museum Board Chair John Melamed and Wick Pilcher

Ward Berlin, Joy Berlin, David M. Roche, Howard Berlin, Janet Melamed and John Melamed

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Moondance Honoree Verma Nequatewa (Sonwai)


EXPERIENCE Sue Glawe and Patti Hibbeler

Harvey and Carol Ann Mackay, Jojo Herzig, Tali Mackay, David Mackay, Katherine Mackay, Mimi and Michael Bartimer

Janis Lyon, Denise Lyon, Amie Lyon, Jan Voorhees, Jim Voorhees

Faye and Donald Ford enoy the cocktail reception in the Central Courtyard

Chuna McIntyre and Agnes McIntyre of the Nunamta Yup’ik Eskimo Singers and Dancers

Arlene Ben-Horin and Sandi Reilly

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OPENING EVENTS FOR YUA: HENRI MATISSE AND THE INNER ARCTIC SPIRIT, OCT. 28, 2018 Circles of Giving Members were invited to an exclusive brunch celebrating the opening of Yua: Henri Matisse and the Inner Arctic Spirit.

Susan Chandler and Christy Vezolles

Bill Healey and Cindy Riding

All members and the public were invited to a full-day Symposium highlighting the themes, history and new scholarship presented in the exhibition.

All museum members were invited to view the exhibition before it opened to the public.

Symposium presenters Patrice Deparpe, Director, Musée départemental Matisse le Cateau-Cambrésis; Sean Mooney, Exhibition co-curator; David M. Roche and Diana Pardue.

A museum member snaps a photo of the dance mask representing Tunutellgem Yua (Arctic loon spirit)

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A group of museum members and their guests

Mary P. Honey and guests

Photos: Haute Photography


EXPERIENCE

OPENING RECEPTION FOR SONWAI On Oct. 5 all Members were invited to the Opening Reception for Sonwai: The Jewelry of Verma Nequatewa. Artist Verma Nequatewa/Sonwai (Hopi) was in attendance at the celebration for the first comprehensive exhibition of her lapidary work spanning a 50-year career.

Verma Nequatewa and museum member

Verma Nequatewa and museum members Tony and Carla Kahn

Don Abraham and Karen Abraham, museum trustee

Janis Lyon, museum trustee; Nadine Basha and Judy Dewey

Members and lenders Quincalee Brown & James P. Simsarian

Photos: Haute Photography

Detail of exhibition case featuring pendants & bracelets

Artist Cody Sanderson, member Bob Jones and artist Olin Singine

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give Dear Members, Every day, I feel privileged to be a part of the Heard Museum family, and I am grateful that you are too! Over the past few months, we have loved seeing our Members enjoy special access to exclusive exhibitions like Yua: Henri Matisse and the Inner Arctic Spirit and major events like our newest series, Second Saturdays at the Heard. Heard Members always receive unlimited free admission to the museum in addition to distinctive benefits like Matisse Member Mondays, VIP Member Lounges at special events, Members-Only Flash Sales at the Museum Shop, exhibition previews and much more.

Dan Hagerty Director of Strategic Development and Programs

We hope that the benefits of membership enrich your experience of the Heard Museum. Best of all, you can take advantage of these special offerings knowing that your membership support makes possible all of the exhibitions, public programs, outreach and educational initiatives that the Heard Museum brings to our community. There is much to come in the weeks and months ahead: the 29th Annual World Championship Hoop Dance Contest, the 61st Annual Heard Guild Indian Fair & Market, Josef Albers in Mexico, Color Riot!, Dia del Niùos ‌ It is an extraordinary time to be a part of the Heard Museum as we reflect on nine decades of rich history and service to our community, and look ahead to many more decades of advancing American Indian art. From the bottom of our hearts, we offer our thanks to you, our Members, for the many ways you support the Heard Museum. We look forward to sharing many cherished memories in the months and years ahead! Thank you for your support. Gratefully,

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GIVE

Maie Bartlett Heard Society Luncheon Tuesday, March 19, 2018 2:30 to 4 p.m.

All members who have been active with the museum for more than 25 years, and those who have made meaningful testamentary plans in their bequests to us, are invited to join us for afternoon tea, coffee and confections with an expert guest speaker. This event is held to show our gratitude to these patrons who, through their financial support, help to ensure the Heard Museum has a bright and prosperous future. Kindly direct your RSVP to Rebecca Simpson at 602.251.0245 or rsimpson@heard.org by March 12.

Haute Photography

Honoring the generosity of Betty Van Denburgh

Betty Van Denburgh has shown her love and support of the Heard through many transformative gifts. As a member of our Circles of Giving program and the Maie Bartlett Heard Society, Betty has also contributed to several capital projects around the campus. Most recently, Betty made a generous gift to our Heard Museum Shop to upgrade and improve the security of our member's and customer’s transactions through new point-of-sale touchscreens and credit card readers. Next time you visit the Shop, you’ll notice a smoother and more secure checkout experience. Everyone at the Shop would like to extend their warmest thanks to Betty.

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2301 N Central Avenue

J O S E F A L B E RS I N M E X I C O WA S O R GA N I Z E D

Phoenix, AZ 85004

BY T H E S O LO M O N R . G U G G E N H E I M F O U N DAT I O N , N E W YO R K

602.252.8840 | heard.org

Profile for Heard Museum

Heard Museum Earth Song, Winter 2019  

Earth Song is the Heard Museum's members-only publication on museum events, exhibitions and milestones. It is published 3 times a year.

Heard Museum Earth Song, Winter 2019  

Earth Song is the Heard Museum's members-only publication on museum events, exhibitions and milestones. It is published 3 times a year.

Profile for earthsong