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Capsule

Summer 2014

University of Maryland School of Pharmacy Magazine for Alumni and Friends

IN THIS ISSUE: FY ’13 ANNUAL REPORT

Mass Spectrometry’s Amazing Rise


DEAN’S MESSAGE While reading the feature stories in this issue of Capsule, I was struck by how diverse the topics are — spanning complicated research techniques for improving medications and creating new ones, to preparing our students for finding employment and providing lifelong learning opportunities for practicing pharmacists. This diversity of interests and expertise is a hallmark of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy. We are a comprehensive school of pharmacy, working across the spectrum of education, patient care, drug discovery, and health outcomes research, all with a goal of improving patient health. Visit the School any day and you will see our diverse faculty, staff, and students in action — in the classroom and in practice and research labs, and at our desks working with complicated data sets. You’ll also find us in the community at clinical sites across the state of Maryland and in service to the Baltimore community at local health fairs, church bazaars, festivals, and more. As a highly ranked school of pharmacy, our diversity is part of what makes us so strong. Students have the opportunity to learn from a variety of faculty, those who practice pharmacy and those who specialize in dozens of research areas. Our faculty benefit, as well, collaborating with their fellow faculty on a variety of research projects that are made more powerful by what each person brings to the table. I am proud to be starting my seventh year as dean of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, and our diversity of interests and expertise is just one of the many reasons I love it here. With that said, I have been asked by Jay A. Perman, MD, president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB), to take on an additional leadership role at UMB. As UMB’s new executive director of university regional partnerships, I will assist the University’s senior vice presidents, working collaboratively with the deans, on issues related to the expansion of UMB’s academic and research programs in Montgomery and Prince George’s counties. I am now responsible for ensuring that proper organizational support is in place to host our academic programs at the Universities at Shady Grove (USG), and I am guiding UMB programming requirements on USG’s Building Committee. Additionally, I am coordinating UMB programs at the Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research, an enterprise created to enhance collaboration in the biosciences, technology, quantitative sciences, and engineering among UMB, the University of Maryland, College Park, and the National Institutes of Standards and Technology. I am coordinating University programming under development in Prince George’s County, and working with University and county leadership to develop a plan to improve the health outcomes of its citizens. This is a role I have agreed to undertake with the understanding that my commitment to the School of Pharmacy as dean remains my priority. Furthermore, this role is an extension of efforts that I have been involved in on behalf of the School. The outstanding leadership demonstrated by the School’s administrative team and the dedication and excellence of our faculty, staff, and students will allow me to spend a portion of my time aiding the University in its efforts to expand its programs into Montgomery and Prince George’s counties. My hope is that the School of Pharmacy will benefit from my involvement with this new initiative as we work to create academic, clinical, and research opportunities for faculty, staff, and students throughout UMB. In the spirit of expertise, influence, and impact,

Natalie D. Eddington, PhD ’89, BSP, FAAPS, FCP Dean and Professor Executive Director, University Regional Partnerships

MISSION The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy leads pharmacy education, scientific discovery, patient care, and community engagement in the state of Maryland and beyond. VISION We will achieve our mission by: • inspiring excellence in our students through a contemporary curriculum, innovative educational experiences, and strategic professional relationships. • advancing scientific knowledge across the spectrum of drug discovery, health services, and practice based and translational research with significant focus on collaborative partnerships. • expanding the impact of the pharmacist’s role on direct patient care and health outcomes. • building and nurturing relationships with all members of our community. • capitalizing on our entrepreneurial spirit to improve pharmaceutical research, practice, and education in Maryland and throughout the world. PLEDGE We are proud to be critical thinkers, lifelong learners, and leaders who are sought for our expertise. We earn our reputation with the highest standards of personal ethics and professional conduct. Students and education are central to everything we do. We engage the community; together, we contribute to the improved health of society. We celebrate the distinctive talents of our faculty, staff, and students. We honor our traditions and advocate for dynamic changes in pharmacy practice, education, and research. We create the future of pharmacy.


Capsule Contents University of Maryland School of Pharmacy Alumni Magazine

Summer 2014 Becky Ceraul, Capsule Editor Assistant Dean, Communications and Marketing School of Pharmacy

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Chris Zang, Assistant Director, Editorial Services

BY GWEN NEWMAN

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THE AMAZING REBIRTH OF MASS SPEC

BY RANDOLPH FILLMORE

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BECOMING ‘JOB READY’

BY ELIZABETH HEUBECK

21

MAINSTAYS

Julie Bower, Assistant Director, Design Services University of Maryland, Baltimore Office of Communications and Public Affairs Special thanks to the following contributors:

SCHOOL NEWS

11 CONTINUING ED IS JUST A CLICK AWAY

Janice Batzold Acting Assistant Dean Development and Alumni Affairs

23 STUDENT NEWS

Malissa Carroll Writer/Web Content Producer

28 PRECEPTOR PROFILE

Dana Joyce Marketing Specialist Jennifer McGinley Associate Director, Alumni Affairs Kierion Stephens Development Associate School of Pharmacy Student Government Association We welcome your comments, news, and suggestions for articles. Send your ideas to Becky Ceraul at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, 20 N. Pine St., Room N302, Baltimore, MD 21201. Email: rceraul@rx.umaryland.edu; Telephone: 410-706-1690; Fax: 410-706-4012. Copyright © 2014 University of Maryland School of Pharmacy

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu

31 ALUMNI PROFILE 33 ALUMNI NEWS 37 ANNUAL REPORT This issue of Capsule magazine is available for download on your tablet or smartphone! Simply go to the app store on your device, search for the Capsule magazine app, download, and start reading. The new electronic version gives you access to additional photos and “clickable” content. If you’d like to change how you receive your Capsule, visit www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu/Capsule to let us know your delivery preference.


SCHOOL NEWS

SOP Faculty Named President-Elect of Leading Psychiatric Pharmacy Society Raymond Love, PharmD ’77, BCPP, FASHP, professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS), has been named president-elect of the College of Psychiatric and Neurologic Pharmacists (CPNP). With a term that began July 1, Love also will serve as president of the organization for 2014-2015 and as past president for 2015-2016. Established in 1998, CPNP is a professional pharmacy association dedicated to promoting excellence in pharmacy practice, education, and research to optimize treatment outcomes of individuals affected by psychiatric and neurologic disorders. As one of the group’s founding members, Love has served in a number of positions and represented the organization on several pharmacy stakeholder groups, including one that provided input on the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and another that seeks to establish provider status for pharmacists. In 2010, he received the organization’s highest honor — the Judith Saklad Award — in recognition of his continuing dedication to the practice of psychiatric pharmacy. “Throughout his career, Dr. Love has remained dedicated to improving pharmacy services for individuals with psychiatric and neurologic illnesses,” says Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner, PharmD ’83, BCPS, CDE, FAPhA, professor and chair of PPS. “As director of the School’s Mental Health Program, his work has led to a number of innovations in clinical pharmacy services, dose optimization, statewide data tracking, central formulary management, drug use analysis, and prior authorization. We are confident that, under his leadership, innovations such as these will continue to evolve and help advance treatment out-

comes in the field.” Since 1983, the Mental Health Program has partnered with the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to improve medication use and safety for patients who are served by Maryland Mental Hygiene Administration facilities and Maryland Medicaid. Its Psychiatric Pharmacy Practice Residency Program was the first residency program established at the School of Pharmacy. Love hopes his new leadership role in this national professional society will help expand education, practice, and research opportunities for faculty, staff, students, and residents at the School. “I am excited to have this opportunity to help lead an organization that is committed to enhancing treatment for those individuals affected by psychiatric and neurologic disorders,” says Love. “Throughout my career, I have been committed to furthering the role of pharmacists in improving mental health care for vulnerable populations. I also hope that my presidency further contributes to the reputation of the School, PPS, and the Mental Health Program, and provides additional opportunities for all members of the School’s community.” As CPNP president, Love will chair the Board of Directors, serve as the primary representative of the organization, outline goals for both the organization and its internal committees, participate in strategic planning, mentor future leaders in the profession, and foster teamwork among officers, committee chairs, and staff. b

Associate Dean Appointed for Health System Affairs Raja Zeitany, PharmD, former chief pharmacy officer at the University of California Irvine Medical Center, has been appointed as the School’s new associate dean of health system affairs. This appointment follows Zeitany being named senior director of pharmacy services for the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) and the University of Maryland Midtown Campus by Jonathan Gottlieb, MD, senior vice president and chief medical officer at UMMC. “This newly created position of associate dean of health

system affairs highlights the level of importance that the School of Pharmacy places on our relationship with the University of Maryland Medical System [UMMS] and its affiliate hospitals,” says Natalie D. Eddington, PhD ’89, BSP, FAAPS, FCP, dean and professor of the School. “I have every confidence that Dr. Zeitany will work collaboratively with the School to enhance clinical, experiential, and outpatient opportunities within UMMS for our faculty, residents, and student pharmacists.” As associate dean of health system affairs, Zeitany will work to strengthen the partnership between UMMS and the School of Pharmacy as the medical system seeks to implement important changes in health care policy. He will serve as the principal teaching, practice, and research partner within UMMS for the School’s Continued on Page 3

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Continued from Page 2 students, residents, and fellows, and provide experiential educational opportunities in clinical practice environments throughout UMMS. “We are delighted that Dr. Zeitany has chosen to serve the School of Pharmacy, as well as UMMC, the University of Maryland Midtown Campus, and UMMS, as the next chapter of our country’s health care is being written,” says Gottlieb. “Since the start of his career, Dr. Zeitany has been an effective advocate for enabling pharmacists to practice at the full extent of their abilities. Through his new role with the University of Maryland, he will help improve service to our patients, enhance education for the next generation of pharmacists, and support innovation through an enhanced partnership with the School of Pharmacy.” Zeitany received his Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) from the University of South Carolina in 1987. For 14 years, he served in a number of roles at the University of California Irvine Health System, holding his most recent role as chief pharmacy officer for three

years. He has experience with consolidating drug distribution, bar code medication administration, inventory management software implementation, automated medication distribution technologies, and other innovative technologies. “My experience since joining the faculty at the School of Pharmacy has been amazing and gracious,” says Zeitany. “All of my colleagues exhibit the utmost courtesy, professionalism, and hospitality. It is my hope that the partnership we are building will be far-reaching and long-lasting — one that helps to set a benchmark for pharmacy practice and clearly demonstrates the value that a pharmacist has as an integral member of the health care team.” Zeitany also will work to enhance practice, preceptor development, and acquisition of experiential sites for the School, expanding existing opportunities for student pharmacists to engage in progressive patient-centered care. He hopes to promote practice scholarship through the development of innovative practice models and educational programs. b

Researcher Receives Nearly $1 Million Funding Award from PCORI Susan dosReis, PhD, BSPharm, associate professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR), has been approved for a research award of $937,812 by the PatientCentered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) to support her study titled “Methods for Prioritizing Surrogate Desired Health Outcomes for Patients.” The study will investigate what outcomes are most important to caregivers when managing aggression in children with developmental disabilities and a co-existing psychiatric illness, helping them choose the best treatment option for their child’s unique circumstances. “Research concerning the health outcomes that are most important to the caregivers who are responsible for a patient’s health care decisions is limited,” says dosReis. “One particular patient population about which we know very little is children with developmental disabilities and a co-existing psychiatric illness, including those with cognitive and social impairments and co-existing depression, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and autism spectrum disorders. It is my hope that the results of this study will transform future patientcentered outcomes research by establishing methods to surround caregivers with meaningful evidence that will help them make moreinformed health care decisions.” The children included in this study’s patient population typically exhibit severe aggressive behavior. The medications used to manage

this behavior are associated with a number of side effects that affect a child’s metabolism and increase his or her risk of becoming obese, as well as developing cardiovascular disease, later in life. Weighing the benefits and risks of these medications, caregivers are forced to make difficult decisions about how best to care for these children. “The goal of this study is to use the information that we learn about caregivers’ preferred outcomes, such as helping their children establish skills for independent living, to advance methods that can assist them in deciding under what circumstances the level of risk associated with a particular treatment is acceptable, given the expected benefits also associated with that treatment,” says dosReis. The study will include caregivers of children with developmental disabilities and a co-existing emotional or behavioral problem from across the United States. Researchers will collect caregivers’ feedback through small focus groups and innovative surveys designed to measure the value of benefit-risk trade-offs in treatment decisions. This information could provide improved evidence that supports which treatments work best to achieve the outcomes that matter most to caregivers and their patients. “This project was selected for PCORI funding not only for its scientific merit and commitment to engaging patients and other stakeholders, but also for its potential to fill an important gap in our health knowledge and give people information to help them weigh the effectiveness of their care options,” says Joe Selby, MD, MPH, executive director of PCORI. “We look forward to following the study’s progress and working with the School of Pharmacy to share the results.” b

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SCHOOL NEWS

Several Faculty Honored with Awards Recent months have brought a flurry of awards and recognition to School of Pharmacy faculty. Here is a roundup:

Bruce Anderson, PharmD, DABAT Anderson, associate professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS) and director of the Maryland Poison Center (MPC), was recognized in March with the University System of Maryland Board of Regents’ 2014 Faculty Award for Public Service. In nominating him for the honor, Dean Eddington wrote, “Dr. Anderson is known for his ability to drive innovation, helping the MPC expand both its staffing and services to work alongside the country’s other poison centers to document poisoning cases and review the data for possible outbreaks of bioterrorism, chemical terrorism, and other potential public health problems, such as food poisoning or contamination.”

Cherokee Layson-Wolf, PharmD ’00, CGP, BCACP, FAPhA Layson-Wolf, associate professor in PPS and associate dean for student affairs, received the 2014 American Pharmacists Association’s Community Pharmacy Residency Excellence in Precepting Award for her leadership of the School’s community pharmacy residency track. Layson-Wolf became director of the program in 2007, and has diligently worked to expand available practice sites and maintain high-quality learning experiences for her residents.

Jill Morgan, PharmD, BCPS Morgan, associate professor in PPS, was recognized in March with the University System of Maryland Board of Regents’ 2014 Faculty Award for Mentoring. In her previous role as the School’s associate dean for student affairs, Morgan “mentored more than 1,000 student pharmacists, and often served as faculty advisor for more than 100 students each year. She exemplifies every aspect of excellence in mentoring and continues to go beyond expectations to assist students in achieving successful careers in both pharmacy practice and academia,” wrote Dean Eddington in the nomination.

C. Daniel Mullins, PhD Mullins, professor and newly named chair of the Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR), received the University System of Maryland’s Wilson H. Elkins Professorship in recognition of his contributions to the field of comparative effectiveness research and service to the University community and beyond. Mullins’ work at the School of Pharmacy focuses on comparative effectiveness research — research designed to inform patients’ and providers’ health care decisions by providing evidence on the effectiveness, benefits, and risks of different treatment options. Recently, he has gained national attention in recognition of his efforts to ensure that this research reflects the diversity of patients in the United States, including minorities and patients with physical and cognitive impairments.

Brent Reed, PharmD, BCPS Reed, assistant professor in PPS, received the 2014 American Pharmacists Association’s Distinguished New Practitioner Award, which recognizes a practitioner who, although new to the profession, has demonstrated distinctive achievements in mentorship, service, and commitment to the pharmacy profession. Reed was nominated by three colleagues in recognition of several multidisciplinary patient care and research projects on which he collaborated, his service as a preceptor and mentor to student pharmacists and residents, and his professional service as a new practitioner.

Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner, PharmD ’83, BCPS, CDE, FAPhA Rodriguez de Bittner, professor and chair of PPS, was recognized in October as the University of Maryland, Baltimore’s Entrepreneur of the Year, an honor bestowed on her during the University’s annual Founders Week celebration. As the first woman to receive the award and as executive director of the School’s Center for Innovative Pharmacy Solutions (CIPS), Rodriguez de Bittner has led the Continued on Page 5

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Ilene Zuckerman (third from the left) with her graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, left to right, Mohammad Al-Jawadi, PharmD; Zippora Kiptanui, MPH; Jennifer Albrecht, PhD; Bilal Khokhar, MA; and Yuen Tsang, PharmD, MPH.

PHSR Professor and Chair Retires Colleague, teacher, mentor, and friend — these are just some of the words that describe Ilene Zuckerman, PharmD ’83, PhD, BSP ’81, professor and former chair of the Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR), who retired from the School of Pharmacy at the end of December after 30 years of service. “Dr. Zuckerman has been a trusted advisor in my role as dean, and I will miss her input and expertise,” says Natalie D. Eddington, PhD ’89, BSP, FAAPS, FCP, dean and professor of the School. “Her reputation as a pharmacist-scholar, educator, and mentor has helped to bolster the reputation of PHSR, its graduate program, and the School. The teaching, research, and service initiatives to which she has contributed also reflect her sincere commitment to the School, interprofessional collaborations, new knowledge, and the future of the pharmacy profession. She is leaving a strong foundation that will serve the department and the School for many years.” A graduate of the School, Zuckerman became a member of its faculty in 1983. She has spent her entire career at the School, rising to the rank of professor and previously serving as associate dean for research and graduate education and as chair of PHSR for more than five years. Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner, PharmD ’83, BCPS, CDE, FAPhA, professor and chair of the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, was one of Zuckerman’s classmates in the School’s postbaccalaureate Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program in 1983. “Ilene was always very kind to me, introducing me to Baltimore and the local culture after I moved to the United States from Puerto Rico. More recently, we shared experiences as faculty members and chairs of our respective departments. I will miss my colleague very much,” she says. Zuckerman also mentored numerous graduate and pharmacy

students, postdoctoral fellows, and junior faculty, who have gone on to successful careers in academia, industry, and government. She launched and managed Pharmaceutical Research Computing (PRC), a center within PHSR that provides computer programming, data management, and analytic support for health services researchers. On Dec. 12, her family and friends joined faculty, staff, and students at the School of Pharmacy to celebrate her remarkable career. In addition to receiving gifts from her students, Zuckerman was presented with an official citation from Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley that commemorated her retirement. She also was named professor emerita in PHSR. “Most of us tend to think about our careers in terms of achievements, but the problem is that we tend to focus on the outcome rather than on the effort or joy of the activity itself,” said Zuckerman. “However, my time at the School of Pharmacy was not just focused on getting work done or what could be achieved. I was really privileged to have some accomplishments, but it was really a joy to work at the School. I feel fortunate to have learned so much here, and to have been surrounded by such splendid colleagues. I will truly miss working here.” To honor her retirement, Zuckerman has asked that friends and colleagues consider making a gift to the Harris Zuckerman Scholarship Fund Endowment, a scholarship that she created in honor of her parents to help support students who want to pursue both PharmD and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degrees. b For more information on how you can support the Harris Zuckerman Scholarship Fund, please contact the Office of Development and Alumni Affairs at 410-706-5893.

Continued from Page 4 implementation of nationally recognized programs, such as the Maryland P3 (Patients, Pharmacists, Partnerships) Program, that not only improve patient outcomes but also reduce health care costs. Her business acumen has also led to the development of the CIPS Knowledge Enterprise, an online platform for continuing education for pharmacists and other health care professionals. As a social entrepreneur, Rodriguez de Bittner’s goal is to expand and enhance pharmaceutical care locally and nationally.

Bruce Stuart, PhD Stuart, professor in PHSR and executive director of the Peter

Lamy Center on Drug Therapy and Aging, received the George F. Archambault Award from the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists, the highest award the society bestows. The award is presented each year to an individual who has made significant contributions to the field of consultant and senior care pharmacy. Individuals are nominated for this award, with the recipient being selected by a vote of past award winners. Stuart is the first economist to receive it. b summ er r 201 2014 4 summe

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From left, Dean Eddington; Harold Chappelear, DSc ’98, LLD (Hon), member of the School’s Board of Visitors; John Gregory; and Jay A. Perman, MD, president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore.

Alumnus’ Entrepreneurial Lecture Imparts Valuable Life Lessons Pharmacist, businessman, and all-around “self-made man” John Gregory, BSP ’76, DPS, returned to his alma mater at the School of Pharmacy in November to spend an afternoon with faculty, staff, and students discussing his experiences as an entrepreneur and offering valuable tips from lessons learned throughout his career. “Dr. Gregory has always been somewhat of a legend — an alumnus who went on to found one of the School’s first spinoff companies and become a member of our Board of Visitors,” said Natalie D. Eddington, PhD ’89, BSP, FAAPS, FCP, dean and professor of the School. “He is also one of the School’s most ardent supporters, giving of both his time and resources to support our mission of leading the way in pharmacy education, scientific discovery, patient care, and community engagement in the state of Maryland and beyond.” In an evening lecture titled “UPM Pharmaceuticals, Inc.: A Model of Successful Collaboration and Commercialization,” Gregory recalled his journey from pharmacy school to successful businessman. He graduated from the School of Pharmacy in 1976, later moving to Bastian, Va., where he opened the only retail pharmacy in a county of 5,000 people. Though a small enterprise compared to his later endeavors, Gregory recalled that it was his experience serving as the county’s only pharmacist that taught him the first basic truth about being an entrepreneur. “People prefer to do business with people they like and trust,” he said. “I knew my customers and gave them personalized service. I counseled them about how to stay healthy. I became an indispensable part of their lives. The majority of my customers believed that I cared about them not because of what I said to them, but because of what lengths I was willing to go to serve them.” In 1984, Gregory co-founded General Injectables and Vaccines, which employed an innovative business model to supply injectables and other perishable vaccine products directly to physicians’ offices using a toll-free (800) phone number. “It sounds simple today, but it was trend-setting back then,” he assured. To further expand his business, Gregory purchased a

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500,000-square-foot pharmaceutical manufacturing facility located in Bristol, Tenn., in 1993. Renamed King Pharmaceuticals, the company was owned by Gregory, his wife, and five siblings. King Pharmaceuticals continued to grow as the company purchased more small, brand-name products from large pharmaceutical companies, which they remarketed in a unique way. In less than a decade, it evolved from a 90-employee, family-owned business to an S&P 500 Index company on the New York Stock Exchange with revenues exceeding $1 billion. It was purchased by Pfizer, Inc., in 2010. “From firsthand knowledge, I can tell you that a solid understanding of the business side of the pharmaceutical industry is absolutely essential for graduates of this School,” said Gregory. “Unless you learn how to take an idea from the lab all the way to the consumer arena, you’re missing a chance to improve the health and well-being of your fellow man.” Now serving as chair and chief executive officer of UPM Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a drug development and contract manufacturer launched by School of Pharmacy faculty to serve the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, Gregory says his career has come full circle. “In May 2013, UPM purchased the same 500,000-square-foot manufacturing facility in Bristol that Pfizer upgraded after purchasing King Pharmaceuticals,” announced Gregory. “It’s also the same facility that my family and I purchased when we launched King Pharmaceuticals in 1993. Talk about déjà vu. UPM now offers a full range of development, testing, and manufacturing services — a seamless transition from early-stage formulation all the way to commercialization and comprehensive laboratory support.” Gregory’s entrepreneurial lecture, which was held in the Discover Auditorium at the University of Maryland BioPark, was cohosted by the School of Pharmacy and UM Ventures, an initiative launched by UMB and the University of Maryland, College Park, to channel the technical resources and research expertise of the University of Maryland and engage partners in industry and social ventures to expand the University’s real-world impact. b


MS in Regulatory Science Program Welcomes Inaugural Class The School of Pharmacy welcomed the inaugural class of its new parttime, online Master of Science (MS) in Regulatory Science program in January. With its emphasis on drug discovery, drug development, clinical research, and post-approval drug regulation, the program is designed to provide professionals who currently work, or would like to work, in regulatory science with the knowledge and skills necessary to contribute to drug regulation and pharmaceutical product lifestyles. “Prominent organizations such as the Food and Drug Administration [FDA] and the National Institutes of Health have articulated a strong need for scientists with backgrounds in regulatory science for years,” says Andrew Coop, PhD, professor and chair of the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (PSC) at the School of Pharmacy. “With the creation of the University of Maryland Center for Excellence in Regulatory Science and Innovation, our School has become a national leader in regulatory science research. Our new MS in Regulatory Science program will further enhance our ongoing work in this field.” Directed by James Polli, PhD, the Shangraw/Noxell Endowed Chair in Industrial Pharmacy and Pharmaceutics in PSC, the program offers a science-driven approach to drug product development and regulation. Its inaugural class includes 32 students who average eight years working in a number of roles related to chemistry/manufacturing/ controls (CMC), clinical research, and post-marketing safety. “There is a vital need for qualified regulatory scientists with the knowledge and skills to develop new tools, standards, and approaches to assess the safety, efficacy, quality, and performance of new drug products and medical devices,” says Polli. “These individuals play critical roles across academia, government, and industry, but are typically trained in programs that do not include regulatory

science education. Our goal was simple Ten members of the MS in Regulatory Science — to establish one program’s inaugural class gathered at the School of the most useful in April for a meet and greet with faculty and graduate programs instructors. in regulatory science, without borders. We have been truly overwhelmed by the incredible support that this program has received.” Because the program is hosted exclusively online, it has attracted professionals from across the state of Maryland, including five alumni of the School of Pharmacy, as well as regions beyond, with two professionals currently residing in Nigeria and Malaysia. “As someone who has worked in regulatory science since 2000, I have had to learn on the job like many other professionals in the field,” says Aziza Ahmed, MSc, senior manager of APAC Regional Regulatory Affairs at Baxter Healthcare in Malaysia. “As a result, my expertise is somewhat restricted. I am excited to return to school after a 14-year hiatus, and hope to broaden my skill set and interact with other professionals through my participation in the School of Pharmacy’s MS in Regulatory Science program. I also hope that the program will give me a fresher perspective that I can apply to my work.” The program’s advanced courses in CMC, clinical research, pharmacovigilance, and pharmacoepidemiology attracted a significant number of industry professionals. Several of its lectures are presented by regulatory science leaders from the pharmaceutical industry and FDA, including a number of lectures delivered by School of Pharmacy alumni. 

New Board of Visitor Members Announced Natalie D. Eddington, PhD ’89, BSP, FAAPS, FCP, dean and professor of the School of Pharmacy, has appointed eight new members to the School’s Board of Visitors. A distinguished group of professional, business, and government leaders who are committed to the mission and goals of the School, the Board of Visitors provides advice and counsel to the dean, advocates for the School in pursuit of its aims, and assists the School with fundraising. “The School of Pharmacy’s Board of Visitors brings together successful men and women who share a commitment to the continued growth and development of the School and its mission to lead pharmacy education, scientific discovery, patient care, and community engagement in the state of Maryland and beyond,” says Eddington. “These individuals provide sound, quality advice that helps us continue to provide a first-class educational experience for our students. Whether they are assisting with the development of new programs and initiatives, identifying new experiential learning opportunities, advocating for the School and the pharmacy profession, or fundraising on our behalf, we truly appreciate their continued support.” The new board members include: Stephen J. Allen, RPh, MS, FASHP, executive vice president of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Foundation

Mary Baxter, MBA, RPh, vice president of national practice leader performance and outcomes at Cardinal Health

Judy Britz, PhD, executive director of

Joseline A. Pena-Melnyk, JD,

Audra Stinchcomb, PhD, founder

the Maryland Biotechnology Center

representative for Anne Arundel County and Prince George’s County in the Maryland House of Delegates

and chief scientific officer of AllTranz, Inc.

Thomas E. Menighan, BSPharm, MBA, FAPhA, executive vice president and chief executive officer of the American Pharmacists Association

John Spearman, MPA, president and chief operating officer at Laurel Regional Hospital

Wenxue Wang, president and chairman of the board for China Fortune Land Development, Ltd.

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Fourth-Year Students Find Their Match in Residency Programs Nationwide

2014-2015 University of Maryland residents and fellows.

On March 21, thousands of fourth-year student pharmacists across the country learned their fate as the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) announced its Residency Match Day results. Forty-one students from the School of Pharmacy were matched to residency positions at institutions such as Yale-New Haven Hospital, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Kaiser Permanente of the Mid-Atlantic States, and the Veterans Affairs Health Care System. “Pharmacy residencies offer students a great opportunity to continue developing their knowledge and skills in an environment where they can be closely mentored by a practicing pharmacist,” says Cherokee Layson-Wolf, PharmD ’00, CGP, BCACP, FAPhA, associate dean for student affairs and associate professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS). “The number of employers that require applicants to have one or two years of advanced training beyond the completion of their Doctor of Pharmacy [PharmD] degree continues to grow. To stay competitive in this advancing job market, students now actively seek opportunities to pursue residency training.” Over the years, pharmacy students have shown an increased interest in residency training to help them obtain more specialized roles within the health system setting. In 2010, only 22 percent of graduates from the School of Pharmacy went on to pursue residency or fellowship training. In 2013, that percentage increased to 25 percent. One of the School’s fourth-year student pharmacists to receive a residency match was Christopher Min, who was matched with the University of Chicago Medical Center, a large academic hospital that offers a broad spectrum of specialty and primary care services. “There were a number of qualities that attracted me to the University of Chicago Medical Center, from its wide range of diverse,

yet individualized rotation and training opportunities to the way pharmacists are integrated into the health care team, allowing us to have a greater impact on patient care,” says Min. “I knew this was the place for me, and I cannot wait to continue developing my clinical skills while working with a great team and exploring an amazing new city.” The School of Pharmacy’s joint residency program with the University of Maryland Medical Center also had a successful match. Twenty-one new residents and fellows joined the program in July to advance their knowledge and skills in a number of specialty areas, including ambulatory care, cardiology, geriatrics, pain and palliative care, and psychiatry. “Our residency and fellowship programs offer innovative educational, research, and practice settings in which residents and fellows can gain the knowledge and skills they need to become successful practicing pharmacists and obtain competitive positions in their respective specialties,” says Kristin Watson, PharmD, BCPS, AQ Cardiology, associate professor in PPS and coordinator of the Residency and Fellowship Program at the School. “We are tremendously proud of this year’s successful match, and look forward to meeting all of our new residents and fellows this summer.” The School also received the first match for its new Ellen H. Yankellow Health Outcomes Fellowship, a two-year program for individuals who want to develop skills as an independent researcher in health outcomes and health services research. This first-of-its-kind fellowship is supported by a gift from alumna Ellen H. Yankellow, PharmD ’96, BSP ’73, president and chief executive officer of Correct Rx Pharmacy Services, Inc., who donated $1.1 million to the School in September 2013 — the largest gift ever from a female graduate. 

Eddington To Direct University Regional Partnerships Natalie D. Eddington, PhD ’89, BSP, FAAPS, FCP, dean and professor of the School of Pharmacy, has been named executive director of University Regional Partnerships at the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB). In her new position, Eddington will work closely with University leadership to coordinate the expansion of UMB’s academic and research programs in Montgomery and Prince George’s counties, including at the Universities at Shady Grove and the new University of Maryland Medical System hospital set to replace Prince George’s Hospital Center. She assumes her new role immediately while maintaining her leadership of the School of Pharmacy. “Dean Eddington is an outstanding leader who has already proven instrumental in establishing and growing the School of Pharmacy’s academic and research programs at Shady Grove,” 8

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says UMB President Jay A. Perman, MD. “Expanding our footprint in Montgomery and Prince George’s counties is a key part of achieving our mission of providing top-notch educational, research, and patient care opportunities to all the citizens of the state of Maryland. We are delighted to have Dean Eddington’s expertise and guidance as the University’s seven professional schools work together, and with the other institutions in the University System of Maryland, to achieve these goals.” “There are many important and transformative initiatives that we can lead as a University in Prince George’s and Montgomery Continued on Page 9


Continued from Page 8 counties,” Eddington says. “With one position now coordinating efforts across our seven schools, there will be unlimited opportunities for growth in new and existing programs in these strategic geographic locations.” The Universities at Shady Grove, in Rockville in Montgomery County, is a collaborative campus involving nine institutions of the University System of Maryland. UMB offers educational programs in nursing and social work at Shady Grove, in addition to pharmacy. Its efforts there could expand with the construction of a new Biomedical Sciences and Engineering Education Facility on the campus that would include new, state-of-the-art laboratories to facilitate the growth of respiratory therapy, pharmacy, and nursing programs. Eddington will work with the Universities at Shady Grove’s Building Committee on planning and construction of the new facility. The new $650 million University of Maryland Medical System (UMMS) hospital in development at Largo Town Center could provide UMB students with additional educational, research, and clinical opportunities, Eddington says. “When you look at the data on Prince George’s County residents going to the emergency room, what you see are preventable visits predicated by manageable diseases such as diabetes, hyperten-

sion, and asthma,” says Eddington. “The county needs a stronger primary care infrastructure to work with these patients to manage their illnesses and keep them out of the hospital. We should look at ways to use not just the traditional health care model, but to also employ pharmacists and nurse practitioners to support primary care activities. My role will be to lead the planning, from a University perspective, of the education and practice components of the new UMMS hospital. This could include on-site training for students from a variety of disciplines at the new hospital.” One of the advantages of educating health care practitioners in Prince George’s County, rather than at the University’s main campus in Baltimore, is that they may be more likely to remain and practice in the county, Eddington adds. “We would want our graduates to stay in the county and help boost its primary care resources,” she says. In her new role, Eddington also will coordinate UMB programs at the Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research, an enterprise created to enhance collaboration in the biosciences, technology, quantitative sciences, and engineering among UMB, the University of Maryland, College Park, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. 

Mullins Named Chair of PHSR C. Daniel Mullins, PhD, professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR), has been named chair of the department following a nationwide search. “Dr. Mullins has been a trusted member of the School of Pharmacy’s faculty for nearly two decades and has served PHSR in many capacities,” says Natalie D. Eddington, PhD ’89, BSP, FAAPS, FCP, dean and professor of the School. “He is an accomplished researcher, a dedicated teacher and mentor, and a thoughtful administrator. I am confident that he will be a stellar leader for PHSR as it works to expand its programmatic research within the department and across campus, and as it shapes the next generation of pharmaceutical health services researchers through its nationally renowned graduate program.” Mullins, who joined the School of Pharmacy faculty in 1995, received his bachelor’s degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and completed his doctorate at Duke University. He has served the PHSR department in many capacities over the years, including as graduate program director, as a previous chair, and most recently as interim chair following the retirement of former Chair Ilene Zuckerman, PharmD ’83, PhD, BSP ’81, in December 2013. “Having served as both a previous chair and graduate program director for PHSR, I am strongly committed to the department’s success,” says Mullins. “I feel fortunate to have a career that has allowed me to work with such remarkable colleagues and students, and I am honored to have the opportunity to continue serving these individuals in this new role. Together, we will continue our department’s mission

to improve health among diverse populations through health services and other drug-related research, education, service, and community outreach.” Mullins’ research and teaching focus on pharmacoeconomics, comparative effectiveness research, patient-centered outcomes research, and health disparities research. He is co-editor-in-chief of the journal Value in Health and serves as a regular member of study sections for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and the National Cancer Institute. Mullins also has received funding as a principal investigator from AHRQ, the National Institute on Aging, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, as well as a number of pharmaceutical manufacturers. Recently, he partnered with researchers from the University of Maryland, College Park and eight stakeholder organizations to establish the Patient-Centered Involvement in Evaluating the Effectiveness of Treatments (PATIENTS) program, which aims to reduce health disparities by leveraging relationships with patient communities and health care systems to ensure that patients, health care providers, and other partners are actively engaged in research. “As chair of PHSR, I hope to lead the department by example and continue working with my collaborators to make health care more patient-centered and ensure that future health services research includes patients who represent the diversity of Maryland’s population,” Mullins adds. “My greatest desire is that the research conducted within our department will inspire researchers across the country to engage in similar projects aimed at achieving health equity for all citizens of the United States where health disparities currently persist.”  summe r 201 4

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Laurels Chanel Agness, PharmD, has been appointed to the National Commission for Certification in Geriatric Pharmacy’s Exam Development Committee for a three-year term and has been appointed by Gov. Martin O’Malley to the Maryland Advisory Council on Arthritis and Related Diseases. Nancy Bowers has been elected to the University’s Staff Senate for a two-year term. Heather Congdon, PharmD, CACP, CDE, has been named a Distinguished Practitioner and Fellow of the National Academies of Practice. Catherine Cooke, PharmD, has been named chair of the Maryland Advisory Council on Heart Disease and Stroke.

named an associate editor of the British Medical Journal. Suzanne Doyon, MD, was a co-recipient of the Best Platform Award at the North American Congress of Clinical Toxicology. Agnes Ann Feemster, PharmD, has joined the School as an assistant professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS). Rachel Flurie, PharmD, received a Resident/Fellow Research Award from the American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP). Joga Gobburu, PhD, MBA, FCP, has been appointed chair of the Pharmacometrics and Pharmacokinetics Section of the American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

Sandeep Devabhakthuni, PharmD, received the Pharmacist of the Year Award from the Maryland Society of HealthSystem Pharmacists and has been elected to the organization’s Board of Directors for a threeyear term.

Jeffrey Gonzales, PharmD, has been appointed chair-elect of the Education Subcommittee of the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacology Committee and received the 2013 Critical Care Education Award from ACCP.

Bethany DiPaula, PharmD ’95, BCPP, has been reappointed to the American Society of HealthSystem Pharmacists’ Section Advisory Group on Preceptor Skills Development.

Young Ah Goo, PhD, has joined the School as a research assistant professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (PSC).

Peter Doshi, PhD, has joined the School as an assistant professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR) and has been

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Stuart Haines, PharmD, BCPS, BCACP, BC-ADM; Kathryn Kiser, PharmD, BCPS; and Christine Choy, PharmD, received an inaugural Innovations Grant from ACCP’s Ambulatory Care Practice and Research Network.

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Stuart Haines, PharmD, BCPS, BCACP, BC-ADM, has been appointed a scientific editor of the journal Pharmacotherapy, and was also appointed for a three-year term to the American Pharmacists Association (APhA) Foundation’s Board of Directors.

Eleanor Perfetto, PhD, MS, has been named a 2014 University of Maryland Pharmacy Quality Alliance Ambassador and has been appointed to the University of Rhode Island College of Pharmacy’s Advisory Board for a two-year term.

Margaret Hayes, MS, has been named vice president of Network 2000, which promotes the advancement of women in professional and executive roles.

Brent Reed, PharmD, BCPS, has been named a fellow of the American Heart Association.

Amy Ives, PharmD ’93, was accepted into the MedStar Health Teaching Scholars Medical Education Research Certificate program. David Kilgour, PhD, has joined the School as a research assistant professor in PSC. Allison Lardieri, PharmD, has joined the School as an assistant professor in PPS. Raymond Love, PharmD ’77, BCPP, FASHP, has been reappointed as co-chair of the Pharmacy Quality Alliance’s Mental Health Work Group for 2014. Joey Mattingly, PharmD, MBA, has joined the School as an assistant professor in PPS. Sarah Michel, PhD, has been named director of the PSC Graduate Program. Ebere Onukwugha, PhD, MS, has been named director of the PHSR Graduate Program.

Timothy Rocafort, PharmD, has been named to the Editorial Advisory Board of Pharmacy Today. Charmaine Rochester, PharmD, CDE, BCPS, BCACP, has been commissioned as an officer of the Department of Health and Human Services. Fadia Shaya, PhD, has been elected to the Board of Directors of the Quality Health Foundation. Hongbing Wang, PhD, has been named a standing member of the National Institutes of Health’s Xenobiotic and Nutrient Disposition and Action Study Section. Roxanne Ward Zaghab, DM, CKM, has been named director of the Center for Innovative Pharmacy Solutions’ Knowledge Enterprise.


Roxanne Ward Zaghab and her team of pharmacy students and staff. From left, Caroline Kim, Ijeoma Agwu, Kathleen Dury, Zaghab, Ednner Oketch, Sarah Faress, and Farrah Tavakoli.

Continuing Ed Is a Click Away With Knowledge Enterprise, pharmacists help others stay ahead of the curve

BY GWEN NEWMAN

Photography by Tracey Brown

The practice of pharmacy has experienced significant changes during the last few decades, one that’s moved pharmacists from behind the counter to more direct patient care roles where they are both a trusted advisor and a vital part of the health care team. This clinical role is a core principle for today’s pharmacy students. But those trained in an earlier era find themselves caught in a paradigm shift. The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy anticipated this shift and in 2008 it launched the Center for Innovative Pharmacy Solutions (CIPS). Six years later, CIPS is recognized as a national resource center where pharmacists both create and gain from new cutting-edge, pharmacist-directed patient care models tailored for diverse settings that include ambulatory care, community pharmacies, hospitals and other institutions, skilled nursing facilities, and assisted living facilities. Designed to improve clinical outcomes, ensure medication adherence, and reduce health care costs, CIPS since its launch has leveraged the collective expertise of pharmacy professionals and experts in the field to foster dialogue among policymakers and health care leaders, organize pharmacy networks, and provide ongoing professional training opportunities for a captive audience that collectively helps identify medication-related gaps in care and improves medication effectiveness overall. One of CIPS’ most visible initiatives is the Knowledge Enterprise, an online platform of continuing education programs launched in 2012 that gives pharmacy professionals the opportunity to actively seek up-to-the-minute knowledge and skill training from faculty at one of the nation’s top-ranked schools of pharmacy, as well as constant access to the latest updates on clinical guidelines on a variety of health summ e r 201 4

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conditions. This is crucial in an arena where ongoing research findings and clinical evidence shape treatment guidelines and pharmacotherapy options. “The CIPS Knowledge Enterprise arose out of the need to prepare pharmacists for the changing health care environment,” says Roxanne Ward Zaghab, DM, CKM, director of the CIPS Knowledge Enterprise. “The Knowledge Enterprise provides access to the best evidence-based practice models using interactive and multimedia technologies. The portal and learning management system offer a convenient way for pharmacists to advance their knowledge, enhance their clinical practice skills, and sharpen their competitive edge. Learners can access the portal anytime and anywhere.”

Team Approach The Knowledge Enterprise curriculum is written by School of Pharmacy faculty with every course carrying the School’s seal of academic approval and meeting continuing education standards of the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education. The Knowledge Enterprise curriculum targets high-priority health care needs — most notably chronic conditions such as asthma, diabetes, and heart disease — and provides research and data-driven knowledge. Since the Knowledge Enterprise’s

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launch two years ago, learning opportunities already have expanded from individual courses, to clusters, to most recently, certification Carlos Maldonado and Dongsook Whitehead of Connect for Education programs. The CIPS Knowledge Enterprise was developed in partnership with an award-winning leader in web-based education, Connect for Education. To date, Connect for Education has worked with some 2,000 colleges and universities as well as a growing roster of non-educational entities. The School of Pharmacy’s Knowledge Enterprise is its first foray into the world of health professional education. “The reason our partnership works is because of our diverse strengths and expertise,” says Dongsook Whitehead, president, CEO, and co-founder of Connect for Education. “The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy brings the subject matter expertise and Connect for Education brings the instructional design, content development, and the full technology infrastructure and support experience. We meld the course design with the online delivery platform. Together, we have envisioned new audiovisual resources and practice-oriented learning tools.” In two short years, the Knowledge Enterprise platform has drawn the attention of thousands of pharmacists and pharmacy technicians from around the world who can take courses from the comfort of their homes and offices, at times that work best for them, with minimal investment, and with ongoing access as courses are updated continuously. So far, the Knowledge Enterprise has delivered more than 2,500 continuing education hours, and each month draws more than a thousand visits, with half of those visitors new to the portal. Mona Tsoukleris, PharmD ’87, BCPS, a professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS), was the first School of Pharmacy faculty member to develop a module and clinical series. As the former director of the School of Pharmacy’s continuing education program, she had the experience and expertise in asthma treatment to set the vision for the first Knowledge Enterprise offerings in asthma. “As the initial team leader of the Knowledge Enterprise, it was important to focus on providing learners with value-added continuing education,” Tsoukleris says. “We wanted to make sure we were providing pharmacists with practical skills and


knowledge they could immediately put to use. The courses include interactive learning features. Some use the ACCLAIM feature that allows the learner to upload video of themselves performing a skill developed in the course. Instructors then provide in-video individualized feedback, which adds to and personalizes the learning experience.” Mona Tsoukleris

Chronic Challenges Timing of the Knowledge Enterprise couldn’t be more crucial. One out of every two persons in the U.S. currently lives with a long-term chronic condition. And the numbers continue to climb annually in total cases, cause of death, and overall health care costs. An estimated 75 percent of the $2 trillion spent annually in the U.S. on health care is attributed to chronic conditions, such as asthma. While some 26 million Americans have asthma, one study published last year in the Journal of Asthma noted that the overwhelming majority of parents with children who had the condition didn’t know how to use the treatments they were prescribed and weren’t equipped to teach their children. And these were children who’d been hospitalized in the past year because of their asthma. Through Knowledge Enterprise courses, pharmacists can gain the knowledge and skills needed to help patients best manage their asthma and teach patients proper inhaler use. Through the portal, they learn how to counsel patients on behavioral changes, medication adherence, and smoking cessation. Part of the exercise is showing that they themselves know proper technique, which they first learn — then demonstrate — visually by recording themselves and submitting the video through the portal. Because instructors can offer personalized feedback, pharmacists can quickly put these skills to use in their daily interactions with patients. Sherry Moore, BSP, a pharmacist at Halethorpe Pharmacy in Arbutus, Md., and a School of Pharmacy preceptor, sees an increasing need to be more clinically focused in dealing with patients day to day — and it’s a role that she’s embracing. “With a growing percentage of patients diagnosed with and trying their best to manage chronic lifelong conditions like asthma, diabetes, and heart disease, one of the most notable challenges for both patients and pharmacists,” Moore says, “is the ever-changing climate of what works best for who and how to stay abreast of the latest and greatest treatment protocols, regimens, and devices at our disposal.”

Staying Up to Date In a world where illness is treated with an abundant and evergrowing array of medications, pharmaceuticals can be life-saving and life-enhancing. On the other hand, they can bring their own assorted side effects and complications when used either solo, in combination with other drugs, or ineffectively. Those affected are often overwhelmed, confused, or hungry for accurate and relevant health information. Patients are asking more questions, making attempts to do research, and assessing their treatment options. “You really have to be on top of your game,” says Moore, a pharmacist since 1995. “I saw the need to expand my role as a clinician and in counseling patients, and the School of Pharmacy’s Knowledge Enterprise provided a convenient, trustworthy, and cutting-edge platform for getting the information I need to help my patients.” Knowledge Enterprise courses require an investment of time ranging from as little as an hour to as many as 20-plus. Some courses are individual; others are part of a larger cluster that offers more intensive training within a specific area of expertise. The learning environment is robust, self-paced, and user-friendly with plenty of opportunities to test-drive new skills before applying them to practice. Each module also is updated regularly to reflect emerging research and user feedback. A onetime portal fee guarantees unlimited access, turning each learning experience into a sustained lifelong learning opportunity. The Knowledge Enterprise works in concert with the School of Pharmacy’s continuing education program, which provides live, in-person programs for practicing pharmacists. “The Center for Innovative Pharmacy Solutions was founded with the goal of developing innovative pharmacy programs that challenge the ‘status quo’ in health care,” says Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner, PharmD ’83, BCPS, CDE, FAPhA, professor and chair of PPS and executive director of CIPS. “The CIPS Knowledge Enterprise allows us to disseminate our practice models and train other pharmacists in new evidence-based treatment Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner modalities.” “It’s definitely given me more insight,” Moore says of the training she completed through the Knowledge Enterprise. “The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy is helping to push the profession forward,” Moore continues. “The School is teaching its students that you have to be more clinical and now, through the Knowledge Enterprise, it is taking that message to pharmacists who have been in the workforce for a while.” b summe r 201 4

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Young Ah Goo, Maureen Kane, and David Goodlett

Amazing Rebirth Mass Spectrometry Center is now flooded with talent, potential after early ‘disaster’ BY RANDOLPH FILLMORE

It may be a bit melodramatic to suggest that the School of Pharmacy’s new Mass Spectrometry Center rose phoenix-like from the ashes and puddles of the School’s old mass spectrometry facility after it was ravaged by fire and water. But it’s true. “Eight months into my assistant professorship, on June 28, 2010, we had a fire that destroyed all of our mass spectrometry resources, which included six instruments located in Health Sciences Facility II,” recalls Maureen Kane, PhD, an assistant professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (PSC) and co-director of the School’s new Mass Spectrometry Center. “A flood ensued when the sprinklers went off. It was a world-class mess. The fire wiped out the analytical tools I needed to conduct my research program.” Fortunately for Kane, the School’s Pharmacy Hall Addition, a seven-story academic, clinical, and research building, was due to open in the fall of 2010. A strategic decision was made to dedicate space on the new building’s seventh floor to an expanded and enhanced mass spectrometry facility. So, for the 14 months following the fire, Kane led the instrument replacement effort and helped with space renovations in the new building, now known as Pharmacy Hall North. She also headed the acquisition effort and oversaw the installation of four instruments purchased with funds for equipping the new building and the replacement of those instruments lost in the fire and flood.

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“I can’t say enough about Dr. Kane’s leadership, her efforts in overseeing the renovations, and her vision for a fresh start after the disaster,” says Andrew Coop, PhD, professor and chair of PSC. “Mass spectrometry [which is defined in a box on page 16] has seen explosive growth in its applications over the last decade, and we have realized our strategic goal to be an unparalleled, premier center with any and all mass spectrometry capabilities under one roof.” With new instrumentation and added expertise coming on board soon after the rebirth of the facility, the School’s mass spectrometry capabilities “more than doubled,” says Coop. That new expertise came with the recruitment of David Goodlett, PhD, in 2012, and Young Ah Goo, PhD, in 2013, both from the University of Washington. The added capabilities — instrumental and intellectual — resulted in the world-class facility receiving center status from the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB) in December 2013. Coop confirms that it took 18 months for everything to work out, but eventually Goodlett, a proven leader and visionary in his field, left his nine-year post at the University of Washington in Seattle and came on board as the center’s director and the School’s Isaac E. Emerson Chair of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Along with Goo, who had worked with him for many years, Goodlett brought five instruments to add to those already acquired by Kane. A biological mass spectrometry expert, Goodlett’s research centers on the structural and functional relationships in molecules such as proteins and lipids. Goo, a research assistant professor in PSC and associate director of the center, focuses on mass spectrometry-based applications to study biological questions aimed at discovering diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for human diseases. She also runs the business aspects of the center as they engage in fee-for-service activities for collaborators and clients at UMB, in University System of Maryland institutions, and beyond.

box,” says Kane, meaning that its combined analytical expertise in both large and small molecules creates a unique research environment with experts in both kinds of molecules under one roof. Their collective focus is on the global and systemic analysis of both large and small molecules using information about their structure and function to better understand systems biology, and also to use that knowledge in technology development. “Proteins are the ultimate working molecules in the body,” explains Goo. “We analyze large molecules — proteins or peptides — using mass spectrometry, but we can also look at small molecules — such as metabolites — which are the end product of a metabolic process and Dr. Kane’s area of expertise.” Their analysis also is aimed at understanding how proteins interact, or how they “talk” to one another in a global, systems approach. In the analysis of small molecules or metabolites, liquid chromatography is similarly employed to separate metabolites before detecting them with mass spectrometry. And, whether used in a large-scale screening or a targeted assay, is focused on quantifying specific molecules; the metabolomic approach provides a unique representation of what is going on in the cell. “The metabolite signature gives you a readout of what is happening now,” says Kane. “It complements the proteomic data and reveals unique information about physiological changes that can result from disease, a toxic insult, or a drug treatment.”

Open for Business The Field of Dreams line “build it and they will come” aptly applies to the new Mass Spectrometry Center. Clients from UMB, other universities in the area, and collaborators from

Adding Proteomics Prior to the fire, the facility had expertise in small molecules and metabolites/metabolomics, says Kane, but it lacked expertise in large molecules such as proteins. That changed with the arrival of Goodlett and Goo, who both have extensive experience in proteomics, the large-scale study of protein structure and function. “The new center is now a complete toolGoodlett brought five instruments to add to those already acquired by Kane. summe r 201 4

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around the globe are relying on the center to help further their research by furnishing what one researcher calls “incredible data.” Joseph Mougous, PhD, an associate professor of microbiology at the University of Washington, and John Whitney, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow at the university, are using the center’s mass spectrometry capabilities to help discover effector proteins, important for the actions of bacteria, but present at vanishingly small levels in bacterial cells. “We began our collaboration with Drs. Goodlett and Goo before they relocated to the University of Maryland,” says Mougous. “I am pleasantly surprised that the thousands of miles between us now have not slowed our rate of progress. We’ve sent complex samples for quantitative proteomics analysis on a Monday and gotten back incredible data by week’s end.” Getting “incredible data” is an interest for Mark Marten, PhD, MS, a professor in the Department of Chemical, Biochemical and Environmental Engineering at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County who will be using the center’s services to further his genetic research aimed at understanding what he calls “the underlying genetic network.” “Their tools are much more sensitive than any others around, allowing us to generate better data and come to better understandings,” explains Marten.

Besides researchers from other universities, researchers from within the School of Pharmacy and the other schools at UMB are lining up to use the center. For example, Kane is collaborating with James Polli, PhD, the School’s Shangraw/Noxell Endowed Chair in Industrial Pharmacy and Pharmaceutics in PSC, to use mass spectrometry to analyze and quantify the pharmacokinetics of a generic epilepsy drug as compared to the patented drug. “Cutting-edge pharmaceutical research requires cutting-edge bioanalytical methods,” says Polli. “The Mass Spectrometry Center is a necessary complement to our drug delivery and clinical research. Without it, we would be at a competitive disadvantage.”

What The Future Holds “There has been a shift in mass spectrometry applications for protein research,” explains Goodlett. “In the past, we have been using a ‘bottom up’ perspective that digests proteins into smaller peptides. With this approach we can lose track of which peptides came from which proteins. With new instrumentation, we can now take a ‘top down’ approach, which is more accurate. However, the process of sequencing whole proteins is not as simple as for peptides.”

WHAT IS MASS SPECTROMETRY? Mass spectrometry is an analytical technique and accompanying technology that produces a spectrum of the masses of atoms or molecules in a sample. The spectrum is used to determine the “fingerprint,” or signature of the sample, whether in terms of mass or chemistry. The analysis works by first ionizing — or charging by electron bombardment, among other methods — molecules or fragments of molecules and measuring their mass-to-charge ratio. The process is similar for solids, liquids, or gases. The atoms or molecules in the sample can be identified by comparing their determined masses to known masses, or through patterns of fragmentation characteristic of known masses.

The mass spectrometer has three major components: the ion source, a mass analyzer, and a detector. The

ions are transported to the mass analyzer via magnetic or electric fields. Data gathered are in the form of a mass spectrum. A pharmacokinetic analysis using mass spectrometry seeks information related to dose and metabolism.

Proteomics, the large-scale analysis of proteins using mass spectrometry, seeks information about the

identification and quantification of hundreds to thousands of proteins simultaneously, determines translational modifications and protein-protein interactions, and ultimately characterizes proteins. Metabolomics is the analysis of small molecules, or metabolites, which are the products of biological processes and are often key signals that direct cellular events.

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To help with the complex issues of interpreting protein spectra, the center hired David Kilgour, PhD, CChem, in early 2014. “Dr. Kilgour brings significant experience in both the development of instrumentation for mass spectrometry and the application of artificial intelligence in the next generation of data processing software,” says Goodlett. “He joins the center from the University of Warwick in the United Kingdom and brings unique perspectives from his previous eight years at the UK’s Ministry of Defense.” Goodlett also is working on applications with miniaturized mass spectrometry instrumentation and new ways to profile and identify bacteria more quickly. The current method of identification requires a timeconsuming, preliminary pure culture, he explains. The new method skips the culturing step. Besides saving time, the new method can identify components in complex mixtures, such as wounds or urine, and see changes in molecular structure, which indicate antibiotic resistance such as with MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus). Kane also is adding another dimension to her metabolomics work through mass spectrometry imaging. In this type of work, spectra are collected at many points in a grid-like array across the surface of a slice of tissue. The resultant mass spectrometry images create a spatial map of the molecular fingerprint. She is using this technique to characterize biomarkers in regions of tissue damage and also to localize the distribution of drugs and drug metabolites within tissue. While the mission of the center is driven by research and its fee-for-service activities, Goodlett embraces education as a third component. He aims to eventually begin a formal program of instruction for those seeking expertise in mass spectrometry, either for research or in practical applications. Coop shares that vision and sees the educational mission as an additional return on the bigger and better Mass Spectrometry Center investment. “We owe much to Dean Eddington and President Perman for their support,” says Coop. “They shared the vision and helped make the Mass Spectrometry Center an unparalleled asset for the School of Pharmacy, UMB, and beyond.” b

MASS SPECTROMETRY CENTER AT A GLANCE The expertise and experience of the Mass Spectrometry Center staff span a broad range of biomedical research from basic biology and medicine to technology development and translational research including: chemical biology; pharmaceutical biology; cancer biology; microbial biology; infectious disease; metabolic disease; chronic pain research; quantitative biosciences; translational and regulatory sciences; nanotechnology; instrumentation; bioinformatics and technology development.

The center is home to 15 state-of-the-art mass spectrometers for use in biomedical research and technology development: > AB Sciex 5500 QTRAP Hybrid Tandem Quadrupole - Linear Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer with a Shimadzu Prominence UFLCXR > Agilent 7700 ICP-MS Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer > Bruker AmaZon X Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer > Bruker Autoflex Speed MALDI-TOF/TOF Mass Spectrometer > Bruker UltrafleXtreme MALDI TOF/TOF Mass Spectrometer > Bruker Solarix 12 Tesla Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer > Thermo Q-Exactive Quadrupole-Obitrap Mass Spectrometer with Waters NanoACQUITY UPLC > Thermo Exactive Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer > Thermo TSQ Quantum Ultra Triple Stage Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer with Dual Pump Dionex UltiMate 3000 Rapid Separation UHPLC > Thermo Orbitrap Elite Hybrid Mass Spectrometer with Waters NanoACQUITY UPLC • Thermo Orbitrap Fusion Tribrid Mass Spectrometer • Waters ACQUITY TQD Tandem Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer with Alliance HPLC

> Waters ACQUITY TQD Tandem Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer with AQUITY H-Class UPLC > Waters SYNAPT G2 HDMS Q-TOF Mass Spectrometer with Ion Mobility Separation coupled with Nano ACQUITY UPLC System with HDX Technology > Waters SYNAPT G2S HDMS Q-TOF Mass Spectrometer with Ion Mobility Separation

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Cherokee Layson-Wolf and Margaret Hayes

Becoming ‘Job Ready’ Growing program gives students the tools to thrive in a tight job market

BY ELIZABETH HEUBECK University of Maryland School of Pharmacy students have always been well-prepared to apply the skills they’ve learned in the classroom and the laboratory to post-graduate jobs in the workforce. But with the stubborn recession that descended on the American workforce in 2008 came a much tighter job market across every sector, including the pharmacy profession. Couple that with the fact that an increasing number of advanced level students today graduate with little to no experience in the workforce because of the demands of their education, and the outlook for obtaining post-graduate employment appeared bleaker still. Responding to the changes, the School in the fall of 2012 launched its Job Ready Program, an all-out effort to prepare students for a competitive job market, earlier and in a more deliberate way than ever before. “The whole idea was to bridge the gap between the skills students had, what was in the curriculum, and what employers were looking for,” says Margaret Hayes, MS, director of student services and outreach in the School’s Office of Student Affairs.

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Hayes, who came to the School in 1997, remembers when student organizations to spread the word. employers were tripping over themselves to hire graduates. “Every time I get in front of students, I’m talking about the “About three years before we introduced the program, the job Job Ready Program,” Layson-Wolf says. “It isn’t just a listing of market was great,” she recalls. “Students had two, three, somejobs we make available. It’s ‘How do you find possible employtimes more offers — before graduation. Then the job market ers? What do you do when you meet with them? How do you began to change all over the country, including here in the present yourself?’ So students start identifying with the promid-Atlantic. Right before we started the program, there were gram early in their pharmacy school career and see what kind 20-plus students who didn’t have jobs as of graduation. We of impact it can have on them.” began to look at what we could do to help them become better As graduates like Amjad Zauher, PharmD, know, the Job prepared to compete for the decreasing number of available Ready Program’s impact can be meaningful. A 2013 graduate positions.” of the School of Pharmacy, he is employed at the University of The Job Ready Program prepares students for post-graduate Maryland Medical Center as a clinical pharmacist. He credits, employment from every in part, the Job Ready angle. The exhaustive list Program for his success. of the program’s activities “The School helped me that students can use to with preparing my CV, their benefit includes: a mock interviewing, and fall career fair; workshops in circulating my CV to on CV and resume writemployers in the area,” ing; information sessions Zauher says. “I definitely on career preparation, found the program helpprofessional dress, and ful. I was able to get a variinterviewing skills; mock ety of different opinions interview sessions for on my CV that enabled me employment and resito create not only what I dencies; roundtable and believe to be a very good Paul Ortiz, PharmD ’12, speaks with Olajumoke Amuwo of the Class of 2015, panel discussions with CV that highlights my Jasmine Ebron of the Class of 2016, and Susie Park of the Class of 2017 during employers; internship precredentials in a constructive a Job Ready Program mentorship event. sentations by employers; manner, but does so in a research career roundtable way that reflects my interdiscussions; and visits to industry. ests and goals. I also got great critical feedback from the mock “Most of these activities aren’t new offerings for us,” interviews.” explains Cherokee Layson-Wolf, PharmD ’00, CGP, BCACP, Those on the other side of the table during the interview FAPhA, associate dean for student affairs and associate profesprocess have been impressed, too. Matthew Shimoda, PharmD sor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science. “But ’84, pharmacy district manager for Supervalu/Shoppers the fact that these activities now are promoted and presented Pharmacy, has been offering his services to the School of in a more coordinated fashion makes them more readily accesPharmacy as a mock interviewer for approximately two decades. sible and effective for students.” And he likes what he sees lately. As Layson-Wolf explains, so too do constant reminders of “I absolutely think that the candidates that we are interviewthe importance of being “job ready,” which start long before ing this year from the School of Pharmacy have been much students graduate. Whereas the School used to impress upon more prepared than in past years,” says Shimoda, a member students in their third or fourth year the importance of preparof the School’s Alumni Association Executive Committee. ing for post-graduation employment, it now gets that message “The candidates seem much more confident and engaged with out earlier through the Job Ready Program, which collaborates the process. The message that the interview process is very with the Student Government Association plus numerous other important has been preached in the Job Ready Program, and I

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Students and employers gather in the atrium of Pharmacy Hall in October 2013 for the Job Ready Program’s annual Career Fair at which students meet with prospective employers to learn more about job opportunities.

think it is being heard.” In addition to revealing anecdotes from those on both sides of the job interview table, other positive signs of the Job Ready Program’s success abound. In 2012, about 72 percent of the School’s graduates had secured jobs upon graduation. In 2013, those with a job upon graduation jumped to 82 percent. Residency acceptance rates also rose after the implementation of the Job Ready Program. In 2013, 37.4 percent of pending graduates were offered a residency or fellowship, compared to 26.9 percent of graduating students in 2012. As the program’s success becomes increasingly evident, it’s attracting attention not only from job-seeking students, but also from prospective employers. “Instead of me calling them [employers], they’ve started calling me asking how they can participate in program activities,” Hayes says. “I think employers see our program as a great way to get in front of

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potential candidates.” That could be in part because of Hayes’ savvy in spreading the word to prospective employers and students. She’s developed a presentation describing the scope of the Job Ready Program that she then saved on a flash drive and sent to area employers. She keeps students updated through a dedicated Job Ready Program website, email blasts, and Facebook page. Promoting the program to employers as well as to students is the best way to bring the two parties together. “We’re constantly putting the message in front of them,” Layson-Wolf says. It’s a lot of work done primarily by one person. While the Job Ready Program comprises about 20 percent of Hayes’ responsibilities, other schools on campus have entire departments dedicated to similar endeavors. “It’s a testament to the support I get from Dean Eddington,” Hayes says. Clearly, Natalie D. Eddington, PhD ’89, BSP, FAAPS, FCP, dean and professor at the School of Pharmacy, is a proponent of the program. “The job market for pharmacy graduates has been more competitive over the last five to six years due to a variety of issues, including the economic downturn of the late 2000s and an increase in new pharmacy schools, which translates to more graduates looking for jobs,” she says. “As such, it was critical for us to enhance our career development activities to ensure that our graduates, in addition to being excellent pharmacy practitioners, also have the requisite skills to be competitive in the job market. We believe the Job Ready Program has been instrumental in the success our students are having in the tightening job market for pharmacists.” Although the program is meeting with success, Hayes isn’t satisfied with the status quo. She sent a survey to participating students — about 70 percent take part in some aspect of the Job Ready Program — and plans to fill any gaps she finds. “Every year I tweak the program,” she says. b


MAINSTAYS

Multi-Tasking ‘Mechanic’ BY MALISSA CARROLL

If you ask William “Bill” Cooper, MBA, to describe his job at the School of Pharmacy, he will tell you he is the School’s backroom “mechanic.” As senior associate dean for administration and finance, Cooper manages myriad responsibilities to ensure that the School runs smoothly. He oversees all of the operations that help advance the School, such as resource management, including budget and finance, human resources, and facilities, as well as information technology/audiovisual services and the Dean’s Office Suite. “The School of Pharmacy benefits tremendously from Bill’s clever, astute, and insightful nature,” says Natalie D. Eddington, PhD ’89, BSP, FAAPS, FCP, dean and professor of the School. “During the last several years, when many statefunded institutions faced significant financial challenges, Bill used his vast institutional knowledge to anticipate challenges and provide thoughtful resolutions that helped the School continue to grow.” Originally from Philadelphia, Cooper started his career at Drexel University, where he rose to assistant comptroller at age 27. “I always wanted to work in higher education, and Drexel was a great fit,” he says. But after his wife was offered a position as the first clinical pharmacist at Sinai Hospital in Baltimore, Cooper’s plans changed. “I promised my wife we would think about her offer,” he recalls. “The next thing I know, the moving trucks are lined up.” Though he commuted to Drexel for three years, Cooper eventually decided to resign and become comptroller of the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute. There he was promoted to acting associate vice president for administration and finance. In 1999, he joined the School of Pharmacy, where he has worked to advance the construction of three buildings — the Pharmacy Learning Center, Health Sciences Facility II, and Pharmacy Hall Addition. “Bill was instrumental in assisting with the development, design, and construction of Pharmacy Hall Addition,” says Eddington. “As a leader, you need someone whom you trust

to tell you what you need to know — whether Bill Cooper good or bad. Since I became dean, Bill has been one of my most trusted advisors.” The construction process also allowed the two colleagues to bond over a unique shared interest. “Like me, Bill is the proud owner of a bichon frise. Whenever I think about him walking that little dog, it brings a big smile to my face,” says Eddington. Cooper also led the development of a business plan to support the expansion of the School’s Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program to the Universities at Shady Grove (USG) in 2007. He negotiated with the University of Maryland, Baltimore, the University System Budget Office, and USG to secure funding for a cutting-edge pharmacy practice lab, institutional pharmacy, and patient counseling area — all in approximately one year. Since coming to the School 15 years ago, Cooper has witnessed enrollment and faculty hires increase by more than 50 percent. He also has seen tremendous research growth, expansion of the Maryland Poison Center, and numerous new centers and programs. Currently, he is involved with planning for Health Sciences Facility III, a Universitywide 428,970-square-foot, 10-story, $305.4 million biomedical research facility scheduled to open in 2017. He’s also overseeing construction of a new pharmacy museum, a telepharmacy suite, and a recording studio at the School. “It has been fun watching the School evolve over the years,” says Cooper. “Although it’s serious work, I love my job and consider myself fortunate to work with such great colleagues. It has been truly rewarding to be a part of an institution that continues to grow and impact the lives of almost every resident living in Maryland and beyond.” b

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MAINSTAYS

Gently Guiding Students on the Right Path BY MALISSA CARROLL

Robert Michocki

Tucked away on the third floor of Pharmacy Hall sits the office of Robert Michocki, PharmD, BCPS, professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science (PPS). The cacophony that is Baltimore’s Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard comes through the window. But that cacophony is unlike the man, for Michocki prefers to keep a quiet profile, happy to teach and mentor the School of Pharmacy’s 640 pharmacy students. “Since joining the faculty in 1971, Dr. Michocki has been one of the School’s most dedicated faculty members,” says Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner, PharmD ’83, BCPS, CDE, FAPhA, professor and chair of PPS. “He has fostered the personal and professional growth of thousands of students and residents at his practice sites in internal medicine, emergency medicine, and family medicine. His commitment to teaching and mentoring his students, as well as junior faculty members, is unparalleled. He makes every effort to ensure that those he mentors find success in their careers.” Born in Baltimore, Michocki has spent almost his entire career at the School of Pharmacy. He received his Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy there in 1971, and later pursued his Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) in the School’s post-baccalaureate PharmD program — a program he helped launch with David Roffman, PharmD, BCPS/AQ Cardiology, professor in PPS, and Robert “Buzz” Kerr, PharmD, professor emeritus. “Before us, the School did not have a clinical pharmacy program,” recalls Michocki. “In fact, pharmacists were not allowed to participate on rounds with physicians. We developed a very innovative and creative program. I could not be more 22

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proud of what it has evolved into today.” After receiving his PharmD, Michocki remained on faculty, where he taught and mentored a half dozen of the School’s current faculty members, including Raymond Love, PharmD ’77, BCPP, FASHP, professor in PPS. “He administered ‘yellow highlighter exams,’ created by Drs. Roffman and Kerr, during which we had to use a colored highlighter to develop a treatment decision tree for a particular patient,” Love recalls. “As you made your decisions, the test would tell you what happened to the patient. He also held a stopwatch on us. If we took too long to make a decision, the patient would develop another complication that we had to address. In our class of five, two students killed the patient. Those tests were truly the best learning experiences.” Michocki also mentored Rodriguez de Bittner, who commends the “sincere and honest” approach that he took with all of his students. “Dr. Michocki never sugarcoated the situation. He was very upfront and straightforward, but also provided me with some truly heartfelt advice.” In addition to his practice sites, Michocki, who served as PPS chair three times, maintained an ambulatory geriatric practice at the Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center. “I cared for many of those patients for 20 years or more, and had an opportunity to build a rapport with them as I addressed their medication needs,” says Michocki. “That is an experience not available to all health care professionals, so I wanted my students to understand the concern and empathy I had for my patients. If they only remembered one lesson from my class, I wanted it to be a sense of responsibility for taking care of people.” To honor Michocki’s dedication, the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the School of Medicine, where he practiced for more than 25 years, presented him with its Excellence in Teaching Award in May 2011. He candidly admits he could not have achieved such a milestone on his own, thanking Dean Emeritus David Knapp, PhD, and the late Peter Lamy, PhD, ScD. “Drs. Knapp and Lamy had a big impact on my success,” Michocki says. “I probably wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for them.” b


STUDENT NEWS

Laurels The School’s Kappa Psi chapter received the national organization’s Scholarship Award for having the best grade-point average out of its eight collegiate chapters. Abdalla Aly, a graduate student in the Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR), won Best Oral Presentation for Session A and the Gerontology and Geriatrics Education and Research Program Award at the University of Maryland, Baltimore’s (UMB) Graduate Research Conference. Simon Bae, a third-year PharmD student, received a Certificate of Recognition from Baltimore Mayor Stephanie RawlingsBlake for his work with 75 Journeys Home, a program that helps Baltimore’s most vulnerable individuals and families find and maintain a stable home. Lijia Chen and Maryanna Lanning, graduate students in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (PSC), received travel awards from the American Chemical Society for

its 247th National Meeting and Exhibition in Dallas in March. Shamia Faison and Sarah Sushchyk, graduate students in PSC, received travel awards from the Committee on Behavior, Biology, and Chemistry: Translational Research in Addiction for its annual meeting in San Antonio. Faison also won the Graduate Translational Research Award at UMB’s Graduate Research Conference. Kathryn Finneran, a fourthyear PharmD student, was the winner of the American Pharmacists Association (APhA)-Academy of Student Pharmacists Local Patient Counseling Competition. Lisa Hutchins, a fourth-year PharmD student, received the Phi Lambda Sigma Leadership Award. Jinani Jayasekera, a graduate student in PHSR, received the 2013 Lee B. Lusted Student Prize in the Applied Health Economics Category at the 35th Annual Meeting of the Society for Medical Decision Making.

Yevgeniya Kalinina, a PharmD/ JD student, has been selected to receive an Express Scripts Foundation scholarship from the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy.

Seemi Patel, a fourth-year PharmD student, received the School’s Dr. Dean E. Leavitt Memorial Scholarship Award for her significant leadership ability and academic excellence.

Bilal Khokhar, a graduate student in PHSR, won Best Poster for Session B and the Gerontology and Geriatrics Education and Research Program Award at UMB’s Graduate Research Conference.

Monet Stanford, a third-year PharmD student, has been appointed as the student consultant for APhA’s Community Pharmacy Residency Panel.

Shailly Mehrotra, a graduate student in PSC, received the American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics 2014 Presidential Trainee Award for her research on “Longitudinal Dose-Response Modeling of Topical Glycopyrrolate, an AntiHyperhidrosis Agent.” Nkem Nonyel, a fourth-year PharmD student, received the 2013 Maryland Pharmaceutical Society Scholarship Award. She also received a Student Government Association Leadership Award and a Certificate of Appreciation from Sheppard Pratt Health System for her service as a volunteer.

The following graduate students from PHSR received second place in the Center for Excellence in Regulatory Science and Innovation’s “America’s Got Regulatory Science Talent” competition for their presentation on enhancing the Food and Drug Association’s website for consumer information on medication safety and efficacy: Priyanka Gaitonde, Bilal Khokhar, Elisabeth Oehrlein, Melissa Ross, and Xian Shen. Winners of the School’s annual Target Case Competition were third-year PharmD students Brandon Keith, Henry Lederer, Jueli Li, and Tae Oh.

ASCP and Pickersgill Retirement Community Students from the School’s chapter of the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists (ASCP) participated in Pickersgill Retirement Community’s annual Country Fair in October, assisting residents at the various event stations, helping them move from event to event, and bringing smiles to lots of faces. b

Shown with Pickergill resident are, from left, Monica Tong, Class of 2017; Annette Piotrowski, Class of 2015; and Caitlin Hall, Class of 2015. summe r 201 4

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STUDENT NEWS

APhA Million Hearts Campaign The Operation Heart group of the School’s American Pharmacists Association (APhA)Academy of Student Pharmacists chapter lent its support to the national Million Hearts Campaign in February with a variety of activities. The campaign aims to raise awareness about the prevalence and prevention of heart disease and stroke in order to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017. b Dean Eddington (in black scarf ) and faculty joined student pharmacists in the Ellen H. Yankellow Grand Atrium in Pharmacy Hall for a Wear Red Day photo to kick off the week’s events.

From left, students Hannah Lee, Class of 2017; Ashley Kim, Class of 2017; Susan Williams, Class of 2015; and Frederick Chim, Class of 2016, offered blood pressure readings to patients at Catonsville Pharmacy.

From left, students Claire Kim, Class of 2017; Sherry Chen, Class of 2015; and Arlene Gao, Class of 2015, promoted the importance of medication adherence at a local Walgreens as part of the Schoolwide Script Your Future initiative.

Kappa Psi Fall was a busy time for the brothers of Kappa Psi. In October, the School of Pharmacy chapter led the volunteer coordination effort for the American Diabetes Association’s annual Step Out: Walk to Stop Diabetes. In November, brothers spent a day at the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital (UMCH) making Thanksgiving cards with patients. b

From left, brothers Francis Nguyen, Class of 2016; Andrea Cheung, Class of 2016; Stacy Choi, Class of 2015; and Monique Kim, Class of 2016, at UMCH.

From left, Annie Zhao, Class of 2015; Grace Herr, Class of 2016; Tyler Atkinson, Class of 2017; Caitlin Corker Relph, Class of 2017; Sheryl Thedford, PharmD ’11; Kinbo Lee, Class of 2015; and Brandon Biggs, Class of 2017, at the Step Out Walk. 24

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Students Promoting Awareness With a goal of spreading awareness of drug abuse to students at the University of Maryland, Baltimore and to those in Baltimore City, student pharmacists from Students Promoting Awareness visited Franklin Square Elementary/Middle School to deliver a fun and interactive presentation about the dangers of energy drinks, how to read nutrition labels, and the principles of drug abuse. b

From left, Emmanuel Ventura, Class of 2017; Susan Williams, Class of 2015; and Lucy Hahn and Emily Dunn, both of the Class of 2016, on the steps of Franklin Square Elementary/Middle School.

Lambda Kappa Sigma Members of the School’s Lambda Kappa Sigma (LKS) organized a fundraising bake sale at the Universities at Shady Grove in the fall. LKS strives to promote leadership and professionalism, scholarship and academic success, and philanthropy, service, and outreach. b From left, Saul Krosnick, Thi Ha Win Ko, and Muhammad Sheheryar — all from the Class of 2015 — staff the table of goodies.

NCPA Connects With Community This academic year, the National Community Pharmacy Association (NCPA) organized several events focused on community pharmacy, including faculty, alumni, and student career roundtables and patient outreach events centered on heart disease, high blood pressure, and diabetes. b From left, student pharmacists Michael Goldenhorn, Veronica Foelber, and Michael Boblitz, all from the Class of 2016, take part in a diabetes awareness outreach event at the Johns Hopkins Outpatient Pharmacy.

Phi Delta Chi Fall is member recruiting season for many Student Government Association organizations, including Phi Delta Chi (PDC), whose mission is to advance the science of pharmacy and its allied interests and to foster and promote a spirit of brotherhood among its members. b From left, student pharmacists Holly Robertson and Steven Sligh of the Class of 2016; Emmanuel Vasilarakis and Rilwan Badamas of the Class of 2015; and Ofuje Daniyan of the Class of 2014 attend PDC’s International Dinner Rush Event to recruit new members.

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STUDENT NEWS

CPFI Gives Thanks Members of the Christian Pharmacists Fellowship International (CPFI) set up a table in the Ellen H. Yankellow Grand Atrium in Pharmacy Hall to encourage faculty, staff, students, and visitors to think about how they express appreciation to others. b Shown at the table are CPFI members, from left, Nicole Kim, Class of 2015; Moses Demehin, Class of 2016; Hee-Jung Noh, Class of 2017; and Emmanuel Ezedike, Class of 2016.

Increasing Public Health Awareness

SMdPHA members share health information with the local community at the Lakeview Tower Community Health Fair Block Party. From left, Kevin Lei, Susan Giang, Kumaran Ramakrishnan, Emmanuel Ventura, and Hee-Jung Noh, all from the Class of 2017; and Jueli Li, Vicky Kuo, and Claire Kim from the Class of 2015.

The mission of the Student Section of the Maryland Public Health Association (SMdPHA) is to encompass all the health care professions as they work together to increase public health awareness and eliminate health care disparities. The group collaborates with many organizations at the University, including other pharmacy organizations, Nurses for Global Health, the Masters of Public Health Program, and its parent organization, the Maryland Public Health Association. b

Pharmacoepidemiology Seminar The School’s student chapter of the International Society of Pharmacoepidemiology (ISPE) hosted its first interdisciplinary Universitywide seminar in April. William O. Cooper, MD, MPH, a professor of medicine at Vanderbilt University, presented “Not Quite What They Were Planning: Evaluating Unintended Consequences of Prescription Medications.” Cooper’s work has influenced global health policy at the Food and Drug Administration, HealthCanada, and the United Kingdom’s Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency. b

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Dr. Cooper (holding plaque) is joined by representatives of the Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research, from left, Melissa Ross, graduate student; Susan dosReis, PhD, associate professor and ISPE faculty advisor; Dinci Pennap, graduate student and ISPE vice president; graduate students Patience Moyo, Xinyi Ng, and Mehmet Burcu; Xian Shen, graduate student and ISPE president; Bilal Khokhar, graduate student and ISPE secretary; graduate students Mindy Tai and Ting-Ying Huang; and Julie Zito, PhD, professor and ISPE faculty advisor.


White Coat Ceremony The Class of 2017 received the traditional white coat of the health care professions at a ceremony in September and read the School’s Pledge of Professionalism in front of faculty, alumni, family, and friends. Delivering this year’s keynote address was Brian Hose, PharmD ’06, president of the School’s Alumni Association and owner of Sharpsburg Pharmacy. b

The Class of 2017 recites the School’s Pledge of Professionalism.

Graduation 2014

Joseph Benner receives his hood from Richard Dalby, PhD, the School’s associate dean for academic affairs.

Family, friends, faculty, preceptors, and staff watched proudly as the School of Pharmacy’s 153 members of the Class of 2014 walked across the stage to receive their Doctor of Pharmacy hoods at the School’s annual convocation ceremony on May 16 at the Hilton Baltimore. Robert Michocki, PharmD, BCPS, a professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science, was chosen by the Class of 2014 as the keynote speaker for convocation. The School’s morning ceremony was followed by a campuswide graduation ceremony at the Baltimore Arena, where Baltimore native and author Wes Moore, MLitt, delivered the keynote address. This year’s graduating class included the first group of Master of Science in Pharmacometrics students. Ten students from the School’s two PhD programs in the Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR) and the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (PSC) received their hoods during an afternoon ceremony on May 15. b

From left, Annie Guan, Natasha Gupta, David Goffman, Claudia Garcia, and Nicholas Garcy.

Lauren Wagner (right), a PHSR graduate, with her mentor Susan dosReis, PhD, an associate professor in PHSR.

From left, Serena Pu, Omosigho Osian, and Stacy Ogle.

Jamie Michalek (right), a PSC graduate, with her mentor Sarah Michel, PhD, an associate professor in PSC.

Shana Bartkowski smiles as she is hooded by Dr. Dalby.

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PRECEPTOR PROFILE

Walter Reed Preceptor Earns a Salute BY BARBARA PASH

Michael Edwards

Michael Edwards, PharmD, MBA, BCOP, FASHP, enjoys teaching. He loves his specialty of oncology pharmacy. And he believes in giving back to the profession. Fortunately, Edwards has found a way to combine all three by serving as a preceptor for 14 schools of pharmacy, including the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy. “As a preceptor, my role is to take students, mainly in their fourth year of school, and teach them as much as I can about oncology pharmacy,” says Edwards. Edwards is chief of the hematology-oncology pharmacy and director of the oncology pharmacy residency at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda. He joined Walter Reed in 2005, but in a way it was a homecoming for him. In 1997, Edwards retired from the U.S. Army after a 22-year career, 17 as an oncology pharmacist. Much of that time was at Walter Reed. A California native who attended the University of the Pacific School of Pharmacy, Edwards is married and a father and grandfather who lives in Chevy Chase. As a preceptor since 2005, Edwards oversees nine five-week rotation blocks during a single year. Each block has about five students, of whom one is usually from the School of Pharmacy. On a typical day, the students spend the morning with staff pharmacists on pre-rounds with patients and then rounds with the medical team on each oncology patient. In the afternoon, they get together for research, patient presentations, and discussions. “I strive for hands-on and case-based learning,” Edwards says, with an emphasis on presentation skills and communication. Just in the span of his career, Edwards has seen significant changes in oncology pharmacy. Before, most of the medications were given intravenously; now, almost half are oral. “These days, there’s more interaction between the pharmacist and the doctor,” he says, especially on counseling to ensure good

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medication compliance. Another change has been the medications themselves. Not only are there more of them, but they can be deadly when used inappropriately. “These are specialty drugs,” he says. “The morbidity and mortality are very high when overdoses occur.” Preceptors provide more than 30 percent of the School of Pharmacy’s curriculum and have a faculty title of clinical assistant professor. Toyin Tofade, PharmD, MS, BCPS, CPCC, assistant dean of experiential learning, and her staff are responsible for finding preceptors. Pharmacists who work in specialty areas like Edwards and who work in health system settings are especially appealing as preceptors. “Students can have a significant experience on health system rotations or on a rotation with a pharmacist who specializes in a unique area that can lead to a decision about their career, such as pursuing a pharmacy residency program,” says Tofade, who has visited Edwards and the students at Walter Reed. “So preceptors like Dr. Edwards have a real impact on the next generation of pharmacy practitioners.” Jueli Li, a third-year PharmD student, did an oncology pharmacy rotation with Edwards at Walter Reed in the summer of 2013. Going on patient rounds was “interesting and eye-opening,” and she liked the afternoon discussions. “I got an outstanding overview and understanding of oncology pharmacy,” says Li, who praises Edwards as “one of the most caring people I’ve met.” As for Edwards, he thoroughly enjoys being a preceptor for University of Maryland students. “They always come well-trained and willing to work hard. The faculty is always willing to work with me,” he says. And, perhaps most importantly to him, “they help me to give back to the profession that has treated me so well for nearly 40 years.” b


DONOR PROFILE

Remembering Bernie BY CHRISTINE STUTZ

In an effort to attract top students and address the very real issue of mounting student debt, the University of Maryland Baltimore Foundation, Inc. (UMBF) recently announced a matching program for all new gifts to either establish a new endowed scholarship or to support an existing one. The timing of this initiative could not have been better for Marilyn Weisman, who recently established a scholarship endowment for the School of Pharmacy in memory of her husband, Bernie Weisman, BSP ’70, who died in 2013. Mr. Weisman was a pharmacist and owner of Charlesmead Pharmacy in North Baltimore from 1977 until a heart attack in 2002 left him incapacitated. To say that Bernie Weisman was beloved doesn’t begin to describe the loyalty his customers felt for him. To hear Marilyn Weisman describe him, her husband thrived on helping people, never had a bad day, and was generous, almost to a fault. “The man had sunshine all around him,” says Mrs. Weisman, who has managed the pharmacy since her husband first became ill. “Bern loved being a pharmacist and taking care of everybody.” It was Mark Levi, BSP ’70, a classmate and close friend of Mr. Weisman, who first suggested to Marilyn that they create a scholarship to memorialize him. “Bernie’s legacy was his personality,” Levi says. “There was not a soul who did not like Bernie. He had a smile on his face for everyone. He was always fair to his customers and served the great and near great with equal attentiveness and compassion.” Unlike many scholarships that reward academic performance, the Weisman scholarship will go to students who bring a passion for service to their pharmacy studies. “The scholarship will be awarded to a Doctor of Pharmacy student who best exemplifies Bernie’s personality,” says Levi. “Neither he nor I were scholars, so it was my intent to honor his memory by explaining to the students at the School that scholarship is important, but being a good person is

just as important.” Marilyn Weisman agrees. “I don’t think you always have to be at the top of your class to be good at what you’re doing,” she says. “Bernie didn’t graduate top in his class, but he was the most wonderful pharmacist.” The Weisman fund already has reached $57,050. While the Weisman family and Levi contributed the major portion of the endowment, friends and classmates also contributed. Since all of the contributions are eligible for the UMBF match, the current value of the Bernard A. Weisman Memorial Scholarship Endowment is $85,575. Any additional gifts made to this endowment over the next two years also will be matched. “The School of Pharmacy was given a pool of $750,000 by the UMB Foundation to match new or currently endowed scholarships,” says Janice Batzold, MS, acting assistant dean for development and alumni affairs. “We see this program as a catalyst for those who may have been thinking about creating an endowed scholarship at the School, and also as a way to help some of our existing endowed scholarships grow.” Traditionally, an endowed scholarship requires an initial gift of $25,000. Because of the match, donors only need to provide $16,667 to create a new scholarship. New gifts of $10,000 or more made to existing endowed scholarships also will be matched. Mrs. Weisman says she is thrilled to be able to assist School of Pharmacy students. “Bernie loved the pharmacy profession so much, and it helped him be successful,” she says. “I wanted to give something back to the profession and the School that enabled Bernie to do so well.” b For information on creating an endowed scholarship through the UMBF matching program, contact the Office of Development and Alumni Affairs at 410-706-5893.

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POSTDOCTORAL PROFILE

SOP Experience Clicked With IT Expert BY LYDIA LEVIS BLOCH

Aman Bhandari

If you are considering a career in the fast-paced world of health information technology (IT), Aman Bhandari, PhD, has this advice: “There are huge opportunities, but you need to find the right signal through the noise,” he says. “Look for the top 10 companies that have revenue and the best research teams.” Bhandari should know. He is U.S. director for health IT and data strategy at Merck & Co., bringing the technology and data lens to the company’s research projects. While working on his PhD dissertation at the University of California, Berkeley, Bhandari read a journal article about the disparities in prescription drug use. It was written by C. Daniel Mullins, PhD, professor and chair of the Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research (PHSR) at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy. Before he knew it, Bhandari, who never considered leaving California, was visiting the School of Pharmacy, where Mullins encouraged him to apply for a postdoctoral fellowship in the department. “I really wanted to do applied research,” says Bhandari. “There was no better place to do this than at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, where pharmacists and PhDs interact. I recognized it would be a great training ground because I saw how focused the department was on the success of its trainees.” From 2006 to 2007, Bhandari worked with Mullins and the School of Medicine’s Sylvain DeLisle, MDCM, associate chief of staff performance at the Baltimore Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center, analyzing the effectiveness of an electronic prescribing tool in the VA.

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Since then, Mullins continues to exercise significant influence on Bhandari’s professional career choices. Says Mullins: “Aman was one of those rare postdoctoral fellows who instantly was able to grasp the importance of and communicate about the policy relevance of his research. It’s not surprising that he was highly sought after by both the public and private sectors for his ability to inform health policy.” Following the fellowship, and on Mullins’ suggestion, Bhandari worked for two years at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. He was then tapped by the White House and, from 2010 to 2013, was senior advisor to Aneesh Chopra, MPP, and Todd Park, AB, President Obama’s two chief technology officers. Bhandari worked on global and national health policy issues involving health IT, data, and innovation. He then moved to his current position at Merck. “At Merck, a company best known for its innovative medicines and vaccines, we work with data partners, such as academic and scientific institutes, to advance science, understand more about disease, improve public health and clinical care, and support patient engagement,” says Bhandari, who resides in Boston. When Bhandari chose the School of Pharmacy for his postdoctoral position, he wanted to join the best research team possible, where he could have the greatest impact. What mattered was the talent and credentials of the team. Similarly, “making an impact in health IT is like climbing Mount Everest twice,” says Bhandari. “You’d better work with people you really like and believe in.” 


ALUMNI PROFILE

He’s Officer Material, Thanks to SOP Training BY LYDIA LEVIS BLOCH

Marco Bennett

Upon graduating from the School of Pharmacy’s PhD program in pharmaceutical sciences in 2003, Marco Bennett began working for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the Office of Generic Drugs Chemistry Division. Today, Bennett is known as a senior regulatory review chemist at the FDA, as well as Commander Bennett, a scientist officer in the U.S. Public Health Service (USPHS). “I’m very excited about being a review chemist in the Office of Generic Drugs because I know that my work leads to the approval of high-quality, low-cost, safe, and effective generic drugs, which are improving the lives of many Americans every day,” he says. His daily work involves reviewing the chemistry, manufacturing, and controls sections of drug applications submitted by drug companies. Bennett says it is his graduate training at the School of Pharmacy and experience with the FDA that enable him to conduct critical reviews of drug applications. While at the School of Pharmacy, he studied in the laboratory of former faculty member Jane Aldrich, PhD, and Andrew Coop, PhD, professor and chair of the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (PSC), working on the synthesis of novel opioid peptides as tools to study the role of opioid receptors. “The training I received at the School was very important because I learned the concept of targeted drug delivery and how drugs mitigate disease on the molecular level, as well as the manufacturing of numerous drug products,” Bennett says. “The courses provided a foundation for what I’m doing today.” As a USPHS commissioned officer, Bennett also functions as part of a mobile unit deployed during natural disasters and

special events. He has served deployments during Hurricane Rita and Hurricane Katrina, and has supplied logistical support during State of the Union addresses. The best aspects of his job, says Bennett, are the independence he has and, oddly enough, the deadlines, because he says he is “a deadline-driven person.” Despite considerable deadlines and job demands, Bennett finds the energy to encourage the next generation of would-be scientists. For several years, under the auspices of USPHS at Morgan State University, he has volunteered as a science fair judge. He is also a USPHS recruiter for COSTEP (Commissioned Officer Student Training Extern Program) for pharmacy students interested in public health and serving their country. “I had never known about USPHS until after I graduated, so that’s why I decided it’s important to become a recruiter and pass the knowledge along,” Bennett says. In addition, he has participated in a roundtable discussion at the School of Pharmacy describing career possibilities in the FDA and USPHS. “I enjoyed this because I could explain how the training the students receive could impact their work life and career choices,” he says. In fact, Bennett advises PhD students to take on leadership positions during their academic training and network with alumni to find out how they made the transition from graduate school to the professional world. Says Coop: “Not only is Dr. Bennett a true advocate for the School, but his efforts on behalf of the next generation are far-reaching.” b summe r 201 4

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ALUMNI PROFILE

Fulfilling Her Dream In a Big Way BY LYDIA LEVIS BLOCH Jung Lee

By the time she was 18, Jung Lee knew she wanted to become a pharmacist. Even before college, Lee began her career as a pharmacy technician in a Safeway Pharmacy in Greenbelt. She never guessed then that she would work for the company for nearly 21 years, steadily advancing to staff pharmacist, pharmacy manager, pharmacy recruiter, and up to pharmacy care manager. “The education I received at the School of Pharmacy was very helpful,” says Lee, who graduated with a BSP in 1993. “The School gave me a strong foundation to pursue a career in community pharmacy.” Of all the positions she had with Safeway, Lee is perhaps proudest of her accomplishments as pharmacy care manager from 2005 to 2011. She was in charge of the pharmacy care program for Safeway’s Eastern Division, which included Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and the District of Columbia. “I had many opportunities to be creative and implement patient care programs, such as the adult immunization program for this division,” says Lee. She was charged with developing and implementing the program and tasked with training pharmacists to immunize patients, a novel concept at the time. One of her biggest accomplishments was achieving 100 percent pharmacists’ participation in the immunization program and establishing 30 travel health sites that offered comprehensive

Jung Lee (center) on deployment at the U.S. Capitol. 32

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travel immunization services. In 2009, during the international H1N1 pandemic, she helped secure and coordinate the distribution of the H1N1 influenza vaccine for the entire Eastern Division. “It was a huge project getting the H1N1 vaccine out,” she says. “That year was like preparing for two flu seasons in one.” In 2011, Lee left Safeway to join the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the Office of Surveillance and Epidemiology. There, in the Division of Medication Error Prevention and Analysis, she was a safety evaluator reviewing proprietary name submissions for potential “look-alike” and “sound-alike” confusion with other marketed products, as well as reviewing labeling from a safety perspective. Since 2013, she has worked as a regulatory project manager in the FDA’s Office of New Drugs, Division of Nonprescription Clinical Evaluation, managing the application process for INDs (Investigational New Drugs) and NDAs (New Drug Applications). Lee also serves as an officer in the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, whose mission is to protect, promote, and advance the health and safety of the nation. A member of one of the five Capital Area Provider (CAP) teams, Lee has been deployed five times as a pharmacist to the U.S. Capitol to assist its Office of Attending Physician medical staff. CAP teams provide medical and public health resources and assistance during special events. So far, her deployments have included formal ceremonies and a joint meeting of Congress for the president of South Korea. On these missions, Lee, who was there to provide medical care if needed, was on standby near where the dignitaries and guests gathered. A frequent donor to the School of Pharmacy, Lee maintains her ties to the University, participating in alumni events, alumni receptions for FDA pharmacists, and attending the School’s annual career fair for current students. She has volunteered to become a preceptor and is eagerly anticipating working with her first student in spring 2015. According to Lee, “If it wasn’t for the School of Pharmacy and the opportunity I had to study there, I would not be where I am now.” b


The School of Pharmacy hosted an alumni reception at the annual meeting of the National Community Pharmacists Association (NCPA) in Orlando, Fla., in October. b

ALUMNI NEWS

NCPA Alumni and Friends Reception

From left, student pharmacists and members of the School’s NCPA student chapter Linda Lu, Class of 2015; Xirui “Emi” Chen, Class of 2015; Rachel Smith, Class of 2016; and Lei Guo, Class of 2015, spend time with Walter Siganga, PhD ’92.

From left, Neil Leikach, BSP ’92; Dixie Leikach, BSP ’92; Brian Hose, PharmD ’06, president of the Alumni Association; and Mark Ey, BSP ’86.

ASHP Mid-Year Meeting Faculty, students, alumni, and current and former residents gathered in Orlando, Fla., in December at the School of Pharmacy’s alumni and friends reception at the mid-year meeting of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP). b

From left, William Heller, DSc ’87, PhD ’55, MS ’51, and Robert Beardsley, PhD, RPh, professor and vice chair for administration in the Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research. Vincent LaCroce, PharmD ’84, and his wife, Cindy.

From left, alumni from the Class of 2013: Margaret Dabek, PharmD; Sheetal Patil, PharmD; Rumany Penn, PharmD; Kristen Ching, PharmD; Elaine Yip, PharmD; Anna Le, PharmD; and Trang Trinh, PharmD.

Alumni Association Ice Skating Event On Feb. 2, alumni, friends, and families gathered for a fun afternoon of skating at the Gardens Ice House in Laurel. This new initiative is designed to bring together School of Pharmacy alumni from the Maryland, Washington, D.C., and Virginia area. b

From front, Lt. Matilda Fienkeng, PharmD ’08; Abi Adebowale, PhD ’99; Capt. James Bresette, PharmD ’97; and James “Chai” Wang, PharmD ’11.

Annual Alumni Spring Fling On March 20, School alumni working at U.S. Department of Health and Human Services agencies and in the D.C. metro area reconnected at TGIFriday’s in Silver Spring. b From left, David Chen, PharmD ’91, and Rudy Winternitz, BSP ’54.

From left, Jung Lee, BSP ’93, and Abi Adebowale, PhD ’99.

From left, Cmdr. Catherine Chew, PharmD ’99, and Katie Klemm, PharmD ’08.

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ALUMNI NEWS

Graduation Banquet More than 200 students, alumni, and faculty celebrated an exciting evening of achievements at the 2014 Graduation Banquet on May 14. The annual banquet is hosted by the School’s Alumni Association as a way of welcoming the new graduates into the alumni family. During the event at Martin’s Valley Mansion in Cockeysville, Cynthia Boyle, PharmD ’96, FAPhA, professor and chair of the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Administration at the University of Maryland, Eastern Shore School of Pharmacy, was presented with the Evander Frank Kelly Honored Alumnus Award, and Marilyn Shangraw, wife of Ralph Shangraw, PhD, professor emeritus of the School of Pharmacy who passed away in 1998, and a loyal, long-standing member of our School of Pharmacy family, received the B. Olive Cole Honorary Alumnus Award. 

From left, students Hung Tran and Taylor Woodroof, a guest, and students Robert Gharavi, Christopher Smith, Ofuje Daniyan, Frederick Asamoa-Frimpong, Njualem Nwelatow, Gabrielle Kokkinakos, and Rae Smith.

Brian Hose presents Marilyn Shangraw with the B. Olive Cole Honorary Alumnus Award.

Brian Hose, PharmD ’06, president of the Alumni Association, presents Cynthia Boyle with the Evander Frank Kelly Honored Alumnus Award.

Michael Leung, president of the Class of 2014, presents Dean Eddington with the class gift of $2,000 designated for a Students for Scholarships fund.

Front row from right, students Lisa Hutchins and Jamie Elsner and two guests. Back row from left, students Andrew Grogg, John Dolan, and Erin Fleming, a guest, student Jessica Pyhtila, and three guests.

In Memoriam This section is dedicated to School of Pharmacy alumni who passed away between July 1, 2013, and Jan. 1, 2014. As the Maryland pharmacy profession is a close-knit community, we are honored to share the names of recently deceased alumni who have in some way impacted the profession and the practice of pharmacy. Robert T. Adkins, BSP ’52, MD Edward Ashe, BSP ’50 John J. Ayd, BSP ’51 Fred S. Barnstein, BSP ’55 Leslie A. Benson, BSP ’74 Sydney L. Burgee Jr., BSP ’55 John L. Cunzeman Jr., BSP ’50 Ronald E. Del Castilho, BSP ’64 34

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Randy R. Delker, PharmD ’01 Jerald A. Freedman, BSP ’67 Jack Gelrud, BSP ’44 Randall W. Grimes, PharmD ’98 Albert Heyman, BSP ’39, MD David M. Oken, BSP ’58 Richard A. Proksch, MS ’77 Charles J. Schulte Jr., PHG ’31

Orin S. Smith, BSP ’82 Allen Spak, BSP ’63, DDS Ronald J. Spector, BSP ’71, MD Leon Strauss, BSP ’44 Herbert C. Wagner, BSP ’62 Martin W. Wolff Jr., BSP ’68 If you would like to make a memorial gift, please use the enclosed envelope or call 410-706-5893.


David Stewart Associates Dinner This year’s David Stewart Associates Dinner was held on April 10 at the Woodholme Country Club in Pikesville. The annual dinner celebrates the generosity of our leadership donors who make a gift of $1,000 or more annually to the School. At the dinner, Dean Natalie D. Eddington, PhD ’89, BSP, FAAPS, FCP, presented the Key to Pharmacy Hall to Ramona Hawkins, RPh, a Dean Eddington with Ramona Hawkins, former commissioner on the Maryland Board of Pharmacy, a member of the Maryland Women’s this year’s recipient of the Key to Pharmacy Hall of Fame, and a staunch supporter of diversity in the pharmacy profession. b Hall.

Third-year student pharmacist Linda Lu, recipient of EPIC Pharmacies’ Leslie S. Feldman Scholarship, with Angelo Voxakis, BSP ’71 (left), and George Voxakis, BSP ’58, PharmD ’96.

Michael Westbrook of the Class of 2015 shares his experiences as the recipient of the Thomas S. Petr & Family Endowed Scholarship.

From left in back row, James Polli, PhD, the School’s Shangraw/Noxell Endowed Chair in the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences (PSC); David Goldberg; Sarah Michel, PhD, associate professor in PSC; Andrew Coop, PhD, professor and PSC chair; Wanda Williams, instructor in PSC; and Keely Pierzchalski, a PSC PhD student. From left in front row, Joyce Pinco; Robert Pinco, JD; Marilyn Shangraw; and Albert Heck, MD.

Class Notes 1971 Angelo Voxakis, BSP, recently announced his retirement after 16 years as president and CEO of EPIC Pharmacies, a national network of independently owned pharmacies.

1976 Marc Summerfield, MS, was recently awarded the W. Arthur Purdum Award from the Maryland Society of Health-System Pharmacists. Summerfield is president

of Summerfield Consulting, which he recently established after serving as director of pharmacy at the University of Maryland Medical Center for 12 years.

1979 Peter Manso, BSP, a former pharmacist and partner in Edwards Wildman’s Intellectual Property group and a veteran of technologyrelated law, has been named to the board of directors of BioFlorida, a statewide trade

association for the bioscience industry.

1993 Paul Voitek, BSP, has been promoted to pharmacy supervisor for RoNetco ShopRite stores, where he will lead and support the pharmaceutical, administrative, and customer service functions at each grocery chain’s stores. He resides in Blairstown, N.J., with his wife and five children.

1996 Cynthia Boyle, PharmD, FAPhA, has been chosen as president-elect of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. She will assume the role of president in mid-2015.

1999 Dennis Killian, PharmD, PhD ’01, has been named interim dean of the University of Maryland, Eastern Shore School of Pharmacy.

Calling all yearbooks! The Office of Development and Alumni Affairs is in need of School of Pharmacy yearbooks for historical purposes. If you have an old yearbook and no longer need it or want it or have extra copies, please consider mailing it to us at the following address. University of Maryland School of Pharmacy Office of Development and Alumni Affairs 20 N. Pine Street, Room S740 | Baltimore, MD 21201

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ALUMNI NEWS

A Message from the Alumni President Dear fellow alumni, It has been an incredible honor to serve as president of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy’s Alumni Association this last year. It is extremely rewarding to work with the Alumni Association’s Executive Committee and students to further the association. I have been told that I have a problem saying “no,” but my wife, Brian Hose Stacey, allowed me to say “yes” to serving as president, and for that I am forever grateful. I would especially like to thank Janice Batzold, MS, acting assistant dean, and Jennifer McGinley, associate director of alumni affairs, for their dedication to the School’s Office of Development and Alumni Affairs and for their support of the association and our officers. For those of you who read Capsule magazine but may not have attended an alumni event in a number of years, I encourage you to seize the opportunity in 2014. Make this the year that you reconnect with your classmates and fellow members of the profession. Regional events this year such as the FDA Happy Hour in Silver Spring and family ice skating in Laurel made it easier for our local alumni to get together and reconnect with the School. These were in addition to receptions at all of the major pharmacy association meetings where we saw so many alumni and friends. Thank you to those who were able to attend one of these events. All of our events are advertised via email invitations, the School’s website, and the Alumni Association’s Facebook page. One upcoming opportunity you will want to take advantage of is our All Alumni Reunion. It is fast approaching on Sept. 12-13. At the reunion, we will spotlight the achievements of our 50-year reunion class members by honoring them and their contributions during the last half-century. As the name implies, ALL alumni are welcome. You need not be a member of the spotlighted class to come and reconnect with your friends and the School. On a more professional note, it is certainly an exciting time for the pharmacy profession as we continue to move toward a tipping point with respect to clinical services and provider status. The School of Pharmacy has always been a leader in our profession, and the next few years will provide the opportunity to reinforce that position as we move toward establishing provider status for pharmacists. I encourage all of you to get involved and come along for the ride! As I hand over the reins to our new president, Julian Chun, PharmD ’02, I am confident that we will continue to work hard to reach out to all of you and provide opportunities for continued involvement with the School. Whether you give of your time by serving on a committee, modeling your practice as a preceptor, or financially supporting the School and our current students, I thank you for your continued support. If you have not yet taken that step to give back to your profession, I can assure you that it will be one of the most rewarding things you do. I look forward to seeing you all soon! Sincerely,

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 2014-2015 OFFICERS Julian Chun, PharmD ’02 President Sharon Park, PharmD ’04 President-Elect Brian Hose, PharmD ’06 Past President J. Bradley Thomas, BSP ’82 Treasurer James “Chai” Wang, PharmD ’11 Secretary

MEMBERS AT LARGE Cynthia Boyle, PharmD ’96, FAPhA Capt. James Bresette, PharmD ’97 Min-li Cary, PharmD ’08 Rai Cary, PharmD ’08 Lt. Matilda Fienkeng, PharmD ’08 Samuel Lichter, BSP ’60 Gina McKnight-Smith, PharmD ’97, MBA

Brian Hose, PharmD ’06 President brian.hose@gmail.com

Matthew Shimoda, PharmD ’84 Michael Steinberg, PharmD ’00 Brian Hose, PharmD ’06, pharmacist and owner of Sharpsburg Pharmacy, was inducted into the Dean’s Hall of Fame for Distinguished Community Pharmacists as part of the annual banquet hosted by the School’s National Community Pharmacists Association (NCPA) student chapter on April 24. Shown with Brian are his wife, Stacey, and Dean Eddington.

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Doris Voigt, PharmD ’04


2012-2013 ANNUAL REPORT

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LEADERSHIP

Dean Natalie D. Eddington, PhD, BSP, FAAPS, FCP Senior Associate Dean for Administration and Finance William J. Cooper, MBA Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Richard Dalby, PhD Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Education Peter Swaan, PhD Associate Dean for Student Affairs Cherokee Layson-Wolf, PharmD, CGP, BCACP, FAPhA Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs and Assessment Lisa Lebovitz, JD

CENTERS Center for Drug Safety Center for Innovative Pharmacy Solutions Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner, PharmD, BCPS, CDE, FAPhA, Director Center for Nanobiotechnology Peter Swaan, PhD, Director Center for Translational Medicine Joga Gobburu, PhD, MBA, FCP, Director Center on Drugs and Public Policy Francis B. Palumbo, PhD, JD, Executive Director

Assistant Dean for Communications and Marketing Rebecca Ceraul

Computer-Aided Drug Design Center Alexander D. MacKerell Jr., PhD, Director Jana Shen, PhD, Co-Director

Acting Assistant Dean for Development and Alumni Affairs Janice T. Batzold, MS

Maryland Poison Center Bruce D. Anderson, PharmD, Director

Assistant Dean for Information Technology Tim Munn

Mass Spectrometry Center David R. Goodlett, PhD, Director Maureen Kane, PhD, Co-Director

Assistant Dean for Instructional Design and Technology Shannon Tucker, MS Assistant Dean for Policy and Planning Deborah Dewitt, JD Assistant Dean at the Universities at Shady Grove Heather Brennan Congdon, PharmD, CACP, CDE Chair, Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research C. Daniel Mullins, PhD Chair, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences Andrew Coop, PhD Chair, Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner, PharmD, BCPS, CDE, FAPhA

Special thanks to the following contributors: Janice Batzold, Nancy Bowers, William Cooper, Cherokee Layson-Wolf, Lisa Lebovitz, Megan Moorefield, Kierion Stephens, and Alicia Walters

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Peter Lamy Center on Drug Therapy and Aging Bruce C. Stuart, PhD, Executive Director Pharmaceutical Research Computing Center Ebere Onukwugha, PhD, MS, Executive Director


KEY FACTS

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

STAFF

PHARMD PROGRAM

73

Administrative, business, development and alumni

1,323

Total applicants

affairs, experiential learning, human resources,

160

Entering class

communications and marketing, student affairs,

12%

Acceptance rate

and faculty support

93%

With undergraduate degree or higher

3.40

Average GPA

223

Technical, research staff, postdoctoral fellows, and

80.2%

Average PCAT composite percentage

teaching assistants

Ethnicity across all four years:

SCHOLARLY ACTIVITY

48.8%

Asian

78

Principal investigators

33.5%

Caucasian

1

Published books (edited, authored, or co-authored)

13.5%

African-American

405

Refereed works published (authored or co-authored)

1.2%

Hispanic

37

Non-refereed works published (authored or

.5%

American Indian

co-authored)

2.5%

No response

573

Papers presented at professional meetings

PHD PROGRAMS

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

77

61

Review panels (off-campus peer review panels and

accreditation and certification teams)

Department of Pharmaceutical Health

1,940

Manuscripts read/reviewed for professional journals,

Services Research

conferences, and publishers

27

81

Editors/associate editors for professional journals

55

Officeholders of professional associations

Total enrollment

Students

67/33% Female/Male

523

Departmental, institutional, and University System

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences

of Maryland committees

50

233

Total days in public service (non-consulting role with

K-12 schools and community colleges, government

agencies, nonprofit organizations, or businesses)

Students

54/46% Female/Male MASTER’S PROGRAMS 82 Total enrollment

EMPLOYMENT SURVEYS Job Placements for the Class of 2013

Pharmacometrics

37%

Residency/fellowship

48 students

37%

Community/chain and community/

independent pharmacy

Regulatory Science

18%

No job by graduation

34 students

5%

Hospital

3%

Industry/PHS/managed care/other

ACADEMIC TRAINING 56

Postdoctoral fellows

17

Residents

FACULTY 86

Full-time faculty

57

Affiliate faculty

722

Preceptor faculty

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FINANCIALS

SOURCES OF OPERATING REVENUES SUPPORTING THE SCHOOL This report is an unaudited presentation of revenues supporting the School.

Gifts $1,895,109

FISCAL YEAR 2012-2013 Total source of funds $50,517,503

Auxiliary and Misc. $2,489,492

Net General Appropriation and Tuition and Fees $24,078,849

Grant and Contract Awards and Designated Research Initiative Funds $20,782,309

Scholarships, Fellowships, and Endowments $1,258,428

FISCAL YEAR 2011-2012

Federal Funds $13,316

Gifts $2,265,341

Total source of funds $48,304,968

Net General Appropriation and Tuition and Fees $24,291,469

Grants and Contract Awards and Designated Research Initiative Funds $18,324,917

Auxiliary and Misc. $1,825,238

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Scholarships, Fellowships, and Endowments $1,184,687

Federal Funds $413,316


NEW FACULTY

Catherine Cooke, PharmD, BCPS Research Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science Cooke earned her Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the Medical University of South Carolina and completed a managed care residency at the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy University of the Sciences. She has worked in academia, managed care, and the pharmaceutical industry. In these areas, she studied medication-taking behavior by examining factors associated with adherence to chronic therapies. Her research focuses on health outcomes associated with medication use.

Young Ah Goo, PhD Research Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences Associate Director, Mass Spectrometry Center Goo received a PhD in genome sciences/pathobiology from the University of Washington, where she gained expertise in functional genomics, proteomics using mass spectrometry, and systems biology. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Institute for Systems Biology in Seattle, where she worked in the prostate cancer research group and the proteomics group. Before joining the School of Pharmacy, she was a clinical assistant professor in the School of Nursing at the University of Washington in Seattle, where her research focused on chronic pain syndromes. Her current research focuses on the use of mass spectrometry-based proteomics applications to study biological questions, applying global systems approaches with a focus toward the discovery of diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers, and therapeutic targets for human diseases.

Mathangi Gopalakrishnan, PhD, MS Research Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science Gopalakrishnan obtained her BS and MS degrees in pharmacy from Birla Institute of Technology and Science in Pilani, India. She completed another MS and a PhD in statistics at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Working in the School of Pharmacy’s Center for Translational Medicine, Gopalakrishnan’s research interests include pharmacometrics, Bayesian applications in drug development, and innovative clinical trial designs.

Hazem Hassan, PhD Research Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences Hassan received a BS degree in pharmacy from Helwan University in Cairo, Egypt. He then came to the School of Pharmacy, where he received his PhD and completed a postdoctoral fellowship. Hassan previously held positions as an assistant professor at Helwan University and as an adjunct assistant professor at the Modern Sciences and Arts University in Egypt. He is a registered pharmacist, licensed to practice in Maryland. The focus of his research is to investigate the pharmacokinetics and biopharmaceutics aspects that impact drug development and drug therapy optimization. summ e r 201 4

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NEW FACULTY

Vijay Ivaturi, PhD Research Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science Ivaturi received his PhD in experimental and clinical pharmacology from the University of Minnesota. He completed a postdoctoral fellowship in pharmacometrics at Uppsala University in Sweden. Working in the School of Pharmacy’s Center for Translational Medicine, Ivaturi’s research focuses on the development of methods and tools for quantitative clinical pharmacology that can be applied in informed decision-making in clinical therapeutics and drug development.

Eleanor Perfetto, PhD, MS Professor, Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research Perfetto is renowned for her work in comparative effectiveness research, quality, health economics and outcomes research, and related policy and regulatory topics. Before joining the School of Pharmacy, she was senior director of federal government relations at Pfizer, Inc. She holds BS and MS degrees in pharmacy from the University of Rhode Island, and a PhD from the University of North Carolina School of Public Health, concentrating in health policy and epidemiology. She is a board member of the Pharmacy Quality Alliance and the Center for Medical Technology Policy. In recent years, she has served on boards and committees for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the National Quality Forum, and the Health Industry Forum. Early in her career, Perfetto served in the U.S. Public Health Service, initially as an Indian Health Service pharmacist and later as a senior pharmacoepidemiologist at the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, now the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Perfetto is an advocate for patients with head trauma-related dementias, receiving wide recognition for her advocacy efforts. She currently serves on the board for and is the immediate past president of the board of directors for the Sports Legacy Institute.

Brent Reed, PharmD, BCPS Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science Reed received a BS degree in biology from the University of Tennessee and a Doctor of Pharmacy degree from the University of Tennessee College of Pharmacy. He completed both a pharmacy practice residency and a cardiology specialty residency at the University of North Carolina Hospitals in Chapel Hill. He is a board-certified pharmacotherapy specialist. Reed’s practice and research interests include cardiovascular critical care, acute decompensated heart failure, cardiac transplantation, and mechanical hemodynamic support. He is a fellow of the American Heart Association and a member of its Council of Clinical Cardiology’s Clinical Pharmacology Committee, and a former trustee of the American Pharmacists Association (APhA), national president for the APhA Academy of Student Pharmacists, and chair of the APhA New Practitioner Advisory Committee. He recently received APhA’s Distinguished New Practitioner Award.

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GRANTS AND CONTRACT AWARDS July 1, 2012 – June 30, 2013

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACEUTICAL HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH (PHSR) PROJECT INVESTIGATOR

RANK/TITLE

PROJECT TITLE

SPONSOR NAME

PROJECT TOTAL

Susan dosReis Associate Professor Comparative Safety of Atypical Antipsychotics in High-Risk U.S. Children with ADHD

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

$20,167

Susan dosReis Associate Professor Measuring Parent Preferences for ADHD Treatment to Predict Adherence

National Institutes of Health

$345,427

Susan dosReis Associate Professor

Community Alternatives to Psychiatric Maryland Department of and Residential Treatment Facilities Health and Mental Hygiene Demonstration Waiver Program Management

Susan dosReis Associate Professor A Multi-State Collaborative to Improve Children’s Mental Health

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$94,092

$51,000

Sarah Dutcher Graduate Student

Pharmacotherapeutic Management and American Foundation for Hospitalizations Among Nursing Home Pharmaceutical Education Residents with Atrial Fibrillation

$6,500

C. Daniel Mullins

Professor and Interim Chair

Heterogeneous Treatment Effect: DNA vs. MSA

National Pharmaceutical Council

$61,854

C. Daniel Mullins Professor and Interim Chair

Do Bayesian Adaptive Trials Offer Advantages for Comparative Effectiveness Research?

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

$358,895

C. Daniel Mullins Professor and Interim Chair

Interpreting Instrumental Variable Estimates When Treatment Effects are Heterogeneous Across Patients: ACE/ARBs and Race

University of Iowa

$74,343

Francoise Pradel Professor

Maryland Strategic Prevention Framework (MSPF) Process and Outcome Evaluation

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$350,000

Thiyagu Rajakannan Postdoctoral Fellow

Feasibility of Patient-Centered Tools for Improving Medication Adherence in Pediatric Attention-Deficit/ Hyperactivity Disorder

Pharmaceutical Research and $50,000 Manufacturers of America

Gail Rattinger

Patient-Centered Medical Home Evaluation

HealthCare Resolution Services, Inc.

$110,950

Emily Reese Graduate Student

Value of Information: The Contribution of the PSA Screening Test to Prostate Cancer Diagnosis

PhRMA Foundation

$25,000

Fadia Shaya Professor

Peer to Peer Approach for the Management of Diabetes

Sanofi-Aventis

$130,379

Research Assistant Professor

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GRANTS AND CONTRACT AWARDS

Linda Simoni-Wastila Professor

Quality of Medication Use in Long-Term Care Facilities

Retirement Research Foundation $75,876

Linda Simoni-Wastila Professor

State Epidemiology Outcomes Workgroup

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

Bruce Stuart

Parke-Davis Chair of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy

Chartbook of Medication Utilization Pharmaceutical Research and Patterns and Outcomes Among Part D Manufacturers of America Enrollees with Common Chronic Diseases

$54,683

Bruce Stuart

Parke-Davis Chair of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy

Medication Adherence and Medicare Expenditures Among Beneficiaries with Diabetes

Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America

$45,000

Bruce Stuart Parke-Davis Chair Assessing Out-of-Plan Drug Use by Pharmaceutical Research and of Geriatric Medicare Part D Enrollees Manufacturers of America Pharmacotherapy Hoai-An Truong Assistant Professor Program Planning, Implementation, Maryland Department of and Evaluation for Various Alcohol and Health and Mental Hygiene Drug Abuse Administration Initiatives

$25,000

Ilene Zuckerman Professor and Chair eICU Research Institute Studies

Philips Healthcare, Patient Monitoring and Informatics

$200,000

Ilene Zuckerman

Novartis Postdoctoral Fellowship

Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp. $97,500

Ilene Zuckerman Professor and Chair

Long-Term Anticoagulation Therapy After Traumatic Brain Injury in Older Adults

National Institute on Aging

$230,250

Ilene Zuckerman Professor and Chair

Maryland Patient-Centered Medical Home

Maryland Health Care Commission

$261,688

Ilene Zuckerman Professor and Chair

Maryland Patient-Centered Medical Home Shared Savings

Maryland Health Care Commission

$111,711

Total PHSR

$3,008,527

SPONSOR NAME

PROJECT TOTAL

Combe Incorporated

$46,498

Health Resources and Services Administration

$272,388

Professor and Chair

$200,000

$28,212

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY PRACTICE AND SCIENCE (PPS) PROJECT INVESTIGATOR

RANK/TITLE

Bruce Anderson

Associate Professor Combe After Hours Support

Bruce Anderson Associate Professor

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PROJECT TITLE

Poison Control Stabilization and Enhancement Program


GRANTS AND CONTRACT AWARDS

Bruce Anderson Associate Professor

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$85,000

Bruce Anderson Associate Professor Medicaid-Maryland Poison Center Contract

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$349,353

Bruce Anderson Associate Professor State Children’s Health Insurance Information Center

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$1,587,594

Bethany DiPaula Associate Professor Bethany DiPaula Associate Professor

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$1,285,000

Thomas Dowling Associate Professor Single-Dose Fed Bioequivalence/ Study of Bosentan Tablets in Healthy Volunteers

Mylan Pharmaceuticals Inc.

$1,063,753

Thomas Dowling

Associate Professor Clinical Protocol Review

Mylan Pharmaceuticals Inc.

$46,848

Joga Gobburu

Professor

RA Modeling & Report Project

Glenmark Pharmaceuticals, S.A. $168,150

Joga Gobburu Professor

NRC-AN-019 Phase 1 PK and QT Analysis & Technical Report

Natco Pharma Ltd.

$30,000

Joga Gobburu

Translational Research Fellowship

Biogen Idec Inc.

$40,000

Joga Gobburu Professor

Development of a Model-Based Insulin Dosing Calculator, Framework, and Algorithms to Support Development of Integrated Glucose Control Devices

Eli Lilly Research Labs

$60,884

Joga Gobburu Professor

Analysis and Reporting of GRT-PK-04 QT Data

Forest Laboratories, Inc.

$19,544

Joga Gobburu Professor

Development of Quantitative Translational Johnson & Johnson Medicine Decision Kit for RA Disease

$40,575

Joga Gobburu Professor

Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine Device

Medicines360

$40,562

Joga Gobburu Professor

Modeling Strategies for Early and Late Clinical Projects Across Several Therapeutic Areas

Merck Research Laboratories

$10,000

Professor

Enhanced Toxidromic Surveillance Using Poison Center Data

A Pilot Project of Howard County Howard County $48,956 Health Department Bureau of Substance Health Department Abuse Treatment Services Springfield Hospital Center - Pharmacy Services

Cherokee Layson-Wolf Associate Professor Catonsville Pharmacy Residency Training Catonsville Pharmacy and Associate Dean Program for PGY1 Community Pharmacy Practice Residency

$39,784

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GRANTS AND CONTRACT AWARDS

Cherokee Layson-Wolf

Associate Professor Professional Pharmacy Residency and Associate Dean Training Program for PGY1 Community

Professional Pharmacy Services, Inc.

$47,884

Raymond Love Professor

Spring Grove Hospital Center - Pharmacy Services

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$1,578,139

Raymond Love Professor

Clifton T. Perkins Hospital Center – Improvement of Pharmacy Services

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$549,960

Raymond Love Professor

Thomas B. Finan Center - Pharmacy Services

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$319,914

Raymond Love Professor

MHA - Centralized Administration of Pharmacy Services

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$501,733

Raymond Love Professor

Eastern Shore Hospital Center and Maryland Department of Upper Shore Community Mental Health Health and Mental Hygiene Center - Pharmacy Services

$323,793

Raymond Love Professor Antipsychotic Prescription Review Program Raymond Love Professor Peer to Peer Review - Pediatrics

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$700,000

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$1,100,000

Raymond Love Professor

Potomac Center - Secure Evaluation and Therapeutic Treatment

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$159,096

Mary Lynn McPherson Professor

National Institutes of Health Pain Consortium Centers of Excellence in Pain Education

Altarum Institute/ Palladian Partners

$40,115

Charmaine Rochester Associate Professor Pharmacist Intervention in Bay West Endocrinology Clinic

Sanofi-Aventis

$110,807

Magaly Rodriguez Professor and Chair de Bittner

Medstar - Georgetown University Hospital

MedStar Health Inc.

$48,195

Magaly Rodriguez Professor and Chair de Bittner Magaly Rodriguez Professor and Chair de Bittner

Intergovernmental Personnel Act Agreement

Baltimore VA Medical Center

$46,613

Operational and Technical Support Provided by the Institute for a Healthiest Maryland

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$50,000

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$153,943

Magaly Rodriguez Professor and Chair Clinical Pharmacy Services de Bittner

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GRANTS AND CONTRACT AWARDS

Magaly Rodriguez Professor and Chair de Bittner

Maryland P3 Diabetes Management Program

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$100,000

Magaly Rodriguez Professor and Chair de Bittner

P3 Medication Therapy Management and Comprehensive Medication Therapy Management Services for Cardiovascular Disease Management

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$100,000

Deanna Tran Assistant Professor

NACDS Foundation and Million Hearts Heart to Heart Community Health Fairs

National Association of Chain Drug Stores

$1,000

Mona Tsoukleris Associate Professor

RX for Asthma - Comprehensive Asthma Maryland Department of Medication Therapy Management Health and Mental Hygiene

$59,823

Kathryn Walker Assistant Professor Union Memorial Hospital Training Agreement

Union Memorial Hospital

$86,499

Kathryn Walker Assistant Professor

Controlled Dangerous Substance Emergency Preparedness Plan

Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

$280,738

Total PPS

$11,594,141

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES (PSC) PROJECT INVESTIGATOR

RANK/TITLE

PROJECT TITLE

Angelique Besold Graduate Student Zinc Finger Proteins Involved in Neuronal Development

SPONSOR NAME

PROJECT TOTAL

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

$28,793

Steven Fletcher Assistant Professor

Optimization of Small Molecule Inhibitors of the BRD4 Protein

Convergene LLC

$51,110

Steven Fletcher

Institutional Research Grant

American Cancer Society

$30,000

Stephen Hoag Professor

Spray Coating of Aquacoat ECD: The Application of QbD (Quality by Design) Principles

FMC Corp.

$16,000

Stephen Hoag Professor

Development of a Spectral Database for Excipients, Drug Substances, and Drug Products

U.S. Pharmacopeia

$42,501

Stephen Hoag

Professor

Nasal Spray Device Manufacture

University of Antwerp

$15,040

Alexander MacKerell Jr.

Grollman-Glick Professor

Energetics of Oligonucleotide Conformational Heterogeneity

National Institute of General Medical Sciences

$257,334

Assistant Professor

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GRANTS AND CONTRACT AWARDS

Alexander MacKerell Jr. Grollman-Glick Carbohydrate Force Fields for Professor Structure, Dynamics, and Molecular Recognition

National Institute of General Medical Sciences

Alexander MacKerell Jr.

Joan & Sanford I. Weill Medical $42,610 College of Cornell University

Grollman-Glick Professor

Program for Therapeutic Targeting of Transcriptional Repression

$288,383

Alexander MacKerell Jr. Grollman-Glick Professor

Discovery of Novel Macrolide Antibiotics Temple University

$71,231

Alexander MacKerell Jr.

Polarizable Force Field for Proteins and Lipids

University of Chicago

$151,349

Amanda Oglesby- Assistant Professor Sherrouse

Mechanism of Heme Regulation of a P. aeruginosa Non-Coding RNA

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

$105,047

James Polli Shangraw/Noxell Endowed Chair

Pharmacokinetic Studies of Epileptic Food and Drug Administration $301,900 Drugs: Evaluation of Brand and Generic Anti-Epileptic Drug Products in Patients

James Polli Shangraw/Noxell Endowed Chair

University of Maryland Center of Excellence in Regulatory Science and Innovation

University of Maryland, College Park

$491,969

Ramin Samadani Graduate Student

Overcoming Drug-Induced Resistance in BRaf Mutated Melanoma Cells

National Institute of General Medical Sciences

$26,885

Jana Shen Associate Professor CAREER - Electrostatic Mechanisms in Protein Stability and Folding

National Science Foundation

$152,588

Yan Shu Assistant Professor

National Institute of General Medical Sciences

$336,858

Wanli Smith Assistant Professor Synphilin-1 and Obesity

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

$316,766

Audra Stinchcomb Professor

AllTranz Inc.

$146,646

Grollman-Glick Professor

Xenobiotic Transporter Regulation and IRIP Function

Transdermal Naltrexone for Opiate Addiction and Alcoholism

Audra Stinchcomb Professor Transdermal Delivery of 2-Arachidonoyl National Institute on $135,817 Glycerol for the Treatment of Arthritis Drug Abuse Peter Swaan Professor and Structural Biology of the Apical Bile National Institute of Diabetes $312,407 Associate Dean Acid Transporter and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

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GRANTS AND CONTRACT AWARDS

Peter Swaan

Professor and Associate Dean

Peter Swaan Professor and Associate Dean

Molecular Organization of the Organic Cation-Proton Exchanger, MATE1

University of Arizona

$28,125

MRP4 Substrate/Inhibitor Structural Features and Polymorphisms in Drug-Induced Liver Injury

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

$63,667

Hongbing Wang Associate Professor Regulation of CYP2B6 in Human Liver

National Institute of Diabetes $322,178 and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Jia Bei Wang Professor Jia Bei Wang Professor

Exploring the Role of HINT1 Protein in Neuronal Function

National Institute of Mental Health

$187,500

Development of I-THP as New Medication for Drug Addiction

National Institute on Drug Abuse

$752,721

Ting Wang Graduate Student

Developing the Scientific Basis for the U.S. Pharmacopeia Application of Spectroscopic and Chemometric Methods to Excipient Identification and Adulteration Detection

Angela Wilks Professor

Structure-Function of the Shigella Dysenteriae Heme Uptake Operon

National Institute of $371,250 Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Angela WIlks Professor

Heme Utilization and Homeostasis in P. aeruginosa

National Institute of $360,725 Allergy and Infectious Diseases

$25,000

Patrick Wintrode Associate Professor Revealing Structure via Dynamics: Biological Networks from Protein Folding to Food Webs

Case Western Reserve University $45,944

Jeremy Yap Graduate Student

American Chemical Society

$26,000

Recognition of Intrinsically Disordered c-Myc through Induction of Localized Helicity: Structure-Activity Relationship Studies of c-Myc Inhibitor 1007

Bruce Yu

Associate Professor Engineering Fluorinated Paramagnetic Complexes for Multichromic 19F MRI

National Science Foundation

$178,873

Bruce Yu

Associate Professor Engineering Fluorinated Paramagnetic Complexes for Multichromic 19F MRI

University of Maryland, College Park

$12,762

Total PSC

$5,695,979

Total PHSR Total PPS Total PSC

$3,008,527 $11,594,141 $5,695,979

GRAND TOTAL

$20,298,647 summ e r 201 4

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HONOR ROLL OF DONORS

July 1, 2012 – June 30, 2013

Loyal donors provide the foundation for the School of Pharmacy’s success. Thank you to everyone—our alumni, faculty, staff, and friends—who has invested in the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy. LEGACY COUNCIL The Legacy Council of the University of Maryland acknowledges those who have made generous contributions to the School of Pharmacy through their estate plans. Anyone who has made such a gift is eligible for membership in the Legacy Council. To qualify, simply provide the School of Pharmacy’s Office of Development and Alumni Affairs with documentation of the gift or a copy of the relevant document in which the School is named as a beneficiary (www.umbfplannedgiving.org). For additional information about membership in the Legacy Council and estate planning, please contact the Office of Development and Alumni Affairs at 410-706-5893 or email mmoorefield@rx.umaryland.edu. Members of the Legacy Council are: John H. Balch, BSP ’68 Billie Chappelear Harold E. Chappelear, DSc ’98 Estate of Evelyn Grollman Glick Gwynne L. Horwits Leonard Horwits, BSP ’60

George H. Huber, BSP ’61 Bernhard Lamy Gregory Lukaszczyk, BSP ’84 Estate of Bertha J. Manchey Estate of Helen Mendelsohn David G. Miller, BSP ’85 Joseph H. Morton, BSP ’60

Paul A. Pumpian, BSP ’50= Chris A. Rodowskas, PhG ’29= Estate of Lillian K. Slama James M. Trattner, PhD ’28= Clayton L. Warrington, BSP ’58 Elizabeth Warrington

DAVID STEWART ASSOCIATES In the mid-1980s, several dedicated alumni and friends established a premier giving society, the David Stewart Associates (DSA), to fund Schoolwide initiatives that would propel the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy nationally as a leader in pharmacy education. This leadership giving society honors David Stewart, America’s first professor of pharmacy and a founder of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, who symbolized a passion for excellence and commitment to pharmacy education. The founding members of the DSA are: Elwin Alpern, BSP ’51= Mayer Handelman, BSP ’54 Leon R. Catlett, BSP ’65 William M. Heller, MS ’51, Melvin S. Cohen= PhD ’55, DSc ’87 James P. Cragg Jr., BSP ’43 H. Elinor Hens= Leonard J. DeMino= Leon Jablon= Donald O. Fedder, BSP ’50= William J. Kinnard Jr. Michaeline R. Fedder Dorothy Levi, BSP ’70 Robert Foer, BSP ’51= Mark A. Levi, PD, BSP ’70 Henry J. Glaser Jr.= Samuel Lichter, BSP ’60 Evelyn Grollman Glick= Nicholas C. Lykos, BSP ’52=

Martin B. Mintz, PD ’65 Benjamin S. Mulitz Elizabeth Newcomb, BSP ’68 John R. Newcomb Jr., BSP ’67 Anthony G. Padussis, BSP ’44= David Pearlman, BSP ’52 William L. Pearlman, BSP ’48= Thomas S. Petr, BSP ’74 Stephen J. Provenza, PhG ’29= Lawrence R. Rachuba

Gerald M. Rosen David M. Russo, BSP ’79 Ralph A. Small Jr., BSP ’74 Arnold Smolen Bernard A. Weisman, BSP ’70= Kenneth P. Whittemore Jr., BSP ’76 Leonard Winkleman = Signifies Deceased

♦ This core group of philanthropists has inspired other donors to follow their lead. Today DSA membership has grown to create a solid base of private support for the School’s efforts to advance pharmaceutical education, practice, and science. To join this prestigious group of alumni and friends, or for more information on giving to the School, please contact the Office of Development and Alumni Affairs at 410-706-5893 or email mmoorefield@rx.umaryland.edu.

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HONOR ROLL OF DONORS

The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy appreciates the financial support of the following individuals and organizations during the period July 1, 2012, to June 30, 2013:

GIVING BY INDIVIDUALS

Jermaine Smith

Brian M. Hose, PharmD ’06~

Clayton L. Warrington, BSP ’58~

JoAnn M. Spearmon,

Stacey Hose~

Elizabeth Warrington~

David Stewart Associates

Walter J. Hryszko, BSP ’74~

Gerolyn A. Whittemore~

$500,000+

Edward A. Taylor, PharmD ’06

David H. Jones, BSP ’70~

Kenneth P. Whittemore Jr.,

Ellen H. Yankellow, BSP ’73,

Rodney H. Taylor, PharmD ’97

Karen M. Kabat, MS ’83~

Ilene H. Zuckerman, BSP ’81,

William J. Kinnard Jr.+

Angela Wilks~

Donald M. Kirson, BSP ’70

Carol Ann Williams~

PharmD ’96*

PharmD ’97

PharmD ’83~

$100,000 - $499,999

BSP ’76~+

David A. Knapp*

Alice A. Williams, PharmD ’12

Billie Chappelear

$1,000 - $4,999

Deanne E. Knapp*

Thomas G. Williams Jr.,

Harold E. Chappelear, DSC ’98

Alfred Abramson, BSP ’56

Dixie D. Leikach, BSP,

Felix A. Khin-Maung-Gyi,

Kimberly L. Barnett, BSP ’86

PharmD ’06~

PharmD ’92~

Janice T. Batzold~

Neil B. Leikach, BSP, RPh ’92~

Dean’s Club

Mary Therese Gyi, BSP ’83,

Kenneth S. Bauer Jr., BSP ’89

Kimberley A. Lentz, PhD ’01

$500 - $999

BSP ’83 PharmD ’06

Cynthia J. Boyle, PharmD ’96*

Samuel Lichter, BSP ’60*+

Sheila Alizadeh, PharmD ’03

Gwynne L. Horwits

Thomas S. Brenner, BSP ’72*

Raymond C. Love, PharmD ’77*

Stephen B. Bierer, BSP ’72*

Leonard Horwits, BSP ’60

Suzanne J. Caplan

Michael Luzuriaga, BSP ’70*

Lynette R. Bradley-Baker,

Jill Molofsky, BSP ’81~

Yale H. Caplan, BSP ’63,

Alexander MacKerell Jr.~

Sidney D. Molofsky~

Daniel Z. Mansour, PharmD ’06

Laci L. Brown, PharmD ’01~

David R. Chason, BSP ’71

Kevin F. McCarthy, BSP ’80

Francis J. Bublavek, BSP ’81~

$25,000 - $99,999

Betty W. Cohen, BSP ’49~

Martin B. Mintz, PD ’65~+

David D. Christ, BSP ’79

John H. Balch, BSP ’68~

Andrew Coop~

Jill A. Morgan~

Mary Ann Christ

Morton D. Kramer, BSP ’50*

William J. Cooper~

Joseph H. Morton, BSP ’60

Nicholas Cornias, BSP ’92*

Mark A. Levi, PD ’70~+

W. Thomas Dolan, BSP ’74*

C. Daniel Mullins

James M. Crable, BSP ’82

James P. Tristani, BSP ’73

Susan dosReis, PhD ’99~

Eberechukwu Onukwugha~

Catherine G. Dormarunno,

Peng Wang

Natalie D. Eddington, PhD ’89

Thomas S. Petr, BSP ’74~+

Wanda Williams~

John F. Fader II, BSP ’63*

Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner,

Matthew Dormarunno

J. Philip Fink, BSP ’79*

Kathleen Gondek, MS ’88,

$10,000 - $24,999

Mark G. Fletcher, BSP ’78,

Bruce D. Roffe, MS ’78

Robert S. Beardsley~

Jerome Schwartz, BSP ’49*

Jefferson J. Gregory, BSP ’79

Mary Lynn McPherson,

Jack Frieman, BSP ’56~

John A. Scigliano, MS ’44,

Alice H. Hill, PharmD ’93*

David R. Fulton Jr., BSP ’81

Jerold A. Kempler, BSP ’62~

Matthew G. Shimoda,

Jogarao Gobburu

Marilyn Shangraw~

Myra L. Kempler~

Donna Handelman~

Jeffrey B. Sherr, BSP ’78~

Lisa T. Kloch, BSP ’80~

PharmD ’86~ PharmD ’84~

PhD ’68*

BSP ’92, PhD ’99

MS ’81, PhD ’83~

PharmD ’83

PhD ’50*=

PharmD ’00

PhD ’93

Mayer Handelman, BSP ’54~+

Joanne H. Sherr, BSP ’78~

Stephen C. Kloch, BSP ’80~

$5,000 - $9,999

Nancy Rose Harmon=

Larry E. Small, MS ’76, PhD ’80

Lisa M. Matson, BSP ’88~

Deborah DeWitt

Barry D. Hecht, BSP ’73

George W. Swope Jr., BSP ’70~

John M. Motsko Jr., BSP ’69~

Ramona M. Hawkins

William M. Heller, MS ’51,

Angelo C. Voxakis, BSP ’71~

Howard R. Schiff, BSP ’56~

Gina P. McKnight-Smith,

George C. Voxakis, BSP ’58,

Frances Spaven, PhD ’86~

Robert W. Henderson, PD ’63*

Kerry Spaven~

PharmD ’97

* Signifies donor for 15+ consecutive years ~ Signifies donor for 5-14 consecutive years

PhD ’55, DSc ’87+

PharmD ’96*

+ Signifies David Stewart Associates Founding Member = Signifies Deceased

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HONOR ROLL OF DONORS

Nina H. Spiller, PharmD ’88~

Jonathan N. Latham,

Century Club

Beatriz N. Caceres-Gentile,

Michael J. Steinberg,

$100-$249

Louise Q. Leach, BSP ’74

Robert T. Adkins, BSP ’52*=

A. Kevin Callahan, BSP ’76,

Eleanor Leavitt Evans

Christine I. Aladi, PharmD ’11

PharmD ’00

Loreen A. Wutoh, BSP ’86~

PharmD ’98~

PharmD ’96 PharmD ’78~

Pauline P. Lee~

Sara Alizai, PharmD ’12

Stewart W. Carter, BSP ’76,

Apothecary Club

Yoo-Jin Lee, PharmD ’04

Michael J. Appel, BSP ’69~

$250 - $499

Lisa C. LeGette, BSP ’92~

Daniel Ashby

Marian L. Cascio, BSP ’77*

Marsha E. Alvarez, BSP ’71,

Frederick J. Mack, BSP ’79*

Larry L. Augsburger, BSP ’62,

Michelle M. Ceng, PharmD ’98~

Jason F. Chancey, PharmD ’00~

PharmD ’96*

Steven J. Marcalus, BSP ’82

Lenore Ammones

Marianthy K. Mendez, BSP ’86

John J. Ayd, BSP ’51=

Donna M. Clark, BSP ’83

Jerome A. Berger, BSP ’60

Jason M. Noel~

Hector T. Ayu, BSP ’93

Dayin Cusick

Sherry N. Berlin, BSP ’74*

Kimberly M. Palasik, BSP ’88

Dov E. Banks~

David A. Custer, BSP ’73

Howard K. Besner, BSP ’78,

Raymond A. Palasik, BSP ’88

Freddy E. Banks, BSP ’92

Hedy J. Cylus-Gleiman, BSP ’73~

Robin L. Paluskievicz,

Marshal Banks~

Rahul S. Deshmukh, PhD ’03

David A. Blake, BSP ’63

Rochelle Banks~

Louis Diamond, BSP ’61, MS ’64,

Charles R. Bonapace,

Thomas J. Pfaff, BSP ’85*

Laurine A. Barrow-Wilson,

Jean M. Dinwiddie, PharmD ’93~

PharmD ’02~

Rena Pietruszko

Michael B. Rodell, BSP ’58*

Andrew Bartilucci, PhD ’53~

James E. Dipaula, BSP ’71~

Barbara S. Chong, PharmD ’97~

David D. Rudolph

William H. Batt, BSP ’63~

David T. Diwa, PharmD ’97

Arnold E. Clayman, BSP ’73

James R. Salmons, BSP ’89,

Gerald E. Beachy, BSP ’72

Charles R. Downs, BSP ’73,

Terry L. Davis, BSP ’83,

Kari Bedell

Cathie L. Schumaker, BSP ’77

Mark Benson

Michelle L. Eby, PharmD ’99~

Wayne A. Dyke, BSP ’68~

Robert H. Schumaker, BSP ’77

Michael T. Benson, BSP ’63

Robert I. Ellin, PhD ’50

Julian M. Friedman, BSP ’56*

Elliott Schwartz

Phyllis A. Bernard, BSP ’88~

Donald B. Elliott Jr., BSP ’57~

Mary A. George

John M. Seroor

Asome Bide, PharmD ’01

Lily Chua Eng, BSP ’76~

Steven P. George, BSP ’82

Abigail M. Strawberry, BSP ’93

Kaloyan A. Bikov

Simon S. Eng, BSP ’76~

Stuart T. Haines*

Sheryl E. Thedford, PharmD ’11

Christopher M. Blanchette,

Michael J. Evanko Jr., BSP ’73*

Ann R. Hallock, BSP ’80

Andrea B. Weiss, BSP ’89~

Susan M. Evans, BSP ’91

Jeffrey J. Harnsberger, BSP ’92

Fred M. Weiss, BSP ’70~

Raymond Bleu-Laine,

Theodore J. Evans, BSP ’83~

Keely Ireland

Susan S. Wells

Thomas P. Evans, BSP ’83

Mary Jo Ivins

Thomas A. Wells

Ronald L. Block, MS ’63~

Daniel A. Farney, PharmD ’01

Martin Jagers, BSP ’85~

Irene L. Winters, BSP ’54*

Karen H. Bohan, PharmD ’88

Fran Favin-Weiskopf,

Ping Jin, PhD ’06

Barbara D. Wirth, BSP ’72,

Thomas V. Bolling, BSP ’69~

Boghoko B. Kaspa, PharmD ’10

David L. Booze, BSP ’81~

Dennis E. Ferguson, BSP ’79*

Wendy Klein-Schwartz,

Gary J. Wirth, BSP ’79~

Lisa L. Booze, BSP ’79,

Camelle J. Firda

Robert Wixson

Joseph A. Firda

Freda L. Krosnick~

Bay-Mao B. Wu, PharmD ’01

Rachel A. Boyer, PharmD ’07

William T. Foley Jr., BSP ’58~

Jay E. Krosnick, BSP ’85~

William Yeboah, PharmD ’00~

James L. Bresette, PharmD ’97*

Florence F. K. Gee, BSP ’74~

Mary Lynn Lanham, BSP ’88,

Louis J. Brill, BSP ’80

Fortin S. Georges, PharmD ’02

Elaine L. Brogan, BSP ’78~

Vandana R. Gupta, PharmD ’08

Cheryl H. Lapouraille

Margaret C. Brophy, BSP ’77

Diana P. Henzel, BSP ’93~

Mark H. Lapouraille, BSP ’84

Gerald N. Brunson, BSP ’57~

Laura J. Herb

PharmD ’98*

PharmD ’77~

PharmD ’00~

MS ’76~

PharmD ’96

cap s u le

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu

BSP ’89

PhD ’67

Rebecca J. Ceraul~

52

PharmD ’97~

PharmD ’98~

MS ’65, PhD ’67

PharmD ’05~

PhD ’07 PharmD ’09

Pharm ’00~

* Signifies donor for 15+ consecutive years ~ Signifies donor for 5-14 consecutive years

PharmD ’99*

PharmD ’88*

+ Signifies David Stewart Associates Founding Member = Signifies Deceased


HONOR ROLL OF DONORS

Daniel R. Hewins~

Kaysha R. Lancaster,

Martin T. Paul, BSP ’71=

Rona S. Snyder*

Mary-Therese Hewins, BSP ’81,

Michael P. Peloquin,

Carol M. Sobon, BSP ’78

Ronald J. Spector, BSP ’71*=

MS ’84~

PharmD ’00

Kirk K. Lancaster

Joanne M. Hilburn, PharmD ’12

Amy W. Law, PharmD ’01

Doris M. Peng, MS ’78

Molrat Sripinyo, BSP ’83

Chau L. Hoang, PharmD ’03

Ronald E. Lay, BSP ’78*

Philip M. Perry, BSP ’74*

Robert J. St. Clair

Marta Hoffman, BSP ’60~

Calvin Y. Lee, PharmD ’04

Anthony J. Petralia Sr.,

Carol E. Stevenson,

Forest S. Howell, BSP ’87~

Jung E. Lee, BSP ’93~

Gayle C. Howell, BSP ’91~

Colleen C. Lehmann, BSP ’78

Carolyn Petralia, PharmD ’03~

Todd E. Stevenson~

Helen Hsiao, PharmD ’06~

Claire E. Leocha, PharmD ’09

Kathleen M. Phelan, BSP ’93~

Alan R. Stoff, BSP ’70~

Jane S. Hulko, BSP ’83

Charlotte D. Levi~

Aruna Pokharel, PharmD ’06

Rosslyn Stoff~

Kim M. Hulko, BSP ’83

Henry M. Levi, BSP ’63~

Susanne Porch

Bruce Stuart

Dolores A. Ichniowski, MS ’50~

Bonnie Levin, BSP ’78

Sovitj Pou, PharmD ’96

Jodi M. Sullivan, BSP ’95

Lionel H. Jacobs, BSP ’68*

Edwin M. Lewis, MS ’84~

Keith S. Pozanek, BSP ’86

Anna Summerfield~

Cindy Q. Jiang, BSP ’90

Karen B. Lewis, BSP ’76~

Raghu R. Prabhu~

Marc R. Summerfield, MS ’76~

Hao Jiang

Harry S. Lichtman, BSP ’51=

Francoise G. Pradel

Jung L. Sung, PharmD ’02

Roy Joellenbeck

Julie E. Limric, BSP ’69~

Budne C. Reinke, BSP ’63~

Wanida Surichamorn, PhD ’91,

Julie S. Johnson, BSP ’94~

Denis Lynch~

Stacey S. Rinehart, PharmD ’97

Vicki M. Joshua, BSP ’87

Kristin A. Lynch, PharmD ’97~

James R. Ritchie, BSP ’63~

Stephen E. Sussman,

Theresa K. F. Justice, BSP ’82~

Walter P. Mackay, BSP ’62*

David M. Rombro, BSP ’54

Aaron C. Kadish, BSP ’63*

Harry E. Macks, BSP ’59~

Melvin N. Rubin, BSP ’55~

Craig K. Svensson, BSP ’81~

Carl Kaiser, MS ’52, BSP ’53,

Ann G. Mantelmacher, BSP ’80

Phyllis S. Rubin~

Nancy L. Taylor, BSP ’62*

Edward T. McCagh Jr., BSP ’75

Sharonjit K. Sagoo, PharmD ’10

Francis J. Tinney, PhD ’66*

Angela M. Kaitis, BSP ’75,

Madeline McCarren, PhD ’83~

Noha N. Salama, PhD ’04

Robin G. Trulli, PharmD ’06

Mark R. McDowell, BSP ’92

Charlene S. Sampson, BSP ’82

Hoai-An Truong, PharmD ’05~

Patrick Y. Kamara, PharmD ’98

Michael F. McMahon, BSP ’80*

Laura E. Sampson, BSP ’87~

Mona L. Tsoukleris, PharmD ’87

Erika L. Kammer, PharmD ’08

Kimberly E. Meany, PharmD ’12

Mark J. Schocken, BSP ’71,

Kenneth C. Ullman, BSP ’63

Arnold L. Kaplan, BSP ’73

Susan L. Mercer, PhD ’08

James B. Walter Jr., BSP ’51~

Charise S. Kasser, BSP ’83~

Howard B. Meyer, BSP ’66

Brian L. Schumer, BSP ’81~

Jia-Bei Wang, PhD ’92

Susan A. Katz, BSP ’88

Hugh E. Mighty

Paul Shapiro

Hal J. Weinstock, BSP ’74*

Thomas H. Keller Jr., BSP ’63~

Janet W. Mighty, BSP ’82

Christopher L. Shawyer,

Brenda K. Weller, BSP ’92*

Laura Y. Kim, BSP ’85

Richard A. Miller, BSP ’56

Mark S. Wienecke, BSP ’77*

Shin W. Kim, PharmD ’03

Robert K. Moler, BSP ’50

Thomas S. Shelor, BSP ’74~

Jamie C. Wilkins-Parker,

Yelee Y. Kim, PharmD ’01

Yvonne K. Molotsi,

Steven L. Silverman,

George A. Kostas, BSP ’52

Jae Hyung Wu, PharmD ’98

Lawrence J. Kotey,

Joyce A. Moulton

Harriet Silverstein

Norman R. Yockelson, BSP ’71

Meredith Y. Moy, PharmD ’11

Morton I. Silverstein, BSP ’54

Kennith L. Yu, PharmD ’06

Julie A. Kreyenbuhl, PhD ’99

Maura P. Murphy, PhD ’99~

Suzanne K. Simala, BSP ’84*

Roxanne W. Zaghab

Edmond J. Kucharski, BSP ’84~

Arnold Neuburger, BSP ’59*

Linda Simoni-Wastila~

Lane P. Zangwill, BSP ’78*

Kathrin C. Kucharski,

Joseph Pariser, BSP ’63*

Kara J. Sink, BSP ’92~

Reid A. Zimmer, BSP ’63*

Angela M. Parker, BSP ’95

John C. Smith, BSP ’76

Julie Magno Zito

Leonard N. Patras, BSP ’74~

Larry A. Snyder, BSP ’60*

PhD ’55* PharmD ’06

PharmD ’03~

PharmD ’87~

Angela Lamy~

* Signifies donor for 15+ consecutive years ~ Signifies donor for 5-14 consecutive years

PharmD ’02~

PharmD ’04

BSP ’52~

PhD ’82

BSP ’76~

PharmD ’06

+ Signifies David Stewart Associates Founding Member = Signifies Deceased

PharmD ’02~

BSP ’92 PharmD ’00~

PharmD ’08

summe r 201 4

53


HONOR ROLL OF DONORS

Contributions up to $99

Susan Cohen-Pessah, BSP ’78

Nancy Himes

Harris L. Miller, BSP ’65*

Elizabeth Abraham, BSP ’95

Paul A. Combs

Joan A. Hoffmann

Philip B. Miller, BSP ’71

Janet M. Abramowitz, BSP ’81

Lisa Coppolo Ruppel,

Ronald M. Hopkins, BSP ’63

Lisa Y. Mostovoy, PharmD ’09

Lawrence M. Abrams, BSP ’55

Lisa Hutchins, PharmD ’14

Monique L. Mounce, PharmD ’13

Dennis M. Ackerman, BSP ’70

Dana C. Couch, BSP ’92

Trang H. Huynh, BSP ’91~

Jeffrey S. Mrowczynski,

Nazeer N. Ahmed, PharmD ’03

C. Richard Crooks, BSP ’69

Lauren M. Hynicka

Lilian T. Alade, PharmD ’93

Meghan E. Crum, PharmD ’13

Robert R. Imbierowicz Sr.,

Amy S. Nagle, PharmD ’04

William P. Albanese,

Victoria E. Dang, PharmD ’12

Marcelle T. Nicolas, PharmD ’12

PharmD ’11

PharmD ’90

BSP ’55~

PharmD ’13

Colleen Day~

Nigel R. Isaacs, PharmD ’93

Elizabeth H. Nolte, PharmD ’07

Rita Amernick

Hope S. DeCederfelt, BSP ’82~

Aroonjit Jenkosol, PharmD ’07

Teresa A. Okala, PharmD ’98

Caroline T. Bader, BSP ’81~

Adam A. Dinerman, PhD ’02

Thomas E. Johnson Jr., BSP ’81

Marc Okun

Jennifer L. Bailey, PharmD ’08

Crystal J. Dixon-Baskerville,

Jace Jones

Ebenezer Oloyede

Patricia Ballinger

Michael E. Jones, BSP ’72*

Jeffrey E. Paup, PharmD ’12

Michael J. Barton, BSP ’95

Mary Lou Doyle

Diane L. Kaufman~

Charlene A. Peterson,

Harry Bass, BSP ’58

Norman DuBois, BSP ’53*

Sonia S. Kim, PharmD ’99

Vahram Bedrossian, BSP ’79~

Noel E. Durm, BSP ’55

Stonewall C. King Jr., MS ’60

Resheena M. Phinazee

Thomas J. Biles, PharmD ’98

Menachem Y. Edelman,

Zippora Kiptanui

Robert M. Pilson Jr., BSP ’63

Anna F. Bittle

Cynthia L. Kisamore, BSP ’83

Kathleen Pincus

Barry L. Bloom, BSP ’66~

Herbert Ehudin, BSP ’43

Kathryn Kiser

Cristina V. Platon, BSP ’83~

Linda W. Bosco, BSP ’73

Mujde Erten

Ronald P. Kleiman, BSP ’82

Marvin S. Platt, BSP ’51*

Curtis A. Bowen, BSP ’56~

Charles A. Fleischer, BSP ’66

Linda C. Klein, BSP ’72~

Monica L. Pogue, PharmD ’00

Brenda M. Brandon, BSP ’72

Veronica Foelber

Emily L. Knapp, PharmD ’10

Michelle Presley

Marian C. Bruce~

John E. Gavlinski, BSP ’53

Charles J. Kokoski, BSP ’51,

Sangeeta V. Raje, PhD ’02

Sydney L. Burgee Jr.,

Herbert Gendason, BSP ’71~

Joseph M. Ras, BSP ’73~

BSP ’55~=

PharmD ’12

PharmD ’13

MS ’53, PhD ’56*

PharmD ’02

Bernardine S. Ginsberg, BSP ’54

Albert W. Kossler, MS ’53*

Abigail Ratcliff

Alvin H. Burwell, PharmD ’99~

Donald J. Glenn, BSP ’83~

Thomas P. LaMartina, BSP ’87~

Gertrude Robinson

Gayle R. Caldwell, BSP ’83

Margie Mae Goldberg-Okun,

Theresa M. Langeheine,

Patrick Tim Rocafort

Karim Anton Calis, BSP ’84,

David H. Rochlin, BSP ’69

PharmD ’86

BSP ’81, PharmD ’02

PharmD ’01

Ronald Goldner, BSP ’60

Stephen L. Lauer, BSP ’62*

Hans J. Rosenbach, BSP ’50

Robert M. Caplan, BSP’50*

Lawrence F. Gonzales

Nhat H. Le, PharmD ’02

Robert F. Royce, BSP ’51

Susan Barbara Carmon

Frances A. Gray, PharmD ’13

Lisa Lebovitz

Joseph M. Ruppel, BSP ’75

Dorothy Carter-Russell

Martin D. Grebow, BSP ’60*

Lisa Lenhart

Stewart Russell

Maggie Y. Chan, PharmD ’13

Gloria S. Grice, PharmD ’02

Melvin Lessing, BSP ’66*

Janine E. Sadek, PharmD ’01

Marina Y. Chang, BSP ’71

Jennifer K. Grier, BSP ’86

Siyun Liao, PharmD ’11

Ankur Sarodia, PharmD ’12

Marvin J. Chertkoff, BSP ’51,

William J. Grimm Jr., BSP ’78~

Xinggang Liu

Annette F. Schonfeld

Deborah F. Groleau~

Feng-Hua Loh

Eric R. Schuetz, BSP ’86~

Kellie S. Chew, PharmD ’13

George E. Groleau, BSP ’76~

Denise Lupo Lutz, BSP ’77*

Charles J. Schutz, BSP ’65

Catherine L. Cioffi, PhD ’88

Alexa J. Havrilko, PharmD ’13

Daniel C. Lyons, PharmD ’07

Morton J. Sclar, BSP ’60

Nancy Clay

Michael C. Hawk, BSP ’90

Kim M. McFarlin, BSP ’79

David J. Seff, BSP ’55

Terri F. Clayman, BSP ’77,

Gerald J. Heilman, BSP ’55*

Robert F. Melendez, BSP ’93

Leah C. Sera, PharmD ’10

MS ’54~

Margaret E. Herb

Rachel L. Melnick, PharmD ’11

Nazim S. Shahzad, PhD ’01

Beth Cohen

Bernard P. Heyman, BSP ’57

Albert T. Meyers, BSP ’51~

Lionel M. Shapiro, BSP ’52*

Michael J. Cohen, BSP ’66*

Renee M. Hilliard, PharmD ’01

Irwin E. Meyers, BSP ’53

Dorothy Shenk

54

PharmD ’98*

cap s u le

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu

* Signifies donor for 15+ consecutive years ~ Signifies donor for 5-14 consecutive years

+ Signifies David Stewart Associates Founding Member = Signifies Deceased


HONOR ROLL OF DONORS

Yan Shu

Class of 1949

Class of 1954

Class of 1959

Lawrence P. Siegel,

Betty W. Cohen, BSP

Marvin J. Chertkoff, MS

Harry E. Macks, BSP

Jerome Schwartz, BSP

Bernardine S. Ginsberg, BSP

Arnold Neuburger, BSP

Mayer Handelman, BSP

Charles H. Tregoe, BSP

PharmD ’02~

Janet B. Simons Allen Spak, BSP ’63~=

Class of 1950

David M. Rombro, BSP

Mark E. Sporre, BSP ’84~

Robert M. Caplan, BSP

Morton I. Silverstein, BSP

Class of 1960

Charles H. Steg Jr., BSP ’78,

Robert I. Ellin, PhD

Irene L. Winters, BSP

Jerome A. Berger, BSP

Dolores A. Ichniowski, MS

PharmD ’00~

Ronald Goldner, BSP

Todd H. Stephens, BSP ’93

Morton D. Kramer, BSP

Class of 1955

Martin D. Grebow, BSP

Patricia Stewart

Robert K. Moler, BSP

Lawrence M. Abrams, BSP

Marta Hoffman, BSP

Lea J. Stokes

Hans J. Rosenbach, BSP

Sydney L. Burgee Jr., BSP=

Leonard Horwits, BSP

Amber Streifel, PharmD ’13

John A. Scigliano, PhD=

Noel E. Durm, BSP

Stonewall C. King Jr., MS

Gerald J. Heilman, BSP

Samuel Lichter, BSP

Michele A. Suit Stephan Sylvan

Class of 1951

William M. Heller, PhD

Joseph H. Morton, BSP

Charles D. Taylor Jr., BSP ’67,

John J. Ayd, BSP=

Robert R. Imbierowicz Sr., BSP

Morton J. Sclar, BSP

Marvin J. Chertkoff, BSP

Carl Kaiser, PhD

Larry A. Snyder, BSP

Donald W. Taylor, BSP ’69~

William M. Heller, MS

Melvin N. Rubin, BSP

Milton F. Toelle, BSP ’55

Charles J. Kokoski, BSP

David J. Seff, BSP

Class of 1961

Sarah Tom

Harry S. Lichtman, BSP=

Milton F. Toelle, BSP

Louis Diamond, BSP

Deanna Tran, PharmD ’11

Albert T. Meyers, BSP

Charles H. Tregoe, BSP ’59*

Marvin S. Platt, BSP

Class of 1956

Patricia P. Tregoe*

Robert F. Royce, BSP

Alfred Abramson, BSP

Class of 1962

Lori Walker

James B. Walter Jr., BSP

Curtis A. Bowen, BSP

Larry L. Augsburger, BSP

Julian M. Friedman, BSP

Jerold A. Kempler, BSP

PharmD ’00

Linda L. Warner

Irvin Yospa, BSP

Anna Marie H. Weikel, BSP ’82

Class of 1952

Jack Frieman, BSP

Stephen L. Lauer, BSP

Laura D. Weiss, BSP ’93

Robert T. Adkins, BSP=

Charles J. Kokoski, PhD

Walter P. Mackay, BSP

Joan P. Williams, BSP ’70

Carl Kaiser, MS

Richard A. Miller, BSP

Nancy L. Taylor, BSP

Corinne Woods

George A. Kostas, BSP

Howard R. Schiff, BSP

James D. Yeargain, BSP ’94

Anthony J. Petralia Sr., BSP

Irvin Yospa, BSP ’61

Lionel M. Shapiro, BSP

Donald R. Young, BSP ’57*

Class of 1963 Class of 1957

William H. Batt, BSP

Gerald N. Brunson, BSP

Michael T. Benson, BSP

William V. Zappa, BSP ’74

Class of 1953

Donald B. Elliott Jr., BSP

David A. Blake, BSP

Harry Zemel

Andrew Bartilucci, PhD

Bernard P. Heyman, BSP

Ronald L. Block, MS

Yan Chun Zhou, PharmD ’13

Norman DuBois, BSP

Donald R. Young, BSP

Yale H. Caplan, BSP John F. Fader II, BSP

John E. Gavlinski, BSP DONORS BY CLASS YEAR Class of 1943 Herbert Ehudin, BSP

Carl Kaiser, BSP

Class of 1958

Robert W. Henderson, PD

Charles J. Kokoski, MS

Harry Bass, BSP

Ronald M. Hopkins, BSP

Albert W. Kossler, MS

William T. Foley Jr., BSP

Aaron C. Kadish, BSP

Irwin E. Meyers, BSP

Michael B. Rodell, BSP

Thomas H. Keller Jr., BSP

George C. Voxakis, BSP

Henry M. Levi, BSP

Clayton L. Warrington, BSP

Joseph Pariser, BSP

Class of 1944

Robert M. Pilson Jr., BSP

John A. Scigliano, MS=

* Signifies donor for 15+ consecutive years ~ Signifies donor for 5-14 consecutive years

+ Signifies David Stewart Associates Founding Member = Signifies Deceased

summ e r 201 4

55


HONOR ROLL OF DONORS

Budne C. Reinke, BSP

Class of 1970

Arnold L. Kaplan, BSP

Raymond C. Love, PharmD

James R. Ritchie, BSP

Dennis M. Ackerman, BSP

Joseph M. Ras, BSP

Denise Lupo Lutz, BSP

Allen Spak, BSP=

David H. Jones, BSP

James P. Tristani, BSP

Cathie L. Schumaker, BSP

Kenneth C. Ullman, BSP

Donald M. Kirson, BSP

Ellen H. Yankellow, BSP

Robert H. Schumaker, BSP

Reid A. Zimmer, BSP

Mark A. Levi, PD

Mark S. Wienecke, BSP

Michael Luzuriaga, BSP

Class of 1974

Class of 1964

Alan R. Stoff, BSP

Sherry N. Berlin, BSP

Class of 1978

Louis Diamond, MS

George W. Swope Jr., BSP

W. Thomas Dolan, BSP

Howard K. Besner, BSP

Fred M. Weiss, BSP

Florence F. K. Gee, BSP

Elaine L. Brogan, BSP

Joan P. Williams, BSP

Walter J. Hryszko, BSP

A. Kevin Callahan, PharmD

Louise Q. Leach, BSP

Susan Cohen-Pessah, BSP

Class of 1971

Leonard N. Patras, BSP

Mark G. Fletcher, BSP

Martin B. Mintz, PD

Marsha E. Alvarez, BSP

Philip M. Perry, BSP

William J. Grimm Jr., BSP

Charles J. Schutz, BSP

Marina Y. Chang, BSP

Thomas S. Petr, BSP

Ronald E. Lay, BSP

David R. Chason, BSP

Thomas S. Shelor, BSP

Colleen C. Lehmann, BSP

James E. Dipaula, BSP

Hal J. Weinstock, BSP

Bonnie Levin, BSP

Barry L. Bloom, BSP

Herbert Gendason, BSP

William V. Zappa, BSP

Doris M. Peng, MS

Michael J. Cohen, BSP

Philip B. Miller, BSP

Class of 1965 Larry L. Augsburger, MS Harris L. Miller, BSP

Class of 1966

Bruce D. Roffe, MS

Martin T. Paul, BSP=

Class of 1975

Jeffrey B. Sherr, BSP

Mark J. Schocken, BSP

Angela M. Kaitis, BSP

Joanne H. Sherr, BSP

Howard B. Meyer, BSP

Ronald J. Spector, BSP=

Edward T. McCagh Jr., BSP

Carol M. Sobon, BSP

Francis J. Tinney, PhD

Angelo C. Voxakis, BSP

Joseph M. Ruppel, BSP

Charles H. Steg Jr., BSP

Charles A. Fleischer, BSP Melvin Lessing, BSP

Norman R. Yockelson, BSP Class of 1967

Lane P. Zangwill, BSP Class of 1976

Larry L. Augsburger, PhD

Class of 1972

A. Kevin Callahan, BSP

Class of 1979

Louis Diamond, PhD

Gerald E. Beachy, BSP

Stewart W. Carter, BSP

Vahram Bedrossian, BSP

Stephen B. Bierer, BSP

Lily Chua Eng, BSP

Lisa L. Booze, BSP

Brenda M. Brandon, BSP

Simon S. Eng, BSP

David D. Christ, BSP

Class of 1968

Thomas S. Brenner, BSP

George E. Groleau, BSP

Dennis E. Ferguson, BSP

John H. Balch, BSP

Michael E. Jones, BSP

Karen B. Lewis, BSP

J. Philip Fink, BSP

Yale H. Caplan, PhD

Linda C. Klein, BSP

Christopher L. Shawyer, BSP

Jefferson J. Gregory, BSP

Wayne A. Dyke, BSP

Barbara D. Wirth, BSP

Larry E. Small, MS

Frederick J. Mack, BSP

John C. Smith, BSP

Kim M. McFarlin, BSP

Class of 1973

Marc R. Summerfield, MS

Gary J. Wirth, BSP

Class of 1969

Linda W. Bosco, BSP

Kenneth P. Whittemore Jr., BSP

Michael J. Appel, BSP

Arnold E. Clayman, BSP

Barbara D. Wirth, MS

Thomas V. Bolling, BSP

David A. Custer, BSP

C. Richard Crooks, BSP

Hedy J. Cylus-Gleiman, BSP

Class of 1977

Ann R. Hallock, BSP

Julie E. Limric, BSP

Charles R. Downs, BSP

Margaret C. Brophy, BSP

Lisa T. Kloch, BSP

John M. Motsko Jr., BSP

Michael J. Evanko Jr., BSP

Marian L. Cascio, BSP

Stephen C. Kloch, BSP

Barry D. Hecht, BSP

Terri F. Clayman, BSP

Ann G. Mantelmacher, BSP

Wendy Klein-Schwartz, PharmD

Kevin F. McCarthy, BSP

Charles D. Taylor Jr., BSP

Lionel H. Jacobs, BSP

David H. Rochlin, BSP Donald W. Taylor, BSP

56

cap s u le

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu

Class of 1980 Louis J. Brill, BSP

* Signifies donor for 15+ consecutive years ~ Signifies donor for 5-14 consecutive years

+ Signifies David Stewart Associates Founding Member = Signifies Deceased


HONOR ROLL OF DONORS

Michael F. McMahon, BSP

Karen M. Kabat, MS

Thomas P. LaMartina, BSP

Dixie D. Leikach, BSP

Larry E. Small, PhD

Charise S. Kasser, BSP

Laura E. Sampson, BSP

Neil B. Leikach, BSP

Cynthia L. Kisamore, BSP

Mona L. Tsoukleris, PharmD

Mark R. McDowell, BSP

Class of 1981

Madeline McCarren, PhD

Janet M. Abramowitz, BSP

Cristina V. Platon, BSP

Class of 1988

Wanida Surichamorn, BSP

Caroline T. Bader, BSP

Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner,

Phyllis A. Bernard, BSP

Jia-Bei Wang, PhD

David L. Booze, BSP

PharmD

Karen H. Bohan, PharmD

Brenda K. Weller, BSP

Francis J. Bublavek, BSP

Molrat Sripinyo, BSP

Catherine L. Cioffi, PhD

Mark G. Fletcher, MS

Ilene H. Zuckerman, PharmD

Fran Favin-Weiskopf, PharmD

Class of 1993

Kathleen Gondek, MS

Lilian T. Alade, PharmD

David R. Fulton Jr., BSP

Kara J. Sink, BSP

Margie Mae Goldberg-Okun, BSP

Class of 1984

Susan A. Katz, BSP

Hector T. Ayu, BSP

Mary-Therese Hewins, BSP

Karim Anton Calis, BSP

Mary Lynn Lanham, BSP

Jean M. Dinwiddie, PharmD

Thomas E. Johnson Jr., BSP

Mary-Therese Hewins, MS

Lisa M. Matson, BSP

Kathleen Gondek, PhD

Jill Molofsky, BSP

Edmond J. Kucharski, BSP

Kimberly M. Palasik, BSP

Diana P. Henzel, BSP

Brian L. Schumer, BSP

Mark H. Lapouraille, BSP

Raymond Palasik, BSP

Alice H. Hill, PharmD

Craig K. Svensson, BSP

Edwin M. Lewis, MS

Nina H. Spiller, PharmD

Nigel R. Isaacs, PharmD

Ilene H. Zuckerman, BSP

Matthew G. Shimoda, PharmD

Class of 1982

Jung E. Lee, BSP

Suzanne K. Simala, BSP

Class of 1989

Robert F. Melendez, BSP

Mark E. Sporre, BSP

Laurine A. Barrow-Wilson, BSP

Kathleen M. Phelan, BSP

Kenneth S. Bauer Jr., BSP

Todd H. Stephens, BSP

James M. Crable, BSP Hope S. DeCederfelt, BSP

Class of 1985

Natalie D. Eddington, PhD

Abigail M. Strawberry, BSP

Steven P. George, BSP

Martin Jagers, BSP

James R. Salmons, BSP

Laura D. Weiss, BSP

Theresa K. F. Justice, BSP

Laura Y. Kim, BSP

Andrea B. Weiss, BSP

Ronald P. Kleiman, BSP

Jay E. Krosnick, BSP

Steven J. Marcalus, BSP

Thomas J. Pfaff, BSP

Janet W. Mighty, BSP

Class of 1994 Class of 1990

Julie S. Johnson, BSP

Lisa Coppolo Ruppel, PharmD

James D. Yeargain, BSP

Charlene S. Sampson, BSP

Class of 1986

Michael C. Hawk, BSP

Mark J. Schocken, PhD

Kimberley L. Barnett, BSP

Cindy Q. Jiang, BSP

Anna Marie H. Weikel, BSP

Karim Anton Calis, PharmD

Class of 1995 Elizabeth Abraham, BSP

Jennifer K. Grier, BSP

Class of 1991

Michael J. Barton, BSP

Class of 1983

Mary Lynn McPherson, PharmD

Susan M. Evans, BSP

Angela M. Parker, BSP

Gayle R. Caldwell, BSP

Marianthy K. Mendez, BSP

Gayle C. Howell, BSP

Jodi M. Sullivan, BSP

Donna M. Clark, BSP

Keith S. Pozanek, BSP

Trang H. Huynh, BSP

Terry L. Davis, BSP

Eric R. Schuetz, BSP

Wanida Surichamorn, PhD

Theodore J. Evans, BSP

Frances Spaven, PhD

Thomas P. Evans, BSP

Loreen A. Wutoh, BSP

Mark G. Fletcher, PhD

Class of 1996 Marsha E. Alvarez, PharmD

Class of 1992

Cynthia J. Boyle, PharmD

Freddy E. Banks, BSP

Beatriz N. Caceres-Gentile,

Donald J. Glenn, BSP

Class of 1987

Lynette R. Bradley-Baker, BSP

PharmD

Felix A. Khin-Maung-Gyi, BSP

William M. Heller, DSc

Nicholas Cornias, BSP

Mary Lynn Lanham, PharmD

Mary Therese Gyi, BSP

Forest S. Howell, BSP

Dana C. Couch, BSP

Sovitj Pou, PharmD

Jane S. Hulko, BSP

Vicki M. Joshua, BSP

Jeffrey J. Harnsberger, BSP

George C. Voxakis, PharmD

Kim M. Hulko, BSP

Kathrin C. Kucharski, PharmD

Lisa C. LeGette, BSP

Ellen H. Yankellow, PharmD

+ Signifies David Stewart Associates Founding Member = Signifies Deceased

summe r 201 4

* Signifies donor for 15+ consecutive years ~ Signifies donor for 5-14 consecutive years

57


HONOR ROLL OF DONORS

Class of 1997

Stephen E. Sussman, PharmD

Class of 2004

Class of 2010

Charles R. Bonapace, PharmD

Charles D. Taylor Jr., PharmD

Calvin Y. Lee, PharmD

Boghoko B. Kaspa, PharmD

James L. Bresette, PharmD

William Yeboah, PharmD

Yoo-Jin Lee, PharmD

Emily L. Knapp, PharmD

Amy S. Nagle, PharmD

Sharonjit K. Sagoo, PharmD Leah C. Sera, PharmD

Barbara S. Chong, PharmD David T. Diwa, PharmD

Class of 2001

Michael P. Peloquin, PharmD

Kristin A. Lynch, PharmD

Asome Bide, PharmD

Noha N. Salama, PhD

Gina P. McKnight-Smith, PharmD

Laci L. Brown, PharmD

Stacey S. Rinehart, PharmD

Daniel A. Farney, PharmD

Class of 2005

Christine I. Aladi, PharmD

JoAnn M. Spearmon, PharmD

Renee M. Hilliard, PharmD

Stewart W. Carter, PharmD

William P. Albanese, PharmD

Rodney H. Taylor, PharmD

Yelee Y. Kim, PharmD

Hoai-An Truong, PharmD

Siyun Liao, PharmD

Class of 2011

Theresa M. Langeheine, PharmD

Rachel L. Melnick, PharmD

Class of 1998

Amy W. Law, PharmD

Class of 2006

Meredith Y. Moy, PharmD

Thomas J. Biles, PharmD

Kimberley A. Lentz, PhD

Mary Therese Gyi, PharmD

Sheryl E. Thedford, PharmD

Michelle M. Ceng, PharmD

Janine E. Sadek, PharmD

Brian M. Hose, PharmD

Deanna Tran, PharmD

Harold E. Chappelear, DSc ’98

Nazim S. Shahzad, PhD

Helen Hsiao, PharmD

Terri F. Clayman, PharmD

Bay-Mao B. Wu, PharmD

Ping Jin, PhD

Class of 2012

Terry L. Davis, PharmD

Angela M. Kaitis, PharmD

Sara Alizai, PharmD

Patrick Y. Kamara, PharmD

Class of 2002

Daniel Z. Mansour, PharmD

Victoria E. Dang, PharmD

Jonathan N. Latham, PharmD

Howard K. Besner, PharmD

Aruna Pokharel, PharmD

Crystal J. Dixon-Baskerville,

Teresa A. Okala, PharmD

Adam A. Dinerman, PhD

Steven L. Silverman, PharmD

PharmD

Robin L. Paluskievicz, PharmD

Fortin S. Georges, PharmD

Edward A. Taylor, PharmD

Joanne M. Hilburn, PharmD

Jae Hyung Wu, PharmD

Margie Mae Goldberg-Okun,

Robin G. Trulli, PharmD

Kimberly E. Meany, PharmD

PharmD

Thomas G. Williams Jr., PharmD

Marcelle T. Nicolas, PharmD

Class of 1999

Gloria S. Grice, PharmD

Kennith L. Yu, PharmD

Jeffrey E. Paup, PharmD

Lynette R. Bradley-Baker, PhD

Nhat H. Le, PharmD

Alvin H. Burwell, PharmD

Yvonne K. Molotsi, PharmD

Class of 2007

Susan dosReis, PhD

Charlene A. Peterson, PharmD

Christopher M. Blanchette, PhD

Charles R. Downs, PharmD

Sangeeta V. Raje, PhD

Rachel A. Boyer, PharmD

Class of 2013

Michelle L. Eby, PharmD

Lawrence P. Siegel, PharmD

Aroonjit Jenkosol, PharmD

Maggie Y. Chan, PharmD

Sonia S. Kim, PharmD

Carol E. Stevenson, PharmD

Daniel C. Lyons, PharmD

Kellie S. Chew, PharmD

Julie A. Kreyenbuhl, PhD

Jung L. Sung, PharmD

Elizabeth H. Nolte, PharmD

Meghan E. Crum, PharmD

Ankur Sarodia, PharmD

Maura P. Murphy, PhD

Alice A. Williams, PharmD

Menachem Y. Edelman, PharmD Class of 2003

Class of 2008

Frances A. Gray, PharmD

Class of 2000

Nazeer N. Ahmed, PharmD

Jennifer L. Bailey, PharmD

Alexa J. Havrilko, PharmD

Lisa L. Booze, PharmD

Sheila Alizadeh, PharmD

Vandana R. Gupta, PharmD

Monique L. Mounce, PharmD

Jason F. Chancey, PharmD

Rahul S. Deshmukh, PhD

Erika L. Kammer, PharmD

Jeffrey S. Mrowczynski, PharmD

Catherine G. Dormarunno,

Chau L. Hoang, PharmD

Susan L. Mercer, PhD

Amber Streifel, PharmD

PharmD

Shin W. Kim, PharmD

Jamie C. Wilkins-Parker, PharmD

Yan Chun Zhou, PharmD

Kaysha R. Lancaster, PharmD

Lawrence J. Kotey, PharmD

Monica L. Pogue, PharmD

Carolyn Petralia, PharmD

Class of 2009

Class of 2014

James R. Salmons, PharmD

Raymond Bleu-Laine, PharmD

Lisa Hutchins, PharmD

Charles H. Steg Jr., PharmD

Claire E. Leocha, PharmD

Michael J. Steinberg, PharmD

Lisa Y. Mostovoy, PharmD

58

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www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu


HONOR ROLL OF DONORS

GIVING BY CORPORATIONS

Sponsors

Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund

STUDENT ORGANIZATION

AND FOUNDATIONS

$1,000-$9,999

Finksburg Pharmacy, Inc.

SPONSORSHIP

AllTranz Inc.

FLAVORx

The University of Maryland

Patrons

Becton Dickinson & Co.

GE Foundation

School of Pharmacy thanks the

$100,000+

Bristol-Myers Squibb Co.

George’s Creek Pharmacy, Inc.

corporations, foundations,

DrugLogic, Inc.

Bristol-Myers Squibb

Hecrol LLC

organizations, and private

MedStar Health

Foundation

IBM Corp.

sponsors who, throughout

National Association of Chain

CARE Pharmacies

Johnson Family Pharmacy LLC

the year, have so generously

Drug Stores

Kaiser Permanente Medical

contributed directly to

National Pharmaceutical Council

Correct Rx Pharmacy

Cooperative, Inc.

Group

student organizations to enrich

Novartis AG

Kappa Psi Pharmaceutical

the student experience and

PhRMA Foundation

CVS Caremark Corp.

Fraternity

enhance ongoing professional development.

Services, Inc.

EPIC Pharmacies, Inc.

Kenneth C. Ullman, MD, PC

Benefactors

Exxon Mobil Corp.

Klein’s Supermarkets, Inc.

$50,000-$99,999

Fink’s Pharmacy

Aerscher Diagnostics, LLC

Hereford Pharmacy, Inc.

Maryland Charity Campaign

Catonsville Pharmacy, LLC

AstraZeneca

Maryland Pharmacists

2011

CVS Caremark Corp.

Retirement Research

Association

Maryland Charity Campaign

Jay’s Catering

Foundation

Merck Partnership for Giving

2012

Maryland Pharmacists

Springer Science + Business

MIME, LLC

National Association of Chain

Association

Nutramax Laboratories, Inc.

Maryland Pharmaceutical

PharmCon, Inc.

Northern Pharmacy & Medical

Society

Polymer Technology

Equipment

MedStar Health

Perry Hall Children’s Center, Inc.

Omnicare

Media, LLC-N.J.

Associates $25,000-$49,999

Systems, Inc.

of Maryland

Drug Stores Foundation

Camden Pub

AbbVie, Inc.

Rite Aid Corp.

Preston Pharmacy Inc.

Penn Restaurant

American Chemical Society

SuperValu

Reynolds, Smith and Hills, Inc.

Professional Pharmacy

Biogen Idec Inc.

University of Maryland School

Sharpsburg Pharmacy

Rite Aid Pharmacy

JG Business Link International

SNC Partners, LLC

Safeway

of Pharmacy Class of 2013

Joan & Sanford Weill Medical College Pharmaceutical Research and

Manufacturers of America

U.S. Pharmacopeia Affiliates $10,000-$24,999 A & G Pharmaceutical, Inc. American Foundation for

Pharmaceutical Education

Forest Laboratories, Inc. Universal Business

Solutions, LLC

Walgreens Co.

The Annapolitan Shop, Inc.

Samos Restaurant

Contributors Up To $999

The Pfizer Foundation, Inc.

Shoppers Pharmacy

Ahold Financial

University Learning Systems

Target Inc.

Services

InPharmx, Inc.

Walgreens Co.

Alpha Zeta Omega -

Walmart Foundation

Walmart

Kappa Chapter

Wedgewood Club

AstraZeneca HealthCare Foundation BIL Inc. Blue Door Pharmacies, LLC CNA Foundation DAB Consulting, LLC Daiichi Sankyo, Inc. Eli Lilly and Co. Foundation

summe r 201 4

59


HONOR ROLL OF DONORS

GIFTS OF TRIBUTE

This is a listing of gifts received from

The School of Pharmacy received the following

July 1, 2012, to June 30, 2013.

gifts of tribute for the individuals listed below:

We have made every effort to provide a complete and accurate listing

In Honor of:

of donors and gifts. If we have made

Gilbert Cohen, BSP ’54

an error or omission, please accept

Natalie D. Eddington, PhD ’89, BSP, FAAPS, FCP

our sincere apology and contact the

Diane L. Kaufman

Office of Development and Alumni Affairs at 410-706-5893 or

In Memory of:

mmoorefield@rx.umaryland.edu

Anne B. Leavitt

so that we may correct our records.

Frank J. Mackowiak, BSP ’62 Martin T. Paul, BSP ’71 Gerald Schonfeld, BSP ’51 Sally Van Doren, PharmD ’85 Bernard A. Weisman, BSP ’70 Thomas G. Williams Sr.,

BSP ’80, PharmD ’99

BOARD OF VISITORS Stephen J. Allen, RPh, MS, FASHP Executive Vice President American Society of Health-System Pharmacists Foundation Mary E. W. Baxter, MBA, RPh Vice President, National Practice Leader, Performance and Outcomes Cardinal Health Judy Britz, PhD Executive Director Maryland Biotechnology Center Hon. Harold E. Chappelear, DSc ’98, RPh, LLD Principal InternaSource, LLC Gina McKnight-Smith, PharmD ’97, MBA, CGP, BCPS Clinical Coordinator Provider Synergies

60

cap s u le

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu

Thomas E. Menighan, BSPharm, MBA, FAPhA Executive Vice President and CEO American Pharmacists Association

Wenxue Wang Chair China Fortune Land Development Co.

Hon. Joseline Pena-Melnyk, JD Maryland House of Delegates

Ellen H. Yankellow, BSP ’73, PharmD ’96, Chair President and CEO Correct Rx Pharmacy Services, Inc

Hon. David D. Rudolph, EdD, MEd Maryland House of Delegates Jermaine Smith, RPh Director, College Relations and Professional Recruitment Rite Aid Pharmacy John Spearman, MBA President and COO Laurel Regional Hospital Audra Stinchcomb, PhD Founder and Chief Scientific Officer AllTranz, Inc.


MESSAGE FROM DEVELOPMENT

Matching A Need Some things never change, right? When you think back to your days in pharmacy school, chances are you remember studying hard, enjoying fun times with your fellow classmates, and trying to make ends meet financially, just like our students today. What has changed, however, is that the cost of a pharmacy education is becoming unaffordable for the majority of students who want to go to pharmacy school. The need for student aid and scholarships is greater today than ever before. In December 2013, realizing the significant need for more financial support for students, the University of Janice Batzold Maryland Baltimore Foundation, Inc. (UMBF) announced a Student Scholarship Matching Program. You can read more about the program in the donor profile on Bernie Weisman, BSP ’70, and his memorial scholarship endowment on page 29. If you’ve ever considered establishing an endowed scholarship, now is the time to take action. Under the new matching program, an endowment can be established with less than a $25,000 gift, which can come from more than one donor. This program will allow a gift of at least $16,667 to be matched to meet the $25,000 endowment threshold, and for your convenience, a gift can be made in the form of a pledge payable over as many as five years. Below is a chart that demonstrates how various gift amounts will be matched. This matching initiative is only available for newly established endowed scholarships and for making additional gifts of $10,000 or more to existing endowed scholarships. The scholarship matching program, however, will only be available during the next two years, so be sure to act soon. Competition for top students is fierce, and the availability of student scholarship support is one factor that helps to ensure the School of Pharmacy remains competitive in attracting and retaining the best and brightest students. Please contact the Office of Development and Alumni Affairs at 410-706-5893 or mmoorefield@rx.umaryland.edu if you would like to learn more about this unprecedented opportunity. On a more personal note, I would like to let you know that I have retired from the School of Pharmacy. My last day was July 1. I have had the wonderful privilege and pleasure of working in the Office of Development and Alumni Affairs for the last six years, most recently as the acting assistant dean. It has been a fabulous ride, and it is with mixed feelings that I say goodbye. While I cannot deny that I am looking forward to retirement, I will miss my interactions with all of you. Let’s stay in touch! Warm regards,

Janice T. Batzold, MS Acting Assistant Dean Office of Development and Alumni Affairs GIFT AMOUNT

$16,667 gift to establish

CH AT M BF UM

IFT LGE A T TO VALU

$8,333

$25,000

$15,000

$45,000

$5,000

$15,000

a new endowed scholarship $30,000 gift to establish a new endowed scholarship $10,000 new gift supporting an existing scholarship endowment *Gifts can be made in the form of a pledge, payable over as many as five years.


Nonprofit Organization U.S. Postage

PAID Permit No. 4695 Baltimore, Maryland

20 N. Pine Street Baltimore, MD 21201-1180

Save the Date

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 2014 SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2014

ALL ALUMNI REUNION Join us for a weekend of friends, food, and fun! FRIDAY NIGHT

Orioles vs Yankees at Camden Yards

SATURDAY

Taste of Baltimore luncheon at the School of Pharmacy Special recognition for the Class of 1964 and classes ending in 3, 8, 4, and 9 School tours, music, and activities for all ages

www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu/alumni

Capsule Summer 2014  
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