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Tennessee State University EDCI 4190: Technology in the Schools

Technology Integration Booklet Dr. Nicole Kendall, Fall 2012

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Purpose: This booklet was developed by teacher education candidates enrolled in EDCI 4190- Technology in the Schools at Tennessee State University. These students seek to provide a service to their future colleagues through their understanding on technology as a beneficial resource in today’s classroom. Within our global society, digital learners seek opportunities to expand their knowledge beyond textbooks, worksheets, and other traditional resources.

Technology is a familiar tool to students whether used for educational or entertainment purposes. It is likely that teachers are not as equipped with materials that incorporate technology effectively in the curriculum. The contributors of this resource guide hope to assist other practitioners with promoting critical thinking, instructional engagement, and curricular enhancements through effective technology integration. The activities support Tennessee curriculum standards, ISTE 2008 technology principles, and TSU’s seven knowledge, skills, and dispositions for teacher education majors. Each student packet includes the following six (6) projects: Wordle, a unit rationale (with links to their website, Glogster, and tutorial video), technology-based lesson plan, opening unit commercial, Tell’em in 10 PowerPoint notes (with three active strategies), and WebQuest.

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Contributors:

Audrey Deberry “This technology class has taught me a lot when it comes to using it inside a classroom. The activities that I have encountered I will be sure to use them in my own classroom. I would recommend anybody to take this course because there were lots of new ideas you can implement not only in the class setting but outside of the classrooms. It was a tough journey but I have learned from it and gotten threw it.”

Crystal Donaldson “From the beginning of the semester to present, I have gained more technological skills than ever before. Skills and documents that were discussed through the duration of the semester will be implemented in many ways in reference to a 21st century learning environment.”

Lexi Knoch “In this course, I have really grown and learned so much about how to use technology in my classroom. There is so much more to do than just use PowerPoint or read from the book, and I don’t think I would have learned this if it weren’t for this course. At the beginning I didn’t know what to expect; I assumed it would be a basic computer science class on how to use computer skills in the classroom. I’m glad I was wrong. I now know of countless ways to use my iPad in the classroom, as well as iPods and even my phone. I can encourage students to use technology in a productive way so that they will be willing to learn. I have really come a long way from just using my iPad for books and surfing the web- I now know that I can use it for roll, interactive ebooks, lesson planning, grade books, and so much more.”

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Abby Spaziani “After taking Technology in School I have become way more aware of the enhancement technology can bring to an average lesson. By learning different styles of technology I can incorporate into my lessons can help dramatically then before. Technology offers podcasting, games, applications, Youtube, Teachertube, and so many other ways for use in a lesson plan. Personally, I am not too good at technology. I did not know half of this stuff was even possible for technology to do. This class has taught me a great amount of technology that I do plan on using when I reach my goal of educating.”

Lacy Turner “Technology can either hinder or help an instructor. As I’ve taken this course, I learned very quickly that incorporating technology into teaching is a time consuming process. Options are vast and difficult to narrow down, but media can add to a student and teacher’s overall learning experience. This course has allowed me to identify tools that I can implement in my daily instruction to offer well rounded and student centered instruction that meets the various needs of multiple learning styles.”

Erin Wolf “As a technologically savvy individual, upon entering this course I was convinced there was not much it could offer me, and to be completely honest I thought it would be an absolute breeze. Although this class has been anything but easy, considering the extensive amount of coursework, it has most certainly been a worthwhile learning experience and each assignment has proven to be an important part of that experience. This class has be a source of a number of invaluable resources that I will use, not only to enhance my student’s education when I enter the classroom as a professional, but also that I have already used as a student throughout the semester in my other courses.”

Kanisha Young “In this class, I have learned an abundance of resources to use in my quest to become a teacher. From the very beginning this class has kept me engaged, and on my toes. I've learned that assignments are not just a onetime deal, that I should always try my best to give the best quality work.”

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Author

Grade Level

Deberry, Audrey

K

Young, KaNisha

Wolf, Erin

Turner, Lacy

Donaldson, Crystal

6

8

10

Knoch, Lexi

Reading

2

4

Spaziani, Abigail

Table of Contents Subject/Content Area

11

Math

Reading

Science

English

Biology

Government

Description

In this unit, we will be learning about various literary and media genres in reading. Kindergarten students need to find out how to navigate through each kind of text to find the information they seek In this 2nd grade unit, we will be introducing operations and algebraic thinking. Second grade students need to learn operations and algebraic thinking because it allows them to make generalizations, and use mathematical symbols to represent mathematical ideas. In this fourth grade unit, we will be focusing on reading comprehension and interpretation through a unit on Judy Blume’s Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing. It is imperative that fourth grade students learn to comprehend and interpret in order to derive some understanding of what the writer is trying to convey and to make use of that information. The purpose of this unit is for the study of energy. There are various types of energy that the students will expect to learn. Along with the different types of energy students will learn the comparisons and contrasts of each type of energy. This eight grade English unit is focused on critical thinking, analysis and the identification of logical fallacies. Eight grade students need to be introduced to logical fallacies and develop skills to identify them so that they are able to use these skills in everyday life as well as in other studies. In this unit, we will be learning about the essential compounds and processes for living organisms. Ninth grade Biology students should be able to understand specific functions their bodies carry out for the continuation of life. In this 11th grade Government unit, students will be learning about the United States Constitution and what went into writing it. The problem that most students face is that they believe the Founding Fathers sat down and came up with these ideals on their own.

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21

34

49

71

85

94

Service Learning Ideas

106

Media Share Resources

110

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Audrey DeBerry Wix Portfolio: Unit of study proposal: Reading Appreciation In this unit, we will be learning about various literary and media genres in reading. Kindergarten students need to find out how to navigate through each kind of text to find the information they seek. Students will look into literary and media genres. Students will be able to identify different genres of books. Based on the knowledge they have acquired they will then be able to create their own book based on a specific genre of literature. What is poetry? What is a fairytale? What is the difference between fiction and nonfiction? Students need to be provided with different activities that describe each genre of books to help develop their own interest in reading and writing, also develop skills in using the library and selecting appropriate materials. Experiencing genres of books is important for a child to comprehend. In order for a student’s reading level to expand they must comprehend and learn the differences of each literary genre. Begin to experience various literary and media genres are expectations covered under Tennessee Reading Standard 1.13. K.1.13: Begin to experience various literary and media genres. a. Explore picture books b. Explore alphabet books c. Explore Mother Goose rhymes and others rhyming d. Explore storybooks e. Explore fairytales f. Explore poetry g. Explore lyrics to song h. View various media genres (posters, pictures, photos, film) i. Sequence event in a story (using books, video, films) Web 2.0 Projects Glogster URL: http://ain1996.edu.glogster.com/the-magical-world-of-reading Opening Commercial: This file is listed as KReadingCommercial.wav in the media folder. Unit Video: This file is listed as KReadingGenresVideo.avi in the media folder.

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(Your)Tales through Technology Name: Audrey DeBerry Duration of Lesson: 50mins

Subject Area(s): Reading/Technology Grade Level: Kindergarten

Context for Learning: (Attention to students’ backgrounds, interests, and needs) The Kindergarten class at Bordeaux Elementary Enhanced Option School in Nashville, Tennessee, is comprised of 18 students; 12 females and 6 males. The classroom ages range from 5 to 6 years of age. Student diversity consists of two Whites, one Hispanic, and fifteen African-American students. Of the 18 students, 13 are on free or reduce lunch. The remaining 17 students live in the surrounding area. One student is homeless and is living in a car. The previous year her dad died, who was paying all of the bills. Her mother couldn’t seek work so they lost the house. The 18 students living in the surrounding area, 12 are in a lower socio- economic level. Nine percent of the students in this particular classroom have an IEP. One came from Cumberland Life Skills and is working on letter and number recognition and writing. The student must be supplied with other work and/or lead through each assignment and assessment orally. The second student has a developmental delay but has the ability to do all class work. The student may do better on assessments and assignments if each are read orally. Each student with an IEP is in and out of the classroom twice a day for resource. Two other students receive additional tutoring in reading three times a week.

State and Technology Standard(s) K.1.13 Begin to experience various literary and media genres. ISTE(s) #1. Creativity and Innovation Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology. ISTE(s) #2. Communication and Collaboration Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others. Lesson Objective: The students will read The Three Little Pigs, and create their own scenario of the story.

Behavioral Objectives

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Given the opportunity to listen to the read aloud story, The Three Little Pigs, the learners will participate in a discussion on a piece of literary genre. Understanding that fairytales are fictional stories arranged in a particular sequential order provides students with the ability to construct knowledge of a fairytale. Students will be in a grouped creating their own story and picture based off the story The Three Little Pigs. Each group will comprehend the knowledge of a sequence. Each group will have certain part of the story including the beginning, middle, and end. Given existing knowledge, the learner will create their own fairytale, in order to demonstrate creativity and innovations. Students will be able to communicate creating their own audio book that correlates with the story The Three Little Pigs. Students will be also creating a picture for the sequence their story represents. Students will record their voice through Audacity and as a whole we will create a PowerPoint representing the story. Students should comprehend and use vocabulary learned in the lesson. Language Objectives: Given the terms on the whiteboard, students will be able to exemplify the terms literature, fiction, non-fiction, picture, presentation and comprehension. Students will be able to identify the technology terms; 1. Computer 2. Microphone 3. Digital camera. 4. Projector 5. Mouse 6. Keyboard These terms are gadgets that the students must operate while doing their audio book. Students will be able to comprehend the meanings of these terms through lesson when they apply to their independence practice. The students will be able to construct a story appropriately and understand a books concept.

Formative Assessment (Process): During the activity, I will observe students’ participation, creativity and understanding of the assignment. While observing, I should notice students designing their picture and writing their story outline rehearsing their story aloud practicing for their audio recording. During observations, I will have a chart in my hand displaying each group member. Students that understand the assignment, creating their pictures and is writing and going over their story will receive a plus sign. For the students that are creating their pictures and lacking participating in the written and/or oral section will receive an asterisk mark. Students that are not participating in any of the assignment components will receive a minus sign. I will assist to any student with questions and concerns about the assignment and the technological feature of the creation. Before the students record their audio, I will ask each group to give me a brief summary of their story. This will allow me to prove students are on the right path towards completion of the assignment. Also this will give the students the opportunity to receive feedback on their audio book acknowledging if they are completing the assignment correctly or if they will need to make revision on their creation.

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Summative Assessment (Product): Once each group has completed their audio book, the students will present in class. I will grade each group on their structure, speech skills, and their creativity. Once the audio book has been reviewed and graded, I will present students with their grades. For students that have speech and reading problems, I will grade them lightly with ease. There will be no modifications for the usage of structure, speech, creativity.

Materials Materials for Curriculum Paper Crayons Markers(Dry erase) Book( The Three Little Pigs) Pencil Chart Whiteboard/

Materials for Technology Laptop or Desktop Computer (4) Internet Connection Access to Audacity.com Microsoft(PowerPoint) Digital Camera Projector Microphones

Procedures: Time Learning Activities –Teacher Learning Activities - Students Purpose ****Use numbers to sequence procedures and align Time, Learning Activity and Purpose in each column. 2min. Anticipatory Set: 1. Students will be seated and give their 1. To give students a visual 1. The teacher will being displaying the audio undivided attention to the listening of the example of what they will be doing book I have created about animals and other audio book. for this activity. random things. 2. This will allow students to engage and give 2. Allows students to think if they 2. The teacher will ask the students have they feedback from the audio book they just have every displayed this action. ever recorded themselves talking or reading. listened to. 3. Allows students to think if they 3. This allows for students to think and have 3. The teacher will ask have they ever created have ever performed this task. their own story before. an open discussion on creating and the writing 4. Allows students to recognize of their own story. 4. The teacher will inform students that today what they will be doing for this they will be performing both task on the story of 4. This will give students and idea of what activity.

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8min.

The Three Little Pigs. Presentation/Explicit Instruction: 5. The teacher will ask students to recover the story The Three Little Pigs. 6. The teacher will read aloud the story. 7. The teacher will instruct to record vocabulary terms down onto their paper as the story is being read.

activity they will be doing today. 5. Students will move quietly to the carpet. 6. Students will listen to the teacher read the story to them. 7. Students will go write their vocabulary terms down.

8min.

Structured Practice/Exploration: 8. After the completion of the book, students will be grouped off brainstorming and writing ideas down that they will include into their audio book. 9. The teacher will walk around and ask questions to see if students understand. 10. The teacher will instruct students to move to their computer stations. 11. The teacher will demonstrate to students how to record their voice onto the computer and they will be able to practice this act. 12. The teacher will give the each group a digital camera to take a picture of their art design that goes with their part of the story. 13. The teacher will inform students that they 15min. should include examples of their vocabulary into their story and be creative. Guided Practice/Feedback: 14. Before the students record their audio book, the teacher will ask each group to give me a brief summary of their story. 15. The teacher will observe the students participation at the computers to see if they are using the computers correctly. 16. The teacher will assists to any student with

8. Students are to jot down what they will say in their story. 9. Students will ask questions or demonstrate that they understand. 10. Students are to quietly move to their selected computer station. 11. The students will listen to the instructions on how to record their voices and practice doing so. 12. Students are to take a picture of their picture that represents their part of the story. 13. Students are to listen to instructions and begin their audio book.

14. The students are to explain their portion of the story and give a thorough explanation of their story. 15. Students will demonstrate their understanding of the computer. They will ask

5. Allows students to prepare themselves for interactive reading. 6. This gives the students a better understand of The Three Little Pigs and formulate ideas. 7. Allows students to know what vocabulary they will be using in this lesson. 8. This allows students to have information ready before moving to the technology potion. 9. This allows students to verify that they understand the giving instructions and content of the activity. 10. This allows students to have structure before the nest part of the assignment. 11. Gives instruction and knowledge on how to record their story. 12. Allows students to capture their art in another view. 13. Gives students instructions of what to be expected of their creation.

14. To let students know if they are effecting the assignment correctly.

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questions and concerns about the assignment and the technological feature of the creation. 15min. Independent Practice/Application: 17. The teacher will I will notify the students that they will create their own audio book that they would like to display to the class on a topic of their choice.

questions if they don’t understand how to work the computer. 16. Students are to ask questions if confused about what is expected of them in this activity or if having troubles with the computer. 17. The students to create their own audio book of the topic of their choice for homework. Students will have until the following week to complete this assignment.

15. To verify if students are understand and are engaged in the activity. 16. Allows students to get a better understanding in using the computer. 17. This allows students to have independent practice and have the opportunity to create a book of their choice.

Modifications: Give the fact that I want to create an inclusive environment, I will make accommodations for my IEP students. For the one student that came from Cumberland Life Skills, she would need assistance when making up her story because of her difficulties with letter recognition and writing skills. For the student with the developmental delay he can get his assignments done, he will just need assistance from the teacher so he can clearly understand your instructions. For my ELL students I would use a translation app of The Three Little Pigs for his dominate language. I would also find pictures that tell the story of the specific book. If the laptop computers fail in the classroom, I will then move the class to the library’s computer station. If all computers are down in the school, I will allow students to draw their own picture book. Students will all receive miniature tape recorders and will be able to use this device to record their parts to the story.

2min. Closure: I will close this activity by allowing students to share what they learned about The Three Little Pigs today. The class will discuss their experience with creating their own storyline to the book. What influenced them to create a story and the creation of their picture? Did they exemplify their vocabulary terms? Was it difficult using technology? I will end the class by having them listen to their story through the PowerPoint.

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Rhymes Through Time

Designed by: Audrey Ain DeBerry Based on the state of Tennessee curriculum standards for Kindergarten Reading GLE K.1.13 Begin to experience various literary and media genres. c. Explore Mother Goose Rhymes and other rhyming books. Introduction

Task

Process

Evaluation

Conclusion

Credits

Introduction Mother Goose Day is May 1st. Mother goose is wandering into town next week to make a special delivery. Your school has been selected to host a Rhyming Carnival for Mother Goose. Rhyming is a great way to use words in songs, poetry, and stories. You are expected to be an expert on Mother Goose rhymes. When you have completed all tasks, you will receive a golden egg to the Rhyming Carnival. Have fun and good luck!!!!!

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Task In order to get prepared for this event, you will need to prepare yourself to become “An Expert Rhyming Singer”. You will have several tasks to complete in a week in order to receive your golden egg to the carnival. So put on your boots, it’s time to explore!

Your duty, as the expert is to:  Choose your rhyming singer partners. Each group will be assigned a parent helper.  Click on the links to learn the words and tunes of rhymes.  Click on the links to learn about costume design and come dressed as your favorite nursery rhyme character.  Take the Mother Goose online Quiz.  Click on the links to print out Mother Goose coloring pages.  Describe your favorite mother goose character through writing, illustrations, and character portrayal.

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Process

Monday: Step 1- Choose your rhyming partners. Fill out the group form. You can get a form from Ms. DeBerry or click to print out form. Step 2- Hear rhymes read by Mother Goose. Hear rhymes read by Mother Goose’s helpers.

Tuesday: Step 3- Print 2 rhyme sequence pages from Mother Goose’s Helpers. Print in order and retell the story in your own words. Step 4- You can use your own paper or print out from here.

OR Step 5- print out Mother Goose color pages. Retell the rhymes in your own words.

Wednesday: Step 6- Visit these sites to give you ideas about creating a costume for the Rhyming Carnival. Click on titles below

 Storybooks Costumes-For Halloween or any time of the year, bring books alive with these cute outfits.

 Prop Box- You don't need a commercial sewing-pattern to create a great Mother Goose Costume. Most Mother Goose enactors simply raid their closets, get donations from friends and relatives, or search thrift stores.

 Free Costume Patterns For Kids And Adults- This site gives you different costume ideas to help make your character come to life. Thursday: Step 7. Take the Mother Goose online Quiz.

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Friday: Step 8- Decide on your favorite nursery rhyme character! Come dressed to the Rhyming Carnival in costume.

Process Resources 1. Story Hour: Mother Goose- Think site lets you listen to Mother Goose rhymes so you can understand the rhyme better.

2. Nursery Rhymes From Teachers and Families- Go to this website and explore. The nursery rhymes collection lets your child learn all the favorite childhood verses. You can use the pages below to teach the rhymes, or print them out and cut the frames apart to create a nursery rhyme hunt or "concentration" game. 3. Hendersonville Police Dept Coloring Pages of Nursery Rhymes- Click on a rhyme page below and print the page. 4. Mother Goose Quiz- Go to this website and refresh your memory on what nursery rhymes you learned and take the quiz.

Evaluation Independent Reading - Elementary: Rhymes Through Time Teacher Name: A DeBerry

Student Name:

CATEGORY

________________________________________

Exemplary

Collaboration of Students worked cooperatively and Group Work productively with peers and made decisions that reflected the members.

Good

Developing

Beginning

Students work cooperatively and productively with peers and worked out the group conflicts with little assistance from the teacher

Students practice satisfactory conflict resolution skills with some assistance from the teacher.

Students failed to practice good conflict resolution skills and relied heavily on teacher to redirect learning

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Used Internet Resources

Student took full advantage of internet resources and it is evident through the student’s writing, speaking, and costume portrayal.

Students made adequate use of the internet to master content.

Mastery of Character(s) and setting(s)

Student expresses

Students write and Student orally orally tell about both describes both elements: yet elements. spelling and sentence structure interfered with clarity.

Costume Portrayal

Costume is creative, Student designed a Student attempted to Student did not clearly reflects effort costume that reflects dress up or design a attempt to dress up and the desired effort and creativity, costume. or design a costume. character.

Mother Goose Quiz

Student understands Student understands Student attempted to nursery rhymes and nursery rhymes. take the quiz with can identify the little understanding. different chracters.

both elements in complete sentences through writing and speaking.

Some use of the internet resources is apparent

Little or no use of internet resources is apparent.

Student can orally identify one of the key elements.

Student did not understand what a nursery rhyme was or how identify one.

Conclusion

Congratulations! By completing this WebQuest, you have found several Mother Goose nursery rhymes.You are now an Expert Rhyming Singer. You have learned a lot about Mother Goose Rhymes. See you at the Rhyming Carnival.

Credits DeBerry, A.(2012, November 11). Rubistar. Rhyme Through Time. Created from http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php?screen=ShowRubric&rubric_id=2253373& Unknown. Little Miss Muffin Image. Retrieved from http://www.lindaslearninglinks.com/nurseryrhymes.html

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Unknown.(2011, November 12). Humpty Dumpty Image. Retrieved from http://www.thekidneydoctor.org/2011/11/dialysis-unplugged-anemia-and-humpty.html Unknown. (2009, June 15). Spider Image. Retrieved from http://bigalscompound.blogspot.com/2009/06/itsy-bitsy-spideryea-right.html Unknown.(2012). Little Bo Peep Image. Retrieved from http://www.istockphoto.com/stock-illustration535648-little-bo-peep.php Unknown.(2012) Singing Clipart Image. Retrieved from http://www.illustrationsof.com/44918-royaltyfree-children-clipart-illustration Unknown.(200-2010). Little Girl Reading Image. Retrieved from http://www.cartoonclipart.com/cartoon_clipart_images/girl_or_child_reading_a_book_0515-1002-0104-0834.html Unknown.(2012, June, 30) Kids Image. Retrieved from http://gardengoatquote.wordpress.com/2012/07/30/an-alien-because-i-like-having-my-kids-around-insummer-thought-i-was-one-anyway-with-a-large-family/ Unknown. Mice Image. Retrieved from http://www.clipartof.com/portfolio/pamela/illustration/three-blindmice-with-canes-and-sunglasses-82802.html Unknown.(2012) Paper Image. Retrieved from http://school.discoveryeducation.com/clipart/clip/poetscorner-color.html Unknown.(2010). Little Boy Blue Image. Retrieved from http://picture-book.com/content/little-boy-0 Unknown.(2003) Mother Goose Image. Retrieved from http://www.unc.edu/~sllamber/pathfinder/mothergooseindex.html

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Unit Media Share

Bookster This link is to a creative android app. This app will launch your kids into literacy with Bookster, the readalong storytelling app that reads to your kids, records and plays their voices, and teaches vocabulary along the way. Designed by educators to help kids of all ages develop literacy skills, Bookster makes beginning to recognize and read new words fun and easy for even the youngest of readers. Read-and-record mode that records as they (or you) read out loud. Read-along mode that highlights words as they are read aloud, teaching word recognition and vocabulary. They also have turnable pages that let them move at their own pace. Requires Android 1.6 or later. Recording feature may not work without a microphone and SD card. Paul Cram (2011, August 18) Bookster. Accessed from Google Play. Cost. Free. Retrieved on November 2, 2012 https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.imaginelearning.bookster Hindi Kids Story By Pari #7 This link is to a free app on Google Play. “Everybody must have heard a story of mischief rabbit and a clever tortoise. Pari will tell you a same story as this story depict a very meaningful essence to life. It teaches you never be over confident of your talent, as over confidence will always let you down and will become the scene of mortification someday. Whereas confidently, slow and steady one can win the race. Just put an effort and hard work, and destiny is achievable� Our application focuses on building a strong bond between parents and children by providing wonderful stories, making children feel loved and uplifting their moral and creating their interest in education. Each book comes rich with vibrant pictures, engaging narration and funny voice over. The app comes with all the cool features of the Recharge Digital. This app will introduce students to different storybooks. Recharge Digital Content Pvt Ltd (2012, September 1) Hindi Kids Story. Accessed from Google Play. Cost. Free. Retrieved on November 2, 2012 https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.recharge.mischiefhindi&hl=en Kindersight This link is a creative that uses characters to directly appeal to the elementary students to learn about music and songs. The web site will offer early learners, with the aid of care-givers, a tool to find and use content in the form of games, songs and stories (not necessarily educationally focused). Students will be very engaged in this source. It will help them explore lyrics to songs. They are able to explore different song types and tempos of Students who visit this website will have the option to pick any song they would like. Kindersight. (2007). Music and Songs. Retrieved on September 22, 2012 http://www.kindersite.org/Directory/DirectoryFrame.htm

Mother Goose On The Loose HD - A Story and Activity Book This link is to a free app on iTunes. "Mother Goose on the Loose" is an interactive rhyming story and activity book for children. The story is told in mother goose rhymes with a twist. The story is filled with exciting and educational games/activities based on the story that children can enjoy for hours. Interactive read-along storybook application features your favorite characters from Mother Goose Rhymes. Read

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yourself or let the narrator read to you. Play exciting and educational games based on the story. Fun things like spellings, missing letters, memory matching, matching shadows, and many more are found on this app. G S Phinest (2011, November 18) Mother Goose On The Loose HD - A Story and Activity Book. Accessed from iTunes. Cost. Free. Retrieved on November 2, 2012 https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/mothergoose-on-loose-hd-story/id475959008?mt=8 Non-Fiction Fun: Identifying the Features of Non-Fiction Books This link is to an informative video. Students discuss features of non-fiction texts and practice identifying them in a variety of books they read. This video shows how the students interact with the teacher about the lesson. This video helps student identify the difference between fiction and non- fiction books. It gives them the source to find out information when doing a lesson. As a teacher we must explain thoroughly the difference between different genres of books. This can teach students to open up and their minds and identify what they observe about their book. balancedliteracydiet (2011) Identifying the Features of Non-Fiction Books. October, 9, 2012 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i5Dk_jTsInQ Once Upon a Mad Lib Junior This link is an educational and informative website that bases their games around educational activities. While the children are playing they are also learning important skills that can be used in the classroom to enhance their grades. Children are able to use this site to enhance their readings skills by playing a variety of games. The "Mad Libs" games are designed to help children learn about nouns, verbs and adjectives by choosing one of the many words that are flying around the screen. Kids will be laughing so hard at their Mad lib’s that they will not even notice they are learning the parts of a sentence.This approach to learning has the ability to teach them new skills while making it fun for them in the process. When visiting you can sign up for free and also create your own book. Pearson Education, Inc. (2000-2012). Funbrain’s Reading Mad lib’s. Retrieved on September 22, 2012 http://www.funbrain.com/brain/ReadingBrain/Games/Game.html?GameName=MadLibsOnceUponA&Brai n=reading&GameNumber=2&Color=FFFFFF Rhymes and Alphabet - Introduction to Alphabets - Creative Learning for Kids This link is to a fun learning video. It is creative featuring cartoon characters to introduce the alphabet. This video explores the alphabet and has creative ideas in sounding them out. Students will be able to build up their vocabulary skills and also build upon their pronunciation method. Rhymes and Alphabet Introduction to Alphabets - Creative Learning for Kids. 'A' for Apple, 'B' for Ball. This video makes your child learn more about English alphabets with the help of this animated video.This particular YouTube video can expand their reading level by practicing the proper usage of the alphabet. This will help students comprehend reading activities more. RajshriKids (2011) Rhymes and Alphabet - Introduction to Alphabets - Creative Learning for Kids. October 9, 2012 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V_gUGwXT-3I Starfall: Fiction and Nonfiction This link is a very kid-friendly site, perfect for using during computer learning time. The activities build on each other, starting with learning the alphabet and its associated sounds, and followed by reading simple online books and more advanced reading activities. Starfall.com opened in September of 2002 as a free public service to teach children to read with phonics. Our systematic phonics approach, in conjunction with phonemic awareness practice, is perfect for preschool, kindergarten, first grade, second grade, special education, home school, and English language development (ELD, ELL, and ESL). Starfall is an educational alternative to other entertainment choices for children. Starfall Education. (2002-2012). Fiction and Nonfiction. Retrieved on September 21, 2012 http://www.starfall.com/n/level-c/fiction-nonfiction/load.htm?f WatchKnowLearn: Between the Lions: Song - "Read a Book Today"

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This YouTube video is a creative way to introduce books. This video is very entertaining and will get the students engaged in the importance of reading and the types of books that are around. In the video they sing about all the different types of genres of books. This video is very informative and fun. The "Between the Lions" lions -- Theo, Cleo, Lionel, and Leona -- team up to sing this catchy, New-Orleans-style, musical tribute to all the different kinds of books you can find at your local library. Students will get a feeling to sing and learn. porter1526 (2011) Between the Lions: Song - "Read a Book Today" October 7, 2012 http://www.watchknowlearn.org/Video.aspx?VideoID=34205&CategoryID=5987

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KaNisha Young Wix Portfolio: http://kanishayoung.wix.com/kanishasclassroom Unit of study proposal: Operations and Algebraic Thinking In this 2nd grade unit, we will be introducing operations and algebraic thinking. Second grade students need to learn operations and algebraic thinking because it allows them to make generalizations, and use mathematical symbols to represent mathematical ideas. Students will learn how to represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction, specifically addition and subtractions within 20. The learner should be able to differentiate between addition and subtraction, as well as learn the different terms used to represent each, such as; estimate, sum, difference, and discount. Knowledge of operations and algebraic thinking is important because it gives students the foundation they need for the rest of their lives. For example, adding pairs of numbers in different orders such as 3 + 5 and 5 + 3 can lead students to infer that when two numbers are added, the order does not matter. Students begin to form their basis of algebraic thinking as they generalize from operations about numbers. Operations and algebraic thinking is a learning experience covered under the Common Core Curriculum under 2nd grade math. Operations and Algebraic Thinking • Represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction. • Add and subtract within 20.

Web 2.0 Projects Glogster URL: http://www.glogster.com/kanishayoung/addition/g-6l5qjbhs78op2gtdmhgo0a0 Opening Commercial: This file is listed as 2AdditionCommercial.wav in the media folder. Unit Video: This file is listed as 2AdditionVideo.mp4 in the media folder.

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Single& Double Digit Addition Name: KaNisha Young Subject Area(s): Math Duration of Lesson: 90 minutes Grade Level: 2nd Context for Learning The 2nd grade class at Thomlin Elementary consists of 18 students, 11 females and 7 males. The students are between the ages of 7 and 8. Each student shows 100% proficiency in the English language. 1 students uses English as a second language. The teacher has done verbal exercises with each student and they have all shown 100% proficiency. For this lesson, the students will need to know how to count to 50, as well as have some basic knowledge of addition. There are no students with additional needs at this time, none of the students have an individualized education program. The majority of the class are of African American descent, with exception of two. One child is Caucasian and the other child is of Hispanic descent. State Standard(s)/Common Core Operations and Algebraic thinking - Add and Subtract within 20 Technology Standards 6.Technology Operations and Concepts Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations. Behavioral Objectives The students will learn how to add/combine numbers using a number line. The lesson will be introduced by showing them the Flocabulary video on Addition. This video demonstrates adding doubles which is a part of the Common Core Standard of Operations and Algebraic Thinking. Given a small lecture of about 20 minutes the students will be able to add single and double digit numbers that make a sum within 1 and 20. Using Wordle the teacher will become familiar with their vocabulary words: Addition, Addend, Combine, Sum, Equal, and Estimate. They will make flash cards to help them remember their words.. After the lecture, the students will be place into small groups of 4 (leaving 1 group of 2) and they will collaborate on the "What's That Number" Worksheet. This worksheet will help the students demonstrate their understanding of the lesson, and well as their ability to add single, and double digit numbers. Following the worksheet, each group will be given a chance to explore the interactive world of Jump Start Math. Jump Start: 2nd Grade is an interactive software that allows the students to experiment with numbers, and play addition games that will help them learn how to represent and solve problems involving addition specifically within 1 and 20. During this period the students at the computer will be introduced to the different parts of the computer: disk drive, mouse, keyboard, and CD- Drive.) Language Objectives: The students will be able to articulate their vocabulary words: Addition, Addend, Combine, Sum, Equal, and Estimate. as well as spell them. I will say a word, and clap out each syllable. This way the students will be familiar with not just the spelling of the word, but the structure as well. The clapping will assist them with sounding out the word, so they will be able to remember the spelling. Next, I will demonstrate adding by drawing a number line on the board (labeled 1-20),

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starting at the number 2, I will show the students that in order to get to the number 6 you move 4 spaces. The students will use their own pencil and paper to construct a number line and given various examples will practice adding using the number line. During the interactive software part of the lesson, the students will have to show that they know the parts of the computer: disk drive, mouse, and keyboard by identifying them to the teacher. This is to be done before they start the JumpStart program. Formative Assessment (Process): The students will be given a worksheet entitled "What's That Number" the students will complete the assignment as a group. I will walk around to each group, and ask that each child individually do 2 problems with me, so I will know that they are grasping the concept. If the students seem that they are not getting the material I will go back into the lesson spending more time on examples. To further demonstrate their knowledge and what they have learned, the students will place into teams of 4 (leaving 1 team with 2). Each group will be given three sandwich bags of Mike and Ike Candy. The bags will consist of 10 green, 10, red, and 10 yellow. Given a problem (i.e. 5+4) the students will model the answer. For example 1 team may use 5 green, and 4 red to show that the answer is 9. The team who gets the correct answer the quickest gets to eat a piece of their candy. The game will continue until the candy is gone, and every student has been allowed to solve at least 1 problem. This is a fun way for the students to show their knowledge, without knowing that they are being assessed. They get to learn while having fun.

Summative Assessment (Product): For my summative assessment I will use the IXL website to give the students a short quiz (10 problems). I will bring the website up on the projector and display each problem 1 by 1.The students will be given approx. 2 minutes to answer each problem. The students will demonstrate mastery of the skill if they get between 7-10 questions correct. If the majority of the scores are low, then I know that I will have to revert back to my lesson, giving better and more extensive examples. Materials Curriculum: The teacher will need: 18 text books, 100 Index Cards, Pen, Clip Board, Paper, Crayons, Markers, Scissors, Candy, Sandwich bags. Technology: Access to the following websites: Wordle.Net, Flocabulary.Com; JumpStart 2nd Grade; Projector, 4 computers Supplementary Materials Flocabulary - FlocabularyYT. (2012, May 9). Flocabulary - Addition and Subtraction - Know About 10s. Retrieved October 7, 2012, from YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZlYvs-0dU8 IXL- INC, I. (2012). IXL-Second Grade Math. Retrieved Sep 22, 2012, from IXL: http://www.ixl.com/promo?partner=google&phrase=Misc%20-%20Math-Specific%20K-8%20%20kidsnumbers.com&gclid=CMD_gMH4zLICFQs5nAodgXoApg

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Jump Start: 2nd Grade- Inc, Knowledge Adventure (2010). Jump Start [computer software] Wordle: Feinburg, J. (2011). Wordle- Beautiful Word Clouds. Retrieved October 12, 2012, from Wordle: www.wordle.net

Procedures: Time

1. 2 min 2. 1 minute

Learning Activities Teacher Anticipatory Set: 1. The teacher will begin by asking the students to count to 50 2.The teacher will ask Who wants to hear a fun song about Addition?

Presentation/Explicit Instruction: 3. The teacher will show 3. 4 minutes the Flocabulary video on addition, allowing the students to sing/ dance along.

4. 10 minutes

4. The teacher will give the students their vocabulary words, and go over the pronunciation and spelling.

5. 10 minutes

5. The teacher will draw a number line on the board, and demonstrate addition with examples. Example, start at the number 2 on the number line. Explain how to get to the number 6, you have to move 4 spaces.

Learning Activities Students

Purpose

1. Students will begin counting to 50 on the teachers cue

1. To prepare students for lessons.

2. Students will sit in their chairs, and listen attentively

2. To build enthusiasm for the Flocabulary video

3. Students will listen to the song, as well as sing and dance along.

3. To introduce the addition lesson. As well as, warm the students up. (get the wiggles out)

4. Students will write down their vocabulary words, and participate in the pronunciation and spelling of the words.

4. To introduce new mathematical terminology

5. Students will draw their own number line, and practice the examples out loud as the teacher moves spaces on the number line, the students are to count each space out loud.

5. To demonstrate addition, and engage students in lesson.

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6. 20 minutes

7. 20

minutes

8. 2 minute

Structured Practice/Exploration: 6. The teacher will divide the students into groups of 4 (leaving a pair of 2.) Then pass out the "What's That Number Worksheet" (This will be the formative assessment, the teacher will walk around observing each group of students work on the worksheetproviding help when needed)

6. Students will collaborate with each other to answer each problem.

6. To build team working skills, and to practice knowledge of addition

Guided Practice/Feedback: 6a. (This will be done union with 6) JumpStart- The teacher will explain the parts of the computer, have the students name them back to you.

6a. Students will go to the classroom computers, and identify each part as shown by the teacher. As well as, explore the Jump Start interactive Math world.

6a. To allow students to explore math interactively, and to identify basic parts of a computer.

7. The teacher will explain that. Each group will be given three sandwich bags of Mike and Ike Candy. The bags will consist of 10 green, 10, red, and 10 yellow. Given a problem (i.e. 5+4) the students will model the answer. For example 1 team may use 5 green, and 4 red to show that the answer is 9. The team who gets the correct answer the quickest gets to eat a piece of their candy. 8. The teacher will congratulate the winning team, and praise everyone

7. Students will listen carefully to the rules of the game, and refrain from touching candy and the game has started.

8. Students will finish up their candy, and clean their desk.

7. To assess and evaluate knowledge of addition

8. To provide feedback

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for having a good game and showing what they have learned. (Let everyone eat there left over candy)

9. 20 minutes

Independent Practice/Application: 9. The teacher will pull up IXL for the students to take the addition quiz. This will be the summative assessment. The goal is for each students to show 7580% proficiency.

9. Students will use pencil and notebook paper to take test quietly

9. To evaluate mastery of single digit addition

Modifications I would make sure that my lesson appeals to each kind of learner (visual, tactile, auditory). For ELL students I would make sure that I am talking slowly and clearly, as well as making sure my examples are clear and crisp. I would even go as far as to saying some of the vocabulary words in their native language, so that way they feel comfortable and the students who speak English get introduced to another language. If technology were to fail, I would have math activities book for the students to play around in. So this way, they can still have fun while learning. I would also have a back up written quiz for the students to take. For students with special needs, I would make sure that they have the proper accommodations. I would also, spend some one on one time with them, while the other students are doing the "What's That Number" worksheet.

Closure The key points of the lesson which include, using a number line to model addition, being able to define addition, as well as identify synonyms for the word addition will be articulated by the teacher, and demonstrated by the students. The teacher will close the lesson by asking each individual students one problem, and having the solve it. As well as, letting them enjoy the JumpStart software some more.

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Magical Math Kingdom

Designed by: Ka'Nisha Young based on the Common Core Curriculum for 2nd Grade Math

Operations and Algebraic Thinking • Represent and solve problems involving Addition and subtraction. • Add and subtract within 20. Introduction

Task

Process

Evaluation

Conclusion

Credits

Introduction Hola! I'm Dora, and this is my cousin Diego. We are going on a trip to Magical Math Kingdom, we need you as Jr. Explorers to help us get there. We had to ask our friend the map how to get there. He said "To get to the Magical Math Kingdom we have to go through the Single Digit Woods, then we have to go through the Double Digit Lake and finally we'll be at Magical Math Kingdom." Everyone grab your backpacks, it's going to be a wild adventure!

Tasks Ok Jr. Explorers, Dora and Diego need your help. It will take us 4 days to complete our quest to Magical Math Kingdom. We will have to help Addend the bear feed his three cubs, build a bridge to get across Double Digit Lake, and finally we will get to explore Magical Math Kingdom. Students will be scored based on their finished products of their bear/fish pictures ( each cub needs to have enough fish to each) picture must be neat, and colored. Students will also be scored as a group as a part of building the bridge ( did you do your part?, how helpful were you in the finished product?, how neat is the finished product? Does it show effort?) Once we get to Magical Math Kingdom, students will be scored based on their use of the computer ( Do you know the parts of the computer, can you access the website without help?). Also, the progress in the games we play ( are you making high scores?, do you understand the math in the game?)  Single Digit Woods - Addend the Bear needs help feeding his 3 cubs. You have only 2 fish and you have to have enough to feed each cub. If each cub likes 3 fish how many more fish will you need?  Double Digit Lake- The cubs are fed, now it's off to Double Digit Lake but oh no! There is not bridge to get across the lake. We need 50 pieces of wood to build a bridge, using at double digit numbers, how many ways can we make the number 50? We will have to split up into 4 groups and find enough wood to build a bridge to cross the lake.

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ďƒź

Magical Math Kingdom- Alas! We have made it to Magical Math Kingdom! Now let the fun begin.

Process Day 1 Using Google Images we will find pictures of bear cubs and fish. We will take a piece of construction paper, using a pencil we will divide the paper into three sections and paste 1 cub in each section. Then we will figure out how many more fish we need so that we can feed the bears. After we figure that out, we will cut out enough fish and distribute them to each bear by pasting them in each section. (Approx. 90 minutes)

Day 2/3 Today we split up into groups of 4. Using popsicle sticks and construction paper, each group will build a bridge. Each group of explorers will be given 50 popsicle sticks. Your job is to paint the popsicle sticks a color of your choosing. After the popsicle sticks are painted you will then construct a bridge. The following website gives step by step how to build a bridge Directions will be given in class, we will be following this model step by step. (Approx. 2 days)

Day 4 We're going to the computer lab to have fun with Dora and Diego! First we will go to CoolMath4Kids and play some addition games such as: Feed Fribbit, Number Twins, and Math Lines. Then if time permits you can log on to Nick Jr.com and play along with Dora Diego, as well as your other Nickelodeon friends.( 60 minutes)

Process Resources Teddy Bear - Click on the picture of the bear, it will take you to the Google Images search engine. Click the magnifying glass to search for cartoon bears. 28


Fish- Click on the picture of the fish, it will take you to the Google Images search engine. Click on the magnifying glass to search for cartoon fish. Diego Video- Watch as Diego and his "mommy" help the baby bear cub. Bridge- Click on the pitcure of the bridge, it will take you to the step-by-step directions to making our bridge Dora Video- After we build our bridge, watch as Dora and Boots the Monkey cross their bridge. Cool Math Games- Play Feed Fribbit, Number Twins, and Math Lines Dora/Diego - Play with your Nick Jr. friends, at NickJr.com

Evaluation

CATEGORY Quality of Work

Provides work of the highest quality.

Provides high quality work. Provides work that occasionally needs to be checked/redone by other group members to ensure quality.

Provides work that usually needs to be checked/redone by others to ensure quality.

Working with Others

Almost always listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others. Tries to keep people working well together.

Usually listens to, shares, with, and supports the efforts of others. Does not cause "waves" in the group.

Rarely listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others. Often is not a good team player.

Construction - Appropriate materials were Materials

selected and creatively modified in ways that made them even better.

Often listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others, but sometimes is not a good team member.

Appropriate materials were Appropriate materials selected and there was an were selected. attempt at creative modification to make them even better.

Inappropriate materials were selected and contributed to a product that performed poorly.

Construction - Great care taken in Construction was careful construction and accurate for the most Care Taken part, but 1-2 details could have been refined for a more attractive product.

Construction accurately followed the plans, but 3-4 details could have been refined for a more attractive product.

Construction appears careless or haphazard. Many details need refinement for a strong or attractive product.

Knowldege of Is able to name basic parts of the Technology

Is able able to name most of the basic parts of the computer. Is able to access websites with some guidance.

Knows some of the parts of the computer. Is able to access websites with some guidance.

Is not able to name the basic parts of the computer. Shows no ability to access websites.

process so that the structure is neat, attractive and follows plans accurately.

computer. Uses skills to access websites by one\'s self.

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Conclusion Ok Jr. Exploers, we have a bigadventure ahead of us. Grab your backpacks as we follow Dora, and Diego through Single Digit Woods, and across Double Digit Lake, so that we can make to Magical Math Kingdom! Que va a ser muy divertido! (it's going to be so much fun)

Credits Unknown. (2012, November 12.) Top Picture. Retreived from. http://www.search-bestcartoon.com/wallpapers/dora_the_explorer/dora_the_explorer_01.jpg Unknown. (2012, November 12.) Introduction Picture. Retreived from http://www.mindtouch.com/wpcontent/uploads/2012/02/5ac81a16f9fc6a4a_dora-the-explorer.jpg Unknown. (2012, November 12.) Task Picture. Retrieved from http://www.disneyclips.com/imagesnewb6/imageslwrakr01/july1811.gif Unknown. (2012, November 12.) Process Picture. Retrieved from http://caro.officialpsds.com/images/thumbs/Boots-The-Monkey-Dora-psd46074.png Unknown. (2012, November 12.) Evaluation Picture. Retrieved from http://www.disneyclips.com/imagesnewb6/imageslwrakr01/july187.gif Unknown. (2012, November 12.) Conclusion Picture. Retrieved from http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m843eemQ3c1qbcifho1_250.jpg Unknown. (2012, November 12.) Credits Picture. Retrieved from http://www.nickasia.com/tvshows/shows/Nick_jr_shows/Go,_diego,_go/images/the_bobo_brothers_big.gif Unknown. (2012, November 12.) Teddy Bear . Retrieved from http://rlv.zcache.com/cute_cartoon_bear_cub_greeting_card-p137206049677944112bh2r3_400.jpg Unknown. (2012, November 12.) Cartoon Fish. Retreived from http://kieffersappliances.files.wordpress.com/2010/10/cartoon-fish-2-normal.jpg Unknown. (2012, November 12.) Dora and Diego. Retrieved from http://www.blooloop.com/News/Image/23201153723Dora_Diego.jpg Unknown. (2012, November 12.) Cooking Dora. Retrieved from http://cdn3.www.babble.com/wpcontent/uploads/2012/03/393b2b976486403e59a7572b715981ae.jpg Unknown. (2012, November12.) Diego. Retrieved from http://cdn.static.ovimg.com/episode/357026.jpg Unknown. (2012,November 12.) DoraCry Retrieved from http://wwwimage.cbsnews.com/images/2009/01/01/image4695116.jpg Young,K. (2012, November 12.) WebQuest Rubric. Created from Rubistar http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php

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Unit Media Share Addition and Subtraction Body Part Dance The addition and body part dance game is fun for everyone to do. The video itself focuses on single digits, if you are interested in double digits you can have the students pair up in groups of 2 or 3, and have them do the dance together. It gives the students a chance to interact with each other, as well as have fun while learning. Hartman, J. (2012, Feburary 22). The Add and Subtract Body Part Dance (song by Jack Hartmann). Retrieved October 7, 2012, from YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X9hA9JvfLFQ&feature=related CoolMath4Kids Cool Math 4 kids is a very kid friendly website, it's eye catching and something the kids would definitely love. I would use it to play in class games with the kids. It's also great to make flash cards with so that the students can remember their vocabulary words. It also has plenty of and kid/parent lessons so that the child and parent can learn together. Cool Math's Addition Lessons, Games and Free Online Flash Cards. (1997-2012). Retrieved September 22, 2012, from CoolMath4kids: http://www.coolmath4kids.com/addition/index.html Flocabulary -Know about 10's This is a Flocabulary video. Flocabulary is a site that has to be paid for but luckily there are plenty of their videos on YouTube. This particular video is about all the numbers you can add and make the number 10. This video will be helpful because it comes with a catchy song that will help them remember all the numbers you need to make 10. FlocabularyYT. (2012, May 9). Flocabulary - Addition and Subtraction - Know About 10s. Retrieved October 7, 2012, from YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zl-Yvs-0dU8 IXL IXL is a great tool for math. It gives step by step directions on how to do math problems. I would use this in the classroom to help break down math problems. I would also send the website home so that the parents could use it to help their child with their homework. Another great feature is that it has practice questions, I could pull the website up in class click on my unit and have problems on hand that we could practice as a class. Maybe even pull some test questions INC, I. (2012). IXL-Second Grade Math. Retrieved Sep 22, 2012, from IXL: http://www.ixl.com/promo?partner=google&phrase=Misc%20-%20Math-Specific%20K-8%20%20kidsnumbers.com&gclid=CMD_gMH4zLICFQs5nAodgXoApg Kids Learning Math Lite Kids Learning Math is a free app in the Amazon app store that displays kid friendly graphics, that allow children to play without parental supervision. An animated monster gives verbal instructions and feedback to the child which makes learning fun. The Lite edition provides, addition, subtraction, and counting activities. The Full version, which is available for 1.99 includes all the features of the lite version plus: flash cards, an aquarium, games, and more challenges. Fun4Kids Hunny Bee. (2012). Kids Learning Math Lite (Version 1.3). [Mobile Application Software]. Available on the Android Market. Cost Free. Retrieved from http://www.amazon.com/Fun4Kids-HoneyBee-Kids-Learning-

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Math/dp/B0085WRXXM/ref=sr_1_1?s=mobile-apps&ie=UTF8&qid=1352120161&sr=11&keywords=kids+learning+math Kids Numbers This website helps the kids take a load off and have fun, but also has them thinking and learning at the same time. It has plenty of games pertaining to both addition and subtraction. It is also a good way to encourage parental involvement. There are multi-player games in which the parents can play with the kids, and join in on their learning. Network, T. K. (2012). Addition Games For Kids. Retrieved September 22, 2012, from KidsNumbers: http://www.kidsnumbers.com/addition.php Learning Gems- Math 2.0 Learning Gems – Math 2.0 is a challenging app that has a wide range of math problems and difficulty. Don’t be fooled by the easier problems! Our game is designed with over 10,500 problems and they are not repeated until each has been displayed once. The result? You are faced with new mixture of different problems and problem types each time you play!! It’s a great way for kids to practice and enhance their math comprehension skills and have fun while doing it. Math 2.0 is available in the Amazon and Apple App Store for .99 Learning Gems. (2012). Learning Gems-Math 2.0 (Version 1.02). [Mobile Application Software]. Available in the Android Market and Apple App Store. Cost 99 cent. Retrieved from http://www.amazon.com/Learning-Gems-Math-2-0/dp/B008PCIL2Y/ref=sr_1_7?s=mobileapps&ie=UTF8&qid=1352120573&sr=1-7&keywords=learning+gems Math Blaster HyperBlast Hop on your HyperCycle and discover the intergalactic adventure that adds up to total fun! Outsmart the alien robots, blast through the razor sharp blockades, and speed past the stars on this mega-math adventure. Make your way through 30 levels of mathematical challenge; test the player on any of the four basic math functions. With three difficulty levels, amazing 3D graphics, kid-friendly controls and functions, and fast paced arcade-style game play, learning math has never been more fun. Math Blaster is available in the Amazon and Apple App Store in lite version for free, or full version for 1.99. Knowledge Adventure. (2011). Math Blaster HyperBlast (Version 1.32) . [Mobile Application Software]. Available in the Android Market and Apple App Store. Cost Free. Retrieved from http://www.amazon.com/Knowledge-Adventure-Math-BlasterHyperBlast/dp/B006BAF2VU/ref=sr_1_1?s=mobile-apps&ie=UTF8&qid=1352120290&sr=11&keywords=hyper+blast Sesame Street -Addition Expedition The addition expedition is a cute video that has everyone's favorite monster Elmo, and one of the prettiest men alive LL Cool J. LL and Elmo go on an addition expedition through Sesame Street. It gives the students a teacher that they are familiar with, and it gives them a song to help them remember how to add. Street, S. (2008, July 18). Sesame Street: LL Cool J goes on an Addition Expedition. Retrieved October 7, 2012, from YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uKD148lpBAE

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Erin Wolf Wix Portfolio: http://rinskibinski.wix.com/educator-extra Unit of study proposal: Reading Comprehension In this fourth grade unit, we will be focusing on reading comprehension and interpretation through a unit on Judy Blume’s Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing. It is imperative that fourth grade students learn to comprehend and interpret in order to derive some understanding of what the writer is trying to convey and to make use of that information. Students will build vocabulary through frequent read alouds and will be able to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words using context clues, dictionaries, glossaries, and use context clues to determine the meaning of multiple meaning words. Students will be able to organize prior knowledge to make predictions about text while using text features. Students will be able to relate text to prior personal and historical experiences, current events and previously read material. Students will be able to derive meaning while reading by formulating questions and predicting outcomes based upon prior knowledge and adjusting appropriately. Student will express reactions and personal opinions to a selection and make inferences. They will be able to select the main idea and supporting details from the text. They will be able to locate information to support their opinions, predictions, and conclusions and be able to confirm or modify pre-reading predictions and conclusions. Students will also be able to identify and interpret figurative language (e.g., idioms, similes, metaphors, personification). Without strong reading comprehension and interpretation skills readers cannot gather any information and use it to efficiently function and enjoy the richness of life. Being able to derive meaning from the written word enables students to develop intellectually, socially, and emotionally and a strong ability to comprehend and interpret literature is imperative to encouraging active learning. Comprehension and interpretation in reading are learning expectations covered under Tennessee Reading Standard 1.0. GLE 1.06 Expand reading vocabulary. GLE 1.07 Employ pre-reading strategies to facilitate comprehension. GLE 1.08 Use active comprehension strategies to derive meaning while reading and check for understanding after reading. Web 2.0 Projects Glogster URL: http://ewolftsu.edu.glogster.com/tales-of-a-fourth-grade-nothing Opening Commercial: This file is listed as 4ReadingComprehensionCommercial.wav in the media folder. Unit Video: This file is listed as 4ReadingComprehensionVideo.m4v in the media folder.

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Character Inference in Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing Lesson # 1 Name: Erin Wolf Area(s): Reading Duration of Lesson: 50 minutes 4th grade

Subject Grade Level:

Context for Learning: This fourth grade class at Wonderland Magnet School for the Arts and Sciences in Los Angeles, California consists of 26 students. Of the 26 students, 14 are male and 12 are female, all of which are bussed up the canyon from the surrounding San Fernando Valley. The students’ ages range from nine- to ten-years of age. The students’ ethnic and racial backgrounds are relatively diverse, with the classroom being composed of three Hispanics/Latinos (Mexican, Peruvian, Guatemalan), seven Caucasians, eight African Americans/Blacks, and seven Asians (three Koreans, one Japanese and two Asian Indians). Most students belong to families of middle socio-economic status (a few of which border on high SES), and five students fall into the low SES classification and receive free or reduced lunch. Four students live in linguistically isolated homes in which their parents only speak in their native language, however all students are proficient in English, except for one who is an English Language Learner (ELL). The one ELL is incredibly advanced. Approximately half the students come from divorced parents and one student comes from a family with two fathers. Most of the students come from families in which both parents work at least one full time job, but all students’ parents seem to be whole-heartedly invested in their child’s education and they try to be as involved as possible. With the exception of two students (one well above and one a little below), all students read at least at grade level. One student has Autism and has an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) in which paraprofessional support is provided for the student throughout the day. The student’s IEP mostly focuses on aiding social development. All students have access to their own personal laptops and have used Voki for projects in the past. State and Technology Standards: Curricular Standards Reading Content Standard 1 GLE 4.1.08 Use active comprehension strategies to derive meaning while reading and to check for understanding after reading

Technology Standards NETS 1 Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology

Behavioral Objectives: The students will be able to connect their own life experiences to the characters and events in chapter two of Tales of a Fourth Grade. They will also be able to organize their prior knowledge and use their schema, along with textual information from the chapter to form inferences about the characters in Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing. The students will also be able to identify the supporting evidence used to reach their conclusions about the characters. Given the method for

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making inferences (We inferred that someone felt ___________ because the text said and we know from experience that ) that was explained, modeled and practiced in this lesson, the students will be able to use their inferences about an assigned character to demonstrate unique and creative interpretations of the supporting characters using Voki (an innovative web 2.0 tool that allows students to create an avatar and record their voice to animate the avatar and make it speak).

Language Objectives: Throughout paired work students will use established rules of conversation by taking turns and raising hands. They will formulate and respond to questions from the teacher and their peers. They will be able to deliver narrative presentations that relate ideas, observations, and/or memories about an event or experience to describe and illustrate their assigned character. They will ask questions to elicit information, including evidence to support their inferences. Students will be able to retell the major events of chapter two in the voice they have ascribed to their assigned character using the inferences made in the lesson. The students will use the following language/thinking strategy to demonstrate their understanding of how to make an inference: We inferred that felt _____________ because the text said _____________ and we know from experience that ____________. In addition, students will be able to define inference, which will be added to the word wall along with other words the teacher notices students have difficulty with throughout the lesson. Through the use of technology, students will also be able to properly use the following technology terms: avatar, export, upload Formative Assessment (Process): Throughout the lesson, the teacher will circulate throughout the room with a clipboard to note anecdotal observations and note progress. The teacher will check for participation while being available to help with clarification, to answer any questions that may arise, and to assist with difficult words. After a quick observation of all pairs, spend a moment of one on one time with individual pairs and listen for the student’s use of language objectives. For those who properly use the thinking strategy and understand the concept, ask questions that provoke further thinking and check for understanding (i.e. can you think of other instances in which you have made inferences? Is an inference the same as a guess? Do you think other make inferences about you? Are your inferences reasonable?). For those who are struggling, the teacher may need to provide further examples and/or guide students through the thinking process by breaking the whole sentence down into individual questions or rewording the explanation for clarification. The teacher will note students’ responses and questions to assess progress throughout the lesson.

Summative Assessment (Product): The teacher will assess the students by giving them one of the following characters from Chapter 2 of Tale of a Fourth Grade Nothing: Fudge, Mom, Dad, Mr. Juicy-O, or Mrs. Juicy-O. They will then use Voki to demonstrate their understanding of the character through the inferences made in class based on their own experiences and knowledge, and the descriptive information given to them as readers by Peter, the narrator. They will assign physical attributes to the character and illustrate them using this free web 2.0 technology and will record a audio narrative, as told from the point of view of their character. The students will be assessed on completion of the Voki project, their ability to use the physical and emotional character inferences and their ability to cite evidence that supports their conclusions (which were recorded in their writing journal, which will be turned in as well for teacher reference). They will also be assessed on whether or not they were able to construct knowledge and demonstrate

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creative thinking through their avatar and whether or not they followed the instructions. The teacher will use the following rubric to assess the students’ projects: 3 Vocabulary Avatar Audio

Technology

Project includes proper use of at least 2 words from the word wall Avatar clearly represents the physical features of character as described in the book. Audio narrative clearly depicts the perspective of the character. Student clearly demonstrates creative thinking, constructs knowledge, and develops an innovative product

2

1

Student uses one words from the word wall

Student uses no words from the word wall

Avatar vaguely represents character’s physical features as described in the book.

Avatar does not represent the character’s physical features as described in the book.

Audio narrative vaguely depicts the perspective of the character. Student demonstrates creative thinking, constructs knowledge, and develops an innovative product, but not to the same extent as a 3.

Audio narrative is seriously lacking in perspective of any kind. Student does not demonstrate creative thinking, ability to construct knowledge, or develop an innovative product.

Materials Materials for Curriculum Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing by Judy Blume (one copy for each student) Individual Reading Journals

Supplementary Materials Voki Inference Song

Materials for Technology Internet access Overhead projector with the capability of accessing a computer screen. Surface with which to project overhead images (pull-down screen/whiteboard) Individual student computers Digital microphone Voki Inference Song YouTube Video

Oddcast (2012). Voki. Retrieved on October 7, 2012 from http://www.voki.com ChannelCheese (October 3, 2008). Inference Song. Retrieved on October 10, 2012 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m_ZNP5aj5fs&feature=player_embedded#

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Procedures: Time

1. 5 min

2. 10 min

Learning Activities -Teacher Anticipatory Set: 1. The teacher will begin by laughing. Then ask the students, “What made me laugh?” Repeat with other expressions (i.e. yawing, slouching, frowning, stomping). The teacher will point out that the students were never actually told what the teacher was feeling. “You must be excellent detectives! And just like detectives you all made inferences.” Presentation/Explicit Instruction: 2. The teacher will play the Inference Song video. After the video the teacher will explain that inferring is “reading between the lines”. Often a storyteller does not tell you how a character is feeling. Instead, he/she leaves clues to describe the character’s behavior. It is then up to the reader to use his/her own experiences to figure out, or infer how a character is feeling. The teacher will explain that since Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing, is told from Peter’s point of view (POV has been discussed in previous lessons, but can be reviewed), we, as readers, know how Peter is feeling, because he tells us exactly how he is feeling. But what about little Fudge, or mom, or dad, or the families dinner guests? How do we know how they are feeling? By

Learning Activities - Students

Purpose

1. Students will be seated and will raise hands and be called on to contribute to teacher-led discussion.

1. To connect the lesson to student prior knowledge, to focus student attention on the lesson, and to create an organizing framework for information that is to follow.

2. Students will be seated and will raise hands or will be randomly called on to participate

2. Provide content information, explain concept, state definitions, and further prepare students for the activities to follow.

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making inferences! So let’s get to inferring! 3. 10 min

4. 20 min

5.

Structured Practice/Exploration: 3. The teacher will display the following prompt (either written on the board or projected): We inferred that felt _____________ because the text said _____________ and we know from experience that ____________. The teacher will demonstrate how to use this format for thinking by going back to the expressions used during the anticipatory set to model the thinking process and/or invite students to act out different feelings and encourage them to fill in the blanks. Guided Practice/Feedback: 4. The teacher will randomly pair students (although it may be beneficial to pair those who tend to perform at higher levels with those who perform at lower levels) and randomly assign (draw from a hat) each pair one of the following characters: Fudge, Mom, Dad, Mr. Juicy-O and Mrs. Juicy-O. Have the pairs take turns reading through chapter two, asking them to use the thinking strategy displayed on the board to record at least five character inferences in their reading notebooks. Move throughout the classroom to make sure all students are on task. Encourage students to make note of any difficult words they come across. Remind students

3. Students will be seated and listen for the teacher demonstration, after which, they will be invited to act out an expression while their peers respectfully and quietly listen.

4. Students will practice their ability to infer by working in pairs and taking turns reading through the chapter. They will work together to find and record evidence from Peter’s narrative in chapter two that will support inferences of their assigned character. Using the thinking strategy from the lesson to record five character inferences in their reading journals, students will work together to use the textual evidence, along with their individual knowledge and previous experiences to support their conclusion. They will also determine whether or not their inferences were reasonable.

3.

To provide students with examples and demonstrate the how to make and use inferences. To initiate practice activities under direct teacher supervision and use active participation to elicit overt response that demonstrates understanding and to allow the teacher to check for understanding.

4. To pose key questions, ask students to explain concepts and definitions in their own words, to encourage students to generate their own examples, and learn through their peers and through cooperative learning. Also, to initiate practice activities under the supervision of the teacher and use active participation to elicit overt response that demonstrates understanding and to allow the teacher to check for understanding.

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5 min (plus extra 15 min over the next two days)

to be respectful of the contributions made by their partner. Independent Practice/Application: 5. The teacher will assign students the Voki project. Explain that they will be using the character inferences made during guided practice. Have students create an avatar, using Voki, for their character and record an audio retelling narrative of the events in chapter two from their assigned character’s perspective. Instruct students to use at least two of the vocabulary words from the word wall.

5. Students will listen to directions, use the computers to access www.voki.com and begin working on the project.

5.

For students to continue practicing inference on their own, to assist them in mastery by allowing them to use it in a different context, and to allow them to demonstrate their creative thinking abilities through the use of technology. This is an opportunity for summative assessment to evaluate the student’s proficiency.

Modifications To accommodate the needs of the student with an IEP for Autism Spectrum Disorder, structure the presentation of visual directions/worksheets by highlighting directions, numbering the steps and/or giving an example of the completed task. Encourage the student to use one or two sentences to summarize knowledge in order to make it easier to identify the key concepts and information from the book. The teacher may even allow the student make inferences based on the student’s own interests (i.e. have them make a Voki of a character from a comic book the student really likes). For ELL give the student extra time to do work or complete projects and ignore spelling or grammar errors unless explicitly taught. The teacher may also allow students to take breaks when working. ELL may also need clarification of the idiom “read between the lines”, which can be substituted with a more concrete explanation like “Story clues + what I know = inference” If the class is unable to access the internet, or if the www.voki.com website is down on the day of the lesson, the students will draw a picture of their assigned character and write a retelling of the main events in chapter two from the point of view of said character.

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Closure The teacher will say, “Did we make random guesses when we inferred things about what we read or when we made conclusions about what we read? No, we used our own knowledge and evidence! We constantly make inferences, not just when we read, but when we watch TV or movies and especially in our daily interactions with others.” Remind students that the next time they see a graphic in their science book, their social studies book, the newspaper, or on the Internet, remember, “Things are not always as they seem!” Encourage them to continue using the inference method they used today to make learning other subjects in the future easier and more effective.

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AD WIZARD WEBQUEST

Designed by: Erin Wolf Based on the state of Tennessee curriculum standards for Fourth Grade Reading: GLE 4.1.08 GLE 4.1.09 GLE 4.1.10 GLE 4.1.12

Use active comprehension strategies to derive meaning while reading and to check for understanding after reading. Develop appropriate information skills and study skills to facilitate learning. Develop skills to facilitate reading to learn in a variety of content areas Experience various literary and media genres.

Introduction

Task

Process

Evaluation

Conclusion

Credits

Introduction Congratulations! You have just been asked to interview with the same advertising firm that Peter’s dad works for in Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing. They have just called you in for an interview to become the company’s newest advertising agent, but you know nothing about advertising! Advertising is sneaky business and you are going to have to prepare yourself.

Task You will have one week to prepare yourself for your big interview and familiarize yourself with the ways in which advertisers try to swindle the public into buying things they don’t really need. In preparation, you must research advertising and propaganda techniques and develop a portfolio of information that you will gather throughout this webquest. You will then present this portfolio to the “C.E.O.” (a.k.a. your teacher) as a resume to be hired. If you are hired as an advertising agent, you will immediately be in charge of your very advertising campaign. You will create a visual advertisement in which you correctly use at least three types of propaganda techniques and demonstrate a clear understanding of your audience. Your presentation should clearly and colorfully depict and describe the product, should have a

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balanced layout, follow logical order, have an attractive color scheme, have legible text, have two or more relevant graphics, and be free of grammatical errors.

Process Step 1: Research various advertising and propaganda techniques using the following websites: Articles: Reading the Fine Print : an online lesson in which you will learn to anayze fine print and the details of an advertisement . Click “Begin Lesson” at the bottom of the site to begin. Making Money: Advertising and Promotion : information on various methods of promotion and advertisment from PBS Kids. Propaganda Techiques : provides detailed discriptions and examples of common propaganda techniques Propaganda : contains a number of informative articles that explain why it is important to think about propaganda, explores the history of propaganda and its current use in advertisment, and discribes the various propaganda techniques. Videos: Persuasive Techniques in Advertisment : explores the concepts of pathos, logos, and ethos with visual examples, and explains how television, print, and online advertisements utilize the three rhetorical strategies. Consuming Kids : an interesting look at how you, as young people are viewed by the consumer markert place. *Write a brief response in your reading journal after viewing this video about how this documentary made you feel. How does this video apply to you? Will you look at advertisments and products differently now? How? *As you research these websites, take notes in your reading notebook regarding the various techniques used to hook consumers, you will need to know them to answer the questions in step 2.

Step 2: Pick three (3), school-appropriate (no drugs, alcohol, or tobacco) advertisements (print, video, or audio). Use the information you have gathered from your research to answer the following questions about each advertisement:  What is the name of the product?  Who are the target audiences?  What are the images, slogans, or mascots used?  What key words are used? What emotions do those words seek to arouse?  What were the advertising/propaganda techniques used?  How were women & men portrayed in these ads?  Does music accompany the visual/words? What effect is this music choice meant to have?  On a scale of 1 (very ineffective) to 5 (very effective) rate the effectiveness of this propaganda. Explain your rating. You are to type your responses and include a graphic representation of each advertisement. Once you have completed all questions for each of the three advertisements you have chosen, print and staple them together. This will serve as your “advertising portfolio.” Once you are finished, present your “advertising portfolio” to the C.E.O. (your teacher) to determine whether or not you are hired, or if your portfolio needs revisions. Once you have been hired, proceed to step 3.

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Step 3: YOU’VE BEEN HIRED! Congratulations! Your research paid off! The company loved your work and has offered you the position. Your first job as an advertising agent is to create a commercial for one of the following clients: Nike : a link to the Nike website Apple : a link to the Apple website Coca-Cola : a link to the Coca-Cola website GM: a link to GM’s website Or choose your own client Or invent your product But be sure to correctly use at least three types of propaganda techniques, demonstrate a clear understanding of your audience, and use a clear and colorful description of the product. Your presentation should be free of grammatical errors and must have a balanced layout, follow logical order, have an attractive color scheme, have legible text, and two or more relevant graphics.

Evaluation Exemplary 20 points

Accomplished 15 points

Developing 10 points

Beginning 5 points

Score

Two types of One type of propaganda No clearly Demonstrates Three or more types of propaganda clearly clearly used. Attempt demonstrated use understanding propaganda easily used. Attempt to use to use a second not of any type of of Propaganda recognized in ad. a third not clearly clearly demonstrated. propaganda. demonstrated.

Demonstrates understanding of Audience

Visual elements (picture, color, and font) show strong connectivity with each other AND targeted audience.

Visual elements Visual Visual (picture, color, elements (picture, elements (picture, color, and font) color, and font) show and font) show limited mismatched with either connectivity connectivity with each each other and with each other OR other and targeted targeted targeted audience. audience. audience.

Uses clear and colorful Description

Product description and ad message communicated with specific descriptives and three or more adjectives.

Product description and ad message communicated with general descriptives and two adjectives.

Product description and Product ad message description and communicated weakly ad message has with unclear unclear descriptives and only descriptives and one adjective. no adjectives.

Overall look of ad Overall look of ad very somewhat unpleasant: attractive to the eye: Overall look of ad awkward layout, some balanced layout, pleasant to the eye: General ordering problems, logical order, attractive orderly layout, attractiveness colors either too vivid color scheme, and attractive color of the Ad or too pale, text that is readable text, two or scheme, readable text, difficult to read, more relevant two relevant graphics. graphics that barely graphics. apply. Editing and Proofreading

Completely free of spelling, punctuation, grammatical errors.

One or two spelling, punctuation, OR grammatical errors.

Three or four spelling, punctuation, OR grammatical errors.

Overall look of ad annoying: jumbled layout, poorly ordered, clashing colors, unreadable text, and irrelevant graphics. Five or more spelling, punctuation, OR grammatical errors.

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Conclusion Not only did you nail your job interview, but you have also successfully completed your very own advertisement, making you one of the youngest advertising moguls the world has ever seen. Now that you know the techniques used to get consumers to do what advertisers want, instead of being brainwashed by the media, you will now have the skills to make sensible judgments about what you purchased and what you believe!

Credits ALTEC at University of Kansas (2008). RubiStar. Retrieved on November 7, 2012 from http://rubistar.4teachers.org/ Blume, Judy (1972). Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing. New York: Dutton. Castle Works, Inc (2005). It’s My Life: Money Making Advertising and Promotion. PBS Kids Go. Retreived on November 12, 2012 from http://pbskids.org/itsmylife/money/making/article10.html Duke University (2000). Emergence of Advertising in America. “No Woman is So Highly Placed That She Can Afford to Neglect her Beauty.” Retrieved on November 12, 2012 from http://library.duke.edu/rubenstein/scriptorium/eaa/ponds/P01/P0189-72dpi.html Schrank, Jeffrey (2012). Language of Advertising Claims. Retrieved on November 5, 2012 from http://home.olemiss.edu/%7Eegjbp/comp/ad-claims.html Steidle, James (2006). Stacked Coins with Dollar Symbol on White Background. [Photograph]. Retrieved on November 7, 2012 from http://www.123rf.com/photo_7059300_stacked-coins-with-a-dollar-symbol-ona-white-background.html Stinaz (2012). Rainbow Circular Arrows. [Digital graphic]. Retrieved on November 7, 2012 from http://www.clker.com/clipart-rainbow-circular-arrows.html\ [Untitled image of handshake]. (n.d.). [Photograph]. Retrieved on November 7, 2012 from http://www.property.al/2009/03/the-property-purchase-process-in-albania/ [Untitled image of clipboard]. (n.d.). [Digital graphic]. Retrieved on November 7, 2012 from http://www.mediabistro.com/fishbowldc/pbs-newshour-hires-task-fiend_b76897 [Untitled image of evaluation]. (n.d.). [Photographic]. Retrieved on November 7, 2012 from http://theworldinyourclassroomthroughpjbl.blogspot.com/2011/08/evaluation-ability-to-judge-valueof.html [Untitled image of light bulb]. (n.d.). [Digital graphic]. Retrieved on November 7, 2012 from http://difference-works.com/the-inclusion-and-engagement-light-bulb-moment-put-that-energy-backto-work/ Your Ad Should Be Here [Photograph]. Retrieved on November 8, 2012 from http://www.roopedog.com/partners/sponsors/

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Unit Media Share Aesop's Quest Aesop’s Quest is an educational game based on Aesop's Fables that will help students with their memory and comprehension skills. The students have to remember elements of the story, which they previously read, in order to complete the level. At the end of each story segment or level, the student is rewarded with a puzzle piece. Once the entire puzzle is completed, the student will be able to continue to the next fable. This free app for the iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPad is an excellent complement to a reading unit that focuses on comprehension skills. This app can also benefit students who are falling behind by making the development of these skills more fun and interesting. NRCC Games (2011). Aesop’s Quest. iTunes $0.99. Retrieved on November 6, 2012 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/aesops-quest/id442928041?mt=8 Comic Strip Capers Students can create their own comic strips with this interactive website that will help strengthen their vocabulary skills. Students are asked to select a word to direct the action of the story, and each word choice will lead the characters in the comic to a different outcome. This game is not only educational, but it’s a lot of fun. Students can play again, and again to see how the different words will change the events and the ending. They can even print out their finished comic strips or email them to a friend. Scholastic, Inc. (2011). Comic Strip Capers. PBS Teachers. Retrieved, September 12, 2012 from http://www.pbs.org/teachers/connect/resources/4852/preview/ Dig it An interactive website in which students help an adorable avatar dog dig up a clues to solve a mystery. Students are given a short paragraph to read and are them prompted to answer questions pertaining to the paragraph. With every correct answer, the cute little dog digs up a piece of the mystery object. In the end, once all the questions are answered correctly, the student discovers what the mystery object is. This is an excellent informal assessment for reading comprehension. Harcourt School Publishers. (2012). Dig It. Harcourt School. Retrieved, September 16, 2012 from http://www.harcourtschool.com/activity_collections_preview/predict_outcomes/3_predict.html Extended Learning: Week 6, Session B In this episode of The Electric Company, cartoons, real children, music and visual clues are used to introduce, reiterate, and exemplify the quintessential skills necessary to comprehend information. There is a sketch with singing and dancing detectives explaining how to solve mysteries by following clues. This episode of the Electric Company also addresses the meaning of details and how they can be used to better understand meaning in books. This video can be used as a supplemental resource for comprehension strategies. The Electric Company (May 30, 2012). Extended Learning: Week 6, Session B. Retrieved on October 10, 2012 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=obxwueSmFh8&feature=plcp Futaba This is a fantastic multiplayer (four player) game for elementary students that actually makes learning new words fun. Futaba is a word quiz game can be used at home or in the classroom. It is ideal for supporting classroom activities of all types, but especially for developing vocabulary to aid in reading comprehension and language skills. Futaba is also a great resource to help ESL students practice learning words in the

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classroom environment. Each player takes a seat around the iPad and taps to start. The game begins as images zoom into the playing area. The first player to match the word to the image scores a point. When the player wins three rounds, they are awarded a giant (but very friendly) seedling (Futaba is Japanese for seedling). You can even design your own game. The illustrations and audio for this game are darling and you can even use your own images and text to create your own content by using a built in camera, adding photos to iTunes, or using a Dropbox account. INKids (2012). Futaba. iTunes $0.99. Retrieved on October 6, 2012 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/word-games-for-kids-futaba/id426517722?mt=8 Inference Song In this video, a teacher playing guitar is accompanied by enthusiastic students singing a song about making inferences, all while a Spiderman doll erratically “dances” to the music. This bizarre, hilarious, educational and age-appropriate video and song will undoubtedly keep students entertained while helping them understand this very abstract concept. The lyrics are set to a classic children’s song melody, making it easy and fun to sing along. The ease with which students in the classroom and at home can view this YouTube video, makes it a priceless resource for in a 21 st century elementary reading class. Channel Cheese (October 3, 2008). Inference Song. Retrieved on October 10, 2012 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m_ZNP5aj5fs&feature=player_embedded#! Into the Book A reading comprehension resource for K-4 students and teachers that focuses on eight research-based strategies: Using Prior Knowledge, Making Connections, Questioning, Visualizing, Inferring, Summarizing, Evaluating and Synthesizing. This creatively designed website is one of the most aesthetically pleasing of literary websites. The quality of the content is also excellent and is in line with Tennessee’s reading standards. It is a free website, but you do have to sign up for access. Once you sign up, you will receive a “student key” via email. Wisconsin Educational Communications Board. (2012). Into the Book: Teaching Reading. Into the Book. Retrieved, September 14, 2012 from http://reading.ecb.org/index.html Making Inferences In this video, students from Mr. Salsich’s third grade classroom thoroughly explain what inferences are and how to make them. The video begins with a stuffed animal sloth named Perezoso, who asks a question about inference, very very very very slowly. Throughout his stunted speech, the video cuts to clips of children yawning, snoring and resting their heads on tables. All the voices are done by children, since the video uses pictures of real students and their voices, students will be able to relate to the information. There are numerous examples and the concept definition is reiterated throughout. This is an excellent supplemental resource to introduce what inferences are and how to make them. Jmsalsich (March 8, 2009). Making Inferences. Retrieved on http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JWSqxItd9SU&feature=g-hi Reading Monster Town 3 This is a great app for kindergarten through fifth graders and for students learning to read in English (ESL). This app has interactive word and sentence games to help students better understanding stories and to review words and sentence structures. The stories and games in this app align with elementary school core curricula and will certainly help students gain a greater appreciation of, and intrinsic motivation for reading. The captivating illustrations will attract and keep learners’ attentions and the fun word games, with their pronunciations and illustrations, will help students grasp the words’ spelling and meanings in an effective and efficient way and the building sentence games will help students comprehend different kinds of sentence structures. This app also allows for learners to read and listen at the same time, which will benefit those with different learning styles. Reading Monster Town, with its simple topics will help the young learners develop a better understanding of themselves and a love of reading. BluePin (2012). Reading Monster Town 3. iTunes $0.99. Retrieved on October 6, 2012 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/reading-monster-town-3/id463252389?mt=8

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Abigail Spaziani Wix Portfolio: http://abbyspazz.wix.com/abbys Unit of study proposal: Potential and Kinetic Energy The purpose of this unit is for the study of energy. There are various types of energy that the students will expect to learn. Along with the different types of energy students will learn the comparisons and contrasts of each type of energy. Further depth of the types of energy will be analyzed in order to develop a full understanding of the diverse energies. Students should be able to differentiate the different kind of energy from each other. As well as understanding, students will develop an understanding of a relationship between certain energies. Students will also learn how different types of energy can change into other kind of energies. This unit will incorporate what kind of energy is man-made or natural. Some questions that will be assessed within this unit will be what kind of energy is man-made? How does manmade energy develop? What kind of energy is natural? How is natural energy continuous? What does kinetic and potential energy have in common? Educating students on energy can help in other aspects besides the knowledge of energy itself. For example, it is important for students to understand the importance of energy conservation. This can help save the planet by being attentive to the amount of energy one uses. Along with the amount of energy being used, it is important for the students to understand and master the concepts of energy in order to proceed to the next level or lesson in science. Studying and understanding Energy in science is a portion of Grade Level Expectations that are required under the Tennessee State Standard 10. GLE 0607.10.1 Compare and contrast the three forms of potential energy GLE 0607.10.2 Analyze various types of energy GLE 0607.10.3 Explain the principles underlying the Law of Conservation of Energy.

Web 2.0 Projects Glogster URL: http://abbyspazz.edu.glogster.com/abbyspazz/ Opening Commercial: This file is listed as 6EnergyCommercial.wav in the media folder. Unit Video: This file is listed as 6EnergyVideo.mp4 in the media folder.

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Kinetic vs. Potential Energy with Technology Name: Abigail Spaziani Subject Area(s): Energy Duration of Lesson: 50 min. Grade Level: Sixth Context Learning: The sixth grade class at Brighton Middle School consists of a total of 16 students. Ten of the students are girls, while the remaining six are boys. The class is composed of four Caucasians, one Hispanic, and eleven African American students. Students are typically either 10-11 years of age during the sixth grade school year. There are a total of two students that have an IEP plan. One of the students has autism, which is assessed by an IEP team. The teacher has help from a special education teacher that comes in the general education setting during daily routines. The student also exits the room at certain periods to strictly work with the special education teacher. The other student has an IEP plan that is under a hearing impairment category with a cochlear implant. This student was born deaf, but received the cochlear implant at a younger age. This student has an IEP plan developed that requires a speaker at a desk. The speaker is required when the student has difficulty hearing the teacher. The student sits at the front of the room in order to help decrease the amount of speaker use. The teacher uses a hands free microphone when the speaker is required in class. The student is proficient with spoken and written language, since the disability was found in earlier academic development. Most of the students live in the city, while three live in a rural neighborhood. Up to ž of students have financial security that enables them to have supplies, food, and more. The remaining Ÿ of the students are on reduced or free lunch. State Standard(s): State Standard GLE 0607.10.2 Analyze various types of energy transformations.

Technology Standard NETS 4. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making

Behavioral Objectives: The main focus will rely on the transformation of strictly two kinds of energies, which are potential to kinetic energy. The students should be able to understand the difference of kinetic and potential energy. Various examples of the types of energies should be correctly aligned by the students. Lastly, students should be able to understand how potential energy can transform into kinetic energy. The contrast of the two types of energies will be introduced and demonstrated in two different forms for better understanding. The first form consists of introducing the two forms of energy. Potential and kinetic energy will be identified in order for the students to comprehend the difference between the two forms. The second form consists of using a video that help demonstrate and explain the difference of the potential and kinetic energy. Activities set out for this lesson will help strengthen the understanding after the energies are introduced. Students will be able to demonstrate understanding by an activity planned out after the introduction, and video clip. An online Potential vs. Kinetic energy game proceeds after the introduction and clip. This will help students with practice and be able to execute prior knowledge of the lesson. The game can also be a great way to review the lesson as well. This game can align with the technology standard used in order to help the students use decision making in order to pick the correct answer to the questions used in the game. It also correlates with the technology standard because students must use problem solving in order to differentiate between the two forms of energy in the online game. Language Objectives: Vocabulary that will be used by the students consists of energy, potential energy, kinetic energy, transformation, transfer, and Law of Conservation. Demonstrations of vocabulary development will appear by incorporating the keywords into habitual routines when discussing the forms of energies, and how the energy changes into a different form. Students will also be able to demonstrate the understanding of the vocabulary by the end of the lesson Potential vs. Kinetic Energy game. The online game will be effective to analyze if the students are using the vocabulary aligned within this lesson correctly. Potential energy transforming into kinetic energy is one phrase that students will be able to develop. This will be present in the introduction and video clip demonstration. Other opportunities to develop these vocabulary terms will occur when the students are working in groups of two. The students are allowed to talk to each other during

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the Potential vs. Kinetic Energy game. This will allot time during class to practice phrases, terms, and examples of kinetic and potential energy. The technology language objectives are internet, the website, and being able to complete the online game by using correct buttons which are the keypad and mouse. Students should be able to use a laptop and correctly open the internet up to get to the online game. Formative Assessment: During the introduction of kinetic and potential energy, the teacher can assess development of understanding by asking questions, listing examples, or taking questions. This should help promote internal thinking, while helping students remain active while introducing the two forms of energy. Also, this can help the teacher evaluate the development speed of the class by being active in discussion with the students. Demonstrations of this material can be executed by the students answering questions correctly, or by the online game designed to occur after the lesson. The teacher can monitor understanding by both the introduction of the lesson and the online game by assisting, asking questions, and being mobile to the groups during the game. Detailed discussion with the students should also help demonstrate the understanding that is being developed through the lesson. Students should be attentive to the introduction, video clip, and the game. Recording of understanding will mainly be controlled by the discussion. This recording will occur during small time slots used for discussion after the introduction and video clip. Most group feedback will be displayed during the introduction and video clip. After the video clip is complete, another time slot can be allotted for discussion. Individual feedback will occur during the online game. The teacher will assist groups while delivering feedback to the groups of two during the online game. The teacher will use the discussion assessment to determine if the class understands enough to move on, or to spend more time on a specific allotted time for discussion. Summative Assessment: Student learning should be evident in the way the students speak during discussion, and also the scores the students make on the online game. This achievement can be calculated by the teacher. Determining the students’ display of vocabulary terms while speaking, and a high amount of points earned during the game should establish forms of student understanding. Every student will receive a chance to play the game individually, but with assistance from their partner if need be. This will allow peer learning as well to help develop the weak areas of the lesson for students that do not fully understand. If peer learning is not effective enough, the groups that are struggling on the online game will receive extra assistance from the teacher. If it is just one person in a group, the teacher can collect all the students that do not fully grasp the material and review again. After a quick review, the teacher can answer a few question examples on the online game and assist the students when they attempt to game again. Reflection of this material will occur after the completion of the game. Students can reflect by the allotted time used in class for discussions. Students can also reflect individual progress by the scores they receive after completing the game. From a teacher’s perspective, proficiency can be determined by the discussion. The students should be able to use the vocabulary, and correctly use the vocabulary during discussion. Students’ proficiency can also be determined by the game assessment. Students will have to match the correct energy with the correct description or example. This activity will allow students to problem solve the correct answers in order to win the online game. The teacher will be able to determine if the students understand the technology skill by observing and assisting the groups during the online game. Other ways to understand if the students are using the technology skill correctly is if the students get to the internet, then the website, and finally play the online game aligned with the lesson. Students will demonstrate the technology standard through the game, as the teacher will record scores to get an understanding of the students’ progress. This is how achievement will be processed by the ability of the students to play the game, and the scoring the students receive from the online game.

Materials: Materials for Curriculum  Dry-erase board  Dry-erase markers  Eraser  Pointer

Materials for Technology  8 Laptops  Dr. Loopy/TeacherTube (2007). Potential and Kinetic Energy Clip. Retrieved on October 4, 2012 from http://teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=9334  Allen, Maria/Quintessential Instructional Archive

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

Worksheet (homework)

Procedures: Time Learning Activities-Teacher 5 minutes

10 minutes

1.

Anticipatory Set: The teacher will open the lesson by a question. Do you think potential and kinetic energy are alike or not alike from each other? Then the teacher will focus and discuss potential and kinetic energy as it is already written on the dryerase board.

2.

Presentation/Explicit Instruction: After the introduction of kinetic and potential energy has been declared, the teacher will then discuss different examples of both of the energy separately and together. Another visual aid to help demonstrate the transition from potential into kinetic energy will be provided by a Dr. Loopy video clip on TeacherTube. This video demonstrates a toy car being pushed back (potential energy), then released to move on its on (kinetic energy). Students will be asked to take mental notes of the video. The teacher will also have time to discuss what happened in the video and explain the happenings in his or her own terms as

(2012). Potential vs. Kinetic Energy Millionaire Game. Retrieved on October 10, 2012 from http://www.quia.com/rr/37397.html

Learning ActivitiesStudents 1. Students will be seated at their individual seats. Students will raise their hands and answer whether they think potential and kinetic energy are alike or not alike. A small discussion will take place for the students to interact in.

2.

Students will input on what they think could be an example of both kinetic and potential energy. Afterwards, they will remain seated in their individual sits. In order to watch a video clip will be shown; students will pay attention while taking mental notes. At the end of the video, questions and a time for the teacher to ask questions will take place. The

Purpose 1.

Opening the lesson up with a question will allow time for students to ponder their personal thoughts on what they think potential and kinetic energy might be. The dry-erase board serves the purpose for visual learning. Also, introducing the two energy forms will help with understanding further in the lesson plan.

2.

Prior knowledge will be developed by the introduction of the two energies being displayed in the video clip. Prior knowledge will also reoccur by an allotted time used for discussion the video and any questions the student may have.

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well.

3.

7 minutes

4.

10 minutes

Structured Practice/Exploration: After the video is complete and students have asked all the questions that may have formed from the video, the teacher can ask questions to assure the students understand the material. Some questions the teacher can ask are: What energy was represented when the toy car rolled back? What energy was represented while the toy car moved forward? What are the differences between kinetic and potential energy. Can you think of any other examples of energy transformation? What about a skate board rolling down a hill? Guided Practice/Feedback: Students will be able to practice this new skill by participating in an online game that relate to the game show “Who Wants to be a Millionaire?� This game includes examples/questions of both kinetic and potential energy. The teacher will evaluate the students by being mobile and assisting the students. Feedback will be given to students that require the assistance which is determined by scoring of the game. If students do not understand the material, the teacher can take the students and review the troubled areas while other students continue the online game.

students will observe the review of the video by the teacher explaining the video in his or her terms. This is the time for students to understand, and ask any questions that may be confusing to them.

3.

4.

Students will still be in individual seats. Questions will be answered by various students. Also, students will be able to make statements or questions during this discussion time

Students will go into groups of two while the teacher passes out a laptop to each group. One student will begin the game,

3.

Prior knowledge will be developed through the introduction, discussion, and video. Students will be able to rely on the visual aid and the discussion to answer questions given by the teacher. Students should be able to ask the various questions the teacher asked from the earlier portion of the lesson.

4.

Students will be able to use prior knowledge

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10 minutes

5 minutes

5.

Independent Practice/Application: The teacher will allow the groups of two to work independently on the game in order to further their own learning. The teacher will be able to collect the correct answers to the game as a part of formative assessment. By the students being close to winning, or winning the game should prove the skills they learned are evident in proof of understanding.

6.

The teacher will continue to record progress of the students participating on the online game. Also, assistance will occur to assure students are not cheating and correctly playing the game. The summative assessment will occur after the game has been complete. Students will be asked to complete a short, two question homework assignment which consist of listing an example of kinetic and potential energy. Also, a summative assessment will occur by the teacher focusing on the completion of the technology standard. The student will have to complete the game in order to complete the goal. After the game is finished, a discussion will begin by the teacher asking questions about the game and the video. Also, key terms will be asked and restated for the students to remember.

while the other student observes and records the scores for the student that is playing the game. Students are able to work with each other for peer learning.

5.

Students continue playing the game and record their scores from the game. If the students are unable to win, or almost win the game then that is evidence of unclear understanding. Students will also be assessed by questions at the end of class during the closure of the lesson. Students will answer independently, with no help from peers. Students will also work independently on the game in order to further develop

while attempting to complete the game. This knowledge can come from the introduction on the dry-erase board, or the video clip of Dr.Loopy demonstrating the transformation of potential to kinetic energy.

5.

The game and discussion will help review and form knowledge into better understanding for the students.

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understanding. 6. 6.

The student that was recoding the scores will switch out and begin to play the game. Peer learning will still occur while the game proceeds. The other student not playing the game will record the student’s score that is playing the game. This allows equal opportunity for both students to participate. By the end of the game, both students will have demonstrated the understanding of the new material. Both students will be able to have their recorded scores in order to evaluate their own work. Students will have a summative assessment after the first few questions of the game are completed. After about 3-5 questions are assisted by the peer, then the students will work on their own in order to finish the game and use problem

Students will be able to use prior knowledge while attempting to complete the game. This prior knowledge can be used by the introduction, discussion, or the Dr. Loopy video clip which demonstrated both potential and kinetic energy.

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solving to determine the correct answer. Modifications: In order to meet IEP modifications for the autistic student, the special education teacher will be additional help during the game portion of the lesson plan. The special education teacher will stay to assist during the completion of the online game. Modifications for the hearing impaired student will occur only during the video clip. The game requires no sound, thus no modifications are needed for that portion of the lesson. The hearing impaired student will be seated closer to the sound of the video, as well as have the additional speaker on that is located on the desk. In case of a technical difficulty the teacher can have a toy car replica and demonstrate the energies in the actual classroom. Another option includes eight toy cars distributed to each group. The students execute the difference between the energies while demonstrating it on the car. A third option for the video difficulties can occur by the teacher acting out the skit that is performed by Dr.Loopy. In case a technical difficulty occurs during the online game, a copy can be printed out and written on the board. Students can still get into groups of two, while the teacher can either write or speak the questions and answer list. The students will record their answers on a sheet of paper, an continue the lesson by switching partners. Closure: Closing the lesson will take the remaining 3 minutes left in class. The key points of the lesson will mainly be articulated by the teacher. The teacher will ask the students to return to their seat while asking questions. Some of the questions can be: Who got the highest score? Do you remember any of the examples listed on the game? What is potential energy? What is kinetic energy? This will be a review grace period for the students to reflect on the full lesson, not just the game. Students will be able to reflect on the introduction by understanding and explaining potential and kinetic energy. Also, students can reflect on the video by explaining potential energy transforming into kinetic energy. Lastly, students can reflect on examples of potential and kinetic energy, and transformations by the aligned game.

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So you want to be the Boss?

Designed by: Abby Spaziani Based on the state of Tennessee curriculum standards for Sixth Grade Science: GLE 0607.10.1 Compare and contrast the three forms of potential energy. GLE 0607.10.2 Analyze various types of energy transformations. GLE 0607.10.3 Explain the principles underlying the Law of Conservation of Energy. Introduction

Task

Process

Evaluation

Conclusion

Credits

Introduction: Be ready to put on your thinking caps because you have been selected as an intern to NES, Nashville Electric Service, company. An internship is basically working for a company for hands on experiences, and great learning experiences. I secretly sent in paper work for you to get hands on experience with the fascinating world of energy. Every one of you has been selected for a two week internship. You have been selected based upon your fresh knowledge of energy forms and transformations. This is a fun and great opportunity for you to not be a student anymore. You can now think out of the box and explore many aspects of energy you have been studying. You will be doing hands on activities and projects for your company, NES. So, represent your company well because you are now an employee that strives to climb to the top in two weeks’ worth of time. Are you ready to climb to the top through hard and precise work? Get ready because if you want to be a boss you have to work for it. Who is the boss? Task: Assuming every one of you has accepted this great opportunity you will have three main work tasks to complete to prove you are boss material. These tasks are to be complete with the boss’s approval of completion in order to continue to climb the ladder at NES.

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 Task one will be given four days to work on and complete. Task one will involve the three different forms of potential energy which are gravitational, elastic, and chemical potential energy. One day will be used for research, two for working on the task, and the fourth day will be used for group presentations.  Task two will allow four days as well to complete. Task two will involve the various energy transformations like potential to kinetic for example. One day will be used for research and review, two for working on the task, and the fourth day is used for group presentation of the task.  Task three will allow two days for completion. The final task will include the Law of Conservation of Energy. One day will be used for research, while the last day will be a presentation of task. Your three tasks will consist of designing, explaining, and transforming. Design:  Look up and understand what gravitational potential energy is. Be able to understand examples of this potential energy. Be able to create and design an energy bar based on characteristic of gravitational potential energy. You will be provided a hyperlink of gravitational potential energy.  Look up and understand elastic potential energy. Be able to understand examples of this potential energy. Be able to create and design an energy bar based on characteristics of elastic potential energy. You will be provided a hyperlink of elastic potential energy.  Look up and understand chemical potential energy. Be able to understand examples of this potential energy. Be able to create and design an energy bar based on characteristics of chemical potential energy. You will be provided a hyperlink of chemical potential energy.  You will present these designs to the class and your boss, other known as your teacher. You will be given two days to work on this task, with one day to present. This will be a group project, so work well together. Explain:  Look up and understand energy transformations. Give a presentation and explain the energy conservation of potential into kinetic energy. You will be provided a hyperlink of energy transformation. This will consist of two days on gathering and applying information with the third day to present the material gained from this task. Transform:

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 The last task includes the Law of Conservation of Energy. You will be provided with a hyperlink including ways to conserve energy. Your task is to explain and transform NES customers on how to save energy. Process: Task 1: The boss has been noticing that the workers are becoming lazy. They are working too slow and not accurate enough. The boss decides to assign you into three different groups. Each group will have to create their own flavors of an energy bar. This is a simple pitch to describe the packaging, flavor, and details of a made up energy bar. You are working with gravitational potential energy, elastic potential energy, and chemical potential energy.

Day 1: You will be placed into your groups. Day one will solely consist of research on an assigned energy you are given. There will be a total of three groups that will work on gravity, elastic, or chemical potential energy.  Group 1: You will begin to research gravitational potential energy. Begin your research here Types of Energy. Scroll down to types of energy and you will find gravitational potential energy. After reviewing the energy watch this short clip by Wile E. Coyote. With your group discuss if you see any examples of gravitational potential energy. Is there more than one example in the clip? Lastly, begin to brainstorm with your group of ideas for your energy bar.  Group 2: You will begin to research elastic potential energy. Begin your research here Types of Energy. Scroll down to types of energy and you will find elastic potential energy. After reviewing the energy watch this short clip by Wile E. Coyote. Forward the video to 32 seconds. After watching the video, discuss with your group what makes it spring elastic potential energy. Are there anymore examples in the video that portray elastic potential energy? Lastly, begin to brainstorm with your group ideas for your energy bar.  Group 3: You will begin to research chemical potential energy. Begin your research here Types of Energy. Scroll down to types of energy and

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you will find chemical potential energy. After reviewing the energy watch this short clip by Wile E. Coyote. After watching the video discuss the video with your group. What was the thing that caused potential chemical energy? Lastly, begin to brainstorm with your group ideas for your energy bar.  REMEMBER: Your research day is only one class period. Make sure you know enough information about your specific potential energy so that your group can continue to day 2. Day 2 and 3: Create your energy bar. Now that you have reviewed the type of energy your group is assigned, it is now time to get to work.  First begin by getting a piece of cardboard provided by your boss.  Second, you may grab any materials that your group has decided upon to create your energy bar. You can find these materials next to the cardboard. (This also include scissors and glue)  You can use markers, construction paper, foil, glitter, paint, and any other supplies provided. Remember, this is your product.  Make sure your energy bar has a name with a flavor included within or in the title.  Begin working with your group. Cut out the cardboard to fit your energy bar.  Make sure to include hints on what type of potential energy your group is assigned.  Remember…You have ONE day to complete this task. Be sure to review your work, no incorrect spelling or grammar. Be POSTITIVE that your type of potential energy bar correlates to the definition provided. The energy bar must be complete in order for the boss to see it. Try to make your energy bar as clean as possible. The more creative you are the better. DO NOT FORGET, the most important task is to assure that the boss knows what kind of potential energy your group was assigned for this project. Day 4: Presentation. The last day of this task will include a sales pitch to your boss.  Your group will present you energy bar to the boss and your coworkers. Tell us about the bar, what flavor it is, and how does it provide energy to the consumer.  REMEMBER, this is a group presentation. All participants should be involved with the sales pitch. This is just a speaking presentation. No extra posters or visuals will be needed. All you need is your group members and the cardboard energy bar that your group has created. Make sure you are loud enough or the whole room to hear. Be confident in what you say, sale this product like it is a real energy bar. This is the third and final day of

59


task 1 so make it something to remember. Presentation should be no longer than 10 minutes. Speak clearly using complete sentences, listen to other sales pitches, make sure your group is prepared, be assure the content is correct, and all members must work together. Task 2: Congratulations, if you have been approved to move forward to task 2 of your internship. This task focuses on energy transformation. Your boss has observed your groups creativity skills, now the boss wants to see your creativity skills come to life. NES offers a “fun day” for its employees a few times a month. The boss has asked you to create an activity skill based on potential and kinetic energy. This task will take a total of three days as well.

Day5: You will be split into three groups again, only this time you will be put into different groups assigned by your boss. You will begin to research and review the relationship between potential into kinetic energy transformation. Although energy transformation involves other types of energy, this task will focus solely on potential into kinetic energy.  First watch this clip provided by Dr. Loopy that describes the transformation of the energies. Discuss with your group the video and the examples are provided to show potential and kinetic energy.  Second, watch Energy Transformation Examples and skip to 29 seconds. Discuss the three examples given of energy transformation. Only focus on the energy transformation types that we have discussed in class. Do not worry about the ones you do not know.  Lastly, begin to brainstorm with your group what kind of game you would like to come up with. Have the materials that you will need for this game ready by the end of class. Send in a piece of paper to your boss with materials you will need for next class meeting for your game.  Remember, this day is meant for research and brainstorming. You should have a game in ideal for you to work with for day 2 of this task. Make sure you turn in all materials you will need to practice your game for day 2.

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Day 6 and 7: Begin the games!  One, retrieve your materials from the boss to test out your energy game.  Begin to work with the rules and procedures of your game. Make sure they are written down on paper.  Lastly, test out your game make sure everything works correctly.  Remember to make sure your rules and procedures are written correctly with no spelling or grammar errors. Make sure all everyone can participate in the game your group created. Lastly, make sure your group is able to demonstrate where exactly the potential and kinetic energy is found within your game. Day 8: Play the games! This is the day your group will demonstrate your game to the boss.  You will begin by explaining your game to the boss and coworkers.  Demonstrate your game with your group members.  Allow the other students to participate in the game you have created.  Remember, every group member must participate in the game. Make sure you have all your materials for the presentation. Be assure there are no spelling or grammatical errors in your procedures and rules. Describe the potential and kinetic portion of the game while demonstrating. Demonstration and playing the games should be no longer than 15 minutes. Make sure the content of your game is accurate to the potential to kinetic energy example, make sure the rules are accurate, be creative, and make sure all members cooperate. Task 3: Congratulations if you have made it past task 2. Task 3 involves the Law of Conservation of Energy. The boss has noticed that too many people have been using energy to the point where the workers and equipment has been overloading. The boss wants you to be a representative of NES and speak on how people can conserve energy. Remember, energy cannot be created or destroyed. Work your way to the top because this is the final task to determine your ability to be the boss. Day 9: You will begin by being divided into three different groups. The boss has designated specific energy aspects to each group which are at home, school, and work. The boss wants you to list different ways to conserve energy through those three things. Day one will consist on researching and recording different ways to conserve energy. You will be presenting this information to your boss and coworkers.

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 Group 1: Begin by researching ways to conserve energy at home by reviewing Energy Hog. Discuss with your group what you have or have not done to save energy in your home. Then write some of the examples down.  Group 2: Begin by researching ways to conserve energy at school by reviewing Energy Hog. Discuss with your group what you have or have not done to save energy at the school you attend. Write some of the examples down.  Group 3: Begin by researching ways to conserve energy at work by reviewing Energy Hog. Discuss with your group what have you have or have not done while working during this internship to conserve energy. Write some of the examples down.  ALL GROUPS: After reviewing your specific energy conservation aspect take the Energy Hog Quiz as group.  Remember…day one is to work on research. Write down the examples of energy conservation on a piece of notebook paper. Be assure that there are no grammatical or spelling errors. Have at least five examples of energy conservation written down. Give at least two personal experiences that involved your topic area. Day 10: Transform! Be able to change people’s minds on the use of energy. Everything you learned yesterday is to be used in your presentation today.  Your group will get in the front of class and introduce the topic area you were given.  Explain the different examples to conserve energy within your topic area.  Give personal experiences of energy conservation.  Presentation should be no longer than 10 minutes.  Remember every member must participate in the presentation. A poster or any other presentation materials are not required. The only required materials are the piece of paper that has the list of energy conservation for

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your group’s personal use. Make sure the paper has no grammatical or spelling errors before being turned in. Make sure your group includes at least five examples of energy conservation for your topic area. Make sure your group includes two examples of personal experiences of conservation of energy. Be confident, this is your last task to determine your ability to be the boss. Make the pitch clear and use complete sentences, listen to others as they present, make sure you do not exceed 10 minutes, make sure content is correct, and all members must work with one another.

Evaluation: Rubric for task 1 & 3 4

3

2

1

Pitch

Pitch was often used and it conveyed emotions appropriately.

Pitch was often used but the emotion it conveyed sometimes did not fit the content.

Pitch was rarely used OR the emotion it conveyed often did not fit the content.

Pitch was not used to convey emotion.

Preparedness

Student is completely prepared and has obviously rehearsed.

Student seems pretty prepared but might have needed a couple more rehearsals.

The student is Student does not somewhat prepared, seem at all prepared but it is clear that to present. rehearsal was lacking.

Listens to Other Presentations

Listens intently. Does not make distracting noises or movements.

Listens intently but has one distracting noise or movement.

Sometimes does not appear to be listening but is not distracting.

Sometimes does not appear to be listening and has distracting noises or movements.

Time-Limit

Presentation is 5-10 minutes long.

Presentation is 4 minutes long.

Presentation is 3 minutes long.

Presentation is less than 3 minutes long.

Speaks Clearly

Speaks clearly and distinctly all (10095%) the time, and mispronounces no words.

Speaks clearly and distinctly all (10095%) the time, but mispronounces one word.

Speaks clearly and distinctly most (9485%) of the time. Mispronounces no more than one word.

Often mumbles or cannot be understood OR mispronounces more than one word.

CATEGORY

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Uses Complete Sentences

Always (99-100% of Mostly (80-98%) time) speaks in speaks in complete complete sentences. sentences.

Sometimes (70-80%) Rarely speaks in speaks in complete complete sentences. sentences.

Content

Shows a full Shows a good Shows a good understanding of the understanding of the understanding of topic. topic. parts of the topic.

Does not seem to understand the topic very well.

Collaboration with Peers

Almost always listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others in the group. Tries to keep people working well together.

Usually listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others in the group. Does not cause \\\"waves\\\" in the group.

Often listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others in the group but sometimes is not a good team member.

Rarely listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others in the group. Often is not a good team member

4

3

2

1

Knowledge Gained

All students in group could easily and correctly state several facts about the topic used for the game without looking at the game.

All students in the group could easily and correctly state 12 facts about the topic used for the game without looking at the game.

Most students in the group could easily and correctly state 12 facts about the topic used for the game without looking at the game.

Several students in the group could NOT correctly state facts about the topic used for the game without looking at the game.

Accuracy of Content

All information cards All but one of the made for the game information cards are correct. made for the game is correct.

All but two of the information cards made for the game are correct.

Several information cards made for the game are not accurate.

Rules

Rules were written clearly enough that all could easily participate.

Rules were written, but one part of the game needed slightly more explanation.

Rules were written, The rules were not but people had some written. difficulty figuring out the game.

The group generally worked well together with all members contributing some quality work.

The group worked fairly well together with all members contributing some work.

Rubric for Task 2: CATEGORY

Cooperative work The group worked well together with all members contributing significant amounts of quality work.

The group often did not work well together and the game appeared to be the work of only 1-2 students in the group.

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Creativity

The group put a lot of thought into making the game interesting and fun to play as shown by creative questions, game pieces and/or game board.

The group put some thought into making the game interesting and fun to play by using textures, fancy writing, and/or interesting characters.

The group tried to make the game interesting and fun, but some of the things made it harder to understand/enjoy the game.

Little thought was put into making the game interesting or fun.

Conclusion: All three of these tasks must be complete within the given date. Your goal is to climb the ladder to the top and be the boss of NES Company. You have two weeks to work together and help each other learn and grow. The boss will determine your success by the presentations and the game you have created. Every single one of you has the chance to become the boss. There are many other electric companies that need bosses like you. If you have any questions for the boss, contact sabigail@my.tnstate.edu. So you want to be the boss? Well get to work, because these three tasks must be approved for your opportunity. Credits: Jarrett, A. (2012, November 4). Energy Bars Image. Retrieve from http://docakilah.wordpress.com/2012/06/04/3808/ Spaziani, A. (2012, November 4) Rubistar. Created from http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php Unknown. (2012, November 4) Boss Hat Image. Retrieved from http://www.zazzle.com/boss_hat-148977482558793720 Unknown. (2012, November 4). Credit Image. Retrieved from http://woozworldboosterclub.pbworks.com/w/page/54723004/Woozworld%20Booster%2 0Club%20Wiki%20%28Main%20Menu%29 Unknown. (2012, November 4). Energy Hog Image. Retrieved from http://www.animalmakers.com/contactus.php Unknown. (2012, November 4). Eye Glass Image. Retrieved from http://www.edtech.vt.edu/edtech/id/eval/eval.html Unknown. (2012, November 4) Finish Line Image. Retrieved from http://203.159.12.32:8082/AIT/education/LanguageCenter/ait-writing-services/guidebook/conclusion.html Unknown. (2012, November 4). Games Image. Retrieved from http://www.chicagomag.com/Chicago-Magazine/December-2008/Kids-and-Play/ Unknown. (2012, November 4). Green Light Bulb Image. Retrieved from http://www.2gogreen.com.au/enhanced-renewable-energy-target-eret/

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Unknown. (2012, November 4). NES Image. Retrieved from http://www.inmotiontechnology.com/customers/testimonials/ Unknown. (2012, November 4). NES Neighborhood Energy Savers Image. Retrieved from http://www.nespower.com/community_workshops.html

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Unit Media Share Conservation of Energy Song A song found on YouTube discusses Conservation of Energy in a familiar song known by Maroon 5 band. The song begins with discussing chemical energy and giving examples of what chemical energy is. As the song progresses, Conservation of Law is introduced and described how it cannot be destroyed. Potential energy becomes the next focus, and then mentions elastic potential energy. As the song progresses, kinetic energy is introduced as described. This video can be great for an introduction of many energy lesson plans because it includes more than one type of energy. The song describes and discusses other energy sources with a melody that can be easy to sing with. Parr/YouTube (2011). Conservation of Energy Song. (Retrieved on October 4, 2012 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k60jGJfV8oU Dr. Loopy discusses Potential and Kinetic energy This is a video that consists of three characters and a dog. In this video the main focus relies on potential and kinetic energy. The video opens as a scientist, Dr. Loopy, describing both energies by using an example. Dr. Loopy is dressed in a lab coat, glasses, and a lime green wig. The example is a toy car that can move on its own by moving it backwards. As Dr. Loopy describes in the video, by moving the car back is potential energy. When the toy car is released kinetic energy is applied. The video continues with Dr. Loopy personally showing the difference between the two energy sources. Dr. Loopy, his friend, and his dog decide to shrink themselves and go into the toy car. Another character, Charlizeta, stays normal in size to push the car back. As the video continues, Charlizeta pushed the car back and releases. While this is performed, both energies are mentioned again. The video ends with the car jumping over a ramp successfully. This video can be very beneficial if students are having a hard time differentiating between kinetic and potential energy. The two energies are introduced, described, and performed clearly for students understanding. Dr. Loopy/YouTube (2007) Potential and Kinetic Energy Clip. Retrieved on October 4, 2012 from http://teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=9334 Ms. Hoskins 6th Grade Science This Android application includes all the subject areas that are present in a sixth grade class. Energy is one topic area that is included in this application, which focuses on kinetic and potential energy. The application includes a PowerPoint form in which provides the important information in an energy lesson. As you open the application, the introduction is an actual science sixth grade page that includes test minders, important dates, and the other subject areas that follow under the science subject. This application allows students to take the information on the go as a portable PowerPoint. There are a total of fourteen slides which include definitions, pictures, and examples of the energies. Ms. Hoskins 6th Grade Science/Ms. Hoskins (October 2012). Android Market. Free. Retrieved on October 24, 2012 from https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wMsHoskinsScienceClass&feature=search_result#?t=W 251bGwsMSwxLDEsImNvbS53TXNIb3NraW5zU2NpZW5jZUNsYXNzIl0. PSLE Science Revision Notes In an application that mainly focuses on energy involves the different forms of energy and other energy factors on flashcards. It provides a quick and easy way to study. The cards come in bright colors of red and yellow. Some of the questions included on the application deal with what is energy, potential

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energy, kinetic energy, and many more. Along with the application, one specific feature includes a voice over. This allows the student to listen to notes listed on each notecard. This is a great way prepare a new version of studying on the go. Wherever a student is, the application takes the important energy information wherever the student is to study. Portable studying can become the next great thing for the generation of student we have today. PSLE Science Revision Notes Energy/ Ahmad Ali Mohd Yusope (2012). Iphone Application Store. $1.99. Retrieved on October 24, 2012 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/psle-science-revisionnotes/id500357203?mt=8 Renewed Energy Song A song found on YouTube discusses energy, renewed energy, in an updated musical melody. This song is popular and students can relate to the hip music in order to create a larger impact on remembering the information. As the song opens, the lyrics state how much fuels are used every day. These fuels are limited, yet much is being used. As the song progresses it is stated what fuels are used for, how we receive fuels, and how to reduce, reuse, and recycle. Other options are listed for energy use, like solar panels, wind, and water. The song states that only 5% of renewable sources are used. This can be incorporated into a lesson to help get an insight view of what sources are being used. It can also be a great way to describe what renewable energy is. Parr/YouTube (2011). Renewed Energy Song. Retrieved on October 4, 2012 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UZol5vMDhe4 Science Jeopardy Game Science Jeopardy appears to look similar to the popular Jeopardy game found on television. There are a total of five columns, with 100-400 point categories. The five columns consist of nonrenewable resource, renewable resource, physical and chemical change, energy, and other. This game can be played between classes divided into two teams. The colors used in this game are the block colored in blue, with yellow writing. A student can pick a category and how many points he or she decides. For example, a student can pick energy for 400. The question will appear which states, which is “a form of energy that results from tiny moving particles.” The student has the option to click continue, or correct response. If the student chose to answer this specific question, the answer would be, “what is electricity.” At the bottom of the Jeopardy game, there is an option to keep score. This game includes terms, definitions, and readings that can be found in a sixth grade science class. This website would best be used after completing the energy chapter and quizzing students by a fun game. Johnson, Matt /Jeopardy (2012). Jeopardy Labs Science Game. Retrieved on September 14, 2012 from http://jeopardylabs.com/play/6 th-grade-science-game Science for Teens In this fun filled application, Energy is used in a form of a game to interact with the player(s). This game specifically focuses on two main aspects which include mechanics and energy. A town is built, with different building listed under specific educational terms. In this town different cartoon characters guide the player(s) through the game. One character includes a teacher, while the player is a part of the student body. Different examples of energy and other aspects are included throughout the continuation of the game. One technique that is used to help the player(s) learn consists of drawing the different aspects listed in order to move on to the next level in the game. The game also allows the player(s) to create their own route. Player(s) can pick which building or route they want to go to in sequential order. The game includes the topics of mechanisms, mechanical work, energy, and sources of energy. This game is full of different cartoons, colors, and interacts with the player(s). Science for Teens Mechanics and Energy 1.0/Brothersoft (2012). Iphone Application Store .99 cents. Retrieved on October 24, 2012 from http://mobile.brothersoft.com/science-for-teens--mechanics-andenergy-471256.html Study Stack Science Flash Cards The main focus of this game is to test prior knowledge of energy for a sixth grade science class. The flashcards demonstrate a definition of a term that can be used in a chapter referring to energy. The student is to state what term should match the definition. After the student answers the question, the card

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can either go into a correct or incorrect pile. The student can then review the incorrect pile, in order to focus on those terms that were incorrect. The game can also include a timer, which will help the student for a timely manner. Along with a timer, the game also includes a shuffle option, so the student will not expect the same order as the previous game. This will help students understand terms and vocabulary found in a sixth grade science class focusing on energy. Some of the vocabulary terms consist of energy, kinetic, potential, energy transformation, Law of Conservation of Energy or Matter, energy resource, renewable, and nonrenewable resource. The website also offers many other games that have the same concept of energy for a sixth grade science class. Some of the games are hangman, matching, and crossword puzzle. The other games also include the same terms, but in a different format of a game. Weinder, John/Study Stack (2012). Study Stack Science Flash Cards. Retrieved on September 14, 2012 from http://www.studystack.com/flashcar-167276

Word-O-Rama Word-O-Rama is set up for students to work on terms found in a sixth grade science class focusing on Energy. The game is set up like an actual television show, with music in the background. Bright colors are incorporated into the game, with a question board that appears in the middle. The points are found at the bottom right hand corner, in order to tally up the game. The host of the game is a talking penguin that instructs the student on how to play the game. The game consists of 10 questions. The questions are the definitions of vocabulary found in an energy lesson. There are a total of four answers the participant can chose from. If the participant answers the question correctly the first time the participant receives 20 points. If the student does not receive the question correct and continues to try, the participant can receive 5 points. For example, a question can ask, â&#x20AC;&#x153;power created in form of heat.â&#x20AC;? If the participant clicks thermal energy first, the participant will win 20 points. If the student clicked another term instead, the student would win 5 points. This game can be a great review for prior knowledge of the terms and definitions used in an energy lesson plan. Laundrie, Robert/ Word-O-Rama (2012). Science Word-O-Rama. Retrieved on September 18, 2012 from <http://www.spellingcity.com/WordORama-spelling-game.html?listId=5583601>

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Lacy Turner Wix Portfolio: http://lacylue.wix.com/educator Unit of study proposal: Logical Fallacies This eight grade English unit is focused on critical thinking, analysis and the identification of logical fallacies. Eight grade students need to be introduced to logical fallacies and develop skills to identify them so that they are able to use these skills in everyday life as well as in other studies. Identifying sound arguments and illogical ones will help students to become more critical thinkers as well as independent thinkers. Students will be studying advertisements, commercials and speeches to analyze them for their logical merit. They will be looking for fact based arguments rather than opinion. Additionally students will be provided with resources and examples to help them identify real life examples of logical fallacies. The skills they develop during this unit will help them to identify lack of merit, basis and evidence. These critical thinking skills will help them in other classes as well as life, proving to be valuable assets to both themselves and their society. Studying and understanding logical fallacies in written and oral communication is a learning expectation covered under Tennessee English Language Arts Standard 5. GLE 0801.5.1 Use logic to make inferences and draw conclusions in a variety of oral and written contexts. GLE 0801.5.2 Analyze text for fact-opinion, cause-effect, inferences, evidence and conclusions. GLE 0801.5.6 Continue to explore logical fallacies.

Web 2.0 Projects Glogster URL: http://lacylue22.edu.glogster.com/logicalfallacies Opening Commercial: This file is listed as 8FallaciesCommercial.wav in the media folder. Unit Video: This file is listed as 8LogicalFallacies.m4a in the media folder.

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Critical Thinking with Logical Fallacies Lesson # 1 Name: Lacy Turner Duration of Lesson: 2 Hours

Subject Area(s): ELA Grade Level: 8th

Context for Learning: The eighth grade classroom at Wright middle school consists of 27 students. The class contains 12 males and 15 females whose ages range from 11 to 13 years old. The diversity of the classroom comprises of 11 African-American children, 10 Latino/Latina children and 6 white/non-Hispanic children. The class is generally reading and writing on their grade level with the exception of 2 male students who struggle with reading comprehension. The class is located in a suburban area with modest SES. All students are able to communicate orally and written in English although two students are bi-lingual and speak Spanish at home. All students have had previous experience with researching on the internet and locating resources through previous courses or previous lesson plans in my classroom. Some students have access to internet at home while others do not. State and Technology Standard(s): Technology Standard â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Research and Information Fluency GLE 0801.5.1 Use logic to make inferences and draw conclusions in a variety of oral and written contexts. GLE 0801.5.2 Analyze text for fact-opinion, cause-effect, inferences, evidence and conclusions. GLE 0801.5.6 Continue to explore logical fallacies.

Behavioral Objectives: Curriculum: Students will be able to determine the relevance and quality of evidence given to support or oppose an argument. I will know that students have mastered this skill by observing their analysis of multiple forms of media. Their reasoning and explanations will demonstrate their understanding of the lessonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s key points. Technology: Students will be able to demonstrate their research and information fluency through locating, organizing, analyzing and evaluating information found on the World Wide Web. Their ability to find appropriate examples will demonstrate their understanding of various types of media found on the internet as well as their ability to determine each sourcesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; validity and value. Language Objectives: Curriculum: Students will learn the definition and apply the following terms; cause, effect, fact, and opinion. Students will demonstrate their understanding of

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these new terms and their application by appropriately using them in their analyses. I will know if a student has not mastered these language objectives if they are unable to apply them to their written/typed assessment. Technology: Students will build upon their prior technology knowledge by further categorizing resources into various groups (blog, advertisement, reader comment, journal/article). Formative Assessment (Process): Students will demonstrate that they are learning and working towards lesson objectives by their ability to locate various logical fallacies and identify the various types of resources they are from. Their ability to locate fallacies will demonstrate their comprehension of the types of fallacies while also displaying their technological literacy. I will continuously monitor group work, offer assistance when students are having difficulty and approve/disapprove examples as needed. I will be looking for students to identify both fact/opinion fallacies and cause and effect fallacies in advertisements, blogs and other types of media. I will be able to monitor student understanding through the approval process and by asking each group probing questions about the examples they have chosen. I will use this opportunity to provide direct feedback so students can confirm if they are taking on the assignment properly and they may confirm if their understanding is correct. Through these group examples, questions and responses, I will be able to identify areas of confusion and address them during group work, as well as during the lesson recap at the end of class. Summative Assessment (Product): Students will write a reflection on the day’s lesson and its application to their own life. Students’ ability to apply the terms and ideas to their own personal experience will demonstrate their understanding of the key terms through real life application. This offers students a chance to show what they have learned through the lesson and how they feel it will affect them in the long run. This assessment allows students to practice both their writing and critical thinking skills in a way that is intrinsically motivating. Students will be able to self-assess their own learning by judging how easy or hard identifying logical fallacy examples in their own life is. Students who have a hard time thinking of examples and composing a paragraph to support it will know that they have not mastered the new knowledge. Students will also receive feedback from the instructor. I will grade each reflection on a holistic rubric that focuses on thought process and support rather than grammar. If a student is able to identify an example in their life and use the lesson’s language terms accurately then I will know that they have met the lesson’s objectives. If a student is unable to either identify an example or provide support for it, then I will know that they have not met the lesson’s objectives and that a review is necessary. However, if students complete the assignment and have mastered the concepts and terms then I will know that they are working on mastering the related standards in the curriculum. Materials: Curriculum: Students will need paper and a writing utensil. The instructor will need the key terms/examples handout created to accompany this lesson. Technology:

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6 computers need to be available for students with internet access and PowerPoint installed. An additional PowerPoint presentation to present the scenario and the lessonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s key terms will need to be prepared and ready to use.

Procedures: Time Learning Activities -Teacher Learning Activities - Students Purpose ****Use numbers to sequence procedures and align Time, Learning Activity and Purpose in each column. Anticipatory Set: Anticipatory Set: Anticipatory Set: 10 1. I will begin my lesson by presenting a 1. Students will read the scenario and 1. This will get students in an minutes two to three paragraph scenario. I will form an opinion about whom or what analytical mindset and ask my students to read it and caused the outcome. They will write intrinsically motivate them determine who or what in the story down their opinion and their reasoning to take it serious because it caused the problem or result. I will on a sheet of paper for reference. is a direct reflection of their instruct students to write down their opinion and their own opinion and their reasoning on a piece reasoning. of paper. Presentation/Explicit Instruction: Presentation/Explicit Instruction: Presentation/Explicit Instruction: 2. I will begin my lesson by starting a 2. Students will raise their hands and 2. This will get students 10 discussion over the scenario just take turns contributing to the engaged and thinking about minutes presented. I will facilitate their discussion. They will verbalize their the multiple views and discussion by offering probing opinion as well as their reasoning. reasoning of each other. questions and exploring student reasoning further than their initial statements.

8-10 minutes

3. I will then walk through the various people or things the students believed caused the issue. I will run through

3. Students will listen to the teacher examine the logic of the various

3. To explore both strengths and weaknesses in logical

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their reasoning to identify which thought processes are logical and which arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t.

8 minutes

4. I will pass out the handout on the lessonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s key points and terms with examples. I will walk through each term and example aloud.

Structured Practice/Exploration: 5. I will break students up into groups of 4. Students will be assigned the task of 10 searching for both cause-effect minutes reasoning and fact/opinion arguments in various types of media on the World Wide Web. Students will have to include at least one advertisement, blog, and a reader comment. 6. Students will be instructed to identify 30 four different examples and whether or minutes not the examples are logical causeeffect relationships and/or fact-opinion based. All examples will need to be approved by the teacher, prior to analysis and completion.

thought processes and ask questions as needed.

4. Students will look over the handout, listen to the explanations and make notes as necessary.

Structured Practice/Exploration: 5. Students will regroup in the classroom into groups of 4. Students will listen to the assignment and ask questions as needed to clarify expectations.

6. Students will sign on to the computer and work on the internet to identify resources and obtain approval before starting their analysis.

reasoning will help students identify lapses in logical reasoning. Verbalizing this will also model appropriate skills to taking on this task. 4. I will do this to explicitly offer both examples and key terms for my students so that they will have the knowledge they need to successfully complete assignments with a high rate of success. Structured Practice/Exploration: 5. This will encourage student collaboration, modeling and an opportunity to practice functional skills, such as group interaction and technological literacy. 6. Requiring students to locate examples and have them approved will both challenge the student to be able to identify the various types of written sources available, as well as ensure

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15 minutes

7. I will instruct students to create a brief PowerPoint to present each example to the class and to highlight key points they want to address.

Guided Practice/Feedback: 8. I will call groups up, one at a time, to present their completed PowerPoint to the class. I will instruct students to 25 either ask questions or comment as minutes needed to clarify points. I will also provide constructive criticism to help students if they did not correctly identify and apply the language and lesson objectives.

5 minutes

9. I will quickly review the lessonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main points and terms before assigning independent practice.

7. Students will work together to analyze approved resources, place each example on a PowerPoint presentation and highlight key points on the slides.

Guided Practice/Feedback: 8. Student groups will present their PowerPoint, one at a time. Students will ask questions and make comments to clarify points in presentation.

9. Students will listen to the lesson recap and ask any questions if needed.

Independent Practice/Application:

that the examples are appropriate for the setting. 7. Collaborating to complete a PowerPoint that they know will be presented encourages intrinsic motivation in the students to produce quality work while practicing yet another technological, functional skill such as producing a PowerPoint presentation. Guided Practice/Feedback: 8. Students will have an opportunity for feedback from both the instructor and classmates. I will have a chance to identify places in the lesson that were either unclear or areas that the class might need to review before the independent practice. 9. Reviewing the lessonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main points can clarify any places in which students consistently did not understand or execute

Independent Practice/Application:

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2 minutes

10. Students will be assigned a take home reflection via Blogger.com or paper. Students who confirmed they have internet access at home during my beginning year survey will be expected to complete the task on the computer and those who did not have it will be allowed to complete the reflection via paper and pencil. I will prompt students to identify one of the lesson’s fallacy types in something they encountered in their everyday life and reflect on how knowing that it is illogical, changes their perspective, if any, about the original message.

10. Students will write a reflection on the accurately. lesson’s fallacies and identify at least one example they have encountered in Independent Practice/Application: 10. Applying lessons to a their life. Students will reflect on how student’s life offers identifying the statement, idea or opportunity to reinforce advertisement as a fallacy has altered gained knowledge and their opinion, if any. increase retention because the student can place value on the gained skill and how it could be used to affect their life in the long run.

Modifications: I will make modifications as possible to meet the various needs of each student. Although neither of the two students who struggle with reading comprehension have an IEP, I will provide a handout with the key terms and their meaning as well as examples to the entire class. This will offer all students additional support while meeting the specific needs of my two struggling readers. The two ELL students can generally read and write in Standard English as well as the rest of the class; however, I will provide the best translation possible of the new terms in case they have some prior background knowledge they can link it to. Closure: Key points of the lesson will be articulated by the instructor both verbally and written (handout). I will prompt student interaction with a class discussion. I will ask students critical questions during the class discussion, group work and PowerPoint presentations. Students will use these opportunities to demonstrate their understanding and application in addition to receiving confirmation that their own interpretations are accurate or not. In order to ensure that students have a general grasp over the lesson’s objectives and thus the curriculum standards, I will provide a brief recap at the end of the lesson to clarify any points that appeared to need further clarification. I will assess my students’ ability to navigate the internet and find appropriate sources by reviewing their sources, identifying how the students labeled them and reviewing their PowerPoint presentations. If a

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student is able to accurately label and identify sources then I will know that they have a general grasp of how to navigate and locate sources using the internet.

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Advertising with Logical Fallacies

Designed by Lacy Turner based on the state of Tennessee curriculum standards for Eighth Grade English GLE 0801.5.6 Continue to explore logical fallacies. Introduction

Task

Process

Evaluation

Conclusion

Credits

Introduction Greetings fellow advertising executives! You’ve been hired by a new advertising agency that is determined to produce advertisements that are honest and do not include logical fallacies. As part of your mission to change the advertisement industry for the better, you will need to both identify ad campaigns that have logical fallacies as well as produce an advertisement that does not contain any logical fallacies. To do this you will need to search high and low and think critically about what you choose to say about your product. It will be difficult but your knowledge about logical fallacies will help you complete the task with ease. Task (3 Days for research and composition + Presentation Day) 

 

You and your group will have 3 block classes to gather your examples, identify the fallacies, and to create your own advertisement and PowerPoint presentation. The next class period we meet, each group will present their example advertisements, explanations of the logical fallacies committed as well as their original advertisement. You will have ten minutes to meet with your group at the beginning of presentation day to ensure that each group is prepared and ready to present their work. Each student will receive an individual grade. You will need to ensure that you have provided at least 4 different fallacy examples. Do not present four different advertisements that contain the same type of fallacy. Each advertisement must contain a different type of fallacy. It is your group’s responsibility to correctly identify what the fallacy is for each advertisement presented and how the ad commits it.

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   

Appropriateness is a key factor in both your example advertisements and your original ad. If you are unsure if an ad is appropriate or not, ask me prior to presentation. As usual, your grammar and spelling are important factors in your evaluation. Additionally, you will be participating in peer evaluation to ensure that each member has contributed to the group and their overall success. Furthermore, practice makes perfect so spend half of your last class period practicing your presentation to ensure that you know the content well and are able to present the information in a smooth manner.

Process Day 1 To begin… review your notes on logical fallacies to remind yourself of some common examples. Visit the following website to help identify or clarify your understanding. Thou Shall Not Commit Fallacies This interactive website allows users to easily navigate through the various types of fallacies. In addition to providing types of fallacies, each link includes both a detailed explanation of what the fallacy is as well as an example of each one. By clicking through the website and reading each one, students will have an opportunity to identify logical fallacies as well as discover ones they have never heard of. Next, you will need to identify four different advertisements with logical fallacies. It’s easy! You can look at advertisements on the internet, in magazines and even the newspaper. No time will be allotted to research TV ads; however, groups are allowed to use TV ads they have found outside of class, as long as they are appropriate for the audience, contain logical fallacies and can be presented in a PowerPoint. Beware not all links will work from school computers, so make sure that all of your examples will be accessible for your presentation. Remember that each example should include a different logical fallacy. Visit the following website to view some popular advertisements from 2010. See The Most Effective Ads of 2010 This website offers 20 examples of the “most effective” print ads from 2010. Advertisements range from shaving cream to whole grain pasta. This is a great place to find some example print ads for common products. Use search engines such as Google and Bing to help identify other print ads. You can also use the library’s collection of newspapers and magazines to find other examples. Check with the librarian to determine the best way to copy any print ads from their resources. Day 2 Choose one of the four advertisement examples your group found the previous block period. Each group should work together to create an original print ad for the same product. The challenge is to produce and create an advertisement without the aid of logical fallacies. You can create your ad in Microsoft Word, Microsoft Publisher or a program of your choice. Click on the highlighted text to review tutorials on either of these publishing programs. Remember when designing your advertisement, to keep your audience in mind and to keep products and advertisements on a PG level. If you are unsure, check with the instructor beforehand. You will present this advertisement during your PowerPoint presentation. If you have questions as to how to best present this portion of your group’s work, please check with me. Day 3 Work as a group to produce a PowerPoint presentation of both the example advertisements and your original ad. If you need help or a refresher course on how to use PowerPoint then review this video to walk you through the basic functions. Ensure that all of your examples are correctly identified and are accessible from a school computer. Your PowerPoint should include links to any websites used as well as the names

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of every group member. Spend half of your time practicing the presentation as a group. Each member will be expected to speak at least once so make sure you are prepared. Day 4 You will have ten minutes at the beginning of class to meet with your group. After ten minutes, each group will be called on randomly to present their PowerPoint to the class. Evaluation CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Original Advertisement

Original Advertisement did not contain a logical fallacy. Advertisement is appropriate for audience, professional and contains no grammar or spelling errors.

Original Advertisement did not contain a logical fallacy. Advertisement is appropriate for audience, professional and contains 1-2 grammar or spelling errors.

Original Advertisement did not contain a logical fallacy. Advertisement is appropriate for audience, professional and contains 3 grammar or spelling errors.

Original Advertisement either contains a logical fallacy, is inappropriate for audience, unprofessional or contains 4 or more grammar or spelling errors.

Ad Examples

Examples are appropriate for the class and each contains a logical fallacy. Correctly identified 4 different logical fallacies.

Examples are appropriate for the class and each contains a logical fallacy. Correctly identified 3 different logical fallacies.

Examples are appropriate for the class and each contains a logical fallacy. Correctly identified 2 different logical fallacies.

Examples are inappropriate for the class and/or do not contain logical fallacies.

Peer Evaluation

Fills out peer evaluation completely and always gives scores based on the presentation rather than other factors (e.g., person is a close friend).

Fills out almost all of the peer evaluation and always gives scores based on the presentation rather than other factors (e.g., person is a close friend).

Fills out most of the peer evaluation and always gives scores based on the presentation rather than other factors (e.g., person is a close friend).

Fills out most of the peer evaluation but scoring appears to be biased.

Preparedness

Student is completely prepared and has obviously rehearsed.

Student seems pretty prepared but might have needed a couple more rehearsals.

The student is Student does not somewhat prepared, seem at all prepared but it is clear that to present. rehearsal was lacking.

Content

Shows a full Shows a good Shows a good understanding of the understanding of the understanding of topic. topic. parts of the topic.

Does not seem to understand the topic very well.

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Conclusion Congratulations! You have officially created honest advertising and in the process, identified some misleading examples. You have mastered identifying logical fallacies and are now able to pick them out everywhere. Use your new skill next holiday season to help identify which company is just using clever advertisement and which is attempting to mislead you into buying their product. Credits Clip Art used with permission from Microsoft. Turner, L. (2012, November 09). Logical Fallacies. Created from Rubistar:

http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php

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Unit Media Share Cheat Sheet 1.0 This application offers users a quick reference list of both formal and informal fallacies. Although this application is just a list of fallacies and examples, the variety of logical fallacies provided far surpasses the other logical fallacy apps out there. What it lacks in appearance, it makes up for in knowledge. Using this app will allow students to access a breadth of knowledge in a format they are familiar with. One of the major pluses is the listing of every logical fallacy on the app. This format is easy for students who quickly need to access a particular fallacy for reference or understanding. Students and instructors can download this app from the iTunes website for $0.99 and quickly access the wealth of information on contained within it. Concentric Sky. (2009, July). Fallacies Cheat Sheet. iTunes. Cost $0.99. Retrieved on November 10, 2012 from https://itunes.apple.com/app/fallacies-cheat-sheet/id322016388?mt=8 Exercises on Fallacious Appeals This simple website offers students a chance to practice their ability to identify fallacies. The website offers and interactive quiz in which students will read an excerpt and then identify if it does have a fallacy and what that fallacy is. After students have had an opportunity to take the quiz, the correct answers will appear as well as an explanation as to why each answer is the correct answer. The language used to cover such difficult topics is appropriate for eight grade readers and easy to understand. Mesher, D. (1996, January). Exercises on Fallacious Appeals. Retrieved on September 20, 2012 from http://www.sjsu.edu/depts/itl/graphics/adhom/appeal-q.html#1d Fallacies of Logic This logical fallacy app looks to offer a visually interesting presentation of logical fallacies. This application provides a comprehensive list of logical fallacies to help users learn new and old ones. The random order helps users access logical fallacies they’ve probably never heard of; however, this feature can be frustrating if you are looking to access a particular example quickly. A major plus for this application is the producer understands that this app will never be finished. The author says that updates occur frequently to introduce new logical fallacies and features to make the application even more interactive for users. Student and instructors can download this app from the iTunes website for $0.99. Students can use this app on a daily basis to help further their knowledge while the visually appealing interface will likely keep students more engaged than the plainer application. Elegant Recursion Inc. (2012, September). Fallacies of Logic. iTunes. Cost $0.99. Retrieved on November 10, 2012 from https://itunes.apple.com/app/fallacies-of-logic/id534062476?mt=8

Logic & Arguments – logical fallacies (formal & informal) This video provides and overall explanation of both informal and formal fallacies. It provides accurate examples and tactics to help students identify illogical arguments. In step by step instructions, the video not only recommends these tactics but shows how to use them when evaluating others' statements. NativLang. (2012, January). Logic & Arguments – logical fallacies (formal & informal). [Video file]. Retrieved on October 13, 2012 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GNeagdJd4rU Logical Fallacies

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This video dramatizes and acts out multiple logical fallacies in an effort to reveal the ridiculous premises behind each of them. Examples include hyperbolas, fear tactics, and slippery slope fallacies. The producers not only act out illogical fallacies, they also take the chance to explain why they are illogical in the first place. Students will have a chance to see how words are realized in actions and normal conversation. bailey2092. (2011, Novemeber). Logical Fallacies. [Video file]. Retrieved on October 12, 2012 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=21822W14Ecs Logical Fallacies This application offers users an opportunity to explore multiple logical fallacies with quick examples of each one. Unlike other resources, this application offers lectures, flash cards and a chapter test to help students assess their own understanding. This will help students both identify logical fallacies in othersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; reasoning but also help them to form their own arguments without committing some of the same logical errors. Student can access this application by downloading it from the iTunes website for $0.99. Cain, A.R. (2012, January). Logical Fallacies. iTunes. Cost $0.99. Retrieved on November 10, 2012 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/logical-fallacies/id494451270?mt=8 Logical Fallacies Hangman Who doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t love hangman? Students are able to go onto this website and practice their fallacy identification through an interactive hangman game. Users are provided with hints as to the type of fallacy and asked to play hangman to identify the various names. This resource allows students the chance to identify fallacies they are already familiar with as well as new ones. This twist on vocabulary and identification should keep students engaged while reinforcing previous knowledge. Quia.com. (n.d.). Logical Fallacies Hangman. Retrieved on September 20, 2012 from http://www.quia.com/hm/105552.html

Recognizing Fallacies in Logic Adding a humorous note to the study of logical fallacies, this video offers clear examples of multiple fallacies. Examples are funny and accurate. Students who watch this video will not only be entertained by the two main characters lack of navigation skills, but also by the ridiculousness of their logic. Crawford, N. (2010, March). Recognizing Fallacies in Logic. [Video file]. Retrieved on October 12, 2012 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1rZAMsDcj8 Thou Shat Not Commit Fallacies This interactive website allows users to easily navigate through the various types of fallacies. In addition to providing types of fallacies, each link includes both a detailed explanation of what the fallacy is as well as an example of each one. By clicking through the website and reading on each one, students will have an opportunity to identify logical fallacies as well as discover ones they have never heard of. Richardson, J., Smith, A., & Meaden, S. (n.d.). Thou Shalt Not Commit Logical Fallacies. Retrieved on September 20, 2012 from http://yourlogicalfallacyis.com/home

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Crystal Donaldson Wix Portfolio: http://scootcd2.wix.com/biologyiwebsite Unit of study proposal: Biology I In this unit, we will be learning about the essential compounds and processes for living organisms. Ninth grade Biology students should be able to understand specific functions their bodies carry out for the continuation of life. The students will compare and contrast the four major macromolecules. Students will also look at everyday products used in the home that contain these macromolecules. Some questions to be answered are as followed. Are some macromolecules healthier than others? How is the chemical makeup of each macromolecule related to their function? In the case of enzyme activity, why are enzymes so important in relation to macromolecules? The students will need laboratory experiments so they will be able to clearly see how macromolecules and enzyme activity works. It is important because these compounds are the building blocks for all types of aspects in Biology, the study of life. Studying and understanding cell activity in science is a course learning expectation covered under Tennessee Science Standard 1.0. CLE 3210.1.2 Distinguish among the structure and function of the four major macromolecules found in living things. CLE 3210.1.3 Describe how enzymes regulate chemical reactions in the body. Web 2.0 Projects Glogster URL: http://scootcd2.edu.glogster.com/cdonaldson/ Opening Commercial: This file is listed as 10MacromoleculesCommercial.wav in the media folder. Unit Video: This file is listed as 10MacromoleculesVideo.mp4 in the media folder.

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The Four Major Macromolecules and Their Effect on Enzyme Activity Name: Crystal Donaldson Duration of Lesson: 90 Minutes

Subject Area(s): Biology I Grade Level: 9th

Context for Learning: (Attention to studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; backgrounds, interests, and needs) There are three 9th grade Biology classes at Nashville Magnet School. The ½ Block, the first class to view the lesson, consists of 26 students; 13 boys and 13 girls. The diversity of the students are as follows: 10 Caucasian, nine African American, one Asian, and six Hispanics. The age span of the class is 14-15 years old. Twenty students come from two-parent homes where both of their parents have college degrees. In addition, there are four students whose parents are professors at local universities in the city. With this in mind, the 20 students seem to be economically stable and privileged. The students have the latest technological gadgets such as iPhones, androids, tablets, and laptops. Although approximately 20 out of the 26 students are economically stable, there are 6 students in particular that are on reduced lunch. One of the reduced lunch students is pregnant, and she is not allowed to participate in laboratory activities. The students were chosen from a lottery to attend this school. Eight students are gifted and talented. One student in the class has a learning disability. This student is not motivated to learn, so there is weekly contact, whether through e-mail or phone, on the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s progress. The gifted and talented students can sometimes become disengaged with the lesson because they are bored. Their lack of motivation causes a distraction for the other 14 students from time to time. Lastly, there is an ELL student that has a paraprofessional. State and Technology Standard(s) CLE 3210.1.2 Distinguish among the structure and function of the four major macromolecules found in living things. CLE 3210.1.3 Describe how enzymes regulate chemical reactions in the body. NETS #4 Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources. Lesson Objectives: The students will be able to compare and contrast the four major macromolecules and explain how they facilitate enzyme activity. Behavioral Objectives:

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Since the students are comparing and contrasting the functions of the four major macromolecules, the students are learning to use their critical thinking skills by providing their hypothesis with evidentiary support. Understanding the function of each macromolecule is essential for life, and the students will be able to understand why they are so important. Tools such as the emolecule generator will give the students a visual of each macromoleculeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chemical makeup, yielding the difference in function. With this in mind, the students will be proposed with a problem to solve. The problem posed is a person that has Type II Diabetes. The students will use their critical thinking skills to be able to figure out which macromolecule is most essential for this personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s daily functioning. In addition, the laboratory activity that tells how macromolecules affect enzyme activity will be shown. The students will apply their knowledge to further understand the process of enzyme-substrate binding, which yields the production of various molecules the body uses for energy. As far as the technology is concerned, students will be able to successfully find and use resources such as the compound builder in order to make decisions (NETS #4) in the classroom. The students will see which programs are more successful than others from a technology standpoint. Language Objectives: The students will be able to use scientific terms in the classroom. The terms that correlate with the lesson are as follows: nucleic acid, carbohydrate, lipid, protein, enzyme, substrate, activation of energy, monosaccharide, disaccharide, and polysaccharide. The understanding of key terms is especially important because I want my students to be professional scientists. When I get my students in the habit of speaking properly in the classroom, it promotes motivation to learn. The Wordle is incorporated to assist with my language objective. Before each lesson starts, the students will define the terms from their textbooks for homework. This is a method to get the students familiar with the coming material. Secondary students have to be motivated to learn something new, so previewing what they will be learning will make the students motivated, hence, promoting effective learning. Once the students are familiarized with their terms in the textbook, the Wordle will be incorporated. The students will need to know how to copy and paste the link once they are finished with their creations. Also, it is essential that the students paste the code at the bottom of the Wordle so their work is properly stored. Formative Assessment (Process): The formative assessment will be during the discussion portion of the challenge question. I will give the students a question where they will have to think critically and analytically to come to an answer. The real-life application will make the students motivated because everyone has some prior knowledge on diabetes. When I pose the question, I will tell them to collaboratively come up with an answer to promote group discussion. I will walk around to see who is participating in the small group discussions and who are not as engaging. I will take note of the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s use of their resources. If the students are using the internet as well as their textbooks, it shows me they are adequately using research techniques, technology standard 4. Depending on the success of the students, it will determine if there needs to be more instruction or another concept can be talked about. For example, if about 3 out of 26 students are not engaging in the discussion, I will encourage the other students in the group to assist the student after I teach the lesson in a one-on-one base. If 10-12 students are having problems with the assignment, I will have to possibly teach the class again. When I notice a majority of the students are not engaging in discussion, it is likely that the rest of the class did not understand. It is that this time I will stop to ask the students what specific areas of the lecture they did not grasp. Once this happens, I will go over what the students did not understand. The students will be formally assessed for their technology skills with the types of resources they will use for their presentations. At times there may be difficulties with technology. When this happens, the students will use other resources such as their textbook and encyclopedias, and videos from the media center. It is essential that the students use credible resources. The specified number of resources to be used is three. The types of resources students will use, such as textbook websites, will be a way of formative assessment whether it is manually written or through word-processing. Summative Assessment (Product):

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The summative assessment will be the student’s collaborative answers they present. They will have to support their hypothesis with visual aids and other graphics they come up with. The students will be graded on participation and creativity of the activity because although there is a “technical answer” many students will make logical explanations. Providing claims with adequate research is essential in science. Students that think about all the possible options show that the student understands the concept beyond what is just in the textbook. This is how research is started, by weighing out all options on the spectrum. When I see great observations from my students, I will know they have grasped the concepts and will be ready for a quiz that carries 10% of their final grades. Before the students are assessed through a quiz, the students will have to show a 70% proficiency on their and of the chapter quizzes that will be assigned as homework. The students will show their technology skills during the summative assessment as well. The students will use a variety of resources found online and through other resources such as the textbook’s supplemental technological materials. Depending on the variety of the information the students present during their presentations, is when the teacher assesses just how much the student understands the critical thinking aspect of NETS#4. The summative assessment is for the teacher to assess how well the students utilized their resources through technology. If students used such websites as Wikipedia or Google websites that are not credible, research techniques should be emphasized during a lecture so students will be able to know how to effectively conduct research in the classroom. Materials Materials for Curriculum Pencils (#2) Colored Pencils Graph Paper Notebook Paper Computer Paper Small Soft Balls (6 total) 1 2X2 of Wooden Solid Lumber Laser Pointer Textbook

Supplementary Materials eMolecules Compound Builder Generator Type 2 Diabetes Video

Materials for Technology 8 Laptops Internet Access Mounted Projector Microsoft Word Clickers USB Outlet for Clicker Base 1 Computer (in the classroom) 2 Printers with Colored Ink

Reference Emolecules. (2012). Retrieved October 5, 2012, from http://www.emolecules.com/ Nucleusanimation. (2012). Type 2 diabetes. Retrieved October 5, 2012, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OXAe3eOjqCk

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Procedures: Time

1. 5 min.

2. 10 min.

3. 40 min.

Learning Activities -Teacher

Learning Activities - Students

Anticipatory Set: 1. The teacher will begin by asking students what they remembered about chemical bonding in the previous chapter. The teacher will then provide an activity for the students to reiterate covalent bonding.

1. Students will be sectioned off into three groups and the students will engage in a ball toss that represents “electron movement” during chemical bonding. The constant reinforcement shows a clear understand of electron exchange within compounds.

2.

6.

To activate prior knowledge and skills learned in the previous class lecture.

2.

The students will work in groups to draw structures of each of the macromolecules with the program. The students will then see from the demonstration how easy enzyme activity is with the help of a “macromolecule” (in representation of a ledge).

7.

To assess the students’ prior knowledge of compound building and to understand the concept of why students need certain macromolecules in their diet to assist with breaking down fats and oils.

3.

The students will use word processor to take notes collectively in their groups. Points of emphasis will be recorded. With this in mind, students are able to be creative and learn from one another. The students will learn critical thinking and effective writing skills.

8.

To familiarize students with the basic molecules essential to their lives everyday.

The teacher will give a demonstration of how macromolecule compounds are bonded by using Emolecule. In the second demonstration, the teacher will angle the lumber against the desk and use a ball rolling (downhill) to introduce lower activation energy levels with enzymes that are made possible with the help of macromolecules.

Presentation/Explicit Instruction: 3. The teacher will start by distinguishing each macromolecule one at a time. The teacher will elaborate on each molecule and its function. A real-life application will be related to each macromolecule to make the material more interesting. The teacher will then move to say how macromolecules regulate enzymes within organisms, and the mechanisms will be shown.

Purpose

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4. 10 min.

5. 15 min.

Structured Practice/Exploration: 4. The teacher will introduce the laboratory laboratory experiment. For starters, the instructor will ask a “Challenge Question” which will be “Which macromolecule is mostly related to Type II Diabetes, and how does this macromolecule cause disruption to enzyme activity?” The students will have some time to think about all possible answers. The teacher will divide the class in groups of 8-9, (total of 3 groups) so the teacher will be able to scan strengths and weaknesses of the class. As a formative assessment for technology, the teacher will assess the students’ research skills from a technology standpoint. If the formative assessment does not go as planned, it is time for restructuring. Guided Practice/Feedback: 5. The teacher will assess the student’s performances. While looking at the presentations, the teacher will take note of the quality and quantity of the resources. In addition, the teacher will make notes of the collaboration within the classroom and provide constructive criticism to each group. If there are minimal deficiencies in all three groups, the teacher needs to assign homework. If there are multiple deficiencies in the group, the teacher will create a mock research project in class.

Independent Practice/Application: 6. The teacher will assign homework to the class. The homework assignment will be to answer the first

4.

The students will work with their group members to figure solve a problem that is posed to them. The students will use their processed notes and other materials such as their textbooks and scholarly articles online. Afterward, the students will discuss what the cause of the problem and possible solutions. The students should be clear with their statements and research.

5.

The students will use materials around the classroom and decorate poster boards, animations, graphics, or any other resources to assist with their hypothesis. The students will also use various media sites to use for graphic aids and charts. There should be at least 3 scholarly resources. If the students used such sites and Wikipedia or Google, research techniques should be incorporated into the lesson and the students must redo their assignment.

6.

The students will quietly examine and answer each question projected from my computer. The

9.

To incorporate problem-based learning in the classroom. To also use critical thinking skills, part of NETS#4.

10. To promote communication skills with peers and assess their critical thinking skills from a technology standpoint. To promote effective research and writing skills.

11. To assess student’s

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6. 5 min.

ten multiple choice questions of the chapter quiz. The teacher will use 70% proficiency on the homework as an indicator of successful knowledge of the content area. The homework is a way of summative assessment. The teacher then closes the lesson out with demonstrating how to operate clickers and poll in their answers.

students will have 30 seconds to answer the question. This is time to work individually. The students will use their clickers to answer questions that are projected from the computer. All questions will be multiple-choice. Key terms and key points will have to be identified by the students. This is a summative assessment where the students will use the technology to assess what they have learned after the lesson is over. The students will then go home and take the test at the end of the chapter and bring it back to class the following day.

knowledge of the material that was taught in the lecture on an individual basis. The students will also prepare for their quiz that is worth 10% of their final grade.

Modifications The student with a disability has to be accommodated. The IEP must be followed precisely for the student to be successful. In this case, the student lacks phonological awareness. Since the student is not able to successfully read aloud, there are other duties the student has. I will have him be in charge of visual aids. That way, he is able to listen and discuss with his classmates, and he is still a part of the group. Another modification that had to be made was that the students were not physically in the laboratory, but still carried out an experiment. The same techniques were followed in conducting a science experiment, we just did ours virtually. With this in mind, there are not any chemicals or other harmful materials. Hence, all the students, including the pregnant girl, are able to participate. If there are malfunctions with technology, students will be able to handwrite their challenge question answers and use their colored pencils and paper to provide visual aids. If there is a malfunction with clickers, the teacher will manually take a poll of the class for each answer. For example, the questions will be written on the board verbatim to how it was processed on the computer. The students will then raise their hands and the teacher will tally the studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; answers. For the ELL student, he or she will be successful with the assistance of a paraprofessional. The student will participate in group discussions with the other students. I will pair the ELL student with students that are willing to assist their classmates. With this in mind, everyone has a successful learning experience. Closure As closure, I will incorporate clickers. The students will be able to use their clickers to â&#x20AC;&#x153;pollâ&#x20AC;? in their answers. The questions will be based off everything that has been talked about during the previous 85 minutes. The teacher will allot the last five minutes of class time for this closure activity. The students will be able to self-check while the instructor is able to see if the students are progressing with the material. Once everyone enters their answers, statistical data will let the instructor knows what concepts students understood and what concepts possibly need reiterating. With this in mind, students are able to earn points for correct answers as well as quizzing themselves on the subject matter.

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Unit Media Share DNA/RNA/Protein and General Molecular Weight Calculator This application allows students to apply the concept of base pairing to understand the process of protein synthesis. There is a DNA sequence that you can type in and it will give you the length of the sequence, and its’ RNA sequence to coincide. In addition to base pairing, this application will calculate and name known protein sequences. Finally, there is a glossary of common formulas that are used in science from the elements. The students are able to understand the importance of forming bonds from amino acids, hence, building proteins. Wiley Publishing (2010, December 15). DNA/RNA/Protein and General Molecular Weight Calculator. iTunes. Cost $0.00. Retrieved on November 10, 2012 from https://itunes.apple.com/ag/app/dnarna-protein-general-molecular/id408366615?mt=8 Enzyme Catalysis This animation gives the students an understanding of how important enzyme catalysts are to carry out various functions for the body. The students can see that more energy is going to be exerted if heat is used when a catalyst can be used to lower the activation energy level. With this in mind, the students understand the importance of preserving energy for daily activities. This video is beneficial for the students because they are able to use prior knowledge to determine which method of enzyme activity would be more beneficial. Key terms such as substrate, enzyme, and activation of energy are emphasized. Garlandscience. (2009, April 21). Enzyme Catalysis. Retrieved October 10, 2012, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uR4Eysyk5N0 The Macromolecules Song The macromolecules song is a great way for the students to remember the role of each of the four major macromolecules. Students will be able to process information because the song gives everyday examples that correlate with the meaning of each macromolecule. For example, in one part of the song, the singer says nucleic acids are responsible for genetic purposes, meaning if he has a child, nucleic acids will play a role in how his child looks. Catch phrases will also be remembered. Finally, students will recall the functions because they will link the concepts with a part of the song. TheElderStatesman34. (2011, October 7). The macromolecules song. Retrieved October 10, 2012, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N9cfkQfKlkI&feature=related Mcgraw-Hill: How Enzymes Work This resource is great for animations of enzyme activity and other biological systems. The student has the option of viewing the animation with our without audio. This type of media is beneficial for students because they are able to visualize the processes of biological systems, in this case, the “lock and key model.” Without visual aids in science it is difficult for students to understand. Students are also able to take self-quizzes and study key terms with computerized flash cards on this web site. This is one of the best resources students can use because it offers all types of study material for all types of learners. Almeida, B. (1989). Animation: How Enzymes Work. Retrieved on September 14, 2012, from http://highered.mcgrawhill.com/sites/0072495855/student_view0/chapter2/animaion__how_enzymes_work .html Molecules The ‘Molecules’ application allows the students to explore the structure the four major macromolecules. There are ways you can expand or decrease the size to see the elements individually or see the entire molecule. There are additional compounds listed on the application, but there are beautiful illustrations that are depicted for the four major macromolecules. Students are able to visualize what these compounds look

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like and how they move. The text does not depict three-dimensional images, which hinders the learners. With these images you can twist, turn, expand, and decrease, the student will have a clear understanding of how these compounds look in reality. Sunset Lake Software (2012, April 5). Molecules. iTunes. Cost $0.00. Retrieved on November 10, 2012 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/molecules/id284943090?mt=8 Nature Education Although this web site offers is simple graphics, there is a lot of knowledge students are able to gain. For example, the illustration shows balls rolling down hills. One has a barrier while the other does not. This simple graphic is a representation of the most important concepts to be learned in Biology. Since enzyme activity is known to be essential in organisms, the least amount of energy must be used when the activity occurs. Not only are there graphics of enzyme activity, there are also illustrations of how cells are copied and reproduced. Nature Education. (2012). Enzymes allow activation energies to be lowered. Retrieved on September 14, 2012, from http://www.nature.com/scitable/content/enzymes-allow-activation-energies-tobe-lowered-14747799 Project Lead The Way-Macromolecules In the beginning of the show, there is a picture of a McDonald’s Big Mac, which is an indication that macromolecules are somehow related to everyday life. The slideshow then starts off by explaining what macromolecules are. Once the definition of a macromolecule is established, the four major classes of macromolecules are explained. Each macromolecule is broken down into it’s own section. First, the chemical makeup of the macromolecule is shown followed by it’s functions and supplemental examples. Project Lead the Way. (n.d.). Macromolecules. Retrieved on September 14, 2012, from http://wilmothighschool.com/jochl/files/2011/11/Macromolecules-updated-1-2-12.pdf Science Glossary The ‘Science Glossary’ application is a handy application to have. Students are constantly confused as to how to spell or pronounce certain scientific terms. With this application, the student is able to see different terms that will be learned throughout the semester in various chapters and lessons. This is an application students can carry to increase their scientific vocabulary abilities. Vision Learning Inc. (2012, October 13). Science Glossary. iTunes. Cost $0.00. Retrieved on November 12, 2012 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/science-glossary/id331657060?mt=8 Type 2 Diabetes This animated video gives a real-life application of one of the major macromolecules, carbohydrates. A malfunction in enzyme activity of the macromolecule causes complications within the body. Students will be able to see how ineffective enzyme activity parallels with complications in the body. Many times students are not able to see how complications in biological functions can harm the body. This also lines with the technology standard four, which has students use critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making skills. Nucleusanimation. (2012, February 22). Type 2 Diabetes. Retrieved October 10, 2012, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OXAe3eOjqCk

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Lexi Knoch Wix Portfolio: Unit of study proposal: Government In this 11th grade Government unit, students will be learning about the United States Constitution and what went into writing it. The problem that most students face is that they believe the Founding Fathers sat down and came up with these ideals on their own. Learning the foundations to the Constitution will give them a better understanding of how our government works and how it was shaped. Once they learn how and why the Constitution was written, hopefully students can then take this knowledge and become better citizens. This unit is designed to introduce the stepping stones of our nation’s government in an easy to understand way. The students will be asked to find similarities and differences in each document and the Constitution. Student will also be encouraged to discuss if they believe these were the right documents to use and what they would have used had they been the Founding Fathers. Students will explore which specific documents were the inspiration as well as different institutions that were the framework for our government. Knowledge about the Constitution is important for students to know because it is the most important document in this country’s history. Students need to know where they get their freedoms from, as well as how they were established. It is important for them to learn what inspired the Constitution before they move to any other levels of Government, because the Constitution is the first and most important building block in American history. The subject matter discussed in this unit falls under Tennessee Government Standard 5.0 - History CLE 5.2: Understanding specific historical documents and institutions which shaped the principles of the United States Constitution. Web 2.0 Projects Glogster URL: http://aknoch.edu.glogster.com/constitution-connections/ Opening Commercial: This file is listed as “11Constitution.wav”in the media folder. Unit Video: This file is listed as 11ConstitutionVideo.mp4 in the media folder.

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Pre-Constitution Documents and Institutions Lesson #1 Name: Lexi Knoch Duration of Lesson: 1 Class period

Subject Area: Government Grade Level: 11th Grade

Context for Learning: There are 20 students in the classroom, and they are 11 th graders, so they are around 16 or 17 years old. There are many ethnicities in this classroom; there is a majority of African American students, a small number of Arab and Mexican American students, and one Caucasian student. The class is mostly male, with 12 males, and only 8 females. There are no students with IEPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in this classroom, but several of the students are struggling with their test scores. The only prerequisites for this lesson (since this will be one of the first lessons taught) are that students must have had taken U.S. History. They will need knowledge of the Revolutionary War, and early European settlers in America. Tennessee Curriculum Standards The subject matter discussed in this unit falls under Tennessee Government Standard 5.0, History CLE 5.2: Understanding specific historical documents and institutions which shaped the principles of the United States Constitution. The Technology standard that this lesson will address is Creativity and Innovation. Behavioral Objectives This unit is designed to introduce the stepping stones of our nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s government in an easy to understand way. The students will be asked to find similarities and differences in each document and the Constitution. Student will also be encouraged to discuss if they believe these were the right documents to use and what they would have used had they been the Founding Fathers. Students will explore which specific documents were the inspiration as well as different institutions that were the framework for our government. Using the Technology standard Creativity and Innovation, students will use models and simulations to explore complex systems and issues. Using this standard, students will use an interactive Constitution online to analyze different sections of the document, as well as understand the language and who wrote it. Students will also use PowerPoint in groups to summarize their findings. Language Objectives The terms that my students should know are representative democracy, taxes, federalists, anti-federalists, confederation, separation of powers, 3/5 compromise, Connecticut compromise, New Jersey compromise, Mayflower Compact, Continental Congress, independence, Articles of Confederation, and ratification. Technology terms and programs my students need to know are PowerPoint, Microsoft Word, how to navigate the internet, how to save a document on a portable flash drive or hard drive, what a flash drive or external hard drive are, how to find certain websites by searching for them in Google, or typing the web address in the address bar. Formative Assessment: Before my students are ready to work alone, they must be very familiar with the key terms. When reading independently about the Constitution and PreConstitution documents and institutions, they must be familiar with what these terms mean so they understand what they are reading. Before starting the lesson I will read through Preamble of the Constitution with them, and go through each and every sentence. I will invite students to ask what any word means, and we will look them up online together. Discussion is important in formative assessment, because that is when students will share what they do or do not understand. For those students who do not voice their concerns, I will go over any key terms or words I feel that is important for them to know. I will ask them to take notes and write down every term and its meaning, so that they will have them written down and can reference them later if needed. For the technology assessment, I will need to make sure every student can work efficiently on a computer and can navigate the internet. Once I get the students settled and we go over key terms, I will ask them to get a laptop that was supplied from the library, and ask them to look up the terms on their own once Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve looked up a few to get them started.

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Summative Assessment Once my students have looked up key terms on their own and used the computers easily (they can open up the internet, type in certain web addresses, navigate the websites, email me drafts of their summaries of what they have found) I can then let them look up websites and talk amongst themselves in groups what they find on the interactive Constitution website. In order to assess that they can complete these tasks, I will ask the students to email me a summary of what they found on this website, as well as compare and contrast with research they find on their own on the Mayflower Compact, Magna Carta, the Articles of Confederation, the English Bill of Rights and the Declaration of Independence. I will know if my students performed the technological assignments correctly based on their PowerPoint presentations and papers. If they are in the correct format and if they were able to save them to their flash drives without help or direction. I will give my students a rubric at the beginning of the class so they will know what guidelines to follow while doing their projects, as well as guidelines for me for grading their work. The grades will be based on complete thoughts, no sentence fragments, and formed opinions based on research of the material. This will all be presented in the rubric. Students will be invited to send drafts so I can assess as they work. Materials Students will need their textbooks, as well as copies of every document that I will provide for them. Students will also need notebook paper and pens to take notes on words they do not know. Every student will need a laptop computer with internet, PowerPoint, word, and access to the following websites: National Constitution Center: Interactive Constitution National constitution center. (2003). Retrieved on November 16, 2012, from http://ratify.constitutioncenter.org/constitution/index_no_flash.php National Archives and Records Administration National archives. (2003, November 15). Retrieved on November 16, 2012, from http://www.archives.gov/ Magna Carta Sealed- This Day in History History.com. (1995). Retrieved on November 16, 2012, from http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/magna-carta-sealed Magna Carta (England 1215)- Britannica Online Encyclopedia Encyclopaedia Britannica. (1995). Retrieved on November 16, 2012, from http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/356831/Magna-Carta Procedures Time

Learning Activities: Teacher

Learning Activities: Student

Purpose

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10 min.

Anticipatory Set 1. The teacher will begin by asking students what they know about the Constitution and if they have any ideas about early documents that the Founding Fathers may have used. The teacher will ask them to share with me in an open class discussion before we begin the lesson. 2.

10 min.

After discussion, the teacher will ask students to take out paper and will hand out copies of the Constitution. The class will read through the Preamble together and go through each word that they may not understand. Students will then be asked to write down those words and when they receive a laptop after we read, they will look up and write down the definitions to those words on their own.

1.

Students will be seated and raise their hands to be called on to contribute to a teacher led discussion.

1.

To activate prior knowledge on the content that will be discussed in the lesson on the Constitution.

2.

Students will be seated and quietly listen as I read through the Preamble. Students will raise their hands if there is a word they do not know. They will write down every word we go over, and write down the definitions after we are done reading. After they summarize they will work together in creating a group PowerPoint that has pictures, short videos, and summaries of their collective findings.

2.

Students need to know certain terms so when reading these documents they can better understand what they are reading.

3.

Students will be seated and taking notes along with the PowerPoint and video(laptops will be put away for this portion of the lesson). They will raise their hands with any questions, and discussion is invited.

3.

This is to give students examples of each document that inspired the Constitution so they can see firsthand what specific phrases were used and language that carried over.

20 min.

30 min.

Presentation/Explicit Instruction 3. Once students have read through the Preamble and now understand terms they may not know, the teacher will then begin lecture on the documents that influenced the Constitution. The teacher will pass out handouts of the Magna Carta, The Articles of Confederation, and the Declaration of Independence. The teacher will spend a short time going over each, since students will be researching on their own. The teacher will lecture from the book, as well as the handouts, and use a PowerPoint so students can take notes. We will also watch the video â&#x20AC;&#x153;This Day In Historyâ&#x20AC;?

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on the Magna Carta. 4. Structured Practice/Exploration 4. The teacher will assign the students into groups of four and give each student a laptop. The teacher will instruct that each group is to research on the websites given and send the teacher a summary that compares and contrasts the documents the class talked about with the Constitution. The teacher should walk around and assist with how to format the summaries and help in the research. 15 min.

5 min.

Guided Practice/Feedback 5. The teacher will walk around and assist each group with looking up different websites and what information to use in their summaries and PowerPoint presentations. The teacher will ask them to send in drafts of their summaries, and ask for the summaries to be due by the beginning of next class. The PowerPoint will be the main focus of the class period, and they will present the next time we meet. If the teacher notices that most students do not finish, they should extend the project to the first 30 minutes of the next class period, and they will start presenting after that. The teacher will make sure that each student gives feedback on what their part of the project is, and that the teacher work with every group. Independent Practice/Application 6. The teacher will pass out a rubric to each student that shows them what they are looking for from their group presentations as well as their summaries. During discussion and when the teacher is walking around and talking to each group, they should listen for use of key terms that they may have not understood at first. The teacher should also ask them to use the key terms in their summaries and presentations.

5.

6.

Students will be expected to do research on their own as well as research within the group, format a Word document to write their summaries, and work together in finding information and writing about it.

Students will be expected to ask questions, talk with one another, and use me as their instructor as much as possible before they do the work on their own. They must utilize their time as much as possible.

Students will be expected to use the rubric while they write their summaries and presentations in order to meet expectations.

4.

This is for students to learn how to work together to learn new information, and to put it in a format that they can teach their peers with.

5.

The purpose of this is to invite students to learn on their own, but also utilize their instructor.

6.

The purpose of the rubric is to show student what is expected of them while providing them with a reference to use while

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writing their summaries and projects.

Modifications: None of my students have IEPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, but for the students that are struggling with reading and writing, I will offer outside help. I will also help them look up any words they have trouble with. Technology problems can always occur, so I will make sure to have at least one extra laptop if one were to quit working. If there are a lot of problems with the laptops, then I will stick to my lecture on the different documents and use the class period as a discussion and have students take notes from the discussion and lecture. Closure To close out the lesson for the last 5-10 minutes before students start packing up, I will pull specific phrases from different documents and ask them which document they came from. Students will also be asked to put up their laptops after we are done reviewing.

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Constitution Connections

Designed by Lexi Knoch Based on the state of Tennessee curriculum standards for 11th grade Government 5.0. History CLE 5.2: Understanding specific historical documents and institutions which shaped the principles of the United States Constitution. Introduction

Task

Process

Evaluation

Conclusion

Credits

Introduction Welcome to the Constitution Convention of 1787. You are junior delegates at the convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Just 11 years ago, the Declaration of Independence was drafted and signed in this very room; now you see our Founding Fathers and other delegates from the thirteen colonies coming together to draft a document that will shape our government and change this country for the better. While at this convention, you get to thinking: “How did we get here? Where did these ideas come from?” There are three important documents that influenced the Constitution. They are the Articles of Confederation, the Declaration of Independence, and the Magna Carta. How could each of these be represented in the Constitution?

Task Your task as junior delegates is to help the Founding Fathers by finding key ideas for creating the Constitution in one of those three documents and you will create a presentation for them. This project should take a total of three days. One day for research, a second day to put together a PowerPoint presentation, and a third day to create a visual brochure. You will create a 10 slide PowerPoint that you will present to the class that focuses on the Magna Carta, Declaration of Independence, or the Articles of Confederation. When creating the PowerPoint, keep it simple. For each slide I will grade on the following:  Use a graphic on each slide  Create an 11th slide with bibliography in APA format  Keep information short, but very clear and concise  Focus on only one document I will grade from a rubric that will be given to you on the following:  Your content must be accurate  Graphics must support the point you’re trying to make for that slide  Spelling and grammar must be correct  The sequence must be organized, clear, and logical

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Your presentation must be effective in the focus on one of these three documents

In addition, you are to create another visual that will persuade your fellow delegates to use these ideals in drafting the Constitution. This can be a brochure or a flyer with enough copies for the entire class. For the visual I will grade on the following:  Make your visual creative. Use pictures, graphics, different color font, and different sizes of font.  Use creative speech. Don’t just say “This is why I feel like…” Type this as if you are speaking directly to the Founding Fathers.  You must use words and pictures on your visual. I will grade your visual on the following from a rubric:  There must be a clear beginning, middle, and end  No grammatical or spelling errors  All facts must be accurate  You must show that you gained knowledge in creating the project  The brochure is attractive, formatted clearly, and well organized Process Day 1: The first day, you will research on your own which document you want to choose. You will take your journals with you to the library and take notes on the one that you like the most. Your notes must be thorough and enough to cover ten slides of information. It will be up to you to decide what your ten slides will cover. Choose one that you personally think had the most influence. Begin your research by using the following websites: The University of Oklahoma offers a great text version of the Articles of Confederation. It divides it in sections, and has the dates it was written and ratified. Use this as a guide. Articles of Confederation: This is a summary of the document. It breaks down each section and gives explanations as to what it means. Use this to gather your main information on each document. Why the Articles of Confederation Failed: If you choose the Articles, you must address not only why the Articles failed as a system of government, but why they worked in influencing the Constitution. This website lists every reason as well as giving explanations for each reason. Declaration of Independence: This is a text transcript of the Declaration. Use this as a guide. Purpose of the Declaration of Independence: This website has not only a summary of the Declaration, but also links at the bottom to other information about the document, such as who signed it, facts about it, reasons, and why it was important. Magna Carta 1215: This website gives a summary, who wrote it, important facts, and most importantly, why this document was important in the history of America. Day 2: Once you’ve done your research and chosen your document, start putting your PowerPoint presentation together. You will need 10 slides and as I said, make sure to keep it simple. Use graphics from Google images or clipart from PowerPoint. PowerPoint Presentation Tips is great if you’re having trouble putting your presentation together and it offers some great tips on how to make a great presentation. Day 3: Once your PowerPoint is done and your presentation is complete, you will make a visual. This can include a brochure or flier to pass out to the class. Pull from your presentation to do this, and make sure to keep it simple. This should be creative. Use pictures, markers or anything creative you want to use to make it appealing. Remember, you are trying to persuade some of the most important men in history so make sure the most important information is on the visual. Evaluation

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Making A PowerPoint: Constitution Connections Teacher Name: Lexi Knoch

Student Name:

CATEGORY Content Accuracy

________________________________________

4

3

2

1

All content throughout the presentation is accurate. There are no factual errors.

Most of the content is accurate but there is one piece of information that might be inaccurate.

The content is generally accurate, but one piece of information is clearly flawed or inaccurate.

Content is typically confusing or contains more than one factual error.

A few graphics are not attractive but all support the theme/content of the presentation.

All graphics are attractive but a few do not seem to support the theme/content of the presentation.

Several graphics are unattractive AND detract from the content of the presentation.

Use of Graphics All graphics are attractive (size and colors) and support the theme/content of the presentation.

Spelling and Grammar

Presentation has no misspellings or grammatical errors.

Presentation has 1-2 Presentation has 1-2 Presentation has misspellings, but no grammatical errors more than 2 grammatical errors. but no misspellings. grammatical and/or spelling errors.

Sequencing of Information

Information is organized in a clear, logical way. It is easy to anticipate the type of material that might be on the next card.

Most information is organized in a clear, logical way. One card or item of information seems out of place.

Some information is logically sequenced. An occasional card or item of information seems out of place.

There is no clear plan for the organization of information.

Effectiveness

Project includes all material needed to gain a comfortable understanding of the topic. It is a highly effective study guide.

Project includes most material needed to gain a comfortable understanding of the material but is lacking one or two key elements. It is an adequate study guide.

Project is missing more than two key elements. It would make an incomplete study guide.

Project is lacking several key elements and has inaccuracies that make it a poor study guide.

Making A Brochure : Constitution Connections Teacher Name: Lexi Knoch

Student Name:

CATEGORY

4

________________________________________

3

2

1

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Writing Organization

Each section in the brochure has a clear beginning, middle, and end.

Almost all sections of the brochure have a clear beginning, middle and end.

Most sections of the brochure have a clear beginning, middle and end.

Less than half of the sections of the brochure have a clear beginning, middle and end.

Writing Grammar

There are no grammatical mistakes in the brochure.

There are no grammatical mistakes in the brochure after feedback from an adult.

There are 1-2 grammatical mistakes in the brochure even after feedback from an adult.

There are several grammatical mistakes in the brochure even after feedback from an adult.

Content Accuracy

All facts in the brochure are accurate.

99-90% of the facts in the brochure are accurate.

89-80% of the facts in the brochure are accurate.

Fewer than 80% of the facts in the brochure are accurate.

Knowledge Gained

All students in the group can accurately answer all questions related to facts in the brochure and to technical processes used to create the brochure.

All students in the group can accurately answer most questions related to facts in the brochure and to technical processes used to create the brochure.

Most students in the group can accurately answer most questions related to facts in the brochure and to technical processes used to create the brochure.

Several students in the group appear to have little knowledge about the facts or technical processes used in the brochure.

The brochure has attractive formatting and well-organized information.

The brochure has well-organized information.

The brochure\'s formatting and organization of material are confusing to the reader.

Attractiveness & The brochure has exceptionally Organization

attractive formatting and well-organized information.

Conclusion Remember class, you are junior delegates at the Constitutional Convention. This is one of the most important, if not the most important document in our nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history. The delegates and Founding Fathers didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t come up with these ideas and concepts off of the top of their heads. They used important documents from the past to shape the ideals and responsibilities of our government. It is up to you as junior delegates to help them along the way and persuade them that your document is important. Make sure to do thorough research and represent all of your ideas. This is a very important time in our nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history and you have a once in a lifetime chance to be a part of it! Credits Knoch, L. (2012, November 10). Constitution Connections Rubric. Created from Rubistar on November 10 2012. http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php

Unknown. (2012, December 3). Constitution picture. Retrieved on December 3, 2012 from http://www.icivics.org/teachers/lesson-plans/constitution-day

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Unit Media Share ConSource This website is great because it provides an interactive Constitution that gives reader more insight to what the Founding Fathers meant when they wrote it, and puts it all into context. There are two main sections to the website, a Constitutional Index, which gives summaries and details of each section, and Documents, which is a research tool. There are also sections on each Amendment and the Bill of Rights. Silverbrook, J. (2005, ). ConSource: The Constitutional Sources Project. Retrieved on Oct 28, 2012, from http://www.consource.org/?gclid=CP7L5PLOrrICFQoFnQod7z8ABQ Constitution for iPad This app is great because it gives a breakdown of each article and amendment in the Constitution, with the original language and what it means. There is also a section called “Signers” that gives a list of each signer that signed the bottom of the Constitution. I really like this because it gives more than just what the Constitution is, but who was behind it, which is really important when analyzing the foundations and where it came from. Each person’s section has who they were, where they were from, and what political power they held. There is also a picture of the painting of the signing, and that is interactive as well. One view is just the painting, and the other view has numbers above each man’s head and tells who they are. The app also has a view of the original document. Clint Bagwell Consulting. (2010). Constitution for iPad. Mobile Application Software. Free on iTunes. Retrieved on November 11, 2012 on https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/constitution-foripad/id363287472?mt=8 Constitution for Kids This website is great because you can choose which age level to teach the Constitution to. Once you choose the age level, it caters to that age level. First, it starts out with a basic overview of the Constitution, and a history section of how it all started. Then, it goes into the amendments and different sections, using language that kids at the age level you chose can understand. Walenta, C. (1995, ). The Constitution for Kids (8th-12th Grade) - The U.S. Constitution Online USConstitution.net. Retrieved on Oct 28, 2012, from http://www.usconstitution.net/constkids.html Constitution Preamble- Schoolhouse Rock Schoolhouse Rock has always been a valuable resource in teaching any subject to kids in a fun and entertaining way, with songs and cartoons acting everything out. I know that Schoolhouse Rock may be a little young for 11th graders, but after watching the video on the Preamble, I really feel like it could work for them. The song is really catchy, and the cartoon actually does a really good job depicting what the preamble means. I think this will be good for those students who may not understand the language and need a visual guide to help them. Kaiser, J. (2005, February ). YouTube - Constitution Preamble - Schoolhouse Rock. Retrieved Oct 15, 2012, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=30OyU4O80i4 Declaration of Independence for iPad This app is the same as the Constitution, but instead is an interactive form of the Declaration of Independence. It, too, has a “signers” section, as well as a painting of the signing. There is a view of the original document, and a section with the text of the Declaration. What’s neat and unique about this app is there is a “notes” section. This section gives a timeline of drafting the Declaration in 1776, as well as the history behind Independence Day, and how and when the document was published. There are two views of the original document, the “parchment” view, which is what you would see in the Archives building in

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Washington DC, and the “engraving” section, which is the original document, but the text is darker and easier to read. Clint Bagwell Consulting. (2010). Declaration of Independence for iPad. Mobile Application Software. Free on iTunes. Retrieved on November 11, 2012 on https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/declarationfor-ipad/id367735045?mt=8 History in the Headlines This is a video on the History Channel’s website that features the Declaration of Independence. There isn’t a very good or lengthy description on the video or the Declaration, but the video does speak for itself. It’s not very long, and it’s very captivating and tells the story very well. The Declaration of Independence was a key piece in putting together the Constitution, and it is important for students to understand what was involved in writing the first important document in this nation’s history. It wasn’t all about tea or taxes, but about the right to revolt against your government if they are oppressing you, and that is where the basis to the Constitution comes from. History Channel. (1996, ). Video: The Declaration of Independence — History in the Headlines. Retrieved Oct 15, 2012, from http://www.history.com/news/video-the-declaration-ofindependence Magna Carta- the Definitive Guide This is one of the best apps I’ve found. At 99 cents it’s cheap, and very in depth about one of the most important documents establishing democracy in the world. There are eight sections in the “History” section. They are an Introduction, Detailed Timeline of the Magna Carta, Origins, Royal Amendments, Magna Carta’s Effect, Magna Carta’s Legacy Abroad, Magna Carta in the Colonies, and Magna Carta in the Modern Era. These are the best part to the application. Each section is long and detailed, gives important information, and is written in a way that makes it easy to understand for students. The next section is the Magna Carta itself. Under this section there are 8 sub sections. There is a Full Latin Translation, a Full English Translation, English Translation Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, the Surety Barons from Clause 61 of the Magna Carta, and a scrollable image of the document. This app goes into great detail and gives a great description about how the Magna Carta had an effect on America. Daniel Dickinson. (2010). Magna Carta the Definitive Guide. Mobile Application Software. 99 cents on iTunes. Retrieved on November 11, 2012 on https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/magna-cartadefinitive-guide/id400492476?mt=8 This Day in History This site, which is on the History Channel’s website, features a certain day in history and a short but informative video on what happened that day. The one I chose was on the Magna Carta. It was sealed on June 15, 1215, and was one of the most primary documents used in forming the Constitution. The site gives the video, and then a lengthy description on the history of the Magna Carta and its importance in history. I think this video and description is good because it sets a good foundation on what importance this document had on American history. It’s said that the Magna Carta laid down the foundation for constitutional development in England, and the Founding Fathers used this in creating a base for their own government. History Channel. (1996, ). Magna Carta sealed — History.com This Day in History — 6/15/1215. Retrieved Oct 15, 2012, from http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/magna-carta-sealed The United States Constitution This website offers quizzes on the Constitution that range from easy to difficult. The quizzes center on certain dates and the amendments. The website also gives interesting facts. The questions are multiple choice, and it is really interactive. (2002). United States Constitution - Free Quizzes. Retrieved on Oct 28, 2012, from http://www.quiz-tree.com/United_States_Constitution_main.html

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Service Learning Ideas

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English As an effort to offer my 8th grade students an opportunity to apply their knowledge and skills to real world experiences, students will participate in a virtual service learning experience. Focusing on advertisements and the use of illogical fallacies, students will be working to educate the general populace on what logical fallacies are and their presence in advertising. The class will compile research, examples and their prior knowledge to compose a blog of advertisements with fallacies. Students will promote the blog using both the internet and word of mouth in an effort to increase the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s awareness of logical fallacies and their impact on consumer spending.

Mathematics Students will use addition skills to help the West Nashville Papa John's give food to the Isaiah 57 organization. The West Nashville Papa John's gives left over pizza and wings to the Isaiah 57 organization who feeds the Nashville homeless population. Students will have to separate the pizza boxes (small, medium, large, and extra large) there should be a total of 200. (How many of each box should we have?) The boxes will have to be counted into groups of 50, then they will have to be folded. Then, with the help of an adult the students will box each pizza and count how many pizzas will be given to Isaiah 57. This activity incorporates basic addition because the students will have to determine how many of each size pizza box they need, and what pizza goes in each box.

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Reading 1. A service learning project that would incorporate Kindergarten reading would be for kindergarten students to create their own genre of book to be published in the school library. Students would choose their own genre type and create and illustrate it in their own way. Once the students have completed their book they will be put in the school library. Students will use Eyejot to send a video to different publishers to get ideas on how to publish a book. As a class field trip, the kindergartners that had published their books would have to go with an administrator to drop off a copy of their book to a public library. This activity would incorporate exploring different types of genres because it requires students to comprehend and read. 2. After completing a 4th grade literature unit based on Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing, the teacher and students will have a brainstorming session over the most important/most interesting parts of the story. The teacher will then discuss the concept of a service-learning project (participating in a project that involves, and preferably benefits the community). The class will continue to brainstorm in an effort to connect the story to possible ideas for a service-learning project. Possible ideas: Clean up a park, The purpose of this project is to have students work together to use their comprehension skills to connect concepts within the story to real life and apply it to their community.

Science 1. A sixth grade science class focusing on energy will base its service learning project on potential and kinetic energy. Students will be able to participate in a trip that involves an amusement park that offers community service projects. For examples, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Give a Day, Get a Disney Dayâ&#x20AC;? is a service project that allows services to convert to a day at the amusement park. This project was offered at both Disneyland and Disney World. Kids were able to volunteer their time to enjoy a day in the park for free. The volunteering can be arranged worldwide in vast cities for completion in order to receive a ticket for free. The main purpose of this service is the reward for educational purposes. The students will be able to observe potential and kinetic energy in real life roller coasters and the other amusement park rides. This will be memorable because the students will be experiencing potential and kinetic energy by the rides. The teacher can also mention energy transformation while reviewing potential and kinetic energy to the students. 2. A service learning application for 9th grade Biology students learning about the four major macromolecules, the students will assist Second Harvest Food Bank in implementing a list of healthy food

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for people to donate. Food banks usually ask for non-perishable food items, however these items may have a negative affect on those who eat this type of food consistently. For example, learning about fats and lipids, students will learn that enzymes in the stomach and intestines do not easily break down Trans fats. Once this happens, the class and I will research different items that are affordable for donators and beneficial for those in need. Once the list is created, we will distribute these lists to neighboring grocery stores to get the community involved.

Social Studies For my service learning project for the 11th grade Government classroom, since itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an election year, I will ask my students to conduct polls throughout the school. They will set up tables at lunch and ask students to participate in various questionnaires based on their beliefs on certain issues. My students will ask them how they feel about prominent issues, such as immigration, healthcare, social justice issues, the economy, and foreign policy. Then my students will ask them who they would vote for (or are voting for if they are 18). Once this poll is complete, I will help the students put it together and we will present it to the school through the school newspaper so that students know where they stand among their peers. Also, thisinvites students to think on a deeper level about how they really feel about certain issues at a very important time.

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Media Share Resources

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Biology DNA/RNA/Protein and General Molecular Weight Calculator This application allows students to apply the concept of base pairing to understand the process of protein synthesis. There is a DNA sequence that you can type in and it will give you the length of the sequence, and its’ RNA sequence to coincide. In addition to base pairing, this application will calculate and name known protein sequences. Finally, there is a glossary of common formulas that are used in science from the elements. The students are able to understand the importance of forming bonds from amino acids, hence, building proteins. Wiley Publishing (2010, December 15). DNA/RNA/Protein and General Molecular Weight Calculator. iTunes. Cost $0.00. Retrieved on November 10, 2012 from https://itunes.apple.com/ag/app/dnarna-protein-general-molecular/id408366615?mt=8 Enzyme Catalysis This animation gives the students an understanding of how important enzyme catalysts are to carry out various functions for the body. The students can see that more energy is going to be exerted if heat is used when a catalyst can be used to lower the activation energy level. With this in mind, the students understand the importance of preserving energy for daily activities. This video is beneficial for the students because they are able to use prior knowledge to determine which method of enzyme activity would be more beneficial. Key terms such as substrate, enzyme, and activation of energy are emphasized. Garlandscience. (2009, April 21). Enzyme Catalysis. Retrieved October 10, 2012, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uR4Eysyk5N0 The Macromolecules Song The macromolecules song is a great way for the students to remember the role of each of the four major macromolecules. Students will be able to process information because the song gives everyday examples that correlate with the meaning of each macromolecule. For example, in one part of the song, the singer says nucleic acids are responsible for genetic purposes, meaning if he has a child, nucleic acids will play a role in how his child looks. Catch phrases will also be remembered. Finally, students will recall the functions because they will link the concepts with a part of the song. TheElderStatesman34. (2011, October 7). The macromolecules song. Retrieved October 10, 2012, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N9cfkQfKlkI&feature=related Mcgraw-Hill: How Enzymes Work This resource is great for animations of enzyme activity and other biological systems. The student has the option of viewing the animation with our without audio. This type of media is beneficial for students because they are able to visualize the processes of biological systems, in this case, the “lock and key model.” Without visual aids in science it is difficult for students to understand. Students are also able to take self-quizzes and study key terms with computerized flash cards on this web site. This is one of the best resources students can use because it offers all types of study material for all types of learners. Almeida, B. (1989). Animation: How Enzymes Work. Retrieved on September 14, 2012, from http://highered.mcgrawhill.com/sites/0072495855/student_view0/chapter2/animaion__how_enzymes_work .html Molecules

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The ‘Molecules’ application allows the students to explore the structure the four major macromolecules. There are ways you can expand or decrease the size to see the elements individually or see the entire molecule. There are additional compounds listed on the application, but there are beautiful illustrations that are depicted for the four major macromolecules. Students are able to visualize what these compounds look like and how they move. The text does not depict three-dimensional images, which hinders the learners. With these images you can twist, turn, expand, and decrease, the student will have a clear understanding of how these compounds look in reality. Sunset Lake Software (2012, April 5). Molecules. iTunes. Cost $0.00. Retrieved on November 10, 2012 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/molecules/id284943090?mt=8 Nature Education Although this web site offers is simple graphics, there is a lot of knowledge students are able to gain. For example, the illustration shows balls rolling down hills. One has a barrier while the other does not. This simple graphic is a representation of the most important concepts to be learned in Biology. Since enzyme activity is known to be essential in organisms, the least amount of energy must be used when the activity occurs. Not only are there graphics of enzyme activity, there are also illustrations of how cells are copied and reproduced. Nature Education. (2012). Enzymes allow activation energies to be lowered. Retrieved on September 14, 2012, from http://www.nature.com/scitable/content/enzymes-allow-activation-energies-tobe-lowered-14747799 Project Lead The Way-Macromolecules In the beginning of the show, there is a picture of a McDonald’s Big Mac, which is an indication that macromolecules are somehow related to everyday life. The slideshow then starts off by explaining what macromolecules are. Once the definition of a macromolecule is established, the four major classes of macromolecules are explained. Each macromolecule is broken down into it’s own section. First, the chemical makeup of the macromolecule is shown followed by it’s functions and supplemental examples. Project Lead the Way. (n.d.). Macromolecules. Retrieved on September 14, 2012, from http://wilmothighschool.com/jochl/files/2011/11/Macromolecules-updated-1-2-12.pdf Science Glossary The ‘Science Glossary’ application is a handy application to have. Students are constantly confused as to how to spell or pronounce certain scientific terms. With this application, the student is able to see different terms that will be learned throughout the semester in various chapters and lessons. This is an application students can carry to increase their scientific vocabulary abilities. Vision Learning Inc. (2012, October 13). Science Glossary. iTunes. Cost $0.00. Retrieved on November 12, 2012 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/science-glossary/id331657060?mt=8 Type 2 Diabetes This animated video gives a real-life application of one of the major macromolecules, carbohydrates. A malfunction in enzyme activity of the macromolecule causes complications within the body. Students will be able to see how ineffective enzyme activity parallels with complications in the body. Many times students are not able to see how complications in biological functions can harm the body. This also lines with the technology standard four, which has students use critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making skills. Nucleusanimation. (2012, February 22). Type 2 Diabetes. Retrieved October 10, 2012, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OXAe3eOjqCk

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English (7-12) Cheat Sheet 1.0 This application offers users a quick reference list of both formal and informal fallacies. Although this application is just a list of fallacies and examples, the variety of logical fallacies provided far surpasses the other logical fallacy apps out there. What it lacks in appearance, it makes up for in knowledge. Using this app will allow students to access a breadth of knowledge in a format they are familiar with. One of the major pluses is the listing of every logical fallacy on the app. This format is easy for students who quickly need to access a particular fallacy for reference or understanding. Students and instructors can download this app from the iTunes website for $0.99 and quickly access the wealth of information on contained within it. Concentric Sky. (2009, July). Fallacies Cheat Sheet. iTunes. Cost $0.99. Retrieved on November 10, 2012 from https://itunes.apple.com/app/fallacies-cheat-sheet/id322016388?mt=8 Exercises on Fallacious Appeals This simple website offers students a chance to practice their ability to identify fallacies. The website offers and interactive quiz in which students will read an excerpt and then identify if it does have a fallacy and what that fallacy is. After students have had an opportunity to take the quiz, the correct answers will appear as well as an explanation as to why each answer is the correct answer. The language used to cover such difficult topics is appropriate for eight grade readers and easy to understand. Mesher, D. (1996, January). Exercises on Fallacious Appeals. Retrieved on September 20, 2012 from http://www.sjsu.edu/depts/itl/graphics/adhom/appeal-q.html#1d Fallacies of Logic This logical fallacy app looks to offer a visually interesting presentation of logical fallacies. This application provides a comprehensive list of logical fallacies to help users learn new and old ones. The random order helps users access logical fallacies theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve probably never heard of; however, this feature can be frustrating if you are looking to access a particular example quickly. A major plus for this application is the producer understands that this app will never be finished. The author says that updates occur frequently to introduce new logical fallacies and features to make the application even more interactive for users. Student and instructors can download this app from the iTunes website for $0.99. Students can use this app on a daily basis to help further their knowledge while the visually appealing interface will likely keep students more engaged than the plainer application. Elegant Recursion Inc. (2012, September). Fallacies of Logic. iTunes. Cost $0.99. Retrieved on November 10, 2012 from https://itunes.apple.com/app/fallacies-of-logic/id534062476?mt=8

Logic & Arguments â&#x20AC;&#x201C; logical fallacies (formal & informal)

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This video provides and overall explanation of both informal and formal fallacies. It provides accurate examples and tactics to help students identify illogical arguments. In step by step instructions, the video not only recommends these tactics but shows how to use them when evaluating others' statements. NativLang. (2012, January). Logic & Arguments – logical fallacies (formal & informal). [Video file]. Retrieved on October 13, 2012 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GNeagdJd4rU Logical Fallacies This video dramatizes and acts out multiple logical fallacies in an effort to reveal the ridiculous premises behind each of them. Examples include hyperbolas, fear tactics, and slippery slope fallacies. The producers not only act out illogical fallacies, they also take the chance to explain why they are illogical in the first place. Students will have a chance to see how words are realized in actions and normal conversation. bailey2092. (2011, Novemeber). Logical Fallacies. [Video file]. Retrieved on October 12, 2012 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=21822W14Ecs Logical Fallacies This application offers users an opportunity to explore multiple logical fallacies with quick examples of each one. Unlike other resources, this application offers lectures, flash cards and a chapter test to help students assess their own understanding. This will help students both identify logical fallacies in others’ reasoning but also help them to form their own arguments without committing some of the same logical errors. Student can access this application by downloading it from the iTunes website for $0.99. Cain, A.R. (2012, January). Logical Fallacies. iTunes. Cost $0.99. Retrieved on November 10, 2012 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/logical-fallacies/id494451270?mt=8 Logical Fallacies Hangman Who doesn’t love hangman? Students are able to go onto this website and practice their fallacy identification through an interactive hangman game. Users are provided with hints as to the type of fallacy and asked to play hangman to identify the various names. This resource allows students the chance to identify fallacies they are already familiar with as well as new ones. This twist on vocabulary and identification should keep students engaged while reinforcing previous knowledge. Quia.com. (n.d.). Logical Fallacies Hangman. Retrieved on September 20, 2012 from http://www.quia.com/hm/105552.html

Recognizing Fallacies in Logic Adding a humorous note to the study of logical fallacies, this video offers clear examples of multiple fallacies. Examples are funny and accurate. Students who watch this video will not only be entertained by the two main characters lack of navigation skills, but also by the ridiculousness of their logic. Crawford, N. (2010, March). Recognizing Fallacies in Logic. [Video file]. Retrieved on October 12, 2012 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1rZAMsDcj8 Thou Shat Not Commit Fallacies This interactive website allows users to easily navigate through the various types of fallacies. In addition to providing types of fallacies, each link includes both a detailed explanation of what the fallacy is as well as an example of each one. By clicking through the website and reading on each one, students will have an opportunity to identify logical fallacies as well as discover ones they have never heard of. Richardson, J., Smith, A., & Meaden, S. (n.d.). Thou Shalt Not Commit Logical Fallacies. Retrieved on September 20, 2012 from http://yourlogicalfallacyis.com/home

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Mathematics Addition and Subtraction Body Part Dance The addition and body part dance game is fun for everyone to do. The video itself focuses on single digits, if you are interested in double digits you can have the students pair up in groups of 2 or 3, and have them do the dance together. It gives the students a chance to interact with each other, as well as have fun while learning. Hartman, J. (2012, Feburary 22). The Add and Subtract Body Part Dance (song by Jack Hartmann). Retrieved October 7, 2012, from YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X9hA9JvfLFQ&feature=related CoolMath4Kids Cool Math 4 kids is a very kid friendly website, it's eye catching and something the kids would definitely love. I would use it to play in class games with the kids. It's also great to make flash cards with so that the students can remember their vocabulary words. It also has plenty of and kid/parent lessons so that the child and parent can learn together. Cool Math's Addition Lessons, Games and Free Online Flash Cards. (1997-2012). Retrieved September 22, 2012, from CoolMath4kids: http://www.coolmath4kids.com/addition/index.html Flocabulary -Know about 10's This is a Flocabulary video. Flocabulary is a site that has to be paid for but luckily there are plenty of their videos on YouTube. This particular video is about all the numbers you can add and make the number 10. This video will be helpful because it comes with a catchy song that will help them remember all the numbers you need to make 10. FlocabularyYT. (2012, May 9). Flocabulary - Addition and Subtraction - Know About 10s. Retrieved October 7, 2012, from YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zl-Yvs-0dU8 IXL IXL is a great tool for math. It gives step by step directions on how to do math problems. I would use this in the classroom to help break down math problems. I would also send the website home so that the parents could use it to help their child with their homework. Another great feature is that it has practice questions, I could pull the website up in class click on my unit and have problems on hand that we could practice as a class. Maybe even pull some test questions INC, I. (2012). IXL-Second Grade Math. Retrieved Sep 22, 2012, from IXL: http://www.ixl.com/promo?partner=google&phrase=Misc%20-%20Math-Specific%20K-8%20%20kidsnumbers.com&gclid=CMD_gMH4zLICFQs5nAodgXoApg Kids Learning Math Lite Kids Learning Math is a free app in the Amazon app store that displays kid friendly graphics, that allow children to play without parental supervision. An animated monster gives verbal instructions and feedback to the child which makes learning fun. The Lite edition provides, addition, subtraction, and counting activities. The Full version, which is available for 1.99 includes all the features of the lite version plus: flash cards, an aquarium, games, and more challenges. Fun4Kids Hunny Bee. (2012). Kids Learning Math Lite (Version 1.3). [Mobile Application Software]. Available on the Android Market. Cost Free. Retrieved from

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http://www.amazon.com/Fun4Kids-HoneyBee-Kids-LearningMath/dp/B0085WRXXM/ref=sr_1_1?s=mobile-apps&ie=UTF8&qid=1352120161&sr=11&keywords=kids+learning+math Kids Numbers This website helps the kids take a load off and have fun, but also has them thinking and learning at the same time. It has plenty of games pertaining to both addition and subtraction. It is also a good way to encourage parental involvement. There are multi-player games in which the parents can play with the kids, and join in on their learning. Network, T. K. (2012). Addition Games For Kids. Retrieved September 22, 2012, from KidsNumbers: http://www.kidsnumbers.com/addition.php Learning Gems- Math 2.0 Learning Gems – Math 2.0 is a challenging app that has a wide range of math problems and difficulty. Don’t be fooled by the easier problems! Our game is designed with over 10,500 problems and they are not repeated until each has been displayed once. The result? You are faced with new mixture of different problems and problem types each time you play!! It’s a great way for kids to practice and enhance their math comprehension skills and have fun while doing it. Math 2.0 is available in the Amazon and Apple App Store for .99 Learning Gems. (2012). Learning Gems-Math 2.0 (Version 1.02). [Mobile Application Software]. Available in the Android Market and Apple App Store. Cost 99 cent. Retrieved from http://www.amazon.com/Learning-Gems-Math-2-0/dp/B008PCIL2Y/ref=sr_1_7?s=mobileapps&ie=UTF8&qid=1352120573&sr=1-7&keywords=learning+gems Math Blaster HyperBlast Hop on your HyperCycle and discover the intergalactic adventure that adds up to total fun! Outsmart the alien robots, blast through the razor sharp blockades, and speed past the stars on this mega-math adventure. Make your way through 30 levels of mathematical challenge; test the player on any of the four basic math functions. With three difficulty levels, amazing 3D graphics, kid-friendly controls and functions, and fast paced arcade-style game play, learning math has never been more fun. Math Blaster is available in the Amazon and Apple App Store in lite version for free, or full version for 1.99. Knowledge Adventure. (2011). Math Blaster HyperBlast (Version 1.32) . [Mobile Application Software]. Available in the Android Market and Apple App Store. Cost Free. Retrieved from http://www.amazon.com/Knowledge-Adventure-Math-BlasterHyperBlast/dp/B006BAF2VU/ref=sr_1_1?s=mobile-apps&ie=UTF8&qid=1352120290&sr=11&keywords=hyper+blast Sesame Street -Addition Expedition The addition expedition is a cute video that has everyone's favorite monster Elmo, and one of the prettiest men alive LL Cool J. LL and Elmo go on an addition expedition through Sesame Street. It gives the students a teacher that they are familiar with, and it gives them a song to help them remember how to add. Street, S. (2008, July 18). Sesame Street: LL Cool J goes on an Addition Expedition. Retrieved October 7, 2012, from YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uKD148lpBAE

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Reading Aesop's Quest Aesop’s Quest is an educational game based on Aesop's Fables that will help students with their memory and comprehension skills. The students have to remember elements of the story, which they previously read, in order to complete the level. At the end of each story segment or level, the student is rewarded with a puzzle piece. Once the entire puzzle is completed, the student will be able to continue to the next fable. This free app for the iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPad is an excellent complement to a reading unit that focuses on comprehension skills. This app can also benefit students who are falling behind by making the development of these skills more fun and interesting. NRCC Games (2011). Aesop’s Quest. iTunes $0.99. Retrieved on November 6, 2012 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/aesops-quest/id442928041?mt=8 Bookster This link is to a creative android app. This app will launch your kids into literacy with Bookster, the readalong storytelling app that reads to your kids, records and plays their voices, and teaches vocabulary along the way. Designed by educators to help kids of all ages develop literacy skills, Bookster makes beginning to recognize and read new words fun and easy for even the youngest of readers. Read-and-record mode that records as they (or you) read out loud. Read-along mode that highlights words as they are read aloud, teaching word recognition and vocabulary. They also have turnable pages that let them move at their own pace. Requires Android 1.6 or later. Recording feature may not work without a microphone and SD card. Paul Cram (2011, August 18) Bookster. Accessed from Google Play. Cost. Free. Retrieved on November 2, 2012 https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.imaginelearning.bookster Comic Strip Capers Students can create their own comic strips with this interactive website that will help strengthen their vocabulary skills. Students are asked to select a word to direct the action of the story, and each word choice will lead the characters in the comic to a different outcome. This game is not only educational, but it’s a lot of fun. Students can play again, and again to see how the different words will change the events and the ending. They can even print out their finished comic strips or email them to a friend. Scholastic, Inc. (2011). Comic Strip Capers. PBS Teachers. Retrieved, September 12, 2012 from http://www.pbs.org/teachers/connect/resources/4852/preview/ Dig it An interactive website in which students help an adorable avatar dog dig up a clues to solve a mystery. Students are given a short paragraph to read and are them prompted to answer questions pertaining to the paragraph. With every correct answer, the cute little dog digs up a piece of the mystery object. In the end, once all the questions are answered correctly, the student discovers what the mystery object is. This is an excellent informal assessment for reading comprehension. Harcourt School Publishers. (2012). Dig It. Harcourt School. Retrieved, September 16, 2012 from http://www.harcourtschool.com/activity_collections_preview/predict_outcomes/3_predict.html Extended Learning: Week 6, Session B In this episode of The Electric Company, cartoons, real children, music and visual clues are used to introduce, reiterate, and exemplify the quintessential skills necessary to comprehend information. There is a sketch with singing and dancing detectives explaining how to solve mysteries by following clues. This episode of the Electric Company also addresses the meaning of details and how they can be used to better understand meaning in books. This video can be used as a supplemental resource for comprehension strategies.

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The Electric Company (May 30, 2012). Extended Learning: Week 6, Session B. Retrieved on October 10, 2012 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=obxwueSmFh8&feature=plcp Futaba This is a fantastic multiplayer (four player) game for elementary students that actually makes learning new words fun. Futaba is a word quiz game can be used at home or in the classroom. It is ideal for supporting classroom activities of all types, but especially for developing vocabulary to aid in reading comprehension and language skills. Futaba is also a great resource to help ESL students practice learning words in the classroom environment. Each player takes a seat around the iPad and taps to start. The game begins as images zoom into the playing area. The first player to match the word to the image scores a point. When the player wins three rounds, they are awarded a giant (but very friendly) seedling (Futaba is Japanese for seedling). You can even design your own game. The illustrations and audio for this game are darling and you can even use your own images and text to create your own content by using a built in camera, adding photos to iTunes, or using a Dropbox account. INKids (2012). Futaba. iTunes $0.99. Retrieved on October 6, 2012 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/word-games-for-kids-futaba/id426517722?mt=8 Inference Song In this video, a teacher playing guitar is accompanied by enthusiastic students singing a song about making inferences, all while a Spiderman doll erratically “dances” to the music. This bizarre, hilarious, educational and age-appropriate video and song will undoubtedly keep students entertained while helping them understand this very abstract concept. The lyrics are set to a classic children’s song melody, making it easy and fun to sing along. The ease with which students in the classroom and at home can view this YouTube video, makes it a priceless resource for in a 21 st century elementary reading class. Channel Cheese (October 3, 2008). Inference Song. Retrieved on October 10, 2012 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m_ZNP5aj5fs&feature=player_embedded#! Into the Book A reading comprehension resource for K-4 students and teachers that focuses on eight research-based strategies: Using Prior Knowledge, Making Connections, Questioning, Visualizing, Inferring, Summarizing, Evaluating and Synthesizing. This creatively designed website is one of the most aesthetically pleasing of literary websites. The quality of the content is also excellent and is in line with Tennessee’s reading standards. It is a free website, but you do have to sign up for access. Once you sign up, you will receive a “student key” via email. Wisconsin Educational Communications Board. (2012). Into the Book: Teaching Reading. Into the Book. Retrieved, September 14, 2012 from http://reading.ecb.org/index.html Hindi Kids Story By Pari #7 This link is to a free app on Google Play. “Everybody must have heard a story of mischief rabbit and a clever tortoise. Pari will tell you a same story as this story depict a very meaningful essence to life. It teaches you never be over confident of your talent, as over confidence will always let you down and will become the scene of mortification someday. Whereas confidently, slow and steady one can win the race. Just put an effort and hard work, and destiny is achievable” Our application focuses on building a strong bond between parents and children by providing wonderful stories, making children feel loved and uplifting their moral and creating their interest in education. Each book comes rich with vibrant pictures, engaging narration and funny voice over. The app comes with all the cool features of the Recharge Digital. This app will introduce students to different storybooks. Recharge Digital Content Pvt Ltd (2012, September 1) Hindi Kids Story. Accessed from Google Play. Cost. Free. Retrieved on November 2, 2012 https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.recharge.mischiefhindi&hl=en Kindersight

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This link is a creative that uses characters to directly appeal to the elementary students to learn about music and songs. The web site will offer early learners, with the aid of care-givers, a tool to find and use content in the form of games, songs and stories (not necessarily educationally focused). Students will be very engaged in this source. It will help them explore lyrics to songs. They are able to explore different song types and tempos of Students who visit this website will have the option to pick any song they would like. Kindersight. (2007). Music and Songs. Retrieved on September 22, 2012 http://www.kindersite.org/Directory/DirectoryFrame.htm Making Inferences In this video, students from Mr. Salsich’s third grade classroom thoroughly explain what inferences are and how to make them. The video begins with a stuffed animal sloth named Perezoso, who asks a question about inference, very very very very slowly. Throughout his stunted speech, the video cuts to clips of children yawning, snoring and resting their heads on tables. All the voices are done by children, since the video uses pictures of real students and their voices, students will be able to relate to the information. There are numerous examples and the concept definition is reiterated throughout. This is an excellent supplemental resource to introduce what inferences are and how to make them. Jmsalsich (March 8, 2009). Making Inferences. Retrieved on http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JWSqxItd9SU&feature=g-hi Mother Goose On The Loose HD - A Story and Activity Book This link is to a free app on iTunes. "Mother Goose on the Loose" is an interactive rhyming story and activity book for children. The story is told in mother goose rhymes with a twist. The story is filled with exciting and educational games/activities based on the story that children can enjoy for hours. Interactive read-along storybook application features your favorite characters from Mother Goose Rhymes. Read yourself or let the narrator read to you. Play exciting and educational games based on the story. Fun things like spellings, missing letters, memory matching, matching shadows, and many more are found on this app.

G S Phinest (2011, November 18) Mother Goose On The Loose HD - A Story and Activity Book. Accessed from iTunes. Cost. Free. Retrieved on November 2, 2012 https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/mothergoose-on-loose-hd-story/id475959008?mt=8 Non-Fiction Fun: Identifying the Features of Non-Fiction Books This link is to an informative video. Students discuss features of non-fiction texts and practice identifying them in a variety of books they read. This video shows how the students interact with the teacher about the lesson. This video helps student identify the difference between fiction and non- fiction books. It gives them the source to find out information when doing a lesson. As a teacher we must explain thoroughly the difference between different genres of books. This can teach students to open up and their minds and identify what they observe about their book. balancedliteracydiet (2011) Identifying the Features of Non-Fiction Books. October, 9, 2012 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i5Dk_jTsInQ Once Upon a Mad Lib Junior This link is an educational and informative website that bases their games around educational activities. While the children are playing they are also learning important skills that can be used in the classroom to enhance their grades. Children are able to use this site to enhance their readings skills by playing a variety of games. The "Mad Libs" games are designed to help children learn about nouns, verbs and adjectives by choosing one of the many words that are flying around the screen. Kids will be laughing so hard at their Mad lib’s that they will not even notice they are learning the parts of a sentence.This approach to learning has the ability to teach them new skills while making it fun for them in the process. When visiting you can sign up for free and also create your own book. Pearson Education, Inc. (2000-2012). Funbrain’s Reading Mad lib’s. Retrieved on September 22, 2012 http://www.funbrain.com/brain/ReadingBrain/Games/Game.html?GameName=MadLibsOnceUponA&Brai n=reading&GameNumber=2&Color=FFFFFF

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Reading Monster Town 3 This is a great app for kindergarten through fifth graders and for students learning to read in English (ESL). This app has interactive word and sentence games to help students better understanding stories and to review words and sentence structures. The stories and games in this app align with elementary school core curricula and will certainly help students gain a greater appreciation of, and intrinsic motivation for reading. The captivating illustrations will attract and keep learnersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; attentions and the fun word games, with their pronunciations and illustrations, will help students grasp the wordsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; spelling and meanings in an effective and efficient way and the building sentence games will help students comprehend different kinds of sentence structures. This app also allows for learners to read and listen at the same time, which will benefit those with different learning styles. Reading Monster Town, with its simple topics will help the young learners develop a better understanding of themselves and a love of reading. BluePin (2012). Reading Monster Town 3. iTunes $0.99. Retrieved on October 6, 2012 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/reading-monster-town-3/id463252389?mt=8 Rhymes and Alphabet - Introduction to Alphabets - Creative Learning for Kids This link is to a fun learning video. It is creative featuring cartoon characters to introduce the alphabet. This video explores the alphabet and has creative ideas in sounding them out. Students will be able to build up their vocabulary skills and also build upon their pronunciation method. Rhymes and Alphabet Introduction to Alphabets - Creative Learning for Kids. 'A' for Apple, 'B' for Ball. This video makes your child learn more about English alphabets with the help of this animated video.This particular YouTube video can expand their reading level by practicing the proper usage of the alphabet. This will help students comprehend reading activities more. RajshriKids (2011) Rhymes and Alphabet - Introduction to Alphabets - Creative Learning for Kids. October 9, 2012 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V_gUGwXT-3I Starfall: Fiction and Nonfiction This link is a very kid-friendly site, perfect for using during computer learning time. The activities build on each other, starting with learning the alphabet and its associated sounds, and followed by reading simple online books and more advanced reading activities. Starfall.com opened in September of 2002 as a free public service to teach children to read with phonics. Our systematic phonics approach, in conjunction with phonemic awareness practice, is perfect for preschool, kindergarten, first grade, second grade, special education, home school, and English language development (ELD, ELL, and ESL). Starfall is an educational alternative to other entertainment choices for children. Starfall Education. (2002-2012). Fiction and Nonfiction. Retrieved on September 21, 2012 http://www.starfall.com/n/level-c/fiction-nonfiction/load.htm?f WatchKnowLearn: Between the Lions: Song - "Read a Book Today" This YouTube video is a creative way to introduce books. This video is very entertaining and will get the students engaged in the importance of reading and the types of books that are around. In the video they sing about all the different types of genres of books. This video is very informative and fun. The "Between the Lions" lions -- Theo, Cleo, Lionel, and Leona -- team up to sing this catchy, New-Orleans-style, musical tribute to all the different kinds of books you can find at your local library. Students will get a feeling to sing and learn. porter1526 (2011) Between the Lions: Song - "Read a Book Today" October 7, 2012 http://www.watchknowlearn.org/Video.aspx?VideoID=34205&CategoryID=5987

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Science Conservation of Energy Song A song found on YouTube discusses Conservation of Energy in a familiar song known by Maroon 5 band. The song begins with discussing chemical energy and giving examples of what chemical energy is. As the song progresses, Conservation of Law is introduced and described how it cannot be destroyed. Potential energy becomes the next focus, and then mentions elastic potential energy. As the song progresses, kinetic energy is introduced as described. This video can be great for an introduction of many energy lesson plans because it includes more than one type of energy. The song describes and discusses other energy sources with a melody that can be easy to sing with. Parr/YouTube (2011). Conservation of Energy Song. (Retrieved on October 4, 2012 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k60jGJfV8oU Dr. Loopy discusses Potential and Kinetic energy This is a video that consists of three characters and a dog. In this video the main focus relies on potential and kinetic energy. The video opens as a scientist, Dr. Loopy, describing both energies by using an example. Dr. Loopy is dressed in a lab coat, glasses, and a lime green wig. The example is a toy car that can move on its own by moving it backwards. As Dr. Loopy describes in the video, by moving the car back is potential energy. When the toy car is released kinetic energy is applied. The video continues with Dr. Loopy personally showing the difference between the two energy sources. Dr. Loopy, his friend, and his dog decide to shrink themselves and go into the toy car. Another character, Charlizeta, stays normal in size to push the car back. As the video continues, Charlizeta pushed the car back and releases. While this is performed, both energies are mentioned again. The video ends with the car jumping over a ramp successfully. This video can be very beneficial if students are having a hard time differentiating between kinetic and potential energy. The two energies are introduced, described, and performed clearly for students understanding. Dr. Loopy/YouTube (2007) Potential and Kinetic Energy Clip. Retrieved on October 4, 2012 from http://teachertube.com/viewVideo.php?video_id=9334 Ms. Hoskins 6th Grade Science This Android application includes all the subject areas that are present in a sixth grade class. Energy is one topic area that is included in this application, which focuses on kinetic and potential energy. The application includes a PowerPoint form in which provides the important information in an energy lesson. As you open the application, the introduction is an actual science sixth grade page that includes test minders, important dates, and the other subject areas that follow under the science subject. This application allows students to take the information on the go as a portable PowerPoint. There are a total of fourteen slides which include definitions, pictures, and examples of the energies. Ms. Hoskins 6th Grade Science/Ms. Hoskins (October 2012). Android Market. Free. Retrieved on October 24, 2012 from

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https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wMsHoskinsScienceClass&feature=search_result#?t=W 251bGwsMSwxLDEsImNvbS53TXNIb3NraW5zU2NpZW5jZUNsYXNzIl0. PSLE Science Revision Notes In an application that mainly focuses on energy involves the different forms of energy and other energy factors on flashcards. It provides a quick and easy way to study. The cards come in bright colors of red and yellow. Some of the questions included on the application deal with what is energy, potential energy, kinetic energy, and many more. Along with the application, one specific feature includes a voice over. This allows the student to listen to notes listed on each notecard. This is a great way prepare a new version of studying on the go. Wherever a student is, the application takes the important energy information wherever the student is to study. Portable studying can become the next great thing for the generation of student we have today. PSLE Science Revision Notes Energy/ Ahmad Ali Mohd Yusope (2012). Iphone Application Store. $1.99. Retrieved on October 24, 2012 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/psle-science-revisionnotes/id500357203?mt=8 Renewed Energy Song A song found on YouTube discusses energy, renewed energy, in an updated musical melody. This song is popular and students can relate to the hip music in order to create a larger impact on remembering the information. As the song opens, the lyrics state how much fuels are used every day. These fuels are limited, yet much is being used. As the song progresses it is stated what fuels are used for, how we receive fuels, and how to reduce, reuse, and recycle. Other options are listed for energy use, like solar panels, wind, and water. The song states that only 5% of renewable sources are used. This can be incorporated into a lesson to help get an insight view of what sources are being used. It can also be a great way to describe what renewable energy is. Parr/YouTube (2011). Renewed Energy Song. Retrieved on October 4, 2012 from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UZol5vMDhe4 Science Jeopardy Game Science Jeopardy appears to look similar to the popular Jeopardy game found on television. There are a total of five columns, with 100-400 point categories. The five columns consist of nonrenewable resource, renewable resource, physical and chemical change, energy, and other. This game can be played between classes divided into two teams. The colors used in this game are the block colored in blue, with yellow writing. A student can pick a category and how many points he or she decides. For example, a student can pick energy for 400. The question will appear which states, which is “a form of energy that results from tiny moving particles.” The student has the option to click continue, or correct response. If the student chose to answer this specific question, the answer would be, “what is electricity.” At the bottom of the Jeopardy game, there is an option to keep score. This game includes terms, definitions, and readings that can be found in a sixth grade science class. This website would best be used after completing the energy chapter and quizzing students by a fun game. Johnson, Matt /Jeopardy (2012). Jeopardy Labs Science Game. Retrieved on September 14, 2012 from http://jeopardylabs.com/play/6 th-grade-science-game Science for Teens In this fun filled application, Energy is used in a form of a game to interact with the player(s). This game specifically focuses on two main aspects which include mechanics and energy. A town is built, with different building listed under specific educational terms. In this town different cartoon characters guide the player(s) through the game. One character includes a teacher, while the player is a part of the student body. Different examples of energy and other aspects are included throughout the continuation of the game. One technique that is used to help the player(s) learn consists of drawing the different aspects listed in order to move on to the next level in the game. The game also allows the player(s) to create their own route. Player(s) can pick which building or route they want to go to in sequential order. The game includes the topics of mechanisms, mechanical work, energy, and sources of energy. This game is full of different cartoons, colors, and interacts with the player(s).

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Science for Teens Mechanics and Energy 1.0/Brothersoft (2012). Iphone Application Store .99 cents. Retrieved on October 24, 2012 from http://mobile.brothersoft.com/science-for-teens--mechanics-andenergy-471256.html Study Stack Science Flash Cards The main focus of this game is to test prior knowledge of energy for a sixth grade science class. The flashcards demonstrate a definition of a term that can be used in a chapter referring to energy. The student is to state what term should match the definition. After the student answers the question, the card can either go into a correct or incorrect pile. The student can then review the incorrect pile, in order to focus on those terms that were incorrect. The game can also include a timer, which will help the student for a timely manner. Along with a timer, the game also includes a shuffle option, so the student will not expect the same order as the previous game. This will help students understand terms and vocabulary found in a sixth grade science class focusing on energy. Some of the vocabulary terms consist of energy, kinetic, potential, energy transformation, Law of Conservation of Energy or Matter, energy resource, renewable, and nonrenewable resource. The website also offers many other games that have the same concept of energy for a sixth grade science class. Some of the games are hangman, matching, and crossword puzzle. The other games also include the same terms, but in a different format of a game. Weinder, John/Study Stack (2012). Study Stack Science Flash Cards. Retrieved on September 14, 2012 from http://www.studystack.com/flashcar-167276

Word-O-Rama Word-O-Rama is set up for students to work on terms found in a sixth grade science class focusing on Energy. The game is set up like an actual television show, with music in the background. Bright colors are incorporated into the game, with a question board that appears in the middle. The points are found at the bottom right hand corner, in order to tally up the game. The host of the game is a talking penguin that instructs the student on how to play the game. The game consists of 10 questions. The questions are the definitions of vocabulary found in an energy lesson. There are a total of four answers the participant can chose from. If the participant answers the question correctly the first time the participant receives 20 points. If the student does not receive the question correct and continues to try, the participant can receive 5 points. For example, a question can ask, â&#x20AC;&#x153;power created in form of heat.â&#x20AC;? If the participant clicks thermal energy first, the participant will win 20 points. If the student clicked another term instead, the student would win 5 points. This game can be a great review for prior knowledge of the terms and definitions used in an energy lesson plan. Laundrie, Robert/ Word-O-Rama (2012). Science Word-O-Rama. Retrieved on September 18, 2012 from <http://www.spellingcity.com/WordORama-spelling-game.html?listId=5583601>

U. S. Government ConSource This website is great because it provides an interactive Constitution that gives reader more insight to what the Founding Fathers meant when they wrote it, and puts it all into context. There are two main sections to

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the website, a Constitutional Index, which gives summaries and details of each section, and Documents, which is a research tool. There are also sections on each Amendment and the Bill of Rights. Silverbrook, J. (2005, ). ConSource: The Constitutional Sources Project. Retrieved on Oct 28, 2012, from http://www.consource.org/?gclid=CP7L5PLOrrICFQoFnQod7z8ABQ Constitution for iPad This app is great because it gives a breakdown of each article and amendment in the Constitution, with the original language and what it means. There is also a section called “Signers” that gives a list of each signer that signed the bottom of the Constitution. I really like this because it gives more than just what the Constitution is, but who was behind it, which is really important when analyzing the foundations and where it came from. Each person’s section has who they were, where they were from, and what political power they held. There is also a picture of the painting of the signing, and that is interactive as well. One view is just the painting, and the other view has numbers above each man’s head and tells who they are. The app also has a view of the original document. Clint Bagwell Consulting. (2010). Constitution for iPad. Mobile Application Software. Free on iTunes. Retrieved on November 11, 2012 on https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/constitution-foripad/id363287472?mt=8 Constitution for Kids This website is great because you can choose which age level to teach the Constitution to. Once you choose the age level, it caters to that age level. First, it starts out with a basic overview of the Constitution, and a history section of how it all started. Then, it goes into the amendments and different sections, using language that kids at the age level you chose can understand. Walenta, C. (1995, ). The Constitution for Kids (8th-12th Grade) - The U.S. Constitution Online USConstitution.net. Retrieved on Oct 28, 2012, from http://www.usconstitution.net/constkids.html Constitution Preamble- Schoolhouse Rock Schoolhouse Rock has always been a valuable resource in teaching any subject to kids in a fun and entertaining way, with songs and cartoons acting everything out. I know that Schoolhouse Rock may be a little young for 11th graders, but after watching the video on the Preamble, I really feel like it could work for them. The song is really catchy, and the cartoon actually does a really good job depicting what the preamble means. I think this will be good for those students who may not understand the language and need a visual guide to help them. Kaiser, J. (2005, February ). YouTube - Constitution Preamble - Schoolhouse Rock. Retrieved Oct 15, 2012, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=30OyU4O80i4 Declaration of Independence for iPad This app is the same as the Constitution, but instead is an interactive form of the Declaration of Independence. It, too, has a “signers” section, as well as a painting of the signing. There is a view of the original document, and a section with the text of the Declaration. What’s neat and unique about this app is there is a “notes” section. This section gives a timeline of drafting the Declaration in 1776, as well as the history behind Independence Day, and how and when the document was published. There are two views of the original document, the “parchment” view, which is what you would see in the Archives building in Washington DC, and the “engraving” section, which is the original document, but the text is darker and easier to read. Clint Bagwell Consulting. (2010). Declaration of Independence for iPad. Mobile Application Software. Free on iTunes. Retrieved on November 11, 2012 on https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/declarationfor-ipad/id367735045?mt=8 History in the Headlines This is a video on the History Channel’s website that features the Declaration of Independence. There isn’t a very good or lengthy description on the video or the Declaration, but the video does speak for itself. It’s not very long, and it’s very captivating and tells the story very well. The Declaration of Independence was a key piece in putting together the Constitution, and it is important for students to understand what was involved in writing the first important document in this nation’s history. It wasn’t all about tea or taxes, but

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about the right to revolt against your government if they are oppressing you, and that is where the basis to the Constitution comes from. History Channel. (1996, ). Video: The Declaration of Independence — History in the Headlines. Retrieved Oct 15, 2012, from http://www.history.com/news/video-the-declaration-ofindependence Magna Carta- the Definitive Guide This is one of the best apps I’ve found. At 99 cents it’s cheap, and very in depth about one of the most important documents establishing democracy in the world. There are eight sections in the “History” section. They are an Introduction, Detailed Timeline of the Magna Carta, Origins, Royal Amendments, Magna Carta’s Effect, Magna Carta’s Legacy Abroad, Magna Carta in the Colonies, and Magna Carta in the Modern Era. These are the best part to the application. Each section is long and detailed, gives important information, and is written in a way that makes it easy to understand for students. The next section is the Magna Carta itself. Under this section there are 8 sub sections. There is a Full Latin Translation, a Full English Translation, English Translation Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, the Surety Barons from Clause 61 of the Magna Carta, and a scrollable image of the document. This app goes into great detail and gives a great description about how the Magna Carta had an effect on America. Daniel Dickinson. (2010). Magna Carta the Definitive Guide. Mobile Application Software. 99 cents on iTunes. Retrieved on November 11, 2012 on https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/magna-cartadefinitive-guide/id400492476?mt=8 This Day in History This site, which is on the History Channel’s website, features a certain day in history and a short but informative video on what happened that day. The one I chose was on the Magna Carta. It was sealed on June 15, 1215, and was one of the most primary documents used in forming the Constitution. The site gives the video, and then a lengthy description on the history of the Magna Carta and its importance in history. I think this video and description is good because it sets a good foundation on what importance this document had on American history. It’s said that the Magna Carta laid down the foundation for constitutional development in England, and the Founding Fathers used this in creating a base for their own government. History Channel. (1996, ). Magna Carta sealed — History.com This Day in History — 6/15/1215. Retrieved Oct 15, 2012, from http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/magna-carta-sealed The United States Constitution This website offers quizzes on the Constitution that range from easy to difficult. The quizzes center on certain dates and the amendments. The website also gives interesting facts. The questions are multiple choice, and it is really interactive. (2002). United States Constitution - Free Quizzes. Retrieved on Oct 28, 2012, from http://www.quiztree.com/United_States_Constitution_main.html

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Technology in the Schools, Unit Booklet (FA12)  

This booklet was developed by seven (7) teacher education candidates enrolled in EDCI 4190- Technology in the Schools at Tennessee State Uni...

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