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Tennessee State University EDCI 4190: Technology in the Schools

Technology Integration Booklet Dr. Nicole K. Arrighi, Spring 2016 1|Page


Purpose: This booklet was developed by teacher education candidates enrolled in EDCI 4190- Technology in the Schools at Tennessee State University. These students seek to provide a service to their future colleagues through their understanding on technology as a beneficial resource in today’s classroom. Within our global society, digital learners seek opportunities to expand their knowledge beyond textbooks, worksheets, and other traditional resources.

Technology is a familiar tool to students whether used for educational or entertainment purposes. It is likely that teachers are not as equipped with materials that incorporate technology effectively in the curriculum. The contributors of this resource guide hope to assist other practitioners with promoting critical thinking, instructional engagement, and curricular enhancements through effective technology integration.

The activities support Common Core/Tennessee curriculum standards, ISTE 2008 technology principles, and TSU’s seven knowledge, skills, and dispositions for teacher education majors. Each student packet includes the following six (6) projects: Wordle, a unit rationale (with links to Glogster, and Present.Me tutorial video), technology-based ASSURE lesson plan, opening unit commercial, Tell’em in 10 PowerPoint notes (with three active strategies), and Wix Showcase portfolio.

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Contributors:

Amanda Berry

http://aberry07.wix.com/msberry “In the beginning of my teaching career, I aspire to plan lessons at least daily that

incorporate technology or media in the classroom. My goal for my classroom is for the students to be able to use technology efficiently and effectively. The teaching style will include integrating various sources of technology and a student- centered approach. I plan to allow every student, no matter than economic or social status, have access to the same materials.”

Betty Conley

http://bettyroseatmypc.wix.com/proportfoliobrc “Technology and the rapid evolution of technology within the past decade is

something that our educational predecessors did not have to face. As modern teachers, our only realistic choice when it comes to technology is to embrace and utilize it in our teaching, with our learners, and within our school and local community. Used correctly, technology can help propel ordinary teachers and lessons into extraordinary learning experiences.”

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Keisha Leath

http://keast15.wix.com/mysite “Technology is becoming more important in the classroom. Teachers are using

technology for a variety of educational purposes. I plan on integrating technology into my teaching in my future classroom. One way that I plan on using technology is by having a class website. In addition to having a class website, I will also email the parents/guardians of my students regularly. I will use technology in the majority of my lessons to enhance the meaning of my instruction.”

Aubrey Kemp

http://aubreyk94.wix.com/mskempsclass “Technology has become an integral part of the everyday lives of many people.

This is especially true for teachers in grades K-12. As time goes on, technology is becoming more and more advanced. Also, it seems that the children of today are becoming more and more familiar with different types of technology at a young age. Technology has proven to be an excellent instructional aid in any classroom. For these reasons, I believe that it is extremely important to integrate technology in the classroom.”

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Taylor Mosley

http://taylordmosley.wix.com/portfolio2016 “As an Early Childhood educator, it is that much more important to establish a stable foundation for their entire educational career is dependent upon these years. With technology being such a big part of today’s society in efforts to stay relevant and up to date with the interest of the students, not including technology would be unthinkable. It is my job to find ways to infuse each subject with a thorough amount of technology, not only for my students, but also for the parents.”

Natalie Nash

http://nnash2.wix.com/mrsnashclass “What technology means for me, as an educator, is a way to connect with the

learners of this generation. Technology is a significant part of the students’ lives that I will be teaching and I have a desire to use technology to create an engaging, encouraging, and educational environment. Technology will be used in my classroom as a way to promote higher thinking in a nontraditional setting to set myself and my students aside from other classes. Given that I enjoy technology myself, I aspire to continuously increase my knowledge on current and new opportunities regarding technology to be able to provide successful learning for my students.”

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MaKeshia Parker

http://mmp4554.wix.com/2016-portfolio “In general, technology is integrated all around the world. Instructors know that each individual is unique and learn differently. The teacher can use technology to aid struggling students and use devices to encourage self-direct learning. When the educator uses an interactive lesson, it turns the boring lesson into a fun lesson and creates an engaging environment. Incorporating technology in the classroom prepares students for the real world. I will declare that technology is connected when working with others.”

Hailey Peeters

http://hdowell94.wix.com/mrspeeters “Having 21st century learners, technology becomes an important tool used to help facilitate and enhance student learning. When we incorporate technology with our instruction, it opens many learning opportunities for students. Technology allows students to extend and enhance research capabilities, as well as explore various tools as supplemental activities. Not only is technology an essential tool when we teach, but it is also essential to our learners.”

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Lindsey Shipley

http://lindseyship1.wix.com/mrs-shipleys-class “As a future educator in this rapidly changing world of technology, I believe it is crucial to use a variety of technology in the classroom in order to improve teaching strategies and to give students experience with it. One of the best and most modern strategies of teaching is to incorporate a significant amount of technology into lesson plans, because it is creative and so engaging for the children. In regards to my future students, I want to help them feel confident when using technology because it is all around us and it is only growing. I want nothing more than to help increase my future little innocent students’ desires and love for learning in the most modern and engaging ways as possible.”

Brittany Vernon

http://bvernon1.wix.com/classbytheocean “In today’s age of technology, it is important to incorporate the technologies students are familiar with into the classroom. There are various ways to do so. The advancement of technology, over the years, now allows teachers to use technology in their instruction, students to use technology to enhance their learning, and both teachers and students to interact with the community and world around them. My instruction will be enhanced by technology. I will use it to bring experiences to my students that they may otherwise be unable to access. Students will learn how to use technology responsibly to further their education and become life-long learners. Communication will be made more efficient and successful with the help of technology as well.”

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Table of Contents Author

Topic

Description

Page

Life Cycle of the Butterfly

This first grade unit plan is designed to support learners understanding of the life cycle of the butterfly and awareness that all organisms go through life cycles. This first grade unit plan is designed to aid students in understanding of how to develop and answer questions about key details in a text. In this unit, first grade students will be learning about the Grand Divisions of Tennessee and their physical features. Students may not understand what a physical feature is or they may not understand the concept of different features in other parts of the state. This unit of study will be over locating and summarizing well-known sites and landmarks in the United States. Those sites and landmarks include Mt. Rushmore, The White House, Statue of Liberty, Golden Gate Bridge, St. Louis Arch, Natchez Trace, and Grand Canyon. This second grade unit plan is a guide to support students in comprehending how to identify the main purpose of a text. The school children need to know how to answer, explain, and classify the main idea in a text to expand their knowledge and skills as well as to help them become great readers. This unit is designed to aid students in comparing and contrasting the different life cycles and understand the differences in how various species develop in stages (i.e. butterflies, frogs, humans). In this unit third grade students will be learning multiplication. Third grade students need to learn things like multiplication so they can progress to more difficult task such as division, where multiplication is necessary to complete the task.

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Grade Level 1

Subject/Content Area Science

Mosley, Taylor

1

English/Language Arts

Understanding Key Details

Nash, Natalie

1

Social Studies

Grand Divisions of Tennessee

Leath, Keisha

2

Social Studies

Parker, MaKeshia

2

English/Language Arts

Main Purpose of a Text

Peeters, Hailey

2

Science

Life Cycles

Berry, Amanda

3

Mathematics

Multiplication

Conley, Betty

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Well-Known Landmarks

23

33

44

58

67

78


Kemp, Aubrey

3

Social Studies

Christopher Columbus

Shipley, Lindsey

3

English/Language Arts

Writing Narratives

Vernon, Brittany

3

Science

Conserve and Recycle Earth’s Materials

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In this unit, we will be learning about Christopher Columbus in Social Studies. Third grade students need to learn about Christopher Columbus because he was such a major historical figure, credited with discovering America. In this unit, we will be learning about writing narratives. Third graders need to understand how to write a story in which a character(s) will be involved in a conflict/ problem and that will use transition terms (sequencing words) correctly. In this unit we will be learning how to conserve and recycle the earth’s materials. Third grade students need to learn how human actions affect the earth.

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96

108

Media Share Resources

117

ASSURE Model Lesson Plans

136


Betty Conley Unit Rationale – Life Cycle of the Butterfly This first grade unit plan is designed to support learners understanding of the life cycle of the butterfly and awareness that all organisms go through life cycles. First grade students must learn about the life cycle because it will aid them in their entire life. To own a pet, to have children, or simply to age over time requires a person to be aware of the life cycle. For my visual students, there are several videos to be viewed for this lesson that will help them establish the cognitive connections. For my kinesthetic students, there are several apps that are interactive and would help them construct their knowledge of the topic. Both of these types of learners will also benefit greatly from the exposure of a live terrarium. For my musical students, there is a music video that will help clarify the stages of a butterfly’s life cycle. My interpersonal intelligent students will favor the personal contact with other students during group work within the lesson and experiment. My intrapersonal intelligent students will favor the independent work that comes along with maintaining their data logs and journals. Linguistic students will also benefit from completing their journals. Students will also research the life cycle of another animal 10 | P a g e


(perhaps their favorite animal or family pet!). Knowledge of the life cycle is crucial for students to know because it affects them directly: they are going through their own life cycle! It is hard to get through life without understanding the components of a life cycle. It is also hard to advance to more difficult levels of science. Biology is a science that depends heavily and animals and their characteristics (which include their life cycles). Studying and understanding the life cycle of the organism is a learning expectation under Tennessee State Science Standards 1.0. GLE 0107.4.1 Observe and illustrate the life cycle of animals.

Additional Resources:  Opening Commercial: 1_LifeCycles  Tell’em in 10 Powerpoint: 1LifeCycles o You will also need to download video 1LifeCyclesPPTvideo.  Knovio PPT Tutorial: https://view.knowledgevision.com/presentation/58459b8fc16f46b e9bbfdcbf454e9124

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Unit Media Share

Butterfly, Butterfly! Butterfly, Butterfly! is a music video to help reinforce knowledge about the life cycle of a butterfly. Auditory and kinesthetic learners will benefit from the repeated exposure. Using the music video also is a great means to get all children moving and engaged in the lesson. Harry Kindergarten Music, (2014, April 9). Butterfly, Butterfly! [YouTube Video]. Retrieved on February 17, 2016, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8rvGUevGxDk. Butterfly HD Butterfly HD is an app that is designed to teach about the life cycle of a butterfly. It is also designed to accommodate various learning types and academic levels. The app provides videos, narration, games, and quizzes. Sprouts Lab, LLC., (2016, January 5). Butterfly HD. [iTunes, $1.99]. Retrieved on February 17, 2016, from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/butterfly-hd/id523544128?mt=8. Butterfly Life Cycle Game Butterfly Life Cycle Game is an interactive game on a webpage. It allows students to fill in a blank life cycle given five pictures of life cycle stages. After each correct answer, a short animation of the stage is illustrated. Students can replay the game continuously. Sheppard Software’s Life Cycles. Butterfly Life Cycle Game. [Website]. Retrieved on February 17, 2016, from http://www.sheppardsoftware.com/scienceforkids/life_cycle/butterfly_lif ecycle.htm.

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Growing Up Butterfly Growing Up Butterfly is a terrific, short video for teachers to illustrate the process of metamorphosis from beginning to end in a real-life context. The students are able to observe the transitional periods from one stage to the next. The short video with professional narration is ideal for engagement. National Geographic, (2010, October 27). Growing Up Butterfly. [YouTube Video]. Retrieved on February 17, 2016, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kHby5DmmOUY. Magical Metamorphosis Magical Metamorphosis is a website flooded with pictures of butterflies and their life cycles. There are tabs dedicated to each stage. Students can explore each tab and find many detailed pictures and lots of relevant information. Monarch Butterfly USA. (2002). Magical Metamorphosis. [Website]. Retrieved on February 17, 2016, from http://www.monarchbutterflyusa.com/Cycle.htm. Pepa and the Butterfly Pepa and the Butterfly is a great tool for children to integrate visuals into the targeted science concept. Children are able to view pictures of real butterflies and actively follow and observe the process of metamorphosis. The story is read for the child and the vocabulary is emphasized. Paper Tunnel, (2016, February 15). Pepa and the Butterfly. [iTunes, $1.99]. Retrieved on February 17, 2016, from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/pepa-butterfly-childrenslearning/id592461546?mt=8.

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Selection Rubric: Web Resources Complete an interactive evaluation and add it to your Professional Search Terms Development portfolio using the Selection Rubric: Web Resources available on the “ASSURE Learning with Technology and Media” DVD. Open the DVD and click on “Install My Professional Portfolio Database.” Follow the on-screen instructions to install the database to your hard drive. Double-click on the shortcut that is on your desktop. Click on the “My Lesson _______________________ Assessments” button in the left navigation bar. (You must assess a lesson plan before the assessment will appear in your lesson plan list.) Click on any lesson assessment, and then click on the “Rubrics” tab. Click on the “add” button to choose and evaluate your selection rubric. A downloadable version of this rubric is available in the Selection Rubrics module of the Companion Website at www.prenhall.com/smaldino.

Title ___________Growing Up Butterfly______ Hardware Required ___CPU____ Source/Location____ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kHby5DmmOUY____________________ © Date ______________________________________________________ Primary User(s): Students Subject Area ____2010______ Grade Level ________1st_____ Instructional Strategies __________video and audio________ Brief Description Growing Up Butterfly is a terrific, short video for teachers to illustrate the process of metamorphosis from beginning to end in a real-life context. The students are able to observe the transitional periods from one stage to the next. The short video with professional narration is ideal for engagement. Standards/Outcomes/Objectives GLE 0107.4.1 Observe and Illustrate the life cycle of animals. "I can" statements Include: I can describe each stage of the butterfly's life cycle. I can use the correct vocabulary to describe the butterfly's life cycle. I can organize the life cycle stages of a butterfly in the correct order. I can recognize a stage of the butterfly's life cycle by a picture or description. Prerequisites (e.g., prior knowledge, reading ability, vocabulary level, etc.) The students should know basic knowledge of insects: how they look, where they are found, etc. The students will be presented with a PowerPoint and other supplemental pieces of Instruction along with this video. The vocabulary will be presented in the PowerPoint. students are responsible for learning the vocabulary since the video will be using those terms. Strengths The video is great for students who are auditory or visual learners. The video is short so students do not lose focus. It is also time lapsed so the students are able to observe a live caterpillar go through metamorphosis in an authentic setting. Every single stage is captured in detail. The professional narration helps students remain engaged. Limitations The video contains a lot of complex vocabulary; the students would not understand a lot of what the narrator Is saying. Because the video is time lapsed, the students may experience trouble comprehending how long of a process metamorphosis is. The video is not interactive. Students with other intelligences may lose engagement. The video is six years old so it is dated. Special Features The video is ideal for visual and auditory learners. The Nat Geo channel has other instructional resources along with this particular video. 14 | P a g e Name _______Betty Conley__________ Date ________2/22/16______


SELECTION RUBRIC: WEB RESOURCES Rating Area

High Quality

Medium Quality

Low Quality

Alignment with Standards, Outcomes, & Objectives

Standards/outcomes/ objectives addressed and use of Web resource should enhance student learning. Information is correct and does not contain material that is out of date. Language used is age appropriate and vocabulary is understandable.

Standards/outcomes/ objectives partially addressed and use of Web resource may enhance student learning. Information is correct, but does contain material that is out of date. Language used is nearly age appropriate and some vocabulary is above/below student age. Topic is presented to interest students most of the time and engage most students in learning. The material represents technology and media that are good quality, although there may be some problems using it. Material follows patterns that are easy to follow most of the time, with a few things to confuse the user. There is little evidence of bias or advertising.

Standards/outcomes/ objectives not addressed and use of Web resource will likely not enhance student learning. Information is not correct and does contain material that is out of date. Language used is not age appropriate and vocabulary is clearly inappropriate for student age. Topic presented so as not to interest students and not engage them in learning. The material represents technology and media that are not well prepared and are of very poor quality. Material follows no patterns and most of the time the user is very confused.

The user guide is good resource for use in a lesson. Directions may help teachers and/or students use the material.

The user guide is poor resource for use in a lesson. Directions do not help teachers and/or students use the material.

Navigation is logical for main use, but can be confusing. Use of Web resource gives students some opportunities to engage in new learning experiences. The Web resource is designed with graphics and text that are of average quality.

Navigation is not logical and pages are not well organized. Use of Web resource gives students few opportunities to engage in new learning experiences. The Web resource is designed with graphics and text that are of poor quality and distract students from understanding. The Web resource links make it very

Accurate & Current Information AgeAppropriate Language Interest Level & Engagement

Technical Quality

Topic is presented so that students are likely to be interested and actively engaged in learning. The material represents the best available technology and media.

Ease of Use (User may be Student or Teacher)

Material follows easyto-use patterns with nothing to confuse the user.

Bias Free

There is no evidence of objectionable bias or advertising.

User Guide & Directions

The user guide is an excellent resource for use in a lesson. Directions should help teachers and/or students use the material. Clear Directions Navigation is logical and pages are well organized. Stimulates Use of Web resource Creativity gives students many opportunities to engage in new learning experiences. Visual Design The Web resource is designed with 15 | P a g e appropriate use of graphics and text to ensure student understanding. The Web resource links facilitate navigating the

The Web resource links are not easy to navigate

There is much evidence of bias or advertising.


Life Cycle of a Butterfly Online Activity Page

Vocabulary Words Our fifteen vocabulary words that we are learning in our life cycle of a butterfly lesson are listed below.

Zebra Swallowtail butterfly

host leaf

life cycle

molt

imago

metamorphosis

pupa

larva

chrysalis

Pawpaw Tree

exoskeleton

Insect

caterpillar

hatch

egg

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Videos Below are several videos on the life cycle of a butterfly. Enjoy!

Life Cycle of a Butterfly Cartoon: Video of the butterfly’s life cycle using cartoon animation Life Cycle of a Monarch Butterfly: Video of an actual butterfly going through its life cycle Butterfly Life Cycle Music Video: Music video of a butterfly’s life cycle Time Lapse Video of Butterfly Life Cycle: An additional video of the life cycle of an actual butterfly Whiteboard Animation: Life Cycle of a Butterfly: A whiteboard animation of the life cycle 17 | P a g e


Professor Hester: Animal Life Cycles: Professor Hester giving a brief overview on animal life cycles, including butterflies Shape Creator: Butterfly: Ivan builds a butterfly shape Alphabet Sentence Chant: Butterfly: “Letter B, Butterfly� chant Butterfly Math: Addition:Mia and Alfred look for caterpillars to add to their growing butterfly habitat

Games and Activities Listed below are many games you can choose to play.

You can learn about life cycle of the butterfly and play other games that are about butterflies.

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**If students try to access games marked with an asterisk(*), this will direct them to abcmouse.com. To play the games, parents will need to have a subscription. The games are available for free in the classroom.**

Butterfly Life Cycle Game #1: A click and drag game to practice the labeling of the stages Butterfly Life Cycle Game #2: A click and drag game to practice the labeling of the stages that also has an introductory video Butterfly Life Cycle Game #3: A click and drag game to practice labeling of the stages that also has information on the stages Butterfly Life Cycle Game #4: A click and drag game to practice labeling of the stages Butterfly Life Cycle Game #5: A click and drag game to practice labeling of the stages Metamorphosis Quiz #1: A short quiz on the butterfly’s life cycle 19 | P a g e


Metamorphosis Quiz #2: A short quiz on the butterfly’s life cycle Metamorphosis Terms: An interactive way to practice vocabulary Butterfly Life Cycle Flow Chart: A fill-in-the-blank flow chart of the life cycle Munch a Bunch*: Help a hungry caterpillar munch on some leaves while practicing subtraction Prefixes and Suffixes Cut Out Puzzle: Caterpillars and Butterflies*: A cut out puzzle to practice the ordering and labeling of stages, and practice affixes Sentence Puzzle: Butterfly*: A sentence puzzle about a butterfly Alphabet Paint: Bb is for Butterfly*: Color the butterfly to match a certain species (*Hint* use a search engine for ideas) Basics Numbers: 14 Butterflies*: Practice counting the butterflies 20 | P a g e


Basics Letters: Bb is for Butterfly*: Practice segmenting and recognizing sounds using the word “butterfly” Dot-to-Dot: 1 to 10 Butterfly*: Finish drawing the butterfly’s wing and color the butterfly to match a certain species (*Hint* use a search engine for ideas) Animal Life Cycles Cut Out Puzzle*: A cut out puzzle to practice the labeling and ordering of the stages Advanced Butterfly Catcher*: A game to practice colors and computer skills

***Any work that is done in class will need to be printed off and given to the teacher. Thank you!***

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Taylor Mosley Unit Rationale – Key Details This first grade unit plan is designed to aid students in understanding of how to develop and answer questions about key details in a text. Students will understand that the main idea is the big picture of the story. The key details support the main idea and elaborate on the topic. When given a story, the learners should be able to write out the main idea and at least three key details on a graphic organizer. Resources such as videos and games will model the expectations that I have and help students sharpen this skill. Many examples, class discussions and modeling will be provided to ensure that each student has the opportunity to submerged into a literacy rich environment filled with practice. Comprehension is a part of everyday life. In order for students to move on to second grade they must be able to understand, ask and answer questions about passages that they have just read. This skill will help them in all of their subjects. Understanding key details in a text in Language Arts is a learning expectation covered under Common Core State Standards for EnglishLanguage Arts 1.1. Being able to comprehend and regurgitate the information that they have just read by asking and answering questions about the main ideas and key details.

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Additional Resources:  Opening Commercial: 1KeyDetails  Tell’em in 10 Powerpoint: 1KeyDetails  Knovio PPT Tutorial: https://view.knowledgevision.com/presentation/9c11b85e736a48 5898f3fcacbdecb9f9

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Unit Media Share The Hamburger Game The Hamburger Game is awesome for all learners. The website displays a burger that consist of a bun and topping and you are to find the “burger� or main idea. Next to the bun and toppings is a list of three statements. They consist of two supporting details and a main idea. It is up to the student to decide which one is the most important or main idea. If a student is stuck on a word they can click on it and the computer will read it aloud for them. This will accommodate auditory learners. Visual and kinesthetic learners will enjoy physically being about to make the burger while the bright colors and animations will keep them engaged. This game is self-correcting meaning that if the wrong answer is chosen they will be told so, a new question will appear and no points will be awarded. If the answer is correct they will receive praise and a point will be awarded. This website goes hand in hand with Common Core Standard for Language Arts 1.1. (Being able to comprehend and regulate information that they have ready by asking and answering questions about main ideas and key details) because comprehension skills are the main focus of this exercise. This website can be pulled up on any device that has an Internet connection.

PSPS. (April 20, 2016). The Hamburger Game. Retrieved on April 22, 2016 from http://www.pspb.org/blueribbon/games/burger/burger.html.

Introduction to Reading Skills The Introduction to Reading Skills video is awesome for first grade students because it introduces the main idea in a fun and creative way. The main characters of this video are detectives and they are trying to solve a case. This story line is perfect for keeping students of all ability levels engaged. The detectives teach students how to point out the main idea and the important details in a case. Asking questions that will get them closer to solving the case 24 | P a g e


does this. The ideas that are exhibited in this video go hand in hand with Common Core Standard for Language Arts 1.1. (Being able to comprehend and regulate information that they have ready by asking and answering questions about main ideas and key details). This video will give my visual learners the ability to physically see what is happening in a fun way. They will not even realize that they are learning yet they will be able to apply the principles seen in the video to the passages that they will have to read in class.

McGraw Hill Education. (Account Holder). (July 12, 2014). Introducing Reading Skills. Retrieved on February 22, 2014 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=42SJTk2XSi4

Main Idea The Main Idea app by Keith Gardner provides students with a paragraph composed of about five sentences followed by a few questions that pertain to the main idea. This app goes hand in hand with Common Core Standard for Language Arts 1.1. (Being able to comprehend and regulate information that they have ready by asking and answering questions about main ideas and key details). It would be most beneficial to the more advanced students in my class (level three students) because the paragraphs are a bit longer and could be intimidating to students on a lower reading level. The app also includes pictures that the student swill be responsible for matching to the stories to make sure that they understand what they have read. When the pictures are clicked on they are activated causing them to make sounds and move. Fist grade students will love this app. It can also be played at home n their own mobile devices and tablets. This app is compatible with apple devices that have iOs 8.0 or later. Gardner, Keith. (February 10, 2016). Main Idea. [iTunes App. Cost $2.99]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/main-idea/id1035472182?mt=8

Main Idea- Short Texts: Reading Comprehension‌ The Main Idea App is an awesome app for first grade readers. It even has background music for those students who work best that way. The passages are composed of a short paragraph of about 3-5 sentences that sight words that 25 | P a g e


are appropriate for first graders. This app goes hand in hand with Common Core Standard for Language Arts 1.1. (Being able to comprehend and regulate information that they have ready by asking and answering questions about main ideas and key details). Every student would start on level one and the difficulty level progresses from there. This is a nice addition because you are assured that the passages that the students are receiving are tailored to their specific reading level. After each passage there is a question that relates to the main idea. This is something that children can even play at home on their mobile devices. This app is compatible with apple devices that have iOs 6.0 or later and Google Play.

Toole, Janine. (September 22,2015). Main Idea- Short Story. [iTunes App and Google Play , Cost $2.99] Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from http://www.happyfrogapps.com/app/main-idea-short-texts/

Reading Comprehension Activity In the video Pizza and Hot Dog Meet Burger 2 students have the opportunity to read a story along with the narrator of the video. The video also comes along with a worksheet that asks questions about the main idea to make sure the students comprehended the video. This goes hand in hand with Common Core Standard for Language Arts 1.1. (Being able to comprehend and regulate information that they have ready by asking and answering questions about main ideas and key details). The story includes sight words and grade appropriate vocabulary. The narrator also puts his finger under the word that they are reading to ensure that the students do not get lost, just as they would do if they were reading an actual book. The pictures and audio will keep students engaged.

McGlover, Mr. (September 1, 2011). Reading Comprehension ActivityPizza and Hot Dog Meet Burger 2. Retrieved on February 22, 2014 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zPA5hWu7jIo

What am I, Comprehension This www.ixl.com website titled “What Am I� offers a language art activity on main idea and context clues. This website goes hand in hand with 26 | P a g e


Common Core Standard for Language Arts 1.1. (Being able to comprehend and regulate information that they have ready by asking and answering questions about main ideas and key details). In addition to the students learning about main idea and key details they will also learn new adjectives and the importance of them. This is a fun website for first graders because this guessing game is exciting and it will keep their brains guess whether it is their turn to go up to the board or they are sitting in the audience cheering on one of their classmates.

IXL Learning. (2016). Practicing First grade language arts: 'What am I?' (n.d.). Retrieved February 22, 2016, from https://www.ixl.com/ela/grade1/what-am-i

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Selection Rubric: Web Resources Complete an interactive evaluation and add it to your Professional Search Terms Development portfolio using the Selection Rubric: Web Resources available on the “ASSURE Learning with Technology and Media” DVD. Open the DVD and click on “Install My Professional Portfolio Database.” Follow the on-screen instructions to install the database to your hard drive. Double-click on the shortcut that is on your desktop. Click on the “My Lesson _______________________ Assessments” button in the left navigation bar. (You must assess a lesson plan before the assessment will appear in your lesson plan list.) Click on any lesson assessment, and then click on the “Rubrics” tab. Click on the “add” button to choose and evaluate your selection rubric. A downloadable version of this rubric is available in the Selection Rubrics module of the Companion Website at www.prenhall.com/smaldino.

Title: Main Idea- Short Texts: Reading Comprehension…

Hardware Required : None

Source/Location http://www.happyfrogapps.com/app/main-idea-short-texts/ © Date: Febuary 22, 2016 Primary User(s): Instructional Strategies: In App Instructions ___________ Teacher Brief Description The Main Idea App is an awesome app for first grade readers. It even has background music for those students who work best that way. The passages are composed of a short paragraph of about 3-5 sentences that sight words that are appropriate for first graders. Every student would start on level one and the difficulty level progresses from there. This is a nice addition because you are assured that the passages that the students are receiving are tailored to their specific reading level. After each passage there is a question that relates to the main idea. Standards/Outcomes/Objectives Common Core Standard for Language Arts 1.1. Being able to comprehend and regulate information that they have ready by asking and answering questions about main ideas and key details. Prerequisites (e.g., prior knowledge, reading ability, vocabulary level, etc.)  Students must know sight words  Students must know how to sound out words and make sense of them  Students must be able to comprehend sentences Strengths The app will provide assistance with the very first passage that is given. Although the app is pretty self explanatory in the bottom right hand corner there is a question mark that can be clicked on at any time to reiterate the instructions. The material that is covered by the app goes hand in hand with a Language Art standard. Students can reread the passage as many times as it takes for them to understand the passage. Limitations One limitation of this app is that if a student gets stuck on a word there is no way that the student can have the word read to them. They would have to rely on myself or one of there student friends to help them. Special Features The app has different levels. It starts off pretty easy and slowly progresses from there. The advantage of this is that no child will be reading something that is too difficult for them. They will | P a g e that are appropriate for their specific reading level. all be reading28 passages Name _____Taylor Mosley_____________________ Date ______2/22/16_____________


SELECTION RUBRIC: WEB RESOURCES Rating Area

High Quality

Medium Quality

Low Quality

Alignment with Standards, Outcomes, & Objectives

Standards/outcomes/ objectives addressed and use of Web resource should enhance student learning.

Standards/outcomes/ objectives partially addressed and use of Web resource may enhance student learning.

Accurate & Current Information

Information is correct and does not contain material that

Information is correct, but does contain material that is out of date.

Age-Appropriate Language

Language used is age appropriate and vocabulary is

Standards/outcomes / objectives not addressed and use of Web resource will likely not enhance student learning. Information is not correct and does contain material that is out of date. Language used is not age appropriate and vocabulary is clearly inappropriate for student age. Topic presented so as not to interest students and not engage them in learning. The material represents technology and media that are not well prepared and are of very poor quality. Material follows no patterns and most of the time the user is very confused.

is out of date.

understandable. Interest Level & Engagement

Topic is presented so that students are likely to be interested and actively engaged in learning.

Technical Quality

The material represents the best available technology and media.

Ease of Use (User may be Student or Teacher)

Material follows easy-to-use patterns with nothing to

Bias Free

There is no evidence of objectionable bias or

User Guide & Directions

confuse the user.

advertising. The user guide is an excellent resource for use in a lesson. Directions should help teachers and/or students use

Language used is nearly age appropriate and some vocabulary is above/below student age. Topic is presented to interest students most of the time and engage most students in learning. The material represents technology and media that are good quality, although there may be some problems using it.

Material follows patterns that are easy to follow most of the time, with a few things to confuse the user. There is little evidence of bias or advertising. The user guide is good resource for use in a lesson. Directions may help teachers and/or students use the material.

There is much evidence of bias or advertising.

The user guide is poor resource for use in a lesson. Directions do not help teachers and/or the material. students use the material. Clear Directions Navigation is logical and pages Navigation is logical for main Navigation is not use, but can be confusing. logical and pages are are well organized. not well organized. Stimulates Use of Web resource gives Use of Web resource gives Use of Web resource Creativity students many opportunities students some opportunities to gives students few to engage in new learning engage in new learning opportunities to experiences. experiences. engage in new Recommended for Classroom Use: ______X_____ Yes ___________ No learning experiences. VisualIdeas Design for Classroom The Web resource is designed The Web resource is designed The Web resource is Use: This app is awesome because it is not limited with appropriate use of with graphics and text that are designed with to one 29 lesson it ensure can be used throughout | Pgraphics abut g e instead and text to of average quality.the year to keep graphics and text that student understanding. are of poor quality comprehension skills sharp. and distract students Subject Area: English language Arts Grade Level :First Grade ______X_____ Student from understanding. The Web resource links The Web resource links are not The Web resource


Main Idea and Key Details

Vocabulary What words should I know to help me better understand main idea and key details?

    

Details Create Tone Mood Details

    

Main Idea Text Story Setting Character

  

Plot Conclusion Theme

Videos

The McGraw Hill Detective Video uses a creative storyline to grasp the attention of students while explaining main idea and key details. In this BrainPOP Main Idea Video Tim and Moby will show you how to figure out the main point of a piece of writing, whether it’s an essay, article, or paragraph. The McGraw Hill Main Idea and Key Details video provides a fun and engaging introduction to Identifying main ideas and supporting details, a key main ideas skill of the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts.

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 

The Main Idea Song explain the basic way to find the main idea in a paragraph. eSpark Learning: Key Details is a read along story that highlights the main idea and key details in the story to ensure that no detail is overlooked.

Games

Main Idea Storm- Read the story in the storm cloud. Once you have finished read the main idea option in the trees. When you click on the right answer a bolt of lightning will strike that tree telling you if you are right or wrong.  Main Idea Burger Game- The bun and toppings are already provided now all we need is the meat. Choose the correct main idea to complete the burger.  Main Idea Game- The details are provided now it is up to you to choose the main idea! Activities

Create your own story- It is time to create your own story! Using the template provided come up with a main idea and three key details. Once you have finished illustrate your creation. Upon completion of a book, fill out this chart- Once you have finished reading a book of your choice use complete the handout. Write the main idea on the table top and on the legs write the ideas that are supporting it. Main Idea Story Hand- Having trouble finding the main idea? Answer these questions and the answer will be clear.

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Natalie Nash Unit Rationale – Grand Divisions of Tennessee In this unit, first grade students will be learning about the Grand Divisions of Tennessee and their physical features. Students may not understand what a physical feature is or they may not understand the concept of different features in other parts of the state. Students will have learning experiences through a virtual field trip, lectures, and hands-on construction activities. These diverse activities aim to assist students when they compare and contrast the physical features and demonstrate knowledge about the Grand Divisions of Tennessee. Knowledge about the state we live in and what makes our region different from others is important for students to know because it teaches them about life in those certain areas. Once students understand different physical features, they will then be able to recognize certain physical features of the division they live in. Also, students may begin learning about things such as why more people live in one region rather than another. Studying and understanding the physical features of Tennessee is a learning expectation covered under Tennessee State Standards for Geography 1.23. 32 | P a g e


Identify the three Grand Divisions of Tennessee on a map and compare and contrast each division’s major physical features.

Additional Resources:  Opening Commercial: 1GrandDivisionsofTN  Tell’em in Ten Presentation: 1GrandDivisionsofTN  Knovio Tutorial Recording:

https://view.knowledgevision.com/presentation/9edeea7e945846b ea0a00f2b516b6a84

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Unit Media Share

Advanced Geography- Part Three: Physical Regions This website is dedicated to exactly what it says- Tennessee History for Kids. This specific link goes straight to the webpage that contains information all about the physical regions of the Three Grand Divisions of Tennessee. The information on this page includes all of the physical features with definitions and pictures. This website also includes a link to a video on YouTube where a man, History Bill, travels across Tennessee through each of the six physical regions. Tennessee History for Kids, Inc. (2005-2010). Advanced Geography- Part Three: Physical Regions. [Website]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from http://www.tnhistoryforkids.org/geography/a_3 Fifty States for Kids – Maps, Facts, Games, and Activities This website is a wonderful resource for interaction and information on the three Grand Divisions. The website offers interactive games and activities. Both the games and activities complement the presentation of interactive information. The website includes numerous information consisting of regions, cities, landforms, landmarks, and individual state fact sheets. The website also includes printables for teacher use. Nussbaum Education Network, LLC. (2015). Fifty States for Kids – Maps, Facts, Games, and Activities. [Website]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from http://mrnussbaum.com/fifty-states-for-kids/

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Google Earth This application allows the user to search for certain cities and places on maps. It has in depth settings that can be changed depending on what the user wants to look at specifically. It also has an exciting feature that allows the user to see real-time activities such as earthquakes and more. This is a free app and can be used on an iPhone, iPad, or even an iPod, but it does require iOS 4.3 or later. Google, Inc. (Jun 26, 2013). Google Earth. [iTunes App, Cost: Free] Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/google-earth/id293622097?mt=8 Landforms 3D This application is really neat to use when learning about physical features and landforms. The app allows the user to view a 3D model of certain landforms. Along with viewing a 3D model, users can label objects of layers of the model. This app would be really beneficial for students to use by viewing a 3D image of landforms. This is a free app that is compatible with an iPhone, iPad, and iPod. It requires iOS 6.0 or later. Trendyworks Technologies Pvt. Ltd. (January 26, 2016). Landforms 3D. [iTunes App, Cost: Free] Retrieved on February 23, 2016 from https://itunes.apple.com/al/app/landforms-3d/id1061066222?mt=8 Prezi This video can be used as either a presentation or a video. The presentation allows the user to push a play button that makes the slides continually run without having to keep manually switching between each slide. This video focuses on the Three Grand Divisions and also what makes up each division. The focus of this video lies on the landforms, climate, natural resources, and major cities in each division.

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Prezi Inc. (2016). Grand Divisions of Tennessee. [Website/Video]. Retrieved on February 23, 2016 from https://prezi.com/t1x8n6gmu-vg/grand-divisions-of-tennessee/ School Media Interactive In this video, the guest (user) is taken in a ‘traveling machine’ to different landforms. The video describes many different landforms and the function of those landforms. The video is very kid friendly! A few landforms that students need to know for this unit are presented in this video such as rivers, mountains, hills, plains, valleys, and plateaus. This site does require Adobe Flash Player version 10.2.159.1. School Media Interactive. (2009-2016). Landforms #1. [Website/Video] Retrieved on February 23, 2016 from http://schoolmediainteractive.com/view/object/clip/97F37081058CD76B 14DF5BE2B49A1C40

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Selection Rubric: Web Resources Complete an interactive evaluation and add it to your Professional Search Terms Development portfolio using the Selection Rubric: Web Resources available on the “ASSURE Learning with Technology and Media” DVD. Open the DVD and click on “Install My Professional Portfolio Database.” Follow the on-screen instructions to install the database to your hard drive. Double-click on the shortcut that is on your desktop. Click on the “My Lesson _______________________ Assessments” button in the left navigation bar. (You must assess a lesson plan before the assessment will appear in your lesson plan list.) Click on any lesson assessment, and then click on the “Rubrics” tab. Click on the “add” button to choose and evaluate your selection rubric. A downloadable version of this rubric is available in the Selection Rubrics module of the Companion Website at www.prenhall.com/smaldino.

Title _The Three Grand Divisions of Tennessee Source/Location

https://prezi.com/t1x8n6gmu-vg/grand-divisions-of-tennessee/ © Date _2016_ Subject Area ____Geography________ Grade Level _____1st___ Instructional Strategies ___Video- audio and visual presentation

Hardware Required

Computer/Laptop Projector (when used for whole cl Primary User(s): _____X_____ Student ___________ Teacher

Brief Description This video can be used as either a presentation or a video. The presentation allows the user to push a play button that makes the slides continually run without having to keep manually switching between each slide. This video focuses on the Three Grand Divisions and also what makes up each division. The focus of this video lies on the landforms, climate, natural resources, and major cities in each division. Standards/Outcomes/Objectives After viewing the video, students will be able to:

TNSS Geography 1.23 Identify the three Grand Divisions of Tennessee on a map and compare and contra major physical features.

Prerequisites (e.g., prior knowledge, reading ability, vocabulary level, etc.) Students are required to listen to whole class instruction, then the video will serve as an additional res the three Grand Divisions in Tennessee. Students will already know how to compare and contrast two

Strengths The video provides excellent examples of physicals features to reinforce comprehension. Students' a to the short length of the video. Flexibility of the video is presented and can be paused to meet studen matches with the curriculum standards. Both visual and auditory learner can benefit from this type of

Limitations Limitations include access to computer and internet. A lot of information is provided, but more informa physical features only could be helpful.

37 | P a g e Name ____Natalie Nash__________________________ Date ___February 23, 2016__________


SELECTION RUBRIC: WEB RESOURCES Rating Area

High Quality

Medium Quality

Low

Alignment with Standards, Outcomes, & Objectives

Standards/outcomes/ objectives addressed and use of Web resource should enhance student learning.

Standards/outcomes/ objectives partially addressed and use of Web resource may enhance student learning.

Stand objec use o not e

Accurate & Current Information

Information is correct and does not contain material that is out of date.

Information is correct, but does contain material that is out of date.

Infor does out o

Age-Appropriate Language

Language used is age appropriate and vocabulary is understandable.

Language used is nearly age appropriate and some vocabulary is above/below student age.

Lang appr clear stude

Interest Level & Engagement

Topic is presented so that students are likely to be interested and actively engaged in learning.

Topic is presented to interest students most of the time and engage most students in learning.

Topic inter enga

Technical Quality

The material represents the best available technology and media.

The material represents technology and media that are good quality, although there may be some problems using it.

The m techn not w very

Ease of Use (User may be Student or Teacher)

Material follows easy-to-use patterns with nothing to confuse the user.

Material follows patterns that are easy to follow most of the time, with a few things to confuse the user.

Mate and m is ver

Bias Free

There is no evidence of objectionable bias or advertising.

There is little evidence of bias or advertising.

Ther bias o

User Guide & Directions

The user guide is an excellent resource for use in a lesson. Directions should help teachers and/or students use the material.

The user guide is good resource for use in a lesson. Directions may help teachers and/or students use the material.

The u resou Direc teach the m

Clear Directions

Navigation is logical and pages are well organized.

Navigation is logical for main use, but can be confusing.

Navig page

Stimulates Creativity

Use of Web resource gives students many opportunities to engage in new learning experiences.

Use of Web resource gives students some opportunities to engage in new learning experiences.

Use o stude enga expe

Visual Design

The Web resource is designed with appropriate use of graphics and text to ensure student understanding. The Web resource links facilitate navigating the material and finding additional information.

The Web resource is designed with graphics and text that are of average quality.

The W with of po stude

The Web resource links are not easy to navigate and make it difficult to find additional information.

The W it ver mate infor

Quality of Links

Recommended Yes No The Site Map is available and Site Mapfor Classroom Use: _____X______ The Site Map is ___________ available and The S 38 | P a g e useful to help navigate and somewhat useful to help navigate or no Ideas for Classroom Use: The Grand Divisions of Tennessee video will be shown after whole group instruct access information.

and access information.

and a

The purpose of showing the video after instruction is to serve as a reinforcement of knowledge w compare/contrast chart about the three Grand Divisions.


Unit Scavenger Hunt Vocabulary Central Basin

Contrast

Compare

farmland

flatland

Grand Division

Highland Rim

map

mountain

physical feature

plain

plateau

ridge

rivers

Tennessee

Create Word Search Make your own word search from the vocabulary words listed above!

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Color/ Draw/ Create

Click on the picture to color this map. Remember to ask your teacher for permission before you print!

Click on the picture to color this map. Remember to ask your teacher for permission before you print!

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Draw Tennessee Use these instructions to draw Tennessee all by yourself! Design a license plate Create your own license plate to say what you want! Story Time Be the author of you own story about Tennessee!

Puzzle

Jigsaw Puzzle Try to put Tennessee back in one piece with this jigsaw puzzle. Unscramble the Words Be prepared! This is a little tough, but you can do it! Give it a try! Word Search Search for words and get familiar with vocabulary.

Games Letter Fall Catch and spell the vocabulary words as they fall on the screen! Memory Match Do you have a good memory? See if you can match the words to their definitions without peeking! Speedy Speller How fast can you spell the vocabulary words? Find out here!

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Word-O-Rama See how well you know the vocabulary words and definitions in this fun game! Letter Fall Catch and spell the vocabulary words as they fall on the screen!

Facts

Information and Images Click here to read interesting facts about Tennessee and to see some neat pictures! Things to Know Click here to learn more about Tennessee!

Videos

Learn about the Grand Divisions Watch this video to learn about the landforms, climate, natural resources, and major cities in each division! Virtual Field Trip Take a ride across the world to visit different landforms. See how many you recognize! 42 | P a g e


Keisha Leath Unit Rationale – Well-Known Landmarks This unit of study will be over locating and summarizing well-known sites and landmarks in the United States. Those sites and landmarks include Mt. Rushmore, The White House, Statue of Liberty, Golden Gate Bridge, St. Louis Arch, Natchez Trace, and Grand Canyon. The students may not have a strong understanding of these well-known sites due to lack of exposure. Therefore, they will need practice and experience in locating and summarizing these well-known sites. The students will be exposed to well-known landmarks in various ways. Unit experiences will include the creation of posters, use of online games, and hands-on activities. Traditional resources will also support the topic and promote student engagement. My goal is for each student to at least know 4 out of the 7 sites so they can gain knowledge about their country. Studying and understanding geography in Social Studies is a learning expectation covered under Tennessee State Standards for Social Studies 2.22. 43 | P a g e


2.22 Identify the location and summarize the significance of well-known sites and landmarks in the United States including Mt. Rushmore, The White House, Statue of Liberty, Golden Gate Bridge, St. Louis Arch, Natchez Trace, and Grand Canyon.

Additional Resources:  Tell’em in 10 Presentation: 2Landmarks  Knovio Tutorial Recording: https://view.knowledgevision.com/presentation/4842a62409f441b e84d164b4dcbde97b

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Unit Media Share

Golden Gate Bridge This app over the Golden Gate Bridge is packed with tons of useful information. It discusses the location and significance of the bridge. It tells about the history behind the bridge. It tells about the design, implementation, and construction of the bridge. It gives specific details about the bridge. It even discusses current issues surrounding the bridge. That is just a skim of the surface of all of the useful information packed into this app. This app helps promote Tennessee State Standard for Social Studies 2.22. This app is great for students. The information is reliable and there is plenty of it. With guidance from the teacher the students would be able to learn from this app. Sanjay Kamath. The Golden Gate Bridge. [Mobile application software, Free] Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://www.microsoft.com/store/apps/9wzdncrdgktg Mt. Rushmore Adventures The Mt. Rushmore Adventures app is interesting. It lists the four people who are carved into Mt. Rushmore. It then gives a short description of each of their significances. It then has a list of three internet links about Mt. Rushmore. One of them takes you directly to Mt. Rushmore's Facebook. One of them goes to a Wikipedia page. The other one goes to the National Park Service government webpage. That page provides a large array of useful information. There is also a map to click on that takes you directly to the location of Mt. Rushmore. There is even a section that shows current weather. No special hardware is required to 45 | P a g e


use this app. This app is great to help with teaching Tennessee State Standard for Social Studies 2.22. It is an interesting app that second graders can understand with teacher guidance. Branquelo Productions. (2013). Mt. Rushmore Adventures. [Mobile application software, Free] Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://www.microsoft.com/store/apps/9wzdncrdf2b7 Natchez Trace This government webpage over Natchez Trace is a very useful learning tool for students and teachers alike. It gives a wide array of reliable information about Natchez Trace. It has information about the history of Natchez Trace. It discusses who first used Natchez Trace and why. It gives accounts of specific historical people and explains their experiences with Natchez Trace. It tells about Natchez Trace being a path used for a variety of purposes. It then tells about the Parkway that is there today. This webpage promotes Tennessee State Standard for Social Studies 2.22. This webpage is free of use. United States. National Park Service. (2016, February 21). History & Culture. [Website]. Retrieved February 21, 2016, from http://www.nps.gov/natr/learn/historyculture/index.htm St. Louis Gateway Arch This enchantedlearning.com webpage titled "St. Louis Gateway Arch" has a simple and kid friendly format. It is colorful. The sentences and phrases are short and to the point. It is on a level that second graders can understand. However, It has pop ups. To avoid students seeing those pop ups I have took two screenshots of what the students need to see. Instead of going to this webpage I will go to my screenshots to show the images of the webpage. This webpage talks about how the design was chosen. It also tells about the construction of the arch. It gives a list of facts and figures about the St. Louis Gateway Arch. This website helps to promote

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Tennessee State Standard for Social Studies 2.22. This website is free of use. EnchantedLearning.com. (2003-2016.) St. Louis Gateway Arch [Website]. Retrieved February 22, 2016, from http://www.enchantedlearning.com/history/us/monuments/stlouisarch/ The White House History And Facts│Cinekids This video from Cine Kids is called The White House History and Facts. It promotes students basic understanding of The White House. It does not go into deep detail. It only mentions a few important facts. It keeps the information level low enough that it is not overwhelming for second graders. It discusses who designed The White House. It also discusses the first president to live there. It goes on to name off interesting facts such as the number of bathrooms, rooms, levels, doors, windows, fireplaces, and staircases. It names the facilities at the White House. It even estimates the number of letters, call, and emails the White House receives each day. It gives a variety of useful information. The video is on Youtube and is free of use. This video helps promote Tennessee State Standard for Social Studies 2.22. Cine Kids. (Producer). (2014). The White House History And Facts│Cinekids. [YouTube Video]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R7NQY4_QlXA WILSON & DITCH: DIGGING AMERICA | Grand Canyon, Arizona | PBS KIDS Wilson & Ditch: Digging America (Grand Canyon, Arizona) is a great video for teaching students about the Grand Canyon. It is two gophers who are going to visit the Grand Canyon. They are discussing how long it took for the canyon to create. They also point out the depth, width, and length of the Grand Canyon. One of the gophers is being silly. The other gopher is naming off the facts about the Grand Canyon. They make learning about the Grand Canyon very interesting. The video is at a level 47 | P a g e


that second graders can understand. The video is available on Youtube. It is free of use. This video promotes Tennessee State Standard for Social Studies 2.22. It helps students to locate the Grand Canyon while providing some information about the Grand Canyon. PBS KIDS. (Producer). (2015). WILSON & DITCH: DIGGING AMERICA | Grand Canyon, Arizona | PBS KIDS. [YouTube Video]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f0xqb7cQB0M

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__Natchez Trace Tracw____________________ _______________________ _______________________

Title ____Natchez Trace_____________________________________

After viewing this visual presentation, students will be able to: Tennessee State Standards for Social Studies 2.22. Identify the location and summarize the significance of well-known sites and landmarks in the United States including Natchez Trace.

This webpage gives a lot of useful and reliable information. There are numerous links to click on to learn more. There are current photos and news releases. There are even videos. All of these links are educational and beneficial.

49 | P a g e Name ____Keisha Leath________________________ Date ___February 22, 2016________________


SELECTION RUBRIC: COMPUTER AND MULTIMEDIA SOFTWARE Rating Area

High Quality

Medium Quality

Low Quality

Alignment with Standards, Outcomes, & Objectives

Standards/outcomes/ objectives addressed and use of software should enhance student learning.

Standards/outcomes/ objectives partially addressed and use of software may enhance student learning.

Standards/outcomes/ objectives not addressed and use of software will likely not enhance student learning.

Accurate & Current Information

Information is correct and does Information is correct, but does Information is not correct and not contain material that is out contain material that is out of does contain material that is out of date. date. of date.

Age-Appropriate Language

Language used is age appropriate and vocabulary is understandable.

Interest Level & Engagement

Topic is presented so that Topic is presented to interest students are likely to be interested and actively engaged students most of the time and engage most students in in learning. learning.

Technical Quality

Ease of Use (User may be Student or Teacher) Bias Free

User Guide & Directions

Stimulates Creativity

Fosters Collaboration

Practice & Feedback

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The material represents best available media.

Material follows easy-to-use patterns with nothing to confuse the user. There is no evidence of objectionable bias or advertising.

Language used is nearly age appropriate and some vocabulary is above/ below student age.

The material represents media that are good quality, although there may be some problems using it. Material follows patterns that are easy to follow most of the time, with a few things to confuse the user. There is little evidence of bias or advertising.

The user guide is an excellent resource for use in a lesson. The user guide is good Directions should help teachers resource for use in a lesson. and students use the material. Directions may help teachers and students use the material. Most students can use the software to create original pieces that represent learning. Some students can use the software to start original pieces that begin to show their Students are able to work in learning. collaborative groups when using the software with little Students are able to work in problem. collaborative groups when using the software most of the Software provides students time. with skill or knowledge practice and information that Software provides students helps them complete their with some skill or knowledge learning tasks. practice and information that sometimes helps them complete their learning tasks.

Language used is not age appropriate and vocabulary is clearly inappropriate for student age. Topic presented so as not to interest students and not engage them in learning. The material represents media that are not well prepared and are of very poor quality. Material follows no patterns and most of the time the user is very confused. There is much evidence of bias or advertising. The user guide is poor resource for use in a lesson. Directions do not help teachers and students use the material. Most students cannot use the software to create original pieces that represent their learning. Students are not able to work in collaborative groups when using the software. Software does not provide students with skill or knowledge practice, nor information that helps them with their learning tasks.


Recommended for Classroom Use: _____X______ Yes ___________ No Ideas for Classroom Use: I believe this website would be a great way to introduce Natchez Trace. It provides the information needed to teach a full lesson about Natchez Trace. The teacher could create a project or task to go along with this interactive presentation.

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Famous Landmarks Parents- Below is a list of resources to help the students to achieve Tennessee State Standard for Social Studies 2.22. Identify the location and summarize the significance of well-known sites and landmarks in the United States including Mt. Rushmore, The White House, Statue of Liberty, Golden Gate Bridge, St. Louis Arch, Natchez Trace, and Grand Canyon.

Key Terms to Know: location, geography, summarizing, map, landmark, country, significant

Students!!! There are some great links below! Be sure to explore them!!! Mt. Rushmore Kids Fun Page Learn about Mt. Rushmore by completing a word search, word scramble, or crossword puzzle!

WILSON & DITCH: DIGGING AMERICA Take a virtual trip to Mt. Rushmore with Wilson and Ditch!

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The White House The White House Video Watch this video to find out interesting facts about the White House!

Letter Fun Click on each letter to find out facts about the White House!

Statue of Liberty The Statue of Liberty Video See real life photos of the Statue of Liberty!

Brainpop Watch this video and take the quiz with Moby!

Take a Quiz Test your knowledge over the Statue of Liberty! 53 | P a g e


Golden Gate Bridge Building a Bridge Build your own Golden Gate Bridge! Materials needed are popsicle sticks, tape, and swine.

WILSON & DITCH: DIGGING AMERICA Take a fun trip to the Golden Gate Bridge!

St. Louis Arch WILSON & DITCH: DIGGING AMERICA Find out the facts about the St. Louis Arch!

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Amazing Facts Explore this website and learn some facts!

Natchez Trace Explore the Natchez Trace Parkway Go through a journey viewing the Natchez Trace Parkway!

Natchez Trace Map On this map you can trace the path the road goes through!

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Grand Canyon WILSON & DITCH: DIGGING AMERICA Watch this fun video! You will take a virtual tour of the Grand Canyon!

Cool Facts Explore this website full of information with an amazing video at the end!

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MaKeshia Parker Unit Rationale – Main Purpose of a Text This second grade unit plan is a guide to support students in comprehending how to identify the main purpose of a text. The school children need to know how to answer, explain, and classify the main idea in a text to expand their knowledge and skills as well as to help them become great readers. The second graders will learn that the main idea is not usually in the reading but more so about the reading. I would like to have my students to be able to pull out key details in a passage or short story. What is the paragraph about? What is the author seeking? Students need to be introduced to various activities that will help them understand and speak the subject knowledgeably. Experiences such as a short video clip, graphic organizer, handouts, small group guided discussions, and modeling will give students the experience to participate in the learning activities that support this unit. Knowing how to identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe is essential in life. In life, everyone is the author and in conversing you need someone to understand what is your point or their point. By understanding how to identify what is the meaning of the conversation helps both parties move further along with the topic. Having knowledge of this information is also vital to become a great reader, to be successful in the next grade level, and to move on to other levels of literature. Studying and understanding how to identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe in English Language Arts is a learning expectation covered under Common Core State Standards for Reading Informational Text RI.2.6 57 | P a g e


Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe. Additional Resources:  Tell’em in 10 PowerPoint: 2MainIdea  Knovio Tutorial Recording: https://view.knowledgevision.com/presentation/e783ff39c8d4482caddae5c4be4c0 f40

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Unit Media Share

Blue Ribbon Readers: The Hamburger Game The Hamburger Game helps students practice attentive reading by choosing the main idea—or "meat"—from a passage of text and dragging it to the center of a sandwich. A hamburger appears and they win points if they are right. The students will enjoy making a delicious burger while learning at the same time! The students will gain skills and comprehension from this game. Teacher will love how involved students will be with this activity! PBS & WGBH Educational Foundation. (2016). Blue Ribbon Readers: The Hamburger Game. [Website]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from http://www.pspb.org/blueribbon/games/burger/burger.html Introduction to Reading Skills: Main Idea/Topic - Episode 1 This video is a great resource for students! This instructional cartoon from SRA FLEX Literacy provides an entertaining and informative animation to help introduce students to Main Idea or Main Topic. The students will more than likely be engaged into the video because it’s exciting, a mystery, and enjoyable. This video is for upper elementary students and possibility early middle schoolers. McGraw-Hill Education. (Account Holder). (November 18, 2013). Introduction to Reading Skills: Main Idea/Topic - Episode 1. [Youtube Video]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-1DZWNVBT4 Main Idea This app is perfect for children ages 6-8. The reading comprehension passages are designed to help students become confident identifying the main idea of a text and understanding how details support the main idea. There are 15 short passages where students will read the passage and then answer two multiple choice questions and one open ended question. The first multiple choice question with each passage asks about main idea. The second multiple choice question consistently asks about a supporting detail. The open ended questions include topics such as author's purpose and distinguishing fact from opinion. This app is Compatible with iPad and requires iOS 8.0 or later. Gardner, Keith. (February 10, 2016). Main Idea. [iTunes, Free] Retrieved on February 21, 2016 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/main-idea/id1035472182?mt=8 59 | P a g e


Main Idea - Sentences ‘Main Idea- Sentences’ helps kids who have trouble with reading comprehension. Identifying the main idea is a key part of reading comprehension. 'Main Idea -Sentences' is an app that builds children comprehension skill in a fun, game-like environment. The skill is developed step-by-step until mastery. This app is designed for children in Grades 2-5 who can read the words, but don't understand what they read. Beginning readers in earlier grades can also benefit from the targeted skill development. 'Main Idea Sentences' develops the skill of knowing what a sentence is about. This skill must be firmly established before a child can determine what a paragraph or page is about.This app is Compatible with iPad and requires iOS 6.0 or later. Toole, Janine. (June 24, 2015). Main Idea-Sentences. [iTunes, Free] Retrieved on February 21, 2016 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/main-idea-sentencesreading/id895686005?mt=8 Main Idea Song – Learn to Read – Learning Upgrade The Main Idea Song is very catchy! I love how the video tells and show the students step by step process on how to find the Main Idea in a passage. This is an awesome resource because it will engage student’s attention and help them remember how to find the Main Idea. This fabulous video has repetition, it is fun to watch and it gets straight to the point. Learning Upgrade. (Account Holder). (October 4, 2006). Main Idea Song – Learn to Read – Learning Upgrade. [Youtube Video]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W24RyhtX1qA RoomRecess.com Reading Games RoomRecess.com was developed entirely by an elementary school teacher with the goal of reinforcing fundamental learning concepts in math, reading, spelling, language arts, and basic problem solving. This is a good website because it provides free educational computer games for children to play while learning important skills. The second grade students will learn how to find the Main Idea in a passage in a fun way! Not only are students improving their comprehension skills, they are also learning how to remember important information. Techers will enjoy this website because this game teaches students how to take a large selection of a text and reduce it to the main points. RoomRecess.com Reading Games. (January 7, 2016). 2nd & 3rd grade Reading Games. [Website]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from http://www.roomrecess.com/pages/ReadingGames.html

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Selection Rubric: Web Resources Complete an interactive evaluation and add it to your Professional Development portfolio using the Selection Rubric: Web Resources available on the “ASSURE Learning with Technology and Media” DVD. Open the DVD and click on “Install My Professional Portfolio Database.” Follow the on-screen instructions to install the database to your hard drive. Double-click on the shortcut that is on your desktop. Click on the “My Lesson _______________________ Assessments” button in the left navigation bar. (You must assess a lesson plan before the assessment will appear in your lesson plan list.) Click on any lesson assessment, and then click on the “Rubrics” tab. Click on the “add” button to choose and evaluate your selection rubric. A downloadable version of this rubric is available in the Selection Rubrics module of the Companion Website at www.prenhall.com/smaldino.

Title: Main Idea Song – Learn to Read – Learning Upgrade Hardware Required: Source/Location: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W24RyhtX1qA Computer/Laptop Projector (if for entire class) © Date: October 4, 2006

Cost: N/A

Subject Area: ELA

Primary User(s):

Grade Level: 2

______x_____ Student

Instructional Strategies: Video- Audio & Visual Presentation

___________ Teacher

Brief Description: The Main Idea Song is very catchy! I love how the video tells and show the students step by step process on how to find the Main Idea in a passage. This is an awesome resource because it will engage student’s attention and help them remember how to find the Main Idea. This fabulous video has repetition, it is fun to watch and it gets straight to the point. Standards/Outcomes/Objectives: Reading Informational Text RI.2.6 Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe.

Prerequisites (e.g., prior knowledge, reading ability, vocabulary level, etc.): The students are in the 2nd grade. The video will serve as a resource to help all of my students especially my visual and audio learners understand the meaning of a Main Idea. Students should have knowledge of these terms (Describe, Purpose, Comprehend, Understand, Main Idea, Noun, Adjective, Verb, Key Point, Purpose, Identify, Text, Point of View, Paragraph, and Sentence) Students previous ELA background should help them comprehend the basis of a Main Idea. Strengths: This video is catchy and will immediately draw in student’s attention. Students can replay the video as much as it is needed to reinforce understanding. Repetition is foreseen throughout this video to ensure complete understanding. The video falls under the curriculum in the CCSS. The video is a musical therefore, it may be easier for students to remember. Limitations: All students will not learn or remember best from a musical standing. Some students may not have computers or internet access at home.

Special Features: None

Name: MaKeshia Parker

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Date: February 23, 2016


SELECTION RUBRIC: WEB RESOURCES

Rating Area

High Quality

Medium Quality

Low Quality

Alignment with Standards, Outcomes, & Objectives

Standards/outcomes/ objectives addressed and use of Web resource should enhance student learning.

Standards/outcomes/ objectives partially addressed and use of Web resource may enhance student learning.

Standards/outcomes/ objectives not addressed and use of Web resource will likely not enhance student learning.

Accurate & Current Information

Information is correct and does not contain material that is out of date.

Information is correct, but does contain material that is out of date.

Information is not correct and does contain material that is out of date.

Age-Appropriate Language

Language used is age appropriate and vocabulary is understandable.

Language used is nearly age appropriate and some vocabulary is above/below student age.

Language used is not age appropriate and vocabulary is clearly inappropriate for student age.

Interest Level & Engagement

Topic is presented so that students are likely to be interested and actively engaged in learning.

Topic is presented to interest students most of the time and engage most students in learning.

Topic presented so as not to interest students and not engage them in learning.

Technical Quality

The material represents the best available technology and media.

The material represents technology and media that are good quality, although there may be some problems using it.

The material represents technology and media that are not well prepared and are of very poor quality.

Ease of Use (User may be Student or Teacher)

Material follows easy-to-use patterns with nothing to confuse the user.

Material follows patterns that are easy to follow most of the time, with a few things to confuse the user.

Material follows no patterns and most of the time the user is very confused.

Bias Free

There is no evidence of objectionable bias or advertising.

There is little evidence of bias or advertising.

There is much evidence of bias or advertising.

User Guide & Directions

The user guide is an excellent resource for use in a lesson. Directions should help teachers and/or students use the material.

The user guide is good resource for use in a lesson. Directions may help teachers and/or students use the material.

The user guide is poor resource for use in a lesson. Directions do not help teachers and/or students use the material.

Clear Directions

Navigation is logical and pages are well organized.

Navigation is logical for main use, but can be confusing.

Navigation is not logical and pages are not well organized.

Stimulates Creativity

Use of Web resource gives students many opportunities to engage in new learning experiences.

Use of Web resource gives students some opportunities to engage in new learning experiences.

Use of Web resource gives students few opportunities to engage in new learning experiences.

Visual Design

The Web resource is designed with appropriate use of graphics and text to ensure student understanding.

The Web resource is designed with graphics and text that are of average quality.

The Web resource is designed with graphics and text that are of poor quality and distract students from understanding.

The Web resource links facilitate navigating the material and finding additional information.

The Web resource links are not easy to navigate and make it difficult to find additional information.

The Web resource links make it very difficult to navigate the material and to find additional information.

The Site Map is available and useful to help navigate and access information.

The Site Map is available and somewhat useful to help navigate and access information.

The Site Map is not available or not useful to help navigate and access information.

Quality of Links Site Map

Recommended for Classroom Use: _____x______ Yes ___________ Ideas for Classroom 62 | P a g e Use: Main Idea Song – Learn to Read – Learning Upgrade video will be shown before the students

start their group activity on Main Ideas. The students will work in Think-Pair-Share groups and find the main idea in a passage together. After finding the key points in the passage, each group will share why they believe their point is the main idea.


Finding the Main Idea By MaKeshia Parker

Interactive Site

Vocabulary

Internet resources

Interactive Site Main Idea - Sentences is a site that will help you develop the skill of knowing what a sentence is about. Main Idea This awesome app will help you become confident identifying the main idea of a text and understanding how details support the main idea. RoomRecess.com Reading Games is a site that will help you remember important in a fun way! Blue Ribbon Readers: The Hamburger Game is a site where you will make a delicious burger choosing the main idea! 63 | P a g e


Main Idea Flippers is a themed activity that will help you practice the main idea. AdaptedMind will improve your comprehension. Main Idea Bag is a exploring activity where clues in the bag will have you guessing the main idea. It’s All Connected is a fun activity where you will chain the main idea to it's details. Guess The Main Idea by looking at the pictures. Main Idea Game Show Discover a fun game everyone can play! Now That’s A Bright Idea Let’s wear the main idea on our head!

Vocabulary for finding the Main Idea Key point

Noun

Point of view

Explain

Main idea

Verb

Paragraph

Text

Describe

Comprehend

Adjective

Sentence

Purpose

Understand

Identify

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Internet Resources Introduction to Reading Skills: Main Idea/Topic - Episode 1 This animation video will help introduce you to the Main Idea. Main Idea Song – Learn to Read – Learning Upgrade This video will be catchy and help you understand the main idea. Main Idea Movie is a great site to enhance your reading skills. What’s The Main Idea Use this site to find ways to discover the main idea. Main Idea and Details This site provides worksheet and practice using various activities. Main Idea and Detail Practice Be a detective and search for the main idea. Main Idea Graphic Organizer This is a useful worksheet to help you find the main idea using your hands. Find the Main Idea: Spots the Barn Cat This site provides worksheet and practice on finding the main idea. Find the Main Idea: Carnival This site provides worksheet and practice searching for the main idea. Find the Main Idea: Storms This site provides worksheet and practice identifying the main idea.

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Hailey Peeters Unit Rationale – Life Cycles Students should be able to recognize that all living things have a different life cycle, depending on the species. This unit is designed to aid students in comparing and contrasting the different life cycles and understand the differences in how various species develop in stages (i.e. butterflies, frogs, humans). Learners will determine the similarities and differences between the two species by comparing the two different life cycles using graphic organizers. They will also observe the physical characteristics in each species that gets passed along by the parents. The students will observe this through group research in which each group is assigned specific specie. For example, Monarch butterflies are always black and red/orange and that is a physical characteristic that is consistently passed along. Making this unit more interesting, unique, and personable, students will also complete a project comparing their physical traits to their parents physical traits by showing physical evidence Life cycles is an important unit because it allows students to dig deeper into research and find the characteristics in life stages that set a species apart from one another. They should be able to identify that a human developmental cycle is different from that of a frog life cycle.

Comparing and contrasting the life cycles of different organisms is a learning expectation covered under Tennessee Science Standard GLE 0207.4.1 GLE 0207.4.1 Compare the life cycles of various organisms. GLE 0207.4.2 Realize that parents pass along physical characteristics to their offspring. 66 | P a g e


Additional Resources:  Opening Commercial: 2LifeCycles  Tell’em in 10 PowerPoint: o You will also need to download video 2DifferentLifeCyclesPPTvideo1. o You will also need to download video 2DifferentLifeCyclesPPTvideo2.  Knovio Tutorial Recording: https://view.knowledgevision.com/presentation/022bded3687745e0a0316d9ce072 768b

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Unit Media Share

A Life Cycle App This life cycle app is a great way for students to practice sequencing life cycles. It helps the students to understand how life starts and how species morph through a series of stages called metamorphosis. It also gives students the opportunity to explore other species life cycles. The app provides great content and narrations for the students to stay engaged. This app compliments the Common Core standard 0207.4.2 Life Science: “Sequence a collection of pictures or illustrations into the correct stages of an organism’s life cycle.” Nth Fusion, LLC. (August 7, 2012). A Life Cycle App. [iTunes App, Cost: 0.99] Retrieved on February 21 from apps.nthfusion.com EDventures with Kids: 30 Animal & Insect Life Cycle Activities The website has diverse activities to implement in lessons to improve the quality of teaching/learning for the teacher and the student. We want to keep learning exciting but still engaging to where we are meeting the learning needs of students. This website provides numerous amounts of books related to the life cycle, as well as hands on activities that enhance students’ learning. This website compliments the Common Core standard 0207.4.1 Life Science: “Compare and contrast the life cycles of different organisms such as a chicken, butterfly, meal worm, frog, or human as well as 0207.4.2 Life Science: “Sequence a collection of pictures or illustrations into the correct stages of an organism’s life cycle” through the various activities and books provided on the website. 30 Animal & Insect Life Cycle Activities. (n.d.). Retrieved February 21, 2016, from http://www.kcedventures.com/blog/30-animal-insect-life-cycle-activities Frog Life Cycle Video Frog Life Cycle Video for Kids is a great resource to see supplemental material on the life cycle of a frog. Seeing this sequential video cycle allows students to consistently see the stages of the cycles through a simple explanation of how it works. Understanding the life cycle of frogs allows students to better relate the cycles in a sequential order. The supplemental video also gives reassurance to the students to have a better understanding, also allowing them to compare and contrast cycles of different animals by having reliable information to apply to related activities. This video compliments the Common Core standard 0207.4.1 Life Science: “Compare and contrast the life cycles of different organisms such as a chicken, butterfly, meal worm, frog, or human as well as 0207.4.2 Life Science: “Sequence a collection of pictures or illustrations into the correct stages of an organism’s life cycle.”

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M. [Account Holder] (2012, June 1). Frog Life Cycle Video for Kids -Science for Kids by makemegenius.com. Retrieved February 21, 2016, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3pOsKcs78C4 Life of a Monarch Butterfly This application is very beneficial for the teacher. It provides lessons and interactive activities for the teacher to implement in the classroom. This can also create an even more in depth research project to specifically talk about Monarch butterflies. Monarch butterflies are the most popular butterflies to study. The activity it provides creates an excitement for students so that they can become engaged in this activity. The lesson plan that is provided is hands on and crafty but still provides a lot of significant content for the students. This app compliments the Common Core standard 0207.4.1 Life Science: “Compare and contrast the life cycles of different organisms such as a chicken, butterfly, meal worm, frog, or human as well as 0207.4.2 Life Science: “Sequence a collection of pictures or illustrations into the correct stages of an organism’s life cycle.” Gonzalez, Edward. (August 30,2013). Life of a Monarch Butterfly. [iTunes App, Cost: Free]. Retrieved on February 21, 2016 from gonzalezedward.blogspot.com Monarch Butterfly Metamorphosis This video is great for students because they can see a real-life process of metamorphosis through time-lapse. It gives students an authentic vision of what the phase looks like. Students can use this video to relate to the phases a butterfly goes through that they previously learned. This video serves as a supplemental resource that allows students to apply life cycles to the real world. This video compliments the Common Core Standard 0207.4.2 Life Science: “Sequence a collection of pictures or illustrations into the correct stages of an organism’s life cycle” as the video gives a real life sequence of butterfly metamorphosis. F. [Account Holder} (2014, August 1). Monarch Butterfly Metamorphosis time-lapse FYV 1080 HD. Retrieved February 21, 2016, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ocWgSgMGxOc Shepard Software: Science for Kids The website provides various simple interactive videos for students to learn different life cycles. Not only does the software have butterfly and frog life cycles, but it also has the life cycle of birds. This website compliments the Common Core standard 0207.4.1 Life Science: “Compare and contrast the life cycles of different organisms such as a chicken, butterfly, meal worm, frog, or human as well as 0207.4.2 Life Science: “Sequence a collection of pictures or illustrations into the correct stages of an organism’s life cycle.” Students will be able to use this website to interactively look at both butterfly and frog life cycles. It allows students to put the cycle in order. When students put the steps one at a time, It allows the students to see an animation step-by-step as they go of the cycles. Doing interactive activities can be very valuable in student learning. This activity will be fun and exciting for students to do as it is like a simulation and game all in one! Sheppard Software: Fun free online learning games and activities for kids. (n.d.). Retrieved February 21, 2016, from http://sheppardsoftware.com/

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Selection Rubric: Web Resources Complete an interactive evaluation and add it to your Professional Search Terms Development portfolio using the Selection Rubric: Web Resources available on the “ASSURE Learning with Technology and Media” DVD. Open the DVD and click on “Install My Professional Portfolio Database.” Follow the on-screen instructions to install the database to your hard drive. Double-click on the shortcut that is on your desktop. Click on the “My Lesson _______________________ Assessments” button in the left navigation bar. (You must assess a lesson plan before the assessment will appear in your lesson plan list.) Click on any lesson assessment, and then click on the “Rubrics” tab. Click on the “add” button to choose and evaluate your selection rubric. A downloadable version of this rubric is available in the Selection Rubrics module of the Companion Website at www.prenhall.com/smaldino.

Title Life Cycles________________________________________________________ Hardware Required Computer Source/Location __Sheppard Software___________________________________________ _______________________ © Date ___Unknown___________________________________________________ Primary User(s): Students/K-5 Subject Area __Science_______________________ Grade Level ___2nd________ ___________ Student Instructional Strategies __Interactive Video/ Simulation/ Game_____________________________________ Brief Description This website provides various simple interactive videos for students to learn different life cycles. Not only does the software have butterfly and frog life cycles, but it also has the life cycle of birds. Students will be able to use this website to interactively look at both butterfly and frog life cycles. It allows students to put the cycle in order. When students put the steps one at a time, It allows the students to see an animation step-by-step as they go of the cycles. Doing interactive activities can be very valuable in student learning. This activity will be fun and exciting for students to do as it is like a simulation and game all in one! Standards/Outcomes/Objectives 0207.4.1 Life Science: “Compare and contrast the life cycles of different organisms such as a chicken, butterfly, meal worm, frog, or human”

0207.4.2 Life Science: “Sequence a collection of pictures or illustrations into the correct stages of an organism’s life cycle.” Prerequisites (e.g., prior knowledge, reading ability, vocabulary level, etc.) Students should have prior knowledge of animal cycles that we discussed in class. The interactive video will serve as practice so that the students are able to complete the cycles multiple times if they need to. Strengths

The video is an accurate age appropriate resource to practice memorizing and understanding the stages of each cycle of butterflies and frogs. The visual illustrations are great for students to see so that they can understand which stage leads to another stage. Students can practice on this website unlimited amounts of times until they are able to understand it. The video plays at an appropriate pace, allowing students to comprehend the video as they watch it and interact with it. Limitations Limitations include allowing all students to interact with the video since not at all students have access to technology. Also, there should be an activity to go along with the source to reinforce that the students have understand the different life cycle stages. Special Features Video appeals to visual and interactive learners. Video goes along students pace, as it is interactive.

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Name _Hailey Peeters_______________________________________________________ Date ____2/25/16_______________


SELECTION RUBRIC: WEB RESOURCES

Rating Area

High Quality

Medium Quality

Low Quality

Alignment with Standards, Outcomes, & Objectives

Standards/outcomes/ objectives addressed and use of Web resource should enhance student learning.

Standards/outcomes/ objectives partially addressed and use of Web resource may enhance student learning.

Standards/outcomes/ objectives not addressed and use of Web resource will likely not enhance student learning.

Accurate & Current Information

Information is correct and does not contain material that is out of date.

Information is correct, but does contain material that is out of date.

Information is not correct and does contain material that is out of date.

Age-Appropriate Language

Language used is age appropriate and vocabulary is understandable.

Language used is nearly age appropriate and some vocabulary is above/below student age.

Language used is not age appropriate and vocabulary is clearly inappropriate for student age.

Interest Level & Engagement

Topic is presented so that students are likely to be interested and actively engaged in learning.

Topic is presented to interest students most of the time and engage most students in learning.

Topic presented so as not to interest students and not engage them in learning.

Technical Quality

The material represents the best available technology and media.

The material represents technology and media that are good quality, although there may be some problems using it.

The material represents technology and media that are not well prepared and are of very poor quality.

Ease of Use (User may be Student or Teacher)

Material follows easy-to-use patterns with nothing to confuse the user.

Material follows patterns that are easy to follow most of the time, with a few things to confuse the user.

Material follows no patterns and most of the time the user is very confused.

Bias Free

There is no evidence of objectionable bias or advertising.

There is little evidence of bias or advertising.

There is much evidence of bias or advertising.

User Guide & Directions

The user guide is an excellent resource for use in a lesson. Directions should help teachers and/or students use the material.

The user guide is good resource for use in a lesson. Directions may help teachers and/or students use the material.

The user guide is poor resource for use in a lesson. Directions do not help teachers and/or students use the material.

Clear Directions

Navigation is logical and pages are well organized.

Navigation is logical for main use, but can be confusing.

Navigation is not logical and pages are not well organized.

Stimulates Creativity

Use of Web resource gives students many opportunities to engage in new learning experiences.

Use of Web resource gives students some opportunities to engage in new learning experiences.

Use of Web resource gives students few opportunities to engage in new learning experiences.

Visual Design

The Web resource is designed with appropriate use of graphics and text to ensure student understanding.

The Web resource is designed with graphics and text that are of average quality.

The Web resource is designed with graphics and text that are of poor quality and distract students from understanding.

The Web resource links facilitate navigating the material and finding additional information.

The Web resource links are not easy to navigate and make it difficult to find additional information.

The Web resource links make it very difficult to navigate the material and to find additional information.

The Site Map is available and useful to help navigate and access information.

The Site Map is available and somewhat useful to help navigate and access information.

The Site Map is not available or not useful to help navigate and access information.

Quality of Links Site Map

From Smaldino, Lowther, & Russell, Instructional Technology and Media for Learning, 9th ed. Copyright Š 2008 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.

Recommended for Classroom Use: ___X________ Yes ___________ No

Ideas for Classroom Use: 71 | P a g e This can be used to test students prior knowledge of life cycles. Maybe they are familiar with these aprticular cycles.

I think this is more ideal when students are in their centers. A few students at a time should work on this activity rather than doing as a whole group. The material is mostly supplemental.


Life Cycles In Mrs. Peeters’ Class

Welcome to Mrs. Peeters’ unit on life cycles! Please use this webpage to enhance your child’s learning on this science unit. I have provided various ways for students to practice understanding life cycles. These supplemental activities meets various learning needs and uses differentiated learning to engage each student in the class.

Games Butterfly Life Cycle Practice identifying the stages of the butterfly life cycle by clicking on the

Frog Life Cycle Practice identifying the stages of the butterfly life cycle by clicking on the image below!

image below!

Butterfly Jigsaw: Put the pieces together to see the beautiful butterfly! Adjust the pieces. If you’re a beginner, begin with minimum pieces. If you’re an expert, go ahead and try the hardest!

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Activities Butterfly Life Cycle in the Kitchen!

Create a frog life cycle using recycled materials at home! This will help in remember the different phases during a frogs life cycle!

Create a butterfly life cycle in your own kitchen! You can learn, create, and enjoy a treat at the same time! Click on the photo for directions!

Click on the photo for directions!

Vocabulary

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Metamorphosis

Pupa

Life cycle

Chrysalis

Eggs

Cocoon

Caterpillar

Tadpole

Larvae

Froglet


Word Search! Use the vocabulary above to complete your word search 

SHRKAUXCTAMFMNP XILUHUDTOGPELUD GCLBAZILVCTULSU GELARVAETAOIPXJ HLOXSWTEMVFOQLV IOFQOYLOEEJENLN XPFJRGRUCZJAWLD VDOHOPZHYHFIECZ WAGRHWXQCUGGOHV BTFOHOVCLPXKSAB UISDAHZQEFVFXDK YIRALLIPRETACSV SBALYCTABIQSGGE UVWMABXVAGWJKGV YOIEMNBLKVHNDYG

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Creativity

Click on the photo below to design your own butterfly!

Learn how to draw a Monarch Butterfly! It’s only 12 steps to make your own! Click on the photo below to get started!

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Create an origami frog! Click on the image for step-by-step instructions!

Take a look at these interesting facts! San Diego Zoo Butterfly Blog Butterfly Breeders Blog The Smithsonian’s interesting frog facts!

Hope you enjoyed your stay!

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Amanda Berry Unit Rationale – Multiplication In this unit third grade students will be learning multiplication. Third grade students need to learn things like multiplication so they can progress to more difficult task such as division, where multiplication is necessary to complete the task. Students will be learning the basics of multiplication and slowly progress to more challenging, high level thinking multiplication. Students will be able to see how multiplication relates to the real world. Students will complete hands on activities to motivate the learning of this task. Students will be given word problems or simple quizzes to access the progression and understanding of multiplication. Students need to be provided with different activities and exercises to study and see exactly how multiplication works. Knowledge of multiplication is important for students to know because it is used in almost every step forward in mathematics. Multiplication is the foundation of mathematics. In order for students to move further in mathematics it is imperative for them to know their multiplication facts and how they affect other aspects of mathematics. Representing and solving problems involving multiplication is a learning expectation covered under Tennessee State Math Standard 3.0. 3.OA.A.1 Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5 x 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each. 3.OA.A.4 Determine the unknown whole number in a multiplication or division equation relating three whole numbers. 77 | P a g e


Additional Resources:  Opening Commercial: 3Multiplication  Tell’em in 10 Presentation: 3Multiplication  Knovio Tutorial Recording: https://view.knowledgevision.com/presentation/a9edf880cfc5412bad890f759f96eda1

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Unit Media Share

Addition & Multiplication Number Bubbles Addition & Multiplication Number Bubbles is a great way for students to practice multiplication. Multiplication Number Bubbles allows students to practice with multiplication and also technology. The multiplication portion of the game asks the students to select two number bubbles whose product is equal to the target number which is at the top of the screen. There are three game modes depending on the level of the student. Time Mode: get as many points as possible in a limited time. Survival Mode: if you make a certain amount of mistakes, game over. Child Mode: time mode with more time and lower difficulty. This is a free app and is compatible with iPad, iPhone, and iPod touch. The app requires iOS 7.0 or later. RENXIAN WANG. (Feb 05, 2016). Addition & Multiplication Number Bubbles. [iTunes App, Cost: Free] Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/addition-multiplication-number/id467091416?mt=8 Fun 4 the Brain Fun 4 the Brain is a website that students can watch videos and play games in order to better understand multiplication. This website allows students to watch videos that teach new strategies to multiplication and then actively be able to play a game that incorporates that new strategy. Students will enjoy being able to active their own knowledge through games and activities online. The students have many options on videos and games. The students will be allowed to explore through the website to learn new things. Fun 4 the Brain. (2008). Multiplication Games. [Website]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from http://www.fun4thebrain.com/mult.html Math Monsters- Bingo Math Monsters-Bingo is a great way for students to practice multiplication. Monsters Bingo can be used in the classroom by students during work places. Students will need access to iPads, iPhones, or iPads. This game is appropriate for students when they are practicing their multiplication. The game has three levels of difficulty. The game allows you to answer multiplication problems and then select the correct answer on the Bingo board. When the students gets BINGO they have successfully completed the task. They can choose to play again and new multiplication problems will appear. This app is free and compatible with iPad, iPhone, and iPod touch. This app requires iOS 6.0 or later.

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June Infrastructure Pvt Ltd. (June 27,2015). Math Monsters – Bingo. [iTunes App, Cost: Free] Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/math-monstersbingo/id452985193?mt=8 Math Playground Math Playground is a website with games for various mathematical concepts. There are pages of multiplication games offered on this website. Students will not only learn about multiplication but could also learn about arrays. Arrays will help with solve multiplication. Third grade students will enjoy learning about multiplication through this fun and exciting website. Students will use technology to learn and be engaged in their learning. Students will have the opportunity to venture throughout the website to learn new strategies in multiplication. Math Playground, LLC. (2016). Multiplication and Division Activities. [Website]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from http://www.mathplayground.com/index_multiplication_division.html Multiplication Brain POP Multiplication BrainPOP is a short video all about multiplication. The setting of the video is at the zoo where Tim and Moby helps answer a question. The video explains what multiplication is and how to solve problems quickly. The video provides examples uses real life applications at the zoo. Students can easily watch this video and then take a quiz to test for comprehension of the video. This video is geared to third grade students learning the basics of multiplication. Tim and Moby help with the students learn multiplication but also help with to incorporate real life scenarios. BrainPOP. [1999-2016]. BrainPOP - Multiplication. Retrieved on February 23, 2016 from https://www.brainpop.com/math/numbersandoperations/multiplication/ Third Grade Multiplication Lesson Third Grade Multiplication Lesson is a video teaching multiplication. The students can watch the video and maybe see another side of multiplication or it can allow them to understand something the teacher may not have been able to explain to them. Technology, such as this video, can allow students to find new or different ways to learn. Every learner is different and learns in different ways. The students can use this video to activate learning. Visual learners would really like this video because it provides visuals of multiplication. Sicard, Lauren. (Host). (July 4, 2013). Third Grade Multiplication. [YouTube Video]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1tycj9txltY

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Selection Rubric: Web Resources Complete an interactive evaluation and add it to your Professional Search Terms Development portfolio using the Selection Rubric: Web Resources available on the “ASSURE Learning with Technology and Media” DVD. Open the DVD and click on “Install My Professional Portfolio Database.” Follow the on-screen instructions to install the database to your hard drive. Double-click on the shortcut that is on your desktop. Click on the “My Lesson _______________________ Assessments” button in the left navigation bar. (You must assess a lesson plan before the assessment will appear in your lesson plan list.) Click on any lesson assessment, and then click on the “Rubrics” tab. Click on the “add” button to choose and evaluate your selection rubric. A downloadable version of this rubric is available in the Selection Rubrics module of the Companion Website at www.prenhall.com/smaldino.

Title: Multiplication BrainPOP Hardware Required: Laptop, Elmo, Projector Screen Source/Location https://www.brainpop.com/math/numbersandoperations/multiplication/ © Date: 2016 Primary User(s): Students and Teachers Subject Area: Math Grade Level: Third Instructional Strategies: Video – audio and visual presentation Brief Description: Multiplication BrainPOP is a short video all about multiplication. The setting of the video is at the zoo where Tim and Moby helps answer a question. The video explains what multiplication is and how to solve problems quickly. The video provides examples uses real life applications at the zoo. Students can easily watch this video and then take a quiz to test for comprehension of the video. This video is geared to third grade students learning the basics of multiplication. Tim and Moby help with the students learn multiplication but also help with to incorporate real life scenarios. Standards/Outcomes/Objectives: Standards: 3.OA.A.1 – Interpret products of whole numbers. 3.OA.A.4- Determine the

unknown whole number in a multiplication or division equation relating three whole numbers. Objectives: The students will be able to multiply whole numbers and relate three whole numbers in an equation. Outcomes: The students will be successful in multiplying whole numbers.

Prerequisites (e.g., prior knowledge, reading ability, vocabulary level, etc.) : The students should already know what whole numbers, factors, and products are in mathematics. The students should know what an array is and how to use it. The students will have to understand the vocabulary mentioned above. Strengths: BrainPOP is a popular website and students are probably familiar with the website. The students know that at the end of each BrainPOP video that there is a short quiz that will assess their comprehension. The students will actively be engaged in the video. Limitations: Some BrainPOP videos cannot be accessed without a login or membership to BrainPOP. This particular video is easily accessible. Special Features: A quiz is offered at the end of each video.

Name _____Amanda Berry___________________________________________________ Date ____February 23, 2016______

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SELECTION RUBRIC: WEB RESOURCES

Rating Area

High Quality

Medium Quality

Low Quality

Alignment with Standards, Outcomes, & Objectives

Standards/outcomes/ objectives addressed and use of Web resource should enhance student learning.

Standards/outcomes/ objectives partially addressed and use of Web resource may enhance student learning.

Standards/outcomes/ objectives not addressed and use of Web resource will likely not enhance student learning.

Accurate & Current Information

Information is correct and does not contain material that is out of date.

Information is correct, but does contain material that is out of date.

Information is not correct and does contain material that is out of date.

Age-Appropriate Language

Language used is age appropriate and vocabulary is understandable.

Language used is nearly age appropriate and some vocabulary is above/below student age.

Language used is not age appropriate and vocabulary is clearly inappropriate for student age.

Interest Level & Engagement

Topic is presented so that students are likely to be interested and actively engaged in learning.

Topic is presented to interest students most of the time and engage most students in learning.

Topic presented so as not to interest students and not engage them in learning.

Technical Quality

The material represents the best available technology and media.

The material represents technology and media that are good quality, although there may be some problems using it.

The material represents technology and media that are not well prepared and are of very poor quality.

Ease of Use (User may be Student or Teacher)

Material follows easy-to-use patterns with nothing to confuse the user.

Material follows patterns that are easy to follow most of the time, with a few things to confuse the user.

Material follows no patterns and most of the time the user is very confused.

Bias Free

There is no evidence of objectionable bias or advertising.

There is little evidence of bias or advertising.

There is much evidence of bias or advertising.

User Guide & Directions

The user guide is an excellent resource for use in a lesson. Directions should help teachers and/or students use the material.

The user guide is good resource for use in a lesson. Directions may help teachers and/or students use the material.

The user guide is poor resource for use in a lesson. Directions do not help teachers and/or students use the material.

Clear Directions

Navigation is logical and pages are well organized.

Navigation is logical for main use, but can be confusing.

Navigation is not logical and pages are not well organized.

Stimulates Creativity

Use of Web resource gives students many opportunities to engage in new learning experiences.

Use of Web resource gives students some opportunities to engage in new learning experiences.

Use of Web resource gives students few opportunities to engage in new learning experiences.

Visual Design

The Web resource is designed with appropriate use of graphics and text to ensure student understanding. The Web resource links facilitate navigating the material and finding additional information.

The Web resource is designed with graphics and text that are of average quality.

The Web resource is designed with graphics and text that are of poor quality and distract students from understanding.

The Web resource links are not easy to navigate and make it difficult to find additional information.

The Web resource links make it very difficult to navigate the material and to find additional information.

The Site Map is available and useful to help navigate and access information.

The Site Map is available and somewhat useful to help navigate and access information.

The Site Map is not available or not useful to help navigate and access information.

Quality of Links Site Map

Recommended

for

Classroom

Use:

____X_______

Yes

___________

No

Ideas for Classroom Use: This BrainPOP video could be used to incorporate technology in82 the or | Pclassroom age to assist a multiplication lesson. Some students are visual learners and need to see a real life application or a visual representation of the same thing the teacher is teaching. Also, the students could use this video during work places when they are chosen to use the iPads. From Smaldino, Lowther, & Russell, Instructional Technology and Media for Learning, 9th ed. Copyright Š 2008 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.


MULTIPLICATION UNIT KEY TERMS TO KNOW: Multiplication- the process of multiplying Represent- stand for or symbolize Expression- A symbol or combination of symbols Fact- the number being multiplied Product- the result of multiplying two or more number Result- the answer Equal- being the same in value Double- twice as much Solve- to find an answer to Algebraic- designating algebra Factors- the numbers being multiplied Groups- set of elements or numbers Numbers- used in mathematics Twice- doubled amount Family- a group of like things Arrays – numerical data

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Multiplication Key Terms Word Search

Multiplication BrainPOP is a short video all about multiplication! Tim and Moby help students to learn how to solve multiplication equations.

Fun 4 the Brain is a website that students can watch videos and play games in order to better understand multiplication.

Math Monsters-Bingo is a great way for students to practice multiplication.

MULTIPLICATION CHART – Click on this to view a multiplication chart to help complete assignments.

Think you got what it takes to be a GREAT Multiplication Mathematician?! Take this quiz to see!

Check out these fun facts about multiplication on our Math Bridges!

Ask the teacher for permission and print these from Multiplication activities. 84 | P a g e


Aubrey Kemp Unit Rationale – Christopher Columbus In this unit, we will be learning about Christopher Columbus in Social Studies. Third grade students need to learn about Christopher Columbus because he was such a major historical figure, credited with discovering America. Christopher Columbus’s life and voyage provides students with an insight into the past. Students will be learning about Christopher Columbus. For auditory learners, the teacher will read to the students. For visual learners, the teacher will present a video about Christopher Columbus, which includes information on his life and his voyage. For kinesthetic learners, students will be given a chance to complete a schema, which allows them to take sticky notes and place them on a folder. These sticky notes will contain information on what the students already knew and what they learned about Christopher Columbus. It is important for the students to witness different methods of presenting and recording the information. The journey of Christopher Columbus tells the students of today that persevering and taking risks can lead to great accomplishments.

Studying and understanding Christopher Columbus in Social Studies is a learning expectation covered under Tennessee State Standards for Social Studies 3.16. Use timelines and historical passages to summarize the history of a region, including events, inventions/inventors, artists, writers, and political figures. 85 | P a g e


Additional Resources:  Opening Commercial: 3ChristopherColumbus.wav  Tell’em in 10 PowerPoint: 3ChristopherColumbus  Knovio Tutorial recording: https://view.knowledgevision.com/presentation/5a478aa69fa54721b0a40bf63df9b591

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Unit Media Share

BrainPOP The BrainPOP video about Christopher Columbus is extremely informational. It coincides with the Tennessee State Standard SS Third Grade- World Geography and Cultures, North America 3.16 (Use timelines and historical passages to summarize the history of a region, including events, inventions/inventors, artists, writers, and political figures) because it tells of his early life, his voyage, his dealings with the natives, and his legacy. This video is very interactive, as are all brainpop videos, and keeps your attention throughout. Though it is not an aspect of the video itself, there is a quiz that goes along with the video. After taking the quiz, I found that it asked very good questions that would gage whether or not the students paid attention. BrainPOP. (1999). Christopher Columbus. [BrainPOP video]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://www.brainpop.com/socialstudies/famoushistoricalfigures/christophercolumbus/ Christopher Columbus - Biography.com Biography.com is a very detailed website which contains a lot of information about Christopher Columbus. This site coincides with the Tennessee State Standard SS Third Grade- World Geography and Cultures, North America 3.16 (Use timelines and historical passages to summarize the history of a region, including events, inventions/inventors, artists, writers, and political figures) because it describes Columbus’s life, all of his voyages, his legacy, and recent discoveries. The first things that stand out on this website are two large, realistic pictures of Christopher Columbus, which help students to give a face to the name. There are quick facts and quotes by Christopher Columbus on the left side of the page, which allows teachers and students to access quick information. There is even a short video included on this site. A&E Networks Television. (2016). Christopher Columbus Biography retrieved March 10, 2016, from http://www.biography.com/people/christopher-columbus-9254209 Explorers Explorers is an app self-described as “the story of exploration of the Americas from before Columbus to Cartier.” As far as I can tell, this app contains information on at least fourteen explorers, along with Native Americans. This site is extremely useful for teachers. When you click on an explorer, you are given the choice of viewing a summary, a map, in-depth information, multimedia, a biography, or documents. The site is easy to navigate, and the words are large and easy to read. The pictures are real pictures, not cartoon pictures, which makes the app more realistic for students. When I become a teacher, I will definitely use this app for 87 | P a g e


information and lessons. This app is compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch and requires iOS 5.1 or later. Multieducator Inc. (Oct. 3, 2012). Explorers. [App Store, $0.99]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/explorers-story-exploration/id562708507?mt=8 Mel-O-Toons: Christopher Columbus This YouTube video is obviously quite old, as you can tell by the graphics and singing throughout the video. However, the ideas are basically the same as any current video or website. The singing might actually keep students interested in the video. It tells of Christopher Columbus, his attempts to find a way to Asia, his voyage, and his dealings with the natives. It contains details of the voyage that I have not seen in other videos. I would, however, use clipgrab to view the video. The students should not be able to read the comments underneath the video. GildersleeveDB. (Producer). (2007). Mel-O-Toons: Christopher Columbus. [YouTube video]. Retrieved on February 22, 2106 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kuvRFZ4Mxbo Scholastic.com Scholastic.com is a very useful website if you want some quick information on Christopher Columbus. This site also coincides with the Tennessee State Standard SS Third Grade- World Geography and Cultures, North America 3.16 (Use timelines and historical passages to summarize the history of a region, including events, inventions/inventors, artists, writers, and political figures) because it describes Columbus’s life, his voyages, and his legend. Something I found very useful about the website was that it listed the ways to site it in MLA, Chicago, and APA style. Grolier Multimedia Encyclopedia. (2014). All About Christopher Columbus (1451-1506). [Website.] Retrieved on February 22. 2016 from http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/article/allabout-christopher-columbus-1451-1506 The Journey of Christopher Columbus HD- Children’s Story Book This app is very fun and interactive for students. When first opened, it asks you if you wish to be read to, read by yourself, or autoplay. When you begin the story, you can see that the pictures are moving. You have to turn the page with your finger. At some point in the story, it gives you the option of putting a ship together in a puzzle, which adds even more interaction. After this, there is another puzzle. This app provides a cute and informational story for students to enjoy. This app is compatible with iPad and it requires iOS 4.0 or later. Playtales, S.L. (Oct. 12, 2011). The Journey of Christopher Columbus HD- Children’s Story Book. [App Store, $2.99]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/journey-christopher-columbus/id464240242?mt=8

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Selection Rubric: Web Resources Complete an interactive evaluation and add it to your Professional Search Terms Development portfolio using the Selection Rubric: Web Resources available on the “ASSURE Learning with Technology and Media” DVD. Open the DVD and click on “Install My Professional Portfolio Database.” Follow the on-screen instructions to install the database to your hard drive. Double-click on the shortcut that is on your desktop. Click on the “My Lesson _______________________ Assessments” button in the left navigation bar. (You must assess a lesson plan before the assessment will appear in your lesson plan list.) Click on any lesson assessment, and then click on the “Rubrics” tab. Click on the “add” button to choose and evaluate your selection rubric. A downloadable version of this rubric is available in the Selection Rubrics module of the Companion Website at www.prenhall.com/smaldino.

Title _____Explorers__________________ Hardware Required iPad, iPhone, iPod touch Source/Location Apple App Store(https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/explorers-story-exploration/id562708507?mt=8 © Date ______________Oct. 3, 2012________________________________________ Primary User(s): students, teachers ) Subject Area ______Social Studies___________________ Grade Level ____3rd _______ ___________ Student Instructional Strategies _______________presentation________________________ ___________ Teacher Brief Description This app gives an overall summary of Christopher Columbus, a map of his voyages, in-depth information, a video, a biography, and a document written by Christopher Columbus. The same information is given for thirteen other explorers, along with Native Americans. The app is simple to navigate and the words are large and easy to read. The pictures on this app are real pictures of the explorers. Standards/Outcomes/Objectives This app coincides with the Tennessee State Standard SS Third Grade- World Geography and Cultures, North America 3.16 (Use timelines and historical passages to summarize the history of a region, including events, inventions/inventors, artists, writers, and political figures) because it contains information on Christopher Columbus, one of the individuals listen in the suggestions for the standard. Prerequisites (e.g., prior knowledge, reading ability, vocabulary level, etc.) There needs to be at least a 2nd grade reading ability. The only prior knowledge required is that of certain words.

Strengths It contains a lot of useful information, a map, and a sample of Christopher Columbus's writing.

Limitations It isn't very interactive in terms of moving graphics or sound effects.

Special Features

Name ____________Aubrey Kemp____________________________________________ Date _____2/22/16____________

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SELECTION RUBRIC: WEB RESOURCES

Rating Area

High Quality

Medium Quality

Low Quality

Alignment with Standards, Outcomes, & Objectives

Standards/outcomes/ objectives addressed and use of Web resource should enhance student learning.

Standards/outcomes/ objectives partially addressed and use of Web resource may enhance student learning.

Standards/outcomes/ objectives not addressed and use of Web resource will likely not enhance student learning.

Accurate & Current Information

Information is correct and does not contain material that is out of date.

Information is correct, but does contain material that is out of date.

Information is not correct and does contain material that is out of date.

Age-Appropriate Language

Language used is age appropriate and vocabulary is understandable.

Language used is nearly age appropriate and some vocabulary is above/below student age.

Language used is not age appropriate and vocabulary is clearly inappropriate for student age.

Interest Level & Engagement

Topic is presented so that students are likely to be interested and actively engaged in learning.

Topic is presented to interest students most of the time and engage most students in learning.

Topic presented so as not to interest students and not engage them in learning.

Technical Quality

The material represents the best available technology and media.

The material represents technology and media that are good quality, although there may be some problems using it.

The material represents technology and media that are not well prepared and are of very poor quality.

Ease of Use (User may be Student or Teacher)

Material follows easy-to-use patterns with nothing to confuse the user.

Material follows patterns that are easy to follow most of the time, with a few things to confuse the user.

Material follows no patterns and most of the time the user is very confused.

Bias Free

There is no evidence of objectionable bias or advertising.

There is little evidence of bias or advertising.

There is much evidence of bias or advertising.

User Guide & Directions

The user guide is an excellent resource for use in a lesson. Directions should help teachers and/or students use the material.

The user guide is good resource for use in a lesson. Directions may help teachers and/or students use the material.

The user guide is poor resource for use in a lesson. Directions do not help teachers and/or students use the material.

Clear Directions

Navigation is logical and pages are well organized.

Navigation is logical for main use, but can be confusing.

Navigation is not logical and pages are not well organized.

Stimulates Creativity

Use of Web resource gives students many opportunities to engage in new learning experiences.

Use of Web resource gives students some opportunities to engage in new learning experiences.

Use of Web resource gives students few opportunities to engage in new learning experiences.

Visual Design

The Web resource is designed with appropriate use of graphics and text to ensure student understanding.

The Web resource is designed with graphics and text that are of average quality.

The Web resource is designed with graphics and text that are of poor quality and distract students from understanding.

The Web resource links facilitate navigating the material and finding additional information.

The Web resource links are not easy to navigate and make it difficult to find additional information.

The Web resource links make it very difficult to navigate the material and to find additional information.

The Site Map is available and useful to help navigate and access information.

The Site Map is available and somewhat useful to help navigate and access information.

The Site Map is not available or not useful to help navigate and access information.

Quality of Links Site Map

Recommended for Classroom Use: ________x___ Yes ___________ No Ideas for Classroom Use: There are several ways to use this app in the classroom. The teacher could possibly use it when teaching a 90 | Pthis a g app e would lesson on more than one explorer or just one explorer in particular. Another good idea for using be to allow the students to use it in small groups. The teacher could give the students an assignment and allow them to find the answers on their own in small group.


Unit Scavenger Hunt: Christopher Columbus ↙↘

You can use these resources to learn all about our unit topic!

Key Terms Christopher Columbus

Nina

culture

interpreter

King Ferdinand

Pinta

Spain

voyage

Queen Isabella

Santa Maria

navigator

discover

ocean

America

gold

natives

Videos 91 | P a g e


Brainpop Video This is a great video all about Christopher Columbus and his voyage. If you want, you can also take the quiz and see how much you learned!

Columbus Day This short video explains why we celebrate Christopher Columbus and Columbus Day. Mel-O-Toons: Christopher Columbus: A five and a half minute video of Christopher Columbus, his attempts to find a way to Asia, his voyage, and his dealings with the natives, all put to song. Enjoy!

Games

Word-O-Rama Test your knowledge of the animals Christopher Columbus may have seen and brought back from South America. Word Search Try a word search with words connected with Europe, the continent Columbus sailed from.

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Activities/Crafts

Triple Sail Boat This is a cute and fun activity that will allow you to make a ship just like one of the three Columbus sailed on. Discovery! This printable activity includes a fill-in-the-blank section, a maze, and some of our key terms!

Web/Mobile Apps

Explorers This fun and easy-to-use app contains lots of information on Christopher Columbus and several other explorers that the whole family will enjoy. The Journey of Christopher Columbus An interactive book that students and their parents can read together!

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Christopher Columbus This book contains a boatload (pun intended) of information on the hard journey taken by Christopher Columbus in 1492. It is available on Amazon, ebay, and at Barnes and Noble.

Who was Christopher Columbus? Read this book to find out about Christopher Columbus’s early life, his three, voyages, and more! It is available on Amazon, Scholastic, Goodreads, and several other sites.

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Lindsey Shipley Unit Rationale – Writing Narratives In this unit, we will be learning about writing narratives. Third graders need to understand how to write a story in which a character(s) will be involved in a conflict/ problem and that will use transition terms (sequencing words) correctly. Some children may find it difficult to physically write their thoughts down on paper using correct grammar. Some students may have difficulty using correct transition words properly so that the narrative reads fluently. Students may have copies of a particular book in order to read the words themselves and pay closer attention. Students can participate in a read-aloud and include a good discussion about text-to-self connections afterwards. In addition, anchor charts can help the process of writing a personal narative for the students to reference back to. Teachers can use different, creative, and if possible, hands on strategies when teaching the students how to create a graphic organizer before writing. All of the components of writing narratives are important in our everyday lives. Narrative writing tells others the stories of our personal experiences and provides us with opportunities to gain empathy and sympathy about the world around us. It is also important because it will be a great help to have more complex writing pieces or when they are simply conversing through emails, letters, and many other things about their ambitions and beliefs. Studying and understanding text types and purposes is a learning expectation covered under the Common Core State Standards for ELA W.3.0 and W.3.3a. W.3.0. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective techniques, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. W.3.3a. Establish a situation and introduce a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. 95 | P a g e


Additional Resources: 

Opening Commercial: 3WritingNarratives.mp4 (audio only)

Tell’em in 10 PowerPoint presentation: 3WritingNarratives

Knovio Tutorial Recording: https://view.knowledgevision.com/presentation/943c59854aa6445794263862446aea3d

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Unit Media Share

How to Write a Personal Narrative Essay How to Write a Personal Narrative Essay is a wonderful source for teachers to demonstrate the steps to take and the organization skills used in writing a narrative. The video is demonstrated by a child writer and it teaches students how to create a graphic organizer before writing their narratives, emphasizing that few words are needed in completing each section of it. The graphic organizer includes a title, introduction, a story with a beginning, middle, and end, and a conclusion. The graphic organizer is well organized and the child actually writes a short personal narrative based on the information provided in her graphic organizer. Since writing a narrative seems complex to children, this video would be a great visual aid to students who need to physically see a personal narrative written. The fact that the video is told by a child (probably a third or fourth grader) may help children feel as if they can relate to it. Teachers could present this before beginning the graphic organizer portion of a lesson. Arden Reading Academy. [Account Holder]. (2013, September 12). How to Write a Personal Narrative Essay. [Youtube video]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://youtube.com/watch?v=iWHc5Yar6Ps Kids' Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh This clpgh.org/kids website offers reading/writing lessons and provides various resources and links to books and reading games. It also has a "storymaker" interactive game in which a child can choose the characters, take them on adventures through various settings, and the player creates sentences along the way to control the story. Although this website compliments many of the TN Standards, it also compliments TN R.I. 3.a. Establish a situation and introduce a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. The website includes resources, tutorials, and games separated into categories for little kids, big kids, educators, and parents. It uses bright colors and cartoon-like sketches that will catch a child's eye. Third grade students and teachers both will be excited to learn about reading and writing in a fun and engaging way by exploring this adventurous website! Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. (2014). Kids' Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. [Website]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from http://clpgh.org/kids/ Narrative Writing Song Narrative Writing Song is a great source for teachers to demonstrate the concepts of writing a narrative. Demonstrating this through a song will appeal to the visual and auditory learners in the 97 | P a g e


classroom. The video defines a story and all the parts that make it up, such as the beginning, middle, end, topic sentences, supporting details, indenting paragraphs, problems, resolutions, etc. Teachers can present this video early on in a narrative lesson in hopes of the catchy tune sticking with the children in order for them to remember important terms included in writing narratives. Also, the video can teach the children that writing can be creative and fun, just like a "magic carpet ride". GrammarSongs. [Melissa Corbett]. (2014, January 5). Narrative Writing Song. [Youtube Video]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLn8E0Jzafo Plot Generator Plot generator is a great app for teachers to use in the classroom as a prompting tool for students to strengthen their creative writing skills. This kid and teacher friendly app provides it's writers with the four key aspects of a story: a location/situation, a detail, a complication, and an objective. Many different genres are provided as well, such as action, drama, murder scenes, fantasy, romance, superheroes, apocolypse, etc. Details in the app's description say that it generates over one million different combinations in which the writer is responsible for creating the story using the four aspects provided. This app could easily be used when teachers assign their students a quickwrite in their journals, in which the students are given a topic to write about and a short amount of time to write about it. The quickwrites could be used daily and hopefully will keep the students engaged in writing using many different genres. Ultimately, the plot generator will be used repetitively as a building block to encourage narrative writing or more complex pieces of writing in the classroom. This app is compatible with Android. ARC Apps. (2016). Story Plot Generator. (Version 2.2). [Mobile Application Software, Free]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.andromo.dev17163.app225586&hl=en Writing Fix This writingfix.com website is a wonderful website used for a teacher preparing a lesson to teach students about writing and organization skills. It presents various graphic organizers that can be used in the classroom. One concept that the website focuses on is that writing is built with 6 traits: sentence fluency, conventions, organization, word choice, voice, and idea development. It provides many anchor charts, books to use in the classroom, writing activities, lesson plans based on writing standards, etc. The only problem I have with this website is that it is too jumbled. It presents so much helpful information for an educator, that it is scattered and seems to be hard to follow. However, a teacher can pull up this website for so many ELA lessons and can use his/her own creativity to build off of the ideas of other teachers if he/she was having trouble coming up with a basic idea for a lesson. It seems to be strictly geared towards teachers and other educators. WritingFix. (2015). WritingFix: Home of Interactive Writing Prompts. [Website]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from http://writingfix.com/6_traits/organization.htm Writing a Narrative Write a Narrative is a very kid-friendly app for students of all levels to create a graphic organizer 98 | P a g e


and a well constructed piece of writing. The graphic organizers are fun, simple, colorful, and appealing. Students can go through step-by-step instructions in the order as the individual parts of a story should appear in their final narratives. Sections in the step-by-step process include a "hook", the setting, the main characters, other characters, building suspense, etc. It really just breaks apart a narrative, simplifies it, and guides a student in completing each section in order to develop a great final narrative. Teachers could present this app on their Smartboards and go through the steps as a whole group to develop one story as a practice run in writing individual narratives. Students can use the app at home to assist them in creating their own papers. This app is compatible with iPad and requires iOS 5.0 or later. Matthew Harrison @ Hatt Designs. (2014). Writing a Narrative. (Version 1.1) [Mobile application software, Free]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/writing-a-narrative/id630393679?mt=8

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Selection Rubric: Web Resources Complete an interactive evaluation and add it to your Professional Search Terms Development portfolio using the Selection Rubric: Web Resources available on the “ASSURE Learning with Technology and Media” DVD. Open the DVD and click on “Install My Professional Portfolio Database.” Follow the on-screen instructions to install the database to your hard drive. Double-click on the shortcut that is on your desktop. Click on the “My Lesson _______________________ Assessments” button in the left navigation bar. (You must assess a lesson plan before the assessment will appear in your lesson plan list.) Click on any lesson assessment, and then click on the “Rubrics” tab. Click on the “add” button to choose and evaluate your selection rubric. A downloadable version of this rubric is available in the Selection Rubrics module of the Companion Website at www.prenhall.com/smaldino.

Title _Story Plot Generator_____

Hardware Required: Laptop/Smart board/ Projector

Source: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.andromo.dev17163.app225586&hl=en © Date _February 22, 2016______________________ Subject Area __English Language Arts______ Grade Level ___3rd__ Instructional Strategies ___Mobile Application Software

Primary User(s): __X__ Student ____ Teacher

Brief Description Story Plot Generator is a great instructional app to help students build their creative writing skills. It is kid/teacher friendly and very easy to use. It provides writers with the four key aspects of a story: a location/situation, a detail, a complication, and an objective. It generates over 1 million different genres with new situations and conflicts. Some of its genres include: murder scenes, romance, fantasy, action, drama, etc. Teachers could easily integrate this app with a quickwrite journal entry. The ultimate goal of using this app often would be that it builds student skills to enable them to write more complex pieces of writing, like a narrative. Standards/Outcomes/Objectives Studying and understanding text types and purposes is a learning expectation covered under the Common Core State Standards for ELA W.3.0 and W.3.3a. After using the Story Plot Generator often, students will be  W.3.0 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective techniques, descriptive details, and clear event sequences  W. 3.3a. Establish a situation and introduce a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally

Strengths This mobile application is very easy to use. It creates over one million combination of story plots, which will hopefully engage students to write and have fun doing it. It also helps students understand the concept of “Genre” and helps them study the different types of Genre represented in Literature. This would be a very easy strategy for teachers to use daily or almost daily for a journal entry. Limitations

Limitations include, the mobile app is so easy to use that some teachers may actually overuse it during journal entries and students may get bored of the repetition. Students may also begin to rely on the app too much to be able to conduct a creative writing piece without it.

Prequisites (e.g., prior knowledge, reading ability, vocabulary level, etc.) Students need to know what basic concept of the term “genre” is and it would help if the student could define each genre before using the app. Not all students have a computer or Smart phone at home to be able to generate a story plot at home i order to complete correct the appropriate assignments assigned. Special Features Special Features This app appeals to students who are visual learners in which the teacher can generate a story plot and project it onto the board. Also, some students need that extra boost to be able to show the world how and 100truly | P atalented ge creative they really are. If a student gets stumped on coming up with a plot for his/her narrative, he/she can use the Story Plot Generator and take off from there!

Name __Lindsey Shipley________

Date ___2/22/16________


SELECTION RUBRIC: Mobile App Software

Rating Area

High Quality

Medium Quality

Low Quality

Alignment with Standards, Outcomes, & Objectives

Standards/outcomes/ objectives addressed and use of software should enhance student learning.

Standards/outcomes/ objectives partially addressed and use of software may enhance student learning.

Standards/outcomes/ objectives not addressed and use of software will likely not enhance student learning.

Accurate & Current Information

Information is correct and does not contain material that is out of date.

Information is correct, but does contain material that is out of date.

Information is not correct and does contain material that is out of date.

Age-Appropriate Language

Language used is age appropriate and vocabulary is understandable.

Language used is nearly age appropriate and some vocabulary is above/below student age.

Language used is not age appropriate and vocabulary is clearly inappropriate for student age.

Interest Level & Engagement

Story Plot and Genre is presented so that students are likely to be interested and actively engaged in learning. The material represents the best available technology and media.

Story Plot and Genre is presented to interest students most of the time and engage most students in learning.

Story Plot and Genre is presented so as not to interest students and not engage them in learning.

The material represents technology and media that are good quality, although there may be some problems using it.

The material represents technology and media that are not well prepared and are of very poor quality.

Ease of Use (User may be Student or Teacher)

Material follows easy-to-use patterns with nothing to confuse the user.

Material follows patterns that are easy to follow most of the time, with a few things to confuse the user.

Material follows no patterns and most of the time the user is very confused.

Bias Free

There is no evidence of objectionable bias or advertising.

There is little evidence of bias or advertising.

There is much evidence of bias or advertising.

Clear Directions

Navigation is logical and genre categories are well organized.

Navigation of the genre categories is logical for main use, but can be confusing.

Navigation for genre categories is not logical and pages are not well organized.

Stimulates Creativity

Use of Mobile apps software gives students many opportunities to engage in new learning experiences.

Use of Mobile application software gives students some opportunities to engage in new learning experiences.

Use of Mobile application software gives students few opportunities to engage in new learning experiences.

Visual Design

The Mobile app is designed with appropriate use of graphics and text to ensure student understanding.

The Mobile app is designed with graphics and text that are of average quality.

The Mobile app is designed with graphics and text that are of poor quality and distract students from understanding.

Technical Quality

From Smaldino, Lowther, & Russell, Instructional Technology and Media for Learning, 9th ed. Copyright Š 2008 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.

Recommended for Classroom Use: ____X_______ Yes ___________ No

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Ideas for Classroom Use:

The Story Plot Generator can be used as a daily informal quickwrite journal entry all throughout the school year in

a 3rd grade classroom setting. The students will hopefully gain creative writing skills over time because of this activity, and when it is time to write a formal personal narrative the students will be familiar with the concept.


This page of our website is dedicated to our Narratives Unit. In class we will be learning about all of the components that make up a narrative. We will also be learning about the importance of narrative writing and how it fosters creativity, improves reading skills, and develops a better understanding language. Additional information about narrative writing can be found here for parents and students to explore. Have fun!

Key Terms to Know    

Transition Terms: words and phrases that provide a connection between ideas, sentences and paragraphs. Exposition: a literary device used to introduce background information about events, settings, characters etc. to the audience or readers. Rising Action: a series of relevant incidents that create suspense, interest and tension in a narrative. Climax: its point of highest tension and drama, or it is the time when the action starts during which the solution is given. Falling Action: the parts of a story after the climax and before the very end.

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  

   

Resolution: the part of the story's plot line in which the problem of the story is resolved or worked out. This occurs after the falling action and is typically where the story ends. Genres: determined by narrative technique, tone, content, and by critics' definitions of the genres. Writing genres may be fictional or non-fictional. Character: a person in a novel, play, or movie. Conflict: an inherent incompatibility between the objectives of two or more characters or forces. Conflict creates tension and interest in a story by adding doubt as to the outcome. Text-To-Self: highly personal connections that a reader makes between a piece of reading material and the reader's own experiences or life. Point of View: (in fictional writing) the narrator's position in relation to the story being told. Narrative: a spoken or written account of connected events; a story. Narrator: a person who narrates something, especially a character who recounts the events of a novel or narrative poem.

Activities See if you can find all of the different types of genres in this word search!

Create your Own Story Plot Mountain using these items!

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Decorate your own Story Spinner, cut it out, and create your own writing game. Read the directions provided to play!

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Here are some helpful videos to further enhance your narrative writing skills. Be sure to check them out! How to Write a Personal Narrative Essay: Watch this video to learn how to appropriately structure a Personal Narrative.

Narrative Writing Song: Watch this video to hear a song about Narrative Writing. Hopefully this will be a beneficial learning tool to help you remember all of the components of a narrative.

Interactive Games Storytelling Spinning Game: Try out this fun interactive game presented by BrainPop by spinning a card and writing about the prompt you land on! Paragraphs : A literacy game where you need to choose the text with the correct paragraphs. It uses Major Moustache a character from Children's BBC television. The exercises can help you to decide the best place for paragraph breaks in text.

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One on One Story: Work your way through this narrative!

Children’s Writing Exercises: Create your own story using these cool writing prompts!

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Brittany Vernon Unit Rationale – Conserve and recycle Earth’s Materials In this unit we will be learning how to conserve and recycle the earth’s materials. Third grade students need to learn how human actions affect the earth. Students will use a range of media such as text and videos to investigate methods and programs that help conserve and recycle earth materials. Students will use technology to discover the impact they have on the earth. Students will work in teams to design a recycling program that can be implemented in their classroom. Students need to be presented with various activities that allow them to explore how humans affect the earth, both negatively and positively. It is important that students learn to appreciate and care for the earth because the earth takes care of all of us.

Determining methods for conserving and recycling natural resources is a learning expectation covered under Tennessee State Standards for Science GLE 0307.7.4. Design a simple investigation to demonstrate how earth materials can be conserved or recycled.

Additional Files:  Opening Commercial: 3_Conservation.wav  Tell’em in 10 PowerPoint: 3Conservation o You will also need to download video 3ConservationPPTvideo. 107 | P a g e


ď ś Knovio Tutorial Recording: https://view.knowledgevision.com/presentation/eb1d399f1898471f9807d42b71bf6ef0

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Unit Media Share

Captain Planet and the Planeteers: A Hero for Earth This video is a cartoon that raises awareness for environmental conservation. This is the first episode of the first season. The video shows the destruction being caused by humans and how it is affecting Earth. Gaya, the Spirit of the Earth, calls on five young people from around the world to help protect the planet. This cartoon shows students that everything they do matters, and that they can make a difference in helping the Earth. This first episode shows several different types of pollution including, deforestation, oil spills, and air pollution. Mattar, Karim. (Host). (2015). Captain Planet and the Planeteers: A Hero for Earth (S1 E1). [YouTube Video]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UI6hyJiUMBo FernGully: The Last Rainforest FernGully is a movie about saving the rainforests. The movie shows viewers that humans are destroying the forests. Crysta, a fairy, and her friends have to fight to save their home. FernGully is being threatened by humans who are cutting down trees and creating air pollution. They also have to fight an evil polluting force called Hexxus. Hexxus feeds off of the pollution caused by the humans and seeks to destroy FernGully for good. Crysta accidentally shrinks a human logger named Zak at the beginning of the movie. Throughout the movie they grow closer and Zak learns the importance of protecting the forests. At the end of the movie, after Crysta and the other fairies have defeated Hexxus with the help of Zak, he returns to the city to tell others why it is important to protect the forests. This movie has a deep focus on conserving the rainforests. After watching the movie students can brainstorm the many reasons rainforests are important to humans, as well as the resources that can be found there. Students can create a plan or campaign to raise awareness and help protect our forests. Kroyer, Bill. (2005). FernGully: The Last Rainforest [DVD]. United States: Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment LLC. (Original Release, 1992) Read Environment This app has news articles on several environmental topics including wildlife and pollution. Some of the articles are old, but there are recent articles listed as well. The user can read part of the article and if interested click on a link that brings them to the full article online. This app can be used for student research. Students can read about environmental issues in the real world. This app is available on Windows Tablets and requires x86, x64, or ARM to run. Nimantha. (2014). Read Environment. [Windows, Free] Retrieved on February 21, 2016 from https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/store/apps/environment-reader/9nblgggzh9q4 109 | P a g e


Recycle Bank This app allows users to find local recycling centers. Students can use this app to determine what materials are recyclable in their area and where the item may be dropped off. Students can use this app in the classroom to set up a recycling program in the classroom. The teacher can schedule pick up dates and set reminders for those dates. This app also rewards the user with points for the items they recycle. The points can be redeemed for new sustainable resources. The items redeemed for can be items that will be used in the classroom. This allows the student to participate in the recycling “cycle�. This app is compatible with Android 4.0 or later. Also compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch and requires iOS 7.0 or later. Recycle Bank. (December 11, 2015). recyclebank. [Google Play, Free] Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.recyclebank&feature=search_result Recycle Nation This a great website for exploring conservation and recycling. The website allows users to search for recycling locations in their area. Students can select their state and learn about recycling centers and programs nearby. There are links to common terms used in the industry of recycling. The site also provides links to several articles on varying topics related to recycling and conservation. Electronic Recyclers International, Inc. (2016). Recycle Nation. [Website]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from http://recyclenation.com/ Science Kids This website has several great features for teaching students about recycling. It includes games, videos, quizzes, experiment ideas, and facts. This website could easily compliment the standard GLE 0307.7.4 -Design a simple investigation to demonstrate how earth materials can be conserved or recycled. Recycling is only one of the many topics that this site offers resources for. Science Kids. (2016, February). Recycling For Kids. [Website]. Retrieved on February 21, 2016 from http://www.sciencekids.co.nz/recycling.html

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Selection Rubric: Web Resources Complete an interactive evaluation and add it to your Professional Search Terms Development portfolio using the Selection Rubric: Web Resources available on the “ASSURE Learning with Technology and Media” DVD. Open the DVD and click on “Install My Professional Portfolio Database.” Follow the on-screen instructions to install the database to your hard drive. Double-click on the shortcut that is on your desktop. Click on the “My Lesson _______________________ Assessments” button in the left navigation bar. (You must assess a lesson plan before the assessment will appear in your lesson plan list.) Click on any lesson assessment, and then click on the “Rubrics” tab. Click on the “add” button to choose and evaluate your selection rubric. A downloadable version of this rubric is available in the Selection Rubrics module of the Companion Website at www.prenhall.com/smaldino.

Title ____FernGully: The Last Rainforest____ Hardware Required T.V., DVD Player, FernGully DVD Source/Location _____FernGully: The Last Rainforest DVD_____________ _______________________ © Date _____2005____Cost___$18.81 on Amazon.com __Length__76 min.__

Primary User(s):

Subject Area ______Science____________ Grade Level _____3rd______

______X_____ Student

Instructional Strategies Video –audio and visual presentation

______X_____ Teacher

Brief Description FernGully is a movie that raises awareness to the destruction that humans cause to the Earth, in particular the rainforests. Crysta, the fairy, and her friends in FernGully fight to save their home from the humans and Hexxus. Hexxus is an evil polluting force of destruction that feeds off the pollution caused by humans to become stronger. Students will identify resources and materials that are natural and/or manmade. They will also be able to determine the importance of rainforests, and create a plan to help conserve them.

Standards/Outcomes/Objectives After watching this movie, students will be able to: GLE 0307.7.3 Distinguish between natural and man-made objects. GLE 0307.7.4 Design a simple investigation to demonstrate how earth materials can be conserved or recycled.

Prerequisites (e.g., prior knowledge, reading ability, vocabulary level, etc.) Students will need to have previous knowledge of rainforests, conservation, and natural resources. This movie will serve as an in depth look at the effects of deforestation. It will also be a visual showcase of natural and man- made resources (i.e. trees, plants, water vs. spray cans, machines, cassette- players) Students will likely need to be told what a cassette- player is and does. Strengths The characters capture the students' attention. It clearly communicates a problem and that humans need to help the environment. The movie is G-rated and age appropriate. There are copies of the movie without the special features available for as little as $5 and can be found on YouTube if a student wanted to watch it at home. The family fun edition of this movie is a 2 disc set. The second disc includes special features. Limitations The movie is focused on conservation of rainforests. This movie is also more than an hour long, so would need to be planned to take up a large block of time or would need to be shown over the course of several days. Special Features | P aifgthe e Games and Adventures- this feature allows the students to interact with the movie. One game is a trivia111 game, students answer correctly a tree will grow. Music and More- there is a song about the food-chain. (not relevant to this lesson) Behind the Scenes- commentaries offer a deeper look into the symbolism of the characters, and how they were developed. Also includes commentary on the inspiration and making of the movie. Name _______Brittany Vernon________________________________ Date ____02/22/2016________


SELECTION RUBRIC: WEB RESOURCES Rating Area

High Quality

Medium Quality

Low Quality

Alignment with Standards, Outcomes, & Objectives

Standards/outcomes/ objectives addressed and use of Web resource should enhance student learning.

Standards/outcomes/ objectives partially addressed and use of Web resource may enhance student learning.

Standards/outcomes/ objectives not addressed and use of Web resource will likely not enhance student learning.

Accurate & Current Information

Information is correct and does not contain material that is out of date.

Information is correct, but does contain material that is out of date.

Information is not correct and does contain material that is out of date.

Age-Appropriate Language

Language used is age appropriate and vocabulary is understandable.

Language used is nearly age appropriate and some vocabulary is above/below student age.

Language used is not age appropriate and vocabulary is clearly inappropriate for student age.

Interest Level & Engagement

Topic is presented so that students are likely to be interested and actively engaged in learning.

Topic is presented to interest students most of the time and engage most students in learning.

Topic presented so as not to interest students and not engage them in learning.

Technical Quality

The material represents the best available technology and media.

The material represents technology and media that are good quality, although there may be some problems using it.

The material represents technology and media that are not well prepared and are of very poor quality.

Ease of Use (User may be Student or Teacher)

Material follows easy-to-use patterns with nothing to confuse the user.

Material follows patterns that are easy to follow most of the time, with a few things to confuse the user.

Material follows no patterns and most of the time the user is very confused.

Bias Free

There is no evidence of objectionable bias or advertising.

There is little evidence of bias or advertising.

There is much evidence of bias or advertising.

User Guide & Directions

The user guide is an excellent resource for use in a lesson. Directions should help teachers and/or students use the material.

The user guide is good resource for use in a lesson. Directions may help teachers and/or students use the material.

The user guide is poor resource for use in a lesson. Directions do not help teachers and/or students use the material.

Clear Directions

Navigation is logical and pages are well organized.

Navigation is logical for main use, but can be confusing.

Navigation is not logical and pages are not well organized.

Stimulates Creativity

Use of Web resource gives students many opportunities to engage in new learning experiences.

Use of Web resource gives students some opportunities to engage in new learning experiences.

Use of Web resource gives students few opportunities to engage in new learning experiences.

Visual Design

The Web resource is designed with appropriate use of graphics and text to ensure student understanding.

The Web resource is designed with graphics and text that are of average quality.

The Web resource is designed with graphics and text that are of poor quality and distract students from understanding.

The Web resource links facilitate navigating the material and finding additional information.

The Web resource links are not easy to navigate and make it difficult to find additional information.

The Web resource links make it very difficult to navigate the material and to find additional information.

The Site Map is available and useful to help navigate and access information.

The Site Map is available and somewhat useful to help navigate and access information.

The Site Map is not available or not useful to help navigate and access information.

Quality of Links Site Map

From Smaldino, Lowther, & Russell, Instructional Technology and Media for Learning, 9th ed. Copyright Š 2008 by Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved.

Recommended for Classroom Use: ____X____ Yes ___________ No

Ideas for Classroom Use: 112 | P a g e


While students are watching the movie, they can work on a list of products or materials that are either natural or man-made. Ask students to identify the different ways in which humans are negatively affecting the plants and animals of FernGully. Using their previous knowledge, ask them to discuss why destroying the rainforests is bad for all living things. Have students discuss ways to raise awareness for the conservation of the Earth's rainforests.

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This page of our website is dedicated to our Conservation Unit. In class we will be learning all about how to conserve our resources and why it is important to do so. Here you will find additional information that you can explore at home or in class when you finish early. Have fun exploring and discovering ways to help our planet!

Key Terms to know: Conservation: The careful and intentional protection of things found in nature. Pollution: When nature’s resources are made dirty and unsafe or unsuitable for use. Reduce: To use less of an item. Reuse: To use an item over again or in a new way. Recycle: To turn a used item or product into something new. Renewable: Resources found in nature that replenish on their own with time such as wood. Non -Renewable: Things that cannot be renewed such as gas and oil. Sustainable: The ability to keep on going or be maintained at certain level. Preservation: The protection of resources to keep them as they are. Soil: the upper layer of earth where plants grow and receive nutrients. Natural Resources: Materials found in nature that can be used by people. Examples are wind, water, oil, trees, and rocks. Environment: The natural world and our physical surroundings. Solar: Relating to the sun. Deforestation: The destruction of forests caused by humans cutting down and clearing trees. The 3 Rs: Refers to the key components of conservation: Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle. Usually referred to in this order because it takes more energy to reuse than to reduce and more energy to recycle than it does to reuse.

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Videos Here are some helpful videos to give you more information on some recycling topics that you may find interesting! Sustainability - Learn more about sustainability by watching this video. Recycling – Learn what happens after your recyclables are picked up by watching this Reading Rainbow video. 3 Rs – This video explains why the 3 Rs (reduce, reuse, recycle) are stated in their specific order. 3 Rs music video – This is a fun song to help you remember the 3 Rs.

Other Resources Below are some useful videos, fun activities, and interesting webpages to further your knowledge about conservation and recycling.

RethinkRecycling Check out this website for cool craft ideas that you can make with recycled materials. This game of catch is just one example:

Science Kids – This website has a lot of fun for you. Watch videos, play games, take a quiz, and do so much more! Try this fun recycling game and see if you can sort all of the recyclables, compost, and trash into the proper receptacles.

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Media Share Resources

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English/Language Arts Blue Ribbon Readers: The Hamburger Game The Hamburger Game helps students practice attentive reading by choosing the main idea—or "meat"—from a passage of text and dragging it to the center of a sandwich. A hamburger appears and they win points if they are right. The students will enjoy making a delicious burger while learning at the same time! The students will gain skills and comprehension from this game. Teacher will love how involved students will be with this activity! PBS & WGBH Educational Foundation. (2016). Blue Ribbon Readers: The Hamburger Game. [Website]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from http://www.pspb.org/blueribbon/games/burger/burger.html How to Write a Personal Narrative Essay How to Write a Personal Narrative Essay is a wonderful source for teachers to demonstrate the steps to take and the organization skills used in writing a narrative. The video is demonstrated by a child writer and it teaches students how to create a graphic organizer before writing their narratives, emphasizing that few words are needed in completing each section of it. The graphic organizer includes a title, introduction, a story with a beginning, middle, and end, and a conclusion. The graphic organizer is well organized and the child actually writes a short personal narrative based on the information provided in her graphic organizer. Since writing a narrative seems complex to children, this video would be a great visual aid to students who need to physically see a personal narrative written. The fact that the video is told by a child (probably a third or fourth grader) may help children feel as if they can relate to it. Teachers could present this before beginning the graphic organizer portion of a lesson. Arden Reading Academy. [Account Holder]. (2013, September 12). How to Write a Personal Narrative Essay. [Youtube video]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://youtube.com/watch?v=iWHc5Yar6Ps Introduction to Reading Skills: Main Idea/Topic - Episode 1 117 | P a g e


This video is a great resource for students! This instructional cartoon from SRA FLEX Literacy provides an entertaining and informative animation to help introduce students to Main Idea or Main Topic. The students will more than likely be engaged into the video because it’s exciting, a mystery, and enjoyable. This video is for upper elementary students and possibility early middle schoolers. McGraw-Hill Education. (Account Holder). (November 18, 2013). Introduction to Reading Skills: Main Idea/Topic - Episode 1. [Youtube Video]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-1DZWNVBT4 Kids' Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh This clpgh.org/kids website offers reading/writing lessons and provides various resources and links to books and reading games. It also has a "storymaker" interactive game in which a child can choose the characters, take them on adventures through various settings, and the player creates sentences along the way to control the story. Although this website compliments many of the TN Standards, it also compliments TN R.I. 3.a. Establish a situation and introduce a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. The website includes resources, tutorials, and games separated into categories for little kids, big kids, educators, and parents. It uses bright colors and cartoon-like sketches that will catch a child's eye. Third grade students and teachers both will be excited to learn about reading and writing in a fun and engaging way by exploring this adventurous website! Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. (2014). Kids' Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. [Website]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from http://clpgh.org/kids/ Main Idea This app is perfect for children ages 6-8. The reading comprehension passages are designed to help students become confident identifying the main idea of a text and understanding how details support the main idea. There are 15 short passages where students will read the passage and then answer two multiple choice questions and one open ended question. The first multiple choice question with each passage asks about main idea. The second multiple choice question consistently asks about a supporting detail. The open ended questions include topics such as author's purpose and distinguishing fact from opinion. This app is Compatible with iPad and requires iOS 8.0 or later. Gardner, Keith. (February 10, 2016). Main Idea. [iTunes, Free] Retrieved on February 21, 2016 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/main-idea/id1035472182?mt=8 Main Idea - Sentences ‘Main Idea- Sentences’ helps kids who have trouble with reading comprehension. Identifying the main idea is a key part of reading comprehension. 'Main Idea -Sentences' is an app that builds children comprehension skill in a fun, game-like environment. The skill is developed step-bystep until mastery. This app is designed for children in Grades 2-5 who can read the words, but don't understand what they read. Beginning readers in earlier grades can also benefit from the targeted skill development. 'Main Idea - Sentences' develops the skill of knowing what a 118 | P a g e


sentence is about. This skill must be firmly established before a child can determine what a paragraph or page is about.This app is Compatible with iPad and requires iOS 6.0 or later. Toole, Janine. (June 24, 2015). Main Idea-Sentences. [iTunes, Free] Retrieved on February 21, 2016 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/main-idea-sentences-reading/id895686005?mt=8 Main Idea Song – Learn to Read – Learning Upgrade The Main Idea Song is very catchy! I love how the video tells and show the students step by step process on how to find the Main Idea in a passage. This is an awesome resource because it will engage student’s attention and help them remember how to find the Main Idea. This fabulous video has repetition, it is fun to watch and it gets straight to the point. Learning Upgrade. (Account Holder). (October 4, 2006). Main Idea Song – Learn to Read – Learning Upgrade. [Youtube Video]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W24RyhtX1qA Narrative Writing Song Narrative Writing Song is a great source for teachers to demonstrate the concepts of writing a narrative. Demonstrating this through a song will appeal to the visual and auditory learners in the classroom. The video defines a story and all the parts that make it up, such as the beginning, middle, end, topic sentences, supporting details, indenting paragraphs, problems, resolutions, etc. Teachers can present this video early on in a narrative lesson in hopes of the catchy tune sticking with the children in order for them to remember important terms included in writing narratives. Also, the video can teach the children that writing can be creative and fun, just like a "magic carpet ride". GrammarSongs. [Melissa Corbett]. (2014, January 5). Narrative Writing Song. [Youtube Video]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLn8E0Jzafo Plot Generator Plot generator is a great app for teachers to use in the classroom as a prompting tool for students to strengthen their creative writing skills. This kid and teacher friendly app provides it's writers with the four key aspects of a story: a location/situation, a detail, a complication, and an objective. Many different genres are provided as well, such as action, drama, murder scenes, fantasy, romance, superheroes, apocolypse, etc. Details in the app's description say that it generates over one million different combinations in which the writer is responsible for creating the story using the four aspects provided. This app could easily be used when teachers assign their students a quickwrite in their journals, in which the students are given a topic to write about and a short amount of time to write about it. The quickwrites could be used daily and hopefully will keep the students engaged in writing using many different genres. Ultimately, the plot generator will be used repetitively as a building block to encourage narrative writing or more complex pieces of writing in the classroom. This app is compatible with Android. ARC Apps. (2016). Story Plot Generator. (Version 2.2). [Mobile Application Software, Free]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.andromo.dev17163.app225586&hl=en 119 | P a g e


RoomRecess.com Reading Games RoomRecess.com was developed entirely by an elementary school teacher with the goal of reinforcing fundamental learning concepts in math, reading, spelling, language arts, and basic problem solving. This is a good website because it provides free educational computer games for children to play while learning important skills. The second grade students will learn how to find the Main Idea in a passage in a fun way! Not only are students improving their comprehension skills, they are also learning how to remember important information. Techers will enjoy this website because this game teaches students how to take a large selection of a text and reduce it to the main points. RoomRecess.com Reading Games. (January 7, 2016). 2nd & 3rd grade Reading Games. [Website]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from http://www.roomrecess.com/pages/ReadingGames.html Writing Fix This writingfix.com website is a wonderful website used for a teacher preparing a lesson to teach students about writing and organization skills. It presents various graphic organizers that can be used in the classroom. One concept that the website focuses on is that writing is built with 6 traits: sentence fluency, conventions, organization, word choice, voice, and idea development. It provides many anchor charts, books to use in the classroom, writing activities, lesson plans based on writing standards, etc. The only problem I have with this website is that it is too jumbled. It presents so much helpful information for an educator, that it is scattered and seems to be hard to follow. However, a teacher can pull up this website for so many ELA lessons and can use his/her own creativity to build off of the ideas of other teachers if he/she was having trouble coming up with a basic idea for a lesson. It seems to be strictly geared towards teachers and other educators. WritingFix. (2015). WritingFix: Home of Interactive Writing Prompts. [Website]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from http://writingfix.com/6_traits/organization.htm Writing a Narrative Write a Narrative is a very kid-friendly app for students of all levels to create a graphic organizer and a well constructed piece of writing. The graphic organizers are fun, simple, colorful, and appealing. Students can go through step-by-step instructions in the order as the individual parts of a story should appear in their final narratives. Sections in the step-by-step process include a "hook", the setting, the main characters, other characters, building suspense, etc. It really just breaks apart a narrative, simplifies it, and guides a student in completing each section in order to develop a great final narrative. Teachers could present this app on their Smartboards and go through the steps as a whole group to develop one story as a practice run in writing individual narratives. Students can use the app at home to assist them in creating their own papers. This app is compatible with iPad and requires iOS 5.0 or later. Matthew Harrison @ Hatt Designs. (2014). Writing a Narrative. (Version 1.1) [Mobile application software, Free]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/writing-a-narrative/id630393679?mt=8 120 | P a g e


Mathematics Addition & Multiplication Number Bubbles Addition & Multiplication Number Bubbles is a great way for students to practice multiplication. Multiplication Number Bubbles allows students to practice with multiplication and also technology. The multiplication portion of the game asks the students to select two number bubbles whose product is equal to the target number which is at the top of the screen. There are three game modes depending on the level of the student. Time Mode: get as many points as possible in a limited time. Survival Mode: if you make a certain amount of mistakes, game over. Child Mode: time mode with more time and lower difficulty. This is a free app and is compatible with iPad, iPhone, and iPod touch. The app requires iOS 7.0 or later. RENXIAN WANG. (Feb 05, 2016). Addition & Multiplication Number Bubbles. [iTunes App, Cost: Free] Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/addition-multiplication-number/id467091416?mt=8 Fun 4 the Brain Fun 4 the Brain is a website that students can watch videos and play games in order to better understand multiplication. This website allows students to watch videos that teach new strategies to multiplication and then actively be able to play a game that incorporates that new strategy. Students will enjoy being able to active their own knowledge through games and activities online. The students have many options on videos and games. The students will be allowed to explore through the website to learn new things. Fun 4 the Brain. (2008). Multiplication Games. [Website]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from http://www.fun4thebrain.com/mult.html Math Monsters- Bingo Math Monsters-Bingo is a great way for students to practice multiplication. Monsters Bingo can be used in the classroom by students during work places. Students will need access to iPads, iPhones, or iPads. This game is appropriate for students when they are practicing their multiplication. The game has three levels of difficulty. The game allows you to answer multiplication problems and then select the correct answer on the Bingo board. When the students gets BINGO they have successfully completed the task. They can choose to play again 121 | P a g e


and new multiplication problems will appear. This app is free and compatible with iPad, iPhone, and iPod touch. This app requires iOS 6.0 or later. June Infrastructure Pvt Ltd. (June 27,2015). Math Monsters – Bingo. [iTunes App, Cost: Free] Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/math-monstersbingo/id452985193?mt=8 Math Playground Math Playground is a website with games for various mathematical concepts. There are pages of multiplication games offered on this website. Students will not only learn about multiplication but could also learn about arrays. Arrays will help with solve multiplication. Third grade students will enjoy learning about multiplication through this fun and exciting website. Students will use technology to learn and be engaged in their learning. Students will have the opportunity to venture throughout the website to learn new strategies in multiplication. Math Playground, LLC. (2016). Multiplication and Division Activities. [Website]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from http://www.mathplayground.com/index_multiplication_division.html Multiplication Brain POP Multiplication BrainPOP is a short video all about multiplication. The setting of the video is at the zoo where Tim and Moby helps answer a question. The video explains what multiplication is and how to solve problems quickly. The video provides examples uses real life applications at the zoo. Students can easily watch this video and then take a quiz to test for comprehension of the video. This video is geared to third grade students learning the basics of multiplication. Tim and Moby help with the students learn multiplication but also help with to incorporate real life scenarios. BrainPOP. [1999-2016]. BrainPOP - Multiplication. Retrieved on February 23, 2016 from https://www.brainpop.com/math/numbersandoperations/multiplication/ Place Value The app Place Value is an education mobile application designed to give children extra practice with place value. Numbers of either one, two, or three digits are running from top to bottom on the screen while a timer is running. The bottom of the screen asks you to “Find numbers with a 6 in the hundreds column” and so on. You have one minute to complete the round and at the end you get to enter your name if you have the highest score. This could be a nice competitive way to kid students to practice place value. I would have a chart with all the student’s names on it and each time they reached the highest score on the app they could put a check. This is a fun, friendly way to motivate the children to practice. Requires IOS 8.0 or later. Taylor, Paul. (May 7, 2013). Place Value. [iTunes, Free] Retrieved on March 16, 2016 from https://itunes.apple.com Place Value Hockey 122 | P a g e


This website is a valuable and educational website for children. The game that I’ve chosen on the website is a fun, interactive game called “Place Value Hockey”, which will help students practice place value. The way the game works is you are shown a one, two, or three digit number; under the number is a place value, like ones, for example. To get the correct answer you must click on the digit that is in the ones place. This would be a great tool to use in the classroom during math stations when learners have the opportunity to do fun educational games on the computer. Abcya.com. (2016) Place Value Hockey. {Website} Retrieved on March 16, 2016 from http://www.abcya.com/place_value_hockey.htm Place Value Machine This website is an instructive website designed to employ children to take their learning to another level. It offers a variety of games, activities, worksheets, lesson plans and many more education tools. The game that I’ve chosen is called Place Value Machine. It teaches place value using ten frames and ones cubes. A one, two, or three digit number is shown and you are asked to drag the correct units or ten frames into the “machine” based on whether it’s asking the tens place or the ones place. As long as you are getting them correct, the game will continue. This game will be very helpful with students at any level in their learning of place value; from novice-expert there is an assortment of levels. Education.com. (2006) Place Value Machine [Website]. Retrieved on March 16, 2013 from http://www.education.com/game/place-value-machine/ Place Value Lesson This video is a teaching tool for place value. It describes each place as a “house” and brings it the vocabulary down to a young student’s level. It guides students through the meaning of place value and its importance. This would be a good teaching tool when introducing or reviewing place value in the classroom. Math and Learning Videos for Kids. (Producer). (2012). Place Value Lesson. [YouTube Video]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=omkDLmfvetk Place Value Story This video is similar to the Place Value Lesson video in the sense that it breaks down each place in what they call a “house”. The lesson is taught in a way that young children can comprehend. It describes a town and all of the places are people in the town. The people are names Ones, Tens, and Hundreds. This can help children relate to places and make a real-life connection. Todd Nesloney. (Producer). (2013). Place Value Story. [YouTube Video]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qOgWFBVdots Place Value and Rounding Place Value and Rounding is another educational app that is fun and engaging. It not only has fun ways of teaching, but it also has a tutoring option to walk students through the lesson and then a test at the end to see what they’ve learned. I would use this app in the classroom as an extra practice for any students that were struggling with place value. I could test them and have them print out the results and check progress through the test. This would also be something I would do during math rotations. Requires IOS 6.0 or later and covers all place value Common Core Standard skills for grades 2 through 5. 123 | P a g e


Rock, Mega. (July 8, 2015). Place Value and Rounding. [iTunes, Free] Retrieved on March 16, 2016 from https://itunes.apple.com

Third Grade Multiplication Lesson Third Grade Multiplication Lesson is a video teaching multiplication. The students can watch the video and maybe see another side of multiplication or it can allow them to understand something the teacher may not have been able to explain to them. Technology, such as this video, can allow students to find new or different ways to learn. Every learner is different and learns in different ways. The students can use this video to activate learning. Visual learners would really like this video because it provides visuals of multiplication. Sicard, Lauren. (Host). (July 4, 2013). Third Grade Multiplication. [YouTube Video]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1tycj9txltY

Science A Life Cycle App This life cycle app is a great way for students to practice sequencing life cycles. It helps the students to understand how life starts and how species morph through a series of stages called metamorphosis. It also gives students the opportunity to explore other species life cycles. The app provides great content and narrations for the students to stay engaged. This app compliments the Common Core standard 0207.4.2 Life Science: “Sequence a collection of pictures or illustrations into the correct stages of an organism’s life cycle.” Nth Fusion, LLC. (August 7, 2012). A Life Cycle App. [iTunes App, Cost: 0.99] Retrieved on February 21 from apps.nthfusion.com Butterfly, Butterfly! Butterfly, Butterfly! is a music video to help reinforce knowledge about the life cycle of a butterfly. Auditory and kinesthetic learners will benefit from the repeated exposure. Using the 124 | P a g e


music video also is a great means to get all children moving and engaged in the lesson. Harry Kindergarten Music, (2014, April 9). Butterfly, Butterfly! [YouTube Video]. Retrieved on February 17, 2016, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8rvGUevGxDk. Butterfly HD Butterfly HD is an app that is designed to teach about the life cycle of a butterfly. It is also designed to accommodate various learning types and academic levels. The app provides videos, narration, games, and quizzes. Sprouts Lab, LLC., (2016, January 5). Butterfly HD. [iTunes, $1.99]. Retrieved on February 17, 2016, from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/butterflyhd/id523544128?mt=8. Butterfly Life Cycle Game Butterfly Life Cycle Game is an interactive game on a webpage. It allows students to fill in a blank life cycle given five pictures of life cycle stages. After each correct answer, a short animation of the stage is illustrated. Students can replay the game continuously. Sheppard Software’s Life Cycles. Butterfly Life Cycle Game. [Website]. Retrieved on February 17, 2016, from http://www.sheppardsoftware.com/scienceforkids/life_cycle/butterfly_lifecycle.htm. Captain Planet and the Planeteers: A Hero for Earth This video is a cartoon that raises awareness for environmental conservation. This is the first episode of the first season. The video shows the destruction being caused by humans and how it is affecting Earth. Gaya, the Spirit of the Earth, calls on five young people from around the world to help protect the planet. This cartoon shows students that everything they do matters, and that they can make a difference in helping the Earth. This first episode shows several different types of pollution including, deforestation, oil spills, and air pollution. Mattar, Karim. (Host). (2015). Captain Planet and the Planeteers: A Hero for Earth (S1 E1). [YouTube Video]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UI6hyJiUMBo EDventures with Kids: 30 Animal & Insect Life Cycle Activities The website has diverse activities to implement in lessons to improve the quality of teaching/learning for the teacher and the student. We want to keep learning exciting but still engaging to where we are meeting the learning needs of students. This website provides numerous amounts of books related to the life cycle, as well as hands on activities that enhance students’ learning. This website compliments the Common Core standard 0207.4.1 Life Science: “Compare and contrast the life cycles of different organisms such as a chicken, butterfly, meal worm, frog, or human as well as 0207.4.2 Life Science: “Sequence a collection of pictures or illustrations into the correct stages of an organism’s life cycle” through the various activities and books provided on the website. 30 Animal & Insect Life Cycle Activities. (n.d.). Retrieved February 21, 2016, from http://www.kcedventures.com/blog/30-animal-insect-life-cycle-activities FernGully: The Last Rainforest

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FernGully is a movie about saving the rainforests. The movie shows viewers that humans are destroying the forests. Crysta, a fairy, and her friends have to fight to save their home. FernGully is being threatened by humans who are cutting down trees and creating air pollution. They also have to fight an evil polluting force called Hexxus. Hexxus feeds off of the pollution caused by the humans and seeks to destroy FernGully for good. Crysta accidentally shrinks a human logger named Zak at the beginning of the movie. Throughout the movie they grow closer and Zak learns the importance of protecting the forests. At the end of the movie, after Crysta and the other fairies have defeated Hexxus with the help of Zak, he returns to the city to tell others why it is important to protect the forests. This movie has a deep focus on conserving the rainforests. After watching the movie students can brainstorm the many reasons rainforests are important to humans, as well as the resources that can be found there. Students can create a plan or campaign to raise awareness and help protect our forests. Kroyer, Bill. (2005). FernGully: The Last Rainforest [DVD]. United States: Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment LLC. (Original Release, 1992) Frog Life Cycle Video Frog Life Cycle Video for Kids is a great resource to see supplemental material on the life cycle of a frog. Seeing this sequential video cycle allows students to consistently see the stages of the cycles through a simple explanation of how it works. Understanding the life cycle of frogs allows students to better relate the cycles in a sequential order. The supplemental video also gives reassurance to the students to have a better understanding, also allowing them to compare and contrast cycles of different animals by having reliable information to apply to related activities. This video compliments the Common Core standard 0207.4.1 Life Science: “Compare and contrast the life cycles of different organisms such as a chicken, butterfly, meal worm, frog, or human as well as 0207.4.2 Life Science: “Sequence a collection of pictures or illustrations into the correct stages of an organism’s life cycle.” M. [Account Holder] (2012, June 1). Frog Life Cycle Video for Kids -Science for Kids by makemegenius.com. Retrieved February 21, 2016, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3pOsKcs78C4 Growing Up Butterfly Growing Up Butterfly is a terrific, short video for teachers to illustrate the process of metamorphosis from beginning to end in a real-life context. The students are able to observe the transitional periods from one stage to the next. The short video with professional narration is ideal for engagement. National Geographic, (2010, October 27). Growing Up Butterfly. [YouTube Video]. Retrieved on February 17, 2016, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kHby5DmmOUY. Life of a Monarch Butterfly This application is very beneficial for the teacher. It provides lessons and interactive activities for the teacher to implement in the classroom. This can also create an even more in depth research project to specifically talk about Monarch butterflies. Monarch butterflies are the most popular butterflies to study. The activity it provides creates an excitement for students so that 126 | P a g e


they can become engaged in this activity. The lesson plan that is provided is hands on and crafty but still provides a lot of significant content for the students. This app compliments the Common Core standard 0207.4.1 Life Science: “Compare and contrast the life cycles of different organisms such as a chicken, butterfly, meal worm, frog, or human as well as 0207.4.2 Life Science: “Sequence a collection of pictures or illustrations into the correct stages of an organism’s life cycle.” Gonzalez, Edward. (August 30,2013). Life of a Monarch Butterfly. [iTunes App, Cost: Free]. Retrieved on February 21, 2016 from gonzalezedward.blogspot.com Magical Metamorphosis Magical Metamorphosis is a website flooded with pictures of butterflies and their life cycles. There are tabs dedicated to each stage. Students can explore each tab and find many detailed pictures and lots of relevant information. Monarch Butterfly USA. (2002). Magical Metamorphosis. [Website]. Retrieved on February 17, 2016, from http://www.monarchbutterflyusa.com/Cycle.htm. Monarch Butterfly Metamorphosis This video is great for students because they can see a real-life process of metamorphosis through time-lapse. It gives students an authentic vision of what the phase looks like. Students can use this video to relate to the phases a butterfly goes through that they previously learned. This video serves as a supplemental resource that allows students to apply life cycles to the real world. This video compliments the Common Core Standard 0207.4.2 Life Science: “Sequence a collection of pictures or illustrations into the correct stages of an organism’s life cycle” as the video gives a real life sequence of butterfly metamorphosis. F. [Account Holder} (2014, August 1). Monarch Butterfly Metamorphosis time-lapse FYV 1080 HD. Retrieved February 21, 2016, from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ocWgSgMGxOc Pepa and the Butterfly Pepa and the Butterfly is a great tool for children to integrate visuals into the targeted science concept. Children are able to view pictures of real butterflies and actively follow and observe the process of metamorphosis. The story is read for the child and the vocabulary is emphasized. Paper Tunnel, (2016, February 15). Pepa and the Butterfly. [iTunes, $1.99]. Retrieved on February 17, 2016, from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/pepa-butterfly-childrenslearning/id592461546?mt=8. Read Environment This app has news articles on several environmental topics including wildlife and pollution. Some of the articles are old, but there are recent articles listed as well. The user can read part of the article and if interested click on a link that brings them to the full article online. This app can be used for student research. Students can read about environmental issues in the real world. This app is available on Windows Tablets and requires x86, x64, or ARM to run. 127 | P a g e


Nimantha. (2014). Read Environment. [Windows, Free] Retrieved on February 21, 2016 from https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/store/apps/environment-reader/9nblgggzh9q4 Recycle Bank This app allows users to find local recycling centers. Students can use this app to determine what materials are recyclable in their area and where the item may be dropped off. Students can use this app in the classroom to set up a recycling program in the classroom. The teacher can schedule pick up dates and set reminders for those dates. This app also rewards the user with points for the items they recycle. The points can be redeemed for new sustainable resources. The items redeemed for can be items that will be used in the classroom. This allows the student to participate in the recycling “cycle”. This app is compatible with Android 4.0 or later. Also compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch and requires iOS 7.0 or later. Recycle Bank. (December 11, 2015). recyclebank. [Google Play, Free] Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.recyclebank&feature=search_result Recycle Nation This a great website for exploring conservation and recycling. The website allows users to search for recycling locations in their area. Students can select their state and learn about recycling centers and programs nearby. There are links to common terms used in the industry of recycling. The site also provides links to several articles on varying topics related to recycling and conservation. Electronic Recyclers International, Inc. (2016). Recycle Nation. [Website]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from http://recyclenation.com/ Science Kids This website has several great features for teaching students about recycling. It includes games, videos, quizzes, experiment ideas, and facts. This website could easily compliment the standard GLE 0307.7.4 -Design a simple investigation to demonstrate how earth materials can be conserved or recycled. Recycling is only one of the many topics that this site offers resources for. Science Kids. (2016, February). Recycling For Kids. [Website]. Retrieved on February 21, 2016 from http://www.sciencekids.co.nz/recycling.html Shepard Software: Science for Kids The website provides various simple interactive videos for students to learn different life cycles. Not only does the software have butterfly and frog life cycles, but it also has the life cycle of birds. This website compliments the Common Core standard 0207.4.1 Life Science: “Compare and contrast the life cycles of different organisms such as a chicken, butterfly, meal worm, frog, or human as well as 0207.4.2 Life Science: “Sequence a collection of pictures or illustrations into the correct stages of an organism’s life cycle.” Students will be able to use this website to interactively look at both butterfly and frog life cycles. It allows students to put the cycle in 128 | P a g e


order. When students put the steps one at a time, It allows the students to see an animation stepby-step as they go of the cycles. Doing interactive activities can be very valuable in student learning. This activity will be fun and exciting for students to do as it is like a simulation and game all in one! Sheppard Software: Fun free online learning games and activities for kids. (n.d.). Retrieved February 21, 2016, from http://sheppardsoftware.com/

Social Studies Advanced Geography- Part Three: Physical Regions This website is dedicated to exactly what it says- Tennessee History for Kids. This specific link goes straight to the webpage that contains information all about the physical regions of the Three Grand Divisions of Tennessee. The information on this page includes all of the physical features with definitions and pictures. This website also includes a link to a video on YouTube where a man, History Bill, travels across Tennessee through each of the six physical regions. Tennessee History for Kids, Inc. (2005-2010). Advanced Geography- Part Three: Physical Regions. [Website]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from http://www.tnhistoryforkids.org/geography/a_3 BrainPOP The BrainPOP video about Christopher Columbus is extremely informational. It coincides with the Tennessee State Standard SS Third Grade- World Geography and Cultures, North America 3.16 (Use timelines and historical passages to summarize the history of a region, including events, inventions/inventors, artists, writers, and political figures) because it tells of his early life, his voyage, his dealings with the natives, and his legacy. This video is very interactive, as are all brainpop videos, and keeps your attention throughout. Though it is not an aspect of the video 129 | P a g e


itself, there is a quiz that goes along with the video. After taking the quiz, I found that it asked very good questions that would gage whether or not the students paid attention. BrainPOP. (1999). Christopher Columbus. [BrainPOP video]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://www.brainpop.com/socialstudies/famoushistoricalfigures/christophercolumbus/ Christopher Columbus - Biography.com Biography.com is a very detailed website which contains a lot of information about Christopher Columbus. This site coincides with the Tennessee State Standard SS Third Grade- World Geography and Cultures, North America 3.16 (Use timelines and historical passages to summarize the history of a region, including events, inventions/inventors, artists, writers, and political figures) because it describes Columbus’s life, all of his voyages, his legacy, and recent discoveries. The first things that stand out on this website are two large, realistic pictures of Christopher Columbus, which help students to give a face to the name. There are quick facts and quotes by Christopher Columbus on the left side of the page, which allows teachers and students to access quick information. There is even a short video included on this site. A&E Networks Television. (2016). Christopher Columbus Biography retrieved March 10, 2016, from http://www.biography.com/people/christopher-columbus-9254209 Explorers Explorers is an app self-described as “the story of exploration of the Americas from before Columbus to Cartier.” As far as I can tell, this app contains information on at least fourteen explorers, along with Native Americans. This site is extremely useful for teachers. When you click on an explorer, you are given the choice of viewing a summary, a map, in-depth information, multimedia, a biography, or documents. The site is easy to navigate, and the words are large and easy to read. The pictures are real pictures, not cartoon pictures, which makes the app more realistic for students. When I become a teacher, I will definitely use this app for information and lessons. This app is compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch and requires iOS 5.1 or later. Multieducator Inc. (Oct. 3, 2012). Explorers. [App Store, $0.99]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/explorers-story-exploration/id562708507?mt=8 Fifty States for Kids – Maps, Facts, Games, and Activities This website is a wonderful resource for interaction and information on the three Grand Divisions. The website offers interactive games and activities. Both the games and activities complement the presentation of interactive information. The website includes numerous information consisting of regions, cities, landforms, landmarks, and individual state fact sheets. The website also includes printables for teacher use. Nussbaum Education Network, LLC. (2015). Fifty States for Kids – Maps, Facts, Games, and Activities. [Website]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from http://mrnussbaum.com/fiftystates-for-kids/ 130 | P a g e


Golden Gate Bridge This app over the Golden Gate Bridge is packed with tons of useful information. It discusses the location and significance of the bridge. It tells about the history behind the bridge. It tells about the design, implementation, and construction of the bridge. It gives specific details about the bridge. It even discusses current issues surrounding the bridge. That is just a skim of the surface of all of the useful information packed into this app. This app helps promote Tennessee State Standard for Social Studies 2.22. This app is great for students. The information is reliable and there is plenty of it. With guidance from the teacher the students would be able to learn from this app. Sanjay Kamath. The Golden Gate Bridge. [Mobile application software, Free] Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://www.microsoft.com/store/apps/9wzdncrdgktg Google Earth This application allows the user to search for certain cities and places on maps. It has in depth settings that can be changed depending on what the user wants to look at specifically. It also has an exciting feature that allows the user to see real-time activities such as earthquakes and more. This is a free app and can be used on an iPhone, iPad, or even an iPod, but it does require iOS 4.3 or later. Google, Inc. (Jun 26, 2013). Google Earth. [iTunes App, Cost: Free] Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/google-earth/id293622097?mt=8 Landforms 3D This application is really neat to use when learning about physical features and landforms. The app allows the user to view a 3D model of certain landforms. Along with viewing a 3D model, users can label objects of layers of the model. This app would be really beneficial for students to use by viewing a 3D image of landforms. This is a free app that is compatible with an iPhone, iPad, and iPod. It requires iOS 6.0 or later. Trendyworks Technologies Pvt. Ltd. (January 26, 2016). Landforms 3D. [iTunes App, Cost: Free] Retrieved on February 23, 2016 from https://itunes.apple.com/al/app/landforms3d/id1061066222?mt=8 Mel-O-Toons: Christopher Columbus This YouTube video is obviously quite old, as you can tell by the graphics and singing throughout the video. However, the ideas are basically the same as any current video or website. The singing might actually keep students interested in the video. It tells of Christopher Columbus, his attempts to find a way to Asia, his voyage, and his dealings with the natives. It 131 | P a g e


contains details of the voyage that I have not seen in other videos. I would, however, use clipgrab to view the video. The students should not be able to read the comments underneath the video. GildersleeveDB. (Producer). (2007). Mel-O-Toons: Christopher Columbus. [YouTube video]. Retrieved on February 22, 2106 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kuvRFZ4Mxbo Mt. Rushmore Adventures The Mt. Rushmore Adventures app is interesting. It lists the four people who are carved into Mt. Rushmore. It then gives a short description of each of their significances. It then has a list of three internet links about Mt. Rushmore. One of them takes you directly to Mt. Rushmore's Facebook. One of them goes to a Wikipedia page. The other one goes to the National Park Service government webpage. That page provides a large array of useful information. There is also a map to click on that takes you directly to the location of Mt. Rushmore. There is even a section that shows current weather. No special hardware is required to use this app. This app is great to help with teaching Tennessee State Standard for Social Studies 2.22. It is an interesting app that second graders can understand with teacher guidance. Branquelo Productions. (2013). Mt. Rushmore Adventures. [Mobile application software, Free] Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://www.microsoft.com/store/apps/9wzdncrdf2b7 Natchez Trace This government webpage over Natchez Trace is a very useful learning tool for students and teachers alike. It gives a wide array of reliable information about Natchez Trace. It has information about the history of Natchez Trace. It discusses who first used Natchez Trace and why. It gives accounts of specific historical people and explains their experiences with Natchez Trace. It tells about Natchez Trace being a path used for a variety of purposes. It then tells about the Parkway that is there today. This webpage promotes Tennessee State Standard for Social Studies 2.22. This webpage is free of use. United States. National Park Service. (2016, February 21). History & Culture. [Website]. Retrieved February 21, 2016, from http://www.nps.gov/natr/learn/historyculture/index.htm Prezi This video can be used as either a presentation or a video. The presentation allows the user to push a play button that makes the slides continually run without having to keep manually switching between each slide. This video focuses on the Three Grand Divisions and also what makes up each division. The focus of this video lies on the landforms, climate, natural resources, and major cities in each division. Prezi Inc. (2016). Grand Divisions of Tennessee. [Website/Video]. Retrieved on February 23, 2016 from https://prezi.com/t1x8n6gmu-vg/grand-divisions-of-tennessee/ 132 | P a g e


Scholastic.com Scholastic.com is a very useful website if you want some quick information on Christopher Columbus. This site also coincides with the Tennessee State Standard SS Third Grade- World Geography and Cultures, North America 3.16 (Use timelines and historical passages to summarize the history of a region, including events, inventions/inventors, artists, writers, and political figures) because it describes Columbus’s life, his voyages, and his legend. Something I found very useful about the website was that it listed the ways to site it in MLA, Chicago, and APA style. Grolier Multimedia Encyclopedia. (2014). All About Christopher Columbus (1451-1506). [Website.] Retrieved on February 22. 2016 from http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/article/allabout-christopher-columbus-1451-1506 School Media Interactive In this video, the guest (user) is taken in a ‘traveling machine’ to different landforms. The video describes many different landforms and the function of those landforms. The video is very kid friendly! A few landforms that students need to know for this unit are presented in this video such as rivers, mountains, hills, plains, valleys, and plateaus. This site does require Adobe Flash Player version 10.2.159.1. School Media Interactive. (2009-2016). Landforms #1. [Website/Video] Retrieved on February 23, 2016 from http://schoolmediainteractive.com/view/object/clip/97F37081058CD76B14DF5BE2B49A1C40 St. Louis Gateway Arch This enchantedlearning.com webpage titled "St. Louis Gateway Arch" has a simple and kid friendly format. It is colorful. The sentences and phrases are short and to the point. It is on a level that second graders can understand. However, It has pop ups. To avoid students seeing those pop ups I have took two screenshots of what the students need to see. Instead of going to this webpage I will go to my screenshots to show the images of the webpage. This webpage talks about how the design was chosen. It also tells about the construction of the arch. It gives a list of facts and figures about the St. Louis Gateway Arch. This website helps to promote Tennessee State Standard for Social Studies 2.22. This website is free of use. EnchantedLearning.com. (2003-2016.) St. Louis Gateway Arch [Website]. Retrieved February 22, 2016, from http://www.enchantedlearning.com/history/us/monuments/stlouisarch/ The Journey of Christopher Columbus HD- Children’s Story Book This app is very fun and interactive for students. When first opened, it asks you if you wish to be read to, read by yourself, or autoplay. When you begin the story, you can see that the pictures are moving. You have to turn the page with your finger. At some point in the story, it gives you the 133 | P a g e


option of putting a ship together in a puzzle, which adds even more interaction. After this, there is another puzzle. This app provides a cute and informational story for students to enjoy. This app is compatible with iPad and it requires iOS 4.0 or later. Playtales, S.L. (Oct. 12, 2011). The Journey of Christopher Columbus HD- Children’s Story Book. [App Store, $2.99]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/journey-christopher-columbus/id464240242?mt=8 The White House History And Facts│Cinekids This video from Cine Kids is called The White House History and Facts. It promotes students basic understanding of The White House. It does not go into deep detail. It only mentions a few important facts. It keeps the information level low enough that it is not overwhelming for second graders. It discusses who designed The White House. It also discusses the first president to live there. It goes on to name off interesting facts such as the number of bathrooms, rooms, levels, doors, windows, fireplaces, and staircases. It names the facilities at the White House. It even estimates the number of letters, call, and emails the White House receives each day. It gives a variety of useful information. The video is on Youtube and is free of use. This video helps promote Tennessee State Standard for Social Studies 2.22. Cine Kids. (Producer). (2014). The White House History And Facts│Cinekids. [YouTube Video]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R7NQY4_QlXA WILSON & DITCH: DIGGING AMERICA | Grand Canyon, Arizona | PBS KIDS Wilson & Ditch: Digging America (Grand Canyon, Arizona) is a great video for teaching students about the Grand Canyon. It is two gophers who are going to visit the Grand Canyon. They are discussing how long it took for the canyon to create. They also point out the depth, width, and length of the Grand Canyon. One of the gophers is being silly. The other gopher is naming off the facts about the Grand Canyon. They make learning about the Grand Canyon very interesting. The video is at a level that second graders can understand. The video is available on Youtube. It is free of use. This video promotes Tennessee State Standard for Social Studies 2.22. It helps students to locate the Grand Canyon while providing some information about the Grand Canyon. PBS KIDS. (Producer). (2015). WILSON & DITCH: DIGGING AMERICA | Grand Canyon, Arizona | PBS KIDS. [YouTube Video]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f0xqb7cQB0M

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Sample ASSURE Plans

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ASSURE Lesson Plan Template MULTIPLICATION Name: Amanda Berry Duration of Lesson: 1.5 hours

Analyze learners

Subject Area(s): Mathematics Grade Level: 3rd

There are 20 students in this third grade classroom. Of the 20 students, 11 are males and 9 are females. Guild Elementary School is a public school in a rural area. The school serves Kindergarten through 5th grade. The school consists of 63.8% Caucasian, 22.1% African American, 12.8% Hispanic or Latino, and 1.2% Asian. 7.6% of the school is English language learners. 70.3% of the school is economically disadvantaged students. 19.9% of the students have disabilities. The school makes accommodations for all students through Response to Intervention. RTI2 Tier Groups are formed after students take the AIMS Web formative assessment. TN Ready achievement tests will be given in the spring. The Reading Interventionist’s program is R.E.A.C.H.: Reading Empowers All Children’s Hopes. This reading interventionist works with Tier III students each day. Paraprofessionals work with small groups of students (mostly in Tier II). English Language Learners receive special instruction with the English Language Learning Teacher. Students with IEPs go to the special education teacher for instruction as needed. There are no identified English language learners in this classroom. Every student in the classroom speaks English as their first language. The students have prior knowledge of the use of many forms of technology such as iPads, computers, and smart boards. The students know how to log into websites. Students have little prior knowledge of multiplication. The student’s assessment scores do indicate that they have mastered objectives to prove that they are ready to begin learning multiplication. There are no IEP’s or 504 plans at this time. However, some students or groups of students may need more assistance or special accommodations in order to understand the task that is given by the teacher. There are various socio-economic, cultural and ethnic backgrounds of the students in this classroom. This might influence the planning, teaching and assessment of the lesson because not every student is going to have the same support at home to help grasp the concept and not every student is going to have the same background knowledge as another because of their culture. The students have a basis of understanding of what multiplication is and how it is used. The students know some of the content specific terms for the particular 136 | P a g e


State & NETS*S objectives

lesson. For example, the students know what factors, products, and arrays are in mathematics. This basis of knowledge will help to form the foundation of their understanding as the class moves forward.  Common Core Standards: 3.OA.A.1 Represent and solve problems using multiplication and division. 1. Interpret products of whole numbers, e.g., interpret 5x7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each.  ISTE Standard: Standard 1 Creativity and innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, constructive knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology. A. Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes. Behavioral Objective: Given iPads with picCollage downloaded, the learners will design a collage in order to demonstrate their understanding of arrays and multiplication. Language Objective:     

Key Vocabulary and Content-Specific Terms: Multiplication, array, equations, collage, manipulatives Academic Language Functions: -In order for the students to demonstrate their understanding of the content, the students will be designed picCollages to display their understanding of arrays and multiplication. -The students will use content specific terms to create a collage and present their collage about arrays and multiplication.

-The students will be given the opportunity to practice their new language and develop fluency through presenting their picCollages to the classroom. The students will be asked to that when they present they use the new content specific terms they have learned. The students should have notes from the lecture about arrays and multiplication. Teacher Centered Select instructional Traditional: -pen methods, -printed collage for modeling media, and -anchor charts materials Technology: -1 iPad -Classroom App Student Centered Traditional: 137 | P a g e


-20 pencils Technology: -20 ipads with internet connection -20 access codes to PicCollage The teacher will have control of the students iPads to ensure the students are working on task. (iPad – digital, Classroom Apps - web 2.0) Additional materials: desks, manipulatives, pencils Access to picCollage: Cardinal Blue Software, Inc. PicCollage. (2016). [App] Retrieved on 2016, April 28 from www.pic-collage.com Preview and prepare materials Utilize media and - Preview the application (previewed and approved) materials - Download the app on all 20 iPads - Have the app ready for the students to use - Make sure that all iPads’ cameras are working properly - Make sure the manipulatives are ready for the students to create arrays - Sharpen pencils - Make sure laptops are charged - Make sure the internet is properly working on all iPads - Make sure all the functions are working properly on the iPads - Open the program and have it ready for student use Prepare the environment - Students will have access to manipulatives to create arrays - Students will take pictures of their arrays - Students will use the PicCollage app to create a collage - Students will present their collages to the classroom Prepare the learner - Introduce the lesson and vocabulary - Present the application to the students using the Elmo and projector - Show the students how to take the picture and create the collage - Create a collage with the students to model expectations Students can turn on their iPads and have the camera ready for use. Students Require will take the pictures of their arrays created using manipulatives around the learner participation classroom. The students will return back to their seats and start working on their picCollage. The students will have a minimum of 5 pictures in their collage. The teacher will walk around the classroom to ensure the students are staying on task and to answer any questions they may have. After every student has completed their collage, the teacher will one by one ask the students to present their collage to the class. The teacher will use the attached rubric in order to grade each student. 138 | P a g e


Evaluate and revise

Formative Assessment (Process):  In order to know that the students are learning, I will walk around and observe the students. The students will be given a time limit in order to ensure the students are on task and working.  The students will demonstrate their understanding of the concept when they present their picCollage of their equation to the classroom.  I will monitor student learning during the lesson by observing and making a checklist while the students work. In order to guide my instruction, I will change the way I teach the content if many of the students during the technology learning experience have trouble with multiplication.  I expect to observe the students creating arrays with manipulatives around the room. I expect to observe the students taking pictures of their arrays. I expect to observe the students creating a picCollage for their equation.  I will have a checklist to record what I observe during the exercise. While they present, I will listen and make sure the students are on the right track.  The criteria I will use to judge whether the students met the goal of the lesson is if they have five arrays created and combining them on picCollage and also how they present their lesson to the class.  The feedback I give the students supports the goals because it tells them what they did right but also what they did wrong. The students always have room for improvement.  During the lesson, I will do many formative assessments, such as, a thumbs up or thumbs down to check for understanding, quickly. Summative Assessment (Product): Array PicCollage  I will collect all of the student’s work and see their progress and effort. Mastery of this learning segment will include the students meeting the requirements. The students will be required to create 5 arrays and in order to complete this task successfully they must correctly complete 3 of the 5 arrays.  college roves to both the students and the teacher that the students met or did not meet the objective/standard.  The assessment given for this particular assignment allows all but maybe five students to show what they know.  In order to modify my assessments for the students I would read the questions aloud and for some students give the student 3 options instead of 4 on multiplication.  The feedback will be given both orally and on paper. The students will be encouraged to reflect on their own knowledge.  The rubric for the assessment for this lesson is to ensure the students have 5 arrays and presenting it to the class. The rubric is attached. 139 | P a g e




The assessments given are aligned with the objectives for the learning segment.

4

3

2

1

The students create 5 arrays correctly.

The students create 4 arrays correctly.

The students create 3 arrays correctly.

The students create 2 or less arrays correctly.

The students present their presentation to the class with great enthusiasm and noticeable efforts.

The students present their presentation to the class with some enthusiasm and some effort.

The students present their presentation to the class with little enthusiasm and effort.

The students present their presentation to the class with no enthusiasm and no effort.

SCORE

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ASSURE Lesson Plan Template Life Cycle of a Butterfly pt.4 Name: Betty Conley Duration of Lesson: 30 minutes

Analyze learners

Subject Area(s): Science Grade Level: 1st grade

General Characteristics In the first grade class at Park Avenue Enhanced Option Elementary School, there are eighteen students—which include eleven females and seven males. All of the students are African American and are between five and six years-old. Three students have IEP’s for speech delays, and one student has an IEP for severe autism with additional behavioral and cognitive developmental delays. The students with minimal speech delays (lisps) spend time each day with a speech pathologist whose office is inside the school building. No students in the class are identified as English language learners and all students speak fluent English—with the exception of the three students receiving speech therapy from the speech pathologist. The PK-4 school is 97% African American and 94% of all students meet the requirements of free or reduced lunch. Curriculum Competencies To complete this lesson, students will need to know how to take measurements using metric units and record data in chart on paper. They will need to know that organisms experience changes in their life cycle, and the specific stages and related characteristics of each stage in a butterfly’s life cycle.

State & NETS*S objectives

Technology Competencies To complete this lesson, students will need to know how to take measurements using the free app “Ruler App + Photo Ruler” and to transfer their data from their log into the free program “DatPlot” to generate a data plot of growth. State Standard 90107.4.1 Observe, describe, and record the life cycle of a particular animal. 90107.Inq.1 Use senses and simple tools to make observations ISTE Standard 1.a. Creativity and innovation: Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes Behavioral Objective Given a measuring application and a data plotting program, the class of first grade students will measure a specimen and record the data to produce a data plot that demonstrates a progressive trend. 141 | P a g e


Language Objective Key vocabulary: molt, exoskeleton, butterfly, chrysalis, cocoon, life cycle, caterpillar, leaf, egg, pupa, hatch, metamorphosis, imago, larva, insect, record, data, plot chart, graph, centimeter, millimeter, measure Academic Language Functions To express understanding, students will use the vocabulary orally to explain and describe their data records and correlating graph, and the connection between the two sets of data, both to me as I informally assess for understanding and to their peers as they present their data and graph. Also in written form as the students reflect daily in their science journals, and again in their final reflection that the students will turn in. The paper will be graded on their use of vocabulary.

Select instructional methods, media, and materials

The vocabulary will be taught at the beginning of the lesson in a mini-lesson that is specifically targeted on teaching the meaning of the words and how to use them. Vocabulary will also be posted on the science word wall for reference in writing and in oral language. Curriculum materials   

18 science journals and logs (student centered) 18 pencils (student centered) 4 butterfly habitats (student centered)

Technological materials       

4 media devices (tablet, smart phone, etc.) with Wi-Fi/internet connection (student centered) 4 computers with mouse, keyboard, and internet connection (student centered) 4 laptops with mouse, keyboard, and internet connection (student centered) Teachers station (teacher centered) Smart board (teacher and student centered) Printer with ink and paper (student centered) Application—GRYMALA. (March 1, 2016). Photo App + Photo Ruler. [Google Play Store, Cost: Free] Retrieved on March 24, 2016 from https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.grymala.photoruler. (student centered)

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Program from web—DatPlot. [Web 2.0 resource, Cost: Free] Retrieved on March 24, 2016 from http://www.datplot.com/. (teacher and student centered)

**** Any teacher using this lesson plan should use a rubric to determine the educational value for the learner and the learning environment**** Utilize media and materials

Preview and prepare materials  Preview the application—*previewed and approved*  Preview the website resource/program—*previewed and approved*  Check the printer and its ink and paper reservoir  Make sure the printer is connected to the CPU’s and laptops  Have the measurement application loaded and ready to use on the media devices  Have the program downloaded on all CPU’s, laptops, and teachers station  Make sure the habitats are ready for students to take measurements (butterflies/caterpillars are alive and within view)  Sharpen pencils  Make sure science journals and logs are accounted for and have been maintained over the past 3-5 weeks (journals/logs should be checked daily)  Make sure laptops are charged  Make sure the internet is working on CPU’s, laptops, and teachers station  Make sure all functions work on CPU’s, laptops, and teachers station  Make sure the teachers station and the connection to the smart board is working  Open the program on all CPU’s, laptops, and teachers station/smart board Prepare the environment  Students will access the butterfly habitats for measurement data  Students will record data in their journals  Students will divide up small groups to access the program at the CPU or laptop  Students will print out their data plot for their journal  Groups will share findings with the class Prepare the learner

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Introduce the lesson and vocabulary, and refer to work (recording data in a log over a period time [3-5 weeks, depending on type of butterfly]) that has been done in previous classes.  Present the program to the students on the smart board. Show them the main screen and the available functions.  Model for students how to add numbers into the program. First, add a number in the program, then ask for approximately five volunteers to do the next few (from the smart board). First thing to be done, even before the teacher starts teaching, is the students Require should record their last measurement of their specimen using the application on learner participation the media device in their science log in their groups (2 groups of 5, 2 groups of 4) and then return to their seat. After the instruction on how to use the technology, students will break up into smaller groups (for example, the 2 groups of 5 will become a group of 2 and a group of 3, and the 2 groups of 4 will become 2 groups of 2) and choose a CPU or laptop to work at. From there the small groups of 2-3 will transfer their data from their science journals into the program and create a data plot. Groups should be monitored to ensure every student is getting experience transferring the data into the program. Also, approach groups and question them on what they are doing. Spend 30 seconds to 1 minute with each group, then let them get back to their work. Once students are done, the data plot will need to be printed and each member receive a copy so they can put the data plot in their science journal. Then, students should convene back into their larger groups (groups of 4-5), then give each group 5 minutes to talk amongst themselves about what they have learned from recording the data, using a data plot, and how this relates to what they learned about how a butterfly grows and its cycles throughout its life. Walk around the class and listen in on what the students are discussing. After that time, the group will select one member to present their data plot, findings, and what they learned about a butterfly’s growth. Once every group has shared, the students will work independently to write a final reflection (minimum 1 page) to turn in for a grade. The students will be graded on their use of vocabulary, knowledge of the butterfly’s life cycle, and their use of written data and their data plot.

Evaluate and revise

If a student is showing signs that they do not understand the lesson (transferring data), place the student in a 2-person group in which their partner is proficient in the skill. If peer modeling does not work, extract the student from the lesson and explicitly teach how to use the program. If the student still does not understand, you can try having the student create a data plot on paper (perhaps the student does not understand the program functions). Formative assessment

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Formative assessments used in this lesson include observations and open-ended questioning. Students will demonstrate understanding by either answering questions correctly in the questioning process or completing tasks correctly while they are being observed. The assessment should be recorded on daily objective sheets that will go in the student’s portfolio. The formative assessment will be done during the mini-lesson at the beginning of the lesson, monitoring and questioning during small group work at the CPU’s and laptops, and observations made during the groups 5-minute talk time before the groups share with the class. I expect students to work in groups and correctly record measurements, transfer data into the program, and collaborate with group members about findings from the lesson. I also expect students to work independently and quietly in writing their final reflections. If a substantial amount of students is not meeting expectations, the lesson needs to be stopped and previous concepts either reviewed or relearned. The students that are not showing proficiency through formative assessment are not ready or able to complete the activity. Summative assessment The summative assessment will be the culmination of each student’s science journal, log, data plot, and final reflection. The student will receive a grade for their work based upon accuracy of the information in log, the quantity of measurements in log (at least two measurements per week [3-5 weeks]), the use of vocabulary and depth of understanding in reflections in the journals, the correlation between the log and the data plot, and the use of vocabulary, depth of understanding, and personal reflection in the final reflection. The work will document the student’s ability to observe the life cycle (TN Science Standard 90107.4.1), use tools to make observations (TN Science Standard 90107.Inq.1), and ability to apply existing knowledge to generate a new product (ISTE 1.a). It will also document the student’s ability to record data in a log (science log), transfer data to a digital program (data plot), and reflect on the learning experience (final reflection).

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Science Log

Science Journal

Data Plot

Final Reflection

TOTAL

3 Log is completed with the minimum of 2 measurement recordings per week Journal has been completed daily and includes vocabulary and demonstrates understanding Data plot is completed correctly without any discrepancies from the science log of measurements Paper meets length requirements, includes vocabulary, demonstrates understanding, and student’s personal reflection

2 Log is missing 1 or 2 of the measurement recordings

1 Log is missing between 3 and 6 measurement recordings

0 Log is not completed or is missing more than 6 measurement recordings

Journal has been completed daily and demonstrates understanding but does not include vocabulary Data plot is completed correctly with the exception of 1 discrepancy

Journal has been completed daily but does not include understanding or demonstrate understanding

Journal has not been completed daily

Data plot is completed correctly with the exception of 2 discrepancies

Data plot has not been completed or has more than 3 discrepancies

Paper meets length requirement includes vocabulary, demonstrates understanding, but does not include personal reflection

Paper meets length requirement but does not include vocabulary or student’s personal reflection, nor does it demonstrate understanding

Paper does not meet any requirements or is not completed

/12

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ASSURE Lesson Plan Comparative and Superlative Adjectives Name: Aubrey Kemp Duration of Lesson: 1.5 hours

Analyze learners

Subject Area(s): English Language Arts Grade Level: 2nd grade

This lesson is going to take place at Guild Elementary School, which is a public school located right off of the city of Gallatin, Tennessee’s main square. The school is a Title I school. Within the school, 63.8% are Caucasian, 22.1% are African American, 12.8% are Hispanic or Latino, and 1.2% are Asian. 7.6 % of the students are English Language Learners. Up to 70.3% of the students are economically disadvantaged. Also, there are 19.9% of students with disabilities. The class that this lesson is being taught to is a second grade class which consists of 22 students: 11 males and 11 females. 11 of the students are Caucasian, 5 are Mexican, 4 are African American, and 2 are Asian. All of the students speak English and can carry a conversation in English, yet two do not speak fluent English. There are five students in the class who have documentation which deems them English Language Learners. There is one student who has an IEP with several modifications. The students must first and foremost possess knowledge of adjectives, as this lesson goes deeper with comparative adjectives, which compare two things, and superlative adjectives, which compare three or more things. According to the Tennessee State Standards ELA Standards for Grade 1, students must use frequently occurring adjectives. The students must know that adjectives describe nouns or pronouns. The students must be familiar with the different types of adjectives, such as, colors, shapes, sizes, etc. It is important that the students possess prior knowledge of how to read an anchor chart, as I will be using one in my lesson. This anchor chart will have listed on it the rules of changing regular adjectives into comparative and superlative adjectives. The students will possess this knowledge, as their mentor teacher has used anchor charts when teaching lessons in the past. The entire class, including the student with an IEP and English Language Learners, has demonstrated basic knowledge of computers and their components, which include a monitor, keyboard, and mouse. All students have also demonstrated knowledge of iPads and navigating and using iPad apps. Students have knowledge of clickers and have used them in the past.

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State & NETS*S objectives

English/Language Arts Grade 2 Language Standards Conventions of Standard English 1. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. e.) Use adjectives and adverbs, and choose between them depending on what is to be modified: Choose correctly between comparative and superlative adjectives. ISTE Standard: Standard 6: Technology operations and concepts a. Understand and use technology systems

Behavioral Objective: Given the clickers, the learners will be expected to correctly identify the type of adjective (comparative or superlative) to be used in a sentence by choosing either a, b, c, or d on their clickers, in order to demonstrate command of these two types of adjectives.. Language Objective: Content Specific Terms: describe, identify, choose, adjective, comparative, superlative The students will be provided with an anchor chart which lists the rules of changing regular adjectives into comparative and superlative adjectives. The rules are as follows: o o o o o o o o

If it is comparative and ends in –e: add –r. If it is comparative and ends in a consonant: add –er. -If it is comparative and ends in –y: change the –y to -i and add –er. -If it is comparative and has two or more syllables: place the word more before the adjective. -If it is superlative and ends in –e: add –st. -If it is superlative and ends in a consonant: add –est. -If it is superlative and ends in –y: change the –y to -i and add –est. -If it is superlative and has two or more syllables: place the word most before the adjective.

This anchor chart will also list the words comparative and superlative and how many things each describe. Students will participate in a discussion where they will be asked more than once how many things comparative and superlative adjectives compare. In this discussion, students will be allowed to answer questions as to how to change a particular adjective to comparative or superlative. The students must be able to choose the correct form of an adjective to use in a sentence, and they must explain why they chose comparative or superlative by telling how many things the specific adjective compares. The teacher will write several of these questions on the white board. Select instructional

Curriculum Materials: 148 | P a g e


methods, media, and materials

    

    

1 Adjectives anchor chart (teacher-centered) 1 Comparative and superlative anchor chart (teacher-centered) 1 Dry erase marker (teacher-centered) 1 Dry erase board eraser (teacher-centered) 1 Comparative and superlative book--Cleary, Brian P. (2013). Breezier, Cheesier, Newest, and Bluest: What Are Comparatives and Superlatives? Minneapolis, MN: Millbrook Press. (teacher-centered) 1 Example sheet (teacher-centered) 1 Blue pen (teacher-centered) 22 Pencils with erasers (student-centered) 22 Pieces of notebook paper (student-centered) 22 Worksheets (student-centered)

Technology Materials:     Utilize media and materials

1 Elmo projector (teacher-centered) 22 Clickers (student-centered) 1 Laptop (teacher-centered) 1 Smart board (teacher-centered and student-centered)

When it comes to preparing for the media and material to be used in the lesson, several things will have to be done:  Make sure to have the two anchor charts and that the charts are legible and large enough for the whole class to see  Make sure to have dry erase marker and eraser, pen, comparative and superlative book, example sheet, and 22 worksheets  Check to see if all 22 clickers are working  Check to see if Elmo is working properly  Check to see if Smart Board is functioning properly  Make sure that the laptop is working properly and is connected to the Internet  Make sure all students have pencils and are aware of the location of extra pencils  Make sure that each student has a sheet of notebook paper For classroom preparation, the anchor chart will be placed against the white board. The students will remain in their seats until called over to the carpet to listen to a story. The students will return to their seats after the story is read. The Elmo and Smart Board will have to be turned on before use. Clickers will have to be passed out to students, and the students will be reminded of the rules of using the clickers. Prior to using the technology, the teacher will first review adjectives by describing them and going over an anchor chart which lists different types of 149 | P a g e


adjectives. The students will be called over to the carpet to listen to a book specifically about comparative and superlative adjectives. After being called back to their seats, the students will participate in completing an example sheet with the teacher using the Elmo projector. Each student will be given a clicker by a volunteer student as the teacher Require prepares the Smart Board. Before starting the activity, the teacher will inform learner participation the students not to blurt out answers, ask what other students are answering, or ask other students whether or not they answered correctly. The teacher will inform the students that there are twenty questions in this activity. The first ten questions will ask you to answer whether the given adjective is comparative or superlative. For these, the students will choose either A or B on their clickers. The last ten questions will ask you to choose the correct adjective that would go in the blank in the sentence. For these, the students will choose either A, B, C, or D on their clickers. The teacher will go through each question slowly and make sure that each student has time to answer. Once each student has chosen an answer, the teacher will display the correct answer on the board, along with a poll of how many students got the correct answer. Once finished, the teacher will ask the students as a whole if they believe that they can identify and choose between comparative and superlative adjectives by asking them to do thumbs up, thumbs down, or thumbs in the middle. The teacher will then go around and collect the clickers. The formative assessment will be conducted as the students are answering the Evaluate questions using their clickers. The teacher will be able to monitor the overall and revise progress of the class as the students are answering the questions. After taking up the clickers and turning off the Smart Board, the teacher will be able to review what each student missed. Mastery of this activity will be determined by correctly answering at least 15 out of the total 20 questions. After quickly reviewing each student’s questions, the teacher will provide feedback to the class as a whole, and address the areas in which students are struggling most by writing more examples on the white board. The summative assessment of the lesson will be a worksheet given to the students after the clickers activity. This worksheet will consist of 7 sentences, each giving the comparative and the superlative form of an adjective to choose between. The students must circle the correct form of the adjective and write it in the blank. This short and somewhat simple assignment will assess the students’ knowledge of identifying and choosing between comparative and superlative adjectives that they have acquired during the lesson. For the English Language Learners and the student with an IEP, only 4 of the 7 sentences will be required to be answered. The teacher will also ask the students to write two sentences on the back of their worksheet: one which contains a comparative adjective and one which contains a superlative adjective. A list of comparative and superlative adjectives will be listed on the white board to choose from. However, the teacher could modify this based on the results from the clicker activity. For example, if 150 | P a g e


the students really struggled with identifying an adjective as comparative or superlative, the teacher will instead list five adjectives on the board and ask the students to identify them as comparative or superlative on the back of their worksheet. After this worksheet is graded using the corresponding rubric, the students will be given the opportunity to reflect upon and self-assess their mistakes by reviewing the mistakes they made and thinking about how they could have answered correctly. After taking up the worksheets, the teacher will grade them based on the corresponding rubric: CATEGORY Completion

Exemplary All of the work is completed.

Proficient Most of the work is completed.

Accuracy

All 9 of the given problems are correct. All of the comparative and superlative adjectives are spelled correctly. The two sentences are complete with one sentence containing a comparative adjective and one sentence containing a superlative adjective.

5-8 of the given problems are correct. Most of the comparative and superlative adjectives are spelled correctly. One of the sentences is complete containing either a comparative or superlative adjective.

Spelling

Sentences

Basic Little to none of the work is completed. 4 or less of the given problems are correct. Few to none of the comparative and superlative adjectives are spelled correctly. Neither of the sentences is complete.

This activity will assess all of the students’ abilities to effectively use and understand the technology involved by handling the clickers correctly and providing the correct answer to the questions posed by the teacher (ISTE 2.a.).

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ASSURE Lesson Plan Comparing and Contrasting

Name: Keisha Leath

Subject Area: ELA

Duration of Lesson: 1 Hour

Grade Level: 2nd Grade

Analyze Learners General Characteristics There are 25 students in this second grade class. There are 11 girls and 14 boys. There are 3 African American students, 14 Caucasian students, and 8 Hispanic students. There is one student with a 504 plan. That student has anxiety. There is not any accommodations or modifications for that student, due to the fact that she does not display any signs of anxiety at school. She only displays anxiety at home. There are 11 students with IEPs. There are 5 special education. There are 7 English Language Learners. 1 of those students is both special education and English Language Learners. The same modifications and accommodations are provided for the special education students and the English Language Learners. They receive modified and shorter assignments. They sometimes receive under grade level work. Sometimes things they get wrong are not counted against them. There are only 2 students who receive special accommodations for their language needs. They are pulled out for a certain amount of time each day to work with the Language Learner teacher. They receive study guides, opportunities to redo work, and shorter assignments. They also have assignments read aloud to them. There are also 2 students with ADD. Constant prompting is required in order for those students to excel. The majority of students in this class are from low income families. Therefore students may not be receiving extra assistance at home. Some students may not have help with their homework while others do. Three students have at least one parent who is in jail. Due to the diverse situations represented, lessons must be adjusted accordingly. Curriculum Competencies During this lesson students are expected to compare and contrast two stories using a Venn diagram. These students have completed Venn diagrams in previous lessons. The majority of the students performed well on these previous assignments. Students will also be participating in the use of Edmodo. The students have used Edmodo throughout the school year. 152 | P a g e


Technology Competencies All of the students have operated computers in previous class sessions. They have demonstrated proper use of computers and/or Ipads through use in the school setting. They operate the computers during lab time. Each student actively participates during this time. They also rotate using the Ipads each day in the classroom. All students are able to use these technology devices with ease. Therefore using Edmodo should be a task they are able to complete.

State and ISTE Standards and Objectives: State Standard: Tennessee State Standard for 2nd Grade ELA Informational Text> Integration of Knowledge and Ideas: Compare and contrast the most important points presented by two texts on the same topic.

ISTE Standard: Standard 2 Communication and Collaboration A. Interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others employing a variety of digital environments and media

Behavioral Objective:

Given the creation of a Venn diagram and communication among peers through the use of Edmodo, the learners will compare and contrast King Midas and the Golden Touch and King Midas and the Music Contest. Mastery will be determined by analyzing each student’s individual Venn diagram along with their posts and responses on the Edmodo page.

Language Objective:

Key Vocabulary: Compare, Contrast, Similar, Different, Cause, Effect, Common, Opposed

Academic Language Functions: Students will learn the meaning of these words to acquire a higher understanding of the objective of the lesson.

Students will need to use academic language to showcase their understanding of the lesson. I will be looking for phrases such as, , “In the first story King Midas was_____,while in the second story he was_____.” 153 | P a g e


Students will have the opportunity to showcase these skills through the completion of their Venn diagrams and communication with their peers through Edmodo.

Select Methods, Media, and Materials: Curriculum Materials:  25 Pencils with eraser (Student Centered)  25 Venn diagrams (Student Centered)  Book titled King Midas and the Music Contest (Teacher Centered) Segur, Adrienne. (1999) King Midas and the Music Contest. Golden Books. Technology Materials:  25 Computers or Ipads with internet connection (Student Centered)  25 Computer mice (if on computer) (Student Centered)  1 Computer with internet connection (Teacher Centered)  1 Mouse (Teacher Centered)  1 keyboard (Teacher Centered)  YouTube video “L. (2012, May 06). Tales of Magic - The King's Ears - Cartoon Fable 1970 1980. Retrieved April 26, 2016, [Video File] retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0TQl5ChyA6g  1 ELMO Projector (Teacher Centered)  Edmodo (Student Centered) Edmodo | Connect With Students and Parents in Your Paperless Classroom. (2016). Retrieved April 29, 2016, from https://www.edmodo.com/

Utilize Technology, Media and Materials: Preview and Prepare Materials  Sharpen pencils, make sure that all students’ ELA journals are accounted for 154 | P a g e


 Make sure the computers and Ipads are ready for students and are charged and working properly  Test to make sure internet connection is working properly  Check ELMO to make sure it is working correctly  Have the Youtube video pulled up and ready for the teacher to hit play  Have the Venn diagrams ready to pass out  Have the students’ Edmodo information on hand in case someone has forgotten their credentials Prepare the Environment  Students will choose the seat they wish to sit at. They will sit in that seat while watching the video and completing the Venn diagram and participating in the Edmodo conversation. Prepare the Learners and Provide the Learning Experience  Teacher will introduce the lesson by discussing the previous King Midas story read.  Teacher will show the video which forecasts the ending of the story they are about to start reading.  Students will predict what is going to happen in the book based on observations made during the video.  Teacher will read the story King Midas and the Music Contest.  Students will take notes as the story is being read aloud.  Teacher will go over the basics of comparing and contrasting and then pass out their individual Venn diagrams.  Students will begin to complete their Venn diagrams.  Teacher will briefly go over the goal for using Edmodo.  Teacher will have each student to log onto Edmodo for them to begin formulating their posts and responses.

Require Learner Participation: Students will begin by completing their Venn diagrams. Their Venn diagrams are over comparing and contrasting King Midas and the Golden Touch and King Midas and the Music Contest. After completing their Venn diagrams, the students will log into Edmodo. Each student already has a username and password. After they log in they will begin formulating their posts and responses. Each student is required to have at least 5 original posts. In addition, they will be required to formulate at least 5 responses to their classmate’s posts. Their Venn diagrams will help them to participate in the Edmodo responses. Their Edmodo posts are to be about each of the two stories. Each post or response must centered around comparing and contrasting the two stories. In addition to the requirements listed above, students will be expected to participate in 155 | P a g e


Edmodo from home. They will be expected to participate using a variety of technological devices such as a laptop, smart phone, or Ipad/tablet.

Evaluate and Revise: Students’ formative assessments will be done throughout the lesson. Student behavior will be observed as the lesson is being taught and as the students are working. Participation is very important. Therefore how attentive the student is will be a factor that is taken into consideration. Observational notes will be made on each student. During the individual completion of the Venn diagram, the teacher will be walking around checking to see the students’ responses. Depending on the responses the teacher will adjust instruction according. If the teacher notices several of the same mistakes then they will go over the correct response. The teacher will be going by a teacher example which is already formulated. There will be notes of responses they expect to see along with ideas the students should know on that example. Students’ summative assessment will be the Edmodo assignment. The teacher will begin analyzing these the day after the lesson since the students will be allowed to work on them up until the night after the lesson is taught. The teacher will be looking for certain criteria while grading this assignment. That criteria is listed in the chart below. Category

3 - Proficient

2 - Basic

1 – Below Basic

Original Posts

5 posts that show a strong understanding of the two texts

3 – 4 posts that show a basic understanding of the two texts

1 – 2 posts that show a limited understanding of the two texts

Responses to Original Posts

5 responses that show a strong understanding of the two texts

3 – 4 responses that show a basic understanding of the two texts

1 – 2 responses that show a limited understanding of the two texts

Use of Academic Language

Student uses a variety of academic language throughout their posts and responses

Student uses some academic language throughout their posts and responses

Student does not use academic language throughout their posts and responses

The objective of the lesson is for the students to be able to compare and contrast the two stories. The Edmodo assignment is where the students will be showcasing their comparing and contrasting posts and responses. Therefore this assignment is appropriate for assessing student 156 | P a g e


achievement. Students have freedom on this assignment. They have the freedom to write what they want and say as much as they want. Of course those statements need to be accurate in order to count toward student achievement. After the teacher has graded each individual Edmodo assignment, each student will receive their rubric which will show which category they scored in. There will also be written feedback that discusses both strengths and weaknesses. The students will be measured through the completion of their Edmodo assignment. ASSURE Lesson Plan The Three Grand Divisions of Tennessee Name: Natalie Nash Duration of Lesson: 1.5 hours

Subject Area(s): Geography Grade Level: 1st Grade

Analyze Learners General Characteristics There are twenty students in the first grade class at Guild Elementary School who will be taught this lesson. The class consists of 9 males and 11 females. 10 students are Caucasian, 5 AfricanAmerican, and 3 Hispanic. There are 6 students in the class with IEPs. Of the 6 students who have IEPs in English/Language Arts, 2 of those students are in the special education program and 3 of the students are in the gifted/exceptional program. Two students have language needs. Both students have an IEP for speech and language. 66% of the total students at Guild Elementary are qualified for free and reduced lunch.

Curriculum Competencies According to prior lessons and assessments, the students are familiar with maps, the state of Tennessee, and physical features. The students are skilled in how to read and construct maps.

Technology Competencies All students in the classroom, those with IEPs included, have demonstrated proficiency in the following basic skills regarding computer technology: mouse, keyboard, printer, and internet. The students have also mastered the skills needed to operate the Google Earth website due to prior lessons.

State and ISTE Standards and Objectives: 157 | P a g e


State Standard: Tennessee State Standard

ISTE Standard: Standard 6

for 1st Grade Geography (1.23) Tennessee’s

Technology Operations and Concepts

Place in America> Identify the three Grand

Divisions of Tennessee on a map and compare and contrast each division’s major physical features.

d. Transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies.

Behavioral Objective: Given the use of Google Earth and PhotoCard, the first grade learners will locate physical features using Google Earth and create a post card using the PhotoCard app in order to compare and contrast the physical features of each division in Tennessee. The learners will use their completed PhotoCard to assist in demonstrating that they are able to compare/contrast their assigned physical feature with one of their peer’s assigned physical feature. Language Objective: Key Vocabulary: Central Basin, contrast/compare, Cumberland Plateau, farmland, flatland, Grand Division, Highland Rim, map, mountain, physical feature, plain, plateau, ridge, rivers, similarity/difference, Tennessee Academic Language Functions: Students will first identify their assigned physical feature (Central Basin, Highland Rim, river, etc…) on Google Earth. Then, students will create a PhotoCard to send via email to one of their peers. (The peer must have a different assigned physical feature.) The teacher will assist in emailing the PhotoCards. Once the above tasks are completed, the students will compare/contrast their assigned physical feature with the classmate that emailed them. The students will demonstrate understanding of comparing/contrasting the PhotoCards by completing a paper Venn diagram that will be turned into the instructor. The Venn diagram will require the learner to identify and use the key vocabulary necessary for this lesson.

Select Methods, Media, and Materials: Curriculum Materials: 

20 Pencils with eraser (Student Centered, non-digital)

20 Blank paper Venn diagrams

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20 Laptops with the following available/installed: (All Student Centered, digital, Web 2.0) o

Internet connection

o

Google Earth 

o

Google Inc. 2016. Google Earth [App] Retrieved on April 29, 2016 from Google Play Store https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.google.earth&hl=en.

PhotoCard App 

Atkinson, Bill. (2016). PhotoCard (12.1) [Mobile application software]. Retrieved from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/photocard-by-billatkinson/id333208430?mt=8.

o Email access 

20 email usernames and passwords (Student Centered, digital, Web 2.0)

20 Computer mice (Student Centered, digital)

1 Desktop computer with Internet connection (Teacher Centered, digital, Web 2.0)

1 Desktop computer with Google Earth installed (Teacher Centered, digital, Web 2.0)

1 Mouse (Teacher Centered, digital)

1 Keyboard (Teacher Centered, digital)

Utilize Technology, Media and Materials: Preview and Prepare Materials       

Sharpen pencils Make sure laptops for students are charged and working properly Test to make sure Internet connection is working properly Make sure Google Earth and PhotoCard is installed on each laptop Create student PhotoCard accounts using student email information Make sure students have their email log in and password information Verify all technology resources through media rubric

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 Make sure each student has a pencil  Make sure that each pencil is sharpened  Make sure each student has a Venn diagram worksheet to complete  Make sure students’ desks are cleared off  Arrange students’ desks to accommodate the laptops Prepare the Learners and Provide the Learning Experience First, the teacher will introduce the lesson by providing a quick review of the different physical features of the grand divisions of Tennessee. Before starting the lesson tasks, the instructor will explain the purpose and instructions for the assignment. The teacher will explain the expectations for the project and also what behavior is expected. Next, the teacher will assign each student their own individual physical feature to complete the project over. Before receiving a laptop, the learners will retrieve a blank paper Venn diagram to fill out upon completion of the assignment. The students will then be ready to get a laptop and begin on the project tasks.

Require Learner Participation: Students will listen to a quick review of the three Grand Divisions of Tennessee. The teacher will assign each individual student a physical feature such as the Highland Rim, the Gulf Coastal Plain, river, etc. The students will be instructed to go to the Google Earth app on the laptop. While on the app, the students must locate and identify their assigned physical feature. Once identified, the students will take a screen shot or save the image on their screen of the physical feature. The students will create a post card through the PhotoCard app with information about their assigned physical feature and also the uploaded/saved image. When finished, the students will go to their school email and sign in. The students will then send the post card to a peer with a different physical feature and also to the teacher. When everyone has completed the above process, the students will compare/contrast the two physical features (their original assigned one and also the one that was sent to them by a peer). The students will complete a paper Venn diagram to assist them in comparing/contrasting which will be submitted to the teacher at the end of the lesson. The teacher will walk around the room to assist students who are having difficulty completing the assigned tasks.  Students will be asked to log on to Google Earth 160 | P a g e


   

Students will look up their assigned physical feature and save the image to the computer Students will open the PhotoCard application on the laptop and create an account with the assistance of the teacher Students will complete the PhotoCard Students will send the PhotoCard to a peer and the teacher via email

Evaluate and Revise: Formative Assessment (Process): The learners will send their PhotoCard that includes the Google Earth image and description to the teacher via email. The teacher will assess if the physical feature is correctly identified and described based on the one that they were assigned. The students will demonstrate understanding by completing the task and correctly identifying their assigned physical feature in Google Earth. The instructor will monitor student learning by walking around the room and observing students work. If the students do not comprehend the instructions, then the teacher will adjust them accordingly. Key components that the teacher will be looking for to be completed correctly will be as follows: identify physical feature, saving image, uploading image, and emailing image. The teacher will record anecdotal notes to monitor student learning. The teacher will present feedback by praising students who work independently with little assistance. The teacher will also present feedback by assisting students who are struggling. Summative Assessment (Product): The teacher will collect the students’ completed Venn diagram and also have a copy of the PhotoCard that students emailed as evidence of student learning. The PhotoCard will document student achievement by having all the correct components. The teacher will use the following rubric to determine the accuracy of students’ identifications using Google Earth and also the quality of students’ computations of the PhotoCard. Category Google Earth Image PhotoCard Upload

3- Proficient Image is correctly identified Image is properly uploaded to PhotoCard

2- Average Image is incorrectly identified Image is not properly uploaded to PhotoCard

1- Below Image is not identified No image was uploaded

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Description

Description of physical feature is accurate

Description of physical feature is somewhat accurate

Description of physical feature is not accurate

If students display having difficulty meeting the objective of creating the PhotoCard, the teacher will provide additional instruction. The teacher will revise the lesson also by focusing on the Google Earth section of the lesson separately as a whole class before moving on to the PhotoCard. A rubric will be used to measure student proficiency for the lesson objective. Mastery will be determined if students receive a grade of 80% or higher on the rubric.

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ASSURE Lesson Plan Main Idea and Key Detail Name:

Taylor Mosley

Duration of Lesson: 45 minutes

Subject Area: Language Arts Grade Level: 1nd Grade

Analyze Learners General Characteristics The first grade class being taught this lesson at Park Avenue Enhanced Option Elementary School consists of nineteen students. There are 10 girls and 9 boys. 18 students are AfricanAmerican and one student is Hispanic. None of the students have identified IEPs and modifications in place. All of the students are native English speakers. Although cencus.gov the median income for families of the Nashville (zip code 37209) as $59,774, Park Avenue EOES’s school data gathered from their website shows that income levels appear to be lower, as 97% of their students qualify for free and reduced lunch. Curriculum Competencies According to pre-assessment results, students are familiar with the different components that make up a story such as characters, setting and plot. Technology Competencies All students have demonstrated the basic knowledge of computer and ipad components such as understanding how to navigate between apps and games. They have also demonstrated competency using touch screen devices and a standard mouse and keyboard computer system.

State and ISTE Standards and Objectives: State Standard: Tennessee State Standard for 1st Grade Language Arts With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

ISTE Standard: Standard 4 Students use critical thinking skills to plan
and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources.  Identify and define authentic problems and 163 | P a g e


significant questions for investigation.

Behavioral Objective:

Given the use of a graphic organizer, YouTube and The Hamburger Game, the 1st grade student will develop a clear understanding of how to locate the main idea and key details in a story with 70% accuracy. All of the resources will be available at any time to reinforce the lesson.

Language Objective:

Key Vocabulary: Details, Create, Tone, Mood, Details , Main Idea, Text, Story, Setting, Character, Plot , Conclusion, Theme Academic Language Functions: Students will incorporate their new vocabulary into conversation when speaking about the parts of a story.

Students will define each vocab word to the best of their abilities on a sheet of paper.

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Select Methods, Media, and Materials: Curriculum Materials:  19 sharpened pencils (Student Centered)  19 main idea graphic organizers (Student Centered)  19 erasers (Student Centered) Technology Materials:  19 Laptops with internet connection (Student Centered)  19 Computer mice (Student Centered)  1 Computer with internet connection (Teacher Centered)  1 Mouse (Teacher Centered)  1 keyboard (Teacher Centered)  YouTube video “Introduction to Reading Skills” McGraw Hill Education. (Account Holder). (July 12, 2014). Introducing Reading Skills. Retrieved on February 22, 2014 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=42SJTk2XSi41 ELMO Projector (Teacher Centered)  1 Screen or SmartBoard (Teacher Centered)  The Hamburger Game - PSPS. (April 20, 2016). The Hamburger Game. Retrieved on April 22, 2016 from http://www.pspb.org/blueribbon/games/burger/burger.html.

Utilize Technology, Media and Materials: Preview and Prepare Materials       

Make sure laptops for students are charged and working properly Test to make sure internet connection is working properly Check ELMO to make sure it is working correctly Add the YouTube video on to the favorites tab in Firefox Have YouTube video open on teacher’s computer and ready to play for students Bookmark The Hamburger Game website on each student computer Make sure students have their computer logins

Prepare the Environment

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 Students will stay at their desks to view the video as well as do individual work on their laptops.  Upon completion of the video students will be required to fill out a graphic organizer about a book that is read as a class. This will allow to do evaluate the degree in which the video contributed to their understanding to main idea and key details.  Preceding the completion of this, student will have to opportunity to practice using The Hamburger Game.  The final assessment will include the completion of another graphic organizer. If students are able to locate the main idea more efficiently than the first time I will know that The Hamburger Game helped to sharpen this skill. Prepare the Learners and Provide the Learning Experience  Teacher will have a Q&A to get a basic understanding of the classes prior knowledge to main idea and key details.  Teacher will introduce the lesson by viewing an attention grabbing video introducing main idea and key detail.  As a class we will read a short story to practice finding the main idea.  Students will then be asked to log on to The Hamburger Game.  Students will practice for 20 minutes.  Students will report and difficulties that they had.

Require Learner Participation: As a class warm up the teacher will read a short story aloud to the students. Proceeding the complete of the story students will be required to fill out a main idea and key detail graphic organizer about the story. As a class the main idea and all of the possible choices for key details will be reviewed. Next, students will be assigned a computer with the hamburger game saved in the favorites bar. Once every student is able to sign in the learners will begin practicing for twenty minutes. The teacher will actively be patrolling the area taking note of any students how are obviously not grasping the concept. If students feel as if they need help they should signal the teacher. The difficulty level will then be reduced or increased based off of ability. Demonstrating proficiency in asking and answering questions about key details will be crucial to student understanding of the Common Core objective of comprehension. This game will be repeated if more practice is needed.

Evaluate and Revise:

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Students’ formative assessments will be playing The Hamburger Game. Students will decide which choice is the main idea and which are the key details. The teacher will be able to see who is grasping the concept and who is not from a few minutes of observing each student. The summative assessments will be the completion of another main idea and key details graphic organizer. Everyone will have different passages. From the key details they will be required to create three questions. If a student appears to not be mastering concepts asking and answering questions using key details a lower difficultly video will be presented for the student. The teacher should review the score to acknowledge all students who scored a 70% or above. If students have fallen below this score these students will be given extra help and a more practice with main idea and key detail to ensure that they will succeed on the next try. After students have been assessed the teacher will complete the following rubric, provided by Essay Tagger, based on the scores to explain the students level of understanding. Below 1st (weakest)

Beginning

Emerging

Proficient

Above 1st (strongest)

Key Detail Questions whole document

RI.1.1

Key Detail Answers whole document

RI.1.1

If it appears that most students are struggling with the concepts of asking and answering question about the main idea the differentiation of instructions will be necessary. Students that are proficient with technology will be able to log on to their computers, locate the favorites tab and click on The Hamburger Game link that will lead them to the website.

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Assure Lesson Plan

Finding The Main Idea

Name: MaKeshia Parker

Duration of Lesson: 45 minutes

Subject Area: Language Arts

Grade Level: 2nd

Analyze Learners General Characteristics Park Avenue Enhanced Option Elementary School is a school in the Metropolitan Nashville Public School District.The urban school serves Pre-Kindergarten through grade 4. The teachers are able to have small classrooms that are student centered, knowledge based, and driven by assessment. This is a Title 1 school that will make sure all students meet challenging academic standards. Many elementary schools dismiss at 3:00pm, but because Park Ave is Enhanced Option, the school is extended an extra 45 mins of class time at the end of the day. The extended time is a great opportunity for struggling academic students to be able to rise. Teachers at Park Ave are required to use State Common Core standards. The teachers are required to meet with their grade level team once a week to plan for instruction. Every year, teachers test their students through two standard assessments on computers for ability levels in Math and ELA. Once the testing is completed, there will be 3 RTI groups based on these benchmark performance scores. The delivery of instruction is differentiated but, is affected because the students’ reading scores are very low. For ELA inclusion, the special education teacher co-teaches with the classroom teacher. There are 16 students in the 2nd grade class with 9 males and 7 females. There is 1 Caucasian, 1 Hispanic and 12 African American students. The second grade class being taught this lesson at Park Avenue Enhanced Option Elementary School consists of four young African American ladies.The students in this class have unique personalities, various backgrounds, and love to work together.

Curriculum Competencies The students prior knowledge indicates that they are able to discuss and identify the main idea in a passage.

Technology Competencies Each student has demonstrated the ability to operate a computer. They each have the basic knowledge and skills to use the mouse, type on the keyboard, access the internet, and turn the monitor's power on or off.

State and ISTE Standards and Objectives: 168 | P a g e


State Standard: Reading Informational Text RI.2.6 Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe.

ISTE Standard: Creativity and Innovation Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology a. Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.

Behavioral Objective: Given a list of topics and powerpoint software, the second grade language arts students will choose two themes and create a ten slide presentation of clip art pictures that will identify the main idea of their chosen topic. Students are expected to have a range of accuracy of 80/120 on their rubric to determine proficiency. Language Objective: Key Vocabulary:             

What’s the point Key note Big picture Main clue Core Theme Topic The most important part Describe Identify Answer Explain Purpose

Academic Language Functions: Students will learn the meaning of higher level words to facilitate understanding of the lesson when encountering unfamiliar words such as identify, purpose, describe, theme and keynote. Students will rainbow write or write new terms three times on the work study sheet. The students will then define each word and write a sentence to show their understanding. New vocabulary words will be added to the word wall as a reference to students to practice using academic language.

Select Methods, Media, and Materials: Curriculum Materials: 

4 sharpened pencils with erasers (Student Centered) 169 | P a g e


       

4 boxes of crayons (Student Centered) 4 work study sheets (Student Centered) 4 highlighters (Student Centered) 4 listed topic worksheets (Student Centered) 4 find the main idea worksheets (Student Centered) 4 strips of tape highlighters (Student Centered) 1 dry erase board with eraser(Teacher Centered) 1 marker (Teacher Centered)

Technology Materials:         

4 desktop or laptop with internet connection and access to clipart and Powerpoint Software (Student Centered) 4 flash drives (Student Centered) 4 computer mice (Student Centered) 4 keyboards if desktop is available (Student Centered) 1 Computer with internet connection and access to cilp art and Powerpoint Software (Teacher Centered) 1 Mouse (Teacher Centered) 1 keyboard (Teacher Centered) 1 Screen or SmartBoard (Teacher Centered) Learning Upgrade. (Account Holder). (October 4, 2006). Main Idea Song – Learn to Read – Learning Upgrade. [Youtube Video]. Retrieved on February 22, 2016 from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W24RyhtX1qA *Any teacher using this lesson plan should use a rubric to determine its educational value for the learner and the learning environment.

Utilize Technology, Media and Materials: Preview and Prepare Materials          

Sharpen all pencils and check to see if each has a eraser Make sure there are enough crayons Make sure flash drives are working Make sure highlighters are working Make sure the teacher marker is working Make sure all laptops are charged or if it’s desktop, each is operating Check smart board Have YouTube video open on teacher’s computer and ready to play for students Check PPT, clipart, and internet connections Make sure there are enough copies of word study, and worksheets

Prepare the Environment   

The students will sit at their desks and watch the video that is pulled up. Once the video is finished the students will work on their 2 worksheets. After they are done with their worksheets, the students will grab their listed topic sheet, laptops or go to a computer desk and start on their presentation. 170 | P a g e


Prepare the Learners and Provide the Learning Experience  

 

Teacher will introduce the lesson by reviewing main ideas and how to identify main ideas. Teacher will play YouTube video on finding the main idea for the students. If any comments or questions need to be address the students are to write them down and the teacher will address them at the end of the video. The teacher will then demonstrate how to create a PowerPoint using a theme to find the main idea. The students will rainbow write or write new terms three times on the work study sheet. The students will then define each word and write a sentence to show their understanding.

Require Learner Participation: The students will grab their listed topic sheet, laptops or go to a computer desk and start on their presentation. Each student will choose two themes and create a ten-slides presentation with clipart pictures that will identify the main idea. The first five slides should pertain to one topic, and the remaining five slides should relate to the next topic. On the first four pages, there should be two clip art pictures that connect to the theme. Once you arrive to the final page, your topic should state the main idea. Follow these steps to complete your next five slides. If a student is to become confused or need assistance she is to raise her hand to signal the instructor. After the students finish their presentation, they will save their file to the flash drive and give it to the teacher to present for tomorrow. Demonstrating proficiency of the concept of describing and identifying the main idea will be crucial to student understanding of the Common Core objective of how to Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe.

Evaluate and Revise: Students’ formative assessments will be done by oral presentation. The students will present their understanding by giving a presentation the next day. The students will explain what each slide represents and and how it connects to their topic. As students are working on their PowerPoint, the instructor will monitor by observing and checking their progress. The instructor should keep a guideline to make sure students are following each step. Feedback will be provided throughout this lesson, the teacher could either give a praise, a suggestion, smile, or pat on the shoulder to support students learning. Students’ summative assessments will be done by the student writing an essay (10-20 sentences) explaining the purpose of the assignment. Why is finding out the main idea important? How do we find out the main idea? Informally,the teacher will review the results of the students scores to determine if students met the 80/120 correct goals for this concept. If scores are not in the acceptable range, the teacher should reevaluate for the struggling students to see what students are not comprehending. The following evaluative criteria will be used to measure student proficiency for the instructor objectives. Student:_______________

Date______________

Score:__/120 171 | P a g e


SA=Strongly Agree(15)

A=Agree(10)

D=Disagree(5)

1. Presenter appeared nervous.

SA

A

2.

Content was delivered well.

SA

3.

Voice was natural.

4.

PPT was well put together.

5.

Presenter could be heard easily.

6.

There were no distracting mannerisms.

7.

Eye contact was established and maintained.

8.

Overall presentation was well done.

SA

A

SA

SD=Strongly Disagree(2)

D

A

D

D

SD

A

SA

SA

SA

SD

D

A

SD

SD

D

A

SA

SD

D

A

A

SD

D

D

SD

SD

Strengths of presenter________________________________________________ Weakness of presenter________________________________________________

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(Summative Assessment) Formally, the following evaluative criteria will be used to measure student proficiency for the instructor objectives. Students Presentation will be scored based on the technology standard. Category

Above Standards (10 pts)

Meet Standards (5pts)

Below Standards (2pts)

Score 50/50

Sentence Structure

All sentences are Most sentences are Most sentences are well-constructed well-constructed and not well-constructed with varied structure. there is some varied or varied. sentence structure in the essay.

Capitalization and Punctuation

Author makes no errors in capitalization or punctuation, so the essay is exceptionally easy to read.

Author makes 1-2 errors in capitalization or punctuation, but the essay is still easy to read

Author makes several errors in capitalization and/or punctuation that catch the reader's attention and interrupt the flow.

Accuracy

All supportive facts and statistics are reported accurately.

Almost all supportive facts and statistics are reported accurately.

Most supportive facts and statistics were inaccurately reported.

Sequencing

Arguments and support are provided in a logical order that makes it easy and interesting to follow the author's train of thought.

Arguments and support are provided in a fairly logical order that makes it reasonably easy to follow the author's train of thought.

Many of the support details or arguments are not in an expected or logical order, distracting the reader and making the essay seem very confusing.

Transitions

A variety of thoughtful transitions are used. They clearly show how ideas are connected

Transitions show how ideas are connected, but there is little variety

The transitions between ideas are unclear OR nonexistent.

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ASSURE Lesson Plan Template Title of the Lesson: Greek Mythological Allusions Name: Hailey Peeters Duration of Lesson: 1 hour and a half

Analyze learners

Subject Area(s): ELA Grade Level: 4th

General Information about the Class: The fourth grade class being taught this lesson at Guild Elementary Consists of twenty-three students. There are eleven girls and twelve boys. There are four African American students and fifteen Caucasian students. Four students in the class are Hispanic/Latino but are also fluent in English; therefore, the class consists of no ELL students. These students converse in Spanish during times that are casual and outside of instruction. These students’ ages range from eight to ten years of age Prior Knowledge: For this lesson, students should have prior knowledge in using internet explorer to research Greek myth allusions and read the story and to use applications to carry out activities such as recording voice and manipulating a digital picture. Students should also have prior knowledge in summarizing texts. In order to complete the lesson, students must read the story of King Midas and create a Blabberize to inform readers about his story. Exceptional Needs: There are four students in the class an Individualized Educational Plan. All four of the students need texts to be read aloud to achieve comprehension. Rather than these students completing assignments alone, they are either all in one group together with an interventionist for Math and English Language Arts, or they are paired/grouped with students with higher ability to levels to help with through peer group work. Student Backgrounds: Briefly discussed in General Information about the Class, I stated that there are four African American students, fifteen Caucasian, and 4 Hispanic/Latino students. The Hispanic/Latino students all speak English fluently, while Spanish is the language primarily spoken at home. Recognizing their ethnic backgrounds is important for the class and for the students, as they might not have the same culture as others and we should be able to relate to these cultural differences, just as they do for our cultural differences. These can influence my planning for lessons in areas such as reading, language arts, and social studies, as these are the subjects where culture can be incorporated in. 174 | P a g e


Tennessee State Standards: State & NETS*S objectives

RL.4.2 Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem, from details in the text; summarize the text.

ISTE Standards: Research and Information Fluency: 3c Evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness to specific tasks. Behavioral Objective: Given the use of Blabberize, students will read and analyze a character of Greek mythology such as King Midas, Pandora from the story of Pandora’s Box, Heracles, etc. and create a summary based on their reading. Language Objective: Students will use internet research to find a Greek mythology story with an allusion associated with it and read it. They will analyze their reading and summarize it by creating a Blabberize to present their understanding of the story. Key Vocabulary: Research, Greek mythology, analyze, summarize, create, transitional words. These vocabulary terms will be addressed throughout the lesson in various ways. Some vocabulary will be defined on an anchor chart that consists of the words figurative language, allusions, as well as various examples of allusions that the students can make connections with. Many of the terms will be learned through discussion and activating prior knowledge, such as the term “Greek mythology”. Students will understand this term after brainstorm stories they might know.

Academic Language Function: The learner will enhance their summarizing skills by planning and creating writing that summarizes the Greek myth that they just read and analyzed. Students will also have practice in speaking and reading fluency by recording their summary to complete the Blabberize. Linguistic Forms: I will instruct the students to use sequential order and to include transitional words and phrases to properly summarize their text. To scaffold the students’ writing, I will provide the students with a graphic organizer to help organize their ideas and to help with putting the story in chronological order. This will 175 | P a g e


also help the students when recording their Blabberize because it will give them a foundation to retell their story summary. Opportunities for Practice: The learner will practice the new language by recording notes and analyzing the story, then creating a summary of the story by using a graphic organizer in order to keep the story in sequential order. The final project will result in a voice recording of the summary using the website Blabberize. Teacher-Centered Materials: Select instructional  ELMO methods, Student-Centered Materials: media, and materials  23 Pen/pencil  23 iPads with internet and mouse  23 reading/ELA journals  Recording device on computer  Headphones  Writing graphic organizer  Kahoot! (2016). Kahoot! Making Learning Awesome. Retrieved on April 30, 2016 from https://kahoot.it/#/  Mobouy, Inc. (2010). Blabberize. Retrieved on April 30, 2016 from http://blabberize.com/ Utilize media and materials

Briefly describe how you will use the learning resources in the following three (3) areas: Prepare Materials and Media:  Sharpen pencils  Prepare computers for students (have passwords)  Charge iPads for Kahoot.  Test internet connection  Test ELMO for proper connection  Create shortcut for Blabberize  Create shortcut for Kahoot.  Have each iPad assigned to a particular student, if not already. Prepare the Classroom:  Students will remain in assigned seating during instruction.  Make sure classroom is organized.  Have iPads in easily accessible area to avoid pushing, shoving, etc. 176 | P a g e


 

Have lesson agenda displayed on the board. Display Kahoot “game pin” on board.

Prepare the Learner:  I will instruct the students about the research assignment that they are going to do and split students into groups  I will then divide students into groups of three with one all students being the researchers, one student being the reader, one being the summarizer, and one being the one to record the Blabberize.  The students will get in groups and go to the computer to research various Greek myths and decide on a myth, the students will read an age appropriate version of the story purchased from Teachers Pay Teachers.  After students have read the story they will discuss and analyze what the story was about. Then the students will draft out a summary on the graphic organizer and once the writing is proficient, they will write the final summary in order to record for the Blabberize summary.  Students will then get on the Blabberize website and begin the recording for the assessment.  After the students have created the Blabberize, we will listen to each recording.  After watching each of the videos, or Blabberizes, we will play an interactive game called Kahoot to measure the information the students learned form the “Blabberizes”. Require The learner will: learner 1. Research Greek Myth on the World Wide Web within group participation 2. Read and analyze the myth. 3. Create a draft to summarize the story. 4. Use draft to create Blabberize speech. 5. Research a picture to use for Blabberize (must be related to the story) 6. Log onto Blabberize and upload photo. 7. Record Blabberize speech. 8. Present speech to the class. Describe how/when artifact presentation, rubric scoring, and discussion of Evaluate ideas for improvement will occur. Include the artifact rubric and revise Formative Assessment (Process): Students will be assessed at the end after students have presented their artifact. Students will be instructed to pay attention to each students’ presentation so that they can be assessed using the website Kahoot. Kahoot 177 | P a g e


will measure what each student paid attention to as each student presents his or her project. This will allow me to see how well the students were paying attention to each student’s presentation.

Summative Assessment (Product): For the summative assessment, I will analyze each group’s Blabberize and grade them based on how well the group worked, conveyed the information in the Blabberize, as well as their draft for creating the Blabberize.

Criteria

Exemplary

Proficient

Basic

Needs Improvement Group All students Three Two students One student Accountability works in students worked worked group worked collaboratively collaboratively collaboratively collaboratively in group in group in group Completes Includes all Includes at Includes at Includes at Draft (including five criteria least 4 of the least 3 of the least 2 of the 5 the title of the for a complete 5 criteria. 5 criteria criteria. myth, main draft. events, problem, solution, and allusion.) Successfully The video has The video has The video has The video has a completes a photo, a photo, a photo, photo, sound, Blabberize sound, and sound, and sound, and and barely vdeo. covers all most criteria some criteria anything from criteria from from the from the the draft. the draft. draft. draft.

Score

/12

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ASSURE Lesson Plan Template Narrative Writing

Name: Lindsey Shipley Duration of Lesson: 50 minutes

Analyze learners

Subject Area(s): English Language Arts Grade Level: 3rd Grade

The third grade class being taught this lesson at Guild Elementary School is made up of nineteen students. There are 11 males and 8 females. 6 students are African American, 3 students are Hispanic, and 10 students are Caucasian. No students have identified IEP’s or modifications in place. All but two of the students are native English speakers. Those two exceptions speak Spanish primarily at home. The two Spanish speakers speak English fluently in class and throughout their academic work; however, their dialect presents their native language. Guild Elementary School’s data gathered from their website shows that they have a low socio-economic status. Information about free and reduced lunch is not given on the public website. The variety of learners in this classroom will make for an engaging environment during the activity in which students will create their own avatar representing themselves.

Curriculum Competencies Students in this third grade classroom have a significant amount of experience with writing. They are familiar with some components of personal narratives as well. For example, the students are experienced with writing dialogue, using transition words, and including a beginning, middle, and end. Technology Competencies All students have demonstrated the basic knowledge of computer components, such as monitor, mouse, keyboard, printer, and CPU. They have basic typing skills, know how to operate the mouse on a laptop differently than on a desktop computer, and are able to navigate websites effectively.

Common Core Standard: 179 | P a g e


State & NETS*S objectives

W.3.0. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective techniques, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. ISTE Standard: Technology Standard 1.a: Creativity and Innovation: Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology: Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.

Behavioral Objective: Given the use of Voki, the third grade learners will compose a narrative in order to demonstrate that they are able to develop real or imagined experiences using effective techniques, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. Language Objective: Key Vocabulary: narrator, narrative, setting, plot, action, sequence, transitional terms, dialogue, conclusion, action, resolution, Narrative Mountain, Graphic Organization, audience, characters

Academic language functions: Students will learn the meaning of higher level words to facilitate understanding of the lesson when coming into contact with unfamiliar words such as narrative, narrator, setting, plot, transitional terms, dialogue, conclusion, audience, characters.

New vocabulary terms such as setting, plot, transition, characters, dialogue, and conclusion are crucial to understanding this learning segment over narrative writing. An anchor chart with all of the unfamiliar words and phrases associated with this learning segment will be posted to the wall at the beginning of the lesson. The teacher will guide the students to reading each term aloud and examples of each term will be discussed. Students will be instructed to write down brief definitions of each term in their ELA journals for them to reference back to during the writing assessment at the end of this lesson and for future references.

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Curriculum Materials: Select instructional 19 ELA journals (Student Centered) methods, media, and 19 Pieces of Paper (Student Centered) materials 19 Pencils with Erasers (Student Centered) 20 Dry/Erase Markers for the board and individual whiteboards (Teacher and Student Centered) 19 Individual White Boards (Student Centered) 20 Erasers for the White Boards (Teacher and Student Centered)

Technology Materials: 19 Laptops with Internet Connection (Student Centered) 19 Mice (Student Centered) 1 Computer (Teacher Centered) 1 Mouse (Teacher Centered) 1 Keyboard (Teacher Centered) 1 ELMO Projector (Teacher Centered) 1 Screen or SmartBoard (Teacher Centered) Oddcast Ink 2016. Voki [Website] Retrieved on April 25, 2016 from http://www.voki.com. (Teacher and Student Centered)

Utilize media and materials

Preview and Prepare Materials  Sharpen pencils  Make sure all ELA journals are accounted for  Be sure I have enough paper for students to write on  Check that all Laptops are charged and are working properly  Test to make sure internet connection is working properly 181 | P a g e


    

Check ELMO and projector to make sure it is working correctly Have Voki pulled up on teacher’s computer and ready Have rubric for writing piece handy in order to explain it to students before the writing Bookmark the Voki website on each student’s computer Verify the Voki website with the evaluation rubric

Prepare the Environment  Students will stay at their desks during vocabulary discussion, instruction, the modeling of Voki, and during individual work. Prepare the Learners and Provide the Learning Experience  Teacher will introduce the lesson by reviewing that a narrative is a spoken or written account of connected events that include a beginning, middle, end, characters, dialogue, setting, plot, and other components.  Teacher and students will discuss the key vocabulary terms posted on the anchor chart.  Students will be instructed to write the definitions of each term down in his or her ELA journal.  Students will listen to teacher’s instruction on the creation of a narrative.  Students will copy, in their ELA journals, the teacher’s drawing of the Narrative Mountain Graphic Organizer on the white board  Teacher will write a Narrative Writing Prompt on the board: “Pretend you can fly whenever you wanted. Where would you go?” She will mention that the students must include transition terms, at least two characters, a beginning, a middle, an end, a problem, and a solution.  Teacher will read the prompt aloud to the students.  Students will each be handed a piece of paper and will be instructed by the teacher to write a short 3 paragraph narrative based on the prompt on the board. Students will set up their laptops and will navigate to the Voki website. Once all Require students have navigated to this website, students will be guided through the learner participation activity by the teacher. The teacher should already have her computer on the website. She will turn the ELMO on to project the website in front of the class so that she can model the activity. The teacher will instruct the students that they must click on the words “Create Avatar”. The students will be allowed to create their own person which, as instructed by the teacher, must represent themselves as far as skin color, eye color, hair color and style, and mouth. The teacher creates her own avatar as well. The teacher will tell the students to click the “Done” button whenever they are finished creating their own avatar. When everyone has finished, the teacher will click on the button that gives students 182 | P a g e


the option to record their voices on the laptop or type their thoughts in the text box in order for their avatars “to come to life”. She will click on the “Type” option. She will finally instruct students to navigate to the text box as well and type their narratives into the text box. Once students are finished typing, they will be instructed to play their avatar and listen for spelling or grammatical errors throughout their narrative writing. (The avatar will say words exactly as they are typed, which will benefit struggling spellers because it will help them notice if words are spelled incorrectly.) When students feel confident about their final product of their writing pieces, they will be guided by the teacher through uploading their work and sending it to the teacher. If students seem to be having trouble mastering the concept, they should signal the teacher for assistance by raising their hand. Evaluate and revise

Formative Assessment (Process):

Students’ formative assessments will be done during the demonstration of how to complete the Narrative Mountain Graphic Organizer. Students will be asked questions to complete each section of the graphic organizer. As each question is asked, they will write their answers onto their individual whiteboards using a marker. The students will hold up their answers once they are finished writing. If a student is not mastering the concept of the stages of narrative writing, more in depth instruction will take place before moving on. Positive verbal feedback with a light and friendly tone will be given throughout the lesson. Summative Assessment (Product): After completing the creation of their avatars and have finished typing their narratives, the students will upload their work to submit it to the teacher to be evaluated. (The teacher can assist students in her retrieval of their work if needed.) The teacher will also receive the students’ written copies of their narratives. Both pieces of work will be evaluated on a rubric. This summative assessment will allow the teacher to know all of the students’ statuses regarding their understanding of narrative writing and the development of innovative products by using prior knowledge and technology. The writing portion of the lesson will demonstrate the students’ understanding and use of transition terms, rising action, problems, resolutions, action, the organization of a written narrative, and narrative content. The avatar creation using Voki will demonstrate the students’ understanding of applying existing knowledge to generate new products using technology. 183 | P a g e


For struggling students, the length of their writing pieces may be shortened. For students who struggle with the use of technology, they may be able to work with a partner, a paraprofessional, or one-on-one with the teacher. I will write feedback on the students’ written narratives. The feedback will regard the students’ written narratives. I will allow the students one night to make revisions to their papers based on my feedback in order for them to reflect upon their learning. 

What are your evaluative criteria (or rubric) and how do they measure student proficiency for your objectives? Evaluative criteria are categories that you use to assess student learning (e.g., the accuracy or quality of the students’ identifications, explanations, solutions, computations, analyses, applications, designs, judgments, etc.

Category Writing Prompt

3.Proficient Student responds appropriately to the writing prompt. The content makes sense.

Narrative Skills

Student uses several transition terms appropriately. The writing piece includes a beginning, middle, and end. The setting is mentioned along with at least two characters. A problem arises

2.Basic Pieces of the student’s writing responds appropriately to the writing prompt. However, there are pieces that are unclear. Student uses few transition terms appropriately. The writing piece includes 2 out of 3 pieces (beginning, middle, and end). The setting is unclear. At least two characters are included. A

1.Below Basic Student’s content does not repond appropriately to the writing prompt. It is obvious the student does not understand the content. Student uses one or no transition terms appropriately. The beginning, middle, and end are very unclear. The setting is unclear and only one character is mentioned. Both the problem and

Score

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Computer Skills

(rising action) and a resolution concludes the narrative. Student had little to no trouble with using the website to create the presentation. The student uses effective typing skills.

problem may arise, but the resolution is unclear.

resolution are unclear.

Student had some trouble using the website to create the presentation. The student has some experience using the keyboard but may need some practice.

Student had much trouble using the website to create the presentation. The student appeared to have very little experience using the keyboard.

Total: ___/ 9 points If it appears that many students are struggling with the concept of narrative writing using technology, the lesson may have to be revised by starting the students out with a slightly lower leveled task. For example, students wouldn’t have to write an entire narrative, but they would write a shorter piece and more assistance with the computer would be included. I created fewer points on this rubric because this task has several components to calculating the final grade. The students have not demonstrated as complex of tasks as this on a computer yet, therefore I do not want to hurt their final grades.

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Recycling Project Name: Brittany Vernon Duration of Lesson: 1.5 hours

Subject Area(s): Science Grade Level: 3rd

School and Classroom Demographics: Analyze learners

Guild Elementary School is a Title I school in Gallatin Tennessee. The state report card found at tn.gov shows that over 65% of the students are considered to be economically disadvantaged. There is a diversity of cultures and ethnicities within the school, as well as the class that will be taught this lesson. There are Caucasian, African American, Asian, and Hispanic or Latino students in both populations. There are 22 students in this third grade class with 12 males and 10 females. The ages of the students in this class range from 7 years old to 9 years old, and the grade level abilities range from 2nd grade level to the 4th grade level. There are fourteen students in the RTI2 Tier I group for English/Language Arts. During RTI rotations the mentor teacher meets with small groups. Students are grouped by ability. The mentor teacher does advanced enrichment with Tier I students such as accelerated or higher level assignments. There are six students in the RTI2 Tier II group for English/Language Arts. During RTI rotations the Reading and Math interventionist meets with these students for 45 minutes in the classroom. There are two students in the RTI2 Tier III group for English/Language Arts. These students are pulled out for instruction with the special education teacher during English/Language Arts instruction. Student A is pulled out for 75 minutes each school day and receives 30 minutes of inclusion with a special education instructor. Student B is pulled out for 30 minutes each school day and receives 30 minutes of inclusion with the special education instructor as well. Individual learner needs: Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) Of the three students who have IEPs in English/Language Arts, one is in the special education program, two are ELL, and none of those students are in the gifted/exceptional program. No students have 504 plans. Student A needs abbreviated assignments, additional time, directions given in an alternative format (picture/verbal), directions given in small distinct steps, shortened test length,

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prompting, modified content on tests, and/or modified formatting of tests (word bank, multiple choice, short answer) for all subjects. Students B and C need shortened test length, abbreviated assignments, directions read aloud, and/or additional time for English/ Language Arts. Language Needs Four students have language needs. Two students attend English Language Learning classes during the regular school day. Students A and B are pulled out for two separate 30 minute periods each for ELL instruction. Student C is pulled out for a one hour period each day for ELL instruction. One student has an IEP for speech and language and attends classes during the school day for 30 minutes on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. These students do not receive any accommodations or modifications to their assignments. Other student learning needs There is one student who rocks gently in his seat. It is not disruptive to any other students and keeps him calm. Another student likes to stretch or stand while he works. His desk is at the back of the class and on the end of a row so as not to disturb any other students. A third student wears glasses and is seated where he can read the board comfortably. Prior Knowledge: Students are familiar with key terms associated with this unit including, conservation, recycle, reduce, reuse, pollution, renewable resources, sustainable, preservation. The have learned the meanings of these terms in previous lessons. They have also learned about several different programs for recycling in America over the course of this lesson. Students have been conducting research for this final lesson in groups for the past several days; therefore they already have an understanding of group dynamics and responsibilities. Technology Competencies: Students know how to use the computers, keyboards, computer mice, and MS Power Point software. They have used these technologies in past lessons and for research. They have also used the Kid Rex website to do research and are capable of locating information. Tennessee State Standard for Science: 187 | P a g e


State & NETS*S objectives

GLE 0307.7.4 Design a simple investigation to demonstrate how earth materials can be conserved or recycled. NETS-Student Standard: 4. Critical thinking, problem solving, and decision making Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources. b. Plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project Behavioral Objective: Given research opportunities and classroom discussion, the third grade learners will create a recycling program using PowerPoint effectively in order to demonstrate an understanding of how earth materials can be conserved or recycled by identifying a problem, possible solutions, best solution and implementation strategy for the chosen solution. Language Objective: Students will use academic language and content specific terms to demonstrate an understanding of different ways to conserve and recycle earth’s resources. Key Vocabulary: - Environmental, renewable, non-renewable, reduce, reuse, recycle, sustainable, conservation, pollution, deforestation, solar, the 3Rs Academic language functions: - Students will use the content specific terms to create and present a recycling program that could potentially be implemented in their classroom, school, home, or community. - Students will need to be able to list the 3Rs and explain their meaning. For example, the 3Rs of conservation are reduce, reuse, and recycle. They will also need to be able to differentiate between the three and understand why the order they are listed in matters. -

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Select instructional methods, media, and materials

Students will have access to these terms on the class website, and they should already be recorded with the definitions in their interactive science journals from previous lessons. Students will complete graphic organizers and mind maps to organize their research and project ideas.

Traditional Materials: Teacher Centered - 1 interactive science journal (for modeling) - 1 pencil 188 | P a g e


- 1 graphic organizer (for modeling) Student Centered - 22 Interactive science journals - 22 pencils - 22 graphic organizers (for research) Technology Materials: Teacher Centered - ELMO - Laptop - Internet connection - Access to popplet.com (to demonstrate) - PowerPoint software installed on the laptop - USB Port on laptop - PowerPoint presentations - Environmental videos (virtual field trips) HowStuffWorks.com. (2016). Most Watched in Environmental Science. [Web] Retrieved on 2016, April 26 from: http://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/28794-how-do-they-doit-recycling-machine-video.htm Student Centered - 5 laptops with internet access and USB ports - PowerPoint software installed on all 5 laptops - 5 Computer mice (optional for student use to aid with hand-eye coordination) - 5 USB flash drives - Access to How Stuff Works webpage on all 5 laptops for students to access for reference - Access to popplet website on all 5 laptops for students to map out their presentation Nation, INC. Popplet.com. (2013). [Web] Retrieved on 2016, April 28 from: http://popplet.com/ Utilize media and materials

Media and Materials Preparation: - Check that all laptops have been charged (teacher and students) - Check internet connection on all laptops (teacher and students) - Format all 5 USB flash drives - Check the ELMO for proper functionality - Gather interactive science journals (students) - Check progress on journals, graphic organizers, and mind maps (teacher) - Create shortcuts on the desktop of each laptop to get to the How Stuff Works webpage 189 | P a g e


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Bookmark Kid Rex in Firefox or Internet Explorer Bookmark popplet in Firefox or Internet Explorer Sharpen pencils Make sure PowerPoint is installed on all laptops Kid Rex, popplet, and howstuffworks.com all scored high on their respective selection rubrics. Therefore, the three websites have been determine appropriate for the learning task, audience, and environment.

Classroom Preparation: - Make sure student desks are arranged into groups

Require learner participation

Learner Preparation: - The teacher will introduce the lesson by explaining the objectives and the expected outcomes. - The teacher and students will review key terms and concepts such as the 3Rs of conservation, preservation, sustainability, recycling, etc. - The teacher will show a couple of environmental videos from howstuffworks.com. - The teacher will ask students to pair up and ask each other 3 questions based on the information in their interactive journals from the previous lessons on this unit. Each student should write down their three questions and then trade papers with their partner to answer them. The teacher will collect these as a formative assessment. - Students will then get into their groups (two groups of 5 and three groups of 4) to begin brainstorming their recycling program. Students can then turn on their laptops and get onto the internet. They will finish up any remaining research using the group laptop. As a group, students will decide what their program will be. Using the website popplet, students will complete mind maps that outline their program including the problem, possible solutions, new or improved program, and strategies for implementation. Once students have a good outline/map they should raise their hand to get feedback from the teacher. This will serve as another formative assessment to check for progress. After students have conferenced with the teacher at their group area, they should open up PowerPoint on their group’s laptop. They will create a PowerPoint that identifies a problem, offers multiple possible solutions, and design or improve a program that uses the best solution to the identified problem. Students will need to explain how this program solves the problem and how it should be implemented. When students have completed their PowerPoints, they should ask the teacher for assistance in saving the project onto the groups USB. Once the project has been saved, the group can select which order they want to present. For example, the first group to finish will have the option of presenting first, second, 190 | P a g e


Evaluate and revise

third, fourth, or fifth. As groups finish their projects, they may read silently as the rest of the groups finish. After all groups have completed their PowerPoints, they will present their projects to the class. They will present in the order that they selected after saving the file to the USB. Each group will have a maximum of 5 minutes to present. When the whole class has finished presenting, each student will be given a self-assessment checklist, and a peer evaluation checklist. Formative Assessment (Process): - The teacher will review the student created questions and answers while students complete research in their groups. Once the students (as groups) have completed their mind maps, the teacher will conference with students to assure that they have found information for all the categories of their project – problem, possible solutions, new or improved program, and implementation methods. If there is something missing or if the information seems unclear, the teacher will ask the students to explain that part. If they cannot explain it, they need to continue with their research. I expect to see students working collaboratively and respectfully. They should be sharing the workload. I will be able to see how much of the mind map was completed by each student because the website popplet uses a different color for each student’s input. They should be using the laptops for research about different types of pollution and programs that aspire to reduce those pollutions. They should also be researching recycling programs to spark ideas for their own program. Students should be having discussions related to the content and creation of their program and presentation. Summative Assessment (Product): As a summative assessment the students will design a simple investigation to demonstrate how earth materials can be conserved or recycled. Students will present the PowerPoint presentation that they created during group work. After the student presentations I will keep the USB flash drives to save the student work. In the presentations students should identify the problem they are seeking to solve. They should identify several possible solutions to the selected problem. Then they will explain the program they created or are improving and how it works, as well as the steps to implement it. Students will self-assess their performance using a checklist. They will also use a separate checklist to assess their group members.

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Category Identified Problem

Possible Solutions

Selection of Best Solution

3 - Proficient One environmental problem has been identified AND described in detail. Impact on environment, humans, and other animals has been identified. Three or more possible solutions have been identified AND described.

One solution has been chosen to correct the identified problem. There is significant evidence to support the selection of this solution. Implementation Clear and easy to Strategies understand directions have been explained for implementing this program. This program could be used in the classroom or community. Presentation Presentation is organized and well laid out AND captures audience attention. PowerPoint is used to clarify and illustrate the main points. Total Score

2 - Basic One environmental problem has been identified AND described vaguely.

1 - Below Basic Environmental problem has not clearly identified OR has not been described at all.

At least two possible solutions have been identified BUT one or both were not described. One solution has been chosen to correct the identified problem. There is some evidence to support the selection of this solution.

Only one possible solution has been identified BUT not described.

Directions or steps for starting this program are stated BUT not explained in clear detail.

Directions or steps for implementation are not stated OR are not explained at all.

Presentation is somewhat organized AND captures audience attention BUT PowerPoint does not illustrate the main points.

Presentation appears sloppy AND/OR unfinished. PowerPoint has no clear organization.

Score

Solution has been chosen BUT there is no evidence to support the selection of this solution.

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Copyright Appreciations:

Word Cloud created using online application, Wordle (http://www.wordle.net) Major/sectional graphics taken from Pete’s Powerpoint Station (http://pppst.com)

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Technology in the Schools (SP2016) Booklet  

This booklet was developed by teacher education candidates enrolled in EDCI 4190- Technology in the Schools at Tennessee State University....

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