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SUMMER / FALL 2019 EST. 1986

FOR PEOPLE WHO LOVE DURANGO

e n i z a Mag

THE COLORADO TRAIL 416 FIRE SOARING TREETOP ADVENTURES VACATION LIKE A LOCAL


C O N T R I B U TO R S

HANK BLUM

Hank is an adventure photographer, videographer, and a well-known Stormtrooper based in Durango, Colorado.

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DURANGO MAGAZINE

ELIZABETH CALAGIAS

Elizabeth is a Fort Lewis College alumna and serves as the assistant director of the Leadership Center. In this role, she supervises student staff, works directly with registered student organizations, and coordinates new-student orientation. She loves welcoming students to their new home at FLC! Outside her career, Elizabeth loves to dance, camp, cook, read and learn about graphic design.

GRAHAM COFFEY

Graham Coffey studied journalism at the University of Georgia before working as a wilderness guide and mental health professional in Asheville, NC. He came to Durango for its access to both the mountains and desert. Graham is the store manager and buyer at Backcountry Experience and loves meeting other locals and hearing stories about their exploits in the outdoors. He lives with his girlfriend Brooke and their large dog, Luna. Graham enjoys backpacking, hiking, skiing, and any other excuse to play outdoors.

MK GUNN

MK has always enjoyed nature. This Fort Lewis graduate grew up exploring the Adirondacks. After college she explored around Estes Park before returning to the San Juans, her favorite place in the universe. Look for her backpacking, mountain biking, pack rafting, or skiing amid the lovely peaks and valleys. Her book, The Art of Misadventure: Volume I,  will be published eventually.


Jim Bommarito

MARGARET HEDDERMAN

Margaret is a freelance journalist, essayist, and sometimes screenwriter with an MA in biography and creative nonfiction from the University of East Anglia in England. She covers outdoor recreation, travel and the environment. Her work speaks to the importance of empty, lonely places on the map.

ZACH HIVELY

Zach Hively writes nonfiction, poetry, and the award-winning Fool’s Gold column. He also dances Argentine tango and is a member of the alt-folk duo Oxygen on Embers.

LISA MACKEY

Lisa is a fine-art printer and photographer, as well as an enthusiastic quilter. These endeavors, professional and personal, provide creative outlets in her life. She is an avid road cyclist, also nutrition for the soul.

SVATKA SCHNEIDER

“I have always been quite obsessive with documenting life – saving packaging from my favorite things, journal writing, whining for my first film camera since as long ago as I can remember and then using it excessively to photograph my toys, pets, friends and later family. Always finding it hard to let go, I have felt an immense need to safeguard memories, too aware of the fact that the real things and moments will otherwise be lost.” DURANGO MAGAZINE

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SUMMER / FALL 2019 • EST. 1986

Volume 34 - No. 1

FEATURES 14

VACATION LIKE A LOCAL

24

SOARING

36

Cowboy Edition: The Wild West May Belong to the Past, but the Cowpoke Spirit Lives on in Durango by Zach Hively Unique Durango Zip Line Adventure has Visitors Soaring

PHOTO PHONE TIPS

Taking Better Photos with Your Phone by Hank Blum

38 FOTEEM

How We Found Durango, the Foteem Story by Svatka Schneider

The Aftermath of the 416 Fire by MK Gunn

44

THE FUTURE OF THE 416 BURN AREA

44

Priscilla Sherman

DEPARTMENTS

10

EXCURSIONS

11

TOP PICKS

22

28 29

Durango’s Premier Attraction What’s New to See and Do

HISTORY: THE COLORADO TRAIL The Colorado Trail by Margaret Hedderman

GALLERIES & GOODS ARTIST PROFILE

Ravenous for Art, with Miki Harder

31 DIVERSIONS

Selected Area Events

Mahogany Grille & Down the Rabbit Hole

48 52

DINING SHOWCASE

DINING GUIDE & NIGHT LIFE Restaurant Listings

FARMERS MARKET

70 72

DURANGO KIDS REPURPOSED A BUILDING

76

DREAM HOME

81

GIVING IN STYLE

by Margaret Hedderman

22

Grady James

68

36

Hank Blum

LIVING IN STYLE

by Zach Hively

by Graham Coffey

IN EVERY ISSUE

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42 80

FROM THE PUBLISHER A New Chapter Has Begun

PHOTO ESSAY ADVERTISER INDEX Who’s Who

ON THE COVER

Looking into the Weminuche Wilderness. Photo by Jack Brauer, WideRange Photo, LLC, MountainPhotography.com 6

DURANGO MAGAZINE


115 W. Ninth St. • Downtown Durango 970-247-1281 • www.earthenvessel.com Open Monday through Saturday 10am to 5:30pm Sunday 10am to 4pm

Fine American Craft Jewelry • Art to Wear • Ceramics Metal • Wood • Glass 7


FROM THE PUBLISHER

A NEW CHAPTER HAS BEGUN For many of you, this may be the first you’ve heard that Durango Magazine has new publishers. The previous ownership closed up shop quietly last summer without a known plan for the magazine’s future, only knowing that after 32 years it was time to retire. What would become of what many consider the iconic publication of Durango? Only time would tell. We, however, are considering it our new business opportunity and plan to take good care of it.

PUBLISHER/EDITOR:

Marianne and Corbet Hoover DESIGN/PRODUCTION:

Eric Emerson

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES:

Marianne Hoover Corbet Hoover

PHOTO EDITOR: Lisa Mackey COPY EDITOR: Barbara Scott, Final Eyes Durango Magazine is published twice a year by Durango Magazine LLC. The Winter/Spring 2019-20 edition publishes in November. P.O. Box 3907 Durango, CO 81302 Phone: (970) 259-2599

DURANGOMAGAZINE.COM No portion of this publication’s content may be reproduced in any manner without written permission from the publisher. Copyright © 2019 by Durango Magazine. All rights reserved.

Let’s begin with a little about us. While we live with our son and dogs in rural La Plata County, like many here in Durango we are not native to the area – or Colorado for that matter. Marianne grew up in Warren, Ohio. Corbet is from Madison, Wisconsin. Both of us, having a love for the mountains, moved west shortly after college. How does the saying go? “I was not born here, but I got here as fast as I could.” Marianne originally landed in Summit County, Colorado. Corbet chose to ski the Wasatch. Our lives first intersected at the 2002 Salt Lake City Olympic Games. We met as volunteer course workers on the women’s downhill – Crew #8 to be specific. What an experience that was! Given the chance, we definitely would do it again. Fast-forward to 2008: We made our first life-changing decision as a married couple and blindly chose Durango as our new home. Prior to that, we had only been to Durango once, simply a late-night drive-through, not even a gas stop, after a weekend of climbing in Ouray. Little did we know that we would later become rooted in such a great community. As serious and avid outdoors people, we are made for Durango and Durango for us. Upon arrival, we did as most new residents have done and found work where we could. A year later, Corbet was hired by Local Deals Coupon Magazine. We purchased the magazine in the spring of 2010. In 2012, we started Farmington Flyer Coupon Magazine, which allowed Marianne to work full time in the new family business. After looking at a handful of other expansion ideas, it became obvious that Durango Magazine was for us. We want this publication to meet your highest expectations. While we publish only two editions per year, we expect to be informative and relevant to both residents and visitors of the wider Durango community. We welcome any suggestions you have for articles, photos and issues you think would be of interest to our readership. We want to express a heartfelt thank you to our advertisers for placing faith in us in getting their important messages out to you, our readers. We encourage you to support them and our community. So sit back and grab a comfy chair and enjoy! It is our honor to present to you, the Durango community, our first issue of Durango Magazine. As local residents and business owners, we truly are People Who Love Durango. Sincerely, Marianne Hoover

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DURANGO MAGAZINE

Corbet Hoover


WITH THE CHERRY ON TOP You know that finishing touch? That extra little burst of awesomeness that takes something which is already fantastic and catapults it way up to the next level? That’s kind of how we do it here. We have our entire team on site going the extra mile, to make sure that you get way more than you ever expected in quality and results ; )

1437 East 2nd Avenue • Durango, CO 81301 • 970.247.5212 • BasinPrinting.com DURANGO MAGAZINE

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E XC U R S I O N S

INTO REMOTE

WILDERNESS

ABOARD THE D&SNG

BY GRAHAM COFFEY

SINCE 1882, THE DURANGO & SILVERTON NARROW GAUGE RAILROAD

has been making the trek from Durango to Silverton by traveling through the beautiful and rugged San Juan Mountains. While passenger service over this visually stunning route has always been among the train’s offerings to the region, originally the line was used primarily for the hauling of gold, silver and other mine ores. Today, the train is used strictly for passengers looking to experience views of the San Juan Mountains while riding along the same lines that the miners, cowboys and some of the West’s first settlers used nearly a century and a half ago. The longest running offering for tourists and locals looking to take a ride on the line is the well-known round-trip route from Durango to Silverton. The trip takes about three and a half hours each way and allows riders to spend about two hours exploring downtown Silverton. During this break, they can experience the shopping and culinary offerings available in this beautiful and remote mountain town. Passengers can also enjoy simply strolling around while looking up in awe at the stunning views of the mountains that surround the town in all directions.

Yvonne Lashmett

For those who have already taken the round trip to Silverton, are short on time, or are looking for a different way to experience the train, the Durango and Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad has some new offerings for the summer of 2019. The Cascade Canyon Express will run from the line’s Rockwood Station to Cascade Canyon and back. Featuring dramatically sloping mountains and incredible cliffs, the ride goes through some of the most spectacular terrain on the line. The round trip through the incredible landscape of Cascade Canyon, a must-see destination for local and out-of-town visitors alike, lasts an hour and 50 minutes. The Cascade Canyon Express runs Monday through Wednesday from June 17–Aug.14. Along this same route, the Durango and Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad also offers its Brew Trains. These rides occur on limited dates and feature a wide variety of incredible culinary offerings paired with a sampling of ales from local Colorado craft brewers. The brewers are also along for the ride to give guests a look at what goes into brewing their creations. Upon reaching Cascade Canyon, guests will enjoy a layover with a live band, lunch and of course, more beer. The ride back to the station features desert and coffee. Don’t want to pace yourself while planning for the drive home? Optional Brew Van Service is available at the downtown Durango train depot.

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Another wonderful option exists for history buffs and train enthusiasts. The Historic Narration Journey takes the train’s classic route to Silverton and back, and supplements the incredible scenery with narrators dressed in period clothing. The narrators take on the persona of an individual from the Old West, who was involved with the train or settling the area. They provide riders with details and historical facts about the region and the railroad that add unparalleled depth to the ride. No matter how you decide to ride, the experience is sure to be a memorable one for all involved. DURANGO MAGAZINE


TO P P I C K S

ALPINE HELI TOURS

ALPINEHELITOURS.COM

Alpine Heli Tours offers private helicopter tours departing from Animas Airpark just minutes from downtown Durango. Their non-stop tours are a true bucket-list experience for the entire family and offer incredible views of Durango, the Animas River Valley and the breathtaking San Juan Mountains. On your journey you’ll experience incredible mountain lakes, massive rock walls and towering peaks from the comfort of Alpine’s climate-controlled helicopter. Their pilots are specifically trained for flight in the mountains, ensuring customer safety and comfort throughout the entire experience. Interested in a thrill ride? Ask about the option for a doors-off flight! Your once-in-a-lifetime mountain adventure is just a phone call away! 970-759-7482

AUTUMN ARTS FESTIVAL 25TH ANNIVERSARY EVENT DURANGOARTS.ORG

The Durango Arts Center is excited to celebrate its 25th year of presenting fine art and fine craft by makers from around the country. This festival takes place amidst the fall colors on quaint Second Avenue in historic downtown Durango, Colorado. They showcase around 100 talented artists from a wide variety of mediums in their two-day juried show. Come see beautiful work and take home pieces to make part of your collection. There is great local music, food and alcohol featured as well. Come enjoy a beautiful fall weekend in Durango with a showcase of great art.

SALT 360 FLOAT: AN EXPERIENCE LIKE NO OTHER

SALT360FLOAT.COM

It’s okay to give yourself a break. It’s okay to step away from life’s stresses for a moment and realign yourself to what is important. Salt 360 Float Studio offers you the chance to escape to a world of zero-sensory revitalization, giving your mind and body a break to disconnect and better focus on the things you love. The float rooms at Salt 360 are designed to help you escape sound, light and touch while you float in a highly dense saline solution, creating a zero-gravity environment for your bones, muscles and blood vessels to release stress. With your body able to relax, your mind can begin to recharge, allowing energy to flow inward and your imagination and creativity to come out. The specialty float rooms contain 1,000 pounds of Epsom Salt and 12 inches of water. The 95-degree saline solution naturally has magnesium sulfate, a mineral vital to the body, that supports the nervous system, brain function and mood. The mineral absorbs through the skin and relieves muscle tension, pain, and inflammation in the joints. Magnesium sulfate brings blood sugar to the muscles and removes lactic acid. It also promotes the production of serotonin and reduces your adrenaline and cortisol levels. When your mind and body float in the zero-sensory rooms at Salt 360 Float, your stress levels are guaranteed to go down, giving you an opportunity to realign with life. You owe yourself the experience to disconnect for even just a moment so that you can reconnect with what matters most to you. 970-422-8284 DURANGO MAGAZINE

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TO P P I C K S

CLASSICAL MUSIC FESTIVAL IN JULY

MUSICINTHEMOUNTAINS.COM

Music in the Mountains, at 33 years, is well known as one of the longest-running classical-music festivals in the Southwest. This year’s season presents more than 30 events in three weeks, July 6 through 28. With its world-class musicians from all over the country at the beautiful Community Concert Hall at Fort Lewis College, wearing their infamous white tuxedo jackets onstage, the festival is a midsummer delight for music lovers and fans. The season includes several benefit events, five classical performances and three pops concerts by the festival orchestra, two chamber performances and a fun kid-friendly dinner and concert at various venues in and around Durango. Savvy festival-goers take advantage of complimentary pre-concert lectures, as well as free open-rehearsals. Maura Allen, award-winning artist, created the 2019 poster art Legato! to celebrate Music in the Mountains’ 33rd season. Allen wanted to capture the connection between place and music. The conductor provides the window into a magical summer of music, wildflowers, mountain living and more. Durango, summer, and music flow together seamlessly – a legato. Her artwork will be auctioned at the Pops Night Benefit Dinner and Concert on July 27 at the Sky Ute Casino Event Center.

VALLECITO LAKE

MaryAnne Nelson

VALLECITOLAKECHAMBER.COM

Sheltered in a secluded mountain valley 8,000 feet above sea level, Vallecito Lake is one of the largest and most beautiful bodies of water in Colorado. Vallecito, Spanish for “Little Valley,” and ancestral home to many of Colorado’s Ute Indians, became the name of the sparkling waters of the lake it surrounded. Located in the Southwestern part of the state just 18 miles from Durango, Vallecito provides a perfect base for enjoying the Four Corners area and its many wonder.

TRUE WEST

TRUEWESTRODEO.COM

Tickets can be purchased at TrueWestRodeo.com/tickets or at the gate on the day of the rodeo. Tickets purchased online are through Eventbrite.

Diane Zahorodny

The True West Rodeo takes place at the La Plata County Fairgrounds, 2500 Main Ave., every Wednesday: June 5, 12, 19, 26; July 3, 10, 17, 31; and August 7. Gates open at 6 p.m., and the show starts at 6:30. Rain or shine? Check True West Rodeo on social media sites for weather updates. Chevel Shepherd, Season 15 Winner of The Voice™, will be singing the National Anthem during the opening ceremony on June 5

PARADE OF HOMES

DURANGOPOH.COM

Home Builders Association of Southwest Colorado presents the 16th Annual Parade of Homes! Come join us September 20-22nd to tour the area’s most beautiful homes, both new and remodeled, get exciting design ideas, and mingle with local builders & suppliers. Tickets available September 1st. For more information call 970-382-0082

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W.E. ROCK EVENTS

WEROCKLIVE.COM

W.E. Rock Events is excited to bring the Grand National Rock Crawling Championship back to Farmington, New Mexico The Grand Nationals are the culmination of a year-long series of rock crawls held all over the United States. The championships are held in the Glade at Chokecherry Canyon, an iconic location that has been home to numerous rock-crawling competitions. Join us September 7-8, 2019 for the best of the best in motorsports action. Competitive rock crawling is the closest you can get to a motorsports competition. Rock crawling is a trials-type competition with vehicles designed to move slowly through the gates. Points are “awarded” for backups and hitting cones. Like golf, the lowest score wins. Various types of four-wheel-drive vehicles compete, from Jeeps to purposebuilt rigs. These cars have all kinds of tricks up their sleeves, from lockers and front digs to rear steer and bumps. You’ve got to see it to believe it. Both days start at 10 a.m.

EXPERIENCE THE UNESCO WORLD HERITAGE AZTEC RUINS

AZTECNM.COM

Among the many astonishing things that can be enjoyed and explored in the American Southwest is the Aztec Ruins National Monument, a major Ancestral Puebloan ruins located in Aztec that dates back to the 12 th century—some 1,000 years ago. This 27-acre site, located near the banks of the Animas River, is so significant that in 1987 it was designated with the prestigious UNESCO World Heritage Site title, awarded by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization because of its special cultural or physical significance.   Dominating the site is a Great Kiva, which is a unique building because it is the largest reconstructed “great kiva” anywhere.

MANCOS ARTS DISTRICT

MANCOSCREATIVEDISTRICT.COM

Mancos, Colorado at the intersection of art and adventure, lies between the majestic La Plata Mountains and the mysterious grandeur of Mesa Verde and is home to countless artists, ranchers, inventors, craftsmen, foodies, makers, growers, and more. The Mancos Creative District spans several blocks in the historic downtown area of town and is home to galleries, artisan cooperatives, an historic opera house, a thriving common press, late 1800’s buildings, and home to our myriad of cowboys, craftsmen, artists, musicians, brewers, chefs, farmers and makers.

DURANGO MAGAZINE

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VA C AT I O N L I K E A LO CA L

Diane Zahorodny

cowboy edition BY ZACH HIVELY

First things first: You’ll need to gear up. For that, just head on over to Kelly’s Cowboy Company, located at 400 S. Camino del Rio, Suite G. This family-run outfit, headed by owner Kelly Hill, has been equipping Durango’s rodeo families for 10 years. It’s the perfect one-stop shop for absolutely anything you could need in order to look, feel and work like a cowboy (or cowgirl).

Always full to the brim, the store houses men’s, women’s and kids’ clothes. You can gear yourself up from your hat to your boots, with everything in between—from staples like jeans and shirts to accessories like belts and purses. Kelly’s Cowboy Company carries apparel for the modern cowboy, as well as clothing with a more Old West look. This store is the real deal. Hill is a fourth-generation Colorado rodeo competitor, and her parents still rope and rodeo. The fixtures in her shop, from the rusted tin to the wooden barn doors on the dressing rooms, were saved from 14

DURANGO MAGAZINE

a barn her great-grandfather built a century ago. She says that people love the variety of the clothing and tack in the store. Even visitors from Texas walk away impressed. In Hill’s words, Kelly’s Cowboy Company has a bit of everything for the cowboy in you. Now that you’re decked out, you can make your way all summer long to the True West Rodeo, in its sixth season in Durango. Held every Wednesday evening at 6:30 from June 5 through August 7 at the La Plata County Fairgrounds at 2500 Main Ave., the rodeo is committed to providing live Wild West entertainment, while sticking to Durango’s genuine heritage as a frontier town. The family-friendly rodeo welcomes more than 6,000 spectators and 1,000 contestants each season. Tickets for adults, youth, seniors and military personnel are available online at www.truewestrodeo.com and at the ticket gate. Plus, if you’re getting settled in Durango for the summer, season passes are available at a discount. Diane Zahorodny

Kelly’s Cowboy Company

The Wild West may belong to the past, but the cowpoke spirit lives on in Durango—and you can jump into it with both boots, even if your home is not where the deer and the antelope play. Here you can find peace in the saddle, joy on the dance floor, and a hat for your head, whether you are a seasoned ranch hand or finally living out your silverspurred dreams.

The event is dedicated to remaining a community endeavor. At each of the nine rodeos, True West Rodeo presents a check to a local nonprofit organization, funded by proceeds from the event. After all, what’s truer to the cowboy way than looking out for your own? Once you’re thoroughly inspired by the high-class competitors and entertainers at the True West Rodeo, you’re


Owner Anne Rapp has been guiding for horseback riding, packing and sleigh rides, as well as wrangling for film and TV, since 1981. Her team operates with priority use permits in the San Juan National Forest, where riders can feel like they’ve galloped far from civilization among some of the most stunning mountain and forest scenery the state has to offer. Rapp Corral offers a range of options as wide as the sky above, with rides as short as an hour or as long as it takes to have a custom packing adventure. These ventures are one of Durango’s many open secrets, with Rapp receiving recognition as a USA Today top-10 pick. The crew at the corral is happy to work with you to choose the right trails for you and your family.

James Ranch

The whole family is bound to be hungry after a hard day’s riding. You’ll discover one of the heartiest and freshest meals in the Animas River Valley at James Ranch, 33846 US Hwy. 550, just ten minutes north of Durango. The ranch raises its own beef, adding to the legend of the James Ranch burger. But that’s not all—every meal at the on-site Harvest Grill, from the salads to the customizable Inside Out cheese-melt sandwich, features locally sourced meat, bread, cheese and produce.

After eight years of the Harvest Grill (and 15 of the James Ranch Market), the ranch’s new expansion project will be finished early this summer. All the ranch operations, from the market and the grill to tours and musical entertainment, will be back in business as soon as the expansion is complete.

Lisa Mackey

Jim Bommarito

bound to want to get in the saddle yourself. You can load up the entire family and head 20 minutes north of town to the Rapp Corral, located at 51 Haviland Lake Rd., just east of US 550 at the entrance to Haviland Lake, where novices and experienced riders alike will find a genuine western horseback experience.

Because James Ranch is a fully functioning ranch, visitors can see the livestock and even pet the baby goats. Everyone is welcome to check out the local produce, jams and jellies, and other wares at the James Ranch Market. Plus, there’s regular entertainment— live music every Thursday night, as well as other ranch- and cowboythemed events—all detailed on the events page on the ranch’s website.

Wend your way back to town if you want to polish off your evening in style at the Wild Horse Saloon, 601 E. 2nd Ave., open at 6 p.m. from Tuesday through Saturday. This realdeal cowboy bar offers so much more than whiskey and twostepping, with dance lessons every weeknight (from salsa to West Coast swing), karaoke contests, DJs and dancing, and live music every Friday and Saturday night. And, yes, this saloon can still be fun for the family. The hall is open to all ages during dance lessons and till 9 p.m. when it’s 18+ with ID. National touring artists stop regularly at the Wild Horse, and every Friday night they welcome fresh new sounds that even branch out from country music. The recently updated saloon features the best public dance floor in town, so be sure to wear your dancing boots. The best part about vacationing like a local, the cowboy way, is that the adventure never really ends. There’s always another hill to climb, another horse to ride, another song to sing. So whether you’re here for a day or a lifetime, join in the fun pardner, and we’ll see you out there soon.

DURANGO MAGAZINE

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D I S T I N C T I V E

S H O P S

Two Locations at 9th and Main Downtown Durango, CO Corner of

9th & Main

Brown’s SHOE FIT CO.

“A World Of Footwear”

Celebrating 40 years of equipping the Durango Lifestyle Chaco • Keen • Teva • Olukai Birkenstock • Ecco • Memphisto

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DURANGO MAGAZINE

Museum Quality Native American Art (970) 247-9210 ASharedBlanket.com

Adjacent to Train • 104 E. 5th Street GOOGLE VIRTUAL TOUR


O F

D O W N T O W N

Colorado’s only Osprey Pro Shop. Every pack. Every size. Every color.

BACKCOUNTRY EXPERIENCE 1205 Camino del Rio, Durango 970-259-5830

ANIMAS TRADING COMPANY , A LOCAL FAVORITE FOR TWENTY YEARS

Lisa Mackey

BY ELIZABETH CALAGIAS

Animas Trading Company, a Durango favorite for 20 years, has something special to celebrate: The local import company is turning 29 and feeling fresher than ever. Unlike others who turn 29, over and over again (wink), the store is embracing turning 30 next year. Before the store hits “The Best Years” of its life, make it a point to stop in and see what treasures you can find. Animas Trading Company has something for everyone of every age. DURANGO MAGAZINE

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personal values. By supporting local business in Durango, you are also supporting families in Thailand and Nepal. Families from across the globe have a personal connection with Durango and have even made the trip to visit the Durango shop in person, thanks to the relationships Cathy has taken the time to develop.

This locals’ hub, now centrally located in downtown Durango at 742 Main Ave., does a great job of capturing and supporting the true Durango spirit. Walk in and experience the eclectic inventory, with new items arriving all the time. You will certainly find fun gifts for any of life’s celebrations, like saying thank you to your dog sitter or giving that teacher the much-needed appreciation they deserve. You will find fun and sassy kitchen accessories—like a tea towel that encourages kitchen lovers to “Squeeze the Day”—bright and colorful prints, or an array of socks to highlight your personality. Not only do they have the best selection of costumes, from Snowdown gear to funky hats and glasses, but they are pleased to style you for your day-to-day look. There’s a reason Animas Trading Company has been a top contender in the Durango Herald’s “Best of” annual competition. Just like the gifts you find in the store, the clothing is equally diverse and can find a home in any wardrobe. Stop by and shop for a funny tee, super soft pajamas, casual basics, stylized office wear, or something unique, fancy, and fun for a night out on the town.

Lisa Mackey

Much of the apparel comes from a very special place in the world. It’s a little-known fact that owner Cathy Wakeman travels abroad each year to hand select the inventory she brings back to Durango. Cathy visits Thailand and Nepal and builds relationships with several of her suppliers. She takes the time to get to know the families, to share some meals, and to visit the facilities where she does her buying. It’s important to be intentional about where we spend our money and to make sure that the business we support align with our own 18

DURANGO MAGAZINE

Be sure to connect with Animas Trading Company so you can join in on all the fun. You will find them on Facebook and Instagram. They have an active social-media presence and are happy to share photos of all the amazing gifts you can pick up in the store. Stop by, support a local gem, and know that you will find something for anyone at any price in a beautiful shop with beautiful people on the inside and out who are here to help you find what you are searching for. Happy birthday, Animas Trading Company! Your new location and fresh new look are serving you well as you enter your 30s.

Lisa Mackey

Lisa Mackey

Not only does Cathy value the relationships she’s made abroad, but Animas Trading Company is also a proud supporter of many local events, finding unique ways to support the thriving Durango community. One of the creative ways the store has chosen to support the community is by partnering with local high-school seniors and the Durango Family Photography shop. Students can pick out an outfit to wear for their senior photo shoot, and if they end up liking the clothes, the store will give them a discount. The store sells jewelry from local artists and is looking to expand and add even more local inventory. Animas Trading Company has supported the Durango Independent Film Festival, the Bluegrass Meltdown, and now sells tickets to shows at the Animas City Theatre. In May 2019, the store became a proud supporter of the Durango Wine Experience and is thrilled to offer wine tasting in the store during the event. Who doesn’t love a good wine-tasting event? Animas Trading Company is Durango’s fine wine of retail; it just gets better with age.


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CBD FOR SALE, INTERACTIVE LEARNING STATIONS, AND MORE! 965 MAIN AVENUE OPEN DAILY: 10am-6pm cannabisdiscoverycenter.com

Check our website for specials! DURANGO MAGAZINE

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D I S T I N C T I V E

Rustic Lodge • Western Decor • Mountain Modern

Shop Online at

www.TippyCanoeDurango.com 925 Main Avenue, Durango, CO • 970.247.1010 20

DURANGO MAGAZINE

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DURANGO MAGAZINE

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MEET THE MAN BEHIND THE MAP

Grady James

COLORADO TRAIL BY MARGARET HEDDERMAN

The first time Jerry Brown mapped the 485-mile Colorado Trail, he did so with a 27-pound surveyor’s GPS wedged into his backpack. The antenna sprouted up over his head like a giant turnip. Powered by camcorder batteries the size and weight of small bricks, it only had enough juice for a single day’s work. To keep both him and the project moving forward, volunteers hiked fresh batteries into the backcountry and carried the old ones out. It was 1999, and Brown was attempting something unheard of: creating the most accurate trail map ever, one step at a time.

“I THINK I MIGHT BE THE FIRST PERSON THAT EVER TRIED IT,” BROWN SAYS. Before his step-by-step survey of the Colorado Trail, most trail maps were designed by hand. “They just looked at aerial maps and tried to draw where the trails were,” Brown explains. “The problem was that anytime the trail went into the trees, they couldn’t see where it was.” Brown’s first survey of the Colorado Trail replaced the original 1988 map, which was more of a guideline for anyone adventurous enough to attempt it. Once the new maps and guidebooks were published, the trail became immediately more accessible to hikers, mountain bikers, and even llama packers. The number of thru-hikers has since ballooned from 13 in its inaugural year to more than 300 last summer. The Colorado Trail rises out of Waterton Canyon, near Denver, and quickly climbs to 10,000 feet, where it stays 22

DURANGO MAGAZINE

for the majority of its traverse across the Rocky Mountains. It wends south through a patchwork of aspen, pine, and fragrant montane forests, scrambling over rocky mountain passes, and wading across several cold rivers. The final push to the finish line takes hikers over the remote and rugged San Juan Mountains near Durango. A couple of years after the Colorado Trail opened in 1988, Brown decided to bikepack the new route. Ninety-thousand feet in elevation gain proved to be great training for mountain-bike racing.

“I WENT BACK TO TEXAS AND WON A WHOLE BUNCH OF RACES,” BROWN LAUGHS. Originally from Boulder, Brown and his wife sold their cabin during a particularly harsh winter and moved to a grapefruit orchard in South Texas. After several years teaching high school and karate classes, Brown eventually landed a job on a survey crew. The work took him around the world, to Russia, the Indian Himalayas, South America, and Turkmenistan. Finally, in the late ‘90s, the mountains called Jerry and his wife home. They moved to Durango, the southern terminus of the Colorado Trail. As consumer-grade GPS units were becoming readily


Grady James

“I told them, ‘You’re going to just end up with a bunch of crap. It’s not going to work.’” Brown recalls. “The nonprofessional GPS’s really were not that good back then.” He recommended they use a surveygrade GPS to collect the most accurate data.

It was a perfect example of why you should never call out a problem unless you’re prepared to solve it yourself. When the CTF balked at the cost—nearly $15,000—Brown volunteered to map the trail himself. After that first trip, Brown completed several more thru-hikes to tidy up his original route or map changes to the trail. The project inadvertently created a new career path for him. In 2004, Brown helped rediscover and map Mexico’s Lost Silver Trail, making his group the first humans to use it in over a hundred years. He has also tackled the immense

job of mapping the ever-evolving Continental Divide Trail, a 3,100-mile route from southern New Mexico to the MontanaCanadian border. Brown completed his seventh thru-hike of the Colorado Trail last summer. This time, however, he was building a new type of map. Brown teamed up with an app developer to create a “guidebook” specifically for long-distance trails. Guthook Guides allows users to access up-to-date trail information— like a bad water source or a bear alert—submitted by other thru-hikers. Brown’s trail data and photographs were used in the production of the new Colorado Trail app. To map it, Brown used a handheld professionalgrade GPS unit that collected better, more accurate data than the 27-pound unit from 20 years ago. It weighed 3 ounces. Jerry Brown mapped the Colorado Trail with the device tucked into the brim of his hat.

DURANGO MAGAZINE

Frank Floyd

Frank Floyd

available, the Colorado Trail Foundation (CTF) sent out a newsletter asking thru-hikers to submit their data to help develop a new trail map. Brown immediately responded with an email detailing all the reasons this was a bad idea.

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UNIQUE DURANGO

ZIP LINE ADVENTURE

SOARING HAS VISITORS

The mystical beauty of the forest is usually only seen from the forest floor. For most people, flying between its branches remains the stuff of fantasy. But for a lucky few, there’s Soaring Tree Top Adventures’ zip line in Durango, Colorado. With 27 breathtaking spans, Soaring offers the largest zip-line course in the world. This all-day family-friendly adventure features five and a half hours of zip lining, a four-course gourmet lunch in the trees, an ecology tour, and first-class transportation to the site via its own private, luxurious train cars, offering guests two of the best Durango attractions in a single day. Soaring takes the time to slow down your hectic vacation down so you can enjoy every moment in an exhilarating, heartpounding way. Soaring Tree Top Adventures has drawn rave reviews for its 1.5-mile-plus zip-line course, which lets guests fly through the treetops. The unique Colorado zip line is the first course of its kind and scale in the United States. National Geographic Adventure named it one of the Top 10 Sky-High Thrills in the country—the only zip line to make the list.

Soaring Tree Top Adventures

On TripAdvisor, Soaring Tree Top Adventures also rates as the No. 1 outdoor activity in Durango. The remote course lets visitors safely zip line over aspen forest, mountain glens, and the clean, cool waters of the Animas River— not to mention the flora and fauna—from a vantage point high in the sky. It’s an adventure the whole family can share. Children as young as four, and grandparents as adventurous as 94, have created lasting memories together on Soaring’s 27 unique zip-line spans ranging from 56 to 1,400 feet.

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DURANGO MAGAZINE


Flying like the actors in Peter Pan, only with visibly sturdy harnesses and cables, guests sail through aspen glades, sometimes crisscrossing the Animas, to the next oldgrowth ponderosa bearing a stainless-steel platform that looks deceptively delicate. The owners had the Lord of the Rings’ elven city Lothlórien in mind when creating the wispy curves and light feel of the platforms in the trees. The zip line spans, as well as the platforms and connectors, are constructed entirely of stainless, which will never rust or flake. Creating the course was a big change from the tradition of the Tall Timber Resort, where Soaring is located. Owner Denny Beggrow says resort guests were no longer satisfied with just being pampered in an exclusive five-star resort with spectacular scenery. Hiking, fishing, and horseback riding were too “old-school” for families who increasingly wanted vacations with extreme or exhilarating sports. So the resort set out to add adrenaline to the resort’s many offerings. Beggrow and his son Johnroy designed and built their Soaring zip-line course with help from local metal artisan

Scott Smith

The full-day adventure package begins with a train ride on the historic Durango & Silverton Railroad, which transports guests from their workaday world into adventure. On board in Soaring’s private, first-class Tall Timber Legend train car, guests experience ticketless travel, open seating, breathtaking views of the Animas River canyon, and the hearty anticipation of the adventure ahead. The first-class comfort and amazing views constitute the first memories people take away from this five-star adventure in the sky.

Ralph Holt. The unique tree-hugging platforms, approved by a master arborist, are part of a patented hugging system designed to release pressure off tree bark until weight is brought to bear on the platform. The more weight on the platform, the tighter the hug. But nothing penetrates the bark or is bolted into any tree, Denny Beggrow says. “Our old growth Ponderosa forest is too precious and needs to be protected. We have several generations of the family that has lived in this canyon, and we want these trees to continue to be around for a long time.” They started testing the first zip-line spans in August 2004. The course, now more than a mile and a half long, was largely complete and ready for guests in May 2005. And for the first time in its history, the resort’s grounds were opened to the general public. The zip-line adventure was so immensely popular that the Beggrows phased out the resort in 2008, and guests come to Soaring for a full day of adventure. Patented engineering innovations and plentiful “Sky Rangers” (zip-line guides) allow fliers to zip to the next platform but to land relatively gently whatever the age, size, or skill of the airborne participant. It is plenty of exhilaration without exertion or much risk.

Soaring Tree Top Adventures

Soaring Scott Tree SmithTop Adventures

“I’ve been zip lining all over the world, and this is my favorite course,” says 14-year-old Jase Stetson, from Laguna Beach, California. “On other courses they have giant sponges at the end, and you slam into them. Here you come slowly up on the platform.”

DURANGO MAGAZINE

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SPECIAL ORDERS

museum quality framing 24 B town plaza 970-375-0090 artsupplyhouse.com 26

DURANGO MAGAZINE

Soaring Tree Top Adventures is open from mid-May to mid-October every year. Reservations can be made online or by phone. Visit www.SoaringColorado.com or call 970-769-2357. Their website features special discounts and offers, and you can watch a video of this incredible tour. Reserve your spot today for this one-of-a-kind bucket-list adventure. It’s a day of memories and fun that will be remembered for a lifetime.

Cole Davis

CONTESTS

Adventure seekers enjoy the Colorado mountains in a way that few will, gliding through aspen forests and across mountain glens, and traversing unique zip-line spans across the rushing Animas River. This exhilarating tour culminates with the 14er: a 1,400-foot zip line on which guests reach speeds of 40 miles an hour.

Scott Smith

ART ART SUPPLIES SUPPLIES

Sky Rangers lead the guests through the old-growth Ponderosa forest on the 5.5-hour Colorado zip-line adventure. Soaring includes a four-course lunch served on an elevated platform in the trees overlooking the Animas River, where chefs accommodate all dietary needs and requests. An eco tour, led by Soaring’s naturalist staff, completes the full appreciation of flora and fauna in the beautiful alpine terrain that Soaring calls home.


F O U R C O R N E R S F AV O R I T E S

Premier Genetics in Southwest Colorado

“HISTORY IS CALLING…”

“Hello?”

And not the yawning kind. Come join us on a walking tour of Durango’s “history with a bite!” From prominent town visionaries and immigrants, to dangerous saloons, gun fights, ghosts, notorious outlaws and brothels, Durango had it all. Tours typically end at a local ‘watering hole’ and take 1-1.5 hours. Private tours available. See our website for current tours and times.

Horsefly History Tours www.horseflyhistory.com Text or call: 970-570-0437 DURANGO MAGAZINE

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G A L L E R I E S & GOO D S Next to the train depot, A Shared Blanket represents Native American art and artifacts including Zuni fetishes, Navajo weavings, baskets, jewelry, pottery, knives, paintings, sculpture and books. Friendly staff. Seven days a week. 104 E. Fifth St., 247-9210, www.asharedblanket.com

APRIL’S GARDEN

Award-winning floral and gift boutique with fresh, long-lasting flowers; custom designs for all occasions; and a creative staff. Extensive gift selection, including Maruca bags, Caldrea bath and body products, local jewelry, candles and home décor. 2075 Main Ave., 247-1633, www.durangoflorist.com

ARTESANOS DESIGN COLLECTION

Artesanos offers a variety of fine Mexican furniture, folk art, gifts and home accessories. From Mexico’s talented craftsmen, each piece is selected for its unique design. Handcrafted items from around the globe. Imaginative design ideas. 700 E. Second Ave., 259-5755, www.artesanosdesign.com

AZUL

A multimedia art gallery that specializes in designer jewelry, art glass, wall art and much more. Representing local and regional artists. Unique lines differ from the norm. A wide variety of products and prices. Azul has a bright, friendly atmosphere. 781 Main Ave., 375-7742, www.azulgallery.com

BEADS AND BEYOND

In the heart of downtown Durango, the premier store for unique gifts, jewelry and accessories. The region’s largest assortment of beads, gems, charms and supplies for creative people who make jewelry. Inspiration, classes, lessons and experts on hand. Open daily. 840 Main Ave., 247-1204, www.beadsdurango.com

DIANE WEST JEWELRY & ART

Contemporary gallery featuring fine art and award-winning jewelry from around the country, as well as outstanding works from a wide variety of artists. The gallery represents Durango’s talented local artists, as well as artists with national reputations. 820 Main Ave., 385-4444, www.dianewestart.com

DIETZ MARKET

A destination for homes, gifts and gardens. Locally made gourmet foods, sauces and condiments. Dietz is a local business supporting local artists and craftspeople since 1983. They take great pride in the quality and originality of their products and the community they serve and support. 26345 Hwy. 160, 259-5811, www.dietzmarket.com

DURANGO ARTS CENTER EDITOR’S CHOICE

A nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing visual and cultural arts for individual and community enrichment, the DAC works to ensure the arts thrive in the Four Corners. DAC provides the community with diverse art experiences, educational opportunities and vibrant expressions in many arts. 802 E. Second Ave., 259-2606, www.durangoarts.org

EARTHEN VESSEL GALLERY EDITOR’S CHOICE

A display of all things handmade — including contemporary jewelry, pottery, art glass, metal, mixed media, wall art, and wearable art from both local and nationally known artists. The gallery’s collection of American Craft is eclectic, with a wide range of prices for giftgiving. Downtown. 115 W. Ninth St., 247-1281, www.earthenvessel.com

KARYN GABALDON ARTS

“Elegance through art and nature” best describes this contemporary art gallery, featuring local landscapes and Zen paintings by owner Karyn Gabaldon. The gallery also has Asian-inspired gifts and magnificent jewelry, along with interior and exterior sculptures. Since 1980. 680 Main Ave., 247-9018, www.karyngabaldon.com

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DURANGO MAGAZINE

PAUL FOLWELL STUDIO

Longtime local artist Paul Folwell exhibits his stunning landscapes, skiers, dancers and musicians in his studio at home. Giclées and prints, as well as cards, are available. Commissions welcome. 8199 County Road 203, 759-4870, www.paulfolwell.com

SAUL DÉCOR & FURNITURE

Full-service design center offering a variety of flooring (carpet, tile and wood), fine furniture, lighting, window coverings, cabinets and accessories. Designers provide decorating and interiordesign service and can work from blueprints to furnish your home. 146 Sawyer Dr., 247-2223, www.saulfurnishings.com

SCENIC APERTURE EDITOR’S CHOICE

In the heart of Durango’s vibrant art scene, the gallery showcases the photography of traveling artist Frank Comisar. The images are available in many sizes and media. Frank leads numerous workshops for aspiring photographers. Custom orders always welcome. 10am–6pm daily except Sundays. 708 Main Ave., 403-5853, www.scenicaperture.com

SORREL SKY GALLERY

Sorrel Sky Gallery, in historic downtown Durango, specializes in a contemporary blend of regional fine art and jewelry. A unique and exciting gallery experience. Highlighting the stunning jewelry designs of Ben Nighthorse. 828 Main Ave., 247-3555, www.sorrelsky.com

URBAN MARKET EDITOR’S CHOICE

The upscale Urban Market specializes in eclectic home furnishings and unique accessories. Stylish and fun. The lines mix modern elements, natural materials and neutral palettes. Inspirational! Gifts, home décor, housewares, furniture and lighting. 865 Main Ave., 259-0472, www.urbanmarketonline.com

WILDSHOTS

Wildshots features the nature photography of Durangoan Claude Steelman. Stunning images of wildlife and landscapes, with mountain lions, polar bears, bald eagles, wolves and wild mustangs. The gallery offers award-winning images printed in many sizes. Five fine-art photography books on sale. The new, second gallery features art photography of the American West. 842 Main Ave., 259-6265; 643B Main Ave. 259-1533, www.wildshots.com

WORLD ACCORDING TO MARK

Handcrafted jewelry, pottery, paintings, rustic décor and collectors’ items fill this store. The perfect gift awaits — and it’s reasonably priced. Many superb selections are locally crafted or made on the premises. Mark Jaramillo welcomes visitors to his world. 131 E. Eighth St., 259-2392, www.worldaccordingtomark.com

STUDIO &

This gallery is a combination studio, gallery and retail store. The space is shared by artisans with talents that include painting, illustration, sculpture, graphic design and more. The artisans engage in creative dialogues with gallery visitors, as well as display and sell their work. 1027 Main Ave., 426-9853, www.anddurango.com

THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE HOME

Here in Durango, There’s No Place Like Home. With an eclectic mix of Chinese antique furniture, decorative accessories, quirky gift items, uncommon clothing and stunning jewelry, the shop offers unparalleled shopping for locals and visitors alike. 822 Main Ave., 385-7300, www.theresnoplacelikehomeinc.com

TIPPY CANOE EDITOR’S CHOICE

From rustic to refined — a fresh look at home furnishings. Accent pillows, lamps, chandeliers, area rugs and mirrors complement this assortment of furniture. For unique gifts, bedding, table décor and fabulous entertaining. Free personalized interior-design consultation available. 925 Main Ave., 247-1010, www.tippycanoedurango.com

TOH-ATIN GALLERY EDITOR’S CHOICE

Traders in Navajo rugs since 1957, the family-owned Toh-Atin Gallery has long been recognized as one of the country’s finest gallery operations. Featuring Native American–made jewelry, kachinas, baskets, prints, paintings, sculpture and pottery, Navajo weavings, and other fine southwestern art. 145 W. Ninth St., 247-8277, www.toh-atin.com

ULTIMATE MOUNTAIN LIVING

For “ultimate” relaxation and entertainment, this downtown store offers unique, exclusive lines of wood and patio furniture, billiard tables and game-room furnishings. Olhausen and Brunswick billiards; Tommy Bahama, Homecrest and OW Lee outdoor lines; handcrafted Woodland Creek Furniture. 858 Main Ave., 247-1461, www.ultimatemountainliving.com

Miki Harder

A SHARED BLANKET EDITOR’S CHOICE


A RT I S T P RO F I L E

RAVENOUS FOR ART, WITH MIKI HARDER

Nearly everyone in Durango knows Miki Harder’s birds, even if they don’t know Miki Harder herself. Her style stands out. Whether the birds are sculpted in metal, painted with oils, or sketched in pencil, her creations—and most especially her ravens—pop to life with a masterful combination of mischief and realism.

“I THINK THAT THEY’RE FUNNY,” HARDER SAYS, DISCUSSING RAVENS IN HER HOME STUDIO. “THEY HAVE SUCH DISTINCT PERSONALITIES. THEY ARE SMART, AND THEY ARE CLEVER.” Harder paints and draws other birds, as well, from owls to herons. She renders them with an authenticity that belongs in a National Audubon Society field guide. An upcoming show, opening May 24 at Illuminarts, in the Smiley Building (1309 E. 3rd Ave.), will feature birds she spotted during a recent birding trip to Costa Rica. But those opportunistic ravens keep drawing her back in. Her ravens often appear to be smiling or cackling. They’re giddy and gleeful, as animated as their flesh-and-blood inspirations. But you’ll know beyond all doubt that you’ve found a Miki Harder raven because of the laughter in its eyes.

BY ZACH HIVELY

enthrall her so deeply. But she realized that limiting herself to biology would also limit her experiences as an artist. “It dawned on me,” she says. “If I’m an artist, my goodness, I can do it all. I can do astronomy, I can do paleontology, I can do geology, and I can pull it all together. I’m able to insert art into all the areas that I find fascinating.” And when her existing art doesn’t fill those spaces, she branches out. She started sculpting ravens from metal and clay because she wanted to make them three-dimensional. She even branches beyond birds, at times. Two of her other favorite subjects are dragons and bristlecone pines. That freedom to express the world however she pleases clearly connects Harder to that same world, and to the art lovers who keep her going every day.

“I FEEL VERY LUCKY TO GET TO DO WHAT I DO,” SHE SAYS, “AND I HAVE HAD SO MUCH SUPPORT AND HELP ALONG THE WAY. I WOULDN’T BE HERE WITHOUT FAMILY AND FRIENDS. I’M PRIVILEGED, FOR SURE.” Miki Harder’s art can be found in Studio & (1027 Main Ave.), in Lakewood, CO, at the Valkyrie Gallery, and online at www.mikiharderart.com.

“I have no idea [how I get that spark],” Harder says. “They have a look in their eye, like maybe whatever I’m thinking at the time comes through. It’s just a feeling.” In every piece, Harder says she wants to honor ravens as a species—every part of them, from their sass to their sheen. “Technically and spiritually, that is my goal,” she says. “I think when I die, I want to become a raven.” Harder’s illustrations, paintings, and sculptures tend to blur the line between caricature and reality. Her art taps into both her cartooning skills and her biology background. She nearly became a forester because Earth’s living systems 29


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DIVERSIONS GO TO DURANGOMAGAZINE.COM FOR A FULL SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

JUNE

JUNE 1 ANIMAS RIVER DAYS, Durango. Annual celebration of the Animas River features high-flowing spring-runoff waters and abundant, colorful fun. Events include kayak, canoe, stand-up paddle slaloms; boater, stand-up paddle cross; freestyle; surf; inflatable rodeo; Smelter Smackdown raft race; river parade. One of the state’s premier whitewater festivals. JUNE 1 BOX, Durango Arts Center. One-man play performed by Dennis Elkins is an autobiographical journey of cleaning house after the loss of a loved one. JUNE 1-AUG. 31 SUMMER TERRACE SERIES, Farmington, N.M. The museum hosts Saturday evening outdoor concerts in the picturesque terrace next to the river. JUNE 5-AUG. 7 TRUE WEST RODEO, Fairgrounds Durango. Keeping Durango’s Western heritage alive with broncs, bulls and Wild West entertainment, Wednesday evenings. JUNE 6-8 UTE MOUNTAIN ROUNDUP, Cortez. The 89th PRCA rodeo is an amazing display of guts and glory; carnival, parades and activities. Parade on Saturday is the biggest parade of the summer. JUNE 7-OCT. 25 FRIDAY NIGHT RACES, Durango. Races at the BMX track for all to come out and show off their speed. JUNE 7-9 FOLK ‘N BLUEGRASS, Pagosa Springs. Annual Four Corners three-day festival features great music and kids’ bluegrass camp; craft and food vendors. JUNE 7-SEPT. 27 FRIDAY NIGHTS AT FOX FIRE FARMS, Ignacio. Summer concert series features live music by local artists and bands, food and wine under the stars every Friday evening on the Fox Fire Farms Winery patio.

JUNE 17; JULY 16; AUG. 15; SEPT. 13 FULL-MOON PROGRAM, Chimney Rock. The full moon

rises between the twin spires; history of ancestral Puebloans, archaeoastronomy theories, area geology. Hour-long trail tour features excavated Great Kiva, pithouse and unexcavated structures.

JUNE 21 SUMMER SOLSTICE, Center of Southwest Studies. Dazzling sunrise viewed through the center’s special spiral window. Performances and refreshments mark the beginning of summer. JUNE 21-22 AZTEC RUINS SUMMER SOLSTICE SUNRISE, Aztec, N.M. Great house alignment at dawn, kids’

activities all day, evening night-sky programs.

JUNE 22 COWBOY HALF MARATHON, Mancos. Hosted by the Mancos Public Library and not just for marathoners, also a 5K run and many family-friendly events. JUNE 22 ANTIQUE TRUCK AND CAR SHOW, Silverton. Antique truckers show off vehicles to raise funds for the Blair Street Historical Association. Waffle breakfast, parade of antique trucks, vehicle display. JUNE 22 MAC AND CHEESE FEST, Farmington, N.M. Gourmet mac-and-cheese tastings, wine and beer tastings, games, vendors and more.

JUNE 21; SEPT. 23 SUNRISE PHOTO TOUR, Chimney Rock. Sunrise viewing from dramatic Great House followed by interpreted hike.

SILVERTON SUMMER SOUNDS

JUNE 8 MORE MUSIC FESTIVAL, Durango. Live-music showcase features Rockin’ Lloyd Tipp and the Zipguns, The Riddims, the Garrett Young Collective, Ragwater, Idiginis, Grassy Green and The Casual Fridays, at Buckley Park. JUNE 8 RIVER FESTIVAL, Dolores. Community celebration of the river includes a river parade, river contests, free raft rides, riverdog contest, food, beer garden and live music in the park. JUNE 8-10 DEATH RIDE TOUR, Silverton. Challenging three day, 235-mile bicycle ride through the beautiful San Juan Mountains to raise funds for ALS. JUNE 10-16 DURANGO RENDEZVOUS IV, Durango. Indian-motorcycle gathering themed “Roads, Rapids and Rockies” welcomes owners and collectors of vintage and newer models to meet and make new friends, share ideas and ride some of the most scenic Rocky Mountain roads. JUNE 11-15 RACE ACROSS THE WEST, Durango.

Ultracyclists from around the globe take on the finest terrain the western U.S. has to offer. Starting in Oceanside, California, and following the first 930 miles of the RAAM route through four states, race ends in Durango.

JUNE 13-JULY 25 FREE CONCERTS IN THE PARK, Durango. Thursday evening performances in Buckley Park sponsored by the Concert Hall. Attendees encouraged to bring folding chairs and a picnic.

FREE MUSIC IN COLUMBINE PARK 3RD FRIDAYS, JUNE - SEPTEMBER @ 6 PM MIKE GERYAK STAGE - 1239 BLAIR STREET, SILVERTON CO

6.21 7.19 8.16 9.20

ROCK AMERICANA THE CONTENDERS &ROOTS J-CALVIN WHITEWATER RAMBLE EMINENCE ENSEMBLE NEO SOUL

HIGH OCTANE BLUEGRASS

FUNK FUSION

5 PM - COMMUNITY BIKE RIDE Departs from Pedal the Peaks, 906 Greene Street. All ages welcome!

6 PM - SHOWTIME Food, libations & music

Show Goes On Rain Or Shine Camp Chairs & Picnic Blankets Welcome No Dogs or Outside Alcohol Columbine Park is a Smoke & Vape Free Zone

JUNE 15 DURANGO MOTOR EXPO, Downtown Durango. Durango Old Car Club’s annual show of all things automobile for enthusiasts from all walks of life. JUNE 15 MEN WHO GRILL, Durango. Signature summertime grilling competition and “fun-raiser” for the Women’s Resource Center features all-you-can-eat grilled creations, live music and entertainment in Buckley Park. JUNE 15 GRAND FUNK RAILROAD, Ignacio. Legendary band celebrates 50 years of funk on their American Band Tour 2019 at the Sky Ute Casino Resort.

Karen Srebacic-Sites QUARTZ MORTGAGE * SILVERTON HARLEY-DAVIDSON * THE TRAIN STORE

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DIVERSIONS JUNE 23 DURANGO COWBOY POETRY GATHERING BARN DANCE, Durango. Annual fundraiser in

Rotary Park features the Tim Sullivan Band. Guests may bring own picnic or burgers, brats, wine, beer, sodas and ice cream available for purchase.

JUNE 26 SUMMER LECTURE SERIES, Center of Southwest

Studies. Fridamania: The Art, Career and Cultural Legacy of Frida Kahlo presented by local freelance journalist and author Judith Reynolds.

JUNE 26-AUG. 28 ROCHESTER SUMMER CONCERT SERIES, Durango. Wednesday evening concerts

in the Secret Garden support local nonprofits. Drinks and food for purchase. Performers: Elle Carpenter, Six Dollar String Band, Leah Orlikowski, Stillhouse Junkies, Kirk James Band, CV Wells (Wells and Van Tyn), Robin Davis Duo, La La Bones, Space Between Shadows, You Knew Me When.

JUNE 29 TRAIL PARTY GRAVITY ENDURO, Purgatory

Resort. Multi-stage downhill mountain-bike competition within the bike park with a “best of” format that allows riders to repeat stages as many times as desired to record their best times.

JULY 4 SILVERTON: Old-fashioned parade and water fight;

brass-band concert; blue ribbon fun run/walk; ducky derby; music and food; and not-to-be-missed fireworks display.

JULY 4-6 RED RYDER ROUNDUP, Pagosa Springs. Cowboys and cowgirls compete for prizes in 70th-annual sanctioned-rodeo series; mutton busters, specialty acts and other fun events. JULY 6-28 MUSIC IN THE MOUNTAINS, Southwest Colorado’s premier classical music festival. World-class musicians perform orchestra, chamber and conservatory classical and world music under the baton of director and conductor Guillermo Figueroa. JULY 8, 31 STORIES AT SUNSET, Chimney Rock. A gathering at the Great Kiva as sunset approaches to enjoy Native American stories told by tribal storytellers. JULY 10 SUMMER LECTURE SERIES, Center of Southwest Studies. La Fabulosa Fabiola (Cebeza de Baca): First ‘Lady’ of New Mexican Cuisine, presented by U Mass Boston professor emerita Lois Rudnick.

JULY 20-28 FIESTA DAYS, Durango. Annual tradition celebrates Spanish and Native American history and cowboy heritage. Sanctioned rodeos, team roping, barrel races, royalty coronation, barbecue, street dance, pie auction, parade and more. JULY 24 SUMMER LECTURE SERIES, Center of Southwest Studies. La Estrella del Pastor – Hispano Sheepherders from Colorado and New Mexico: Culture, Tradition and Sheepscapes, presented by FLC history professor Andrew Gulliford. JULY 24-29 100S IN THE HILLS, Silverton. Gathering of 100 Series Land Cruiser aficionados enjoy some of the most beautiful trails in the San Juans with like-minded enthusiasts.

JULY 24-AUG. 3 CONNIE MACK WORLD SERIES, Farmington, N.M. Teams from the U.S. and Puerto Rico play in front of pro scouts and college officials in some of the best amateur baseball in the country. JULY 26-28 MANCOS DAYS, Mancos. The town embraces its cowboy heritage at 60th-annual celebration. Parade, family-friendly games, food, arts-and-crafts market in the park.

JULY 13 KENDALL MOUNTAIN RUN, Silverton. Classic footrace to the top of Kendall Mountain and back to Silverton; “K2” Double for twice the challenge.

JULY 26-AUG. 4 MONTEZUMA COUNTY FAIR, Cortez. Exhibits, events, judging, arts and crafts, food, activities and fun for the whole family.

JULY 13 AMERICAN INDIAN CULTURAL ARTS FESTIVAL,

JULY 27 KENNEBEC MOUNTAIN RUN, Durango. Tough, scenic 15-mile trail run through the La Plata Mountains. Proceeds to La Plata County Search and Rescue.

fun run, pancake breakfast, public reading of historical documents, family fun in the park, live music, Stars and Stripes Parade, street dance and fireworks.

JULY 14 ALPINE MARATHON AND 50K, Silverton. Course follows Alpine Loop jeep roads past the ghost-mining towns of Howardsville, Eureka, Animas Forks and Gladstone; high point is California Pass at 12,930 feet..

AUGUST

JULY 4 BAYFIELD: Pancake breakfast, parade, games, arts and crafts, entertainment, fireworks at dusk.

JULY 19-21 HARDROCK 100, Silverton. 100-mile ultramarathon through four counties in the San Juan Mountains.

JULY

JULY 3-7 FARMINGTON: Freedom Days celebration with fireworks, night parade, party in the park and more at various town locations.

FOURTH OF JULY SOUTHWEST COLORADO

JULY 4 DURANGO: Salute to America includes a 5K freedom

Aztec, N.M. Aztec Ruins hosts fourth-annual event with arts and crafts, Pueblo dancers, demonstrations, lectures and more.

AUG. 3 MUCK AND MIRE ON THE MOUNTAIN, Purgatory Resort. A 5K adventure race through mud pits, a giant slip ‘n slide and hay bales, climbing walls and more. AUG. 3 BARBERSHOP MUSIC FESTIVAL, Silverton. Annual celebration of harmonies and talent from all over the Rocky Mountain District. AUG. 3 SILVERTON ULTRA MARATHON, Silverton. 100K and 55K mountain trail-running races is 61 miles of the most spectacular singletrack trails, including 23 miles along the most scenic part of the famous Colorado Trail. AUG. 4-10 DURANGO PLAYFEST, Durango. Weeklong workshop with professional theatre artists developing three new plays and an improv show in intimate setting at the Henry Strater Theatre. AUG. 7 SUMMER LECTURE SERIES, Center of Southwest Studies. Historic Churches of New Mexico: A Visual Tour, presented by author Frank Graziano. AUG. 7-11 LA PLATA COUNTY FAIR, Fairgrounds Durango. From quilts and cakes to livestock displays and horse shows, the county fair celebrates the community’s rural heritage and is everyone’s favorite midsummer event. Carnival, open-class livestock events, barbecues, bull-riding competitions, horse shows, crafts exhibit and popular, rowdy Demolition Derby. AUG. 9-11 HARDROCKERS’ HOLIDAYS, Silverton. Traditional San Juan hard-rock mining 45th celebration. Contests, kids’ mini-mining. AUG. 9-11 GREAT WESTERN ROCKY MOUNTAIN BRASS BAND FESTIVAL, Silverton. Brass-band

concerts all weekend featuring musicians from all over the country.

AUG. 12-17 SAN JUAN COUNTY FAIR, Farmington, N.M. New Mexico’s largest fair with livestock exhibits, fiddlers contest, parade, arts and crafts, live music and more. AUG. 16-17 MUSHROOM AND WINE FESTIVAL, Purgatory Resort. Celebration of all things fungi features exquisite Friday evening mushroom dinner with wine pairings; Saturday mushroom hunt and culinary showcase of mushroom-inspired dishes from Durango’s finest restaurants.

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AUG. 17 SUMMER BREWFEST, Mancos. Afternoon of live music and local beers and wines at Cottonwood Park raises funds for local nonprofits.

SEPT. 16-17 BALLET FOLKLORICO DE LOS ANGELES, Concert Hall. Premier U.S. Mexican-American folk-dance company joined by Jarabe Mexicano.

AUG. 21 SUMMER LECTURE SERIES, Center of Southwest

SEPT. 20 FALL GALLERY WALK, Downtown Durango. Casual

Studies. Documentation of Three Hispano Cemeteries Along the San Juan River, presented by Ruth Lambert, local anthropologist and cultural director of the San Juan Mountains Association.

evening of featured artists and special exhibits at Durango’s fine galleries. Jim Rey and Star Liana York oil paintings and sculptures at Sorrel Sky.

AUG. 22 CONCERTS IN THE PLAZA, Durango. Formerly rooted in Nashville, husband-and-wife folk-rock duo You Knew Me When serves up a mix of craft-brewed folk and indie rock compositions with passionate songwriting. A free concert while you picnic on the plaza at Three Springs.

SEPT. 20-22 PARADE OF HOMES, Durango. A tour of some of the area’s most interesting homes, both large and glamorous or smaller and built green. Builders, architects, designers and other building-trades professionals showcase homes they have built or designed with opportunities for citizens to meet and brainstorm ideas.

AUG. 24 SAN JUAN BREWFEST, Downtown Durango. Four Corners’ largest festival with more than 50 breweries from near and far sampling their best beers. Proceeds benefit the United Way of Southwest Colorado. AUG. 24 THIRSTY 13 HALF MARATHON, Durango. A downhill

run from Hesperus to Durango with a brewfest post-race party at Ska Brewing.

AUG. 30-31 WESTERN MOVIE FESTIVAL, Silverton. Seventhannual festival features movies filmed in and around Silverton in the 1940s and 50s. Fundraiser for the Silverton Standard & Miner newspaper.

SEPT. 20-22 COLORFEST, Pagosa Springs. Passport to Pagosa Wine and Food Festival, Bands and Brews Festival, Breakfast with Balloons and mass balloon ascensions, 5K Color Run/Walk fundraiser hosted by Rise Above Violence. SEPT. 21 MOUNTAIN MARMOT TRAIL RUN, Purgatory Resort. Classic 11.5-mile race from base of Purgatory to the summit and back through beautiful mountain scenery. SEPT. 21 INTO THE UNKNOWN AND BEYOND:

CELEBRATING 150 YEARS OF JOHN WESLEY POWELL’S LEGACY, Durango. Center of Southwest Studies-sponsored presentation.

AUG. 30-SEPT. 1 FOUR CORNERS MOTORCYCLE RALLY, Ignacio and Durango. One of the nation’s premier biking events with daily poker runs on some of the best roadways in the country. Full-time fun including free concerts, beer tents, vendors and artists, custom bike shows, biker bull riding, tattoo contests, biker games and more.

SEPT. 21-22 AUTUMN ARTS FESTIVAL, Durango. Durango Arts Center’s signature annual event on Second Avenue celebrates 25 years; juried fine arts and crafts, local artisanal food, interactive art activities, music.

AUG. 31 HOOLIGAN DIRT DASH, Fairgrounds Durango. Harley Davidson-sponsored dirt-track event features street-legal, purposebuilt machines of any make, model and engine size.

and judged in challenging trail competition through scenic Chokecherry Canyon.

SEPT. 21-22 NATRC REGION 3 HORSEBACK COMPETITION, Farmington, N.M. Horses and riders are evaluated

SEPT. 27 GET THE LED OUT, Concert Hall. Group of professional musicians’ tribute to the legendary music of Led Zeppelin. SEPT. 28 FALL BLAZE, Durango. Fun, safe cycling tour through the fall colors for all skill levels with proceeds supporting cycling scholarships for FLC student athletes. SEPT. 28 SAN JUAN SYMPHONY, Concert Hall Durango. Four Corners innovative orchestra’s Essential Classics, Franz Schubert’s Overture in the Italian Style, No. 1 in D Major; J.S. Bach’s Orchestral Suite No. 3 in D. Major, BWV 1068; and Felix Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 4 in A Major, “Italian.” SEPT. 28 A REAL NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM, Farmington, N.M. Annual history extravaganza with live music, tractor rides, traditional hands-on activities and crafts that bring the past alive; apple pressing, butter churning, candle making, log cabin building, leather stamping and more. SEPT. 28-29HARVEST WINE FESTIVAL, Blanco, N.M. Celebration of the season at Wines of the San Juans with live music, juried art show, specialty foods, grape stomp and more.

OCTOBER

OCT. 1-31 SUTHERLAND FARMS PUMPKIN FESTIVAL,

Aztec, N.M. Local foods, family games, a corn maze and hayride through the pumpkin patch, and pumpkin sale every weekend throughout the month.

OCT. 3-6 COWBOY POETRY GATHERING, Downtown Durango. Strater Hotel hosts the 31st-anniversary celebration of Durango’s rich culture and heritage of the American cowboy. Featuring Trinity Seely and many more cowboy poets and musicians. Cowboy poet train, trail ride, chuck wagon breakfast, motorless cowboy parade and more.

SEPTEMBER

SEPT. 3-4 JAMBOREE AT THE BAR D, Durango. Chuckwagon of the West Association’s 43rd-annual dinner event showcases the western music and humor of wrangler guests from Colorado, Wyoming, South Dakota, New Mexico and Arizona. SEPT. 6-7 IMOGENE PASS RUN, Ouray to Telluride. Named for the 13,120-foot Imogene Pass that must be climbed, this 17.1-mile mountain race takes runners from Ouray, at 7,810 feet, to Telluride, elevation 8,820 feet. The mountainous traverse is famous for its rapidly changing weather conditions and its unsurpassed scenery along the way. A virtual rite of passage into the realm of true mountain running. SEPT. 7-8 COLORFEST QUILT SHOW AND SALE, Silverton. Display and sale of quilted items; judging for hand quilting, machine quilting, long-arm machine quilting, quilted item, wall hanging. First, second and honorable mention awards. SEPT. 7-8 W.E. ROCK NATIONALS, Farmington, N.M. The World Extreme Rock Crawling Nationals Championship returns for off-road enthusiasts from across the globe. SEPT. 13-14 OLD SPANISH TRAIL, Aztec, N.M. Aztec Ruins provides access to the “longest, crookedest, most arduous pack-mule route in the history of America,” a trade route traversing through six states. SEPT. 13-15 SOUTHERN UTE TRIBAL FAIR AND POWWOW, Ignacio. Parade, games, exhibits, Native

American dance and drum contests.

SEPT. 14 HARVEST BEER FESTIVAL, Cortez. Regional breweries, super silent auction, live music, food vendors and kids’ activities; 21st-annual fundraiser for Montezuma Land Conservancy. SEPT. 14 DINING WITH THE DEAD, Farmington, N.M. San Juan County’s early pioneers will be brought to life with historical performances, humorous stories, delicious barbecue dinner. DURANGO MAGAZINE

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DIVERSIONS OCT. 4 WESTERN ART EXHIBITS AND RECEPTIONS, Durango. Fred Clark historic photos, Lisa and Loren Skyhorse exquisite saddles, Tim Cox fine-art prints at Toh-Atin; Timeless West, Jim Rey paintings and Star Liana York sculptures at Sorrel Sky.

THE NSIDE OUT: Visions from the Artist’s Mind A look into the Southern Ute Museum’s permanent collection featuring:

Orian Box Russell Box Sr. Woody Crumbo Sam English McGarey Gallegos Norman Lansing Sam Ray Byron Red Sr. Dorothy Strait Bennett Thompson

OCT. 5 JAZZ ON THE HILL, Concert Hall. Annual Serzen

Endowment fundraiser supports maintenance and preservation of the concert hall.

OCT. 18 HOT-AIR BALLOON GLOW, Durango. Unique downtown event is part of the Animas Valley Balloon Rally and offers attendees a chance to get up close and personal with balloons and pilots; candlesticks for the kids.

OCT. 5 JOURNEY OF HOPE, Durango. Mercy Health Foundation’s 5K family run/walk to help women needing assistance with the cost of mammograms at Three Springs.

OCT. 18-20 THEATER, Durango Arts Center. Ninth-annual 10-Minute Play Festival is a fast-paced evening offering a grab-bag of comedy and drama.

OCT. 5 ROAD APPLE RALLY, Farmington, N.M. Pro/expert, veteran and beginner mountain bikers test their skills on a 30- or 15-mile course through canyons and arroyos of the Glade Run Recreational Area.

OCT. 24 STEPHANIE AND PAOLO, Concert Hall. Husband-andwife team perform swing, jazz and ragtime piano duets.

OCT. 5-6, 12-13, 19-20 PEANUTS™ THE GREAT PUMPKIN PATCH EXPRESS, D&SNG. Characters Snoopy, Charlie Brown

and Lucy await at the pumpkin patch where riders will find the perfect pumpkin.

OCT. 10 TAKE ME TO THE RIVER, Concert Hall. New Orleans

Live celebrates the soul of America with legendary Memphis and Mississippi Delta blues.

OCT. 11-12 FOUR CORNERS STORYTELLING FESTIVAL, Farmington, N.M. National and local storytellers of all ages celebrate an almost-lost art, presenting traditional tales of the Navajo, Hispanic stories, cowboy poetry, a few tall tales and more. OCT. 12 SKIPPY AND THE COMEDY WARRIORS, Concert Hall. Actor and comedian Mark Price, best-known for his role as Skippy on 80s sitcom Family Ties, and fellow comedians bring healing through humor. OCT. 12 DURANGO DOUBLE MARATHON, Durango. Daylong trail run and mountain-biking event. 10.8-mile Horse Gulch Hustle; Gena Rych 5K; for “Doublers,” a 17-mile bike ride through two loops in Horse Gulch. Kids’ Mini Double run/ride supports Durango DEVO. OCT. 12 HARVEST FESTIVAL AND ORCHARD SOCIAL, Dolores. Fall bounty from Montezuma County; cider tasting, apple pressing and judging.

The exhibition is open through April 30, 2020 The museum’s collection consists of an array of archival items and objects. From April 5, 2019 to April 30, 2020 the Southern Ute Museum will be highlighting ten Native artists and their contribution to fine art.

SOUTHERN UTE MUSEUM

(970) 563-9583 | www.southernutemuseum.org 503 Ouray Drive, Ignacio, CO 81137

OCT. 15 SKERRYVORE, Concert Hall. Winners of Scotland’s traditional music “Live Act of the Year” award, Scerryvore creates a unique fusion of folk, traditional, rock and Americana.

OCT. 29 DAVID SEDARIS, Concert Hall. American humorist, comedian, author and radio personality.

NOVEMBER

NOV. 1-9 GALLERY SHOW, Studio &. All Souls: A Celebration

of Remembrance.

NOV. 2 SAN JUAN SYMPHONY, Concert Hall Durango. Four Corners innovative orchestra’s Turbulent Passions, Mozart’s Piano Concerto in D Minor, K466; and Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 6, Pathetique Symphony. NOV. 6 FOREVER TANGO, Concert Hall. World-class dancers join forces with 11-piece orchestra and vocals to tell the story of the birth of tango in 19th-century Argentina. NOV. 9 BARK AND WINE SILENT AUCTION FUNDRAISER, Durango. Evening of fun and festivities is the humane society’s largest annual fundraiser that provides second chances to animals. Silent auction, presentation of the Animal Advocate of the Year, music, food and cash bar. NOV. 16 MUSIC OF CREAM: 50TH ANNIVERSARY, Concert Hall. Will Johns, Malcom Bruce and Kofi Baker, offspring of original band members Eric Clapton, Ginger Baker and Jack Bruce, join forces to pay tribute to Cream’s legendary reign over the psychedelic frontier of the late 60s.


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JULY 6 - JULY 28, 2019

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Autumn Arts Fest September 21 & 22 on 2nd Ave

10 Minute Play Fest October 18-20, 2019

Theater & Art Classes Available! www.durangoarts.org DURANGO MAGAZINE

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PHONE PHOTO TIPS WORDS & PHOTOS BY HANK BLUM

The days of needing to own an expensive camera to take professional-looking photos and videos are over. It’s 2019 — technology has evolved, and the camera phone you have in your pocket will do everything you need and more. Here are some tips on taking better photos with your phone.

HERE ARE SOME TIPS ON TAKING BETTER PHOTOS WITH YOUR PHONE.

CLEAN THE LENS

This might seem obvious, but it’s something that is always overlooked. This is the first thing I check. Phones spend most of their time in our pockets, bags and in oily hands, gathering dust, fibers, debris and fingerprints that can cover the lens. A dirty lens will often result in pictures that seem cloudy, as the oils and dirt can diffuse and diffract the light entering the lens. If you happen to carry around a microfiber cloth, use it. If you don’t, a simple wipe with a clean, dirt-free area of shirt should get the job done. Be aware that clothing fibers could scratch the lens. Make sure your soft cloth is free of dust, dirt and debris.

TREAT YOUR CAMERA PHONE LIKE IT’S A $5,000 CAMERA

I’ve had many close friends thank me for this advice. Just this mindset will guarantee better photos. Hold the phone in front of you with both hands and look through the screen at what you are taking a photo of, as you would with a fancy camera, rather than looking past the phone. Imagine the phone screen as the viewfinder on a big full-frame camera.

ZOOM IN WITH YOUR FEET

If you want to take a close-up, actually use your legs and walk up to it. Your phone loses lots of quality on anything with more than a 2x zoom, and it becomes really grainy and pixelated. So never move the zoom in unless it’s completely necessary, or you’re just super lazy. Get close—beauty is in the details.

LIGHT

Light with camera phones is so important. The lower the light, the grainier and lower the quality of the photo. Always take advantage of natural light. Your best photos will happen in the “golden hours,” just after dawn and just before dusk, when sun bathes everything in soft, golden hues. Overcast days are wonderful, as clouds dampen the sun’s rays, providing soft, even lighting. Just after a light rain is a good time to shoot landscapes for a little extra color pop and for close-ups of raindrops on flowers. 36


RESOLUTION

It sounds simple, but go to the camera settings and make sure the resolution is on the highest setting.

STABILITY

Keep the camera as still as you can, as camera-shake is likely with a camera phone. Get a mobile tripod for quick hands-free shots. Most mobile tripods are not much bigger than your phone and can bend to any angle. If you do not have a tripod, keeping your elbows close to your body will reduce shake. Don’t hold your breath—it will just make it worse. Instead, breathe deeply, exhale, then take the shot. Leaning against a tree is another great trick for stability.

BE A MARMOT

One of the things I love about my phone is that it is small and easy to get down low and dirty with it, or you can point it up and high really easily. One thing that drives me crazy is seeing people take the same shots from head or chest level. Be creative. Use your feet and move around. Pretend you are a marmot and get close to the ground. You will see the world from a new perspective.

FOCUS AND EXPOSURE

Most phones have an autofocus feature, but sometimes technology will fail. You can tap the screen where you want the camera to focus. To lock in your focus, press and hold, it and the AE/AF LOCK will appear on the screen.

TAKE A BUNCH OF SHOTS

It’s rare to get the shot you want on the first try. If you have a moving subject and want to get the perfect shot, hold down the button to take a photo. Your phone will enter burst mode and take multiple shots in a row. You can then scroll through this set of shots later, select the perfect one and discard the rest.

DON’T BE AFRAID TO EDIT

Taking the photo is the first step. Editing the photo is the next step. Have fun with filters and other third-party apps. No one will know if you used a little digital retouching to make your photo perfect—unless, of course, you add emojis or oversaturate your colors to look like something out of Avatar.

THAT’S HOW I TAKE PHOTOS WITH MY PHONE. I HOPE THESE TIPS HELP YOU, TOO.

NOW GO OUT, HAVE FUN, BE CREATIVE AND GET SOME AWESOME PHOTOS!

DURANGO MAGAZINE

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DURANGO MAGAZINE

Svatka Schneider

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WORDS & PHOTOS BY SVATKA SCHNEIDER

IN HER WORDS.....................

Having met my husband in my homeland of Prague, Czech Republic, I had the pleasure of hearing many fascinating tales about Colorado’s stunning beauty, active lifestyle and the magic for all who wander there. After many heaven-onearth visuals and two children later, I gave in and let our family start all over, on a different continent, with a few suitcases in hand, ready for the American dream to strike. This is in essence how we, like many others who seek the ideal place for their kids to grow up, landed in Durango. I have always photographed life, wanting to document pretty much everything. I begged my parents for a camera for what seemed like an eternity. Back then, in communist Czechoslovakia, I felt like the luckiest child on the planet when my dad handed me a Russianmade film camera on my eighth birthday. No child has ever taken as many pictures of hamsters, dogs, horses or chickens as I did at the time, I am certain of it. I loved taking and sharing photographs of my friends. Whether it was my passion to document everything or just my difficulty in letting go of anything, I have been obsessed with photographs for as long as I can remember. Funny enough, though, I have never seriously pursued the photographer’s journey. Small, compact digital cameras quickly became my norm. I kept shooting for myself and those around me using basic tools, and never in my life would I have dared to dream that this could be my path. Sometimes you just don’t see what is right in front of you.

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We had taken a lot of risks moving our family across the ocean. I figured I might as well go big and invested in my first pro-level camera at the very same time. This really marked the beginning of my exciting, frustrating and ever so rewarding journey as a self-taught photographer. Foteem Photography was born. And just as I felt I was making up something new, I also made up the word Foteem. Well, not entirely—it may mean nothing to English speakers, but if you say it to a Czech person you are literally saying: “I take photos.” After many late nights studying, reading and listening to everything I could get my hands on related to photography, there was still one problem to solve: I loved taking pictures of people, but I couldn’t stand posing them. I despised the resulting images. Not understanding the point of becoming one of zillions of portrait photographers, I felt the strongest urge to turn my passion into a business. I refused to settle for standardized styles. I knew there had to be another way. I wanted to create something significant. Just the thought of telling a family how to sit and where to aim their chins gave me shivers. How could I photograph the children’s expressions without them saying cheese and looking positively constipated? How could I create real memories, capture honest expressions and offer the kind of photographs I knew, as a parent, would actually become meaningful mementos? How could I do that without faking something, pretending, or telling people what to do? I knew I had a vision—and I knew I had to keep it real. I was on a mission to get families to invest in worthwhile memories that would be treasured forever, and I refused

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to give up on my values. There had to be a way. I’m a slow learner, so it would probably have taken me a very long time to find the how to my why had I not discovered an amazing family documentary photographer, Kirsten Lewis. I took one look at a photograph she’d taken and I had to know absolutely everything about how she’d made it. There really was a way. Kirsten was not only already taking these kinds of photos but also teaching others how to do it. My world had opened up to family photojournalism. All the apertures opened, and Kirsten became my mentor. There was no going back. So what is it that I do? You can imagine it as a journalist following you around and photographing your life. There’s no script, no guidance, no directing. You do what you would have done if I hadn’t been there, while I just hang out with you and your family and document the very life you are living—whether for an entire day or as little as a couple of hours. I have never been more physically and emotionally exhausted from a job. Mind you, the three small kids at home may be an exception. But I have also never had greater job satisfaction. I count my lucky stars that I have discovered a passion that makes me smile, keeps me up at night, and often results in happy tears all around. I feel that honesty is underrated in general, and so is family documentary photography. This genre may be in diapers but mark my words, it won’t be long before more people start yearning for photography that tells a true story…their story.


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GET OUT & EXPLORE

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A

P H O T O

DURANGO DURANGOMAGAZINE MAGAZINE

E S S A Y

Kennan Harvey


Grady James

Whit Richardson

DURANGO MAGAZINE

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Ron Martin

Grady James

Ron Martin

Jim Bommarito


THE FUTURE OF THE

416 BURN AREA BY MK GUNN

IN THE AFTERMATH OF THE 416 FIRE, WE ARE LEFT WITH MANY QUESTIONS ABOUT THE FUTURE OF THE AREA’S ECOSYSTEM. In a community like

Durango, it’s only natural for us to be concerned about the health of the soil, plants, animals and water. The San Juan Mountains Association (SJMA) partners with the San Juan National Forest (SJNF) to provide visitor information, conservation education, and volunteer opportunities on public lands. SJMA is committed to working with our community, and hopes to provide answers about the fire and help people access the burn area in order to learn more about what happened and what can be done to help restore these lands. On the whole, the 416 Fire was a healthy fire and will ultimately be good for the ecosystem.

Priscilla Sherman

2018 was a historically dry year. Over the winter of 2017-18, old-timers throughout La Plata County waxed on about how they hadn’t seen a winter this dry since 1977. Mountain-bike sales were way up, and sales of skis and river rafts were abysmal. High-mountain lakes that are normally snowed in until July were accessible in late May. The San Juan National Forest (SJNF) implemented stage 1 fire restrictions on May 1. Most years, such strict restrictions are not implemented at all. In 2016, stage 1 restrictions went into effect on July 1, and that was only for limited areas of the SJNF.

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June 1, 2018, was the first day of stage 2 fire restrictions for the entire SJNF. This was also the day that the 416 Fire started. DURANGO MAGAZINE


Hank Blum Hank Blum

A great resource for information about the effects of the fire is the 416 Fire Burned Area Emergency Response Executive Summary or BAER Assessment. The information in this assessment was furnished by a team of hydrologists, soil scientists, engineers, weed specialists, archaeologists, wildlife/fisheries biologists and GIS analysts.

Only 3 percent (1,480 acres) of the soil in the 416 burn area on national forest lands burned with high intensity. Thankfully, 67 percent (36,061 acres) burned only with low severity or was not burned at all. This is according to the Soil Burn Severity chart found in the final BAER Assessment.

root system of the aspens also provides soil stability, so that other plants can more easily take root. A healthy aspen population is hugely beneficial for wildlife. A plethora of small creatures take shelter in the grasses and shrubs that make up the ground cover in aspen ecosystems. Just imagine how many pocket gophers, squirrels, chipmunks, songbirds, mice, voles, weasels, rabbits and foxes can hide from predators or sneak up on prey on this understory. Conversely, the understory of an old-growth conifer forest, like some places within the 416 burn area, provides almost no cover or forage for animals. Plus, the dense canopy of these old spruce, fir, and pine trees allows very little light to reach the ground. Aspens also create habitat for beavers. Aspens are fastgrowing and make great forests. Beaver ponds create new habitat that is used by as many as 80 percent of the species in an ecosystem.

Priscilla Sherman

Low-intensity burns can be a boon for new vegetation. Gambel oak and twinberry bushes can be two feet tall just two months after a major wildfire. According to the Mountain Studies Institute, “With more light penetrating the canopy and reaching the forest floor, wildflowers and tree seedlings can regenerate in abundance. Several plant species are even stimulated to germinate after exposure to heat and smoke. Fire also releases nutrients into the ecosystem and clears out diseases, allowing a new cycle of life to thrive.” Aspens also thrive after a fire. They are a “pioneering species,” which means that they’re some of the first trees to grow after an area of land is cleared, whether by fire, avalanche or a major timber-clearing project. This is because aspens can sprout up from their underground root system faster than the time it takes seeds to germinate. And Aspen groves benefit smaller plants, such as grasses and wildflowers. The open canopy and fluttering of the leaves in the breeze allows more sunlight to reach the ground. The

Priscilla Sherman

Extreme concern about the fire was partly fueled by the fact that southwest Colorado typically receives very little rain in June. Fortunately, the edge of Hurricane Bud blew through in midJune. Even with two days of intense rains, the 416 Fire continued to grow and was not 100 percent contained until July 31. The burn area contains 53,504 acres of National Forest lands. But even before the last flame was extinguished, the SJNF and other local organizations were collecting data about the fire and making plans for the future.

Lindsey Hansen of the SJNF says the Forest Service would like to control invasive weeds in the burn scar to allow natural vegetation to regrow. They are also proposing to replant approximately 100 acres in the Lower Hermosa area. Replanting of riparian willows is also being considered as a restoration method. These willows would assist in streambank stabilization. DURANGO MAGAZINE

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Priscilla Sherman

The ecological impact of the fire is more significant than just “acres burned.” The 416 burn area encompasses most of the Hermosa Creek watershed, a network of many creeks. They all flow to the Animas River, which continues down to the San Juan River before mingling with the waters of Lake Powell. From there, it’s water under the dam into the Colorado River. As many of you know, the waters of the mighty Colorado are diverted widely throughout the Southwest in order to quench thirsty desert cities.

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What is in the waters of Hermosa Creek these days? As the heavy snows of the 2018-19 winter melt off and seasonal rains pelt the steep hillsides of this watershed, scorched soils and burnt debris flow downhill and into the water. Runoff will also wash “slurry,” the fire retardant dropped by air tankers to help control the fire, into the waterways. The slurry consists mostly of water but also contains fertilizers. These fertilizers can have adverse effects on vegetation, water quality and wildlife. According to a National Forest Service document titled Wildland Fire Chemical Products Toxicity and Environmental Concerns: General Information, “The fertilizer contained in long-term retardants consists of ammonia and phosphate or sulfate ions. Studies show that a single retardant-drop directly into a stream may cause a sufficient ammonia concentration in the water to be lethal to fish and other aquatic organisms. The severity of the effects will be different depending on the volume of the retardant that actually enters the water, the size of the body of water and the volume of flow in the stream or river. For example, if an 800-gallon drop is made into a fast-flowing river, it is likely that the lethal effects will be short-lived as dilution below the toxic level is quickly achieved. In contrast, if a 3,000-gallon drop is made into a stagnant pond, toxic levels will be likely to persist for some time.” So in the case of Hermosa Creek and its tributaries, the slurry might wash out fairly quickly. Water from melting snowpack will help to dilute the slurry’s potentially toxic effects. Overall, the 416 Fire was beneficial to the ecosystem. Wildland fire is natural, and the Hermosa Creek watershed will heal itself over time. SJMA looks forward to watching the area regenerate over the years and sharing this with the community.

Priscilla Sherman

For more info on the 416 Fire, wildfire and ecosystems, go to fs.usda.gov/sanjuan or mountainstudies.org/forest-fire-ecology.

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D I N I N G S H O WC A S E

G ETS B A C K TO W H AT’ S G O O D BY ZACH HIVELY

Scott Smith

THE MAHOGANY GRILLE

The Mahogany Grille, located within the Strater Hotel, is built on craftsmanship as exquisite as the menu itself, and patrons can feast on the atmosphere just as heartily as on their entrées. “We try to bring some really creative, interesting, different things to our operation, for our guests and our locals to share,” says owner Rod Barker, who has helmed the Strater since 1983.

The history shows in every angle of the restaurant. The exposed-brick arches were discovered during a renovation project, and the rearmost stained-glass dome light was rescued from another bar downtown. The staff built the wooden fixture housing the exorbitant light, and a glass smith working at the hotel replicated it nearly perfectly for the front of the dining room. The only way you can tell the difference between the two? The smith could not replicate the brown shades, because that process is now too hazardous to be legal. 48

DURANGO MAGAZINE

Paul Pennington

The Mahogany Grille is housed in one of the oldest buildings in town, erected in 1881 as a paint store before becoming a hotel and opera house. After it joined the Strater Hotel, the space transformed into a restaurant with a series of names. It has been the Mahogany Grille since 2004, named for the rich wooden features that adorn the interior.


The waitstaff will gladly share the history of the building with diners—that is, if they can pry their attention from their food. The menu is as rich with stories as the restaurant is. For instance, the elk tenderloin is one of Chef Steve Siote’s staples. It is made with a chokecherry demiglace, the tartness pairing beautifully with the elk, and the fruits are harvested locally.

Scott Smith

Then there’s the Peppersteak Herbert, named for the onetime chef at the Broadmoor Hotel in Colorado Springs. Barker used to travel with his father to hotel conventions. “I was 10 or 12 years old, and Herbert came out to do tableside service,” he recalls. “I memorized everything he did. He had this wonderful fillet, sautéed in butter with black pepper, garlic, and a chutney sauce, and he would flame it with cognac.” The dessert menu is similarly laden with history. The Bananas Foster originated with a maître d’ at the old Hotel Utah, who also entertained Barker with his tableside service. Then there’s the Chocolate Avalanche, an in-house creation of Chef Steve Coakley. This opulent dessert heaps hot chocolate ice cream atop a brownie, with whipped cream and a chocolate drizzle. As the ice cream melts, it topples— thus, the avalanche. Barker notes that this decadence was featured in the book 1,000 Things To Do Before You Die, and it’s certainly not one to be missed.

DURANGO MAGAZINE

Scott Smith

Evan Vitale

Whether you pop in for an appetizer or stay for a date night, the Mahogany Grille is a must-do destination for visitors and locals alike. “We define it as an ‘unwind dining experience,’” Siote says. “You don’t have to wear a suit and tie to come in and enjoy some really good food for a very reasonable price.”

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Scott Smith

D I N I N G S H O WC A S E

DOWN THE RABBIT HOLE

640 MAIN AVE. DOWNSTAIRS, DURANGO, CO Down The Rabbit Hole is one of Durango’s newest venues for great food, quality drinks, and an array of fun and entertaining activities. It is a welcoming place for all comers.

Do you like to sit back and play a game of Cards Against Humanity with some friends? Maybe your date night should include a jigsaw puzzle. How about a game of Candy Land with the family? Down The Rabbit Hole is your place for all kinds of card games, table games and puzzles.

Scott Smith

As you walk down the stairs into their well-lit and attractive space, be prepared to relax and have a good time. They have a full bar, cocktail seating, dining tables and a comfortable couch area. They even have a sweet “rabbit hole” booth that fits right into their theme! The entire space has a whimsical look that evokes thoughts of Alice in Wonderland. Their staff is funny and attentive and works hard to help you have a great time during your visit.

Their chef has taken the time to put together some amazing food. Everything is made from scratch and with great care— from the Hatch green chili queso, served with homemade flourtortilla chips, to the poached-pear salad. Their prime 50

DURANGO MAGAZINE

Scott Smith

They also feature a comedy open-mic night every Friday at 9 p.m. for some adult laughs, and Saturdays feature different performers and artists.


cheeseburger with garlic Parmesan fries makes a great lunch, while the black-pepper-dusted sirloin is an elegant dinner choice. Down The Rabbit Hole also offers menu items for children, including homemade mac and cheese or chicken strips. Their menu changes periodically to incorporate seasonal choices as well as new ideas from the chef. Down The Rabbit Hole offers an excellent choice of beer, wine and spirits. Some of their house favorites include the strawberry cobbler cocktail or SKA Brewing Company’s Rue B. Soho, a refreshing grapefruit lager. They also offer other Colorado favorites, such as New Belgium’s Voodoo Ranger Imperial IPA and Spring44 vodka and gin.

Scott Smith DURANGO MAGAZINE

Scott Smith

Scott Smith

They’re happy to be here and to help you have a great time, whether you’re a local or a visitor. Stop by and see what the fuss is all about! Check them out online at rabbitholedurango.com, or follow them on Instagram and Facebook to see what they have up their sleeves!

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NIGHTLIFE &

Grady James

DINING GUIDE

NIGHT LIFE BALCONY BAR & GRILL

The Balcony and The Balcony Backstage is the Four Corners destination for live music, tasty beverages, great food & good times. Gotta come up to get down! Full lunch and dinner menu, weekend brunch. Salads, sandwiches, tacos, burgers and more. 600 Main Ave.,Ste. 210, 422-8008. www.balconybarandgrill.com

BAR D CHUCKWAGON SUPPERS EDITOR’S CHOICE

Old West music and comedy stage show with traditional barbecue supper. Fun for the whole family. Nightly: Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day. Reservations required. 8080 C.R. 250, (970) 247-5753. www.bardchuckwagon.com

BOOKCASE & BARBER

The Bookcase and Barber showcases Durango’s local talent while transporting guests to another time with an intimate atmosphere, expertly crafted cocktails and superior service. Do you know the password? 601 E. Second Ave., Ste. B, 764-4123. www.bookcaseandbarber.com

DURANGO CRAFT SPIRITS EDITOR’S CHOICE

Distillery & Tasting Room, Durango’s first grain-to-glass distillery since prohibition. 1120 Main Avenue Suite 2, 970-247-1919

COLORADO PONGAS

An off-the-hook late-night scene dedicated to serving people who want a warm, friendly, fun atmosphere. Awesome DJs spin weekend nights for dancing. Games galore. pool, beer pong, foosball, Buck Hunter, shuffleboard. 121 W. 8th St., 382-8554.

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DURANGO MAGAZINE

EIGHTH AVENUE TAVERN

JOEL’S

EL RANCHO TAVERN

MOE’S SPORTS LOUNGE

Neighborhood favorite just south of College Drive in College Plaza. Top notch karaoke three nights a week, Thursday–Saturday from Over 46,000 songs to sing before a nonjudgmental crowd. Bar snacks available. Off-Main beverage prices! 509 E. Eighth Ave., 259-8801. Founded in 1897, El Rancho is a local pub in downtown Durango. Open 10am–2am daily. Durango Diner breakfast and lunch service. 975 Main Ave. www.elranchotavern.com

ENO

Premier cocktail lounge and wine bar offers respite from the daily hectic pace. Wide selection of wines from around the world; delicious, award-winning, handcrafted cocktails; fresh-brewed coffee and espresso drinks; tasty morsels for lunch or dinner. Locals’ favorite. M-F 10am -9pm, Sat 10am-9pm.. 723 E. Second Ave., 385-0105. www.enodurango.com

FOUR LEAVES WINERY

Charming downtown winery and tasting gallery. Over 20 wines made on site: varietals, ports and specialty crafted wine. Tastings, by the glass, or take home a bottle. Local chocolates for pairing. Appetizers include artisan cheeses, hummus, artichoke dips. Monday–Saturday, noon– 8pm; Sunday, noon–7pm. 528 Main Ave., 403-8182. www.fourleaveswinery.com

A classic long bar with lots of seats, a few tables, and mirrored shelving stacked with bottles. With a restaurant serving allAmerican food like burgers and fries, Joel’s is fun, friendly and moderately priced. 119 W. Eighth St., 903-0266. This fun lounge is a local favorite for food and live music, plus one of the area’s best patios. Largest selection of vodkas in Colorado; world-famous Bacontini. Great appetizers; over 90 martinis. Happy hour Monday–Friday, 4:30–7pm: half-price wells and appetizers, discounted drinks. 4:30pm–2am daily. 937 Main Ave., 259-9018

ORIO’S ROADHOUSE

One of Durango’s “last REAL bars,” Orio’s is a sports bar and much more, with pool tables. Open seven days week, 2pm–2am. 652 Main Ave., 259-6120.

WILD HORSE SALOON

Durango’s favorite for live country-western music and southern rock. National artists and talented locals. Giant dance floor, dance lessons, special concerts, karaoke, DJ Crazy Charlie. “A fun loving redneck’s dream.” Wednesday–Saturday, 6pm–2am. Must be 18 to enter, 21 to drink. www.durangowildhorsesaloon.com


DINING GUIDE 2nd DELI & SPIRITS

ANIMAS BREWING COMPANY

BIRDS

11TH STREET STATION

ANIMAS CHOCOLATE COMPANY EDITOR’S CHOICE

BLOOM CAFÉ

Co-owners Zach Williams and Colin Brunson have been close friends over the past 8 years and decided to roll the dice and go all in on their new deli/bar venture. Offering hot and cold sandwiches along with a full bar. Open at 11:30am Mon-Sat. 601 E. 2nd Ave. 970 2591000. www.2nddelidurango.com A culinary collective with a progressive vision giving a nod to the site’s history. From tacos to pizza, sushi to Indonesian cuisine, 11th Street Station’s independent food-truck kitchens cure any craving. Outdoor deck perfect for relaxing with a cold drink or a quick lunch. 1101 Main Ave., 946-6903. www.eleventhstreetstation.com

425 DEGREES TAKE & BAKE PIZZA

Just off the Animas River trail, offering a variety of flavorful craft beers along with a spin on comfort food and plenty of kid favorites. Relaxed, family-friendly. Comfortable outdoor seating. Open 11am, Tuesday– Sunday, 4pm on Monday. 1560 E. Second Ave., 403-8850. www.animasbrewing.com Casual, comfortable — chocolate lovers can relax while tasting amazing chocolates. From decadent truffles to divine darks, chocolate confections made on-premise using the highest-quality chocolate, simple ingredients, no preservatives. Tasting room/ shop/ factory open M-F 8am-7pm, Sat-Sun 10am-7pm. 920 Main Ave., 317-5761. www.animaschocolatecompany.com

Bird’s opens daily at 11am with our signature rotisserie chicken ready to fly out the door. Plenty of fresh and house made salads and sandwiches are on the menu as well. Stay tuned as we plan to open earlier with our great breakfast offerings as soon as we get some wind under our wings. 2957 N. Main Ave., 970 426-4596 A creative, casual spot in Albertsons’ parking lot, dedicated to providing tasty and satisfying meals. Options include daily soups, sandwiches on house-made bread, veggie burgers, salads of quinoa, kale, or fresh veggies on mixed greens, desserts. Eat in or take out. 309 W. College Dr., 426-4276.

BOATHOUSE AT ELECTRA

“Who bakes the best pizza? You do!” Offering 16” traditional, 14” thin and 12” gluten-free pizzas to take home, as well as wings, cookies and salad. Order by phone or text for drive-through pickup. Inside Elmore’s Corner Store at the northeast corner of highways 160 and 172. 50 C.R. 234, 799-0425. www.pizza425.com

APPLEBEE’S NEIGHBORHOOD GRILL & BAR

Serving family favorites. Breakfast, lunch and dinner. Sunday– Thursday, 11am–midnight; Friday–Saturday, 11am–1am. Nine TVs. Full bar. Casual, comfortable, friendly. In Durango Downtown Inn. 800 Camino del Rio, 259-5850. www.applebees.com

Overlooking Electra Lake, the Boathouse opens for the summer in June. The restaurant is open, with reservations, to the public. Former Seasons chefs Dave and Jenn Stewart. James Ranch beef, fresh fish and locally sourced produce; everything made from scratch. 141 E. Electra Rd., 247-5180.

81301 COFFEE HOUSE & ROASTERS

BART’S NEW YORK DELI

BREAD

Sit-down coffee shop owned by Taylor and Sage Anderson. Coffee, roasted in house, uses “pour-over” coffee making process. Hot coffee, iced drinks, mochas, lattes, chai, homemade baked goods. Laid-back atmosphere. Daily, 6:30am–6pm. 3101 Main Ave., Ste. 1, 385-1941. www.81301coffee.com

ALCÉ RESTAURANT

Alcé (pronounced - All-chay) is a new Italian-American restaurant located at Dalton Ranch Golf Club just 8 minutes North of downtown Durango. Alcé is the Italian word for Elk which can be seen from what is no doubt the best patio dining experience in Durango. Executive Chef Jonathan Fletcher spent many winters in Italy and has brought back traditional Italian recipes and cooking. Reservations. Dalton Ranch, 247-4980. www.daltonranch.com

Breakfast sandwiches and breakfast burritos. Burgers, hot dogs, fries, hot pastrami, “the best Reuben in town” and more. MondayFriday, 6am–3pm; Saturday, 7am–2pm. Inside the Exxon gas station across from Walmart. 1220 Carbon Junction, 247-1144.

BASKIN-ROBBINS

At Town Plaza (north end) on Camino del Rio, just a block west of Main. Fortytwo ice-cream flavors, as well as ice-cream cakes, smoothies, sundaes, shakes and blasts. Daily 11am–10pm. 32 Town Plaza, 247-1231. www.baskinrobbins.com

BEN’S BIG BURGERS

Known to many as the best burgers, fries and shakes, these burgers are prepared by professionals. Many American favorites. Dine out on the deck, inside, or grab treats to go. Monday–Saturday, 8am–7pm. 1400 E. Second Ave., 385-4469.

Fresh homemade breads, pastries, cookies and deli sandwiches served daily in this popular bakery — a gathering spot for breakfast and lunch at the corner of Florida and East Animas roads. From whole wheat to rye, ginger snaps to scones, Bread is fast, friendly and fantastic. Open every day. 42 C.R. 250, 247-5100. www.breaddurango.com

BURGER KING

Redrock Foods, a Burger King Corp. franchisee, owns and operates this Durango location and 19 New Mexico and Colorado stores. Redrock, in business for many years, is based in Albuquerque, N.M. 1415 Main Ave., 247-9095. www.bk.com

BURGER THEORY

Lunch and dinner menu features specialty burgers and Colorado Craft beers, while a Start Fresh breakfast menu focuses on the morning classics. Thirteen high definition TV’s promise no bad seat in the house, and our daily Happy Hour will keep your glass full! Open daily 6am-11pm. 21636 Hwy. 160 W., 385-6387.

Durango’s favorite family entertainment since 1969

Old West Music and Comedy Show and Chuckwagon

Supper

The Bar D Wranglers perform songs of cowboys and the old west, comedy, and lively instruments after supper to please the whole family.

Shops, playground, train ride, hayride, & more open at 5:30 pm. Open Memorial Day weekend thru Labor Day

www.bardchuckwagon.com

Reservations Required

970-247-5753


DINING GUIDE CAIRO CAFÉ

COLD STONE CREAMERY

DERAILED POUR HOUSE

CANTERA

COLLEGE DRIVE CAFÉ

DIAMOND BELLE

Just north of downtown, in a historic brick house, authentic Egyptian cuisine (salads, hummus, tabouli, dolmas) from scratch. Turkish coffee, local eggs, farm-fresh meats. Traditional gyros, chicken and beef kabobs, authentic dishes, dips, salads, falafel, spinach pie. Fresh, healthy, delicious. Seasonal hours. 1849 Main Ave., 403-6362 . Beto Navarro, owner of Macho’s Mexican restaurant, brings to Durango dishes similar to those of his birthplace in Guadalajara, Mexico. “Modern Mexican” menu includes steak, lobster, seafood, fusion dishes. His chef has studied in Peru, Brazil and India. 1150-B Main Ave., 422-8523.

CARVER BREWING CO.

One of the Southwest’s original brewpubs, Carver offers tours of its solar-, wind-powered brewery, and has 12 award-winning handcrafted brews on tap. Healthy, hearty and fresh creations for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Cocktails with organic produce grown locally at Carver Farm. Vegetarian, kid friendly. Historic downtown. 1022 Main Ave., 259-2545. www.carverbrewing.com

CHIMAYO STONE-FIRED KITCHEN

Contemporary American bistro with southwestern flair. Creative small plates, salads, artisanal pizzas, plus fire roasted steaks, chicken and seafood. Stone-hearth ovens in an expo kitchen. Specialty cocktails, fine wines and local tap beer. Curved concrete bar, rollup wall, historic interior. Unique, casual fine dining. 862 Main Ave., 259-2749. www.chimayodurango.com

CHINA CAFE

Favorite longtime area restaurant (25-plus years) offers Mandarin and Szechuan cuisine. Full bar and riverside patio. Parking. Dine in or take out, Mon-Sat open 11am Sunday 4pm. 1525 Main Ave., 259-0868. www.durangochinacafe.com

CJ’S DINER

Popular south-side eatery is open at 6am Monday–Saturday for breakfast and lunch. Specialty breakfasts, Mexican food, specialty sandwiches,burgers and salads. Catering, delivery, takeout. Prices from $4 to $10. 810 E. College Dr., 375-0117.

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To deliver the “ultimate ice-cream experience,” the secret recipe for smooth, creamy ice cream is made fresh daily in the store, and then customized with your choice of mix-ins on a frozen granite stone. Custom, signature ice-cream cakes, pies, cupcakes. 598 Main Ave., 259-5052. www.coldstonecreamery.com Creative and large menu, fresh-roasted organic coffee, and friendly folks. Daily specials and tried-and-true entrées. Everyone is treated like a regular at College Drive Café. Open daily 6:30am–2pm. Free Wi-Fi. 666 E. College Dr., 247-5322. www.cafedurango.com

COMMON GROUNDS CAFÉ

Staffed by high-school students who want experience. Sandwiches, yogurt, chips, fruit, and coåld drinks, Bread baked products, Desert Sun Coffee Roasters coffee. Perfect snack spot for kids, library patrons, river-trail users and meeting attendees. 10am–2pm Monday Friday. Durango Public Library lobby. 1900 E. Third Ave., 375-3380.

CUCKOO’S CHICKEN HOUSE & WATERIN’ HOLE

Family sports eatery. Broasted chicken, 20-plus kinds of wings. Most items under $12 make it a place “where a family can afford to eat, every night of the week!” HDTVs, satellite sports. Family friendly; full menu and bar. Dine in, take out. Lunch, dinner. 128 E. College Dr., 259-6322. www.cuckooschicken.com

CYPRUS CAFÉ

Just one block off Main. Cyprus Cafe is dedicated to providing high quality cuisine which promotes the health and well being of our customers and community. We use the freshest produce available and serve only free range chicken, natural meats, and sustainable seafood. Live jazz. Call for hours. 725 E. Second Ave., 385-6884. www.cypruscafe.com

DENNY’S

Family-friendly menu selections; serving breakfast, lunch, dinner. Open 24 hours every day. 666 Camino del Rio, 247-1512. www.dennys.com

An 1890s bar and a stage for local and touring musicians, Derailed offers martinis, wines, 14 beers on tap, fresh cocktails. Scratchmade food. Winter fireplace; summer openair windows on Main. Eight sports screens, friendly staff. Everyone feels like a local. 725 Main Ave., 247-5440. www.derailedpourhouse.com Legendary Old West saloon in the heart of historic downtown. Famous ragtime piano, costumed Belle girls, cowboys and bartenders. Daily live music, lunch, happy hour and dinner. Sunday brunch. Gunfights Monday, Wednesday and Friday, 5:30pm, June– October. Strater Hotel, 247-4431. www.diamondbelle.com

DIGS RESTAURANT & BAR

“Where neighbors become friends!” Serving burgers, sandwiches, wraps and salads, hand-cut steaks, salmon and cod for fish-n-chips. Flavors from the Southwest. Happy hour 3–6pm.Open M-F 11am9pm. Sat 3-9pm. Menu available online. Large groups welcomed. 125 Mercado St., Ste. 107, 259-2344. www.3springsdigs.com

DOMINO’S PIZZA

Fast, friendly delivery or carryout. Pizzas, chicken wings, breadsticks, pasta, sandwiches, more. Open for lunch, dinner and late night; daily, 10am–midnight. 1485 Florida Rd., 259-3660. www.dominos.com

DOWN THE RABBIT HOLE

Down The Rabbit Hole, serves up soups, salads, burgers, steaks, beautiful appetizers and desserts, and more. Full bar will quench your thirst, too. Open for lunch, dinner and late night. Open daily at 11am. 640 Main Ave., 970 422-8686. www.rabbitholedurango.com

DURANGO BAGEL

Voted “best bagel in the Four Corners.” Freshly baked bagels, muffins, cinnamon rolls and pastries — daily from 6:30am. Great breakfast selections and lunch bagel sandwiches. Takeout bag lunches. Downtown, next to the train depot. 106 E. Fifth St., 385-7297.


DURANGO DAWG HOUSE

FIESTA MEXICANA

DURANGO DELI

FIRED-UP PIZZERIA

A great place for a quick, affordable lunch or dinner — inside or on the patio. Soon-to-be-famous specialty hot dawgs, fresh-cut fries and the best gyros in town. Open daily at 11am. Friday and Saturday ’til 2am for late-night grub. 600 Main Ave., 259-3647. For a warming soup, a satisfying sandwich or a burger, the airport deli is just the ticket. For a quick bite or relaxing while waiting For a plane, the Durango Deli is the perfect traveler’s haven. Open daily. 1000 Airport Rd., 259-6964.

DURANGO DINER

On historic Main Avenue, “The Diner” is one of the town’s landmark eateries. Known for its nostalgic no-frills meals and local camaraderie. Brand-name green chile and Southwest salsa sold nationwide. Monday–Saturday, 6am– 2pm; Sunday, 6am–1pm. Breakfast and lunch all day. 957 Main Ave., 247-9889. www.durangodiner.com

DURANGO DOUGHWORKS

Fresh donuts and bagels, breakfast burritos, grill lunch favorites something for everyone. Grab a ready-to-go breakfast burrito or bagel sandwich, or relax in the comfy dining room for a full breakfast or lunch. Soup/ salad bar. 6:30am–2pm daily. 2653 Main Ave., 247-1610. www.durangodoughworks.com

DURANGO JOE’S COFFEE

Colorful family restaurant on the north side of town offers great margaritas and authentic Mexican food. Travelers to the south can enjoy their sister eatery in Cortez. 2850 Main Ave., 375-2492. www.fiestamexicanarestaurants.com Devoted to quality local and imported ingredients and the traditional Methods for artisan wood-fired pizza, sandwiches and salads. Always fresh, handmade and wood fired. Gluten-free options. Daily specials. Full bar. Family friendly. Seasonal rooftop patio. Open daily: winter, 11am–9pm; summer, 11am–10pm. 735 Main Ave., 247-0264. www.fireduppizzeria.com

FRANCISCO’S

HARVEST GRILL & GREENS EDITOR’S CHOICE

Where unforgettable food & memories are made. Experience out Table-on-the-Farm organic restaurant, farm market, and ranch tours. We’re expanding into our new building this summer. Call before you come see us. Mon - Sat, 11am–9pm (Memorial Day to mid-October); Saturday only (mid-October to Memorial Day). 33846 Hwy. 550, 676-1023. www.jamesranch.net/harvestgrill

HERMOSA COFFEE ROASTERS

GAZPACHO

Locally owned café in the valley north of town, the perfect stop on the way to the mountains. Egg dishes, pancakes, cinnamon rolls, specials daily. At lunch: sandwiches, burgers, authentic gyros, salads, soup in the winter months. Full espresso bar. Daily 7am–2. 32223 Hwy. 550, 247-0014. www.hermosacreekgrill.com

Voted Durango’s favorite for Mexican food and margaritas. Traditional northern New Mexican fare. Hatch red and green chiles. Carne adovada, tamales, blue-corn enchiladas, stuffed sopapillas and vegetarian menu. Full bar. Parking. Open Daily, 11am–ppm. 431 E. Second Ave., 259-9494. www.gazpachodurango.com

GIANNI’S OVEN & GRILL

DURANGO NATURAL FOODS

GRASSBURGER

EAST BY SOUTHWEST

This very reasonably priced, popular southwestern and American dinerserves fajitas, carnitas, enchiladas, smothered burrito plates and burgers. Vegetarian and kids’ meals, and takeout. Monday– Saturday, 10am–9pm. Good food, friendly service. Considered a local favorite. 2603 Main Ave., 259-3558.

Award-winning, authentic New Mexican, Mexican and Continental cuisine. Family-owned/operated since 1968, Francisco’s serves great steaks, fresh fish, chicken, pasta and salads. Seniors’ and kids’ menus. Daily specials. Full bar and terrific margaritas. Tues-Sat 11am-10pm, Sun 10am-10pm.639 Main Ave., 970247-4098.

Nine convenient locations in Durango, Farmington and Aztec, serving the best espresso/coffee drinks, blended drinks and smoothies paired with tasty pastries, breakfast burritos, salads and sandwiches. Enjoy “legendary customer service”; loyalty programs; and fair trade, certified-organic coffees/teas. Free Wi-Fi., 259-1808. www.durangojoes.com Durango’s first and only community-owned food market and deli. The best local, organic produce; non-GMO groceries and bulk foods; locally raised meat and eggs; cruelty- free body-care products; more. Open daily. Corner of College and Eighth. 575 E. Eighth Ave., 247-8129. www.durangonaturalfoods.coop

GRIEGO’S RESTAURANT

With fresh ingredients and homemade tastes, the perfect place for a hearty Italian lunch or dinner. With pizza and calzones, hot hero sandwiches and delicious pastas, the food is great, in a cozy familyowned atmosphere to boot. Convenient location on North Main. Monday–Saturday, 11am–9pm. 2477 Main Ave., 764-4727. Award-winning restaurant serving 100 percent grass-fed, USA-raised beef burgers; turkey or vegan burgers; sweet and regular fries; salads; and bowls. Fun western-industrial décor; indoor/ outdoor seating, and kiddie corral. Vegan, allergy, gluten-free friendly. The American burger made healthy, ethical and delicious. Dine in or carry out. 726ó Main Ave., 247-1081. www.eatgrassburger.com

Dedicated to providing the highest quality specialty coffee along with unparalleled customer service. 738 Main Ave.. 970 259-2059. www.hermosacoffee.com

HERMOSA CREEK GRILL

HIGHWAY 3 ROADHOUSE

Locals’ hang-out. Interesting appetizers, full bar. Fresh and fried oysters, jumbo Gulf shrimp, catfish, crawfish, quesadillas, blue-crab cakes. Happy-hour oysters 4–5:30pm: $9/half-dozen. Slider night is Wednesday: $3.95/slider. Thursday Ladies’ Night Out: $5 drinks. Friday catfish night: $12.95. Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, 4–8pm. Great for private parties. 955 Hwy. 3, 385-7444. www.highway3roadhouse.com

HIMALAYAN KITCHEN EDITOR’S CHOICE

Tastes from such top-of-the-world regions as Nepal, India and Tibet. Daily gourmet lunch buffet. Dinner temptations include yak, lamb, chicken, seafood, vegetarian. Bread fresh from the Tandoor oven. Lunch, 11am–2:30pm; dinner, 5–9:30pm; Fridays and Saturdays ’til 10pm. 992 Main Ave., 259-0956. www.himkitchen.com

Voted Durango’s best happy hour, hottest date night, best dessert, best cocktail, best bartender. Creative Pacific Rim fusion. Black Angus beef. Full sushi bar. Vegetarian options. Sake, Asian beers, libations. Comfortable upscale, urban setting. Dinner. Kids’ menu. 160 E. College Dr., 247-5533. www.eastbysouthwest.com

EDGEWATER GRILLE

For breakfast, lunch and dinner with great river views. Daily specials. For the healthy minded, DoubleTree has created an “eat right menu.” Kids’ menu. Easy-order takeout by phone. DoubleTree Hotel, 2596580. www.doubletree3.hilton.com

EL MORO SPIRITS & TAVERN

Lunch and dinner daily, plus weekend brunch. Termed “modern rustic” and “approachably upscale,” El Moro is named for the early-1900s saloon that occupied the historic site. Comfortable, with exposed red-brick walls, hardwood floors and tin ceilings. A “farmto-table restaurant” that features local fresh foods. 945 Main Ave., 259-5555. www.elmorotavern.com

EOLUS BAR & DINING EDITOR’S CHOICE

Locally owned and operated since 2013. Named for the famous peak near Chicago Basin, featuring farm-to-table and vine-towine. Contemporary American cuisine. A fine array of local products. Elegant dining room, comfortable bar, rooftop patio with views. Open 5pm nightly; reservations accepted. 919 Main Ave., 259-2898. www.eolusdurango.com

Located Inside Nature’s Oasis We Proudly Serve Only the Best We Serve...Meyers Beef, Niman Ranch, Smart Chicken, and more. We stand by providing the highest quality and ethically produced products.

FATHER’S DAUGHTERS PIZZA

Family owned and operated and with a full bar, this new restaurant at the corner of College and Main (formerly Diorio’s) features the East Coast flavor of Sicilian or New York–style pizza. Dough made fresh daily. Great salads, wings and soups. Private parties welcome. Open daily 11am-10pm. 600 Main Ave., Ste. 110, 385-0420. www.fathersdaughterspizza.com

Locally and Family Owned

970.247.1988 • 300 S. Camino del Rio • Durango, CO

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DINING GUIDE

HOMESLICE PIZZA

Gourmet pizza, salads and sandwiches, plus a full bar. In-town delivery or dine out on the patio. If you love fresh homemade pizza and friendly service, this is the place for you; just ask the locals. Open daily, 11am–10pm. Online ordering. 441 E. College Dr., 259-5551; 2915 Main Ave., 422-8337. www.homeslicedelivers.com

HOT TOMATOES CAFÉ & CATERING

Charming lunch spot and bakery. Homemade baked goods, delicious fresh sandwiches, tasty soups and salads. Baked goods include pumpkin bread, apple Danish, muffins, chocolate croissants. Cozy setting with the hospitality of proprietors Robynn and Ken. 939 Hwy. 3, 385-5577. www.hottomatoescafe.com

IRISH EMBASSY

KENNEBEC CAFÉ

JITTERS’ JAVA

LIVING TREE

Now open in the busy plaza at the crossroads of Camino del Rio, 14th Street and Main, the popular franchise has featured “gourmet sandwiches since 1983.” The business is known for its irreverent attitude, low prices, great food and speedy delivery. More than 2,000 stores in the U.S. 1316 Main Ave., 259-0577. www.jimmyjohns.com Locally owned drive-through at Eighth Avenue and Camino del Rio. Shadegrown organic, fair-trade coffees. Espresso drinks, teas, smoothies and more. Grab-n-go breakfast and lunch. Fast, friendly. Get your Jitters organically. Monday–Saturday, 6am–2pm. 802 Camino del Rio. 385-JAVA.

Durango’s first “authentic” Irish pub. Warm and cheerful — Gaelic style — with décor and furnishings from the homeland. Subtle Irish music, Irish draughts and whiskeys. Hearty Irish comfort foods with a local touch. Open weekdays at 11am, weekends at 8am. 900 Main Ave., 403-1200. www.theirishembassypub.com

KACHINA KITCHEN

J. BO’S PIZZA & RIB COMPANY

KASSIDY’S KITCHEN

Known locally as Bo’s, this fast, casual family eatery serves pizza, ribs, grinders, burgers, salads, local microbrews, wine and more. Pool tables, jukebox, video games, live music. With kids, the friendly restaurant, the lounge or the patio is easy. Eat in, take out or delivery. Get some. 1301 Florida Rd., 259-0010. www.jbosdurango.com

JEAN-PIERRE BAKERY, C AFÉ & WINE BAR

Breakfast, lunch and dinner. Wine room for small business meetings or private dinner parties. Live classical and/or jazz music on the weekends. Traditional and innovative dinner menu. Full bar. Reservations recommended. Top Trip Advisor sweets. 601 Main Ave., 385-0122.

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JIMMY JOHN’S

DURANGO MAGAZINE

Delicious Southwestern foods. Mexican and Native American dishes prepared fresh daily. Fast, efficient service; great prices and free parking. Monday–Saturday, 10am–8pm. Centennial Center. 325 S. Camino del Rio, 247-3536. In Bodo Park behind the Comfort Inn. Breakfast and lunch; weekday specials. Choices for large and small appetites. Gluten-free and vegetarian options. Homemade baked goods, MSG-free sauces and chilies. Breakfast served anytime Mon–Fri, 6am–2pm; Sat & Sun, 7am–2pm. Delivery/to go. 171A Suttle St., 247-4007.

KEN & SUE’S

Locals Ken and Sue Fusco invite you to be their guest. Creative food and great service at reasonable prices. Upscale, comfortable eatery. Yearround patio. Lunch Monday–Friday, 11am–2:30pm. Dinner, 5pm nightly. Reservations are encouraged. 636 Main Ave., 385-1810. www.kenandsues.com

Taste Tuscany in the La Platas, 10 miles west on Hwy. 160. Mediterranean- and American-inspired cuisine, bistro setting. Extensive wines, full bar, takeout, ever-changing seasonal menu. Events, banquets. Dinner Tuesday–Sunday; brunch Saturday, Sunday. Lunch May–October. Reservations accepted. Hesperus, 247-5674. www.kennebeccafe.com “Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.” Live foods salad bar. Fresh, healthy, organic, cultured foods. Friendly, fun setting. Locally sourced food when possible, kombucha on draft. Grass-fed beef; cage-free, hormone-free chicken; salads; chili; kimchi; ferments. Compostable plates, cups, bowls and silverware. 680 Main Ave., 286-0227. www.thelivingtreesaladbar.com

LONE SPUR CAFÉ

Lone Spur Café is classic Old West with Western themed wall décor and cowboy vittles to match. The café serves hearty breakfasts, like steak-and eggs, all day; lunch features burgers, fries, classic sandwiches, soups and salads. Weekend-only dining menu features steaks like prime rib and rib eye. 619 Main Ave., 764-4280. www.lonespurcafe.com

LOS AMIGOS DEL SUR

In the Main Mall downtown, this unassuming restaurant is small but features a great-big Mexican menu. Plus, handcrafted margaritas. Owner Tonny offers a friendly, comfortable atmosphere and serves everyone’s favorite dishes, plus ceviche, “street” tacos and vegetarian platters. Monday–Friday 9am-10pm. Sat 8am-10pm. 835 Main Ave., 764-4042. www.durangoamigos.com

MACHO’S FAST MEXICAN FOOD & DRINKS

Fresh and bursting with flavor, great dishes prepared with the highest-quality ingredients. Authentic Mexican meals — Beto’s Burrito Bowl is a favorite! Great atmosphere, friendly service, affordable prices. Take your taste buds on an unforgettable journey. Open 7am–10pm daily. 1485 Florida Rd., 422-8540; 275 E. Eighth Ave., 259-4108.


MAGPIE’S NEWSSTAND CAFÉ

MONGOLIAN GRILL

MAHOGANY GRILLE

MUTU’S ITALIAN KITCHEN

Sunny sidewalk patio in the heart of downtown. Most affordable sandwiches in town. Traditional or grilled panini. Breakfast burritos, salads, smoothies espressos. Bestever house-brewed chai and freshmade gelato. An incredible selection of magazines and cards. Games, puzzles, candy and sodas. 707 Main Ave., 259-1159. The New Mahogany features something for everyone. From shared plates to all that’s fine. Crafted by our master chef, with meats, produce and ingredients from local family-owned farms and ranches. Open daily for breakfast, happy hour and dinner; weekend brunch. Strater Hotel, 247-4433. www.mahoganygrille.com

MAMA SILVIA’S ITALIAN KITCHEN

Coming this summer from Hydi and Sergio Verduzco, owners of East by Southwest. 150 E. College Dr.

MAY PALACE RESTAURANT

Some of the town’s best Chinese food. Specialties: Szechuan, Hunan, Mandarin and 38 lunch specials. No MSG. Full menu for takeout. Full bar. Downtown. Open 11am daily, lunch and dinner. 909 Main Ave., 259-4836.

In the Walmart shopping center. Featuring Peking barbecue, plus Hunan, Mandarin and Szechuan cuisine. Grill opens daily at 11am. Beer, wine. Free parking. All-you-can-eat dishes. Dine in, take out. 1135 S. Camino del Rio, 259-7228. www.mongoliangrilldurangoco.com From classic to contemporary cuisine, Mutu’s offers a menu that everyone in the family can enjoy. Culinary Olympic medalist owner/ chef Rustin Newton creates delicious, savory dishes with fresh and local ingredients. Excellent wine selection, house-made lemongrass martinis. 701 E. Second Ave., 375-2701. www.mutusitaliankitchen.com

NATURE’S OASIS EDITOR’S CHOICE

Durango’s great natural market is the largest provider of natural and organic products in the Four Corners. Fresh sandwiches, salads, soups and hot foods daily in the deli. Largest selection of supplements and beauty-care products in the region. Locally owned since 1993. 300 S. Camino del Rio, 247-1988. www.naturesoasismarket.com

NAYARIT RESTAURANT

Fast and friendly service. Order from the dollar menu or the regular value meals. Open daily, 5am–1am (except Thanksgiving and Christmas). 201 W. College Dr., 247-2446. www.mcdonalds.com

Named after the central Mexican state of Nayarit on the Pacific coast of Mexico, they offer real, authentic Mexican food that cannot be found anywhere else in the area. They are best-known for the wide selection of tequilas and margaritas, fresh seafood and delicious tacos. New, larger location! 2525 Main Ave., 385-1595.

MICHEL’S AUTHENTIC CRÊPES

NINI’S TAQUERIA

MICHOACANA EL OASIS

OFFICE SPIRITORIUM

MCDONALD’S

Longtime Durango chef Michel Poumay brings authentic sweet and savory French crêpes to the heart of downtown. Each made fresh to order. Perfect on your way to the mountains to grab some unique fare to go, or dine on the patio. 598 Main Ave., 769-0256. An adventure into Mexican and Latin American cuisine. A “paletería,” an ice cream/snack shop, serves freshly made fruit bars, homemade ice cream and snacks. As a reminder of home or an exciting new taste, this traditional Mexican fare is an oasis in the desert Southwest. 2980 Main Ave., 764-4343.

OLDE SCHOOLHOUSE CAFÉ & SALOON

Lively place for great pizza, calzones, beer and spirits. Food is served daily until 9:42pm; bar hours after kitchen closes. Just three miles south of Purgatory Resort, across from Needles Country Store. 46778 Hwy. 550 N., 259-2257. www.OldeSchoolHouseSaloon.com

OLDE TYMER’S CAFÉ EDITOR’S CHOICE

Locals’ favorite for over 25 years! One of the Four Corners’ best patios. Superb salads, marvelous margaritas and huge burgers (voted Durango’s best). Full bar plus 15 beers on tap. Handful of TVs. Specials: Thursday, chicken-fried steak. Friendly locals. 1000 Main Ave., 259-2990. www.otcdgo.com

ORE HOUSE

Established in 1972, one of Durango’s oldest and finest restaurants. Hand-cut, USDA-certified prime and choice steaks; sustainable wild seafood; seasonal produce; award-winning wines; handcrafted seasonal cocktails. Reservations encouraged. Open daily 5pm. 147 E. College Dr., 247-5707. www.orehouserestaurant.com

OSCAR’S CAFÉ

Voted Durango’s “best breakfast,” a ’50s-style diner with a train. Homemade hash browns, chili verde, pancakes, omelets, biscuits and gravy, French toast, cinnamon rolls, soups, salads, homemade pies and shakes. Burgers, Reubens, clubs. Kids’ menu. Take out. Open Daily, 6am–2pm. 18 Town Plaza, 247-0526. www.oscarscafedurango.com

PALACE RESTAURANT

Celebrating over 45 years in Durango, offering traditional American cuisine. Open for lunch, dinner and in-between. Historic dining rooms, beautiful tavern for great cocktails and lighter fare. Happy hour 4–7pm. GF menu. 505 Main Ave., 247-2018. www.palacedurango.com

Food so good, you won’t trust the water! Funky, casual Mexican. Giant burritos, grilled quesadillas and tasty tacos. World-famous margaritas and local beers. Open daily at 11am. 552 Main Ave., 259-4221. www.ninistaqueria.com

PAPA MURPHY’S TAKE ’N’ BAKE PIZZA

Locals’ favorite happy hour. Perfect after-work and late night Victorian bar at the historic Strater Hotel. Creative libations, local beers and fabulous wines. Amazing interior setting. Daily happy hour, dinner and live music. Strater Hotel, 247-4431. www.strater.com

Freshly prepared, ready to pop in the oven — pizzas from gourmet to “deLITE.” Papa’s All-Meat, Cowboy, Papa’s Favorite, Vegetarian pizzas. Gourmet, stuffed to thin, crispy crust, there’s a Papa Murphy’s pizza your family wants. 11am–8pm daily, old Town Plaza. 12 Town Plaza, 382-0961. www.papamurphys.com

Where unforgettable food & memories are made. Experience our Table-on-the-Farm organic restaurant, farm market, and ranch tours. We’re expanding into our new building this summer. Call ahead before you

COME SEE US!

(970) 385-6858

The Grill, 11 a.m. - 9 p.m. / The Market, 9 a.m. - 7 p.m.

33846 Highway 550, near Honeyville

www.jamesranch.net follow us

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DINING GUIDE PIZZA HUT

Find all your favorites at this national chain pizzeria on Main. Pan-style, stuffed crust, thin and crispy, or hand-tossed styles. Ask about the Pizza Supreme. Buffalo wings, bread sticks. Delivery and take out. 1316 Main Ave., 259-2112. www.pizzahut.com

PJ’S GOURMET MARKET

Rare treats or necessities, fresh produce, meat, poultry, seafood. Deli with the best salads, meats, cheeses. Freshly baked breads, sweets, pastries. Everyday groceries. Fresh local and regional products: locally made coffee, snack chips, sodas, salsa, honey. 67 Trimble Crossing, 247-0100. www.pjsgourmetmarket.com

POP SUSHI

Restaurateur Jimmy Nguyen, owner of the successful Rice Monkeys, unrolled Pop Sushi at the corner of Florida and East Animas roads. As executive chef, 26-year veteran Ray Srisamer oversees a Japanese tapas restaurant with a full bar. Urban atmosphere, seating for 70. Sashimi, thinly sliced fresh fish. 42 C.R. 250, Unit 400, 422-8182.

PURGATORY RESORT RESTAURANTS

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The resort offers fun, convenient bars and distinctive restaurants, including indoor and al fresco options. From pastries, salads, gourmet burgers, pizza, steak, pasta and fish entrées, choose a variety of delicious dining options for everyone in the family. Breakfast, lunch, dinner. North of Durango, 247-9000. www.purgatoryresort.com

RAIDER RIDGE CAFÉ

Locals’ choice for healthy meals. Tasty wraps, deli sandwiches, breakfast burritos, vegetarian green chile, local organic coffee, and the very best freshfruit smoothies in town. Takeout orders welcome. Website has menu, hours and directions. 509 E. Eighth Ave., 375-9727. www.raiderridgecafe.com

RED SNAPPER

Voted No. 1 in Durango — more than just seafood. Award-winning service, food, salad bar. Fresh seafood, steaks, prime rib, specials, large wine list, kids’ menu, homemade desserts — plus aquariums! Your satisfaction is Red Snapper’s goal. Happy hour Monday–Friday, 4–6pm. Dinner nightly, 5pm. Online reservations. 144 E. Ninth St., 259-3417. www.redsnapperdurango.com

RGP’S FLAME-GRILLED WRAPS

Homemade dough grilled over an open fire and filled with the freshest ingredients. Local favorite: Southwest turkey club. Also, pulled-pork barbecue and chicken pesto panini. 11am–5pm Monday–Friday. In the heart of downtown. 835 Main Ave. (Main Mall), 382-9868. www.rgpswraps.com

RICE MONKEYS

Healthy, creative, delicious Asian food in a fast, friendly environment. Sushi, sashimi, teriyaki, traditional Vietnamese. Specialty rolls, hotsoup bowls, rice bowls, egg rolls and platters with such favorites as ceviche, seared blackpepper tuna, Saigon noodles, beef pho, ginger chicken. Partyto- go platters, delivery. 1050 Main Ave., 403-3852. www.ricemonkeysdurango.com

THE ROOST

Brought to you by the owners of Cuckoo’s Chicken House & Waterin’ Hole and The Animas City Theatre. Serving American traditional and burgers. Dine-in or take out. Open Tues-Sat at 4pm. 128 E. College DR., 970 764-4661.

SAN MARCOS MEXICAN RESTAURANT

Great food, drinks and company. Open for dinner Mon- Sat a 4am. Next to the Best Western. 21382 Hwy. 160 W., 970 385-1016.

SEASONS ROTISSERIE & GRILL

Modern American, simply the best seasonal ingredients. Changing dinner menu (often weekly) to showcase the area’s bounty. Wood-fired grill, great service, award-winning chef. Critically acclaimed, internationally awarded wine list. Main Avenue views, private-cellar dining, patio. Lunch, 11:30am– 2:30pm Monday–Friday. Dinner nightly, 5:30pm. Reservations encouraged. 764 Main Ave., 382-9790. www.seasonsofdurango.com

SERIOUS DELIGHTS BAKEHOUSE

Local family bakery provides fresh breads, pastries and desserts, and proudly offers gluten-free options. Treats are always handcrafted from scratch using local, organic ingredients when possible. Inside Nature’s Oasis market. Open daily. 300 S. Camino del Rio, 403-1517. www.seriousdelights.com

SERIOUS TEXAS BAR-B-Q

Selected by Sunset magazine as one of the best barbecue restaurants in the West. Tasty smoked meats, huge sandwiches and their legendary ribs. Outdoor deck and patio dining. 11am–9pm summer; 11am–8pm winter. 18-hole minigolf at south location. 650 S. Camino del Rio, 259-9507; 3535 N. Main Ave., 247-2240. www.serioustexasbbq.com


SEVEN RIVERS STEAKHOUSE

For an authentic steakhouse experience, Seven Rivers Steak Seafood Spirits at the Sky Ute Casino Resort is unique in the Four Corners. This restaurant wows with selections of mussels, giant prawns, lump crab, scallops and shrimp. Prime cuts of succulent beef, such as petite filet and New York strip. Beautiful décor. Reservations available. Ignacio, 563-6235. www.skyutecasino.com

SINGLETRACK CAFE

SMILEY CAFÉ

STEAMWORKS BREWING CO.

SONIC DRIVE-IN

SUBWAYS IN DURANGO

A cozy and inviting coffee shop in the popular Smiley Building. Serving fresh, local coffee from 81301 Coffee Roasters, breakfast burritos, salads, sandwiches and delicious variety of home-baked, gluten-free goodies. Monday–Friday, 7am–5pm. Saturday, 8am–2pm, 1309 E. Third Ave., 903-5598.

Known for not only great coffee, but also for amazing breakfast burritos, quality baked goods, great soup and sandwich lunches in a fun, friendly cafe in Rivergate. 555 Rivergate Ln., Ste. B103, 970 422-8558.

Breakfast and main menu items all day. Sunday–Thursday, 6am– midnight; Friday– Saturday, 6am–1am. Happy hour (half-price fountain drinks and slushes) every day, 2–5pm. Monthly specials. Major credit cards. 240 E. Eighth Ave., 247-8160. www.sonicdrivein.com

SIZZLING SIAM

SOW’S EAR

A locals’ favorite with the wonderfully different, delicious and healthy foods of Thailand made with the freshest ingredients by native Thais. Call in, carry out or dine in. Very affordable, healthy and delicious. 519ó Main Ave., 385-9470.

SKA BREWING & THE CONTAINER RESTAURANT

Eat local while enjoying fresh craft beer right from the source. Built from repurposed shipping containers situated in Ska Brewing World Headquarters, Chef Jeremy Storm serves brick-oven pizzas, sandwiches, soups, salads, kids’ options. Tasting room, retail outlet, tours at the brewery. 225 Girard St., 247-5792. www.containerrestaurant.com

SKY UTE CASINO RESORT

For unique dining options: Seven Rivers Steak Seafood Spirits for upscale steaks and seafood; Willows Café Bistro for breakfast, lunch, dinner and weekend buffets; Rolling Thunder Grill for pub fare; 49 Lounge for sports fans has TVs, a full bar and appetizers. Shining Mountain Café for sandwiches, salads and Native American fare. Ignacio, 563-7777. www.skyutecasino.com

Great spot for a casual lunch or dinner. Award winning beers, cocktails and wines. Nightly food and drink specials. World-famous Cajun Boil. Games on several TVs. 11am daily. Downtown, corner of Eighth and East Second. 801 E. Second Ave., 259-9200. www.steamworksbrewing.com Fast, inexpensive and ready to go when you are. Perfect for backpacks or picnics. Delicious salads, cold or toasted sandwiches. Fresh meats, crisp veggies, breads baked daily. Four sites: 2101 Main Ave., 259-0887; 1537 Florida Rd., Ste. 101, 247-2335; 20800 Hwy. 160 W., 259 1422; 1145 S. Camino del Rio, 382-9511. www.subway.com

Casual Durango mountain dining with great mountain views of Engineer Peak. Hand-cut steaks, wild game, fresh fish, poultry, soups, salads, homemade desserts since 1986. Kids’ menu, full bar, wine list. One mile south of Purgatory Resort. Birthdays, reunions, rehearsals, weddings or a night out. Silverpick Lodge, 247-3527. www.sowseardurango.com

T’S SMOKEHOUSE & GRILL

STARBUCKS COFFEE

TACO BELL

STEAMING BEAN COFFEE CO.

TACO BOY

Fresh-brewed coffee, mochas, Frappuccinos, lattes, pastries, bagels and more. Outdoor seating, weather permitting. Open daily, 6am. 6 Town Plaza, 247-4475; 311 W. College Dr., 382-2224; 3130 Main Ave., 259-0240; 2817 Main Ave., 382- 1783; 558 Main Ave., 375-1694. www.starbucks.com Popular internet café in the heart of downtown. Slow-roasted, smoked European beans for rich, smooth espresso drinks and coffees. Chai, teas, smoothies, frappes, burritos, bagels and pastries. Great lunch spot for fresh sandwiches, wraps, soups and pies. 900 Main Ave., 799-6299.

Fast becoming a local favorite with hickory-smoked barbecue, po’ boys, fresh-ground burgers, Creole fare. Newly renovated interior. Largest patio in downtown, with horseshoe pit and great views. Eat in, take out, delivery, catering. #3 Depot Pl., 259-6000. www.tssmokehouse.com Known for thinking “outside the bun.” Tacos, burritos, gorditas, Mexican pizza, chalupas, nachos, cheese roll-ups, quesadillas, taquitos, taco salad. Salsa, guacamole, sour cream, extra cheese, rice, beans. Daily, 9am–9:30pm; drive through ’til 10pm. 2902 Main Ave., 259 5588. www.tacobell.com Tacos, enchiladas, tamales, burritos, guacamole and chile rellenos, everyone’s favorite Mexican dishes now in the busy Three Springs neighborhood. Beer and wine. New “fast-casual” eatery seats nearly 100. Family operated by Silvia, Juan and Miguel Aguayo. Fresh, authentic Mexican food fast. Open daily, 7am. 150 Confluence Ave., Ste. 101C, 422-8399. www.tacoboydurango.com

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DINING GUIDE

Hola! For an authentic Mexican-food experience, Tequila’s is highly inventive; always surprising daily specials. Known for the town’s best margaritas. Wonderful food, drinks and great service. You won’t soon forget colorful Tequila’s. 948 Main Ave., 259-7655. www.tequilasco.com

THAI KITCHEN

Tucked in the Alpine Bank at 11th and Main, authentic Thai cuisine served daily, 11am– 9pm. Spring rolls, egg rolls, chicken satay, crab rangoon, wonton soup, chicken peanut salad, pad Thai noodles, fried rice, curry dishes, stir-frys. Eat in or carry out. 101 W. 11th St., Unit B100, 385-3903.

THREE PEAKS DELI & GRILL

Premier north side breakfast and lunch spot. Delicious house-cured meats, soup and mighty hand-pressed burgers. Local faves: grab-ngo breakfast or custom sandwiches, house-roasted Southwest turkey or the tasty Philly cheesesteak. Across from DHS, next to Durango Rapid Wash. 2411 Main Ave., 422-8204.

TOP THAT FROZEN YOGURT

WENDY’S OLD FASHIONED HAMBURGERS

Hot, juicy 100-percent-pure-beef burgers, savory chicken sandwiches, garden sensation salads, frosty shakes. Take out, eat in. Daily, 10am–10pm. Drive-through ’til midnight. 1840 Main Ave., 247 4505. www.wendys.com

WILDLIFE CAFÉ AT TURTLE LAKE REFUGE

Locally grown, wild-harvested, living-foods lunch every Tuesday and Friday, 11:11am–2:22pm. Soup, salad, entrée, dessert for suggested $15 donation. Raw, organic, vegetarian and vegan ingredients. Sharing the Victorian brick building with Rocky Mountain Retreat, the café entrance is in the back. Patio in summer; cozy, warm (greenhouse) second floor in winter. 848 E. Third Ave., 247-8395. www.turtlelakerefuge.org

YELLOW CARROT BISTRO

Modern dining from Sari Brown. Creative vegetarian choices: roasted cauliflower with kale rice; mango and coconut curry; Tomato Bombs with cabbage, raisins, caramel vinaigrette. Also, bisque, chowders, steaks, chicken, ribs, grits, burgers. Wednesday–Saturday, 5–8:30pm. Lodge at Tamarron, 382-6776.

Self-serve frozen yogurt at the corner of Main and College. Open daily, Noon–7pm, the shop offers multiple flavors of the delicious, healthy treat plus over 40 toppings to try. Sodas, bottled water and other refreshments. 600 Main Ave., Ste. 105, 970 442-8088. www.topthatfrozenyogurtdurango.com

YELLOW CARROT RESTAURANT & BAR

UPPER EAST SIDE COFFEE DELI

ZIA TAQUERIA

In the Grandview area. Gourmet coffee/espresso drinks, teas, bagels, breakfast sandwiches, burritos and fresh in-house baked goods. Hot, toasted lunch sandwiches and salads. Free Wi-Fi. Tuesday–Saturday from 6am-2pm, Sunday 6am-12pm. 28902 Hwy. 160 E., 385-5747.

Indiana Reed

TEQUILA’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT

Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, the Yellow Carrot has a new location. Fresh and creative, with all of Sari Brown’s delicious offerings. Menus and catering options available online. 3206 Main Ave. #1, 259- 3773. www.theyellowcarrot.com Fresh-Mex: burritos, quesadillas, tacos, beers and margaritas. Enchiladas, tamales, soups, fish tacos, salads, rice bowls. Specials, kids’ menu. Eat in, take out, catering. 11am–9pm, summer; open ’til 8pm, winter. Online ordering at ChowNow. Two locations: 400 S. Camino del Rio, 247-1002; 3101 Main Ave.; 247-3355. www.ziataqueria.com

IN MEMORY OF

GREG RYDER, WESTERN SINGER & GUITARIST 1951-2019

60


IT’S THE WINTER

THAT KEEPS ON GIVING Ron Martin

SILVERTON WILDFLOWERS BY MARGARET HEDDERMAN

As you climb higher into the mountains, you’ll notice that the landscape transforms into alpine tundra. This hardy yet delicate ecosystem comprises many of the most spectacular wildflowers and grasses in the region. It’s also easily destroyed by errant footsteps or tire tracks. Be sure to stick to the trail or road and avoid accidentally damaging the landscape. Also teach your children not to pick wildflowers—especially the blue columbine, Colorado’s state flower.

Ron Martin

Silverton sits in a long, rolling valley, overlooked by windswept mountaintops. It’s located just an hour north of Durango, over two scenic mountain passes. The high-alpine region is abundant with more than 150 species of wildflowers, many of which come to bloom at the height of summer. Keep an eye out for towers of purple delphiniums in early summer or violent bursts of magenta fireweed as fall approaches.

Scott Smith

It’s the winter that keeps on giving. After receiving record snowfall, the San Juan Mountains are expected to experience one of the best wildflower seasons in recent years. And what better place than Silverton to enjoy quilted meadows of columbine, paintbrush and sunflower? With ample backcountry trails and easy-to-access roadside pullovers, you’re bound to capture that perfect “Summer in the Rockies” photo.

Scott Smith

If you can’t decide where to start, stop by a local outfitter and grab a trail map. Silverton has some of the best trails and backcountry byways in the region—not to mention the most spectacular views—so choose a trailhead and get out there. DURANGO MAGAZINE

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S I L V E R T O N

SILVERTON YOUR BASECAMP FOR adventure #lifeat9318 | silvertoncolorado.com

COLORADO

SKIING • SNOWBOARDING • NORDIC TRAILS • ICE CLIMBING • FAT BIKING SNOWMOBILING • HIKING • 4 WHEELING • MOUNTAIN BIKING • CAMPING • FISHING

Silverton, Colorado Cracked Compass Photography

JOIN YOUR HEARTS IN THE HEART OF THE SAN JUAN MOUNTAINS

UNIQUE VENUES FOR THE PERFECT MOUNTAIN WEDDING Kendall Mountain ~ Historic Town Hall ~ Molas Lake ~ Memorial Park Gazebo

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www.silvertonweddings.com | 970-387-5522


C O L O R A D O

Luxury Lodging D&SNG Railroad Gift Shop & Ticket Office Restaurant & Live Entertainment Family Friendly, Full Bar 1219 Greene Street, Silverton, CO | 800.341.3340 | GrandImperialHotel.com


NEW MEXICO

Farmington CVB

FARMINGTON

Whether you’re looking for a one-of-a-kind off-road expedition, a hike at your own pace, an amazing outdoor photo shoot or a float down the Animas River, Farmington offers adventures for every skill set. September 5-9, visitors can enjoy Four Corners 4x4 Week with Fall Crawl trail rides, Eat My Dust Lunch, and Off-Road Downtown Takeover, then cap it off with the 2019 WE Rock Grand Nationals in famed Chokecherry Canyon. If hiking and photographing otherworldly landscapes is more your speed, discover the Bisti/De-Na-Zin Wilderness. These vast badlands will transport you to another planet— a place that was once a coastal swamp of an inland sea where dinosaurs roamed. Water opportunities abound, including swimming, paddle-boarding and kayaking at The Beach at Lake Farmington, and, opening this summer, Bisti Bay Water Park.

Farmington CVB

If you are a lover of the outdoors, or if you have an active family, Farmington, New Mexico, is the ideal place for you. Known for iconic landscapes and cultural treasures, it serves as the perfect basecamp for adventure. With a plethora of options for bikers, hikers, off-roaders and more, visitors will have an energized journey!

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DURANGO MAGAZINE

Farmington CVB

Farmington, New Mexico welcomes you! To discover more ways to Jolt Your Journey with us, visit: FarmingtonNM.org.


AZTEC:

WHERE THE SOUTHWEST MEETS THE ROCKIES Few places in North America offer the recreational splendor of the Four Corners, with whitewater rivers, water-carved canyons, moonscape badlands, expansive deserts and forested mountains. Helping to anchor this singular landscape in northwest New Mexico is Aztec, a vacation destination celebrated for its top-ranked mountain biking, premier fly-fishing and world-class hiking through the various surreal badlands, one of which Georgia O’Keeffe visited repeatedly over 14 years. Aztec’s attractive year-round weather makes it a place for travelers to venture and experience the great outdoors. Located in northwest New Mexico’s high-sierra desert, the region is also celebrated for its Aztec Ruins National Monument, Chaco Culture National Historical Park, and Mesa Verde National Park—all UNESCO World Heritage sites. Northern New Mexico is a land of immeasurable splendor, an expansive highdesert setting with river valleys, towering mountains and boulder-strewn canyons. And Aztec is at the center of it all. Visit us at: AztecNM.com

Kennan Harvey

NEW MEXICO


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DURANGO MAGAZINE


Jim Bommarito

CONTENTS: 68 70 72 76 81

FARMERS MARKET DURANGO KIDS REPURPOSED BUILDING DREAM HOME GIVING IN STYLE DURANGO MAGAZINE

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DURANGO FARMERS MARKET

KNOW FOOD BY MARGARET HEDDERMAN

Durango Farmers Market

It’s Saturday morning in Durango. The sun has crested over Raider Ridge, illuminating the old brick buildings of downtown. The sound of guitars and fiddles drifts toward Main Avenue like the smell of fresh bread from the oven. Locals and tourists follow the music to the Farmer’s Market, where brightly colored tents glow in the morning rays. Pops of tomato red, zucchini green, eggplant purple and corn yellow greet the eye. This is the essence of Durango’s vibrant and growing local food scene. With thirty agricultural vendors, in addition to numerous local artisans and food dealers, the Durango Farmer’s Market is the community’s primary hub for fresh, local food.

Yvonne Lashmett

KNOW FARMERS, “WE CAME TO FARMING BECAUSE WE REALLY WANTED TO FIND A CAREER THAT WE ENJOYED AND THAT PROVIDED THE LIFE AND LIFESTYLE WE WANTED,” SAYS HANA FULLMER OF TIERRA VIDA FARM. Tierra Vida Farm is situated on two acres beside the Florida River between Durango and Bayfield. Ms. Fullmer and her husband Daniel Fullmer specialize in developing and improving soil health as a method of producing nutrient rich vegetables. “Nutritionally dense food isn’t available in the same way it used to be,” Mr. Fullmer says. “In the health sphere, we talk about how people are overfed but undernourished,” adds Ms. Fullmer. “We’re getting the calories, but not the micronutrients.”

The Durango Farmer’s Market only features farmers and ranchers from the area’s surrounding five-county region. It ensures consumers find truly regional meat and produce, as well as get to know the people who grow their food. Despite the short growing season and often challenging weather events—think wildfires, dust storms, and blizzards—there is a strong local food community in the Durango area. 68

DURANGO MAGAZINE

Tierra Vida Farm

“We’re a grower’s market,” says market manager Melanie McKinney-Gonzales. “The vendors are the farmers and ranchers who are in the fields raising those livestock and planting and harvesting the crops.”


The Fullmers practice something known as regenerative agriculture, which aims to improve soil fertility by increasing biodiversity and cycling carbon back into the land. “Rather than being a carbon producer, we remove carbon and put it back into the soil,” Daniel explains. “It’s really become a high leverage point for us in affecting climate change.”

of mindset [from traditional beef], but that’s just how our program works.” James Ranch also produces a variety of artisan dairy products, pork and vegetables, available at both the Durango Farmer’s Market and at their on-site market. As the demand for local food increases, Durango restaurants are taking heed. Eolus Bar & Grill, Living Tree, and El Moro, among several others, source local, seasonal food for certain menu items. During the summer months, the Garden Terrace Cafe at Mercy Regional Health Center sources salad greens from Tierra Vida Farm. If you’re eating out in Durango, it’s likely you’ll find something local on the menu.

The process not only improves the quality of the land, but also produces healthier food. The Fullmers have seen a direct correlation between soil health, the quality of their

The greatest challenges inherent in raising livestock and growing produce in southwest Colorado aren’t always the most obvious. Yes, the Western Slope’s rugged climate offers challenges, but many growers say their biggest obstacles are more systemic—from the cost of land to a lack of distribution.

Tierra Vida Farm

“THE CONSTRAINT FOR MOST FARMERS IS NOT THEIR LAND OR PRODUCTION BUT THE ABILITY TO SELL BASED ON CONSUMER DEMAND,” DANIEL FULLMER SAYS.

produce, and anecdotal evidence from customers who say they feel healthier. While Tierra Vida Farm doesn’t display at the farmer’s market, they do have a popular CSA program that allows them to interact directly with their customers. This type of thoughtful, intentional farming is prevalent among Durango growers. North of town at the James Ranch, Jennifer Wheeling and her husband Joe manage the family business’s beef production. The James Ranch has been raising grass-fed and finished beef in the Animas Valley since the early 1990s. Jennifer’s father, Dave James, cultivated the natural grasses on their land, building a rich mixture of orchard grass, fescue and clover. They began rotating the herds to minimize the impact on the land and to provide their cattle with a constant supply of fresh grass. The process results in their juicy, richly marbled steaks. “From a traditional, beef standpoint, most animals are raised up and processed between 15 and 18 months old,” Jennifer says. “At a year, they’ll go to a feedlot and be pumped full of grain and steroids.” Because James Ranch cattle are raised entirely on grass and processed locally, they don’t receive hormone or antibiotic treatment. They also live longer. “In order to get fat onto their muscles, we have to hold our animals up to 26 months,” Jennifer says. “It’s a total shift

Despite the success of the farmer’s market, it can still be difficult to find local foods on a regular basis—especially for residents outside of town. “We’re looking to establish additional end-markets for our ag folks,” says Rachel Landis, director of The Good Food Collective. The new nonprofit is developing a viable “seconds” market for bruised or damaged produce, as well as organizing a system of volunteers to provide better distribution of regional foods, particularly among underserved communities. “It’s great that lots of us have access to healthy foods,” says Landis. “But there’s a sizable chunk of the population that doesn’t have access to sufficient nutrients.” Last year The Good Food Collective organized a regional food gleaning project to collect unused fruits and vegetables from farms, neighborhood gardens, and even backyard fruit trees. The group amassed over 10,000 pounds of otherwise unwanted produce and donated much of it to local food banks. “Eating healthy food shouldn’t be a privilege,” Landis adds. “It should be a right.” In the 30 years since they began promoting grass-fed beef, Jennifer Wheeling of James Ranch says that she’s seen a dramatic shift in the demand for local food. Nationwide, local food sales are up, and Durango is certainly making the most of that trend. However, many proponents believe that to establish a strong local food system in Durango, it will take the entire village. Are we up for the challenge? DURANGO MAGAZINE

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DURANGO KIDS

Grady James

DURANGO 5TH GRADERS ON WHY THEY LOVE DURANGO

PURGATORY IS A SKI RESORT

Jim Bommarito

NEAR DURANGO. YOU CAN STAY OVERNIGHT AT PURGATORY AND SKI THE NEXT DAY. ALSO, PURGATORY HAS A WIDE VARIETY OF SKI TRAILS. WHETHER YOU’VE SKIED ALL YOUR LIFE OR IT’S YOUR FIRST TIME, PURGATORY IS THE PLACE FOR YOU. IN ADDITION, DURANGO HAS OTHER AREAS TO SKI NEARBY. THEY ARE CALLED HESPERUS SKI AREA AND CHAPMAN HILL. HESPERUS HAS A SPECIAL FEATURE – NIGHT SKIING. CHAPMAN HILL IS AT A VERY CONVENIENT LOCATION, INSIDE THE TOWN. CHAPMAN HILL HAS A BEGINNER COURSE. IN DURANGO WE ALSO HAVE VERY GOOD CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING COURSES. FOR INSTANCE, ON TOP OF CHAPMAN HILL BY THE COLLEGE, PEOPLE WILL GROOM THE GOLF COURSE SO YOU CAN CROSS-COUNTRY SKI ON IT. DID YOU KNOW THAT YOU CAN CROSS-COUNTRY SKI AROUND A SMALL POND? ANOTHER PLACE TO CROSS-COUNTRY SKI IS THE NORDIC CENTER, WHERE YOU CAN RENT CROSS-COUNTRY SKI EQUIPMENT AND THEN GO TRY THE EQUIPMENT OUT ON THEIR AWESOME SKATE-SKIING TRAILS. THERE IS ALSO VALLECITO LAKE, WHERE YOU CROSS-COUNTRY SKI NEAR THE LAKE. IN CONCLUSION, YOU SHOULD COME TO DURANGO FOR OUR SKIING. – TILIA

DURANGO IS VERY HISTORIC. WE HAVE AN ANIMAS HISTORY MUSEUM, TRAIN, STRATER HOTEL, AND ON OUR RIVER TRAIL THERE ARE SIGNS THAT TELL ABOUT THE HISTORY OF THE SPECIFIC AREA. ALL IN ALL, DURANGO IS MY FAVORITE PLACE IN THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS. – ADRIA DURANGO HAS SOME EXTRAORDINARY VIEWS. IN THE FALL ALMOST ALL THE LEAVES TURN RED, ORANGE AND YELLOW. IN THE WINTER WHEN IT DOES SNOW IT LOOKS REALLY NICE WHEN YOU WAKE UP AND EVERYTHING IS DUSTED IN SNOW. IN THE SUMMER IT LOOKS NICE WHEN YOU DRIVE AROUND TOWN AND ALL THE TREES ARE GREEN AND THE SUN IS OUT. THEN THERE’S SPRING AND THE FLOWERS ARE BLOOMING AND THERE CAN BE CRABAPPLES GROWING ON TREES AND THE WEATHER IS USUALLY PRETTY NICE. – DYLAN

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DURANGO MAGAZINE

Kennan Harvey

Yvonne Lashmett

MOUNTAIN BIKING TRAILS

ARE A HUGE THING TO HAVE IN A SMALL MOUNTAIN TOWN BECAUSE THERE ARE SO MANY OF THEM. YOU GET TO RIDE ALL OVER DIFFERENT MOUNTAINS AND THERE ARE A VARIETY OF SHXOPS WHERE YOU CAN EITHER BUY OR FIX UP YOUR BIKE. FOR INSTANCE, IF YOU WERE RIDING ON A TRAIL AND NEEDED TO FIX UP YOUR MOUNTAIN BIKE VERY QUICKLY YOU COULD JUST STOP INTO A NEARBY BIKE SHOP. – GARRETT


Paul Pennington

Hank Blum

Kennan Harvey

IN DURANGO THERE ARE SOME AMAZING NATIONAL PARKS. THERE IS MESA VERDE, WHICH IS PRECISELY WHAT THE NAME IMPLIES: BEAUTIFUL GREENERY ON TOP OF A MESA, WITH ALCOVES CARVED OUT BY YEARS OF TRICKLING WATER, AND FINISHED WITH SOME ANCIENT ANCESTRAL PUEBLOAN DWELLINGS PAINFULLY MADE BY HAND, NESTLED IN ALMOST EVERY ALCOVE BIG ENOUGH FOR THEM TO BE SHELTERED. IN ADDITION TO MESA VERDE, THERE IS ALSO AZTEC RUINS, CHACO CANYON, CHIMNEY ROCK AND MORE. – RUBY

Kennan Harvey

ANOTHER REASON THAT MAKES DURANGO AN AWESOME PLACE TO BE IS THE

NARROW GAUGE RAILROAD

THAT GOES FROM DURANGO TO SILVERTON. IT’S AN AMAZING EXPERIENCE. THERE’S NOTHING LIKE SITTING IN A TRAIN CART AND WATCHING THE MILES GO PAST AND HOW BEAUTIFUL IT IS ON THE TRAIN. THERE IS NOTHING LIKE THE VIEWS THAT YOU SEE WHILE YOU ARE IN A TRAIN CAR. – MIKAEL THE REASON I LIKE LIVING IN DURANGO IS BECAUSE IT GETS LOTS OF SNOW WHICH INCLUDES LOTS OF ACTIVITIES LIKE SKIING AND FUN GAMES IN THE SNOW. MY FAVORITE ACTIVITY IS SKIING BECAUSE IT’S SOFT SNOW. ADDITIONALLY IT IS SO PRETTY WHEN YOU ARE HAVING FUN SKIING. WE HAVE A REALLY FUN SKI RESORT. PURGATORY IS A FABULOUS SKI RESORT BECAUSE IT IS A GREAT PLACE FOR EVERYONE. THEY HAVE RUNS FOR SKIERS OF EVERY LEVEL. – WYNN

Scott Smith

Scott Smith

PEOPLE LIKE DURANGO BECAUSE THERE ARE

MANY GREAT PLACES FOR HUNTING AND FISHING. MANY PEOPLE COME FROM ALL OVER THE FOUR CORNERS JUST TO HUNT AND FISH DURANGO’S AWESOME FORESTS, LAKES AND RIVERS. DURANGO’S FORESTS HAVE SOME OF COLORADO’S BIGGEST BULL ELK, AND REALLY BIG DEER. DURANGO HAS MANY LAKES AND RIVERS THAT HAVE HUGE FISH. ALSO DURANGO HAS A WIDE VARIETY OF FISH SUCH AS BROWN TROUT, RAINBOW TROUT, CUTTHROAT TROUT, BROOK TROUT AND KOKANEE SALMON. DURANGO ALSO HAS MANY AWESOME HIKES. YOU CAN GO ON SOME SHORT HIKES OR ON A LONG HIKE. DURANGO HAS A SWEET SETUP OF PLACES TO GO ON A HIKE. THERE ARE DESERT HIKES SUCH AS RAIDER RIDGE OVERLOOK AND THERE ARE HIGH MOUNTAIN HIKES SUCH AS ENGINEER MOUNTAIN. – BRADY DURANGO HAS GOOD LAKES, A FUN TRAIN AND COFFEE SHOPS. FOR INSTANCE, DURANGO HAS LEMON LAKE, LAKE NIGHTHORSE AND VALLECITO LAKE. LAKE NIGHTHORSE HAS GOOD BOATING BECAUSE NEAR THE DOCK IS DEEP SO YOU WOULDN’T SCRAPE THE BOTTOM OF YOUR BOAT ON THE ROCKS. SECONDLY, YOU SHOULD COME ON THE TRAIN AT CHRISTMAS FOR THE POLAR EXPRESS. THEY HAVE HOT CHOCOLATE AND COOKIES. THE TRAIN GOES ALL THE WAY TO SILVERTON AND BACK TO DURANGO AND YOU GO THROUGH THE SAN JUAN NATIONAL FOREST. – KEVYN DURANGO MAGAZINE

71


footwear on the inside, creates a pretty unique shopping experience.” Durango Outdoor Exchange celebrates five years in business this year, but the store could easily never have happened. Durango did not have a consignment shop like it at the time, and it was only after visiting a friend’s store in Carbondale that Jen and Chase developed the idea to start their own. Jen had experience working for small businesses, and Chase had a more corporate background. Putting their skills together, they realized they were capable of making it work. And they knew Durango was ripe for such a store. Lisa Mackey

“WE KNEW THERE WAS A LOT OF GEAR SITTING AROUND IN STORAGE. PEOPLE UPGRADE BECAUSE WE’RE ALL SO PASSIONATE ABOUT THE OUTDOORS,” JEN SAYS. “The environmental impact of being able to reuse that gear, or get it back in action before it ages out in the garage, is an aspect we’re passionate about.” Here’s how the store works: Anyone can bring new or used gear to the shop. Functional items that the store accepts are sold on consignment, meaning that the previous owners get paid when their items sell. Sometimes Chase and Jen even see the same gear come back into the store time and time again, because the consignment model is a great way to try out a new sport without investing massive amounts up front in new equipment.

DURANGO OUTDOOR EXCHANGE

REPURPOSED A BUILDING BY ZACH HIVELY

The region’s one-stop consignment shop for adventure gear is Durango Outdoor Exchange. Here, shoppers find in-season gems of all kinds—from kayaks and snowshoes to jackets and boots—that have been given another chance at life. Now, owners Jen and Chase LaCroix are carrying their guiding philosophy of repurposing used gear into the store itself. They’ve just opened a new location at 3677 Main Ave., starting a new chapter in an old Pizza Hut building.

A lot of locals rely on Durango Outdoor Exchange both for their own purchases and for clearing out their closets. It’s a great destination for visitors, too, because many travelers don’t always have the right clothing for the adventures they want to take—whether that’s an extreme backpacking trip or a walk down the Animas River Trail. “We want to provide a place where everyone is comfortable and everyone is helped and accepted and excited to get outdoors,” Jen says. For years, the store thrived on College Drive near downtown Durango. But the couple decided to move locations to improve the experience for customers, from the parking lot to the sales floor.

“RESTORING A PIZZA HUT TO CREATE A RETAIL ENVIRONMENT WAS A CHALLENGE,” CHASE SAYS.

DURANGO MAGAZINE

Durango Outdoor Exchange

72

Lisa Mackey

“People know what the Pizza Hut architecture looks like. To have paddleboards and bikes and skis displayed outside on our retail patio, and to have used gear and clothing and


THE ONLY QUESTION WAS WHERE TO GO? Jen and Chase looked at existing buildings, and they considered building on empty land. Some options fell through, and others simply didn’t feel right. Then they describe a moment when it all came together.

Lisa Mackey

“We were looking at an empty piece of property with the Agave Construction developers, and we were talking through the idea of building new from the ground up, which was really intimidating,” Jen says. “Then there was this Pizza Hut location. Mark Williamson [of Agave] said, ‘This is what you guys do: repurpose and reuse.’ And we said, ‘Yeah, let’s stick with that intention and turn this unused piece into a really exciting new property.’” The location of the Pizza Hut on North Main also excited—and challenged—the LaCroix tribe. Jen acknowledges that the North Main district was, for a long time, not considered the place to go. But there’s a revitalization happening on the north side of town, she says, and she’s thrilled to be on the ground level of that effort. Plus, Chase points out, the location is on the way to many of the area’s prime recreational locations, such as Purgatory Resort and the San Juan Skyway.

1973’s original build, uncovered by the remodeling team. “They’d covered them up during a 1987 remodel,” he explains. “These corner windows have the slanted cut to them that you still see throughout California but not so much here in the Rocky Mountains. We thought, wow, this is a real gem to preserve and showcase. A lot of people are commenting, ‘I like that you put in those corner windows,’ but in reality they were there, and we just really accented them and played to their strength.”

The architecture of the building itself, though, is perhaps the most engaging aspect of the new location. “We tried to carry over [from the old location] as much of the character as possible,” Chase says. “We also have this somewhat iconic architecture. It has plenty of parking and plenty of retail space. We met with Agave Construction to get their two cents on the potential for the layout, and we got really excited after talking with them and realizing that this was a perfect remodel for our business.”

The old structure has definitely been a topic of conversation, ever since the new location opened in April. And the move is a thrilling next step for Durango Outdoor Exchange. But the new location has not distracted Jen and Chase from what their business is really all about.

Don’t expect a pizza buffet line on the inside—but there are plenty of touches that Durango Outdoor Exchange is preserving or modifying from the building’s past life. The emblematic rooftop, of course, still sits atop the shop. The original freezers turned out to be load-bearing, so they are now functioning as storage for the business. And one of Chase’s favorite features are the corner windows from

DURANGO MAGAZINE

Lisa Mackey

Durango Outdoor Exchange

“Our goal is to provide access to adventure,” Jen says. “And we really try to get to know our customers and our consigners. The relationships we’ve been able to make with people have been the most fun for us, for sure.”

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DREAM HOME

DURANGO DREAM HOME

255 ELK RIDGE LANE BY GRAHAM COFFEY

IMAGINE WAKING ON A BEAUTIFUL DURANGO MORNING. The natural light of the

coming sunrise begins working its way into your living room as you sip your coffee and look out from your home. As the sleep melts from your eyes, the sun works its way over the cold spires of the La Plata Mountains, continues downward onto the blocked ridge of Perins Peak, and finally hits the beautiful Animas River Valley below as you take full advantage of the 270-degree views you enjoy from your home. Sound like a dream? Well, the skilled and award-winning custom home creators at Kogan Builders in Durango have made it a reality at 255 Elk Ridge Lane. Sitting atop a bluff on just over 6.5 acres, the 4,459-square-foot 4-bedroom, 4.5-bath split-level home was designed to blend into the ridgeline. While it might be low profile, it’s high on luxury and packed with amenities. On approach, one notices how the 76

DURANGO MAGAZINE


entertaining or sitting in silence while enjoying the views from the floor-to-ceiling windows. The room also features two sets of multiple sliding-glass stacked doors that bring the outside in and completely open to the rear deck that stretches along the entire length of the home. Additionally, the integrated Sonos sound system that reaches throughout the home is the perfect tool to help set the mood for the evening.

exterior landscaping by Advanced Designs Land and Waterscapes blends with the cedar siding and metal seam roof to create an inviting feeling. That sensation is only heightened when entering the home. With a Telluride stacked-stone wall on one side and cedar planks on the other, the foyer is luxurious but casual. That theme of refined relaxation is carried into the great room. With its white oak flooring, asymmetrical floor-toceiling woodburning stone fireplace and cedar ceilings with exposed steel I-beams, the room is perfect for

If preparing dinner while entertaining, the open kitchen is a perfect place to chat while whipping up something delicious. The leathered granite island is a natural gathering spot for guests, while the quartz countertops provide plenty of space for meal preparation. The Italian Carrara marble backsplash, stretching from the countertops to the ceiling, makes the space feel light and airy. Would you rather be outdoors? The front patio features lounge seating and a built-in barbecue area that is the perfect space for a summertime cookout. The house was designed to bring in natural light, and the white oak flooring running throughout soaks it in to continue bringing a rustic yet warm feeling. When the sun goes down, LED lighting provides the perfect level of illumination. The home also features a three-car garage with an attached mudroom. The mudroom has DURANGO MAGAZINE

77


custom built-in cabinets and storage with a sink and dog wash for when the day’s adventures get messy for you and your best friend. For times that call for work instead of play, the home features two offices. The playroom is a perfect space for children to explore their imaginations while the adults work. Relax after completing work or adventures by returning to the great room or enjoying the second woodburning fireplace in the hearth room. For days that really take a toll, curl up in the master bedroom, where a glass of wine can be enjoyed by the warmth of the modern stone-tile gasribbon fireplace. Whether relaxing or entertaining, the thoughtful design of this mountain contemporary home from Kogan Builders ensures that you will be surrounded by beauty and luxury at all times.

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DURANGO MAGAZINE


BOUTIQUE VACATION RENTAL HOMES & STUDIOS CASADURANGO.COM HOLLY JASON 970-749-9636

DURANGO MAGAZINE

79


DD A I NVIENRT G G I SUEIR D EI N D E X 2180 Lighting & Design Studio.......................................74 A Shared Blanket..........................................................16 Alpine Heli Tours..........................................................47 Animas Chocolate & Coffee...........................................58 Animas Eyecare............................................................47 Animas Museum...........................................................27 Animas Trading Company..............................................16 Art Supply House..........................................................26 Aspen Design Studio.....................................................75 Aztec Chamber of Commerce.........................................65 Backcountry Experience................................................17 Bank of the San Juans..................................................80 Bar D Chuckwagon.......................................................53 Basin Printing................................................................9 The Benson..................................................................63 The Bent Elbow............................................................62 Brown’s Shoe ..............................................................16 Casa Durango...............................................................79 Center of Southwest Studies.........................................32 Closets Plus................................................................74 Colorado Cannabis Discovery Center..............................19 Colorado Grow Company.............................................. 19 Community Cosncert Hall.............................................35 Crow’s Closet...............................................................21 Durango Arts Center.....................................................35 Durango Craft Spirits....................................................53 Durango Organics.........................................................41 Durango Nursery..........................................................74 Earthen Vessel...............................................................7 Eolus..........................................................................56 The Fallen Angel...........................................................20 Genesis Land and Waterscapes.....................................75 Grand Imperial Hotel.....................................................63 Himalayan Kitchen.......................................................54 Horsefly History Tours..................................................27 Inside Ideas.................................................................79 Jack’s.........................................................................55 James Ranch...............................................................57 Kelly’s Cowboy Company...............................................27 Kogan Builders, Inc......................................................82 Living Solar..................................................................75 Maria’s Bookshop.........................................................21 Molas Lake Campground...............................................63 Music in the Mountains.................................................35 Nature’s Oasis..............................................................60 Old hundred Gold Mine Tour..........................................62 Olde Tyme’s Café..........................................................59 Parade of Homes.................................Inside Back Cover Pleasant Journey Alpacas.............................................27 Prohibition Herb...........................................................46 Purgatory.............................................Inside Front Cover River Liquors................................................................58 Rocky Mountain Chocolate Company.............................21 Re-Love Consign & Design............................................16 Salt 360 Float Studio....................................................79 San Juan Symphony......................................................35 Scenic Aperture............................................................20 Silver Summit RV.........................................................63 Silverton Soapbox........................................................62 Silverton Summer Sounds.............................................31 Soaring Tree Top Adventures............................Back Cover Southern Ute Museum..................................................34 Southwest Vapor..........................................................41 The Sparrow................................................................20 Sky Ute Casino..............................................................1 Stitch..........................................................................21 Tippy Canoe.................................................................20 Toh-Atin Gallery.............................................................7 Town of Silverton..........................................................62 Two Bears Farm...........................................................26 Urban Market...............................................................17 Westwood Culligan.......................................................80 80

DURANGO MAGAZINE


CELEBRATING A NEW SEASON AND COCKTAILS WITH THE CONDUCTOR!

MUSIC IN THE MOUNTAINS - About 85 classical-music lovers

attended “Cocktails with the Conductor,” the traditional kickoff event benefitting Music in the Mountains, on Saturday, April 6, at Sorrel Sky Gallery. Attendees were the first to hear about the much-anticipated 33rd festival season programs and soloists in the new home venue in the Community Concert Hall at Fort Lewis College. Music in the Mountains’ own Music Director and Conductor, Guillermo Figueroa, was on hand to unveil the season. Music in the Mountains is a three-week classical-music festival, with musicians of the highest caliber. Their mission is to entertain, educate and delight audiences with the richness of classical music, and to complement concerts with year-round educational programs for local youth. While sipping signature martinis called “The Quintet,” designed by David Woodruff of El Moro, or an opulent glass of wine provided by Stan and Alice Crapo of Star Liquors, and indulging in delicious hors d’oeuvres by Hot Tomatoes and sumptuous pots de crème provided by Animas Chocolate Company, guests actively bid in a live auction for the chance to host their own event with world-renowned musicians. Winning bidders will host Festival Orchestra musicians in the privacy of their own living room or backyard during this coming July season! The beautiful atmosphere of Sorrel Sky Gallery was the perfect place to kick off the 2019 Music in the Mountains’ season and reveal this year’s festival artwork, Legato! by artist Maura Allen. Ms. Allen was in attendance and talked to the audience about her process and inspiration for the conductor’s silhouette design and colorful graphics. Music in the Mountains is a fully integrated festival of orchestra and chamber music. Its year-round Music in the Mountains Goes to School program reaches thousands of elementary and secondary school students in the Four Corners region through hands-on instruction and free concerts. Ticket sales generate less than 20 percent of total revenue. Music in the Mountains is a 501(c)(3) corporation and is supported through contributions from foundations, businesses and individuals, locally, regionally and nationally.

Photos Julie Dunn Brown

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Durango Magazine - Summer/Fall 2019 Issue  

Durango Magazine is for people who love Durango. With award-winning excellence in design and a high-quality, standard-size magazine format,...

Durango Magazine - Summer/Fall 2019 Issue  

Durango Magazine is for people who love Durango. With award-winning excellence in design and a high-quality, standard-size magazine format,...