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150011907 ARC3001

NEWCASTLE UNIVERSITY 2017-2018

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Content INTRODUCTION

1

CHARRETTES ( UNABLE TO ATTEND)

5

PRIMER SITE ANAYSIS DISMANTLES CONTRAPTION PAVILION

6 9 13 29

FIELD TRIP

36

THINKING THROUGH MAKING

46

STAGING SITE ANAYSIS PROGRAMME

50 63

REALISATION MASSING DESIGN EXPLORATION

70 75

REFINEMENT DESIGN EXPLORATION FINAL DESIGN

84 91

TECTONIC INTEGRATION PART I CASE STUDY REPORT

128

TECTONIC INTEGRATION PART II MATERALITY, ATMOSPHERE & EXPERIENCE

160

APPENDIX

166

BIBLIOGRAPHY

183


Introduction Studio Theme (Culture & Legacy) Our studio puts accents on exploring cultural architecture in perspectives of temporary and interaction between people and space, which is also coherent with my personal interest in social space and social interaction. The studio was set up in the context of Sunderland and Stoke-On-Trent as the rival bidding of City of Culture year 2021. We explored two cities in depth of their intangible infrastructures, from the marco scale of the decline of ship building industries in Sunderland and the traditional ceramics cultures and Stoke-On-Trent, to the micro scale of changing and evolving cultural infrastuctures. We are asked to explore architecture as the way to invite people to interact with it, providing a creative framework of temporal opportunities. In the first semseter, we designed an interactive contraption embodying a myth, legend or story from the chosen sites from Sunderland or Stoke-On-Trent, in parallel with site anaylsis of intangible infrastructure in both sites as a group work. The contraption was an interactive lens to tell the stories and cultures in specific sites, in which people can potentially interact with. We then designed a temporary pavilion for the events during City of Culture Year as the stepping stone before moving foward to a permanent cultural building. In the second semseter, we searched and developed a programme for the proposed building in the chosen site. We then moved forward to Thinking Through Making Week to explore micro scale of architecture, rather than from marco scale, as an innovative way to interact with materials. Finally, we put all elements deriving from primer and staging to develop the design of culture in depth of temporal nature and interactive narratives.

1 I Academic Portfolio I Introduction

Portfolio This portfolio will provide a broad record of work that I have done within the framework of ‘‘culture and legacy’’. It will show the critial anaylsis of how each work informed the thinking to the next stage and how they form relationship between each other and become the nature of temporary and interaction. Extra works will be showed as following:

Refined Work

New Work

Timeline

Story

Oct

Primer

Dec

Field Trip

Jan

Staging

Feb

Thinking Through Making

Feb

Realisation

April

Object

Pavilion

Refinement Building


Group Shot

Primer I Academic Portfolio I 2


Reflective Journal Primer We firstly started to disclose the stories and myths from two cities based on the infrastructure resources and furthur researches. It was ainteresting process of researching and sharing them as a group to understand a city through the lens of revealling their interesting stories. One of the stories was then selected to be used for designing a contraption as a metaphor. It was challenging to identify the core nature of the story - Anna of Five Towns into visualised object, which was balance and harmony. I applied the idea of Flensted Mobile to illustrate balance visually and collision of hanging ceramic cylinders to embody harmony aurally. It becomes interactive that people are able to rotate the cylinder to produce sound or they touch the ceramic to experience the culture of Stoke-on-trent tactilely. The experience was engaging to gain skills of conceptualising ideas and modelling skills so that an object is already captable to tell the conceptualised ideas.

bind personal interest into building design and across different discipline areas, while it nestled up with my identity as a student who is seeking for social interaction; Not only I started to develop a consistent style of rendering, I also explored the option of using watercolour embodying ideas in a representative level, although there might be area to improve my watercolour becoming more appropriate to illustrate idea.

Thinking Through Making Week was an new experience in terms of exploring materiality and details from the first stage without any brief and design intent. From the exploriation of brick wall construction, I was inspired by the nature of brick that can transparent and flexible. It can be adopted to the next stage of realisation. It provided a new perspective to trigger our thinking from the start.

The project explored the harmony of allocating spaces with different privacy requirements but promoting social interaction between users. I have learnt to use the perspective from the users when designing, which allowed me to relate back to our studio theme of enabling flexibility and interaction. As a foreign student, it was really rare to have such experiences to explore the nature of ‘‘brick’’ in depth, where it is barely possible to find one that is built by brick in Hong Kong. It was a fruitful year of delving into the interest of expressing stories from an object to manifesting them from a building, in relation to materiality and interaction. More importantly, it is a year to improve all skills of thinking, drawing, modelling, editing but also to identify my own drawing and representation style for future’s study or practice. I have learnt a lot from my studio tutors, not only by the perspective to design building for people with the interpretation of stories but also how we can express our design intent in a themore direct and effective way.

Realisation

I took the element of harmony and balance from primer into the cultural building design. Researchs revealing the lack of local production and performance space in Sunderland led to the idea of designing a building in relate to performing art culture. While my personal area of interest was about social interaction in social space (which I also explored in my dissertation study), the nature of interaction was coherent with brief of including compenhensive performing art courses, requiring good communication and exchange of ideas to construct one performance. It was motivative to

3 I Academic Portfolio I Introduction

The design adopted hanging brick curtain as the core design intent. The idea was to transfer the nature of brick from hard to soft. In spite of the fact that the brick curtains work harmoniously with the performing art programme that requiring different privacy level, it is relatively challenging to balance of the design intent responding to site but not overwhelming the programme of performing art to encourage social interaction.


Interaction, Museum Voorlinden

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Charrettes

Fig.1 Charrette Week Poster Due to personal issue, I was not able coming back to UK from Hong Kong and to the attend the charrette week.

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Primer Site Analysis - Dismantle - Contraption - Pavilion

Primer I Academic Portfolio I 6


Site Analysis

Cinema

Political

Music

Pubs / Bars Clubs

Tourism

Pub+Club

Retail

Monument

Community Centre

Food

Theatre

Library Mapping from collaborative group work

Sunderland Cultural infrastructures are generally distributed in the city centre in several scales. Some interesting facts are that tourism is not only centralised in the city centre but also running along with the canal; There is no library facility in the city centre but there are few surrounding the city.

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Cinema

Political

Monument

Pubs / Bars Clubs

Theatre

Pub+Club

Retail

Food

Community Centre

Library

Tourism

Music Mapping from collaborative group work

Stoke-On-Trent It has an unique distribution of intangible infrastructures since the city is formed by six towns. The main cultural core is proportioned in Stoke city and Hanley, where they have their own railway stations. Cultual faciliies are also uniformly distributed in other four towns. However, there is a lack of music facilities in towns other than Hanley; Theatre spaces are only centralised in Hanley.

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Object Dismantle

Comparsion

(Contemprary VS Vintage) After a broad understanding on two cities, 15 objects were dismantled that mine was an contemporary instant camera. The components required for a contemporary camera is extensively reduced as more simplier,comparing with a vintage camera, especially the construction of the lens. The ways they join every parts of component are relatively distinctive. While contemporary camera adopts the method of using plastic clip, vintage camera uses metal screw and rings.

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Contemporary

Vintage

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Object Dismantle

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1

4

2

5

3

6


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Contraption

The Story - Anna of Five Towns

(Week 1) After the exploriation of the construction of an object, I designed another object to tell a story, myth in Sunderland or Stoke-On-Trent. The story was derived from the name of a novel called ‘’Anna of Five Towns’’ written by the author Arnold Bennett , based on the pottery industry background in Stoke. Despite the fact that Stoke is consisted of six towns, Arnold claimed there were only ‘’Five Towns’’ instead of ‘’Six Town’’, that Fenton was omitted as the identity of forgotten town. He believed the vocal of ‘’Five’’ was more harmonious then that of “Six’’. However, it led to the spread of misunderstanding to the public that Fenton is not included in Stoke.

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Fig.2 Book Cover


x Tunstall

x Burslem

x Hanley

x Stoke x Fenton

x Longton Stoke-On-Trent

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Contraption

Flensted Mobile Flensted mobile is a type of kinetic sculpture constructed to take advantage of the principle of equilibrium. It consists of a number of rods, from which weighted objects or further rods hang. My idea is to design a mobile embodying the balance and harmony of six towns, emphasising the existence of the “forgotton town’’.

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Fig. 4 Hanging Mobile Example

Fig. 5 Hanging Mobile Example

Fig. 3 Rouge Triomphant by Alexander Caler

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Contraption

Mobile Testing

(Week 2)

The second week was having the first attempt to make a flested mobile. It was the test undertstanding the challenges to balance different elements and what materials are suitable for constructing my mobile.

Barrier Testing

(Week 3)

The third week was to add depths based on the idea of making a flested mobile. The mobile at that stage illustrated the map of Stoke-On-Trent. They will hit the cylinder-barrier to produce harmonious sound.

Refinement

(Week 4)

The fourth week was more about refinement of the materiality and form of the mobile. A frame was made to test the dimension of the mobile should be. There were various material experiments going on to mold a clay cylinder which will be explained in TTMW section. Timber cylinders with ceramic facade were decided for the final model because of feasibility.

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Concept Mapping

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Contraption

Final Model The flensted mobile was formed by the map of Stoke, with a barrier of clay-cylinders. Reaching the equilibrium of the balance, the mobile rotates itself without the need of manual force. When white balls hit the clay barrier while rotating, euphonious sounds generated by the collision of cylinders. However, the red ball representing Fenton never hits clay cylinders to satirise people never find out if Fenton is harmonious or not with other towns, but they just followed a belief without having their own judgement.

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Contraption

Interaction Interaction is considered through human’s senses. Flensted Mobile illustrates balance visually; collision of hanging ceramic cylinders manifests sense of harmony aurally by producing euphonious sound by people to rotate them or they touch the ceramic to experience the culture of Stokeon-trent tactilely.

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Contraption

Primer Show It was a celebration showcase of the physcial and intangible exploration of two cities - Sunderland and Stoke-On-Trent. Along with the interactive site analysis panels, there are total fifteen contraptions embodying sixteen different stories in both cities also in an interactive way. A booklet was made to record all the works we had done in primer. (Please refer to the appendix for the booklet’s snapshot)

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Contraptions

Individual contraption from groupmates

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Individual contraption from groupmates

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Contraptions

Individual contraption from groupmates

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Individual contraption from groupmates

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Temporary Pavilion

Fabrication of Memories After telling a story from an object, we started to convert stories into pavilion. The core event I had chosen was an art workshop named ‘’FORGET-ME-NOT’’. It offered opportunities to the public exploring, conserving and sharing the heritage of the First World War silk embroidered postcards sent home soldiers. By discovering memories and stories of people’s relatives they are caring, series of workshop provide skills and space to recreate those in silk embroidered postcards. Fig. 6 Silk Embroidered Postcard Example

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Week 1

Week 6

Week 4

Week 8

Construction Process My design idea was constructing a pavilion by organic formed mesh-wire walls. Lasting for two months, visitors build the facade of the pavilion themselves by hanging the postcards onto walls once they have done them.

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Temporary Pavilion

Section A-A’ 1:50

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A

A’

Plan 1:50 (scaled)

Primer I Academic Portfolio I 32


Temporary Pavilion

Stoke-On-Trent

Sunderland

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Stoke-On-Trent

Sunderland

Primer I Academic Portfolio I 34


Temporary Pavilion

Key moment of building the pavilion’s facade

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Field Trip Hull - Rotterdam - Sunderland - Stoke-On-Trent

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Hull

Memory of food culture

City’s facade

City of Culture Hull, as the host of City of Culture 2017, is a city having local artists, cultural organisations, businesses all in one. A visit of art gallery showed a memory collection of restaurant owners and their food. It revealed an interesting perspective to discover more about Hull by their intangible infrastructure - food.

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City’s facade


Rotterdam

City Church Het Steiger Saint Dominic

New Luxor Theatre

Kunsthal

Engagement of Architecture Rotterdam, as the second largest city in Netherlands, has a fruitful language in architecture which is easily found out from the visit of it. They have a high profile of culture projects, such as, New Luxor Theatre, Kunsthal. The City Church impressed me a lot in terms of the exploriation of narrative architecture that people build their stories in the church, which become more important than the church itself.

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Sunderland

Riverside

Brick Facade Detail

Celebration of Brick Sunderland has a compenhensive planning in preserving existing buildings, such as The Old Fire Station in Edwardian brick architecture along with the development of culture. Whlist they have many cultural organisations supporting the cultural vision and promoting joint planning between different cultural sectors.

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Keel Square, City Centre


Stoke-On-Trent

Stoke City Centre

Riverside

Pottery Factory Chimney Detail

City of Six Town Stoke-on-trent is a very unique city which is formed by six towns. It left the fruitful history of pottery industry through out the city. The visit of seeing the refurbishment of old pottery factory inspired me in way to rethinking the conservation of old buildings.

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Interaction

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Movement

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Texture & Colour

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Reflection The biggest gain from this trip was not only we visited numerous cultural buildings, but we also had opportunities to understand a building thoroughly from facade to details. The one that impressed me a lot was City Church in Rotterdam that stories embodied inside the church were more valuable to reveal from just the building itself.

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Thinking Through Making Ceramic Casting - Brick Experience

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Thinking Through Making

Making of Mold

Filling of Casting Material

Ceramic Workshop It was my first experience to mold a ceramic. The lesson I had learnt from the process was technique of forming a ceramic in terms of time, ratio or cement and water and the characteristic of ceramic.

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Finished Ceramic


Cut of Rubber for Melting

Cast of Ceramic Mold

Finished Ceramic

Ceramic Cylinder Casting In order to make a ceramic cylinder to illustrate the material of Stoke, a rubber mold was made for it. After being cut and heating them up in a boiler, melted-rubbers are then placed into a timber-made mold as the negative space of the rubber mold. I successfully made a rubber mold once the rubber had been dry. However, the result was not satisfactory that ceramic cylinders were too fraglie to be easily broken.

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Thinking Through Making

Detail of Brick Sequence

Detail of Brick Sequence

Brick Exploration Three brick walls were constructed in different privacy levels to test to building technique of brick. They were reinforced by steel wire, which unexpectedly provided a great range of flexiblity to bind in different angles and assured the structure of brick walls.

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1:20 Brick Exploriation


Staging Site Analysis - Programme

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Introduction

Brief We identified a suitable brief for the new cultural building based on the researches and explorations during primer in the sites of Sunderland and Stoke-On-Trent. The aim was to design a building that is about people. By viewing place through peoples perspectives and stories, the building shall promote social interactions and invite people to experience the architecture itself.

4

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Site Options (Stoke-On-Trent)

1

Fig. 7 Stoke Digimap

Corner of Station Road and A52

Near Bullrushes Close

2

Fig. 8 Stoke Digimap

Behind the railway station, having an existing industrial Based at a key convergence of two canals, near the existing warehouse and a small brick building. It is well connected site Industrial Museum, less connected than some of the other rich in industrial history. sites, but is rich in industrial history.

3

Bethesda Street

Fig. 9 Stoke Digimap

4

Fig. 10 Stoke Digimap

Corner of S Wolfe Street and A52

Based in the cultural quarter of stoke-on-Trent, close to the Based in Stoke and houses the existing market. A new library existing Library and Ceramic Museum, having been identified has also been built next nearby. as requiring development by the local Council.

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Site Options (Sunderland)

Off High Street West

5

Fig. 11 Stoke Digimap

Holmeside

6

Fig. 12 Stoke Digimap

Based on a public square (Keel Square) close to the developing Based at the existing market with a very interesting group music and performance quarter. of buildings and routes, being a developing area with a number of recent additions, including the new bus station and Sunderland College building.

7

Off Livingstone road

Fig. 13 Stoke Digimap

8

Garden Place

Fig. 14 Stoke Digimap

Based between Keel Square and the River. It is currently a Based at the developing music and performance quarter. It site under developmen and is rich in history having previously sits next to the old Fire Station which has now been turned housed the Vaux brewery into a bar and event space and Sunderland Empire Theatre.

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Site Decision I picked site 8 Garen Place in Sunderland as my proposed building to develop. I was interested in theatre infrastructure because I was assigned to research in depth during primer. Moreover, my another area of interest was social space in educational facility which was adjoining my identity as a student who seeks for social interaction. Since site 8 is located nearby two major performing art facility and in front of police station, it is suitable and in a safe but easily accessible area for developing an educational performing art centre.

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Site Analysis (Marco)

Theatre with teaching service Performing art teaching school Commercial Use with theatre facility Theatre

Physical Infrastructure Theatre facilities generally come with teaching services in cooperating with other performing art societies; There is a leak of medium scale of theatre facility in city centre.

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1800s 1950

A style of social realism which depicts the domestic lives of the working class, to explore social issues and political issues

2017

Mainly fair-tales story, musical and music performance, suitable for family; Biography of renewed people

1900

Edwardian musical comedy came to dominate the musical stage, capturing the optimism, energy and good humour

Licensed to perform spoken drama ; Public entertainments, such as theatrical performances, were banned under the Puritan rule.

Intangible Infrastructure Sunderland Empire as the largest threate in Sunderland has only showed as international scale and of various types of option, without any local productions of performance.

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Site Analysis (Micro) Potential site

2018 Performing art school for ASD Comprehensive drama performing learnings (history + pre-production + practical) Capacity: 100-120 people Auditorium, studios, learning resource centre, cafe, social space

The Sunderland Empire 1907 By Ambassador Theatre (Creative Learning) Group Capacity: 2,200 people (Ambassador Lounge) Cross-Country/International scale performance public performing learning workshop

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The Fire Station 1907 By Dance City Organisation Edwardian Architectural Style the hub for cultural activities, hosting drama studios, a heritage centre and a bar and restaurant. Dancing classes and workshops, drama studios and small-scale studio productions


Wear View House (gov. office) Police Station

Bus stop

Magistrates Court

Gllbridge House (gov. office)

View out towards Sunderland Minister Church

15mins walk from central bus station

5mins walk from city centre

15mins walk from View out towards Crowtree Leisure Centre train station (green area)

Access Prevailing wind

View out

Sun path

Noise pollution

Greenery

Air pollution Work from ARC3013 Coursework

Staging I Academic Portfolio I 58


Site Analysis (Micro)

9am Jan

12pm Jan

3pm Jan

59 I Academic Portfolio I Staging


Social space can be positioned facing south; studio, classrooms, studios can be positioned facing north

Main access point of students, visitors can be located at front street; Teachers, officer, transportation of material, drop of waste can be at the back

Acoustic features can be positioned more at the west facing area to reduce noise from theatre

Avoid open space, but positions solid wall or glazing facing south west to reduce wind effect

Greenery area at the front can be extended to the site to offer more social green space to the public

There can be physical or intangible connection between Sunderland Empire and The Fire Station in term of materiality, programmes and access points. Work from ARC3013 Coursework

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Site Analysis (Micro)

Wear View House (Government Office)

The Fire Station (Edwardian Architectural Style)

Brick Detail

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Site (Existing Car Park)

The Old Fire Station

Sunderland Empire

Sunderland Cultural Partnership It is an authority binding with various cultural organisations in Sunderland. One of their aims is to promote joint planning and facilitate stronger interaction between cultural organisations in the city including The old Fire Station and Sunderland Empire. Assuming my client of proposed building is Sunderland Music, Arts and Culture Trust, there are possible options to utilise the surrounding cultural organisations with Sunderland Cultural Partnership physically or intangibly.

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Precedents (School)

Fig. 15 Itoi Elementary School

Itoi Elementary School, Japan/ Atelier BNK

Fig. 16 Rehabilitationof Louis Figuier

Rehabilitation of Louis Figuier, NAS

Plan layout allows for free movement of the living space as the Introduction of an articulation in movements, sitting in the light changes with the time of day and the seasons, which is center of the island which gives access to the whole building. flexible in use during day and night time. It becomes the common playground of two schools, to promote interaction between students.

Fig. 17 Dalton Elementary School

Dalton Elementary School,

Fax Architect

Fig. 18 InsideOut School

InsideOut School, Andrea T & Francesca V

Creating rich public space as much as possible to let in the Blurring the boundary between inside and outside, it offers sunshine and the wind, so the kids could find a lot of interesting an alternative to standard introverted classrooms, which are playgrounds, accompanying them in their growth. flexible to control classrooms’ openness.

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Precedents (Performing Art Centre)

Fig. 19 Itoi Elementary School

Northwestern Uni Music Centre,

Goettsch

The horizontal weaving wood ribbon panels of the recital hall were designed to absorb the sound reflections from the glass wall so that the entire room could work in harmony to create an unique vision without sacrificing acoustical performance.

Fig. 21 Dalton Elementary School

Nevers Cultural Center,

Ateliers O-S architect

Fig. 20 Rehabilitationof Louis Figuier

Dee & Charles Wyly Theatre,

REX + OMA

Application of a flexible seating and minimising opening. Under seat ventilation is replaced by wall ventilation ventilation system along with displacement system to provide good thermal comfort with minimal installations for stage.

Fig. 22 InsideOut School

Marshall Family PA Center,

Weiss+Manfredi

The building has an excellent organisation of balancing private Brick works, illuminated soffits and overhangs shape the and public social space with a welcoming circulation path. The building to advance teaching, performance, and production private social space - patio serves as lighting up the offices. across the boundaries of individual performing arts disciplines.

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Programme

Performing Art School for ASD Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is the name for a range of similar conditions, including Asperger syndrome, that affects a person’s social interaction, communication, interests and behaviour. However, there’s no “cure” for ASD, but educational support and architectural design could possibly help those in need. My brief is a performing art educational centre that is specific for students between age 12-17 having autism spectrum disorder with social difficulties. There are three major subjects to explore - plot writing, costume and stage/set design and drama performing, additional learning on compulsory national curriculum subjects of languages, maths, music, computing, history and art/design. The aim of the school is to help students express themselves through the process and art of performing; It is also the stepping stone of a fundamental learning towards further study in colleges or university. The architecture itself plays as the vital role of offering pleasing spatial experiences and facilitates the importance of performing art for students expressing themselves in the school more reassuringly.

1% 0% Total 6 special need school in sunderland

75%

Total 8 special need school in sunderland

For Age

special need school in Sunderland that buildings are designed for need of it

special need school in Stoke-On-Trent that buildings are designed for need of it

12-17

Total 6 levels of classes

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population having autisam spectrum disorder in UK


Auditorium 300 Multi-functional room 240 1.Reading & ICT facilities, 70 2.Textile and design studio, 70 3.Practice Studio 70

Classroom 210 (30x7) Staff room 100 Office 60 Storage 40 Services 40 W.C. 48 (4x12) Cafeteria 200 Outdoor sport court 150 Social space 200

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Programme (Refined)

Therefore, the area of exploration in this project was shifted delving into an educational centre providing three fundamental subjects of performing art courses along with an theatre space. The building proposed was a performing art educational centre in Sunderland. In day time, inviting students to visit from schools in Sunderland, it offers a comprehensive performing art studies in terms of plot-writing, stage/set and costume design and drama performing training. It aims to stimulate social interaction through exchanging ideas in different cultural field. Moreover, the building serves as a public educational centre offering performing art knowledge access and social space for leisure and interaction. In night time, it transforms to a theatre facility for medium-scale local performance. Sitting between Sunderland Empire and The Fire Station, it offers practice studios and theatre space respectively serving their needs. During City of Culture year, as a role of preserving performing art culture, the building is open for performing art learnings, history exhibition and performances to the public. The proposed building aims to provide benefit of preserving the value of performing art but also to stimulate local culture development through the medium of performing art for public involve and interact with it. The non-building benefit is to connect the adjacent cultural buildings to accelerate the cultural influences to the society.

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How the atmospheric environments described in words could possibly transform to real?

How the lines in the story could be embodied by performing verbally and physically?

Plot Writing

co ll

ab

or at

Costume & Stage /Set Design

ion

at or

ab

ion collaboration

Despite the fact that school for ASD is an interesting area to explore in terms of their different design requirement in relate to their different circumstances, ASD patients have a large range of characteristics which is hard to achieve every single one’s maximum comfort in learning space. It was too broad exploring the nature of ASD kids and also the relationship between performing art.

ll co

Drama Performing

How the design of costume and stage could collaborate with the atmosphere and movements of performance?

Exchange knowledge across different fields through social interaction

Studio space with tables and computer cluster so

cia

ls

Workshop space with corresponding machines for design

pa

so

ce

pa

s ial

c

ce social space

Performing Art Educational Centre

Practice studio space with large span opportunity


Auditorium

300

Office

40

AUDIENCES GENERAL PUBLIC

Cafeteria (With kitchen) Learning resource centre (computer cluster + reading space)

150

Practice studios (2)

150

Staff room

150

Open social space

200

costume & stage Costume & stage design workshop 120 120 co-working Co-working ++ private private studio studio 80 80 Classrooms (5) 240 Office

STUDENTS & ARTISTS

120

40

Backstage + Storage

50

W.C. (12)

48

(inside auditorium)

Total: 1650 sqm

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Realisation Massing Process - Design Exploriation

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Massing Process

Idea 1

Idea 2

This idea aimed for centralising circulation from the draft This idea was to focus on open space within the building is lobby into different spaces, but the separation of private and connected to the existing open space and private open space public is not clear. just for users.

Idea 3 This idea was to allocate all components situated at side, allowing circulation passing through the building, drawing attention from public For more detail, please refer to plans in appendix

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Idea 4

Idea 5

This idea was to separate more public and more private This idea was to play around the private and public layers in spaces into two parts by the partition of auditorium with two different areas open social spaces

Idea 6 This idea was to situate all components into right side to create visual connection of public circulation and the users’s circulation in the building For more detail, please refer to plans in appendix

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Massing Process

Idea 7

Idea 8

This idea was to have all components are surrounded This idea was to separate more public and more private by a sizeable open space, emphasising the creation of spaces into two parts by the partition of auditorium as the infrastructure than a building central space

Idea 9

Idea 10

This idea was to position different components formed an This idea was to keep open space within the building which atrium, providing daylight and privacy is connected to the existing open space, privacy levels are running along both horizontial and vertical layers For more detail, please refer to plans in appendix

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Flexibility

Day Time

Night Time

City of Culture Year

Idea 10 was taken to develop further and was tested in adoptability of being used in different period in relate to our studio theme of flexible building design.

Brick Curtain The idea was then tested with the inspiration of using brick as the skin from Thinking Through Making Week. They played as the role to separate spaces.

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Design Exploration

Idea Development I developed the idea into a larger scale. More detailed components were added into plan. The brick acts as role to define spaces into three parts, circulation running between brick walls. However, there was an excess use of brick curtain, where some of them were not necessarily positioned.

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G/F Plan 1:200


1/F Plan 1:200

2/F Plan 1:200

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Design Exploration (Realisation Review)

Idea Development The design was further modified into more refined spatial organisation in terms of defining more public, less public and more private within the brick curtain in levels of transparency, separating three types of users to access the building; Auditorium standed as different language of its size and materiality to lead audiences easiler to locate the building.

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Section A-A’1:200


Design Exploration (Realisation Review)

14

13

12

11

25

24

10 9 6

7

18 8 17

4 3

1. Cafeteria 2. Kitchen 3. Reception 4. Office 5. Learning Resource Centre 6. Auditorium 7. Backstage 8. Studio

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2

1

5

15

9. Costume and stage/set workshop 10-13. Classrooms 14. Exhibition space

G/F Plan 1:200 (Scaled)

15. Practice studio 16. Practice studio 17. Bridge to Sunderland Empire 18. Auditorium 19. Studio 20. Costume and stage/set workshop 21-24. Classrooms 25. Outdoor pub


A

23

27

22 21 20

26

19

16

26. Control room 27. Staffroom

1/F Plan 1:200 (Scaled)

A’

2/F Plan 1:200 (Scaled)

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Design Exploration (Realisation Review)

Access

Social space

The access of three types of potential users were separated Social space formed through out the building to encourage into different paths. A central path broke through the building exchange of knowledge through social interaction in different during City of Culture Year. performing art field.

Day Time

Night Time

Flexibility Audiences

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General Public

Students/ Artists

City of Culture Year


Facade Collage The collage took the elevation in the openings on bridge and cafeteria, showing various levels transparency achieved by brick curtain wall.

Interior Perspective Collage The collage took the perspective of a user looking through the glazing and the layer of brick curtain, having the vision of city’s fragment.

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Design Exploration (Realisation Review)

Process Model 1:200

Reflection In terms of layering spaces in different privacy levels by brick curtain, vertical layers in student learning spaces could be added, which would build more depth into the project; More consideration of construction method could be explored to achieve the transparency of brick curtain incooperating with buildings facade materials.

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Refinement Design Exploriation - Final Design

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Design Exploration

Idea Development The design was amended and stated a more clear construction method. Buildings in the more public layer was constructed by steel frame in full-glazing to maximise the visual effect with brick curtain; the auditorium was constructed by reinforced concrete earthen-coloured that is harmony with brick curtain. The classrooms and staff room space were built by load bearing construction for privacy concern. I developed the building form according to orientation view and daylight collections. Circulation was allocated according to the brick curtain and in which the social space was formed.

Fig 23 The Yves Saint Laurent Museum, Studio CO

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Section A-A’1:100 (Scaled)

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Design Exploration

G/F Plan 1:200 (Scaled)

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A

1/F Plan 1:200 (Scaled)

A’

2/F Plan 1:200 (Scaled)

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Design Exploration

Process Model 1:200

Reflection The building was more developed in terms of form and construction method. However, form was according only to orientation view but in lack of consistency; steel frame was too chunky in need of reduction of size and quantity.

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Final


Site Plan 1:2500

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Site Plan 1:1000

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Plan G/F 1:200 (scaled)

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Plan 1/F 1:200 (scaled)

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94


Plan 2/F 1:200 (scaled) A

A’

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Spatial Organisation

5 Classrooms

Central Social Space (For Students) Stage + Costume Design Workshop

Staff room

Self- working Studio Practice Studio (Students)

Outdoor Bar

Co-working Studio

Backstage

Learning

120 seats

Resource Centre

Auditorium

Practice Studio (SET) Cafeteria

Public Open Space

More public Less public More private

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Section 1:200

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Elevation 1:200

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100


Elevation 1:200

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Brick Curtain

Brick Pattern Three types of brick patterns, referrencing existing design by practicing architects, are applied to achieve three types of transparency. There are positioned according to the privacy requirement in different spaces. For example, individual studio and office space can be more private, while workshop space and cafeteria can be more public to have visual interaction.

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More private

Fig 24 Premises in Ordaz, T3arc

Fig 25 House in Da Nang, Tropical Space

More public

Fig 26 Terra Cotta Studio, Tropical Space

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Modelling

1:50 Detail Model (Entrance)

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1:100 Final Model

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Modelling

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1:100 Final Model

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Brick Curtain

Day Time The atmospheric render shows how the brick curtain sits with the surrounding Old Fire Station. It responds the form and the colour of bricks but embodying brick as a soft and dynamic material instead of being hard and firm, as an energetic performing art centre.

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Night Time The atmospheric render shows that at night time, the curtains stand more than just brick but becoming a light box to transparentise itself diffusing the movement inside the building, joining the visual interaction between interior and exterior.

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Brick Curtain

Layering Brick curtains play as role to define spaces into three different privacy levels horizontially in more public, less public and more private layers; it works coherently with the vertical layer running across the student learning sector.

Classroom

Classroom

Classroom More private

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Private social space

More private

Practice Studio

Textile Workshop

Movie room/ studio

Less public Learning Resource Centre

Stage Workshop Less public

More public

More public

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Brick Curtain

Hanging Curtain Hanging curtain was inspired by the work by Thinking Through Making Week. They express a greater depth of softness of brick. They are achieved by a steel frame with steel wire joining and reinoforcing bricks. Three parts of hanging curtain are running between the junction of layers without any glazing or solid wall adjacent with. 1:20 Model (Thinking Through Making)

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Brick Curtain and Interaction

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3D Sectional Render

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Interaction

Users from Old Fire Station

Public users during COCY

Staff(Artist)

Workshop material

Students Audiences Back stage material Public users

Access

Users from Sunderland Empire

The general access point for different users inhabiting through layers of brick curtain in day time, night time and during city of culture year.

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Food material

Material Access

The materials for auditorium, workshop and kitchen arrive to the building in different access point.


Vertical Circulation

Vertical circulation can be achieved by elevators spliting into two parts, where buildings in different brick layers are connected by bridges; Staircase in student learning sector are running beside the brick curtains and part of the staircase is hidden inside buildings to achieve a clearer language of vertical circulation.

Sanitary

Unisex toilets in student learning sector are located at the point behind the staircase and more toilets are located in other buildings.

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Interaction

Building Form The refined form is achieved considering creating compressing and contracting spatial quality, orientation to daylight and orientation to interaction between

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Orientated facing to northwest direction to collect direct daylight from west for social space in staff room

Auditorium shaped according to the seating arrangement

Vision is led towards brick curtain and the interaction behind the curtain with dynamic of contraction and compression

Directing vision away from Dun Cow building but towards green space in church area

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Interaction

Students that are Social Space One of the key objectives to achieve is to promote social interactions between different types of users inhabitating in the building at the same time. Not only providing social spaces for each type of users, but we also offer social spaces varying different privacy levels between types of users to promote either for intentional interaction in a refined open space or just accidental interaction in corridor space.

Writing Plot

Designing Costume/Stage

Performing For more additional concepts about the topic of social space, please refer to my dissertation study about social space in student accommodation

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Social space for audiences during the break of performances

General Public

Social space in staff room for artist taking rest from work Social space in widened (2.5m) corridor with seating areas to encourage accidental interaction for students inhabiting in learning sectors.

Student’s assembly space before they have lessons

Audiences

Central social space in situated at the middle point of learning sector for students to exchange their ideas from users three performing art fields Public social space in set up in the circulation overlapping between all types of users; There will costume display celebrating students’ process works and also causal busking from street artists

Teachers (Artist)

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Interaction

2/f

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Watercolour Illustration of Student Open space


1/f

Watercolour Illustration of Practice Studio

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Interaction

Costume Display Students’ process of making one performance should be valued. Therefore, from rough costume designs to refined costumes, all will be shown in public open space during performance period to leave the legacy of creation in every performances.

G/f

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Atmospheric Illustration of Public Open space


G/f

Atmospheric Illustration of Public Open space

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Case Study Tectonic Integration I

TU Delft Library A. Overview B. Design Intent C. Site Appraisal D. Atmosphere and Materiality E. Structural Strategy F. Energy and Environmental Strategies G. Key Moment

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A: Overview

TU Delft Library Institution: Delft University of Technology Architects: Mecanoo Situated: Prometheusplein 1, 2628 ZC Delft, Netherlands Area: 15000m2 Realisation: 1996 – 1998 Design concepts: incorporate digitalisation of library use, new heart in the campus General form: Roof inclined by 13 degre es to South-West, cone form penetrating through centre of roof Structure: Steel frame and concrete Key features: green roof

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B: Design Intent

Factors of influence

Delft Library was made during the beginning of digitilsation where computers and the internet were used as management and educational tools. It had to be flexible to new technologies12. University wanted heart to their campus2 ; a positive hub of inhabitation and the library had accomodate large fluctuations inhabitation throughout due to the nature of the academic year1. Mechanoo had to choose between two seperate sites. They chose a site opposite a building called the Aula as there was potential to compliment it and to take advantage of the site’s surroundings1. The nature of the site and the intention of their descision shaped the design of the building. From the TU delft library PDF1 two reoccuring key phrases are found which can be used to sum up the building’s design concept: Airport of Technology Lifted Landscape

1. Delft University of Technology, 2000. TU_Delft_Library.pdf. [Online] Available at: https://d1rkab7tlqy5f1.cloudfront.net/Library/Over%20de%20Library/TU_Delft_Library.pdf 2. Mechanoo, 2017. Library Delft University of Technology. [Online] Available at: http://www.mecanoo.nl/Projects/project/27/Library-Delft-University-of-Technology?t=0

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B: Design Intent

‘‘The lifted landscape is a positive green roof space above the building’’ Oppsite the TU delft library is a building called the Aula. The lifted landscape inclines away purposefully to compliment the Aula by avoiding confrontation. A zoing of communal buildings in the university is created as the Aula is also a auditorium and canteen.

Left Aula Building Right TU Delft Library

The Netherlands being a flat country the lifted landscape is intented to be a landmark. Lifted landscape in figure (?). People inhabit the top provided a positive green space and an informal area of the library where groups are encourage to talk and read in the sun. This combination of landmark and green spaces fulfills the university’s need for a “heart of the campus”. Below this landscape is where the building is. It is seperated into a four zones: Office spaces (red), study spaces (yellow), entrance (blue), central warehouse (clear) where books are housed. The warehouse is below ground as well as book storage.

Isometric intieror zoning

Due to this system and their sequence, three areas of inhabitation occur. This creates flexible and versitle spaces to study and/or communicate. Space squence diagram: 1. Green roof and entrance- rest, communication, and external, informal 2. Large Volume - open and flexible, encouraged communication, collaborative study 3. Study zones - access to library resources (either books or computer), quiet zoning, introverted, area of concentration

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Isometric green roof


B: Design Intent

‘‘Likened to an airport due to function and symbolism’’ The library is described as an “airport” in the way it is run; a hub space connecting people to information and in a way to associate the building’s intimate association with technology. Generous area in central volumn for comfortable fluctuations of inhabitation as well as flexibility for future technological intergration. Cone form is not only symbolic of technology in its intentional feate of construction but it also provides light, a focal point to the building and an internal volume for study.

Photo taken on univerwity trip, overlooking the quiet space from book shelves

It displays the theme of technology through lightweight features: hanging book cases, light shiny roof, thin columns and cone.

Photo taken on university trip, inside warehouse space looking upwawrds towards cone

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C: Site Appraisal

The building sits on the site as a wedge protruding from the ground, from the west it appears as a sloping green hill whereas from every other side glass curtain walls greet you with reflections of the opposing context. The prominence of the library, as it stands out from much of it’s context, can presumably be put down to a flexibility in the design due to the, equally distinctive, pre-existing neighbouring university conference centre. With it’s green roof that slopes up from ground level the building acts as a part of the landscape, providing both a pleasant place to read books and an elevated topography that the surrounding area significantly lacks. The slope also has been positioned in a way to contain people within the campus area of the university and so that views don’t overlook the neighbouring residential area, as well as allowing prevailing wind to flow over the building protecting it from both wind load and heat loss. The cone protruding from the building has a dominance over the context, suggesting that the intentions were to create a landmark within the campus. The services access to the building face onto the car park whereas the pedestrian access acts as a cut into the green hill.

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C: Site Appraisal

Pedestrain routes

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Roads

Carpark


D: Atmosphere & Material Exterior

The Delft Central Library, in contrast to the Brutalist Auditorium adjacently, sits as a sloping-vast lawn. The insulated green roof is not only built for environmental concerns but acting as an natural landscape which is rare to find any mountains in Netherlands. The concrete cone emerges from the skin of grass slope. Embodying the symbol of technical engineering, the cone is an noticeable indication of the library from the surrounding. In contrast of the green roof, the glazed facades at other sides reflect surrounding landscape and buildings.

Glazed facade reflect surrounding landscape and buildings

Contrast appearances of materiality and form in different orientations

The library sits as a nature landscape harmoniously in the site

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D: Atmosphere & Material Interior

An unexpected spaciousness of the library appeared underneath the sloping roof, centralised by the polished cone. The sloping metal celling, shaping the entire space, reflects indirect daylight harmoniously delivered from the cone. Materials are carefully selected to illustrate different architectural elements. Structural components of stairs, columns and floor structures are built in steel; Non structural components of floor finishes, furniture, and celling in the cone are built in timber. Locating all bookshelves at two sides of the building, stunning blue backgrounds behind the bookshelves are applied to bring out numerous amounts of book. They become more than bookshelves, but interior facade to the building.

Sloping metal celling reflects indirect daylight delivered from the cone

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Concrete cone

becomes the mutual languages between exterior & interior

Insulated green roof

is not only built for environmental concerns but acting as an natural landscape

Books

Sloping metal celling

brought out by blue backgrounds, become more than just books, but interior skin of the building

reflects daylight delivered from the cone

Glazed facades Materials illustrate different architectural elements

reflect surrounding landscape and buildings

Structural components:

Steel

Non-structural components:

Timber

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E: Structural Strategy The TU Delft library is a structurally fascinating building within itself. It has a basic structure which is composed of both a steel frame which is planned in a grid, and a partial concrete frame and columns which is cast in situ which are found mostly in the lower ground level and the west wing of the building where the offices and administration facilities (mostly non-public) are contained. These structural elements are vital in order to support the load of the green roof which extends the university landscape. The cone which signifies the technological age is an independent structure from the rest, having its own steel supporting columns which run through the ground floor plate and into the basement at foundation level. The visible cone which slices through the green roof is constructed from steel and concrete, before being rendered. The exposed steel pinnacle of the cone was constructed separately and then craned-in and installed pre-built.

1

2

2

1 - Contains majority of library facilities. 2 - Cone: Contains four floors within, housing quiet study areas.

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Joining Point As the building is split into two separate elements, the point at which they join must be carefully considered for it to be successful. In this case, the architects have chosen a transparent material to clearly identify and define this part of the building. The glazing that stretches across the joint allows a halo of light to flood the space below, illuminating the cone structure. It also gives the impression that the cone structure is almost floating and it lightweight. However, composed of a mixture of steel and concrete it is anything but. The glazing appears frame-less as it rests effortlessly between the two despite the separate panes being bonded by a silicon filler, to ensure the horizontal glass is weather-tight. The following images show the joining point of the cone and green roof via the glazing from both interior and exterior.

1

2

From the interior, it appears that the green roof has had a circle sliced from it, revealing some structural elements from the roof in section* including the steel beams, suspended ceiling and some of the fire sprinkler services. From the exterior, despite the safety railings, the glazing sits almost flush with the lawn roof landscape. Metal flashing protects when the glazing meets the roof structure and the cone, which is visible from the following images.

3 1 - Green Roof: Contains and protects the majority of the library building. Structurally supported by both steel and concrete frames. 2 - Cone: Contains study space over four levels. Structurally supported by diagonal steel columns. 3 - Glazing: Defining the joining of the Green Roof and Cone.

3 2

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E: Structural Strategy

1 3

2 1

1 - Suspended Ceiling: Represented using metal panelling which reflects the light. 2 - Cone: Constructed from Steel and Concrete before being rendered white to defuse light.

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2

1 - Suspended Ceiling: Represented using metal panelling which reflects the light. 2 - Cone: Constructed from Steel and Concrete before being rendered white to defuse light. 3 - Glazing: Separate panes of glass bonded using silicon filling.


Mags

Metal Safety Railings

Rendered Cone Surface

Metal Flashing

Glazing

Silicon Filling

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E: Structural Strategy

1

Two Independent Structures The main space within the library is open plan which is made possible by using steel columns us support the roof, opposed to load bearing walls. The steel columns are slender in diameter with services such as ventilation and lighting contained within a column unit. The actual slenderness of the column can be seen as it joins the ceiling. The columns are worked around a grid of 7800mm.

1

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2

The steel columns supporting the cone run through the floor plate (which is shown in the image) and through to the lower ground level where it is supported by the foundations of the building. The diagonal columns are set out in six pairs and are equally spread apart from one another. Four floors of quiet study space is supported by the cone where they are joined by suspended curving concrete-castin-steel staircases.

1

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E: Structural Strategy

Slender steel column meets roof with up-lighting contained within the unit.

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Base of steel column containing air ventilation.


Floor Plans The construction used is a Orthographical grid, however the shape of the building is non-orthographical meaning that the grid has to be modified at points in order for it to be structurally suitable. This can be seen through the grid of the steel columns in the floor plans.

-1/F

G/F Ground floor steel columns follow footprints of concrete columns on the lower ground level. Concrete frame elements at the East and West ends of the structure contribute to supporting the green roof. Supported by steel columns in-between the two internal masses.

Concrete columns

1/F

2/F

Cone cuts through the green roof, leaving a clearing Cone visible from the roof plan also, creating mutual language around the circumference where it would otherwise both internally and externally. meet the roof structure. Grass roof meets the ground on the West side where the main entrance is situated.

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E: Structural Strategy

ALL STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS

STEEL COLUMNS (CONE)

CONCRETE CAST IN SITU

STEEL COLUMNS (ROOF LOAD)

G/F plan

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Green Floor

The green roof has a surface area of approximately 5500 metres squared and a slope of a maximum of 13 degrees to the South East. Due to the green roof being lawn, it is classified as an intensive green roof, which typically requires more support due to its increased load. Due to leakages, the roof underwent refurbishment and enhancement during 2009. During this refurbishment the Styrofoam insulation was replaced with foam glass which could be fixed with hot bitumen meaning that it would create more of a water resistant layer compared to the Styrofoam which could not be due to its properties. The grass package on the roof was greatly reduced, from 400kg/ m2 to 280kg/m2. Though this would not benefit the lawn, it would indeed benefit the construction, reducing the overall load on the structure below. The soil that was advised by the firm Agterberg to be used on the green roof was mixed with a mineral product which would help maintain moisture for the vegetation. This allowed the depth of the grass package to be reduced by 10cm to 10cm therefore, reducing the loading.

Green Floor Overview - 48,000kg of hot bitumen processed. - 42,000kg of Axis Mineral powder mixed with soil. - 78 Water sprinklers installed. - Grass package thickness: 10cm. - Mass of roofing and grass package: 280kg/m2. - Total permissible roof load: 550kg/m2. - Rubber drainage mat produced by ZinCo allows reduced grass package depth.

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E: Structural Strategy

ROOFING

INSULATION VAPOUR CONTROL LAYER

CONSTRUCTION

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GRASS PACKAGE (100MM) EPDM ROOFING MEMBRANE VULCANIZED RUBBER DRAINAGE MAT BITUMINIZED POLYESTER MAT CELLULAR GLASS INSULATION (100MM) BITUMINIZED POLYESTER MAT (0.2MM)

CONCRETE ROOF DECK

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F: Energy & Environmental Strategies

Heat accumulator

Rainwater storage Sound insulator

Climate Facades

Cold Storage - GSHP

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Green Floor The grass roof has multiple functions, not only acting as an outdoor seating and studying space, it also was designed with environmental qualities in mind. The roof is an insulator of both sound and heat, the thickness of the structure and nature of the vegetation absorbs this energy, this helps to maintain a constant indoor temperature and reduces noise disruptions, an important quality for a library. Lastly, the vegetation collects and stores rainwater, this helps to not overbear sewers during heavy precipitation, but also ensures during summer natural cooling due slow evaporation. West facing view, sloped grass roof for students to reach.

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F: Energy & Environmental Strategies Cold Storage Cooling ventilation is necessary as indoor appliances emit heat that needs to be exhausted. There is a ground water storage system which works by using ground temperatures to heat/ cool liquid and hence heat/cool the space. The air is then fed into the space via vents situated within the columns. Most computers are situated in the silent study area, therefore there is high heat production. The room is north facing to reduce gains via solar, cooling is provided by chilled beams in the ceiling. There is zoning of spaces to allow for specific temperature control between them. Photo of the North-facing seperated silent study area from the main study space. This image shows the zoning of spaces so that they are independent of each other, this allows for differentiation in environments.

Ground floor plan showing study silent study space.

Air vents within columns

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Climate Control Facades

The climate control facade system ensures the inner leaf maintains the temperature of the interior spaces. In winter this prevents cold radiation, and in summer it reduces solar gains. This allows work areas to be situated up against the glass without glare and temperature concerns.

Reflective glass climate control facades.

1Photo of curtain wall with study spaces facing directly out. Thenature of the specified glass ensures minimal glare making the work spaces more comfortable, it also reduces solar gains, thus no unwanted heat enters the room via solar.

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G: Key Details/ Moment

Ring of glazing

that circles the central cone, neatly joining it with the roof and conveying the structural independence of the cone from the rest of the design. The glazing acts as a halo around the central mass, bringing in light onto the white/grey rough surface and reflecting and dispersing it into the space below.

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Stairs

that take individuals spiralling up into the cone are suspended from it’s underside, not only does this provide nice structural details, off which the staircase hangs, but it seems to absorb the sound of foot steps well as people move up into the quiet space of the cone. To continue the theme of sound absorption the stairs are finished with a concrete surface, the density of the material choice attenuates the sound of footsteps well.

Concrete finish to steps

Stairs hung from metal elements

Stairs hung from metal elements

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G: Key Details/ Moment

Self-structuring bookshelf

situated at the back of the library, spread over 4 floors and backing onto a deep blue painted wall, provides many key moments and becomes one of the major design features of the space. The stairs that protrude from the front of the structure seemingly float, as they appear to not touch the floor. The small detail of the mesh bookstands allow for the reading of books whilst overlooking the large communal space below.

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Material, Atmosphere & Experience Tectonic Integration II

Sectional Atmospheric Drawing

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Sectional Atmospheric Drawing

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Three-Dimensional Study Tectonic Strategy The render embodied how layers running along the building and define the types of inhabitations in different privacy requirement. The brick curtain design was achieved by two strategies technically. The first way is to hang the brick curtain by a steel frame structure, reinforced by steel wire jointing bricks and reducing the brick’s thickness to lowering load; The second way is that brick curtain meets the ground and supporting its own load but is joint with buildings’ solid facade or it stand separatedly with a glazing facade.

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Work from ARC3013 Coursework

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Appendix Primer Booklet Snapshot - Massing Sketches - Sketchbook Snapshot - Reading List

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Primer Booklet Snapshot Typewriter

Camera

Metronome

Mixer

Object Dismantle Collaborative group work

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Waterways

Stoke-on-Trent

Flooding

Stoke-on-Trent

Towards Peak District Uplands

Towards Liverpool

nt Tre ey ers &M Canal

Caldon Ca

Riv er

Tre n

t

nal

Trent & Mersey Canal

Towards Hull

Canals

Canals

Rivers

Rivers

Flood zone 2

Towards Bristol & London

Rail

Flood zone 3

Stoke-on-Trent

Rail

Stoke-on-Trent

Physcial Infrastucture Mapping Collaborative group work

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Harmony in Five. The story is derived from the name of a novel called ‘’Anna of Five Towns’’ by written by the author Arnold Bennett , based on the pottery industry background in Stoke. Despite the fact that Stoke is consisted of six towns, Arnold regarded there were only ‘’Five Towns’’ instead of ‘’Six Town’’ that Fenton was omitted as the forgotten town from the history. He believed the vocal of ‘’Five’’ is more harmonious then that of ‘’Six’’. My contraption is a flensted mobile formed by the map of Stoke, with a barrier of clay-cylinders. Reaching the equilibrium of the balance, the mobile rotates itself without the need of manual force. When white balls hit the clay barrier while rotating, euphonious sounds generated by the collision of cylinders. However, the red ball representing Fenton never hits clay cylinders to satirise people never find out if Fenton is harmonious or not with other towns but they just followed a belief without their own judgement.

In-Balance

Don Hong

Centri-pede. The contraption is designed to display events and movement within a circular environment. The idea is based on the “modern circus” invented by Philip Astley, an equestrian born in stoke. His creation on the “modern circus” includes programmes of various events including horse riding tricks, acrobats and clowns, With a large ring to set up as boundaries. All these events should be situated inside a circular space. Strong visual stimulation was created during the Astley’s circus show, through the powerful movements of the performers and the use of vivid colour. The contraption attempts to generate the similar visual stimulation so to recreate a particular atmosphere caused by the events happening in the modern circus.

Centri-Pede

Azelia Yue Ching Nam

Contraption Illustration (Stoke-on-stroke) Individual work from groupmate

169 I Academic Portfolio I Appendix


The Legendary Battle. The story of the legendary battle originated in the city of Sunderland in the North East of England. The story told around two communities which rivalled each other in the latter part of the 20th century, especially during the 70s, 80s and 90s. These two estates were the ones of ‘Red House Hylton’, also known as ‘The Red Housers’, and the ‘Castle View’ estate, who were better known as ‘The Castlers’. The two estates had a history of being at each other’s necks, however, on one evening in August it came to a head in ‘The Legendary Battle’. The youths of the two estates came head to head on ‘Bunny Hill’ where there were reports of one of the Red Houser’s being fully engulfed in flames, and in retaliation, they responded by breaking the jaw of one of the Castler’s. These constant disagreements of the two neighbourhoods benefited neither, becoming very pointless. This comes onto the Hetrogeniser contraption. The word is deciphered from the word Heterogeneous means: differing, unrelated and contrasting, which greatly represents the two communities. The contraption contains both red and white beads, one colour for each estate, and the concept is that the contraption mixes these gradually over time when in use to address the story that after the ‘battle’ (the mixing process) that the two communities began to come together to the present day, where they live in near unity. The contraption itself is very futility, which portrays the battle being useless, that one would retaliate to the other. The contraption is making a mess through the mixing process as well as sweeping up, making its function pointless.

The Hetrogeniser

The Black Cats.

A man was guarding a gun battery in Sunderland. Accompanied by a bottle of whisky and the full moon he sat there all night. When a cat appeared, the man was convinced it was the devil incarnate. The Gun Battery was there on known as the black cat battery. A 100 years later, following the legacy of the gun battery, a football fan took a cat in his top pocket to watch Sunderland in the 1937 FA Cup Final. The team won their first trophy, and since then it has been a good luck symbol for the club.

The Dis-Illusioner

Ellie Waugh

Contraption Illustration (Stoke-on-stroke) Individual work from groupmate

Appendix I Academic Portfolio I 170


Massing Sketches

1

4

171 I Academic Portfolio I Appendix


2

3

5

6

Appendix I Academic Portfolio I 172


Massing Sketches

7

10

173 I Academic Portfolio I Appendix


8

9

Appendix I Academic Portfolio I 174


Collage

Softness vs Hardness The collage emphasises the materiality approach in this building. While it responds of materiality to exisiting Old Fire Station indirectly in a more dynamic and softer approach, the concrete auditorium is also in contrast to the brick walls in terms of material but they all work harmoniously in colours and form.

175 I Academic Portfolio I Refinement


Refinement I Academic Portfolio I 176


Sketchbook Snapshot

Story Research

177 I Academic Portfolio I Appendix


Object Dismantle

Appendix I Academic Portfolio I 178


Sketchbook Snapshot

Contraption Development

179 I Academic Portfolio I Appendix


Contraption Logo Design

Appendix I Academic Portfolio I 180


Sketchbook Snapshot

Auditorium Research

181 I Academic Portfolio I Appendix


Reading List

Confabulations Storytelling Architecture,

This is Temporary,

Cedric Price

Re-Cp,

Narrative Architecture,

Saw Swee Hock,

Materials for Architectural Design 2,

Nigel Coates

RIBA

Paul Emmons

Julian Robinson

Victoria Ballard Bell

Appendix I Academic Portfolio I 182


Bibliography Fig. 1 Newcastle University (2017), Charrette Week Poster <URL:https://www.ncl.ac.uk/apl/> Fig. 2 Bennett, A. (1902). Anna of the five towns, United Kingdom : Chatto & Windus Fig. 3 Art Observed (2012), Rouge-triomphant Alexander Calder, <URL:http://artobserved.com/2012/06/ao-auction-preview-london-postwar-and-contemporary-sales-at-christies-sothebys-and-phillips-de-pury-june-26-28-2012/> Fig. 4 The Art Zoo (2012), Living Mirรณ abstractions by Alexander Calder, <URL:https://zoowithoutanimals.com/category/events/> Fig. 5 The Art Zoo (2012), Constellation by Alexander Calder, <URL:https://zoowithoutanimals.com/category/events/> Fig. 6 Hull City Council (2017), Silk Embroidered Postcard Example, <URL:https://www.hull2017.co.uk/>> Fig. 7-10 Digimap (2018), Stoke Mapping, <URL:http://digimap.edina.ac.uk/>> Fig. 11-14 Digimap (2018), Sunderland Mapping, <URL:http://digimap.edina.ac.uk/>> Fig. 15 ArchDaily (2016), Itoi Elementary School by Atelier BNK, <URL:https://www.archdaily.com/792976/itoi-elementary-school-atelierbnk>> Fig. 16 ArchDaily (2017), Rehabilitation of Louis Figuier by NAS architecture, <URL:https://www.archdaily.com/885042/rehabilitation-oflouis-figuier-nas-architecture>> Fig. 17 ArchDaily (2017), Wenzhou Dalton Elementary School by FAX ARCHITECTS, <URL:https://www.archdaily.cn/cn/883897/wen-zhoudao-er-dun-xiao-xue-faxjian-zhu-shi-wu-suo>> Fig. 18 Professione Architetto (2017), Inside Out by Andrea T & Francesca V, <URL:https://www.professionearchitetto.it/gallery/insideout-ghana-la-scuola-degli-architetti-andrea-tabocchini-e-francesca-vittorini/insideout-tabocchini-vittorini-08/>> Fig. 19 AIA chicago (2015), NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY MUSIC AND COMMUNICATION BUILDING by Goettsch Partners, <URL:https:// www.aiachicago.org/dea_archive/2015/northwestern-university-bienen-school-of-music-and-communication1/>> Fig. 20 ArchDaily (2015), Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre by REX + OMA, <URL:https://www.archdaily.com/37736/dee-and-charles-wylytheatre-rex-oma>> Fig. 21 ArchDaily (2012), Cultural Center in Nevers by Ateliers O-S architectes, <URL:https://www.archdaily.com/294892/cultural-centerin-nevers-ateliers-o-s-architectes>> Fig. 22 ArchDaily (2016), The Marshall Family Performing Arts Center by Weiss/Manfredi, <URL:https://www.archdaily.com/788399/themarshall-family-performing-arts-center-weiss-manfredi>> Fig. 23 Dezeen (2017), Marrakech museum by Studio KO, <URL:https://www.dezeen.com/2017/10/20/studio-kos-musee-yves-saintlaurent-marrakech-museum-morrocco/>> Fig. 24 ArchDaily (2014), Commercial Spaces in Ordaz by T3arc, <URL:https://www.archdaily.com/565724/commercial-spaces-in-ordazt3arc>> Fig. 25 ArchDaily (2016), Terra Cotta Studio by Tropical Space, <URL:https://www.archdaily.com/791430/terra-cotta-studio-tropicalspace>> Fig. 26 ArchDaily (2015), Termitary House by Tropical Space, <URL:https://www.archdaily.com/594339/termitary-house-tropical-space>>

183 I Academic Portfolio I Appendix


End Thank you for reading.

Appendix I Academic Portfolio I 184


Stage 3 Architectural portfolio Newcastle Uni by Don Hong  
Stage 3 Architectural portfolio Newcastle Uni by Don Hong  
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