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earthsong MUSEUM MEMBERSHIP MAGAZINE

D E A R L I S T E N E R WORKS

BY

NICHOL AS

GAL ANIN

ON VIEW MAY 4, 2018

S U M M E R 2 01 8

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BOARD OF TRUSTEES John Melamed Wick Pilcher

Chair Vice-Chair

Patricia K. Hibbeler Leland W. Peterson

Secretary Treasurer

David M. Roche

Director and CEO

earthsong

TRUSTEES Karen Abraham Tony Astorga Arlene K. Ben-Horin Mark B. Bonsall Gregory H. Boyce Dr. Craig Cohen Robert A. Cowie Elizabeth Murfee DeConcini Judy Dworkin John Graham Carrie L. Hulburd James R. Huntwork Mary Endorf, Guild President

Stephen R. Lewis Marigold Linton John F. Lomax Janis Lyon Robert Meyer Scott Montgomery Susan H. Navran Scott H. O’Connor William G. Ridenour Mark Schiavoni Don Smith Christy Vezolles David Wilshin

LIFE TRUSTEES Kay Benedict Howard R. Berlin James T. Bialac Dr. George Blue Spruce, Jr. Herbert J. Bool Robert B. Bulla F. Wesley Clelland, III Norma Jean Coulter Alice (A.J.) Dickey Robert J. Duffy Mary G. Hamilton Barbara Heard Joel P. Hoxie Mary Hudak Dr. Thomas M. Hudak Richard L. Johnes Edward F. Lowry

Frederick A. Lynn Dennis H. Lyon Carol Ann Mackay Clint J. Magnussen Robert L. Matthews Miriam J. McClennen Mary Ellen McKee James Meenaghan Louise Menk Dr. Wayne Lee Mitchell Dr. Arthur L. Pelberg David E. Reese William C. Schubert Sheryl L. Sculley Richard H. Silverman John B. Stiteler John G. Stuart

EARTHSONG Allison Lester

Membership Manager

Carli Krueger

Design Editor

Caesar Chaves

Creative Director

Deborah Paddison

Copy Editor

Jan Jordan

Copy Editor

COVER: She in Shadow Form, Nicholas Galanin in collaboration with Nep Sidhu, 2015. Raw Silk, Brass, Gold Zari Stitch, Jute and Cotton Rope.

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EARTHSONG

Allan Houser at the dedication of Earth Song at the Heard Museum in 1983. Photo: Houser Foundation

It took five months for Allan Houser to create Earth Song ­— a large and powerful sculpture made from Alabama marble depicting a drummer (modeled by fellow artist Delmar Boni), drumming and chanting. Houser and his gallery gifted the sculpture to the museum in 1979: “Initially, it was placed near the museum’s original entrance at 22 E. Monte Vista; after the 1999 museum expansion, it was moved to the [new entrance]. In 1997, Earth Song left the museum and was included in the exhibit Twentieth Century American Sculpture at The White House: Honoring Native America along with sculpture by Houser’s colleague John Hoover and a group of artists a generation younger.” - Diana Pardue, Allan Houser. Voices Heard, Journal of the Heard Museum . 2009. pg 24. Nearly 40 years later, Earth Song continues to welcome all visitors as they pass through the museum’s doors. Some are visiting for the first time, and many, especially our members, more times than they can count. We want you, as a member, to know that Earth Song, this publication we named for the artwork that greets you at our door, is your continuing welcome to the Heard. This magazine serves as your guide to our upcoming exhibitions and programs, and it provides information exclusive to members. We want you to have the best experience possible every visit ­— and every visit begins with Earth Song. Take a picture with Earth Song on your next visit! Share on social media with #heardmembers or email us at members@heard.org. We might feature your photo in our next issue and hope you enjoy seeing yourself and other members on the pages of your Member Magazine.


table of contents 4

Director's Letter

5

Museum News

VIEW

EXHIBITIONS ON DISPLAY

6

Q&A with Nicholas Galanin

12

Contemporary at the Heard

14

The Mural Project

GO + DO

EVENTS

18

Calendar

23

Hoop Dance World Championship

24

Fair & Market Best of Show

READ DINE SHOP 26

GOTTA HAVE IT, ON THE MENU

Contemporary reads

TRAVEL + LEARN

EXPLORE WITH THE GUILD

30

The Art of Being Indian

31

Be Our Guide: How to Join Las Guias

EXPERIENCE 32

GIVE 37

MEMBERS EXPERIENCE MORE

Opening recaps ADVANCING AMERICAN INDIAN ART

Thank you to our donors

S U M M E R 2 01 8

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DIRECTOR'S LETTER Dear Heard Museum Members: On May 4, we are thrilled to be opening the exhibition Dear Listener: Works by Nicholas Galanin. The exhibition is the largest showing of contemporary art at the Heard in more than a decade and is the first dedicated to a living artist in the new Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust Grand Gallery.

David M. Roche Dickey Family Director and CEO

I encourage you, as a member of the Heard Museum, to take great pride in knowing that your support has made many opportunities for Native American artists possible. For example, in the early 1960s, when living Native artists were being denied the chance to display their work at many mainstream galleries and museums, the Heard started presenting monographic exhibitions featuring the works of fine art practitioners such as Allan Houser, Oscar Howe, Fritz Scholder and Al Momaday. These once-radical artists are now considered among the most important of their generation. In 1973, the commitment to living artists expanded, with the Heard’s initiation of an invitational which facilitated exposure for artists’ work and invited critical discourse, that at the time was nonexistent. Within a decade, the Heard launched the first-ever biennial for Native art based on a fine art model. Continuing a focus on the contemporary into the 2000s, the Heard co-organized two group exhibitions: Holy Land: Diaspora and the Desert (2006) and REMIX: New Modernities in a Post Indian World (2007). Each was well-received critically and served to further showcase the changing realities of Native American art. Now, with our new mission and strategic direction that emphasizes advancing American Indian art — and an exciting new whitewall gallery — ­ the world’s largest private museum dedicated to American Indian art has an opportunity, if not an obligation, to continue our pioneering efforts into the 21st century. Dear Listener marks the Heard Museum’s return to the forefront of presenting the finest and most current examples of contemporary Native American art, as well as advancing critical discourse on the role that Native American art plays in the modern world. I thank each of you for the role you are playing in making this important work a reality.

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EARTHSONG


museum news 60TH HEARD MUSEUM GUILD

INDIAN FAIR & MARKET 20% 14%

MORE VISITORS ATTENDED SATURDAY THAN IN 2017

MORE VISITORS ATTENDED

15,080

VISITORS, ARTISTS, FAMILIES AND VOLUNTEERS

SUNDAY THAN IN 2017

618

ARTISTS WERE SELECTED BY JURY TO PARTICIPATE

ATTENDED THE THREE-DAY EVENT

116

TRIBAL AFFILIATIONS WERE REPRESENTED BY ARTISTS FROM AMERICAN INDIAN AND ALASKA NATIVE TRIBES, AND CANADIAN FIRST NATIONS

450

GUILD VOLUNTEERS DONATED TENS OF THOUSANDS OF HOURS

BEST OF SHOW

$61,300

WAS AWARDED TO WINNERS, INCLUDING $10,000 FOR BEST OF SHOW, THE SINGLE-LARGEST PRIZE EVER GIVEN AT THE FAIR.

347

623

109

ARTISTS SUBMITTED WORK TO THE JURIED COMPETITION

WORKS WERE PROCESSED FOR JUDGING

RIBBONS WERE AWARDED

SEE PAGE 24 FOR A STORY ON THE BEST OF SHOW WINNER.

S U M M E R 2 01 8 Photo: Carli Krueger / Heard Museum

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view

D E A R L I S T E N E R W OR K S B Y NIC HOL A S G A L A NIN BY ERIN JOYCE FINE ARTS CURATOR This May the Heard is ushering in a new wave of contemporary art. Our exhibition, Dear Listener:

Works by Nicholas Galanin, is

a mid-career retrospective of Nicholas Galanin, b. 1979.

The exhibition will feature over

10,000 square feet of new

and existing work, including installation,

video art, work on paper, performance art and fashion. I recently asked Galanin to discuss

the exhibition, his practice as an artist, and what is on the horizon for him after the Heard. Where did it Go? Collaboration with Christian Petersend, 2014

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EARTHSONG


ERIN JOYCE: Nicholas, I have had the privilege of

working with you and seeing your career progress over the years. For our readers who are new to your work,

can you share a bit about your background and what has

VIEW

led to this moment in your career?

NICHOLAS GALANIN: Yes, I am grateful for all of

these projects we have worked on. I have been involved and interested in creative work since I was a child; this

has been an ongoing practice of passion and process,

a lifetime of growing, learning, teaching, holding and Nicholas Galanin Photo: Wendy Red Star

contributing to my cultures’ continuum. So yes, this is a

personal milestone for me, [and] I hope it is one of more to come, as I feel like I am still just getting started here.

EJ: Your practice as an artist is so diverse. Looking at

your visual work, can you describe your process as you start a work, commencing with research and then manifesting that into a physical object? How does that progression unfold for you?

NG: It is always different, [there’s] no recipe—just

creative necessity and curiosity, listening, learning and continual growth. I believe everything is connected

and am not so quick to categorize or separate my

creative practice. There is sovereignty in diversity

of medium. There is power in this sovereignty. Institutions and audiences tend to need

boundaries and definitions, walls and

barriers often built by stereotype and romanticization.

CIRCLES AND EXPERIENCE OPENING

May 3 | 6 to 8 p.m. MEMBERS' OPENING

May 4 | 6 to 10 p.m. S U M M E R 2 01 8

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EJ: One of the pieces in the exhibition that I am most excited to bring to the Heard is Imaginary Indian.

Can you tell the readers more about that work and the concepts behind it?

NG: This series has taken form in many works. The

original concept started with cultural appropriation and an economy of culture rooted in colonialism and settler communities that forcibly removed these objects from Indigenous communities through theft and genocide. Generations later, this same settler community

commodified and homogenized Indigenous knowledge, ceremony and object. It is a way of reclaiming that

agency, reclaiming power over our cultural heritage and cultural future.

EJ: Another piece like that is A Supple Plunder. Often

your work addresses and redresses histories of violence and the genetic memory of trauma. Can you discuss this work and your intention behind creating it?

NG: My work is not solely based in or defined by these

conversations, though I will not stand by as this violence continues. It is necessary to highlight and expose

histories and conversations [that] settler communities deny. We are still living in a nation that continues this

oppression and violence institutionally. These conversations are often ignored, purposefully overlooked as we are expected to remain available and complicit in giving

our experiences and knowledge for homogenization and

anthropology. To create work that holds this space and sits

in to do what it has been created to do, engage and promote progress and dialogue in all communities. A Supple Plunder is a memorial to Indigenous men and women who’ve been subject to the still-ongoing violence of U.S. and Canadian government nation-building. Many of the statues we see

erected in bronze are of men who were responsible for the raping, murdering violence toward Indigenous peoples.

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LEFT Imaginary Indian Wood, floral wallpaper. 216 x 216 in. 2016 EARTHSONG

RIGHT Nicholas Galanin. Photo: Wendy Red Star


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10 E A R T H S O N G


VIEW A Supple Plunder. Leonard Getinthecar, 2015-18. Ballistic Torsos, two-channel video. Dimensions variable. Leonard Getinthecar is a pseodomyn used for collaboations between Nicholas and Jerrod Galanin.

EJ: In addition to your practice as a contemporary

EJ: You collaborate quite a bit with other artists, and

like the canoe and the totem you are currently

Tell us how those projects with other artists begin and

artist, you participate in projects in your community, working on. Can you share more about that and the importance of those activities?

NG: My practice formed and continues to exist on this

side of cultural continuum with community-based

projects that are not always rooted in conversations

mentioned in the question above. The violent history

is not removed from our generations here now, and this

cultural work is also engaging in healing. The totem I am carving now in Juneau is a healing pole for the Yanyeidi

clan in Juneau. The Taku village was burnt to the ground to remove Tlingit families from their homes to make way for a boat harbor. This happened in 1962! The

strength in our culture is understood and shared through our cultural arts, visual language, customs, subsistence,

language and cultural sovereignty. I want to see all of our Indigenous brothers and sisters succeed; to the outsider, our presence and resilience is resistance. LEFT Let Them Enter Dancing, Showing Their Faces: Guwakaan Monotype 2018

many of the works in the exhibition are collaborative. evolve.

NG: Collaborations have all happened organically. I feel

grateful for the opportunities to collaborate and work with some of the brightest minds in the game. Some of these collaborations happen on the spot, as in creating while

we hit “record� in the music studio; other collaborations occur over several lifetimes of conversation, and we are continuing these conversations today.

EJ: After your exhibition, what are you working on? NG: I’ll always be working on music; the next

planned collaboration is taking place as a Rockefeller Foundation Fellowship at the Bellagio Center in Italy this fall with poet Adrian Matejka. We will work on music and video projects. I was recently invited to do

something for the Honolulu Biennial in 2019, so I am getting excited about this as well. As for long-term

projects, I would love to build a school in my community for visual and creative arts, music, etc.

S U M M E R 2 01 8

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CONTEMPORARY ART THROUGH THE YEARS BY DIANA F. PARDUE CHIEF CURATOR

Who ever said, that my paintings are not in the

traditional Indian style, has poor knowledge of Indian

When Maie Bartlett Heard purchased two Fred

Art indeed. There is much more to Indian Art, than pretty,

relatively new and exciting art form. Although the

individualism (emotional and intellectual insight) in the

and murals, painting in watercolors on paper was

studied fact of Indian paintings. Are we to be held back

a few artists. Collectors quickly became enchanted

common way? We are to be herded like a bunch of sheep,

Kabotie paintings in 1922, she was buying a

Southwest had a rich tradition of painted pottery

new, having been initiated just five years earlier by

stylized pictures. There was also power and strength and

old Indian paintings. Every bit in my paintings is a true forever with one phase of Indian painting, that is the most

with Southwestern paintings, and galleries and

with no right for individualism, dictated as the Indian has

small selections. Kabotie, Hopi (1900-1986), was

and only the White Man knows what is best for him. Now,

museums in Chicago and New York began showing

always been, put on reservations and treated like a child,

considered one of the most talented artists of his day.

even in Art, “You little child do what we think is best for

When the Heard Museum opened in 1929, it

initially exhibited collections from around the world.

After curator H. Thomas Cain came on board in 1952, he began to change the exhibitions more regularly

and featured a show of contemporary paintings in

his first year. By the 1960s, contemporary paintings began to be shown more consistently. Perhaps the

most pivotal exhibition was in 1964, for artist Oscar

Howe, Yanktonai (1915-1983), whose abstract paintings of dancers were strikingly new and

shocking to some. Just a few years before, Howe’s

work had been eliminated from the Philbrook

Indian Art Annual exhibition because it did not

you, nothing different.” Well, I am not going to stand for it.

Indian Art can compete with any Art in the world, but not as a suppressed Art….

—Oscar Howe, letter to Jeanne Snodgrass, Billie Jane Baguley Library and Archives, Jeanne Snodgrass King Collection, RC259(1):552.

Howe’s exhibition at the Heard represented the

museum’s interest in showing current works of art by some of the most inspirational artists of the day. A

series of one-person exhibitions followed throughout

the 1960s for artists including Al Momaday, Joan

Hill, Carl Gorman and his son R.C. Gorman,

Pablita Velarde, Michael Kabotie, Fred Beaver,

“look Indian.” On April 18, 1958, Howe wrote the

Andrew Tsinahjinnie, Harrison Begay, Chethlahe

Jeanne Snodgrass, whose papers are now at the

exhibitions included sales of each artist’s paintings. This

following passionate statement to Philbrook curator

Heard’s Billie Jane Baguley Library and Archives: 12 E A R T H S O N G

Paladin and Helen Hardin, among others. These

type of exhibition continued in the 1970s, and artists


VIEW Allan Houser, Fritz Scholder and George Morrison

were among those whose works were featured. In the

1970s, the Heard initiated a series of invitational art

Oscar Howe (Yanktonai, 1915-1983), Ghost Dance, 1960, watercolor on paper. Heard Museum Collection, Gift of Edward Jacobson, IAC85. Photo: Craig Smith / Heard Museum

exhibitions that included Sculpture I (February - April

Curator of Fine Art, Joe Baker, developed exhibitions

a painting exhibition called Invitational ’74 (January -

Virgil Ortiz and Steven Yazzie, among others. Both

1977) and a drawing show titled Invitational ’77

American Indian in New York. Baker also curated a

1973), Sculpture II (December 1973 - February 1974),

March 1974), Invitational Sculpture (February - March

(September - November 1977).

The invitational format was modified in the

1980s when curator Erin Younger initiated a fine arts invitational. The museum followed this format for

for leading contemporary artists including Will Wilson, exhibitions traveled to the National Museum of the

contemporary exhibition, REMIX: New Modernaties in

a Post-Indian World, that traveled as well.

Contemporary art has deep roots at the Heard,

and its exhibition has been a mainstay for more than

several years through the leadership of curator Margaret

50 years. We continue celebrate contemporary artists

known as the Biennial Invitational. Lloyd Kiva New

show at the Heard Museum.

Archuleta, who spearheaded a series that became

who create the works of art we are privileged to

S U M M E R 2 01 8

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THE MURAL PROJECT: CHEYENNE RANDALL Artist Cheyenne Randall (Cheyenne River Sioux) prepares a large mural for installation. During an artist-in-residency program. Randall installed six large-scale murals around the Heard Museum grounds. Explore the campus to see them yourself. A map is available at heard.org. Photo: Haute Photography and Videography

14 E A R T H S O N G


VIEW S U M M E R 2 01 8

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INSTALLING THE MURALS Artist Cheyenne Randall (Cheyenne River Sioux) and Dominic Nieri installed six of Randall's large-scale murals. Many of them feature iconic figures icluding Elvis Presley and Audrey Hepburn manipulated digitally. Randall created the imagery with photoshop and paint before using wheat paste to adhere the printed murals to walls around the Heard.

Photos: Craig Smith / Heard Museum

16 E A R T H S O N G


VIEW S U M M E R 2 01 8

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go + do APRIL 6 | FRIDAY

MEMBERS' LOUNGE

6 TO 10 P.M.

15 | SUNDAY

25 | WEDNESDAY

9:30 A.M. TO 5 P.M.

5:30 P.M.

FIRST FRIDAY: ROCK OUT WITH THE HEARD

LAST DAY: OF GOD AND MORTAL MEN

GUILD APPRECIATION DINNER

Heard Museum Campus See page 22

Virginia G. Piper Grand Trust Gallery

6-8 | FRIDAY - SUNDAY

1:30 P.M. TO 3 P.M.

9:30 A.M.

T.C. CANNON LECTURE SERIES: FROM T.C. TO NOW

MUSEUM YOGA

ALL DAY MEMBER DISCOUNT: 20% OFF

POTTER FLASH SALE Online only Heardmuseumshop.com

Steele Auditorium

Steele Auditorium

28 | SATURDAY Heard Museum Campus

21 | SATURDAY 9:30 A.M.

14 | SATURDAY 9:30 A.M.

AMERICAN INDIAN ART & ARTIFACTS APPRAISAL DAY

MUSEUM YOGA

Steele Auditorium

24 | TUESDAY

Heard Museum Campus

10 A.M.

10 A.M. TO 4 P.M.

LAS GUIAS INFORMATIONAL MEETING

KATSINA DOLL MARKETPLACE

Encanto Room See page 31

Steele Auditorium

Photo: Craig Smith / Heard Museum

29 | SUNDAY 11 A.M. TO 4 P.M. DIA DEL NIÑO

Photo: Megan Richmond / Heard Museum

Heard Museum Campus See page 21

5 | SATURDAY

12 | SATURDAY

1:30 TO 3 P.M.

9:30 A.M.

DEAR LISTENER LECTURE SERIES: RACE AND IDENTITY READDRESSED THROUGH CONTEMPORARY ART

MUSEUM YOGA

MAY 3 | THURSDAY 6 TO 8 P.M.

CIRCLES + EXPERIENCE

DEAR LISTENER CIRCLES AND EXPERIENCE OPENING Heard Museum Campus See page 8, 21

4 | FRIDAY 6 TO 10 P.M. DEAR LISTENER MEMBERS' OPENING Heard Museum Campus See page 8, 21

MEMBERS ONLY

Steele Auditorium See page 21

Heard Museum Campus

11:30 A.M. FILM SCREENING:

THE THICK DARK FOG Steele Auditorium See page 25

26 | SATURDAY 9:30 A.M.

6 TO 11 P.M.

MUSEUM YOGA

FIRST FRIDAY: NOT A BLOCK PARTY WITH SHABAZZ PALACES

Heard Museum Campus

Heard Museum Campus See page 22

Seattle-based band Shabazz Palaces. Photo: Courtesy of artist.

18 E A R T H S O N G


JUNE 6 TO 10 P.M.

9 | SATURDAY

MEMBERS' LOUNGE

9:30 A.M.

FIRST FRIDAY: ARTIST TAKEOVER

MUSEUM YOGA Heard Museum Campus

Heard Museum Campus See page 22

11:30 A.M. FILM SCREENING:

2 | SATURDAY

THE LOST ONES: THE LONG JOURNEY HOME; THE SALT SONG TRAIL

12:30 P.M. NAALTSOOS SÁNI’ (OLD PAPER)

Steele Auditorium

Monte Vista Room

See page 25

150th Anniversary of 1868 treaty signing between the U.S. and Navajo Nation. Come and learn about this historic event.

1:30 TO 3 P.M. DEAR LISTENER LECTURE SERIES: AMERICA: ALTERNATIVE PRACTICE IN PUBLIC ART

1-3 | FRIDAY - SUNDAY ALL DAY TEXTILE FLASH SALE Online only Heardmuseumshop.com

GO + DO

1 | FRIDAY

Heard Museum Campus See page 21

MEMBER DISCOUNT: 20% OFF

23 | SATURDAY 9:30 A.M.

Photo: Shaliyah Ben / Heard Museum

MUSEUM YOGA Heard Museum Campus

JULY 6 | FRIDAY 6 TO 10 P.M.

MEMBERS' LOUNGE

FIRST FRIDAY Heard Museum Campus See page 22

7 | SATURDAY

20 | FRIDAY 6 TO 8 P.M. ADULT POP-UP STUDIO: REMIX: WITH CALVIN OTIS |||

21 | SATURDAY 10 A.M. TO NOON

1:30 TO 3 P.M.

KIDS' POP-UP STUDIO! WITH OTIS CALVIN III See page 21

9:30 A.M.

DEAR LISTENER LECTURE SERIES: LAND: LAND RIGHTS, SOVEREIGNTY AND STEWARDSHIP

LAST DAY: AWA TSIREH

Heard Museum Campus See page 21

Jacobsen Gallery

14 | SATURDAY

1 | SUNDAY

9:30 A.M. Awa Tsireh (Alfonso Roybal) San Ildefonso Pueblo (1898-1955) Detail of Eagle and Snake, c. 1920s The Cleveland Museum of Art, gift of Amelia Elizabeth White 1937.798

Detail of Eagle and Snake tray, c. 1930s - 1940s Howard Collection

28 | SATURDAY 9:30 A.M. MUSEUM YOGA Heard Museum Campus

MUSEUM YOGA Heard Museum Campus

11:30 A.M. FILM SCREENING:

PLAYING FOR THE WORLD Steele Auditorium See page 23

S U M M E R 2 01 8

19


AUGUST 3 | FRIDAY 6 TO 10 P.M.

MEMBERS' LOUNGE

Belt Buckle by Richard I. Chavez. Photo: Craig Smith / Heard Museum

FIRST FRIDAY Heard Museum Campus See page 21

21 | TUESDAY

5 | SUNDAY

10 A.M.

9:30 A.M.

11 | SATURDAY

LAST DAY: SYMMETRY IN STONE

Encanto Room See page 31

9:30 A.M.

Lovena O'ahl Gallery

MUSEUM YOGA

6-12 MONDAY - SUNDAY

Heard Museum Campus

SHOP SUMMER SALE Heard Museum Shop and online heardmuseumshop.com

LAS GUIAS INFORMATIONAL MEETING

MEMBER DISCOUNT:

20%

25 | SATURDAY 9:30 A.M.

11:30 A.M.

MUSEUM YOGA

FILM SCREENING:

OUR SPIRITS DON’T SPEAK ENGLISH: INDIAN BOARDING SCHOOL

Heard Museum Campus

Steele Auditorium See page 25

SEPTEMBER 7 | FRIDAY 6 TO 10 P.M.

MEMBERS LOUNGE

FIRST FRIDAY Heard Museum Campus See page 22

9 | SUNDAY 9:30 A.M. TO 5 P.M. GRANDPARENTS' DAY AT THE HEARD Heard Museum Campus

8 | SATURDAY

11 | TUESDAY

11:30 A.M.

10 A.M.

FILM SCREENING:

LAS GUIAS INFORMATIONAL MEETING

WE WERE CHILDREN See page 25

Encanto Room See page 31

Las Guias. Photo: Sebastian Kleihs / Heard Museum

STAY UP TO DATE This calendar is accurate as of April 1, 2018, but we're always planning more events. Check heard.org/events or our Facebook page for the most up-to-date information. You can also learn more about the events listed in this edition of Earth Song and register for events with limited availability.

20 E A R T H S O N G


DEAR LISTENER CIRCLES AND EXPERIENCE RECEPTION AND PREVIEW MAY 3 | 6 TO 8 P.M. Experience and Circles of Giving members are invited to an exclusive reception and preview for Dear Listener: Works by Nicholas Galanin. A special performance by Laura Ortman (White Mountain Apache) will begin at 7 p.m., and catering is generously supported by M Catering. Kindly RSVP to 602.251.0262 or email circles @heard.org by April 27, 2018

DEAR LISTENER MEMBERS' PREVIEW MAY 4 | 5 TO 7 P.M. All members are invited to a private viewing of Dear Listener: Works by Nicholas Galanin before it opens to the public. Members are also invited to enjoy the Members' Lounge at First Friday following the preview. Kindly RSVP to 602.251.0209x6402 or email members@heard.org by April 27, 2018

Exhibit Conversations DEAR LISTENER LECTURE SERIES

GO + DO

Member Exclusives

This three-part lecture series will examine concepts explored in Nicholas Galanin’s exhibition Dear Listener through public discourse with artists, curators and activists. Join us for special engagements in May, June and July. Things Are Looking Native, Natives Looking Whiter. Nicholas Galanin, 2012. Giclée, 29 x 20 in.

RACE AND IDENTITY READDRESSED THROUGH CONTEMPORARY ART MAY 5 | 1:30 TO 3 P.M. STEELE AUDITORIUM

Family Events DIA DEL NIÑO APRIL 29 | 11 A.M. TO 4 P.M. The Heard Museum is proud to present Dia del Niño, a day of fun, arts, storytelling, music, dance, games and activities for kids of all ages! Kids (12 and under) can bring adult chaperones (2) to the museum for free admission!

KIDS' POP-UP STUDIO! WITH OTIS CALVIN III JULY 21 | 10 A.M. TO 12 P.M. ENCANTO ROOM

Study the science of sound with a visit from musician and producer Otis Calvin III, aka OC Notes. Otis explains in detail the different valuable tools and components needed to make music but emphasizes imagination as his most valued musical tool.

Nicholas Galanin (Tlingit/Unanga ); Nep Sidhu, artist and Dear Listener collaborator; and Erin Joyce, fine arts curator

AMERICA: ALTERNATIVE PRACTICE IN PUBLIC ART JUNE 9 | 1:30 TO 3 P.M. STEELE AUDITORIUM

Fortoul Brothers, artists; Chip Thomas, artist; and Demian DinéYazhi' (Diné), artist; and Ginger Dunnill artist/DJ

LAND: LAND RIGHTS, SOVEREIGNTY AND STEWARDSHIP JULY 7 | 1:30 TO 3 P.M. STEELE AUDITORIUM

Cannupa Hanska Luger (Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara, Lokata), artist; Klee Benally (Diné), filmmaker/activist; James Q. Martin, photographer, filmmaker, conservationist; and Yolanda Hart Stevens, artist, activist.

Series supported by Kathleen L. and William G. Howard S U M M E R 2 01 8

21


ROCK OUT! APRIL 6 | 6 TO 10 P.M. 6:15 Samantha Crain (Choctaw) musical performance in Steele 6:30 RUMBLE Screening in Steele Auditorium. 8:15 Samantha Crain (Choctaw) performance in Grand Gallery.

RUMBLE: The Indians Who Rocked The World

About Samantha Crain: Samantha Crain won Best Folk Album of the Year and Songwriter of the Year at the Native American Music Awards in 2009. Her music has been heard on 90201, HBO’s Hung and in many independent documentaries and films.

NOT A BLOCK PARTY FT. SHABAZZ PALACES

MAY 4 | 6 TO 11 P.M. • Public opening of Dear Listener: Works by Nicholas Galanin • Not a Block Party Concert Doors open at 5:30 in Steele Auditorium • TICKETS REQUIRED. Purchase at: dearlistener.org/events

SAMANTHA CRAIN (Chocktaw)

5:30 – 6:30 Dj Byron Fenix 6:30 – 7:30 Heebie Jeebies 7:30 – 8:00 Dj Byron Fenix 8 – 9 Indian Agent 9 – 9:30 Dj Byron Fenix 9:30 – 10:30 Shabazz Palaces

ARTIST TAKEOVER! JUNE 1 | 6 TO 10 P.M. Keep cool in the museum and join local artists who take over the Heard Museum and create fun activities for all to enjoy!

More fun We are still planning the fun for future First Fridays. Be sure to check out heard.org/firstfridays/ closer to the event dates for more informations including themes, acts and activities. We hope to see you July 6, Aug. 3 and Sept. 7 from 6 to 10 p.m.

SHABAZZ PALACES TOP: Link Wray Photo: Bruce Steinberg courtesy linkwray.com/ Kino Lorber. MIDDLE: Courtesy of artist. BOTTOM: Courtesy of artist.

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The Lounge Don't forget, members are invited to enjoy an hour of

private museum access and a members'-only lounge in conjunction with each Frist Friday at the Heard Program. No RSVP necessary; please check in upon arrival.


NAKOTA LARANCE

WINS WORLD CHAMPION HOOP DANCE TITLE GO + DO

BY SHALIYAH BEN DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC PROGRAMMING

Feb. 10 and 11 marked a beautiful 28th Annual World Championship

Hoop Dance Contest at the Heard Museum. The

event attracted more than 80 hoop dancers from

throughout the United

States and Canada ranging

from one through 62 years of

age. This year we welcomed more

than 5,000 attendees, and another 1.2

million watched online via Facebook Live. We also welcomed new partnerships and

friends from Canada, who shared live musical performances. DJ Shub, founding member of the acclaimed music group A Tribe Called Red,

performed on both days and was accompanied by Oneida Smoke Dance artist Ty Smoke. Both shows were generously presented in partnership with Culture Canada.

Sunday culminated in the awarding of the 2018 Hoop Dance World

Champion, Nakota LaRance (Hopi-Tewa/Assiniboine) of Ohkay Owingeh Pueblo. LaRance, a two-time world champion in 2015 and 2016, was

cheered on by his adoring students from the Pojoaque Pueblo Youth Hoop Dance Group in New Mexico.

Visit heard.org/hoop for a list of all 2018 winners. SAVE THE DATE 29TH ANNUALWORLD CHAMPIONSHIP HOOP DANCE CONTEST

Feb. 9-10, 2019

2018 World Champion Nakota LaRance (Hopi-Tewa/Assiniboine) Photo: Robert Doyle / Canyon Records

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Best of Show JAMIE OKUMA WINS AT INDIAN FAIR & MARKET BY ANNA FLYNN 2018 FAIR MARKETING CHAIR

Jamie Okuma (Luiseño/Shoshone-Bannock) won Best of Show for her mixedmedia sculpture Protect, Honor, Cherish, depicting a Shoshone mother with her child in a cradleboard. She received the first-ever $10,000 prize sponsored by Howard R. and Joy M. Berlin and Kristine and Leland W. Peterson. The museum acquired the piece through a gift from Kathleen L. and William G. Howard and the Heard Museum Council. It is on display in the lobby.

Okuma describes her sculpture as “the culmination of the past six years’ experiences [after] stepping away from this art form to raise a family and focus on a lifelong desire to work in fashion. ‘Protect’ is literally the function of the cradleboard. Its work and design were created in such a way because of the great love for our children, so we ‘cherish’ this stage in life and ‘honor’ it with a functional piece of incredible art.” For 60 years, the Heard Museum Guild has welcomed the artists and their families to a meal with Guild and Museum members, collectors and supporters on the evening before Indian Fair & Market. Since the inauguration of the juried art competition, the highlight of the evening has been unveiling the ribbon winners. This year we recognized 109 artists who took home awards totaling $61,300.

Visit heard.org/fair, for a list of winners. Protect, Honor, Cherish. Jamie Okuma (Luiseño/Shoshone-Bannock). Mixed Media. 2018 Best of Show. Photo: Craig Smith / Heard Museum

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BOARDING SCHOOL FILM SERIES

GO + DO

From May through September we will share boarding school experiences with a free monthly screening of films and documentaries on every second Saturday at 11:30 in Steele Auditorium: MAY 12 THE THICK DARK FOG Documentary by Randy Vasquez and Jonathan Skurnik. At the age of five, Walter Littlemoon (Lakota) was removed from his family to attend a federal boarding school where his culture, language and spirituality were suppressed. Embark on Walter’s journey to heal himself and his community while reclaiming his heritage. 2011, 57 min.

JUNE 9 THE LOST ONES: THE LONG JOURNEY HOME This documentary tells the story of two Lipan Apache children captured along the Texas-Mexico border in 1877 by the U.S. Army 4th Cavalry. The children rode with the soldiers for three years before being taken to the Carlisle Indian School. Ties with their Richard Gomez and family were completely severed. Daniel Romero Jr., in The Lost Ones: Long Journey Home The documentary reveals how in 2009, Lipan Apache Photo: Courtesy Susan Rose descendants from California, Texas and New Mexico came to Carlisle to offer blessings. 2011, 42 min.

THE SALT SONG TRAIL "The Salt Song Trail: Bringing Creation Back Together" documents a healing ceremony at the Sherman Institute ­— a former Indian boarding school where Indian children were forcibly taken from their homes and forbidden to practice their traditional cultures. The singers return to the school years later to sing for the children who never came home. 2005, 20 min.

The Fort Shaw Indian Boarding School girls' basketball team pose for their 1905 team photo. Photo: Terry Bender

JULY 14 PLAYING FOR THE WORLD In 1902, a unique combination of Native women came together at a boarding school in Montana. They used the new sport of basketball to help them adjust to a rapidly changing world. Their travels and experiences led them to places they never imagined. Ultimately, these women played for something much larger than themselves. 2010, 56:44 min.

AUG. 11 OUR SPIRITS DON’T SPEAK ENGLISH: INDIAN BOARDING SCHOOL A Native American perspective on Indian boarding schools. This documentary uncovers the dark history of U.S. Government policy which took Indian children from their homes, forced them into boarding schools and enacted a policy of educating them in the ways of Western society. 2008, 80 min.

SEPT. 8 WE WERE CHILDREN This film contains disturbing content and is recommended for audiences 16 years of age and older. Parental discretion is strongly advised. For over 130 years, more than 100,000 of Canada's First Nations children were legally required to attend government-funded schools run by various Christian faiths. These children endured brutality, physical hardship, mental degradation, and the complete erasure of their culture. These schools were established with the express purpose 'To kill the Indian in the child.' Told through their own voices, 'We Were Children' is the shocking true story of two such children: Glen Anaquod and Lyna Hart. 2012, 88 min. S U M M E R 2 01 8

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read

DOCUMENTING NATIVE FINE ART BY MARIO NICK KLIMIADES LIBRARY AND ARCHIVES DIRECTOR

BETTY MURPHY LIBRARIAN

The Billie Jane Baguley Library and Archives has developed one of the premier documentary collections on the Native American fine art movement. One component of the collection is documentation on Native fine artists and their achievements in painting, sculpture, photography, printmaking, installation, new media art and performance, among other modern expressions. The library actively acquires monographs, reference books, exhibition catalogs, art journals, ephemera and artist papers that support the fine art collections, exhibitions and programs of the Heard Museum. The year 2018 marks a new era for the Heard Museum in which it will enhance its contemporary edge. This move into the presentday world of Native fine art will be exciting, with a library that is prepared and ready to serve staff, members, visitors and researchers with a current and comprehensive collection. Examples of recent library acquisitions on contemporary Native American fine art are Native Art Now! Developments in Contemporary Native American Art Since 1992, published by the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art, and the Winnipeg Art Gallery’s catalog Insurgence, Resurgence. Such resources assist visitors in interpreting and appreciating the sights and sounds they will encounter in future exhibits. Explore these titles and the variety of materials in the Heard’s library and archives . . . your adventure awaits.

26 E A R T H S O N G

NATIVE ART NOW! Native Art Now! brings together essays on various aspects of fine art by artists and scholars in the U.S. and Canada, including the Eiteljorg Contemporary Art Fellowship awardees.

INSURGENCE, RESURGENCE Insurgence, Resurgence examines the Canadian fine art scene and features the work of 29 First Nations artists in a variety of media, including tattooing, painting, sculpture, installation, photography, sound, light and performance. This catalog represents the Winnipeg Art Gallery’s largest-ever exhibition of contemporary Indigenous art.


MEMBER DISCOUNT:

10%

READ SHOP DINE

shop GOTTA HAVE IT! Photos: Megan Richmond / Heard Museum

GLASS BERRY BASKET by Preston Singletary (Tlingit) $8,000

MULTI-STONE BOLO TIE, BELT BUCKLE by Vernon Begaye (Navajo), Bolo: $950, Buckle: $900

KOYEMSI BRINGS THE RAINS by Aaron J. Fredericks (Hopi) $3,200

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dine ON THE MENU:

WILD-CAUGHT SALMON BY IRENE RUTIGLIANO HEARD MUSEUM RESTAURANT OPERATIONS MANAGER

IR: Every season the Heard Museum’s Courtyard Café features a special menu item that relates to a current artist exhibition in the Grand Gallery. We know that you practice

As a Courtyard Café tradition, staff are already at work developing a featured item for our summer menu inspired by Nicholas MEMBER Galanin’s subsistence DISCOUNT: 10% lifestyle and featuring wild-caught Alaskan King Salmon. The new summer menu will be available beginning May 1. Galanin answers a few questions regarding his subsistence lifestyle regarding food and the environment as it relates to his art.

subsistence; can you explain to our members what this is?

NG: Subsistence is survival and appreciation for where we are, how we teach our children to survive on the land and sea. Subsistence is connection to place; subsistence is teaching and respect. Industrial farming and the corporate food industry sit on the opposite side of this spectrum. Living in Alaska, we are fortunate enough to hunt, fish and process these foods ourselves. Subsistence is love.

IR: Does your approach to food gathering/farming inspire your art, or does your art inspire your lifestyle?

NG: Yes, all of what we do is connected. When we are out harvesting or hunting, the salmon will feed our family, and we might tan the salmon skin and use this leather in our works (see Creation With Her Children). The relationship to land has always been integral to our culture’s existence, survival and spirituality. Our stories and histories, our clan structures are all tied to place; this history documents us as original stewards to the land for the last 15,000 years.

IR: In the planning of our featured menu item, you requested that the salmon we use should be wild and not farmed. Can you tell us why that is important to you?

NG: Farmed salmon is damaging our waterways and the wild salmon species with disease. The accidental release of farmed salmon is damaging to the natural balance in our habitats. Jennifer and Mike Moquino, Santa Clara Pueblo Polychrome jar, 2000s Heard Museum Collection, Gift of Dr. Anthony Terrana


travel + learn TRAVEL + LEARN

EXPLORE WITH THE GUILD BY DIANE LEONTE | GUILD COMMUNICATION CHAIR, GUILD TRAVEL CHAIR HOPI MESA II – MAY 11–14

A unique experience led by lifelong trader, researcher, author and Native American expert Mark Bahti. Spend four days visiting artists throughout the Hopi Mesas. Our tour includes time with master basket weavers, katsina carvers and jewelry artists as we learn their expertise and unique native perspective of their craft. FIRST NATIONS GARDENS OF THE NORTH - SEPT. 6-15

Encounter people of the First Nations of British Columbia and experience world-class gardens of Vancouver and Victoria.

LAND OF THE SERI OCT. 21-24

Explore the little-known world of the Seri Indians in northern Sonora, Mexico. Jesus Garcia from the Arizona-Sonoran Desert Museum in Tucson. will share lifeways of this desert. Our voyage of discovery includes a panga ride to the mangroves of Isla Tiburón, birding the estuary of Laguna de la Cruz, touring Isla Alcatraz and visiting the Seri people themselves on the beaches of Kino Bay.

The Heard Museum Guild not only provides its members a wide variety of volunteering options at the museum, but Guild members also join together on regional journeys designed to better acquaint them with Native culture, art and history. Join the Guild and travel with us! Visit heardguild.org/travel-with-us/.

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learn THE ART OF BEING INDIAN

ART IS LIFE BY NINA SANDERS (APSAALOOKE) CONTRIBUTING COLUMNIST I am not an art historian — these thoughts are my own — the thoughts of a Crow Indian, mother, anthropologist and artist. When I think of contemporary Native art, I think of my friends who are Native and making art today. They are potters, painters, jewelers, muralists and fashion designers. I tend to believe that art created by indigenous people is external and internal narrative, a vital part of our human life. What we create in the name of beauty, concept or utility is always meaningful and purposeful. It matters not if the things created are honored through regular use or placed in a sanctified space for continued adoration and reflection. Not long ago I visited an artist friend while he was working in his studio at one of the Pueblos in Northern New Mexico. We discussed various things as I watched him toil over a new body of work. He told me about his daughter’s new glasses, his most recent grant application, the upcoming feast day and an important exhibition. As we chatted, I gazed out a window onto a road that led to the plaza, a road that is probably unfathomably ancient. Over the next hour I witnessed a midsized sedan bounce past, a horse in a corral, a couple of kids shooting hoops and some kind of purebred

dog wandering around looking for something. I understood I was witnessing and participating in what we like to call “time immemorial,” a space where time-honored traditions effortlessly occur alongside new modes of existence. Jason Garcia, the artist I was visiting, is a modern Pueblo man who communicates his people’s narratives, shared ideologies and personal thoughts and experiences through his work. His work is used in publications, shown in museums and commonly used as an education tool to teach the public about the Pueblo revolt and Pueblo way of life. He works to sustain and enrich his culture with his technical mastery and meaningful worldview; he and his ancestors share many of the same motivations. Like many other artists, Jason makes things that are relevant to his people and the world around him. He is needed. All Native artists are needed. They show us who we are, what we are doing and where we are coming from. What they create — their art — is a concept and act that transcends time, social structures and systems. Art cannot be encapsulated by time, technique, methodology or fixed meanings. We remember through art. Art is a way to understand, heal and forgive. The artists who lived before us showed us new ways to see, make and thrive. We learn from them and continue to build on what they have created. Art is a way of being — art is life.

ART CANNOT BE ENCAPSULATED BY TIME, TECHNIQUE, METHODOLOGY OR FIXED MEANINGS. 30 E A R T H S O N G

TOP Works in progress by Jason Garcia (Santa Clara Tewa Pueblo). BOTTOM Warrior Woman design which Garcia turned into a screen print. Photos: Nina Sanders (Apsaalooke)


HOW TO JOIN

Las Guias TRAVEL + LEARN

BY JACK RUEBENO LAS GUIAS DOCENT

When I was a kid, I loved nothing better than show-and-tell time at school. It was easy — bring in something visually curious and interesting. Prepare a story based on a little research in the Britannica and include some information your parents provided. And enjoy the glory of standing in front of the room and holding forth on a subject that, for that moment in time, was peculiarly known to you and you alone. Heaven. Such an opportunity is available once a year to all members of the Heard Museum Guild to become a docent or guide for the museum, one of Las Guias. It’s time to sign up for the new class, which runs from October 2018 through April 2019. The training includes classroom work led by our in-house staff and experienced Las Guias members, plus fascinating field trips to archaeological sites and the Three Mesas. Mentoring from longtime docents in presentation skills is an important element of the training. After graduation, you will be asked to work twice each month for three-hour shifts. This year we are targeting Guild members who are winter visitors, and we will make accommodation for your travel schedules. Orientation sessions will be at 10 a.m. on April 24, Aug. 21 and Sept. 11 in the Encanto Room. The session serves as an introduction to the training classes below. To get started, or for more information, email: lasguiasfacilitator@heardguild.org. There is no obligation for coming to one of the info sessions, and you might get a chance to do some show-and-tell of your own.

CLASS SCHEDULE Tuesdays, 9 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Oct. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 Nov. 6, 13, 20, 27 Dec. 4, 11, 18 Jan. 8, 15, 22, 29 Feb. 5, 12, 19, 26 March 5, 12, 19, 26 April 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 All classes will take place in the Encanto Room. The maximum allowed absences from class is two nonconsecutive absences.

Photo: Sesbastian Kleihs / Heard Museum

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experience ARTISTIC EXCELLENCE OPENING

Tonya Plank at the opening of Artistic Excellence: The Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair & Market Celebrates 60 Years

Mary and Mark Bonsall

Gregory Burns and Alexandra Greenwald

32 E A R T H S O N G

Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair & Market chairs of the past, present and future

Abigail Melamed and Janet Melamed


EVENT HIGHLIGHTS

VALENTINE'S DAY EXPERIENCE

Members experience more, including exclusive exhibition previews and events. Here are a few highlights from those events over the past few months. Check page 21 for more upcoming member events. ARTISTIC EXCELLENCE On Jan. 12 members attended the opening-night reception for the exhibition Artistic Excellence: The Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair & Market Celebrates 60 Years , a special exhibition featuring more than 40 award-winning artists.

Martha Gonazales and Gabriel Gonzales

VALENTINE'S DAY We LOVE our members and love that you love us too! On Feb. 14 we stayed open late and treated more than 200 members to a dinner and special performance by siblings Gabriel and Martha Gonzalez, ASU Gammage’s Resident Artist and Grammy Awardwinning singer/songwriter for East Los Angeles rock band Quetzal.

Kathy Serrapede, Ethel Zilber, Lakisa and Dewayne Muhammed

ON THE NEXT PAGE: SYMMETRY IN STONE OPENINGS Circles of Giving members and their guests attended Circles Collects: Richard Chavez on Feb. 1. The evening featured Richard and Jared Chavez with Chief Curator Diana F. Pardue in a wonderful conversation about the exhibition Symmetry in Stone: The Jewelry of Richard I. Chavez .

Jesus Vinas and Ana Cabello

The rest of our membership had a private viewing and reception for Symmetry in Stone: The Jewelry of Richard I. Chavez , on Feb. 2 before it opened to the public. Photos: Haute Photography and Videography

Alberto and Melinda Vazquez

Randy Schilling, Christy Vezolles, Gil Waldman and Jim Bialac

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CIRCLES OPENING

Richard I. Chavez, Chief Curator Diana F. Pardue and Jared Chavez in conversation

Judith Dobbs, Sandra Mano and Anita Hicks

Sharon and Richard I. Chavez and Karen Epstein.

Lila Harnett, Lee Peterson and Alice J. Dickey

Rod Lambert, Wayne Gaussoin and David Gaussoin

34 E A R T H S O N G


Tania Larsson and Keri Ataumbi

Cynthia Wheeler and Nicholas Warner

EXPERIENCE

MEMBERS OPENING

Dawntaye Johnson, right, and guest

SYMMETRY IN STONE: The Jewelry of Richard I. Chavez

Carole Katz, Diana F. Pardue, Bruce Nussbaum and Leslie Beebe

Sharon Chavez, Walter Lamar, Miya Chavez and Joe Rosen.

Photos: Haute Photography and Videography

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Moondance

Heard Museum

Oct. 27, 2018 For more information visit: heard.org/moondance 36 E A R T H S O N G


give What an amazing time to be a part of the Heard Museum family. We are so grateful and proud to recognize our many cherished supporters ­— Members, Circles of Giving, sponsors, underwriters and many other friends — whose generosity enables our exhibitions, Library and Archives, educational programming, public festivals and events, and so much more. We don’t use the word “family” lightly ­— when you make that commitment to support the Heard Museum, you become part of something extraordinary, and we are honored by the investment you make in this 89-year-old national institution. Thanks to you, we enjoyed stunning exhibitions last year like Beauty Speaks for Us and Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera . And thanks to you, we continue to gain momentum (and new members) as we look forward to new exhibitions like Dear Listener and Yua: Henri Matisse and the Inner Arctic Spirt , and as we endeavor to reach and teach across the state and beyond with original educational resources and family programming. Members make all of these things possible — and more. On behalf of the staff and Board of the Heard Museum, please accept my heartfelt thanks for your support. We can’t wait to share even more exciting experiences with you! Sincerely,

Thank you to our Annual Supporters The Heard Museum continues to achieve and serve its mission through the generosity of its members and supporters. We recognize these and all of our loyal donors for their gifts during the museum’s fiscal year 2017 (Oct. 1, 2016 through Sept. 30, 2017) 5,000,000 + Anonymous

1,000,000 + Betty Rosenzweig Separate Property Trust

250,000 - 500,000 Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

100,000 – 249,999 Bank of America

Flinn Foundation

Drs. Kathleen L. and William G. Howard Margaret A. Cargill Foundation

William Randolph Hearst Foundation

50,000 – 99,999 Arizona Public Service

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona

Don Nierling Memorial Foundation

PetSmart, Inc.

Salt River Project

Virginia M. Ullman Foundation

25,000 – 49,999 Arizona Commission on the Arts Arizona Community Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Giora Ben-Horin*

Diane and Bruce Halle Foundation Ms. Mary G. Hamilton‡

Kemper and Ethel Marley Foundation Mrs. Samuel Kitchell

Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Lyon

Mr. and Mrs. Leland W. Peterson*

Phoenix Office of Arts and Culture Mr. and Mrs. Randy Schilling

Target Foundation

10,000 – 24,999 Mrs. Nadine Basha

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Berlin‡ Mr. Robert Bulla ‡

Mr. and Mrs. F. Wesley Clelland III‡

Dan Hagerty Director of Strategic Development and Programming

Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Cowie*

Dino and Elizabeth Murfee DeConcini* Ms. Alice J. Dickey‡

GIVE

DEAR MEMBERS,

Dr. Scholl Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Duffek

Evelyn and Lou Grubb Charitable Fund Mr. and Mrs. John Graham:*

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Hornaday Mr. Tom Hulseman

Chase Private Client

Mr. Robert Fippinger and Ms. Ann Kaplan

Dr. Marigold Linton and Dr. Robert Barnhill* Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Mackay‡

Mr. and Mrs. James J. Meenaghan‡ Mr. and Mrs. John H. Melamed*

National Endowment for the Humanities Mr. and Mrs. Scott O'Connor*

Dr. and Mrs. Arthur Pelberg‡ Mr. and Mrs. John E. Rogers Mr. Norman L. Sandfield Mrs. Louise C. Solheim

Mrs. Betty Van Denburgh

5,000 – 9,999 Anonymous Arch W. Shaw Foundation Ayco Charitable Foundation Ms. Leslie M. Beebe and Mr. Bruce Nussbaum Mr. and Mrs. Donald E. Brandt Mr. and Mrs. Richard Carr Dr. and Mrs. Craig Cohen* CopperPoint Insurance Companies David Wright House Mrs. Susan Diamond Ms. Denise Dowers Mrs. Jean Grossman Mr. and Mrs. Joel P. Hoxie‡ Mr. and Mrs. Jon Hulburd* Dr. Dorothy Lincoln Smith Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. McKee‡ Mr. Howard Mekemson Mr. and Mrs. Scott Montgomery* Native American Art Magazine Mr. and Mrs. James Navran* OH Partners Mr. and Mrs. Fred Palmer Mr. and Mrs. Harry Papp * Trustee ‡ Life Trustee

S U M M E R 2 01 8

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Phoenix Children's Hospital Mr. and Mrs. David E. Reese Mr. and Mrs. Steve Rosskam Sacks Tierney P.A. Salmon, Lewis & Weldon, PLC Mr. and Mrs. Mark Schiavoni* Silverman Family Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Donald Smith* Snell & Wilmer LLP The Chickasaw Nation Union Pacific Foundation USI Insurance Services Mr. Gilbert Waldman and Ms. Christy Vezolles* Wells Fargo Mr. and Mrs. David Wilshin*

$2,500 - $4,999 Mr. and Mrs. Donald Abraham* Mrs. Howard Aidem Mr. and Mrs. Jett Anderson Arizona Department of Veterans' Affairs Arizona Lottery Bank of Arizona Mr. James T. Bialac‡ Mr. and Mrs. Mark B. Bonsall* Mr. and Mrs. John Boppart Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Clark Mrs. Carol Cohen Mr. W. David Connell and Mrs. Becky Sawyer Cox Communications Ms. Martha L. Cramer Mr. and Mrs. Ronald T. Davis Drs. Frances and Paul Dickman DLR Group Mr. and Mrs. Cliff Douglas Ms. Judith M. Dworkin and Mr. Kalman D. Pijawka* Dr. B. Robert Meyer and Dr. Terri Gallen Edersheim Mr. and Mrs. Lynn Endorf* Mr. and Mrs. Ed Foutz Mr. and Mrs. Bert Getz Mrs. Jeanie M. Harlan Mr. Mike Hawksworth and Ms. Norma Homco Hensley Beverage Company Ms. Alexis Hill Dr. and Mrs. Thomas M. Hudak ‡ Mr. and Mrs. James R. Huntwork* Mrs. Bonnie Kraft Joseph S. and Mary Trigg Lentz Mr. and Mrs. Michael Levenberg Mr. and Mrs. Frederick A. Lynn‡ Dr. and Mrs. M.S. MacCollum Mr. and Mrs. Clint Magnussen‡ Ms. Miriam J. McClennen‡ Mr. and Mrs. Francis Najafi Okland Construction Ms. Joette Schmidt and Mr. Kent Derdivanis Mr. and Mrs. William Schubert ‡ Ms. Barbara Slater Mr. and Mrs. Joachim W. Staackmann

38 E A R T H S O N G

Mr. and Mrs. John Stiteler ‡ Mr. and Mrs. John G. Stuart ‡ Mrs. Betty Lou Summers Mr. and Mrs. William Taubman Mrs. Gay Thomas Mr. and Mrs. Gary West Zaplin Lampert Gallery

1,500 – 2,499 Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Allender Ms. Caralee Allsworth

Mr. Joseph Anderson and Ms. Mary Dewane

Anonymous Anonymous

Dr. Christopher Appleton and Dr. Marcia Ko Mrs. Patricia AtLee

Mr. and Mrs. John Augustine Mrs. Shirley Avery

Mrs. Delores Bachmann

Mr. and Mrs. Judson Ball

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Benedict Mr. Neil Berman

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Bidstrup Ms. Rachel Blank

Mrs. Cerelle Bolon

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Bool Ms. Rebecca Bowman Mrs. Marilyn Brooks Ms. Sue Bunch

Mr. and Mrs. Dain Calvin

Harry M. Conger and Mary F. Sailors Mr. and Mrs. Ted Cosner

Mrs. Norma Jean Coulter‡ Mr. Jerry Cowdrey

Mrs. Betty Dahlberg

Mr. Jack Salisbury and Mrs. Leslie Dashew Mr. and Mrs. Dejan M. Dordevich

Dr. and Mrs. Robert Dunn Ms. Lynne Fenderson

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Fine

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley J. Getch

Mr. and Mrs. Frank H. Goodyear, Jr. Ms. Bernice Groves

Dr. Sam Gualtieri Ms. Deb Gullet

Ms. Roberta D. Hall

Ms. Ashley J. Harder Mrs. Joel Harnett

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Hedlund Mrs. Jeanne Herberger Mr. Daniel Hidding Ms. Pearl Hintze

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Ingeman

Dr. Norma Kafer and Mr. James Gordon Mrs. Maurine Kahn

Mr. and Mrs. Matt Korn

Mrs. and Mr. Sharron Lewis Mr. and Mrs. John Lomax* Mr. and Mrs. James Lowman Ms. Amy Maffeo

Mr. and Mrs. Vance Marshall Mr. and Mrs. Marc Martini

Dr. Janet Maurer and Mr. Marty Davis Maurice Meta Gross Foundation Mrs. Donald F. McCann Mr. Paul Meginnis

Dr. and Mrs. Donald Miles Mr. Arjay Miller

Dr. and Mrs. Richard L. Morgan

Ms. Jane Sidney Oliver and Ms. Catherine Meschter On Media Publications

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Ottosen Ms. Jody Pelusi

Dr. and Mrs. Deane Penn

Mr. and Mrs. Russ Perlich

Mr. and Mrs. Wick Pilcher*

Pro Em Party & Event Rentals Mr. and Mrs. Don Randolph Ms. Elizabeth Raspolic

Mr. Zachary M. Rawling Ms. Marian Reichert Mr. James M. Roche

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Rothschild Mrs. Nancy Russell

Salt River Pima Maricopa Indian Community

Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Sands

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Scholsohn

Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Schumacher Mr. and Mrs. W. Ford Schumann Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Seidler

Drs. Leslie and Connie Seldin Mr. and Mrs. Rene Severtson Ms. B. J. Shortridge

Shoumaker Family Fund

Mr. and Mrs. C.A. Smith Ms. Evelyn M. Smith

Mr. and Mrs. Scott Spangler

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Tait, Sr. Mrs. Jane Wallace Thorne

Thunderbirds Charities

Mr. and Mrs. Van Arsdale Mr. David Van Denburgh

Waddell Trading Company

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Ward Mr. Barry H. Westgate

Mr. and Ms. Daniel I. Wilhelm Mrs. Diane Willian

Mr. and Mrs. Larry Willman Ms. Diana Wykes

Ms. Helen Kersting

Dr. and Mrs. Andrew B. Kim

Dr. Mari Koerner and Mr. Frank Koerner Mr. and Mrs. Mark Kolman

* Trustee ‡ Life Trustee


2018 FAIR DONORS BEST OF SHOW AWARD Mr. and Mrs. Howard R. Berlin and Mr. and Mrs. Leland W. Peterson CONRAD HOUSE CUTTING-EDGE AWARD Heard Museum Guild PHILLIPS SCHOLARSHIP FOR YOUNG ARTISTS Antique Tribal Art Dealers Association (ATADA) BEST OF SHOW CLASSIFICATION Anonymous Anonymous Ms. Delores Bachmann Friends of the Fair Ms. Martha Head Heard Museum Shop King Galleries Mr. and Mrs. Matt Korn Pro Em Party and Event Rentals Waddell Gallery INNOVATION Mr. Neil S. Berman Idyllwild Arts - Native American Arts Program Dr. Mari Koerner and Mr. Frank Koerner Ms. Leslie M. Beebe and Mr. Bruce Nussbaum Ms. Marian L. Reichert Richardson Trading Company South of the Border Tours, LLC Mr. Gilbert Waldman and Ms. Christy Vezolles Mr. and Mrs. Myron Warshaw 1ST-PLACE DIVISION Allan Houser Inc. Ms. Cerelle Bolon Mr. W. David Connell Ms. Dee Dowers Faust Gallery Mr. and Mrs. Jed Foutz, Shiprock Santa Fe Mr. Denis B. Duran and Ms. Georgia Heller Mr. and Mrs. Joel P. Hoxie Mr. and Mrs. Garrett Johnson Ms. Jacquelyn Kemmer, Mr. Rex Nelsen and Mr. Jim Szabo, Las Guias Facilitators Dr. and Mrs. Donald Miles Mr. and Mrs. Burton J. Miller Mr. and Mrs. Paul Piazza Ms. Betty Van Denburgh

HEARD MUSEUM, HEARD MUSEUM SHOP 2ND-PLACE DIVISION Ms. Suzanne Benjamin Mrs. Carol Cohen Mrs. Carol Gunn Ms. Dorothy Hockenberg Hoel’s Indian Store Mr. and Mrs. George Karas Mr. and Mrs. Carl Merrell Mr. and Mrs. James Navran Mr. Kenneth Noone In Memory of Phyllis Aaron Noone Ms. Liz Raspolic Mr. Warren Schimpff Ms. Lucille Shanahan Ms. Betty Van Denburgh Mr. and Mrs. David Watters JUDGE’S CHOICE Anonymous Mr. Neil S. Berman Mr. and Mrs. Ben Blackstock Mr. and Mrs. Mark Bonsall Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Buchanan Ms. IlgaAnn Bunjer Mrs. Ellen A. Gildersleeve John C. Hill Antique Indian Art Gallery Dr. Sona Kalousdian and Dr. Ira D. Lawrence Mr. and Mrs. Dennis Lyon Dr. and Mrs. Edwin Manning Mrs. Jan McAdams Ms. Jean Humlicek Meier Ms. Sheila B. Morris Mr. and Mrs. David Mowry Mr. and Mrs. David Rothberg Mr. and Mrs. William Sparman Ms. Sandra Straub Dr. and Mrs. Patrick Sullivan Mr. and Mrs. Abbott Wainwright FRIENDS OF THE FAIR Anonymous Anonymous Mr. and Mrs. Louis Benedict Mrs. Martha J. Cozzi Mrs. Ellen Cromer Mr. and Mrs. Pete Dodge Ms. Barbara Filosi Ms. Anna Flynn and Mr. Dean Hansen Ms. Susan K. Grenyo Mr. and Mrs. Bill Matthews Mr. and Mrs. John Murdy Ms. Lillian Vancel Mrs. Judith Wallace Mrs. Gloria Murison

2301 N. Central Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85004 Monday to Saturday, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Closed Easter Sunday, Independence Day, Thanksgiving Day & Christmas. Main: 602.252.8840 Events Hotline: 602.252.8848 Shop: 602.252.8344 1.800.252.8344

THE COURTYARD CAFÉ Open Every Day, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. 602.251.0204

COFFEE CANTINA Monday to Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. We appreciate the support of these sponsors:

Increase your support through our community partners:

The Heard Museum is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization incorporated in the State of Arizona. Exhibition, event and program funding provided in part by the Arizona Commission on the Arts, the Arizona Humanities Council, the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Phoenix Office of Arts and Culture.

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H E N R I M AT I S S E AND THE INNER ARCTIC SPIRIT

MEMBERS SEE IT FIRST E XC L U S I V E O P E N I NG FO R M E M B E R S O N O C TO B E R 28, 2018 F O R M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N V I S I T

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M AT I S S E . H E A R D. O R G

Profile for Heard Museum

Heard Museum Earth Song, Summer 2018  

Earth Song is the Heard Museum's members-only publication on museum events, exhibitions and milestones. It is published 3 times a year.

Heard Museum Earth Song, Summer 2018  

Earth Song is the Heard Museum's members-only publication on museum events, exhibitions and milestones. It is published 3 times a year.

Profile for earthsong