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earth song HEARD MUSEUM MEMBERSHIP MAGAZINE

SPRI NG 2019 ISSUE

CONTEMPOR ARY PL AINS INDIAN DOLLS FROM THE CHARLES AND VALERIE DIKER COLLECTION


BOARD OF TRUSTEES John Melamed James R. Huntwork Patricia K. Hibbeler Leland W. Peterson David M. Roche TRUSTEES Karen Abraham Tony Astorga Arlene K. Ben-Horin Mark B. Bonsall Gregory H. Boyce John Coggins Dr. Craig Cohen Robert A. Cowie Elizabeth Murfee DeConcini Judy Dworkin John Graham David A. Hansen Carrie L. Hulburd Sharron Lewis LIFE TRUSTEES Kay Benedict Howard R. Berlin James T. Bialac Dr. George Blue Spruce, Jr. Herbert J. Bool Robert B. Bulla F. Wesley Clelland, III Norma Jean Coulter Alice J. Dickey Robert J. Duffy Mary G. Hamilton Barbara Heard Joel P. Hoxie Mary Hudak Dr. Thomas M. Hudak Richard L. Johnes Edward F. Lowry

Chair Vice-Chair Secretary Treasurer Dickey Family Director and CEO Stephen R. Lewis Marigold Linton John F. Lomax Janis Lyon Robert Meyer Scott Montgomery Susan H. Navran Scott H. O’Connor William G. Ridenour Don Smith Sue Snyder Guild President Christy Vezolles David Wilshin

Frederick A. Lynn Dennis H. Lyon Carol Ann Mackay Clint J. Magnussen Robert L. Matthews Miriam J. McClennen Mary Ellen McKee James Meenaghan Dr. Wayne Lee Mitchell Dr. Arthur L. Pelberg Wick Pilcher David E. Reese William C. Schubert Sheryl L. Sculley Richard H. Silverman John B. Stiteler John G. Stuart

COVER: Rhonda Holy Bear, Cheyenne River Sioux/Lakota, b. 1959. Maternal Journey, 2010. Wood, gesso, paint, clay, cotton, wool, metal, glass microbeads, brain-tanned buckskin, rawhide, fur, hair, feathers, 31 x 42 in. Collection of Charles and Valerie Diker. Photo: Craig Smith, Heard Museum.

HEARD MUSEUM, HEARD MUSEUM SHOP 2301 N. Central Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85004 Monday to Saturday, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Closed Easter Sunday, Independence Day, Thanksgiving Day & Christmas. Main: 602.252.8840 Events Hotline: 602.252.8848 Shop: 602.252.8344 or 1.800.252.8344 THE COURTYARD CAFÉ Open Every Day, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. 602.251.0204 COFFEE CANTINA Monday to Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. WE APPRECIATE THE SUPPORT OF THESE SPONSORS:

Partial funding provided by the Phoenix Office of Arts and Culture through appropriations from the Phoenix City Council.

INCREASE YOUR SUPPORT THROUGH OUR COMMUNITY PARTNERS:

EARTHSONG Allison Lester

Membership Manager

Caesar Chaves

Creative Director

Willow Senjamin

Marketing Manager

Deborah Paddison

Copy Editing

Sarah Moore

Graphic Design

The Heard Museum is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization incorporated in the State of Arizona. Exhibition, event and program funding provided in part by the Arizona Commission on the Arts, the Arizona Humanities Council, the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Phoenix Office of Arts and Culture.


DETAIL OF THE MOUNTED PHOTOGRAPH OF THE HEARD MUSEUM THAT APPEARED IN A CHRISTMAS CARD FROM MRS. DWIGHT BANCROFT HEARD, CIRCA 1929


DIRECTOR’S LETTER

The cool and rainy winter has given way to what is known in the desert as a “Super Bloom.” Across Arizona, one can find swaths of wildflowers so bright and widespread that their colors can be seen from space. Mother Nature’s timing couldn’t be more perfect. This month, the Heard Museum will open Color Riot! How Color Changed Navajo Textiles and, for the next six months, The Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust Grand Gallery may be the next most colorful spot in the entire Southwest.

David M. Roche Dickey Family Director and CEO

Color Riot! is the largest exhibition of Navajo textiles in the Heard’s 90-year history and features exceptional examples of Navajo weaving from the last quarter of the 19th century. Known for their dazzling color and design, these blankets and rugs were not only appreciated by collectors and traders of the period but future collectors and artists such as Josef Albers. Not by chance, we are simultaneously presenting Albers’ work in the exhibition Josef Albers in Mexico, which gives our Members the rare opportunity to explore the visual similarities in the use of color, repetition and design between Navajo textiles and the iconic paintings of Josef Albers. We are equally excited to be presenting Grand Procession: Contemporary Plains Indian Dolls from the Charles and Valerie Diker Collection, opening on April 28th as part of our Día del Niños celebration. This is the most significant private collection of its kind and features the work of leading artists including Jamie Okuma, Rhonda Holy Bear and members of the Growing Thunder family. Each doll, also known as soft sculpture, is a marvel of imagination and technique. The Heard is deeply grateful to the Dikers for their generosity, the Denver Art Museum, who originally presented the show in 2015, and the late Nancy Blomberg who was its curator. The Heard Museum experienced record attendance in December, January, February and March. We’re thrilled for the interest that our exhibitions, programs and events are generating. But, the best feeling of all, comes from seeing a spike in our membership program (we’re at a ten-year high). This is the result of a team of dedicated staff and volunteers, all of whom are working to ensure that the Heard Museum is an extraordinary experience for each and every member.

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earth song HEARD MUSEUM MEMBERSHIP MAGAZINE

SPRI NG 2019 ISSUE

WHAT'S INSIDE VIEW

EXHIBITIONS ON DISPLAY

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Color Riot!

8

Mellon Fellowship Program

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Grand Procession

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ARTIST IN PROFILE: Raven Chacon

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On the Road with The National Endowment for the Humanities

GO + DO

EVENTS

16 Calendar 18

Exhibition Lectures and Public Programs

20

A Look Back at the 61st Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair and Market

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Dia del Niño

SPECIAL APPEAL 24

Grand Gallery Exhibition Fund

READ 28

Three Best Selling Books in Books & More

SHOP + DINE 30

Gotta Have It!

32

Summertime in the Café

TRAVEL + LEARN 34

Explore With the Guild

36

Master Artist Workshop

EXPERIENCE 38

Member Highlights and Appreciation Events

43

The Visitor Experience Project

GIVE

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44

Moondance at the Heard

46

Thank You to our Supporters


VIEW BY ANN MARSHALL | DIRECTOR OF RESEARCH


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In the late 19th century, Navajo weavers began an unprecedented period of experimentation, translating the design system they had observed in Hispanic textiles into their unique vision. Weavers also began utilizing aniline dyes for their handspun yarns and colorful commercial yarns—a true Color Riot! And the experiments didn’t stop there—they also developed a style of weaving known as wedge weave, where instead of weaving straight across, from edge to edge, a wedge

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was woven at one edge and then repeatedly outlined, pulling the textile’s warp and creating a textile that can seem to undulate. The Heard’s new exhibition in the Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust Grand Gallery, Color Riot! How Color Changed Navajo Textiles, visits the explosion of color and design that occurred following the Navajos’ return to rebuild their lives on a reservation following the


VIEW dark years of imprisonment in the Bosque Redondo concentration camp in New Mexico between 1863 and 1868. The 1868 treaty signed with the U.S. government provided 10 years of annuity goods to the Navajo. Of these annuities, commercial yarns and dyes were procured from a variety of sources; these contributed to the development of several new, distinct Navajo weaving styles. For instance, Germantown yarn, named for the

LEFT: Unidentified artist, Navajo. Transitional blanket, 18901910. Handspun wool, aniline dyes. Collection of Carol Ann Mackay. ABOVE: Unidentified artist, Navajo. Blanket, 1875-1885. Handspun wool, four-ply commercial yarns, indigo dye, aniline dyes. Fred Harvey Fine Arts Collection at the Heard Museum, 211bl.

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Germantown suburb of Philadelphia where the mill was located, was produced with aniline dyes to make colors of green, red, orange-red, blue, lavender-purple, dull yellow and brown. Bayeta blankets (baize trade cloth) were raveled to yield red. Blankets of indigo blue were raveled as well. Weavers also received their own packets of indigo and other commercial dyes for their handspun yarns, along with wool cards for combing the wool prior to spinning. Design changes influenced by Hispanic weavings were also an integral part of this period. The longer-than-wide dimensions of Hispanic sarapes were most commonly used as reference, as was the central medallion with multiple serrate outlines. These outlined serrate designs, when woven in the brilliant colors of the aniline dyes,

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gave rise to the term “Eyedazzlers” to describe these Navajo weavings. All of this change occurred in a time when markets for textiles were in transition and Navajos’ former Indigenous markets for blankets were in disarray. In some instances, military escorts were needed for trade expeditions. A small but growing number of Anglo traders were establishing relations with the Navajo and supplying them with materials for weaving, but until the 1890s the traders’ primary interest was in purchasing wool from the Navajo for sale to Eastern markets. As a result, outside market influences on Navajo weavers were relatively weak, allowing space for these new designs and colors to develop, until the collapse of the wool market in the 1890s. Traders then began searching


VIEW for a product that the Navajo could produce, so they focused their attention on encouraging production of floor coverings, bedspreads, lap robes, pillowcases and ancillary small textiles. As this new trade developed, outside market tastes began to limit this previous riot of color and experimentation. Fortunately, the exciting design, color and contemporary feel of the Transitional Period was not only appreciated by collectors, but it also continued to be appreciated by artists like Anni and Josef Albers and is influential today on contemporary weavers like Melissa Cody (DinÊ). Shaping the Color Riot! exhibition has involved many people and resources. In addition to utilizing the textiles in the Heard’s collection, we are fortunate to have the invaluable consultation and loan of textiles by Heard

Museum life trustee and co-curator, Carol Ann Mackay. The exhibition will also feature weavings on loan from the collections of Anthony Berlant and Steve and Gail Getzwiller of Nizhoni Ranch Gallery. COLOR RIOT! On view April 5 through September 29, 2019 Virginia G. Piper Chariatable Trust Grand Gallery SPONSORS The Kemper and Ethel Marley Foundation Patrons of the Grand Gallery Exhibition Fund ABOVE: Color Riot! in the Grand Gallery. Photo: Craig Smith, Heard Museum.

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An Update on Our Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship Program BY DIANA PARDUE | CHIEF CURATOR

Velma Kee Craig

Natalia Miles

Ninabah Winton

In October 2018, the Heard Museum was honored once again to offer three fellowship positions with generous funding provided by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The goal of the Mellon Foundation fellowships is to raise the awareness of employment opportunities within the museum field and the conservation profession. Our particular fellowship is centered on the care and long-term preservation of Navajo textiles. This year, our Mellon Fellows are three talented individuals: returning fellows Natalia Miles (Diné/Akimel O’otham/Apache) and Velma Kee Craig (Diné), and new fellow Ninabah Winton (Diné). Winton was selected from more than 45 applicants for the position, and Miles and Craig from more than 50 applicants the prior year.

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YEAR ONE

YEAR TWO

In the first year of the fellowship, Miles and Craig worked with sculpture and textile conservators, as well as the museum’s registrars and curators, to gain a multidimensional view of collections management and care. One key aspect of the fellowship involved studying and caring for Navajo textiles. Each week, the museum’s director of research, Dr. Ann Marshall, provided the Mellon Fellows with an in-depth, hands-on review of Navajo textiles in the Heard collection. Dr. Marshall also provided a syllabus of reading materials on the topic.

Year two has offered new experiences for the three Mellon Fellows, as their work has focused on assisting Dr. Marshall to review the collection in preparation for the exhibition Color Riot! (see page four for more) and working closely with Heard Museum life trustee and noted textile collector Carol Ann Mackay. Their review has included items from not only Mackay’s collection, but also from other important private collections, including those of Steve and Gail Getzwiller and Tony Berlant.

Basic approaches to the conservation of textiles were offered through two workshops led by Dr. Nancy Odegaard, conservator at the Arizona State Museum in Tucson, and Jeanne Brako, conservator at Fort Lewis College in Durango, Colorado. Both practical and philosophical approaches to cleaning and caring for textiles from Indigenous communities were discussed with the conservators, the Heard curatorial team and esteemed Navajo weavers Barbara Teller Ornelas, Lynda Teller Pete and Marlow Katoney, who provided valuable insights on technical aspects of Navajo weavings as well as personal reflections from their experiences as weavers.

In mid-February, the curatorial team and the Mellon Fellows were joined by weavers Lola Cody, Melissa Cody and Marilou Schultz and conservators Nancy Odegaard and Jeanne Brako for another textile review. The timing of the visit offered a perfect opportunity for the group to review with the Mellon Fellows and Dr. Marshall their selections for Color Riot! Visitors will be amazed at the array of textile designs, styles and techniques chosen for this exhibition.

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CONTEMPOR ARY PL AINS INDIAN DOLLS FROM THE CHARLES AND VALERIE DIKER COLLECTION BY DIANA PARDUE | CHIEF CURATOR Grand Procession: Contemporary Plains Indian Dolls from the Charles and Valerie Diker Collection celebrates an exceptional collection of dolls, also known as soft sculptures, created by Jamie Okuma (Luiseño/ShoshoneBannock), Rhonda Holy Bear (Cheyenne River Sioux/ Lakota) and three generations of Growing Thunder family members: Joyce Growing Thunder, Juanita Growing Thunder Fogarty and Jessica Growing Thunder (Assiniboine/Sioux). The dolls are figurative references to Indigenous peoples from the Great Plains and Great Basin regions who lived in those areas during the late 19th century. Historically, dolls of soft leather outfitted to look like their maker or others in the community were made for children. Holy Bear, Okuma and the three Growing Thunder family members have transformed that concept and today are making exquisite soft sculptures that are appreciated for their beauty and craftsmanship. Each doll is embellished in intricate detail with flawless beadwork, and some are further decorated in quillwork. The artists use glass beads called microbeads because of their tiny size. The dolls these women make illustrate a visual artistic expression of body decoration and clothing ornamentation from an important point in time.

It is not surprising that the dolls are made with such accuracy, as all five of the women who make the dolls participate in contemporary powwows and create traditional garments for themselves. The dolls in Grand Procession were collected by Charles and Valerie Diker, who have collected Native American art for more than 40 years. The couple first took note of the dolls in the 1990s and began amassing a collection that has grown to include 23 works, the largest private collection of its kind. The collection was shown at the Denver Art Museum in 2010 and has been generously made available to the Heard Museum. The Heard Museum is grateful to the Dikers for allowing us to share these incredible works with our visitors. GRAND PROCESSION On view April 28 through Spring 2020 Sandra Day O’Connor Gallery MEMBERS’ PREVIEW April 28 10 to 11 a.m.

MEMBERS’ PREVIEW

SUPPORTED IN PART BY

Collectively, the dolls look like they have gathered for the processional entry that occurs at powwows, where participants dressed in grand regalia enter the arena.

Jamie Okuma, Luiseño/Shoshone-Bannock, b.1977. Lady in Red, Lakota Woman, 2003. Hide, cloth, glass beads, hair, dentalium and abalone shells, metal, sequins, wood. Collection of Charles and Valerie Diker. Photo: Craig Smith, Heard Museum.

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ARTIST IN PROFILE: RAVEN CHACON BY ERIN JOYCE | FINE ARTS CURATOR

It is important and thrilling to have the opportunity to bring contemporary works by Indigenous artists to the Heard. On July 5, we are pleased to present a solo exhibition of contemporary composer and visual artist Raven Chacon (DinĂŠ).

Chacon was born in Fort Defiance on the Navajo Nation in Arizona in 1977 and was raised primarily in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Currently living and working in Toronto, Ontario, and Albuquerque, Chacon is participant in a variety of modes of artistic production, including visual work, composition, music projects, producing and performance art. Chacon is no stranger to the creative fields. His work has the capacity to illustrate the liminality of sound and image and how they can fuse to impart a narrative to the listener/viewer. Raven Chacon, Still Life, #3, 2015 (detail). Sound and light installation with text. Voice and translation by Melvatha Chee. Collection of the artist. Photo by Joshua Voda, NMAI.

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Chacon’s work is varied materially, often dealing with his Indigeneity and the residue of colonialism in the Americas. A work from 2003, “While Contemplating Their Fate in the Stars, the Twins Surround the Enemy,” comprised a metal birdcage, two zebra finches, and the expected trappings such as a water/food dish and newspaper liner, accompanied by a high-pitched repeating frequency that discombobulates and creates a dialogue and disturbance with the zebra finches contained within the cage. According to Chacon, this work addresses “people being trapped in a situation, despite any efforts or illusions toward self-determination, where they are forced to defend themselves, and in doing so, must interact with an encroaching presence in any way necessary.” In a 2015 video, a score Chacon wrote in 2001 is brought to life through a performance filmed by Blackhorse Lowe and D.E. Hyde. The work features an ensemble of eight people standing in the New Mexico desert, eight music stands with scores, and eight firearms of various calibers. Chacon counts down at the beginning of the film to start the performance. In timed succession, the players begin to fire their guns off into the desert landscape in timed rhythm. The musical composition’s percussive nature is jolting, creating a series of

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As a solo artist, collaborator or former member of Indigenous collective Postcommodity, Chacon has exhibited or performed his work at the Whitney Biennial, documenta 14, REDCAT, Musée d’art Contemporain de Montréal, San Francisco Electronic Music Festival, Chaco Canyon, Ende Tymes Festival, 18th Biennale of Sydney and the Kennedy Center. He has received several awards, including the United States Artists Fellowship in music, the Creative Capital Award in Visual Arts, the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation artist fellowship, and the American Academy’s Berlin Prize for Music Composition. Chacon is also director of the Native American Composers Apprenticeship Project (NACAP), in which he travels to schools of the Navajo Nation, Hopi Tribe and Salt River PimaMaricopa Indian Community to work with students to compose original works for string quartet. The finished compositions are then performed at the Grand Canyon Music Festival—and as of 2018, at the Heard Museum in a newly re-formed ongoing partnership.

Photo: courtesy of Raven Chacon

organized explosive sounds with disquieting moments of silence. The piece creates a narrative of what an instrument is, what the agency of the user is, and how, as Chacon puts it, these weaponized technologies can be instrumentalized as a form of “musical resistance.” For his exhibition at the Heard, we will be showing “Still Life No. 3,” a singular work that will occupy the entire gallery, which retells the Diné Bahane’ (“Story of the People,” the Diné emergence story) through a full-room installation composed of sound, speakers, text and timed colored lighting that scrolls through multiple hues over an eight-hour cycle—relating to the colors of light throughout the day. The voice of a Diné woman will be amplified through the speakers, which are set up on a delay, causing parts of the story to overlap. This situates the narrative in a non-linear form, illuminating past, present and future all in one singular moment. The exhibition will create an ambiguous, immersive and metaphysical space within the confines of the gallery to create room for pensive reflection and sense of place and situationality. STILL LIFE NO. 3: RAVEN CHACON On view July 5 through Nov. 3, 2019 Jacobson Gallery MEMBERS’ ONLY RECEPTION AND PREVIEW First Friday, July 5 5 to 8 p.m.

MEMBERS’ RECEPTION

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The Heard Goes On the Road With the National Endowment for the Humanities BY JANET CANTLEY | CURATOR With the reopening of the Heard Museum signature exhibition Away From Home: American Indian Boarding School Stories, the Heard is honored to announce that it has been selected by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to travel the exhibition through NEH on the Road, a special initiative to create wider access to ideas, themes and stories explored in major NEH grant-funded exhibitions. Along with the NEH, the Heard is partnering with Mid-America Arts Alliance (MAAA), which is responsible for working with us on the content development, the fabrication of the adapted exhibition, the shipping and the tour management. Away From Home: American Indian Boarding School Stories is scheduled to hit the road in January 2020. The smaller traveling exhibition, which features elements of the main exhibition’s content such as first-person stories, interviews and interactive material, is designed to fit within a 2,000-squarefoot space, about half the size of our long-term exhibition. The traveling exhibition includes panels with 35 or more objects, photographs and support materials. It will travel to six venues each year, for a seven-week run at each institution. Currently we are developing the script, suggesting images and helping to locate objects to include in the traveling show. Because the size is compressed, we need to make sure our major themes are covered. Heard Education Director Sharah Nieto and I are working with the humanities MAAA curator, educator and design team. Two of the MAAA team members attended our Community Preview and Symposium “Legacy of American Indian Boarding Schools,” which took place on Feb. 22 & 23. It was an opportunity for them to see the newly installed exhibition and to meet with our advisory team, who were panelists at the symposium. The MAAA staff will work with our advisory group to find local scholars and affiliate organizations to help develop educational programs for the hosting institutions.

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VIEW The primary goal of the NEH with the subsidized traveling exhibition is to bring humanities programs to local communities. With the network of American Indian boarding schools that was established across the United States, it will be possible to bring communitybased histories and personal stories associated with these institutions to the public on a local as well as national level. Nieto is providing a high school–level curriculum with lesson plans, media sources (books, articles, DVDs, websites), suggested speakers and educational activities.

Go to nehontheroad.org and select “Exhibitions” to watch for the posting of Away From Home: American Indian Boarding School Stories and follow it on its travels.

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This calendar is accurate as of April. 5, but we are always planning more events. Check heard.org or our Facebook page for the most up-to-date information.

APRIL 17 | WEDNESDAY

27 | SATURDAY

9 TO 11:30 A.M.

9:30 TO 10:30 A.M.

GUILD MEETING

MUSEUM YOGA

Steele Auditorium

Heard Museum Campus

18 | WEDNESDAY

28 | SUNDAY

6 TO 8 P.M.

11 A.M. TO 4 P.M.

GREAT CONVERSATIONS: JOSEF ALBERS IN MEXICO: INDIGENOUS INFLUENCES

DIA DEL NIÑO

Monte Vista Room

see p 26

Heard Museum Campus Photo: Haute Photography and Videography

MAY 3 | FRIDAY

10 A.M. TO 4 P.M.

18 | SATURDAY

6 TO 10 P.M.

SECOND SATURDAY MARKETPLACE: BOOKS & BEATS

1 P.M.

FIRST FRIDAY: GET CRAFTY

See Josef Albers in Mexico, on its last First Friday. Plus Crafty Chica and Cut+Paste.

Heard Museum Campus see p 19

Central Courtyard

Heard Museum Campus 11:30 A.M. TO 1:00 P.M. SCENE & HEARD FILM SERIES: TAQWACORE

23 | WEDNESDAY

10-13 | FRIDAY - MONDAY

Steele Auditorium

B.Y.O.L. LECTURES: MICHAEL SMITH, “LUNCHING WITH ALBERS AT TEOTIHUACAN”

HOPI ARTS, HOPI CULTURE

see page 18

Monte Vista Room

11 | SATURDAY 9:30 TO 10:30 A.M. MUSEUM YOGA

Heard Museum Campus

15 | WEDNESDAY 12 P.M. B.Y.O.L. LECTURES: ZARCO GUERRERO, “TOLTEC ART OF LIVING WELL”

Monte Vista Room see p 18

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EXHIBITION LECTURE SERIES: JOSEF ALBERS IN MEXICO

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see p 18

25 | SATURDAY 9:30 TO 10:30 A.M. MUSEUM YOGA

Heard Museum Campus


JUNE TEACHER APPRECIATION MONTH

Teachers receive free admission all month! (School ID required) VISITOR EXPERIENCE PROJECT

Courtyard and Admissions Lobby renovations in process see p 43

23 | SUNDAY

24-26 | MONDAY – WEDNESDAY

11AM TO 5PM SUMMER SUNDAYS: COLOR!

Free admission all day and printmaking with Gabriela Muñoz

GO + DO

ALL MONTH

TEACHER INSTITUTE

For current information visit https://heard.org/event/teacher-institute/

see p 18 11:30AM SCENE & HEARD FILM SERIES

7 | FRIDAY 6 TO 10 PM FIRST FRIDAY: KEEP CALM AND HAVE PRIDE

In Celebration of National Pride Month, Two Spirits documentary and Q&A with writer/producer Russell Martin see p 18

see p 19

JULY ALL MONTH VISITOR EXPERIENCE PROJECT

Courtyard and Admissions Lobby renovations in process

5 | FRIDAY 6 TO 10 PM FIRST FRIDAY: SOUND & LIGHT

28 | SUNDAY MEMBERS’ PREVIEW

11AM TO 5PM SUMMER SUNDAYS: COLOR!

Free admission all day and printmaking with Jacob Meders (Mechoopda-Maidu)

see p 43

OPENING OF RAVEN CHACON’S STILL LIFE NO. 3

4 | THURSDAY

Members-only Reception and Preview

see p 18

see p 13

11:30AM

MUSEUM CLOSED FOR INDEPENDENCE DAY

SCENE & HEARD FILM SERIES: PARTNERSHIP WITH PHOENIX FILM COLLECTIVE

see p 18

AUGUST ALL MONTH VISITOR EXPERIENCE PROJECT

Courtyard and Admissions Lobby renovations in process see p 43

2 | FRIDAY

25 | SUNDAY 11AM TO 5PM SUMMER SUNDAYS: COLOR!

Free admission all day and printmaking with Sam Gomez

11:30AM SCENE & HEARD FILM SERIES: YOUR NAME ISN’T ENGLISH AND Q&A WITH ACTRESS CHELSEY LUGER

see p 18

see p 18

6 TO 10 PM FIRST FRIDAY

SEPTEMBER ALL MONTH VISITOR EXPERIENCE PROJECT

Courtyard and Admissions Lobby renovations in process see p 43

6 | FRIDAY 4:30 TO 6PM

6 TO 10PM FIRST FRIDAY

HEARD MUSEUM MEMBERS ANNUAL MEETING

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go + do B.Y.O.L. Lectures Learn on your lunch hour! Join us for these upcoming lectures organized in conjunction with our current exhibition, Josef Albers in Mexico. Location: Monte Vista Room

ZARCO GUERRERO “TOLTEC ART OF LIVING WELL” May 15 | 12 to 1 p.m. Zarco is a sculptor, mask maker and performance artist and has dedicated his artistic endeavors to create positive social change through the arts.

Summer Sundays Color! Escape the heat of summer and join us again for this annual series to enjoy free admission and performances every fourth day of June, July and August! This summer, we are focusing on printmaking artist demonstrations, and each month we will feature a different printmaker in the Lyon Family Crossroads Gallery, so bring the whole family and make your own take-home print.

JUNE 23RD Gabriela Muñoz

JULY 28TH Jacob Meders (Mechoopda-Maidu)

AUGUST 25TH MICHAEL SMITH “LUNCHING WITH ALBERS AT TEOTIHUACAN” May 23 | 12 to 1 p.m.

Sam Gomez, Sagrado Gallery

Scene and Heard Film Series

Michael E. Smith is a professor of Archaeology & Director of the ASU Teotihuacan Research Laboratory.

MAY 11 | 11:30AM

Reserve a lunch from our own Coffee Cantina 48 hours in advance by emailing IRutigliano@heard. org your choice of: Chicken Salad Sandwich on 9 grain, Turkey BLT wrap, Spanish market salad or Heard House Salad.

Two Spirits (documentary)

Taqwacore: The Birth of Punk Islam

JUNE 23 | 11:30AM

In celebration of National Pride Month Followed by a discussion with writer/producer Russell Martin

JULY 28 | 11:30AM SUMMER SUNDAYS AND SCENE AND HEARD FILM SERIES

Partnership with Phoenix Film Collective

SUPPORED BY

AUGUST 25 | 11:30AM

The Flinn Foundation

Your Name Isn’t English (short feature) Followed by a discussion with actress Chelsey Luger (Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa / Standing Rock Sioux)

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First Fridays On the first Friday evenings of the month from 6-10 p.m., the Heard will bring music, demonstrations, food and drink to the museum to share the cultural pulse of Phoenix and the Southwest today. Free and open to the public.

GET CRAFTY AND SEE JOSEF ALBERS IN MEXICO, ON ITS LAST FIRST FRIDAY MAY 3RD Come create with Cut and Paste Phoenix, the Crafty Chica Kathy Cano-Murillo will also being doing fun take home activity. Plus listen to Rastafarmers, a Chicano-Reggae Infused band fill Crossroads Gallery will music.

KEEP CALM AND HAVE PRIDE JUNE 7TH Celebrate National LGBTQ Pride Month with our partner Organization Native PFLAG (https://www.nativepflag.org/) for music and a film screening of Sweetheart Dancers at 7 p.m. The director and producer Ben-Alex Dupris, and the stars of the film Adrian Mathis, and Sean Snyder will do a Q & A after the screening.

SOUND & LIGHT JULY 5TH Come join us for the opening of Raven Chacon's art installation, Still Life No. 3, with live music and artist demonstrations.

SPONSORED BY

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A Look Back at the

61st Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair & Market The 2019 Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair & Market, held March 2 & 3, was a rousing success. Nearly 3,000 Heard Members and their guests joined us this year—a 26 percent increase over last year! Many of the artists reported excellent sales and commented favorably on the Guild’s hospitality. Throughout the weekend, our amphitheater, Courtyard stage, storytelling and craft stations were packed.

By the Numbers

15,729 visitors, artists, families and volunteers attended the three-day event

644 artists participated

350+ Guild and other volunteers filled 700 slots and donated tens of thousands of hours

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100+ tribal affiliations represented by artists from American Indian and Alaska Native tribes and Canadian First Nations


Best of Show GO + DO

Zefren (Ephraim) Anderson (Navajo) of Zefren-M Weavings won Best of Show for “White House Revival II.� The piece is 100 percent white wool, acid-dyed black and hand-dyed indigo blue, woven in diamond and plain weave twill. The borders are tapestry woven with interlocking point woven onto one side. It is representative of the Navajo horse cinch tapestry twill and Pueblo III diamond interlocking twills. According to Anderson, his first mission is to recreate Navajo wool and weaving techniques from the 1750s. He received the $10,000 Best of Show prize sponsored by Howard R. and Joy M. Berlin and Kristine and Leland W. Peterson, as well as taking home awards for Best of Classification and First Place, Weavings & Textiles. (A complete list of our ribbon sponsors can be found on page 22.)

Fashion Show Guests watched models on the Heard catwalk at the Friday-evening Best of Show reception. The wearable art on display was designed by 16 Fair artists representing 10 different tribal affiliations.

Juried Competition Highlights

267

572

artists submitted work

pieces of artwork judged

145

103

ribbons were awarded

$62,050 total prize money awarded

artists received awards Visit heard.org/fair for a list of winners.

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go + do 61st Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair & Market Best of Show Award Sponsors Best of Show Award

II. Pottery

IV. Pueblo Carvings

Howard R. & Joy M. Berlin and Kristine & Leland W. Peterson

BEST OF SHOW CLASSIFICATION AWARD

BEST OF SHOW CLASSIFICATION AWARD

Conrad House Award

Samantha & Jed Foutz, Shiprock Santa Fe

Barbara & Matt Korn

INNOVATION AWARD

Neil S. Berman

Samuel J. Parker

Idyllwild Arts Imagination Award

King Galleries

1ST PLACE (2 DIVISIONS)

1ST PLACE (7 DIVISIONS)

Anonymous

Idyllwild Arts Foundation — Native American Arts Program & Festival

Cerelle Bolon

Anonymous

Youth Awards: Ages 12-14 and 15-17

Martha Head

Catherine Meschter

Janis & Dennis Lyon

Dr. Thomas Stevenson & Ms. Nadia Hlibka

Esther & Gil Sager

V. Sculpture

I. Jewelry & Lapidary BEST OF SHOW CLASSIFICATION AWARD

Waddell Gallery INNOVATION AWARD

John R. Ward 1ST PLACE (8 DIVISIONS)

Anonymous Faust Gallery Mary G. Hamilton Martha Head Carol Ann & Harvey Mackay Dr. Don & Judith Miles Elizabeth Raspolic Dorothea & Don Smith

Mary & Mark Bonsall Carol Cohen

W. David Connell

BEST OF SHOW CLASSIFICATION AWARD

2ND PLACE (7 DIVISIONS)

Martha Head

Delores Bachmann (4 divisions) Neil S. Berman Jane & Steve Marmon

INNOVATION AWARD

Alan Houser, Inc. 1ST PLACE (4 DIVISIONS)

Territorial Indian Arts Gallery

Marilyn Brooks

III. Paintings, Drawings, Graphics & Photography

Mary G. Hamilton (3 divisions)

BEST OF SHOW CLASSIFICATION AWARD

Hilde & Helmut Horchler

Sue Snyder INNOVATION AWARD

USG Foundation, Inc. 1ST PLACE (5 DIVISIONS)

Lynda Barber

2ND PLACE (8 DIVISIONS)

Mary G. Hamilton (3 divisions)

Karen & Donald Abraham Mary G. Hamilton (5 divisions)

Christy Vezolles & Gilbert Waldman

Dorothy Hockenberg

2ND PLACE (5 DIVISIONS)

The McDonough Family

Monica Graham

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2ND PLACE (2 DIVISIONS)

Kathleen & Sam Serrapede

Mary G. Hamilton (4 divisions)

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INNOVATION AWARD

2ND PLACE (4 DIVISIONS)

Mary G. Hamilton (2 divisions) Jana Turner


BEST OF SHOW CLASSIFICATION AWARD

Heard Museum Shop INNOVATION AWARD

USG Foundation, Inc.

IX. Personal Attire BEST OF SHOW CLASSIFICATION AWARD

PRO EM Party & Event Rentals INNOVATION AWARD

Valerie & Paul Piazza 1ST PLACE (3 DIVISIONS)

1ST PLACE (3 DIVISIONS)

Mary G. Hamilton (2 divisions)

Christine & John Augustine (3 divisions)

Georgia Heller & Denis Duran

2ND PLACE (3 DIVISIONS)

Jan & Jim Darrington

Anonymous Paul H. Meyer Lucille Shanahan

VII. Diverse Art Forms BEST OF SHOW CLASSIFICATION AWARD

Martha Head INNOVATION AWARD

First American Art Magazine 1ST PLACE (5 DIVISIONS)

Mary G. Hamilton (3 divisions) Norma & Burton Miller Claire & Myron Warshaw 2ND PLACE (5 DIVISIONS)

Ken Noone in memory of Phyllis Aaron Noone Mary G. Hamilton (4 divisions)

VIII. Baskets BEST OF SHOW CLASSIFICATION AWARD

Sue Snyder INNOVATION AWARD

Carolyn & James Halladay 1ST PLACE IN 2 DIVISIONS

Betty Van Denburgh (2 divisions) 2ND PLACE IN 2 DIVISIONS

Mary G. Hamilton (2 divisions)

GO + DO

VI. Weavings & Textiles

2ND PLACE (3 DIVISIONS)

Saralou & Carl Merrell Mary G. Hamilton

XI. Open Standards 1ST PLACE IN DIVISION

Dee Dowers 2ND PLACE IN DIVISION

Shirley & George Karas

Judge's Choice Awards Katie & Ben Blackstock Linda & Warren Breisblatt W. Dan Broome Dorcas & Landon Browning Roberta Buchanan Norma Jean Coulter Dino J. & Elizabeth Murfee DeConcini Judith Dobbs Constance Harrington & William Carlson John C. Hill Fred Horowitz Sona Kalousdian Dr. Mari & Frank Koerner Colleen & John Lomax Phyllis & Ed Manning Jan & Mike McAdams Carol McElroy (2 awards) Mike Miller Sheila Bernadette Morris Nancy Mossman Nancy Mossman in honor of Barbara Johnson in appreciation for her kind gesture

Dr. & Mrs. Ted Murray Elinor & David Rothberg Barbara I. & William O. Sparman Judy Wallace

Friends of the Fair Anonymous Anonymous Arlene and Giora Ben-Horin IlgaAnn Bunjer Margaret W. Busch Ellen Cromer Linda & Clay Crossland Barbara Filosi Anna Flynn Carolyn & Frank Gollings J. Griffith Susan K. Grenyo Constance Harrington & William Carlson Jan & Tom Lathrop Cozette & Bill Matthews Dr. & Mrs. Wayne L. Mitchell Dee Murdy Ellen & Rex Nelsen William M. Pendleton Carrie Schalloch & Robert Moss Louise R. Slotta Daniel Steinman Ellen & John Stiteler Kenny Suiter Lillian Vancel

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special appeal

Grand Gallery Exhibition Fund DAN HAGERTY | DIRECTOR OF STRATEGIC DEVELOPMENT AND PROGRAMS

In February 2017, the Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust Grand Gallery opened with an extraordinary original exhibition, Beauty Speaks for Us, which magnificently revealed the potential of this major exhibition space. In the two years since, the Heard has explored this large and versatile new venue through exhibitions that can only be seen at the Heard Museum. Through exhibitions like Frida Kahlo & Diego Rivera and Yua: Henri Matisse and the Inner Arctic Spirit, which drove record-breaking attendance and inspired electrifying public programs and events, the Grand Gallery has opened up a world of possibilities as the Heard Museum organizes new exhibitions that advance American Indian art and explore its intersections with broader artistic and cultural movements.

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Throughout spring and summer 2019, Members and visitors will enjoy our latest original exhibition, Color Riot! How Color Changed Navajo Textiles, which will showcase stunning weavings and include an original hands-on gallery space just for kids and families. We are deeply grateful to have received grants and sponsorships to support these exhibitions. However, these gifts do not fully cover the cost of bringing these exhibitions to you. Today, we invite you to play a leading role in enabling the Heard to continue bringing these outstanding exhibitions to our community by making a special gift to the Heard Museum’s Grand Gallery Exhibition Fund.


SPECIAL APPEAL

Beauty Speaks for Us (February 10 – March 31, 2017) Frida Kahlo & Diego Rivera from the Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection (April 11 – September 4, 2017) Of God and Mortal Men: Masterworks by T.C. Cannon from the Nancy and Richard Bloch Collection (October 7, 2017 – April 15, 2018) Dear Listener: Works by Nicholas Galanin (May 4 – September 3, 2018) Yua: Henri Matisse and the Inner Arctic Spirit (October 29, 2018 – February 3, 2019) Color Riot! How Color Changed Navajo Textiles (April 5 – September 29, 2019)

Your gift to the Grand Gallery Exhibition Fund will directly support the exhibitions in this vitally important venue and will enable us to continue presenting nationally recognized exhibitions that elevate our community’s artistic vibrancy and inspire new and meaningful discourse. We are grateful for your support of this fund with a gift in any amount, which you may make by sending your contribution in the enclosed envelope or by making a donation on our website at www.heard. org/support. Special benefits for supporting the fund are available at higher levels of support, including in-gallery recognition. Find out more by contacting Rebecca S. Hunter at rhunter@heard.org or 602.251.0145.

Thank you for helping us realize the potential of this outstanding gallery! Left to right: Beauty Speaks for Us, Frida and Diego, Yua: Matisse and the Inner Arctic Spirit. Photos: Craig Smith, Heard Museum.

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go + do

SUNDAY APRIL 28 Dia del Niño coincides with the exhibition opening of Grand Procession. See page 10.

Join the Heard Museum as we celebrate the youth with Children’s Day, Día del Niño, a day-long program with music, food, family activities, Folklorico performances, music in the courtyard, the opening of Grand Procession and so much more! FREE admission to the museum for children 12 and under with up to two accompanying parents or guardians! Bring the entire family out for a day of fun, arts, storytelling, music, dance, food, and activities for kids of all ages!

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Live Performances

GO + DO

SCHEDULE

HARMONY PROJECT | 11 A.M. AND 1 P.M.

Come listen to over 30 children musicians fill the campus with music! STORY TIME | 11:45 A.M. AND 12:45 P.M.

Spend some time in the museum and sit down for a story with Violet Duncan! BALLET FOLKLORICO ITZAMATUL DEL VALLE DEL SOL | 12 P.M. AND 2 P.M.

Experience Folkllorico dance, and see these amazing dancers perform. KIDS YOGA! | 1:30 P.M. AND 3 P.M.

Art Activities Xico Gallery will be here all day. Come join them and make a print to take home. Sana Sana Foods will be here doing a food demonstration. Stop by and learn about indigenous foods, and try to make your own blue corn tortilla!

30 minute sessions for kids only. Led by Rooted Community Yoga.

Food Enjoy specials all day long from the Heard’s Cafe and Cantina, paletas from Paletas Betty and delicious hand made plant-based ancestral cuisine from Sana Sana Foods.

Try your hand at making your own clay doll, with guest artist/demonstrator Yolanda Hart-Stevens. Native Health will be tabling and providing fun activities for children. Bow and Arrow demonstration with Royce Manuel. Learn about the materials used, and what it takes to make a bow and arrow. Coloring contest hosted by the Mexican Consulate for their yearly calendar. Phoenix Public Library will also be on hand and will provide activities for kids. SPONSORED BY

Tony and Milena Astorga Foundation

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read

Three Best-selling Books in Books & More We asked Emily Hogan, our Books & More buyer, about some of the most popular titles in our store. Here are her recommendations.

THE WISDOM OF DONKEYS: FINDING TRANQUILITY IN A CHAOTIC WORLD ANDY MERRIFIELD The Wisdom of Donkeys: Finding Tranquility in a Chaotic World, by Andy Merrifield, is my first pick. Donkeys are a ubiquitous part of Arizona history, so when my biggest distributor started carrying this title, I ordered it without a second thought. Once it arrived, I discovered it was about a personal spiritual journey that took place in France, though at least a donkey was involved. Oh well, I thought, I’ll wait until these copies sell out and then take it off my order list. I changed my mind about that when I sold out in one day! Apparently the steady, patient character of donkeys has wide appeal, whether you’re in the deserts and canyons of Arizona or the mountains of France. So, it’s a little off the beaten path for us, but I trust the judgment of my customers. Come and learn some of that wisdom for yourselves.

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READ

KILLERS OF THE FLOWER MOON DAVID GRANN The second book, Killers of the Flower Moon by David Grann, is much more in our wheelhouse. It’s about a series of cold-blooded, systematic murders of Osage tribal members that began to take place in the early 1900s after they became rich because they had been exiled to land in Oklahoma that turned out to have oil under it. It’s also a riveting story of the fledgling FBI, including a Native American agent and a former Texas Ranger who work together with the Osage tribe to uncover a stunning conspiracy.

TRAIL OF LIGHTNING REBECCA ROANHORSE My third choice is Trail of Lightning by Rebecca Roanhorse, the first book in a new series called The Sixth World. Roanhorse is a finalist for the Nebula, Hugo, Sturgeon and Campbell awards in science fiction and fantasy. The action of Trail of Lightning takes place in Dinetah, in a post-apocalyptic world where heroes and monsters once again walk the Earth. I have been actively searching for more books by Indigenous authors, and I’ve discovered that many young writers have an affinity for the fantastic. This should probably come as no surprise, when you consider how much science fiction and fantasy have pervaded pop culture, but it is especially appropriate when you recognize the SF trope of the invasion story, à la War of the Worlds. Who would know more about surviving an invasion than Indigenous Americans? PS - Book 2, Storm of Locusts, is due out on April 23. We’ll have copies faced out in our New Books section as soon as it arrives.

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shop

GOTTA HAVE IT!

5-IN-1 RUG

by Vivian Descheny (Navajo) Includes 39 vegetal dyes & 10 aniline dyes $8000 Measurements: 47" x 71"

TYPES OF DESIGNS USED:

Burntwater rugs are typically comprised of warm earth tones and pastels. This style is a variation of the traditional Two Grey Hills design. The Wide Ruins design evolved from the Chinle but is much more involved. It is marked by many thin bands of colors alternating with wider bands which frequently contain geometric designs. A traditional Ganado rug always should have a red background. The central design motif is usually based on a single or double diamond pattern and the edges are typically embellished with geometric details. Ganado rugs are named for the town of Ganado where John Hubbell founded his trading post in 1878 and popularized the style in catalogs to buyers in the eastern United States. Two Grey Hills rugs are typically woven with natural colored wool in white, black and shades of brown. These rugs are usually much finer in yarn and weaving and take much more time to make. These rugs often have a border and the patterns tend to be more complicated than similar rugs such as Ganado or Klagetoh. The name of the design does not represent hills. The design is named for a village in New Mexico. Revival style refers to a rug in which the weaver references older patterns, frequently from the mid 1800's. Variations of the blue, white, red and black Chief blankets are a popular Revival design.

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SHOP + DINE

QUINTANA COLLECTION POTTERY

by Margaret Tafoya (Santa Clara Pueblo) $12000 Measurements: 12.5" tall, 30� circumference

BLUE A'HOTE KATSINA DOLL

by Carl Nequatewa (Hopi) $265 The A'hote Katsina can appear in any of the four directional colors, but the most common are blue (Sakwahote) and yellow (Sikyahote). Often depicted with feather headdresses, these Katsinas are inspired by Plains warriors and primarily appear in the Mixed Katsina Dances.

Photos: Megan Richmond, Heard Museum

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dine

ON THE MENU:

Summertime at the Café

FIESTA CORN SALAD 1 lb Fresh or frozen corn Olive oil Salt and pepper 1 cup diced red bell pepper

BY IRENE RUTIGLIANO

1/2 cup diced jalapeno

DIRECTOR OF RESTAURANT OPERATIONS

1 cup diced jicama 1/2 cup chopped cilantro

One of my favorite things in creating menus for the Courtyard Café is sourcing seasonal ingredients that complement our featured exhibition. Developing a balanced menu during the summer is an annual challenge we have Arizona due the hot climate. I plan to keep this summer’s menu lite, bright and colorful. We are bringing back a personal favorite of mine, the Crispy Shrimp Bahn Mi. Our version is a modern twist to the traditional sliced pork used on this sandwich. The fresh pickled vegetables are vibrant in color and add a tangy, sweet crunch to this very flavorful, unique lunch option. A museum member’s favorite that is on this summer’s menu is the Fiesta Corn salad. I am pleased to share this recipe so you can try it at home. This zesty and crunchy corn salad can be serve as a side or even as an entrée by adding chicken, shrimp or beef. I invite you to make the Courtyard Café at the Heard Museum a destination for lunch and experience our summer menu flavor riot!

FOR THE DRESSING:

2 cups Mayo 1/2 cup red wine vinegar 2 Tablespoons mustard 1/2 Chipotle 2 cups canola oil

Toss the corn with a little olive oil, salt and pepper and roast at 350 for approx. 10 minutes – you want a little char but still keep the corn plump. When cool mix the remaining salad ingredients together. Make the dress by mixing everything together with a food processor, blender, or whisk. Add the dressing to the corn mixture to taste. You may want less or you may want more. Chill. Season with salt and pepper.

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SHOP + DINE SPRING 2019

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travel + learn

Explore with the Guild

CHACO CANYON, MESA VERDE OCTOBER 6-11, 2019 Spaces still available! Join us as we explore two of the most significant archeological sites in the United States: Chaco Canyon and Mesa Verde. Guided by Fred Nials, world class geologist, Native American historian,

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and authority in the fields of archeology and anthropology, we will spend two days at Mesa Verde and a day at Chaco Canyon. Find the full itinerary and registration form at https://www.heardguild.org/travel-with-us/


TRAVEL + LEARN

Become a Museum Guide

The next training course for the Heard Museum Guild’s Las Guias docent program will begin in the first week of October and conclude in April 2020. Classes will be held one morning per week from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The curriculum includes classroom instruction, hands-on training, a mentorship program and field trips.

Advance registration is required; please reserve your spot now by emailing us at museumeducation@heardguild.org, or call the Guild at 602.252.8840 for more information.

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travel + learn

Master Artist Workshop Series Goes to California BY MARCUS MONENERKIT | DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT Over the past five years, the Heard Museum has had the pleasure of organizing the Master Artist Workshop Series, developed specifically to target American Indian communities and promote the intergenerational communication required to pass down important cultural principles and customs. Some of these workshops are held close to home, at the museum, and some take place at locations in or near tribal communities, such as the Navajo Nation, Santa Fe, N.M., and, most recently, the Tohono O’odham nation in southern Arizona and Sonora, Mexico. In January we began our fifth year with a workshop in Los Angeles, at the Autry Museum of the American West. This was the first time we had partnered with the Autry to produce a class focused on American Indian cultural arts, and it was the first time the Heard had worked with weaver Melissa Cody (DinÊ) as a workshop instructor. She was no doubt up to the task, as she has

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been part of the museum world since she was a small girl, demonstrating and teaching Navajo weaving with her family for more than two decades. Upon our arrival, we found ourselves in a torrent of rain. But when it rains, it is considered a blessing. So, despite the cold, wet conditions, we felt welcome in Southern California and glad to have the opportunity to be working directly in such a dynamic American Indian community. After getting checked in, we were intent on exploring and even found our way to the local mall in downtown Glendale to pick up a few needed supplies. The next day, participants met at the venue to begin the workshop under the instruction of Melissa Cody. One of the interesting aspects of these workshops is watching our participants come together from many different backgrounds to form new acquaintances and networks. This class did not disappoint. Cody is a presence in the


TRAVEL + LEARN

IN LOCATIONS AWAY FROM THEIR TRIBAL COMMUNITIES, LIKE LOS ANGELES, CULTURAL-ARTS PROGRAMS GIVE PARTICIPANTS A PIECE OF HOME THEY HARDLY GET TO EXPERIENCE. Programs like the Heard’s Master Artist Workshops help preserve and revitalize some rarely practiced American Indian art forms. The hegemonic history of the United States’ American Indian policy had a devastating impact on the cultural continuity of American Indian lifeways. In locations away from their tribal communities, like Los Angeles, cultural-arts programs give participants a piece of home they hardly get to experience. It is very satisfying to see people reconnect to something, or someone, and build their associations into a network for resilience.

room, and weaving has been her life since she was five years old. Her experience is amazing, and the knowledge she maintains about Navajo weaving kept the students attentive and asking questions. The students bonded too. There were people from Navajo communities who have lived in Los Angeles for their whole lives. Their stories are familiar: their family was moved out to Los Angeles during the relocation program in the 1950s. By the end of the week, new friendships were formed, along with new knowledge and skill sets for weaving. As first-time weavers, many in the class did not finish their projects during the week, but they have scheduled time with the artist to continue and finish what, for many, will be their first tapestry.

Workshops will continue throughout the year with a variety of art forms, including moccasin making, shell etching, drum making, Pueblo weaving and Navajo weaving. As we continue our series, we look forward to making new friends on the road and discovering both unique and new interpretations of these historic art forms. You can watch short videos from some of our Master Artist Workshops on the Heard Museum YouTube site. Check them out at youtube.com/HeardMuseum.

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experience AN EVENING OF ALBERS On Thursday, January 31, 2019, exhibition collaborators, sponsors, and museum patrons gathered for an exclusive preview of the exhibition, Josef Albers in Mexico followed by a talk by Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum Associate Curator Lauren Hinkson and three-course dinner in the Lyon Family Crossroads Gallery generously provided by Aventura.

John Jackson, Valerie and Charles Diker, and curator Lauren Hinkson together admire works in the Jacobson Gallery

Heard Museum Board Chair John Melamed and Janet Melamed enjoy visiting with museum trustee Beth Murfee DeConcini and Dino DeConcini

Guests of the dinner enjoy a private preview of the exhibition hung in the two-story Jacobson Gallery

Nancy Pletka, Francie and Dick Mallery seated in the Lyon Family Crossroads Gallery at tables colorfully adorned with authentic Oaxacan linens

Harvey Mackay and museum trustee John Lomax visit in the Jacobson Gallery during the preview

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Susan Jackson visits with museum trustee Janis Lyon during the preview

Guggenheim Associate Curator Lauren Hinkson and museum trustee Sharron Lewis visit during the dinner


EXPERIENCE

MEMBERS’ OPENING RECEPTION FOR JOSEF ALBERS IN MEXICO + FIRST FRIDAY On Feb. 1, Heard Museum and Circles of Giving Members attended the opening reception for the exhibition Josef Albers in Mexico, organized by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York, and curated by Lauren Hinkson, associate curator of collections at the Guggenheim. Following the members-only preview was First Fridays at the Heard, featuring live music and an installation of Lowriders with Lowtography in our Freeport-McMoRan Plaza

A member takes a look at a vitrine featuring original maps, guidebooks, postcards, personal images and entry tickets to archaeological sites in Mexico that the Alberses used and collected on their journeys

Photos: Haute Photography and Videography.

The Members Reception featured small plates crafted by our Courtyard Café and a special Paloma cocktail.

A guest from First Fridays at the Heard examines the Homage to the Square series by Josef Albers.

Life Trustee Norma Jean Coulter and her guest enjoy the reception.

A collection of Lowriders from Lowtography sit on the Heard Museum’s plaza.

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experience WE

OUR MEMBERS

Once again we invited Heard Museum Members to be our date for Valentine’s Day. In collaboration with ASU Gammage, Martha Gonzalez, a singer/songwriter for East LA rock band Quetzal, performed classic Mexican ballads with special guests Juan Perez, Robert Robles and Tylana Enomoto.

MEMBERS PICNIC

Friends Anna Flynn and Flavio Marsiglia were each others’ “dates” for Valentines Day.

As we near our 90th anniversary season we partnered with The Farm at South Mountain and Artisan by Santa Barbara Catering for a special day to thank museum members and celebrate the special connection between The Farm and the Heard Museum. In the early 1920s Dwight Heard acquired a large parcel of land where the Farm is now with a vision of sustainability that is still carried out today. Throughout the afternoon Members played lawn games, tried their hand at a community loom organized by Mellon Fellow Velma Kee Craig (Diné), took a special tour of The Farm and enjoyed live music and performances by the YellowHouse Dancers. Photos: Haute Photography and Videography.

Members Ann and Tim Cothron enjoying their evening

Award winning musician and ASU Gammage artist in residence Martha Gonzalez.

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Special musical guest, Tulane Enomotoz, serranade the audience.


EXPERIENCE 2019 World Youth Champion, Kailayne Jensen (DinĂŠ/Maricopa), Hoop dancing at the Members Picnic.

YellowHouse Dancer Members Lane Jensen, LaDawn Yazzie and Kailayne Jensen.

Sustainability Manager, Greg Brownell led members on a tour of The Farm.

Members had a chance to play a variety of lawn games including giant Jenga.

Friends and family came together to watch the special performances by the YellowHouse Dancers.

Mellon Foundation Fellow Velma Kee Craig demonstrates weaving on a community loom with Virginia Lester.

Members of all ages enjoyed spending time together at the picnic.

Artisan by Santa Barbara Catering served a special prickly pear lemonade for members to enjoy.

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experience See More With a Private Tour There is always more to see at the Heard Museum, especially when you take a guided tour. Bring a group for a personalized tour of our newest exhibition, Color Riot! How Color Changed Navajo Textiles. Or, introduce your friends to the Heard’s most prized masterpieces, sweeping landscapes, poetry and personal recollections that are all included in the unforgettable journey through the exhibition HOME: Native People in the Southwest. Let us assist in designing a special tour experience for your group: • Groups of 10 or more tour with a private docent. • Choose from five different gallery tour options. • Members always receive free admission. • Groups can enhance their experience by including luncheon at the acclaimed Courtyard Café. Consider the Heard Museum your destination for your next group activity or outing. Please feel free to contact us with any questions. We look forward to enhancing your next visit! CONTACT: Web: heard.org/visit/group-reservations Phone: 602.252.8840 Email: privategrouptours@heard.org

DEEPEN YOUR CONNECTION Circles of Giving members at the $5,000 Silver level and above receive a completely complimentary, private, curator-led tour for up to six guests. Please call Allison Lester at 602.251.0262 to arrange a tour.

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EXPERIENCE

The Visitor Experience Project: 90 Has Never Looked Better In early 2017, the Heard Museum opened the Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust Grand Gallery with the original exhibition Beauty Speaks for Us. Since then, exhibitions such as Yua: Henri Matisse and the Inner Arctic Spirit, Of God and Mortal Men: Masterworks by T.C. Cannon and Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera have prompted an increase in museum attendance, attracted new Members and strengthened public engagement. Building on this extraordinary success, we are thrilled to announce that Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust has awarded the Heard Museum another generous grant that will enable us to update and improve our Central Courtyard and Admissions Lobby, with the goal of creating an exceptional visitor experience for Members and patrons from the moment they enter our campus. Beginning in mid-May and extending throughout the summer, construction will commence with a refresh of the Central Courtyard, including desert-friendly and space-appropriate plantings, improved directional signage, a new sound system and sunshades across a fresh walking surface spanning the entire courtyard. The current Admissions Lobby will become “entrance only,” and a new dedicated exit path will be created by enclosing a portion of the walkway adjacent to the current entrance of the museum. And, the Admissions Lobby will be reconfigured with a dedicated “Members’ Entrance” and Member Services desk, along with new signage above the current Visitor Services desk.

Once the project is underway, we’ll share more information on what to expect when you visit the Heard Museum during the renovation project, plus additional details on new services that will be available at the Member Services desk, including onsite membership card printing and more! Ensuring an exceptional, welcoming experience for our Members and visitors during each visit is incredibly important to us. As we continue to grow, this project is essential to delivering on our commitment to serve our audience while upholding our mission of advancing American Indian art. We are deeply grateful to Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust for their commitment to the Heard Museum and cannot wait to share this newly refreshed and inviting space with you when we unveil the Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust Central Courtyard this fall!

SPRING 2019

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9

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M O O N D A N C E AT

T H E

H E A R D

CELEBR ATING THE MUSEUM’S 9OTH ANNIVERSARY | 1929-2O19


Celebrate the Heard Museum’s

9oth Anniversary Saturday, October 26, 2019 Be the first to see

David Hockney’s Yosemite and Masters of California Basketry Gala Honorees

Doug Hyde Ellen and John Stiteler

Gala Co Chairs

Mary Ellen and Robert H. McKee

For more information contact Rebecca S. Hunter at rhunter@heard.org or (602) 251-0245 Left: Carrie Bethel Mono Lake Paiute, 1898-1974 Basket, 1956 Sedge root, dyed bracken root, redbud, willow 13 x 25 inches Collection of Stevia and Wayne Thompson

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give Thank you to our Supporters The Heard Museum continues to achieve and serve its mission through the generosity of its members and supporters. We recognize these and all of our loyal donors for their gifts during the museum’s fiscal year 2018 (Oct. 1 2017 through Sept. 30, 2018). 250,000+

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Melamed

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick A. Lynn

Anonymous

Mr. and Mrs. Leland W. Peterson

Sanderson Ford

100,000 - 249,999

PetSmart

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Berlin

Great Clips, Inc.

Ms. Joette Schmidt and Mr. Kent Derdivanis

Henry Luce Foundation, Inc.

David Wright House

Mr. and Mrs. John Stiteler

Drs. Kathleen L. and William G. Howard

Robert H. McKee and Mary Ellen McKee Charitable Family Foundation

The Chickasaw Nation

10,000 - 24,999

7,500 - 10,000

Steele Foundation

Adelante Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Abraham

Terra Foundation for American Art

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Anderson

Ameriprise Financial

Mr. and Mrs. Tony Astorga

Ballard Spahr LLP

Bank of America

Mr. and Mrs. Mark B. Bonsall

Mr. and Mrs. Gregory Boyce

Clifton Larson Allen LLP

Mr. Robert Bulla

Mr. Dan Cracchiolo and Ms. Pamela Grant

National Endowment for the Humanities

The Andy Warhol Foundation For The Visual Arts 50,000 - 99,999

Arizona Public Service Arizona Commission on the Arts Arizona Community Foundation Don Nierling Memorial Foundation Phoenix IDA The Kemper and Ethel Marley Foundation Mrs. Betty Van Denburgh Virginia M. Ullman Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. F. Wesley Clelland, III CopperPoint Insurance Companies

The Lovena Ohl Foundation Mr. David Wilshin

Dino J. and Elizabeth Murfee DeConcini Fennemore Craig, P.C.

Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Cowie

Mr. and Mrs. Scott Montgomery

Ms. Alice J. Dickey

MUFG Union Bank Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Bennett Dorrance

Mr. and Mrs. James Navran

Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold

Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Mr. and Mrs. John Graham Ms. Mary G. Hamilton

Sacks Tierney P.A. Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Schramm

25,000 - 49,999

Mrs. Nancy Hanley

Mr. Gilbert Waldman and Ms. Christy Vezolles

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Kim

Wells Fargo Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. James J. Meenaghan

5,000 - 7,499

Papp Family Foundation

Mrs. Howard Aidem

Dr. and Mrs. Arthur Pelberg

Arizona Humanities Council

Mr. and Mrs. Wick Pilcher

Arizona Lottery

Robert Lehman Foundation

Bank of Arizona

Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Lyon Phoenix Office of Arts and Culture Dr. and Mrs. Jurg Bieri Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Mackay

Mr. and Mrs. Donald E. Brandt

46

EARTHSONG


Mrs. Delores Bachmann

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Tait, Sr.

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Carr

Mr. and Mrs. Giora Ben-Horin

Mr. Robert W. Uphaus

Cascade Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bogacz

1,000 - 2,499

Mrs. Susan Diamond

Mr. and Mrs. John Boppart

Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Allender

Mr. and Mrs. James Drake

Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Clark

Mrs. Ginger Allingham

Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund

David Rothschild Memorial Foundation

Ms. Caralee Allsworth

Mr. Robert Fippinger and Ms. Ann Kaplan

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald T. Davis

Mr. Joseph Anderson and Ms. Mary Dewane

HighGround Inc.

Mr. and Mrs. Ray Dewey

Dr. and Mrs. Thomas M. Hudak

DLR Group

Mr. and Mrs. James R. Huntwork

Ms. Denise Dowers

Jewish Community Center of Greater Phoenix

Ms. Andrea Driggs

Dr. Christopher Appleton and Dr. Marcia Ko

Mr. and Mrs. Verlane Endorf

Arch W. Shaw Foundation

Dr. Marigold Linton and Dr. Robert Barnhill

First Things First

Mr. and Mrs. John Augustine

Mr. and Mrs. Frank H. Goodyear, Jr.

Mrs. Shirley Avery

Ms. Agatha M. Melamed Mr. Jesse Monongye

Hensley Beverage Company

Mr. and Mrs. Vaughn Beals

Mr. and Mrs. David E. Reese

Mr. and Mrs. Jon Hulburd

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Benedict

Rob and Melani Walton Foundation

James and Louise Roche Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. John Benson

Mr. and Mrs. John E. Rogers

Jett and Julia Anderson Fund

Mr. and Mrs. Steve Rosskam

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Bidstrup

Joseph S. and Mary Trigg Lentz

Salmon, Lewis & Weldon, PLC

Ms. Deborah Bjornson

Mrs. Maurine Kahn

Mr. and Mrs. Mark Schiavoni

Ms. Rachel Blank

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Kim

Mr. and Mrs. Randy Schilling

Mrs. Cerelle Bolon

Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Latta

Season for Sharing

Mr. and Mrs. Mark B. Bonsall

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Lehmann

Mr. and Mrs. Richard H. Silverman

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Bool

Mrs. Jean Lester and Mr. Christian Lester

Ms. Sue Bunch

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Smith Mr. and Mrs. Paul Steiner

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Matthews

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Chandler

Mr. and Mrs. John G. Stuart

Ms. Miriam J. McClennen

Cherokee Royalty Syndicate

Mr. and Mrs. William Taubman

Okland Construction

Cocopah Indian Tribe

Mr. and Mrs. Ray R. Thurston

Mr. and Mrs. Mark Paper

vCore

Mr. Samuel J. Parker

Harry M. Conger and Mary F. Sailors

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Weil III

Mr. Louis Rogers

West Family Foundation

Mr. Norman L. Sandfield

2,500 - 4,999

Sheldon and Lili Chester Philanthropic Fund

Applied Materials Foundation Arizona Department of Veterans’ Services

Ms. Christina S. Snyder Mr. and Mrs. James Swanson

GIVE

Mrs. Linda Bruckheimer

Antique Tribal Art Dealers Association

Mr. and Mrs. Judson Ball

Mr. Neil Berman

Mr. Steve Carter

Dr. and Mrs. Lattie Coor Mrs. Norma Jean Coulter Mr. Jerry Cowdrey Mr. W. David Connell and Mrs. Becky Sawyer Mr. David Van Denburgh Drs. Frances and Paul Dickman

SPRING 2019

47


give Ms. Judith Dobbs

Laura and Michael Levenberg

Mr. and Mrs. Scott Spangler

Mr. and Mrs. Cliff Douglas

Mr. and Mrs. Delbert Lewis

Mr. Jeremy Staab

Ms. Betty A. Drake

Mr. and Mrs. John Lomax

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Duffek

Mr. and Mrs. James Lowman

The AtLee Family Foundation, Inc.

Ms. Judith M. Dworkin and Mr. Kalman D. Pijawka

Dr. and Mrs. M.S. MacCollum

Ms. Lynne Fenderson

Mr. and Mrs. Vance Marshall

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Fine

Matson Foundation

Mrs. Jo Flittie

Dr. Janet Maurer and Mr. Marty Davis

Mr. and Mrs. Jed Foutz

Mrs. Gay Thomas Thunderbirds Charities Tonto Apache Tribe Mr. and Mrs. Gene Waddell Waddell Gallery

Schwab Charitable Fund

Maurice Meta Gross Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley J. Getch

Dr. and Mrs. Donald Miles

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Ward

Globe Foundation

Dr. and Mrs. Richard L. Morgan

Mr. and Mrs. Scott Grainger

Northern Trust Bank

Dr. Paul L. Weiden and Mrs. Beverly Linkletter

Ms. Carol A. Gray

Mr. and Mrs. Scott O’Connor

Dr. John Weinstein

Ms. Roberta D. Hall

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Ottosen

Mr. and Ms. Daniel I. Wilhelm

Mrs. Jeanie M. Harlan Mr. Robert Harrison

Ms. Mi-ai Parrish

Mrs. Diane Willian

Ms. Jody Pelusi

Ms. Diana Wykes

Ms. Martha M. Head

Dr. and Mrs. J. Michael Powers

Yavapai-Prescott Indian Tribe

Mr. William Healey

PRO EM Party & Event Rentals

Dr. David Young

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin D. Hetz

Ms. M.J. Pulliam

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Zabel

Mr. Daniel Hidding

Ms. Margaret Ranck

Zuni Tribe

Ms. Alexis Hill

Ms. Elizabeth Raspolic

Mr. and Mrs. Joel P. Hoxie

Mr. and Mrs. William Reed

Hualapai Tribal Council

Ms. Diane Reesor

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Ingeman

Ms. Marian Reichert

Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Kackley

Mrs. Nancy Russell

Dr. Norma Kafer and Mr. James Gordon

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Salke

Ken and Betty Dahlberg Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Scholsohn

Ms. Helen Kersting and Mr. Donald DeWitt

Seidler Foundation

Dr. and Mrs. Jack A. Friedland

Mr. Charles King Mr. and Mrs. Mark Kolman Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Korn Mrs. Bonnie Kraft LaneTerralever

48

Mr. and Mrs. Clint Magnussen

The Susan and Ford Schumann Foundation

EARTHSONG

Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Sands Mr. and Mrs. William Schubert Drs. Leslie and Connie Seldin Ms. B. J. Shortridge Shoumaker Family Fund Ms. Jane Sidney Oliver and Ms. Catherine Meschter Mr. and Mrs. C.A. Smith

Mr. John R. Ward


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MY FIGURES REPRESENT COUR AGEOUS PEOPLE FROM THE PAST— CHIEFS, WARRIORS, WOMEN, AND MY LAKOTA RELATIVES. WITHOUT THEM, I COULD NOT BE WHO I AM TODAY. —Rhonda

Holy Bear, from the book Grand Procession: The Diker Collection at the Denver Art Museum by Lois Dubin, 2010

Profile for Heard Museum

Heard Museum Earth Song, Spring 2019  

Earth Song is the Heard Museum's members-only publication on museum events, exhibitions and milestones. It is published 3 times a year.

Heard Museum Earth Song, Spring 2019  

Earth Song is the Heard Museum's members-only publication on museum events, exhibitions and milestones. It is published 3 times a year.

Profile for earthsong