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ÂŽ I N T E R N A T I O N A L Summer 2020

BlackNorth I N I T I AT I V E led by

Wes Hall

Executive Chairman and Founder of Kingsdale Advisors

19 th Annual Women Worth Watching ÂŽ Edition G l o b a l C o m p a n i e s A d v a n c i n g Wo m e n i n L e a d e r s h i p


Inclusion Inspires Ingenuity No one ever changed the world with the status quo. That’s why we foster a culture of diversity and respect — because the future of thought leadership depends on it.

Congratulations to our Women Worth Watching! AMD is proud to have four leaders – Denise Gourlay, Laura Smith, Christine Brown, and Linda Lam – among this year’s award winners.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT AMD.COM ©2020 ADVANCED MICRO DEVICES, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. AMD, THE AMD ARROW LOGO, AND COMBINATIONS THEREOF ARE TRADEMARKS OF ADVANCED MICRO DEVICES, INC. PID# 20594414-A


PUBLISHER'S COLUMN Greetings Reader,

All Things Diversity & Inclusion FOUNDER/CEO/PUBLISHER

James R. Rector VP OF OPERATIONS

James Gorman DESIGNER

Stephen A. Toth ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Teresa Fausey EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT

Elena Rector WEBMASTER

David Toth

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Profiles in Diversity Journal Gemini Towers #1 • 1991 Crocker Road, Suite 600 • Westlake, OH 44145 Tel: 440.892.0444 • Fax: 440.892.0737 profiles@diversityjournal.com

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issuu.com/diversityjournal Profiles in Diversity Journal® is a quarterly magazine dedicated to promoting and advancing diversity and inclusion in the corporate, government, nonprofit, higher education, and military sectors. For more than 23 years, we have helped to stimulate organizational change by showcasing the visionary leadership, innovative programs, and committed individuals that are making it happen. The views expressed in this publication are those of the authors and may or may not represent the views of the publisher. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Registered in U.S. Patent Office

CONGRATULATIONS to all the winners of the 19th International Women Worth Watching® in Leadership awards for 2020. We are excited to present 67 women nominated by their peers and employers, who are blazing new trails, leading in their field, mentoring, giving back, and sharing their stories. Each year, organizations nominate worthy candidates for this prestigious recognition. It is, indeed, an honor to profile these living examples of how the roads to success and accomplishment are many and diverse. Canada’s Wes Hall, executive chairman and founder of Kingsdale Advisors, is also in our spotlight in this summer issue. See pages (12-23.) His launch this year of the BlackNorth Initiative in Canada has generated the pledged support of more than 300 CEOs from leading Canadian businesses to add more minority professionals to C-suite and boardroom positions. In light of recent developments in the United States, we feel that Wes Hall’s leadership in Canada will have a positive ripple effect in many areas around the world. Our lives have been severely impacted by the global pandemic. However, there is a silver lining in this dark cloud. Including the 67 honored in our 2020 summer issue, we have profiled more than 2,000 Women Worth Watching winners over the past 19 years. (See winner profiles, past and present, at www.womenworthwatching.com.) One of our original objectives was to prove beyond a shadow of a doubt that there are many women qualified to lead organizations. These Women Worth Watching profiles are stellar examples of the many women leaders in the workforce today. Yes, you may consider Women Worth Watching a brand—a prestigious brand, if I may say so. During the past two years, we have provided additional opportunities for women to be honored and profiled, specifically in the area of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math). In future issues, we will expand into specific fields, such as medicine, nursing, law, insurance, finance, and others. On page 100 is an interesting story about diversity in Italy from Claudio Guffanti, founder of Unlimited Views, a diversity management and coaching firm headquartered in Milan, Italy. As our magazine becomes more international in scope, more articles from around the world will be featured in future issues And in our efforts to be more inclusive, we recently launched a new award: Black Leaders Worth Watching™, which will recognize and honor both men and women in our 2020 fall issue. Leadership is not a matter of race; it is a matter of a persistent effort to set and reach goals. It is a matter of steadfast commitment and unwavering dedication to achievement. We expect to profile many impressive awardees. As regular readers of PDJ already know, our issues are eclectic, containing numerous articles covering diversity and inclusion. Now, Actionable Quick Reads, a new section recently added to our website, puts even more valuable content shared by leading experts at your finger tips. We offer our sincere appreciation to all the organizations participating in this issue and to the wonderful PDJ team, who put all the pieces and parts together so admirably. Take care,

James R. Rector Founder & Publisher Since 1999

www.womenworthwatching.com WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

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IN THIS ISSUE

01 | PUBLISHER’S COLUMN 05 | EDITOR’S COLUMN 06 | WOMEN WORTH WATCHING INDEX 12 | CANADA'S BLACKNORTH INITIATIVE 28 | WOMEN WORTH WATCHING PROFILES 100 | ARTICLES 122 | CORPORATE INDEX

28 PAGE 12

Canada’s Wes Hall Assumes Leadership Role in Fight Against Anti-Black Systemic Racism Canadian businessman Wes Hall tells readers why and how he created the BlackNorth Initiative. Along with more than 300 CEO's from top companies across Canada, Wes is leading the fight against anti-Black systemic racism in order to create more opportunities for Black leadership in the corporate world.

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Why I Support Wes Hall & BlackNorth D&I expert Trevor Wilson voices his support for Wes Hall’s BlackNorth Initiative, and explains why he believes it’s so important for corporate Canada to act now to disrupt anti-Black systemic racism.

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Congratulations TO INL’S

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING

Lynn Wendt

Jennifer Turnage

Kimberly Evans Ross, Esq.

Bonnie C. Hong

Senior Research Scientist

Department Manager, Emergency Response and Readiness

Senior Council

Director, International Programs, Nuclear Science & Technology

You continually inspire us with your leadership and vision. LOOKING FOR A NEW OPPORTUNITY? INL IS WHERE YOU BELONG! www.inl.gov/careers


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Building a Future of Work for Women In her introduction to this year’s Women Worth Watching in Leadership profiles, Catalyst President and CEO Lorraine Hariton discusses the current challenges working women face, the tremendous progress they have already made, and how women like this year’s award recipients will surely build a better future.

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2020 Women Worth Watching® in Leadership Awards We are pleased and proud to honor this year’s 67 Women Worth Watching in Leadership Award recipients. Get to know these highly successful and dedicated women, and join PDJ in celebrating their many achievements.

PAGE 100

The D&I Journey in Italy: How Far Have We Come? Claudio Guffanti, D&I expert and founder of Unlimited Views, a diversity and management firm in Milan, Italy, shares his views regarding the current state of D&I in Italy, and across Europe, and offers suggestions regarding what Italian companies must do to create more diverse and inclusive work environments. (This article appears in the original Italian on page 102,)

PAGE 104

Women Worth Watching–Viewpoints Over the Years Take a look back at the keen observations, strong opinions, and priceless wisdom shared in the pages of Profiles in Diversity Journal by top D&I leaders and innovators.

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EDITORS'S COLUMN The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude. 15th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, ratified February 3, 1870

The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex. 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, ratified August 18, 1920

BE IT ENACTED by the Senate and house of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That all non citizen Indians born within the territorial limits of the United States be, and they are hereby, declared to be citizens of the United States…. Indian Citizenship Act, approved June 2, 1924

The right of citizens of the United States to vote in any primary or other election for President or Vice President, for electors for President or Vice President, or for Senator or Representative in Congress, shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any State by reason of failure to pay poll tax or other tax. 24th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, ratified January 23, 1964

The Voting Rights Act ensures that state and local governments do not deny American citizens the right to vote based on race, color, or membership in a minority language group. Signed into law August 6, 1965; later amended five times to expand protections

The right of citizens of the United States, who are eighteen years of age or older, to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of age. 26th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, ratified July 1, 1971

If voting were not so important, the right to vote wouldn’t have been so hard to win for so many of us. Honor those who fought to secure and protect this right on our behalf. Vote. As always, thanks for reading. Teresa Fausey Associate Editor, PDJ

www.womenworthwatching.com WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

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Company and Executive 2020 Award Winners (company names in alphabetical order)

Adam Law Aisha Shelton Adam Managing Partner...........................................28 Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) Christine Brown Senior Director, Public Relations..............29 Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) Denise Gourlay Corporate Vice President Global Sales Finance, Real Estate/EHS, Travel...............................30 Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) Linda Lam Director of Corporate Law & Assistant Secretary............................................................31 Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) Laura Baldwin Smith Senior Director, Product Management...................................32 Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld Barbara Niederkofler Partner................................................................33 AliveCor Priya Abani Chief Operating Officer...............................34 Allstate Heather G. Hansen HR Inclusive Diversity Consultant...........35 Ares Management Chelsea Little Senior Associate, Human Resources......36 Arrow Electronics Tamara Ells Senior Director of Sales, Next Generation Infrastructure.................37

Arrow Electronics Paige Eding Vice President, Global Supply Chain Operations & Strategy..................................38

Arrow Electronics Kim Brown Wilmsen Vice President & Chief Information Office–IT............................................................39

Axinn Veltrop & Harkrier LLP Jeannine Yoo Sano Partner...............................................................40

Best Best & Krieger LLP Nancy A. Park Partner.................................................................41

Bristol Myers Squibb Kathryn Metcalfe Executive Vice President, Corporate Affairs............................................42

Catalyst Europe AG Allyson Zimmermann Executive Director, Europe, Middle East & Africa.....................................43

Cathedral Capital, Inc. Brooke Lively President & Founder.....................................44

Cisco Systems, Inc. Brenda Dennis Vice President, Customer & Partner Services....................45

cleverbridge Lauren K. Schwartz General Counsel & Corporate Secretary.....................................46

Dechert LLP Carol Widger Partner................................................................47

Dickinson Wright PLLC Anna M. Maiuri Member (Co-Chair Energy & Environmental Group).................................48

e.l.f. Beauty Mandy Fields Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Officer.................................49

FordHarrison LLP Rachel Ziolkowski Ullrich Partner...............................................................50

Frantz Ward LLP Nora E. Loftus Partner................................................................52

HARMAN Lynn Longo Senior Vice President, Connected Car, Digital Cockpit...............54

Hoguet Newman Regal & Kenney LLP Amory W. McAndrew Associate..........................................................55

Holwell Shuster & Goldberg LLP Margot Hoppin Associate..........................................................56

Hughes Hubbard & Reed LLP Patrice P. Jean, JD, PhD Partner...............................................................57

Hunton Andrews Kurth Deidre Duncan Partner...............................................................58

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Company and Executive 2020 Award Winners (company names in alphabetical order)

Hunton Andrews Kurth Amber M. Rogers Partner...............................................................59

Kelly Services Tammy Browning President, KellyOCG......................................69

Hunton Andrews Kurth Emily Burkhardt Vicente Partner, Co-Chair–Labor & Employment Practice..................................60

Keystone Alliance Mortgage & Capital Megan E. Marsh Cofounder & Chief Financial Office........70

Idaho National Laboratory Bonnie C. Hong Director, International Programs, Nuclear Science & Technology..................61

Idaho National Laboratory Kimberly Evans Ross, Esq. Senior Counsel................................................62

Idaho National Laboratory Jennifer Turnage Department Manager, Emergency Response & Readiness.................................63

Idaho National Laboratory Lynn Wendt Senior Research Scientist...........................64

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Krauss Shaknes Tallentire & Messeri LLP Malissa A. Osei Associate............................................................71 Latham & Watkins LLP Jennifer L. Barry Global Vice Chair, Intellectual Property Litigation Practice & Deputy Office Managing Partner, San Diego office..............................................72 Latham & Watkins LLP Robin M. Hulshizer Partner................................................................73 Lincoln Financial Group Karla Munden Senior Vice President & Chief Audit Executive...................................74

Interprose Inc. Vivian Kelly Chief Executive Officer & Founder..........65

LinkedIn Rosanna Durruthy VP, Global Diversity Inclusion and Belonging.................................................76

Jones Walker LLP Krystal Pfluger Scott Partner...............................................................66

Mayer Brown LLP Ann R. Knox Partner................................................................78

Kasowitz Benson Torres LLP Kelly A. Frawley Partner................................................................67

Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Sarah H. “Sally” Caver Columbia Office Managing Partner...........................................79

Kasowitz Benson Torres LLP Olga Lucia Fuentes Skinner Partner................................................................68

New American Funding Patty Arvielo Cofounder & President................................80

Summer 2020

New York Life Heather Nesle President, New York Life Foundation; Vice President, Corporate Responsibility, New York Life.....................81

RBC Wealth Management–US Shareen Luze Senior Director, Human Resources..........82

Renasant Bank Tracey Morant Adams Chief Community Development & Corporate Social Responsibility Officer.................................................................83

Republic Services Rebecca Wilson Motion Graphics Designer, Learning Solutions Department...............84

Richards Kibbe & Orbe LLP Jamie A. Schafer Partner................................................................85

Robins Kaplan, LLP Teresa Fariss McClain Partner................................................................86

Sandia National Laboratories Carrie O’Hara Systems Engineer...........................................87

Sanford Heisler Sharp, LLP Felicia M. Gilbert Managing Partner, San Francisco Office.....................................88

Sephora Americas Deborah Yeh Chief Marketing Officer................................89

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Sullivan & Cromwell LLP Renata Hesse Partner & Co-Head, Antitrust Group..............................................90 Ulmer & Berne LLP Rachel L. Rodman Partner.................................................................91 Walmart Chandra Holt Executive Vice President and Chief Merchandising & Integration Officer, Walmart.com....................................92

Walmart Kerry Kotouc Senior Vice President & General Counsel, Walmart U.S..................93

Wellstar Health System, Inc. Erika Hickman Assistant Vice President & Assistant General Counsel.........................94

WilmerHale Chalyse Robinson Partner................................................................95

Wilson Turner Kosmo Carolina Bravo-Karimi Partner................................................................96

Wintrust Financial Corporation Christy Horn Executive Vice President, Bank Operations.............................................97

Xandr Michele Golden Chief Human Resources Officer...............98

By promoting a diverse and inclusive workforce, we better develop ideas and people Congratulations to Shareen Luze for being named one of the Profiles in Diversity Journal’s Women Worth Watching. At RBC Wealth Management, we recognize and value the many important contributions of women. This is why we promote an environment where women can be successful and deliver programs and tools to help them create the futures they want. Learn more about our commitment to diversity and inclusion and explore opportunities that match your values at www.rbcwm.com. Shareen Luze Head of Human Resources RBC Wealth Management – U.S. © 2020 RBC Wealth Management, a division of RBC Capital Markets, LLC, Member NYSE/FINRA/SIPC. 20-RT-07759 (07/20) 20-74-02736_WomenWorthWatchingLuze_AD_KC_FINAL.indd 1

7/28/20 9:11 AM

www.womenworthwatching.com WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

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2020 BLACK LEADERS Worth Watching Awards TM

NOMINATION DEADLINE: September 22, 2020

F

or more than two decades Profiles in

Diversity Journal has showcased and honored individuals who have blazed new trails, led the way, mentored others, advanced diversity and inclusion in the workplace and the community, and excelled in their chosen fields. In the upcoming fall issue of the magazine, PDJ will recognize Black Leaders with our first ever Black Leaders Worth Watching Awards.

2020

ER g LEAh D Watchin

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Summer 2020

AWARD

B L A C KS

TM

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ÂŽ


Profiles in Diversity Journal is proud to honor these individuals who contribute to the success of your organization. We invite you to join us in this endeavor by nominating a member of your team who, through their advocacy, perseverance, legacy, or professional achievements, has addressed racism and bias to become a Black Leader Worth Watching. Your nomination of a Black Leader Worth Watching, or multiple Black Leaders Worth Watching, affords you an important opportunity to recognize and showcase the talents, ambition, and achievements of these exceptional people, while also voicing your support of a truly diverse and inclusive workplace.

Who Are these Outstanding Individuals? Black Leaders Worth Watching are confident, determined, high-performing, purposedriven professionals who create value for their coworkers, customers, community, and of course the organizations where they contribute their talents. Throughout its history, Profiles in Diversity Journal has recognized thousands of men and women from around the world who are making a difference. The profiles that will appear in this important edition will recognize and celebrate our inaugural group of Black Leaders Worth Watching awardees, and enhance the reputations of the organizations that encourage, empower, and support these trailblazing individuals.

NOMINATION DEADLINE: September 22, 2020

Visit www.diversityjournal.com today to nominate!

www.womenworthwatching.com WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ÂŽ

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Canada’s Wes Hall

Assumes Leadership Role in Fight Against

ANTI-BLACK

SYSTEMIC RACISM By Trevor Wilson and Alecia Maragh

Photo credit: Jonathan Williamson

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WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


W

es Hall, one of Canada’s most influential powerbrokers, runs the leading shareholder advisory firm in North America. This strong, confident and dynamic man was the subject of a rags-to-riches success story featured on the cover of Report on Business (a magaizne insert in The Globe and Mail) on January 30, 2014. The story notably referred to Hall as “The Fixer,” a title that best describes him. Yet, in spite of his myriad successes, a pattern of anti-Black systemic racism permeates the lives of Hall and his family on a regular basis. As he navigates his Ferrari 458 between his Rosedale home and his King Street office in the heart of downtown Toronto, Hall anticipates being pulled over by the police at any

men would think this way?” The effect of systemic racism not only impacts Hall, but he has also seen its effects on even his young children. It can take all forms. “When my boys are at the park playing basketball and a neighbour calls the police and the police order them to clean up all the garbage in the entire park and leave, this is anti-Black systemic racism,” Hall says. And “When my daughter is called the N-word at an exclusive private school in Toronto, this is anti-Black systemic racism.” Studies have shown that race is deeply implanted in our psyches at the individual and collective levels. The stereotypes depicting Black people as violent, delinquents, and intimidating, can sometimes be deadly, as in the case of George

Muhammad Ali, Tommie Smith and John Carlos, and the many other Blacks throughout history who spoke up only to be silenced by the White establishment, the usually self-assured Hall was worried that he would lose everything he had worked hard to attain, once the story appeared. Hall, who was raised in a zinc shack with his grandmother and at least a dozen other siblings and cousins, was painfully aware of what it meant to have little. There is a saying in Jamaica, “If yuh waan good, yuh nose haffi run” (You have to work hard for what you want in life), and Hall recalls as a child his 60-year-old grandmother working on the plantation, making wares to sell, and doing her best to make the food stretch farther for her grandchildren, with

...because all the people, like myself, who have gone through those things and just shrugged them off all these years are now going, okay, enough is enough! We need to use our influence to do something about it. We can't just shrug it off and say it's no big deal, because it's not going to end. – Wes Hall, Founder and Executive Chairman of Kingsdale Advisors

given time, and having to quickly code-switch between the world of the businessman and the reality of being just another Black man. He is acutely aware that Indigenous and Black individuals are more likely to receive unfair treatment from the police in Canada than any other group, relative to their population size. The tentacles of such all-encompassing racism can reach deep into the psyche, and create a sort of automatic self-censorship, as Hall has come to realize. “I was out for a walk recently and saw an elderly White woman fall,” he says. “I was hesitant to help her, because I was concerned she would be startled by a Black man helping her, or that the neighbours would call the police on a Black man standing over an elderly White woman. How many White

Floyd, a Black man who suffocated under the knee of a police officer during an arrest. Hall couldn’t help seeing himself in Floyd, and feeling so viscerally impacted after watching the video of the man’s killing. He knew he had to act, and that staying silent was no longer an option, “... because all the people, like myself, who have gone through those things and just shrugged them off all these years are now going, okay, enough is enough! We need to use our influence to do something about it. We can't just shrug it off and say it's no big deal, because it's not going to end.” Hall’s response was to write an article entitled, “When I look in the mirror, I see George Floyd – and so do others,” which appeared in The Globe and Mail on June 3, 2020. Like Martin Luther King Jr.,

little support. He recalls promising his grandmother that he would one day help her financially, only to have her tell him to focus on getting educated and live a moral life. She died before he was in a position to support her, but her selflessness and work ethic continue to guide his life. That work ethic has helped Hall climb the corporate ladder with the support of mentors and sponsors, and become the business leader he is today. Hall worried that all that hard work would be for naught. He feared that he would lose contacts, contracts, and credibility in the business community, and he would be, in his words, “Kaepernicked.” Hall explained, “Kaepernick knelt down and put his fist up and said police brutality is wrong and the way we treat Black people is wrong. One of the

www.womenworthwatching.com WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

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The BlackNorth virtual summit launch event (from left to right} Co-Chair Prem Watsa, NHL Hockey player Akim Aliu, Chair Wes Hall, Co-Chair Rola Dagher and Co-Chair Victor Dodig

best quarterbacks in the league can’t play for the worst team in the league because they boycotted him. Until today, he is still boycotted. Right?” Fortunately, his fear of being boycotted proved to be unfounded. Hall received overwhelming support from a number of business leaders from across Canada. This further inspired Hall to pen a letter to the Toronto Star entitled, “I Saw No Examples of Black Corporate Leaders Talking about Systemic Racism. So, I’m Speaking Up.” The Canadian Council of Business Leaders Against Anti-Black Systemic Racism, otherwise known as the BlackNorth Initiative, was borne from his “speaking up.” The BlackNorth Initiative has strong leadership on its 24-member Board, including its Chairs, and its mandate is supported by close to 20 committees comprised of reputable business, political, and not-for-profit leaders.

The BlackNorth Initiative The Initiative enables senior Canadian business leaders to sign a non-legally binding CEO Pledge,

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committing their companies to seven concrete actions: 1. Increase efforts to make workplaces trusting places to have complex, and sometimes difficult, conversations about anti-Black systemic racism, and ensure that no systemic barriers exist to prevent Black employees from advancing within the company 2. To implement or expand unconscious-bias and antiracism education, and make nonproprietary unconscious-bias education modules available to others free of charge 3. To share best—and unsuccessful—practices, helping other companies evolve and enhance their current diversity strategies, and encourage them, in turn, to share their successes and challenges with others 4. Create and share strategic inclusion and diversity plans with the board of directors, establishing at least one diversity leadership council

5. Use resources to work with members of the Black community to increase awareness of opportunities for employment within our organization, and ensure that employment opportunities are set aside for Black people, including committing to specific hiring goals of at least 5% within our student workforce from the Black community and investing at least 3% of corporate donations and sponsorships to promote investment and create economic opportunities in the Black community, both by 2025. 6. Engage Canada’s corporate governance framework with a goal of, at a minimum, 3.5% of executive and board roles based in Canada held by Black leaders by 2025 7. Create the conditions for success (what gets measured gets managed) by collecting data on race and ethnicity, including from Black employees, to understand where we have gaps and when we are making progress

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Rola Dagher, Global Channel Chief, Dell Technologies I am proud and grateful to have been one of the founding members of BlackNorth. I truly believe the pledge is a step in the right direction, but only a step in a longer marathon of work that needs to be done to eliminate years of systematic racism. If you change nothing, nothing changes, and that is why BlackNorth will help us set the right foundation for change. To succeed, we all need to be committed to action. We need to turn the intention into tangible action.

Prem Watsa, Chief Executive Officer, Fairfax Financial Holdings I think that this has been long overdue. We all knew that racism existed, but we were not willing to talk about it. The recent events that unfolded have pushed this conversation to the forefront. After reading Wes Hall’s article in The Globe and Mail, I felt compelled to join him in this fight, and to bring about change so that we can open up opportunities in education and hiring in the black community, which for so long has been marginalized. I believe that education is the great equalizer. Wes has formed an excellent board and coalition of business leaders, and under his leadership we will make a difference.

Victor Dodig, Chief Executive Officer, CIBC Bank As the leader of our CIBC team and our Inclusion and Diversity leadership committee, I’ve had the opportunity to sit down with some of my colleagues from the Black community and listen as they talked openly about anti-Black systemic racism, white privilege, and the impact it had on their lives and the lives of their children. It really brought home for me the imperative for action and that the time is now. The BlackNorth Pledge is part of taking a stand, creating change, and acting to end anti-Black systemic racism wherever it exists.

www.womenworthwatching.com WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

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Barry McInerney, Chief Executive Officer, Mackenzie Investments BlackNorth is a long-needed wake-up call for our industry. It provides the opportunity for organizations to move beyond talk and actually commit to measurable action. The financial services sector must work aggressively to reflect the diversity of our country, and this includes ensuring there are increased opportunities for members of the Black community. My hope is that, through this initiative, we can help create an environment where Black Canadians feel more welcome, empowered, and able to reach their full potential, as well as inspire other sectors to do the same.

Isiah Thomas (former NBA All-star with Detroit Pistons), Chief Executive Officer, Isiah International We are only successful when we are all fighting for equality, fairness, and equity. It is incredibly essential for my organization to sign the BlackNorth Pledge because of the importance of standing together for what is right and just. We can either fight for what matters most or we can lend our voice to this fight; and our team has made the commitment to do both.

Brian Porter, Chief Executive Officer, Scotiabank We have long believed that our bank needs to reflect the communities we serve, and we’re proud of the progress we’ve made in this regard. We know that we are only as successful as the societies in which we operate, and when individuals and communities are left out, we cannot be strong. We're confident that our work with the BlackNorth Initiative will create real and positive change across corporate Canada, for the benefit of all Canadians.

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Although Hall had been quietly making efforts to combat systemic anti-Black racism since 2016, it was the murder of George Floyd on May 25, 2020, in Minnesota that set the stage for the BlackNorth Initiative to launch on June 10, 2020, and initiate its mandate. Incredibly, the Initiative has already secured support from over 300 CEOs signing the Pledge. Valued at a market cap of over $1 trillion, these organizations span various sizes, industries, and mandates—ranging from financial and professional services to health care. The companies are now united by a pledge to create opportunities for current and future employees in the underrepresented Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) communities of corporate Canada. While the Greater Toronto Area is a beacon of diversity, with more than 250 ethnicities speaking 170 languages calling the region home, and more than half of the population identifying as a visible minority, this diversity fades as you examine the higher ranks of the corporate offices in downtown Toronto. McKinsey’s Diversity Wins: How inclusion Matters made the case that companies in the top quartile of ethnic and cultural diversity outperformed their counterparts in the fourth quartile by 36 percent. This report has not become operationalized by Canada’s Big 6 (the dominant banks in Canada) or its largest life insurers as noted in a Bloomberg article entitled, “Toronto Banks Lack Minority Leaders in City of Diversity,” that looked at almost 200 top executive and board positions, and found only one position occupied by a Black person. It is the lack of representation at the board level, as well as in executive and senior management positions, and the lack of a pipeline, that the BlackNorth Initiative seeks to address with goal number six. This goal taps into the business mindset of metrics and accountability, and

sets a numeric goal that a minimum of 3.5 percent of executive and board roles based in Canada must be held by Black leaders by 2025. In contrast to a quota, the 3.5 percent number is seen as a target (reflecting the 3.5 percent of Canada’s population that identifies as Black) that represents the Black talent whose careers would have led to boardrooms had systemic racism not filtered them out. A Jamaican by birth, Hall likens the filtering process to a race where track superstar Usain Bolt is being challenged to run a 100-meter race, but under the condition that he wear a potato sack. Hall notes, “You can say, ‘Well, I have Black friends or Black neighbors. I go to basketball games and I see all these Black people. I hang out with them, and I like them.’ But if they don't exist in your organization, there’s a reason for that. There’s a bias in your own organization that's

preventing them from doing that. And if they don't live in your neighborhood, if they're not there in your neighborhood, why is that? Why are they not here?” He challenges business leaders to think of their bright and competent Black counterparts—with whom they went to business school, worked on projects, and started their careers— and ask themselves why they are not in the same boardrooms. He believes business leaders will find that it is a combination of the structural lack of mentorship, sponsorship, representation at the higher echelons, networking, formal pipelines, and lack of recognition of the lived experiences of these Black counterparts. The result is that when Blacks are not invited to the boardrooms or the executive suites, they are forced to create their own business. Still, today the rooms of power, are

At virtual summit launch event Wes Hall explains his vision for BlackNorth lnitiative

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divided among racial communities. Hall hopes to change this with the BlackNorth Initiative. In addition to high-profile companies that have signed the pledge, another early win for the Initiative was a $1 million donation from one of Canada's well-known philanthropists, Seymour Schulich and The Schulich Foundation. The donation is to support the building of a Cultural Centre for Black Canadians to ensure Black history is accurately recorded and communicated. According to the press release, “The cultural center will raise awareness about the challenges Black Canadians face, preserve and spotlight Black history in Canada, promote Black arts and culture, and be a gathering place for people of all backgrounds working together to combat anti-Black

and impact of anti-Black systemic racism. The cultural mosaic that Canada prides itself on means that a push for racial equity can be seen as redundant, as some perceive that Canada does not have the systemic problem that the United States has, as it relates to race. To those who doubt that antiBlack racism exists, Hall offers the following challenge: “Identify a curriculum where Black history is taught. Ask a Black friend or a colleague if systemic racism exists in Canada. I've never heard a Black person say that there is no systemic racism.” This recognition that systemic anti-black racism exists has led Prime Minister of Canada Justin Trudeau to say, “As a country, we can’t pretend racism doesn’t exist here. Anti-Black

boss, Wes Hall, operates in a world where executive presence, political calculation, and power are currencies worth their weight in gold. He has led billion-dollar deals and highprofile activist campaigns spanning the United States and Canada, including Enbridge and Spectra Energy’s $37-billion merger and Tim Hortons and Burger King’s $12.5-billion merger. However, the emotional tax and additional struggles that racism inflicts, and that Hall and other Black executives have to overcome, to show up in corporate Canada seemingly unscathed, were largely not understood. Hall’s stature and prominence in the community, and his op-ed letters in The Globe and Mail and Toronto Star, made his reality revelatory and allowed the larger construct of anti-Black

As a country, we can’t pretend racism doesn’t exist here. Anti-Black racism is real. Unconscious bias is real. Systemic discrimination is real. And they happen here in Canada. – Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada

systemic racism.” The Cultural Center will tell the story of Black Canadians who contributed to Canada’s development. For example, Robert Sutherland (1830–1878), was not only Queen’s University's first Black graduate, but he was also the first university graduate of colour in British North America, and the first Black lawyer. One of the University’s most important early donors, he left the school his entire estate. This donation, its largest at the time, has been credited for saving the institution from financial ruin. Black community leaders argue that when stories such as Sutherland’s are not told, and when slavery and its impact is not taught as part of Canadian history, we fail to understand the contribution to our society made by Black Canadians and miss the opportunity to dissect the roots 18

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racism is real. Unconscious bias is real. Systemic discrimination is real. And they happen here in Canada.” It follows that the Canadian workplace should reflect the wider Canadian society. This reflects one of the two key takeaways that Kingsdale Advisors President Ian Robertson, who serves as the communications leader and a key leader in the Initiative, and who is a White executive, says has become more evident over the past 60 days. Robertson's first takeaway is that corporate Canada has failed to truly understand or empathize with what it means to be Black on Bay Street and the anti-Black systemic discrimination that Black leaders and professionals in particular have had to overcome. To the outside gaze, Robertson’s

racism to become personal and credible in the eyes of his White peers. The evolution from op-ed to Initiative helps bridge the divide. Hall explains that he sees it as his responsibility to call up corporate Canada and say, “Corporate Canada, we can do better. And let's figure out how we can work together and do better.” It is important to note that the emotional tax faced by Black leaders working on these issues is a point worthy of serious discussion. Among Diversity and Inclusion experts, there is concern about Black colleagues being tasked with the responsibilities of educating their counterparts, while not being compensated or recognized for the additional work. The Harvard Business Review article, “Toward a Racially Just Workplace,” notes that this results in Black professionals taking on the role of “cultural ambassadors” and

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The BlackNorth virtual summit launch event (from left to right} CTV Journalist Marci len, Co-Chair Prem Watsa, Co-Chair Rola Dagher, and Co-Chair Victor Dodig

Marlon Hylton, Chief Executive Officer, INNOV-8 Legal Inc. I believe effectively tackling systemic racism requires a critical mass of good people and good organizations—irrespective of individual power or size— taking clear, coordinated, collaborative action against the issue. This belief drives the work I do as chair of the CEO Pledge Committee at the BlackNorth Initiative, where I’m tasked with organizing the efforts of some great people to provide support to our community of signatories to ensure that, as a community, we deliver meaningful impact through the commitments we make under the Pledge. To be aware of the facts on the issue is to understand the issue as one of epic proportions that must urgently be addressed because, left unchecked, the issue represents a credible threat to the social and economic well-being of all of us. I understand intimately the devastating impacts that racism has on the lives of Black people and, in turn, our broader community, but I’ve also objectively paid attention to the facts. Black Canadians are far more likely than non-racialized Canadians and other visible minorities to be unemployed. Black Canadians are nearly twice as likely as non-racialized Canadians to be considered low-income. Although 94 percent of Black youth aged 15 to 25 said that they would like to get a bachelor’s degree or higher, only 60 per cent thought that they could, according to data from 2016. In 2018, Black Canadians were more likely than any other racial group in Canada to be the victims of a hate crime, according to data reported by police. There’s something wrong here and INNOV-8 should be a part of the solution.

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Sabrina Geremia, VP & Country Manager, Google Canada The tremendous work by the BlackNorth Initiative has brought corporate Canada together to create lasting, meaningful change. At Google we’ve made a concrete set of commitments to racial equity, both internally, to build sustainable equity for Google’s Black+ community, and externally, to make our products and programs helpful in the moments that matter most to Black users.

Doctor Upton Allen, Chief of Infectious Diseases, The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) A chief of Infectious Diseases at SickKids, I have been fortunate to occupy a leadership position within my organization. That said, it is important to institutions like mine to not only sign the BlackNorth Pledge, but to put in place structural changes that are permanent, and which recognize the immense benefits to be derived from enhanced diversity within organizations. By signing the Pledge, prominent institutions, such as mine, have an opportunity to lead by example.

Jad Shimaly, Chief Executive Officer, Ernst & Young Canada The BlackNorth Initiative goes beyond providing guidance to leaders on how they can build a better culture of belonging—it holds them accountable. I’m incredibly proud to sign my name to the Pledge and commit EY Canada to meaningful, measurable actions to address racism and injustice. We’ve embraced this opportunity and are working towards enhancing our talent and business processes, engaging our community and clients, and driving policy change. My sincere thanks to Wes Hall for his leadership in bringing business leaders together on this important journey.

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doubling their workload as they fill the role they were “hired to do, and a second one as a champion for members of the person’s minority group.” This comes at the cost of burnout from “diversity fatigue” due to their participation in task forces, panels, and training sessions. Robertson’s second takeaway is that diversity and unconscious-bias education has not been successful, despite being a staple of the workplace for more than five decades. There may be several reasons for its failure to move the needle. One reason may be our understanding and expectations. In the Anthropology Now Journal article, “Why Doesn’t Diversity Training Work? The Challenge for Industry and Academia,” Dobbin and Kalev examine five reasons that this training fails. The result could be a waste of resources, increased feelings of disengagement, or worse, increased bias. This article mirrors the findings of a University of Toronto study that looked at how the level of bias increased or decreased in White subjects, depending on whether participants felt externally forced or internally motivated to participate in an implicit-bias-related activity. The takeaway is that unconscious bias instruction has to be evidence based, action oriented, and conducted with relevant framing. Another reason that unconscious bias training may fail is that it has to be understood in a much larger, more complex conversation about structural racism and inequities. A Forbes article entitled, “Your Unconscious Bias Trainings Keep Failing Because You’re Not Addressing Systemic Bias,” looks at structural racism and other systemic and structural issues (SSI), such as exclusive and hostile work environments, affinity bias, and the network gap. To tackle SSI, one Business Insider article entitled, “I'm A Diversity and Inclusion Expert Who Admits that 'Unconscious Bias' Trainings Don't Work. Here

Are 3 Ways Companies Can Ensure They’re Not a Waste of Time,” suggests looking at company policies, requiring manager accountability, and including relevant scenarios in unconscious bias training. It is for this reason that the BlackNorth Initiative goals number 2 (The implementation or expansion of unconscious bias and antiracism education) and 3 (Commitment to sharing best practices, as well as unsuccessful practices) are so critical.

The winning formula It is uncommon for an organization less than three months old to have accumulated the wins the BlackNorth Initiative has already achieved. Despite its momentum, the Initiative is not without its fair share of critics. Some critics worry about the Initiative’s ability to connect progress made at the top of the organization with the grassroots. Our response is two-fold: 1) BlackNorth Initiative offers a holistic approach to the problem of anti-Black racism with committees focused on Justice, Education, At Risk Youth, Mentorship/ Sponsorship, and Health, etc.; and 2) the Initiative aims to identify, partner with, and support grassroots organizations that are already engaged in progressive work, but that need resources such as money, expertise, and political support to help them scale up and have better results. Moreover, the Initiative will use the momentum from the top to create meaningful and sustainable change on the ground. The second critique concerns BlackNorth’s chairs and board of directors, and the fact that there is not a full board of Black members. The current make-up of the board is based on the central principle that those who have been oppressed by the system are unable to change it on their own—as generation after gen-

eration have shown. And as Blacks are unable to end anti-Black systemic racism on their own, the gatekeepers of the oppressive system are the ones who have to make the changes. It is not a problem for Blacks to fix. Some would argue that this reasoning has been one of the key reasons for the movement’s unprecedented success. Robertson, who hails from a unique background of handling proactive and strategic communications and crisis management in the not-for-profit, political, and corporate worlds, adds his take on other reasons for BlackNorth’s success. He shared how the BlackNorth team was able to craft a powerful threepillared playbook that brought more than 300 CEOs to the table.

Pillar One This included tapping into the sense of collective solidarity and commitment to a common cause created by the pandemic, which had not been seen since World War II. Businesses in Canada followed government shutdown requirements and formed a collective front for tackling the pandemic. It was not difficult for businesses to see that a similar approach would be needed to tackle a systemic social pandemic.

Pillar Two This meant mirroring the push for gender equality. In Canada, companies on the Toronto Stock Exchange were required to disclose the number of women in senior executive and director positions, and outline their policies in this area. In less than five years, the companies achieved a 6 percent increase in the number of women in board positions. This change was accompanied by a cultural shift and an understanding of how targets can be effective. Without government regulation mandating the targets, BlackNorth saw the commitment to targets and

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Wes Hall, Founder and Chairman, BlackNorth Initiative I would like to publicly thank Seymour Schulich for his generosity and his pledge of $1,000,000 to support the BlackNorth Initiative, and the building of a cultural centre for Black Canadians to ensure Black history is accurately recorded and disseminated. The cultural centre is an important component of our vision to dismantle the anti-Black systemic barriers negatively affecting the lives of Black Canadians.

timelines coming from C-suite as important. According to Robertson, a handful of companies requested a more diluted pledge without targets or timelines, which is an uncharacteristically un-businesslike approach to a business problem. BlackNorth has been clear that it is interested in partnering with CEOs who are serious about change and not companies that are simply looking for a quick PR hit without a commitment to meaningful, measurable change. He explains that the BlackNorth Initiative believes that the moment for performative showmanship has passed. The Initiative further challenges leaders who want to continue to use a catch-all approach to diversity to consider how it would differ from what they have always done and to show where there has been progress.

Pillar Three This pillar consisted of presenting a compelling business case and looking at both risks and opportunities. • Risks As we look at the risks, shareholder activists can use a lack of diversity and the unwillingness to improve performance as another tool in their toolkit to push for leadership turnover. Further tipping the scale is the damage to reputational capital and the hefty financial price tag of racial discrimination suits. According to a Harvard Business Review article entitled “Why Diversity Programs 22

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Fail”, a prime example is that in 2013, Bank of America Merrill Lynch settled a suit for $160 million. This case, coupled with other settlements, cost over $500 million in settlements for Merrill Lynch over 15 years. • Opportunities As previously noted, several studies have shown that diversity (including cultural and racial diversity) improves financial performance, employee engagement, and innovation results. The generational cohorts of Millennials and GenZ are more likely to use strong environmental, social, and governance factors to decide which companies they buy from, work for, and invest in. This evolution in how potential employees, clients, and consumers understand the role of business led to 200 of the top CEOs committing to “purpose and profit” at the Business Roundtable in 2019. Society expects companies that access public capital to have a social conscience, examine society, and bring about positive change. It is in this context that Robertson asks CEOs to consider the longer-term reputational capital and legacy of their tenure and their businesses, and to reflect on how history will judge their actions.

Lessons Learned The chairs of the BlackNorth Initiative are heartened to see the progress being made as more Black leaders are recruited for board posi-

tions, evidence-based unconsciousbias training programs are initiated, supply chains are diversified, and companies are embedding diversity and inclusion strategies. There are also corporate marketing commitments regarding the way Black persons are portrayed. The chairs hope to see the BlackNorth Initiative serve as a template for other racial/ethnic and other groups to follow. When asked what is on the horizon, BlackNorth chairs report that American Black business leaders have reached out to assess whether a similar initiative could be implemented south of the Great White North, bringing full circle a movement that was catalyzed on U.S. soil on May 25, 2020. PDJ This article is based on an interview with Trevor Wilson, President, TWI Inc., and the creator of “Human Equity.” Trevor is a D&I Strategist, and leading consultant on issues of diversity and equity in the workplace. He is the author of two books: Diversity at Work: The Business Case for Equity and The Human Equity Advantage: Beyond Diversity to Talent Optimization. Trevor is a regular contributor to this magazine (trevor@ twiinc.com), Alecia Maragh is a freelance writer with TWI Inc. She writes about diversity, equity, and the future of work.

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Jordan Banks, President, Rogers Sports & Media We recognize our role and responsibility in helping shine a light on racial injustice and social unrest. Rogers Sports & Media is in a powerful and unique position to lead the conversation and help be a catalyst for positive change by providing a platform for ideas and voices that have not always been heard with equal measure. As Canadians, we like to say “diversity is our strength,” and I fundamentally believe that is true. Organizations whose people and leaders are diverse in thought, background, and culture are more successful, make better decisions, and benefit from enhanced employee pride and engagement. And even more importantly, those employees feel supported and empowered to go out beyond the workplace and inspire change in their communities.

Seymour Schulich, Chairman of The Schulich Foundation, Canadian philanthropist (Donated $1 Million to BlackNorth) I’m pleased to support this important initiative. We are confident the BlackNorth Initiative will improve the lives of Black Canadians, effect positive change, and continue to build a stronger, unified, more prosperous Canada.

David Sharpe, Chief Executive Officer, Bridging Finance Inc. BlackNorth is vital for awareness and action in Canada to eliminate systemic racism and create equality of opportunity BIPOC people. It must be action by corporate Canada and every level of government with measurable results. As an Indigenous person, I am proud to be part of BlackNorth, as Indigenous people are similarly impacted by systemic racism in Canada. We want to learn from the Black North Initiative, and apply the principles and action to the systemic racism that impacts us as well.

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Photo credit: Jonathan Williamson

Trevor Wilson and Alecia Maragh interviewing Wes Hall for cover story

By Trevor Wilson

Why I support

Wes Hall & BlackNorth 24

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Wes has used his access and his influence to encourage some of the most powerful Canadian corporate leaders to take action and disrupt the status quo as it relates to anti-Black racism.

S

everal years ago, I had a vexing business problem that proved to be difficult to overcome. A friend of mine asked me if I knew Wes Hall. While I had heard the name, I had never met the man. I knew he was Black, I knew he was extremely successful, and I knew his reputation was stellar. Several times I had heard him described as the number one M&A guy in Canada, perhaps in North America. Although I have dealt directly with some of the highest-level executives globally, I would never consider trying to make direct contact with such a powerful man in our Black community. I assumed he was out of my reach. My friend offered to connect us. Imagine my surprise when a short time later I was sitting in Wes’s office discussing my problem and he offered to help. What had happened here? There were many things that linked Wes and I. We were both Canadians from a strong Jamaican heritage. We were both immigrants, who had happily lived most of our adult lives in our adopted home of Canada. We both had very strict Jamaican fathers who believed in corporal punishment. We were both Black entrepreneurs who frequented the powerful Fortune 500 boardrooms. We were both Christians and deeply spiritual people. And we both witnessed and were outraged by the brutal murder of George Floyd and the tragic shooting of Jacob Blake. So why was I hesitant to reach out to him? To tell the truth, I really didn’t know who Wes Hall was. I simply didn’t know the man. I probably

made assumptions that he would be arrogant, standoffish, and unapproachable. In preparing for the cover story in this issue, I had the good fortune of spending a lot of time with Wes. I came to better understand the man. The time allowed me to understand his aspirations, his talents, and his fears. I came to see him as a leader the caliber of which we have not seen before in our country. The BlackNorth Initiative has the capacity to change the lives of millions of people, and it was his brainchild. Wes has used his access and his influence to encourage some of the most powerful Canadian corporate leaders to take action and disrupt the status quo as it relates to anti-Black racism. A few months ago, Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada, made international news when pictures of him in blackface surfaced. There were accusations of racism, and members of the Black community demanded an apology, which he readily provided. It is important to note that Justin Trudeau may not be the first prime minister to wear blackface. However, he is the first prime minister to publicly use the term anti-Black systemic racism. This has created an unprecedented opportunity to discuss the ramifications of anti-Black systemic racism. For example, anti-Black systemic racism is the reason that the majority of inmates in our prisons are Black people, even though their community represents less than five percent of the national population. These proportions are even more startling in the United States. It is because of

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anti-Black systemic racism that a huge proportion of Black youth drop out of school, with some of them winding up in gangs, leading to Black-on-Black violence. It is antiBlack systemic racism that accounts for the few Blacks in positions of corporate power in executive and boardroom positions. It is anti-Black systemic racism that caused Wes Hall to create BlackNorth. The first pillar of the BlackNorth pledge mentions the “complex and difficult conversations” related to anti-Black systemic racism. This is especially the case for us as polite Canadians who are not used to using words like racism, white privilege, or even unconscious bias. And yet, if there were no issues in the system, as it relates to anti-Black racism, the situation referenced above would not exist. Wes Hall and BlackNorth deserve our full support. Now is the time for all corporate leaders to sign the BlackNorth pledge and work together to overcome anti-Black racism. PDJ This article by Trevor Wilson, President, TWI Inc., and the creator of “Human Equity”. Trevor is a D&I Strategist, and leading consultant on issues of diversity and equity in the workplace. He is the author of two books: Diversity at Work: The Business Case for Equity and The Human Equity Advantage: Beyond Diversity to Talent Optimization. Trevor is a regular contributor to this magazine (trevor@twiinc.com).

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By Lorraine

Hariton,

President & CEO of Catalyst

Building a Future

of Work for Women 26

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s President and CEO of Catalyst, a global nonprofit that works with some of the world’s most powerful CEOs and leading companies to help build workplaces that work for women, I am honored to introduce the 19th annual Women Worth Watching® issue of Profiles in Diversity Journal. In a time of immense challenge and disruption, I am inspired to read the stories of the 67 women featured this year. Many have overcome personal and professional challenges to succeed in their careers, and they are strong role models for other women in their organizations and communities. Not only am I inspired by these women’s accomplishments; I am also inspired by their diversity. They work in all industries and regions, and they represent a wide array of backgrounds, experiences, and skills that have shaped

In addition to the pandemic, companies and leaders are also facing increased scrutiny of their diversity and inclusion practices as a result of global protests against racial inequity. Some companies have used these dual crises to reinvest in their diversity and inclusion efforts. Yet, even as some companies have made diversity and inclusion a priority, others have allowed these commitments to fall by the wayside. Data show that coronavirus layoffs could erase many gains women have made in the workplace over the last decade. But Catalyst has identified several ways that companies can build more inclusive workplaces for women, both during and after the pandemic: 1. Embrace remote and flexible work Particularly now, as women working from home experience increased domestic responsibilities

ed employees to thrive; they also will prepare their organizations for the future. Yet, even as we see some alarming trends for women in the workplace, we have reasons to be optimistic. A recent Catalyst survey revealed that seven in ten working people believe workplaces will accelerate gender equity in the wake of Covid-19. Half of respondents expect better economic prospects in the future. I know from my own conversations with corporate leaders that they are committed to addressing the current moment and to removing barriers for women and other people of color in the workplace. They are sponsoring women into leadership and board positions; reevaluating recruitment, hiring, and talent management for gender and racial bias; and holding themselves accountable for achieving specific targets for representation in

The 2020 Women Worth Watching represent the remarkable progress women have made toward equity over the last 100 years. They also represent the best of who we are today. I am excited to see how these leaders shape our future. their careers. As the world prepares for a post-pandemic future, we must recognize that it is now more important than ever for companies to build inclusive workplaces in which all women can thrive. I would be remiss if I didn’t acknowledge that it has been a challenging year for women, particularly women of color. The Covid-19 pandemic has upended the workplace—with millions of people now working from home, unemployed, or putting their lives at risk every day as essential workers. Many women are struggling to deal with the dual responsibilities of work and child- or eldercare. And women of color are especially experiencing disproportionate rates of job loss. Systemic inequities, stereotypes, and bias all contribute to the disproportionate negative impact of the pandemic on women’s lives and careers.

like child- or elder care, companies must allow for flexible scheduling options to help employees manage work and life demands. 2. Tackle inequities head-on Before making decisions about layoffs, leaders should review their data and examine strategies they can deploy to retain highpotential women. They should also plan now to rebuild their workforces with women in mind. 3. Connect with empathy Empathy is not just a trait; it’s a critical future-of-work skill essential to building an inclusive work environment. Leaders who prioritize empathy will not only create stronger teams that allow women and other underrepresent-

their workforce. We’re also living through another important moment this year: The centennial of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which gave women the right to vote—although women of color remained disenfranchised over the following decades. Reflecting on this anniversary—and on the more than 2,000 Women Worth Watching featured by Profiles in Diversity Journal over the last 19 years—I am reminded again that broad cultural change for all women requires patience, persistence, and hard work. The 2020 Women Worth Watching represent the remarkable progress women have made toward equity over the last 100 years. They also represent the best of who we are today. I am excited to see how these leaders shape our future. PDJ

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Aisha Shelton Adam Managing Partner

Education: JD, University of Iowa; BA, Arizona State University Company Name: Adam Law Industry: Law Company CEO: Aisha Shelton Adam Company Headquarters Location: Seal Beach, California Words you live by: Compassion, respect, and grit Personal Philosophy: If you know your worth, you will never negotiate against yourself. What book are you reading: The Nickel Boys by Colson Whitehead Interests: Cooking, reading, and traveling Family: Husband, four children (9, 7, and 3)

Be Willing to Redefine Success After my infant daughter died in 2010, I received a magnet in the mail from my former supervising partner. Quoting Winston Churchill, the magnet said, “If you’re going through hell, keep going.” I have lived by those words ever since. The loss of a child is an unimaginable grief that continues to shape my life. I was forced to find a way to live after a piece of me had died. I stayed home for three years as my husband and I mourned, expanding my family with the birth of two beautiful sons. I planned to return to work in 2014, but after a series of telephone interviews with various law firms, the managing partner of a firm said, “I know your former firm and you have great experience, but you

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have not worked for three years and in this economy, law firms may not be sure how to assess your skill level.” I thanked him for his time and started my firm that day. It was never my desire to manage my own law firm. I believed strongly that making partner at a firm was an attorney’s leading metric of success. But when wariness about my competency arose as a direct result of the time I took to mourn my loss and have my sons, I took the advice I would have given my daughter and the advice I have given to countless women since:“Do not let anyone or any circumstance define or limit you.” Not long after, I had as much work as I could handle. Within three months I co-chaired a secu-

rities arbitration. One year later, I second-chaired what was my fifth jury trial. Three years later, we welcomed another daughter. Now, six years later, I manage a thriving workplace and campus investigations firm. I love what I do. I continue to honor my older daughter’s memory as a member of Cedars-Sinai’s Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Family Council, where I help support families with babies in the NICU and families who have experienced loss. My journey, both personally and professionally, is a call to action to women: (1) Be willing to redefine success; (2) Chart your own course and break barriers along the way; (3) Do not be afraid to lead; (4) No matter how many times you fall down, get back up and keep going. You’ve got this.

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Christine Brown Senior Director, Public Relations

Education: Master’s degree, Queen Mary & Westfield College, University of London Company Name: Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) Industry: Semiconductor Company CEO: Dr. Lisa Su Company Headquarters Location: Santa Clara, California Number of Employees: 12,000 Your Location (if different from above): London, UK Words you live by: “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” –Maya Angelou Personal Philosophy: Keep listening, learning, and most of all, be kind. What book are you reading: Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race by Reni Eddo-Lodge What was your first job: Corporate communications executive Favorite charity: WaterAid Interests: Tennis, reading, cinema, art galleries, and gatherings with family and friends Family: Husband, Niall, and son, Callum (8 years old)

Best Advice Received… I’m sure, similar to many women, that in my 25 years of professional life, advice has poured in—sometimes requested, oftentimes unsolicited. I’ve either appreciated or disregarded it, but undoubtedly the one piece of advice that made a huge impact on me fortunately came very early in my career, related to how to work with others. I remember the moment clearly. It was my first proper job in a publishing company and I was talking to our CMO—interviewing him for the company newspaper—and asking a rather simplistic question about how it felt to have such a large team working for him. His response was simple: “They don't work for me, they work with me.” This concept was astonishing to me. It may just seem like semantics, but “chain of command” in the work environment was already entrenched in my imagination, and I thought leadership was about mandating action

and expecting others to comply. Being the boss was the pinnacle of your career. It meant that your opinion matters, your judgment is unquestioned and those who work “for” you, do as they are asked. The idea of teamwork, and that people work with their leaders, was a novelty and opened my eyes to a way of working which has stood me in good stead throughout my career. Anyone who leads a team knows that people management is the hardest part, when done properly. Investing the time and energy to get the most out of others, as well as understanding their motivations and needs, is vital. Traditional hierarchical structures are becoming a thing of the past in certain types of big business, as well as functions like marketing, where the benefits of flat hierarchies are obvious, including clear communication and speedy

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action. However, the real benefit of this way of engaging is the incredible opportunities for growth and innovation for the business, as well as the increased empowerment and overall satisfaction—both for employees and their managers—of recognizing that everyone has value and brings something to the table. I’ve been lucky enough to manage a team for much of my career, and the personal satisfaction that has brought me is immense. That pride has come from setting aside the concept of being the boss and focusing on working with individuals together to create positive outcomes—to the benefit of the company, the team, and myself. So when I am now asked how it feels to have a large global team working “for” me, my response is definitive: They work with me, and the results are impressive.

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Denise Gourlay Corporate Vice President Global Sales Finance, Real Estate/EHS, Travel

Education: BA, accountancy, Caledonia University, Scotland Company Name: Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) Industry: Semiconductor Company CEO: Dr. Lisa Su Company Headquarters Location: Santa Clara, California Number of Employees: 12,000 Your Location (if different from above): Austin, Texas Words you live by: Diversity, equality, teamwork, passion, inclusion, best in class, fun, and family Personal Philosophy: People first, follow your passions & make a difference every day! What book are you reading: Trailblazer by Marc Benioff What was your first job: Junior financial accountant Favorite charity: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Interests: Yoga/Pilates, global travel, food from all cultures, and great quality family time Family: Two sons, David and Jack

My Global Career Adventure In my early high school years, I had a passion for the world beyond my native Scotland—a constant curiosity about different people and cultures. This had a huge influence in my decision making for degree and career choice. I opted for a career in finance, knowing this was an international skill set that would allow me to explore the world. Once I graduated, I was extremely diligent in my choice of interview— each company had to have a great training program, as well as overseas assignment opportunities. I was very fortunate to be offered a job with one of these companies, and my journey and adventure to a career in global finance took off. My 29+ years in the semiconductor field has spanned five countries and given me significant leadership opportunities across the globe. My first overseas role took me to Geneva, Switzerland, working at the European Headquarters supporting

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our Eastern European partnerships. In this role, not only did I learn a different culture, I also broadened my development from traditional general accounting to business analytics. My journey continued to Toulouse, France. This was a particularly interesting challenge for me, as I oversaw a large team where no one spoke English. I had to learn the culture, business model, and business practices, but most important, I had to learn the language very quickly. With the amazing passion, patience, and commitment of my team, we worked together in a new learning model. It presented challenges, but we overcame them quickly, and within six months, we all spent our days speaking and driving business in French. From there my adventure continued to Asia, based in Hong Kong supporting all Asian entities. I grew so much in this role in terms of understanding how the many different

cultures in this region worked despite language and cultural barriers, and how I could have a strong influence on female development in the workplace, a strong passion of mine. My final destination on the world map was supporting our product businesses in Austin, Texas. If I am honest, this was not my most desired location, but the career opportunity was too good to pass up. Lo and behold, I fell in love with Austin, and 21 years, two companies, and two children later this became my permanent home. My global leadership journey continues from my Austin base and with the technology that exists in the world we live in today; my global teammates are never too far away. Global thinking knows no bounds and the influence we as female leaders can have on any company is limitless. Always remember to follow your passion, make a difference, constantly learn on your journey, and never forget the power of a global diverse team!

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Linda Lam Director of Corporate Law and Assistant Secretary

Education: Bachelor of Laws, Queen’s University; Master of Industrial Relations, Queen’s University; Bachelor of Commerce (Hons), The University of British Columbia Company Name: Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) Industry: Semiconductor Company CEO: Dr. Lisa Su Company Headquarters Location: Santa Clara, California Number of Employees: 12,000 Your Location (if different from above): Toronto, Ontario, Canada Words you live by: Dream big. Work hard. Personal Philosophy: Pay it forward. What book are you reading: Elizabeth and Mary by Jane Dunn; Prayer by Timothy Keller What was your first job: Sales associate at a retail clothing chain Favorite charity: World Vision Interests: Traveling, entertaining friends and family and mentoring Family: Husband, and two daughters, ages 11 and 13

Strive for Excellence, Not Perfection When my daughter was in kindergarten, she and a friend decided to play house. They agreed that my daughter would be the mommy and her friend would be the daddy. Once roles were decided, my daughter picked up a picture book, placed it on her lap, and started to pretend to type. When I asked her what she was doing, she looked at me and said, “I’m working! I’m the mommy!” Juggling a rewarding career and a happy family life is hard work. Anyone who says otherwise is lying. I am fortunate to have a legal career that allows me to work on strategic projects where I can stretch and grow, and have a supportive husband and thoughtful daughters who keep me grounded. Some days I feel like I have a handle on it all—work is going to plan, my team is running effectively, and the house is clean. Other times work and home priorities clash, and there is just not enough time to do things as well as I think they should be done.

While there is no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to managing work and family, there are a few practices that I use to help me manage my career and family life:

• Set boundaries. It is not uncommon to block off time during the workday to concentrate on a deliverable. It should also be the same for family life. I schedule personal activities that are important in my calendar. For instance, at the beginning of the school year, I schedule school holidays, events, and concerts in advance. It is not about being inflexible. Sometimes, I may have to travel and miss my daughter’s piano recital or work during a holiday. But if I do not plan ahead, my calendar can quickly fill up with work and leave no room for family life. • Strive for excellence, and not perfection. We put so much pressure on ourselves to be the perfect employee and the

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

perfect mother. Successfully managing work and family life is not defined by being able to know it all or do it all. Perfection is an impossible standard. When we strive for excellence, we still aim high, but we learn from our mistakes and do not let them define us.

• Cultivate support systems. We are allowed to lean on others and be candid about our struggles. We need to intentionally establish support systems, so that we are not on our own. We are made better by coworkers, mentors, and sponsors who help us thrive in the workplace; and by spouses, extended family, and caregivers who support us at home.

Working full-time and being a mother comes with rewards and challenges. Managing a career and family requires constant modifications, compromises, and sacrifices. Is it hard? Yes. Is it worth it? You bet. www.womenworthwatching.com

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Laura Baldwin Smith Sr. Director, Product Management

Education: BSEE, Georgia Institute of Technology Company Name: Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) Industry: Semiconductor Company CEO: Dr. Lisa Su Company Headquarters Location: Santa Clara, California Number of Employees: 12,000 Your Location (if different from above): Austin, Texas Words you live by: Turn your hopes into goals and your goals into plans. Personal Philosophy: Knowledge is gold. What book are you reading: Ready Player One by Ernest Cline What was your first job: Daycare teacher’s aide Favorite charity: Central Texas Food Bank Interests: Swimming, travel, and family Family: Husband, Alan, and sons Louis (16) and Walter (13)

Take the Hard Option “When you do not know what to do, take the hard option. When you’re done, you’ll have the most opportunities.” My grandfather gave me this great advice when I was a typical overwhelmed teenager trying to decide what to do after high school. I have returned to his words of wisdom throughout my life when making hard decisions. When it comes to science and engineering, this advice takes on a special meaning for underrepresented groups. In my case, I was interested in pursuing a career in engineering. While in school, taking difficult courses, I would be reassured by those around me that I could always pick an easier major. Thankfully, my grandfather had told me becoming an engineer was a hard path for everyone. His advice re-

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minded me although I didn’t look like the majority of my classmates, we all faced similar challenges. As an adult, my partner Alan and I were fortunate to have children join our lives. One of the first questions I got asked from friends and family was would I continue working. That is a question many first-time parents grapple with. Realizing the first year as a working parent would be hard, I remembered my grandfather’s advice. At the end of the first year, I was able to learn, grow, and reflect, giving myself more opportunities, both personally and professionally. I believe it is very important to remember that we get to make choices throughout our lives. Sometimes picking a hard choice in the short term gives enough

time to gain more understanding and make a more confident decision at the next crossroad. Thinking back to that conversation with my generally quiet grandfather, that afternoon he shared one more thing. He spoke about how much he admired engineers and scientists, and the amazing things he had seen them do in his lifetime. He believed they were society’s problem solvers and caretakers. I was deeply moved he could see me among a group he thought so highly of. His advice was perfect—we all face times when the path forward is unclear. By choosing the hard option, we give ourselves the opportunities in the journey. Hard is hard for everyone but, with confidence and support, we can take it on.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Barbara Niederkofler Partner

Education: JD, Harvard Law School; BA summa cum laude, Yale University Company Name: Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP Industry: Law Company Chairperson: Kim Koopersmith Company Headquarters Location: N/A Number of Employees: 1,780 Your Location (if different from above): New York, New York Words you live by: Life is too short to wait. Personal Philosophy: Live with courage, authenticity, and lots of laughter. What book are you reading: Act of Congress by Robert Kaiser What was your first job: Summer intern at a law office in Milan Favorite charity: No Kid Hungry Interests: Flying trapeze, hiking, and yoga

Defining a Better Future My passion to mentor and sponsor the next generation of women stems from my first days in this country. As a young girl, I timidly entered school without speaking a word of English. The beginning was difficult, and I had to find my voice with no command of the English language. It was the unwavering support of my family and relentless mentorship of teachers that encouraged me to not only do my best, but to also seize opportunities. Being the first woman—actually, the first member—in my family to graduate university, I cherish how so many mentors helped me start on the American Dream. Nowhere else could I have pursued my aspirations with such an amazing education, as well as mentors cheering me on as I studied and worked long hours. My mentors also made me realize that one of my most

important social responsibilities would be to provide the same, if not better, opportunities and support for future generations. Women face numerous challenges in the legal profession, and the statistics for women, particularly women of color, are sobering. Not only can we do better, we must do better. With recent events, including the additional pressures of the pandemic, it may become even more difficult for women in the profession. However, I believe that mentoring and sponsoring are key for promoting women in the practice of law and for all of us, in fact, to do better. I have been very fortunate to work at a firm dedicated to inclusion and diversity (our chairperson is one of the few women leading a global law firm). As co-chair of our Women’s Firmwide Resource

Group, I focus on mentorship and sponsorship. Part of that sponsorship includes allocating resources and opportunities to associates. Another part comes from the commitment of women and men (our important allies!) to support women. Providing support will make the difference as to whether we are able to retain women in the legal profession. I strongly believe that mentorship and sponsorship must be exercised through perseverance, but also, importantly, with authenticity. My goal is to help as many women as I can at my firm, as well as outside my firm. So many of my opportunities arose as a result of the commitment of my mentors, and it is my duty to pay it forward for the women of the next generation. If we all support the female lawyers in the pipeline, we will succeed in defining a better future.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

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Priya Abani CEO

Education: BS, computer science, Victoria Jubilee Technical Institute; MS, computer science, Clarkson University; MBA, Babson F.W. Olin Graduate School of Business Company: AliveCor Industry: Digital Health Company CEO: Priya Abani Company Headquarters Location: Mountain View, California Number of Employees: 75 Your Location (if different from above): Palo Alto, California Words you live by: “You must be the change you wish to see in the world.” –Mahatma Gandhi Personal Philosophy: Take risks, fail forward, learn continuously. What book are you reading: Sapiens: A Brief history of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari What was your first job: Component design engineer & validation tools lead at Intel Favorite charity: International Rescue Committee, Children’s Aid Society (India) Interests: Painting, travelling, and spending quality time with friends and family Family: Our house is bustling with energy and busy with two careers (my husband’s and mine), two growing kids, and our energetic dog.

Leading in the Time of COVID-19 Our society and the health care system have been tested during the pandemic and, in turn, so have its many leaders. My leadership style had to adapt rapidly. As CEO of AliveCor, I was challenged with evolving our offerings to aid with the pandemic, while still ensuring decisions were driven by our mission to transform cardiology. Because of this experience, I have relearned, and coached my team on, the importance of remaining nimble in the face of the unexpected. I have experienced true strength in numbers. And I have recognized again that there is something valuable to learn from every crisis.

in a unique position to offer real value to health care providers and patients battling COVID-19. We developed a measurement service that helps health care providers monitor dangerous heart intervals (QTc) in patients being treated for coronavirus. This service lifts some of the burden off the strained health care system and provides crucial remote monitoring capabilities to those in need. Our commitment to remaining nimble allowed us to efficiently adapt workflows and do our part to help fight the pandemic.

Remaining nimble

I believe that collaboration and leveraging each other’s strengths is crucial for success. The pandemic has been a critical catalyst, pushing leaders across industries to come together and develop solutions for complex problems. At AliveCor, we built strategic partnerships with leading technology companies—including OMRON, ERT, and Medable—to expand our offerings

The moment the pandemic hit, I prepared my team to be flexible and ready to pivot. We quickly shifted our efforts to deliver a solution that would help those most in need right now. AliveCor has the world’s only FDA-cleared, six-lead personal ECG device—KardiaMobile 6L. This put us

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Strength in numbers

to patients across the world. These partnerships have made clear that in order to scale and make health care truly accessible, collaboration is key. Learning from crisis COVID-19 has taught us that our health care system has much work to do in order to successfully navigate a pandemic like this now and in the future. Having witnessed the unpreparedness of our current systems, I believe that every effort in progress today should have the aim of preparing us better for the future. At AliveCor, I have committed to ensuring that everything we develop— services, AI, software, hardware, and workflows—is entirely scalable. Making these investments today will help ensure our health system is in the best position possible in the future. While there’s no playbook for a pandemic, I will continue to drive my team to face new challenges with grit and to work together to provide our services to the patients and health care providers who need them most.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Heather G. Hansen HR Inclusive Diversity Consultant

Education: BS, University of South Dakota Company Name: Allstate Industry: Insurance Company CEO: Tom Wilson Company Headquarters Location: Northbrook, Illinois Number of Employees: 36,000+ Your Location (if different from above): Sioux Falls, South Dakota Words you live by: “Do the best you can until you know better. Then when you know better, do better.” –Maya Angelou Personal Philosophy: Live BIG. Be Brave. Curiosity and judgment cannot live in the same space. What book are you reading: How to Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi What was your first job: Newspaper girl Favorite charity: Conscious Youth Solutions; Dress for Success Interests: I have a growth mindset, so trying new things, visiting new places, meeting new people, and reading new things occupies most of my time. Family: I have three adult children who are truly lovely and unique individuals. It's a joy and stress to watch their journeys unfold.

Our Dialogue for Change “We” (that ever powerful pronoun) are in a relationship together. One that embarks on a new awakening for much of the United States and starts a discussion among the more socially aware with those who are not. You and I are endeavoring to establish new ground rules to communicate in this new reality, and like any relationship the beginning should consist of expectation and level-setting. I will commit to:

you and your feelings, genuinely listening when I need to listen. I will respect your privacy and timetable, and know you will share when you are ready.

• Trusting you. You can assume positive intent in my words and actions. I will be vulnerable and lean into discomfort on this journey together. I will not practice or play the blame and shame game that is so counterproductive to our dialogue and will only cause a person to shut down.

• Respecting you. In understanding that your reality, and the nuances of that reality, may be multifaceted, I will not tell you how you should or shouldn’t feel. What I will do is hold space for

• Practicing empathy, compassion and support. This may require me to compromise at times and be flexible with my thinking. I will avoid comparing our feelings and pain, as that invalidates your pain or discomfort, causing you to shut down. I can’t have that, because if we want this relationship to work we both need to show up. • Being present. To be truly present and practice openness, vulnerability is essential. It means embracing those tough feelings of shame and being aware when my defenses kick in so that I can move past them. Relationships include finding common interests. As we continue, I commit to also honoring the differences that make a difference. I cannot empower you to bring all of

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yourself and be present if I reduce or redact parts of you.

• Communicating. Let’s build understanding by asking questions, allowing for mistakes, and moving on. I will be open to your curiosity if you are open to mine. I will ask for what I need and set boundaries. Not every topic needs to be open for discussion, especially if it causes you pain. Let’s encourage the best versions of ourselves and promote self-love. No relationship can thrive on insecurities and darkness.

• Being passionate and fun! Not every discussion needs to be a part of a heavier worldly darkness. I need to also focus on the light. Attempts at humor may sometimes be a coping mechanism in uncomfortable situations. I will recognize those as such. I will bring passion for knowledge tempered with grace and good humor.

We are in a relationship, by choice or not. Let’s start our dialogue for change. www.womenworthwatching.com

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Chelsea Little Senior Associate, Human Resources

Education: BFA Company Name: Ares Management Industry: Finance Company CEO: Michael Arougheti Company Headquarters Location: Los Angeles, California Number of Employees: 1,400 Words you live by: Goodness is the only investment that never fails. Personal Philosophy: Be somebody who makes everybody feel like a somebody. What book are you reading: Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates What was your first job: I worked at a gym. Favorite charity: Penny Lane Centers Interests: Volunteering, shopping, and beach days Family: … is anyone who loves you unconditionally.

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In today’s world, with a global pandemic and social issues coming to a head in our society, instilling a culture of belonging, inclusion, and diversity has never been more important in our work environments.

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Invest in Goodness “Goodness is the only investment that never fails” – Henry David Thoreau This mantra has carried with me throughout my personal and professional life. When you act with kindness, compassion, empathy, courage, and integrity, it will never let you down. As I think about what ignites my professional passion, and what I am most passionate about, they are one in the same. The answer is always helping others and being kind. When I think about the unusual path, I have taken in order to find my passion in developing a culture of belonging, I realize that needing and wanting to help others is in my DNA. It has been part of my day to

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day since I was a small child—from giving all of my Christmas presents away to foster children to feeding the homeless. I started my career as an executive assistant. It is the nature of this role to help others. In truth, I did not know exactly where the role would take me or what I wanted in my career. As a member of the Human Resources department, I worked on a philanthropy program. I immediately fell in love with the work and the incredible feeling of helping others in the community. In today’s world, with a global pandemic and social issues coming to a head in our society, instilling a culture of belonging, inclusion, and diversity has never been more im-

portant in our work environments. It has also never been clearer that all organizations need an Inclusion and Diversity department, and an advocate in the Human Resource function, to bridge the gap between I&D councils, employee resource groups, employee giving and philanthropy, education, and mentorship. This has greatly influenced my career path and has grown my passion to help develop programs and events that will lead to discussions and education, not only within the firm but also in the community. We have come so far in the I&D space, but we have so far to go. Continuing to invest in goodness will never fail us, and with that we can change the world.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Tamara Ells Sr. Director of Sales, Next Generation Infrastructure

Education: BA, economics, Northwestern University Company Name: Arrow Electronics Industry: Electronics Company CEO: Michael J. Long Company Headquarters Location: Centennial, Colorado Number of Employees: 19,300 Your Location (if different from above): Naperville, Illinois Words you live by: Make it happen. Personal Philosophy: Work hard, play hard, be good to people. What book are you reading: Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson What was your first job: Jewelry store sales Favorite charity: Ride Assist Naperville Interests: Travel, reading, and sports Family: Husband, Timothy, and sons Tim and Trevor

Leadership in 2020 When I look back at the first half of 2020, I wonder at the sheer magnitude of the changes. COVID-19 has changed the way we live, interact with each other, and sell and support clients. It has been challenging, but it has also provided a unique opportunity to know and understand coworkers, clients, and their families in new ways. Amid this pandemic, the Black Lives Matter movement has led to a reexamination of personal stereotypes and prejudices, and work towards improving the systems and communities. The world is quite literally a different place today than it was six months ago—and the need to drive a diverse and inclusive workplace has never been more crucial. The impact of diversity and inclusion has always been critical in the workplace— to create a community based on equality and to foster better decision making, increased productivity, and

profitability—but this movement has pushed to address these issues with more urgency. A more varied and equitable workplace is needed to attract and keep talent, and to do that, move from simply talking about inclusion to actively implementing strategies to ensure teams have a broad mix of voices, and that those voices are heard. My career has always been about pushing boundaries. I strive to build teams that leverage individual strengths and drive results through a cooperative motion. As a young woman navigating the workplace in the ’80s and ’90s, I knew the challenges and added pressures of being the first women to hold a seat at the table with my male peers. In a male-dominated tech industry, the challenge at times was simply an ability to be heard—not talked over or have my ideas ignored (and then

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later restated by one of the guys at the table as a “great idea”). Have things improved? Yes, in some ways, but not nearly enough in others. I find that even with that personal knowledge and experience, my understanding of inclusion is still not complete. True understanding comes from listening to the experiences of others—listening to my son tell his story as he came out to me at age 23, listening to colleagues with vastly different backgrounds and challenges from mine, and listening to the voices being raised in protest today. To succeed as leaders, as businesses, as a society, we need to not only accept the differences, but find ways to embrace and elevate these voices. Differing opinions challenge us as leaders—they also open the door to innovation and success, in 2020 and beyond.

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Paige Eding Vice President, Global Supply Chain Operations & Strategy

Education: BA summa cum laude, Boston College; Chicago Management Institute, University of Chicago Booth School of Business Company Name: Arrow Electronics Industry: Electronics Company CEO: Michael J. Long Company Headquarters Location: Centennial, Colorado Number of Employees: 19,300 Words you live by: "Where there is an open mind, there will always be a frontier." –Dorothea Brande Personal Philosophy: Act as if. What book are you reading: The Great Alone by Kristin Hannah What was your first job: Training Manager, CASA Advocates for Children Favorite charity: Partners in Health Interests: The outdoors Family: John Eding (husband), Harbo Eding (son, 3 yrs)

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Solutions to problems are generally sought through a path of least resistance. Innovation is an alternative to this pursuit of low hanging fruit. It’s a leapfrog approach to greatness and competitive advantage. Innovative people embrace difficulty. This does not make them difficult.

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Guiding Innovation Forward Innovation is a methodology for problem solving. It is about finding a way forward, rather than a way out. It calls for unbiased analysis, rational thought, and creative collaboration. Innovation is fresh thinking that creates value, and it ignites my professional passion. Solutions to problems are generally sought through a path of least resistance. Innovation is an alternative to this pursuit of low hanging fruit.

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It’s a leapfrog approach to greatness and competitive advantage. Innovative people embrace difficulty. This does not make them difficult. At Arrow Electronics, our mission is to “Guide Innovation Forward.” Applying this anthem to supply chain consists of more than just the selection and application of new technologies (robotics, blockchain, AI, machine learning). It also entails thinking strategically about why

we exist, how we organize, and how we measure our success. Innovating requires imagination. Those who equate innovation with automation, and view automation simply in terms of what it streamlines or takes away, are missing the point. Rather, innovation is an additive process—one that demands that people work together to build something brand new.

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Kim Brown Wilmsen VP & CIO–IT

Education: BBA – University of Missouri at Kansas City (UMKC) Company: Arrow Electronics Industry: Electronics Company CEO: Michael J. Long Company Headquarters Location: Centennial, Colorado Number of Employees: 19,300 Words you live by: “There is a special place in hell for women who don't help other women” –Madeleine Albright Personal Philosophy: I believe in Karma—you get back what you give. What book are you reading: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J.K. Rowling; my 2 girls are big fans, and I've never read the collection What was your first job: My first job in an office was check encoder for a lockbox department. I worked evenings. My mom had to drive me as I wasn't 16 yet. Favorite charity: Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (My oldest son is T1D.) Interests: Hiking, snow shoeing, cooking, and wine tasting Family: Married; 4 children; 2 grandsons

What I’ve Learned Along the Way When you get to the stage in your career where I am, you have probably been given a lot of advice or picked up some things along the way. In my early years, I learned many things from watching my father. When I was elementary school age, he sometimes worked two jobs to make sure the family had what we needed. As I got a little older, he took over the family business when his father retired. It seemed like he was always working. When he finally did sit down for a few minutes, he was always reading a book or magazine—nonfiction of course, so he could keep learning. A few of the many things I have learned from my father are to work hard, do not be a victim of your circumstance, and never stop trying to improve yourself, as well as the following pieces of advice:

• Nobody is just going to give you a job or a promotion. You must work hard and prove yourself. You own your career.

• Not every job is going to be a dream job. Sometimes you may struggle to even find a job. Not every boss will be a good leader. Make the best of it; learn from it (even if it is learning what not to do); and grow from it. • Most of all never stop trying to be better at whatever you do—a better listener, a better project manager, a better leader, a better person, a better whatever you do.

As I progressed in my career, I realized you must network, network, network. When you are looking for your next job or help with a problem, a good network can be your best resource. What I’ve learned about networking:

• Belong to a few groups. I belong to a technology group, Chamber of Commerce, an executive group, and various women’s networks. You want

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some diversity in your contacts or else you see the same people at every function. I’m fortunate that my husband is also in technology, so I can drag him to a few events with me.

• Volunteer in your networks. It is a good way to get to know some of the people better as you spend more time with them. The bonus is it feels good to help a cause, so make it a good one. • Reach out to others in your network regularly, not just when you need something.

• Help others in your network when they are in need. Make that introduction to one of your contacts, offer to proof their resume. I am a big believer in karma! You get back what you give.

So, work hard, make the best of your situation, and learn from it. Most important, network, network, network. www.womenworthwatching.com

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Jeannine Yoo Sano Partner

Education: JD, University of California Hastings College of Law; AB with honors, human biology, Stanford University Company Name: Axinn Veltrop & Harkrider LLP Industry: Intellectual Property Litigation Company CEO: John Harkrider, Matthew Becker & Rachel Adcox (Executive Committee) Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Number of Employees: 95 attorneys Your Location (if different from above): San Francisco, California Words you live by: Make progress, not excuses. Personal Philosophy: Be fair, even when others are not. What book are you reading: The Rosie Result by Graeme Simsion What was your first job: Kelly Girl (office temp; typing 120 words per minute) Favorite charity: Cat House on the Kings Interests: Animal welfare, wine, and running Family: Husband, six cats, and two dogs

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I was fortunate to receive guidance and training from great trial lawyers during my first few years as an associate. They helped me overcome stage fright and find my own voice, so that I could become a persuasive advocate for my client, whether a small or large company, plaintiff, or defendant.

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My Professional Passion The biggest motivator that ignites my professional passion is fostering the development of young attorneys in becoming strong advocates and effective trial lawyers. My favorite part about working in patent litigation is the team-sport aspect, including teaching associates what other senior attorneys have taught me over the last 26 years.

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I was fortunate to receive guidance and training from great trial lawyers during my first few years as an associate. They helped me overcome stage fright and find my own voice, so that I could become a persuasive advocate for my client, whether a small or large company, plaintiff, or defendant. My willingness to take on anything and everything meant

that I ended up leading most case teams. That led to second chairing, and then first chairing, trials early in my career. Watching associates develop their own styles in the courtroom is one of the most satisfying experiences in litigation. When they win a particular motion, or adeptly present a witness at trial, it makes the experience even better.

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Nancy A. Park Partner and Business Practice Group Leader

Education: BS, California State University Sacramento; JD, University of the Pacific McGeorge School of Law Company Name: Best Best & Krieger LLP Industry: Law Company CEO: Eric Garner, Managing Partner Number of Employees: 385 Your Location: Sacramento, California Words you live by: Be the best you can be and live by the Golden Rule. Personal Philosophy: Excellence matters; always try to achieve it. What book are you reading: The Dutch House by Ann Patchett What was your first job: Assembling wind chimes for family business Favorite charity: Girl Scouts Interests: Reading, sewing, rowing, running, hiking/backpacking, travel, and photography Family: Husband of 31 years, David Tacherra; daughter Victoria and son Spencer

The Glass Ceiling Can Be Broken I am often the only woman on a conference call or in the board room, especially in certain industries. This is just one way I can tell women are still bumping against the glass ceiling—due to factors in and out of our control. The main barrier, though, is simply that some industries are underpopulated by qualified women candidates. Employers bear much of the burden of changing the pipeline, but we can control some things from within it. First, prepare for and take risks. Apply for that plum job. Some women may be reluctant because they feel they are not yet 100 percent competent, while their male counterparts often feel that taking a risk on a new position is worth it, and if someone is willing to put them in such a position, they are qualified enough. Women, in my view, more frequently than men, feel that, even when hired, someone will “find out” they really aren’t as competent as they should

be—that they are imposters. Even highly intelligent and overqualified women feel these insecurities. While an honest assessment of skills needs to be made to evaluate potential opportunities and readiness for them, most jobs involve some learning and challenge. Second, be an ally. Because of this self-doubt, women may discredit or discourage peers from seeking advancement or scrutinize a female candidate’s credentials more closely than those of her male counterpart. We need to give other women the same credence they give (or should give) themselves. Encouragement, mentorship, and sponsorship help us learn from each other and boost advancement for women who otherwise might be discouraged. Third, speak up and show up. Women should ask—even tactfully insist—to be in the room or at key meetings where growth opportunities are available. In addition, we should not

shy away from business development “bonding” opportunities, like going out for a beer, golfing, or other traditional “male” activities. Women may decline because they feel they are not competent golfers (men often aren’t!) or fear they will feel uncomfortable in such settings. Learning (or learning to fake) some social skills to talk-the-talk at happy hour is part of conforming to the historic social-business structure. We can also create alternative events and, as more women advance, the universe of bonding and mentoring activities will evolve. In the meantime, golf lessons and learning enough about baseball to join the conversation can help women be perceived as part of the team. The glass ceiling can be broken, but it takes a combination of boldness, confidence, conformance to current and changing social norms, and the desire to advance. Sharing experiences and advice will help the ceiling shatter sooner.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

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Kathryn Metcalfe Executive Vice President, Corporate Affairs

Education: MSJ, BSJ, Northwestern University Company Name: Bristol Myers Squibb Industry: Pharmaceutical Company CEO: Giovanni Caforio Company Headquarters Location: Princeton, New Jersey Number of Employees: 30,000+ Words you live by: “If you want to go fast, go alone; if you want to go far, go together.” –African Proverb Personal Philosophy: Take one day at a time. What book are you reading: Neptune's Inferno: The U.S. Navy at Guadalcanal by James D. Hornfischer What was your first job: I was lucky enough to find Noonan/Russo Communications, a biotech PR firm that took a chance on me Favorite charity: Quell Foundation (focus on mental health—a critical issue, especially with the pandemic) Interests: Skiing, spending time with family Family: two boys, ages 17 and19, and an 11-year-old daughter

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I have always felt it important to pay my good fortune forward. To help others get a start, get ahead, or get through difficulty. I am convinced more than ever that we must help the next generation propel us forward, regardless of gender, ethnicity, or other criteria other than skill.

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Now Is Not the Time to Rest Thanks to many wonderful mentors, sponsors, and leaders who took a chance on me, I have been able to achieve more than I dreamed. Yes, it took hard work, determination, and persistence. But for a kid who grew up in Idaho, being successful working in New York seemed more of a fairy tale.

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Finding that first job wasn't easy; I needed a break. Finding my way from an agency to corporate America; I needed a chance. Changing industries; I needed to find a boss who would take a leap of faith. I have always felt it important to pay my good fortune forward. To help others get a start, get ahead, or get

through difficulty. I am convinced more than ever that we must help the next generation propel us forward, regardless of gender, ethnicity, or any criteria other than skill. How do we accelerate change? We must do more. Now is not the time to rest. Let us run ahead together on this journey.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Allyson Zimmermann Executive Director, Europe, Middle East and Africa

Education: BA, University of Minnesota Company Name: Catalyst Europe AG Industry: Nonprofit Company CEO: Lorraine Hariton Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Number of Employees: 122 Your Location (if different from above): Zurich, Switzerland Words you live by: Be so completely yourself that everyone feels safe to be themselves too. Personal Philosophy: “The world is changed by your example, not by your opinion.” –Paul Coehlo What book are you reading: Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women That a Movement Forgot by Mikki Kendall What was your first job: Working in a fast food restaurant at age 13 Favorite charity: Save the Children Interests: Meditation, yoga, animals, reading, baking sourdough bread, and traveling Family: Husband of 25 years, Jens, and one cat, Saraphina

What Inclusive Leadership Looks Like When I was young, I never wanted to be a leader. When I thought of leaders, I thought of people who were very serious, often male or with masculine traits, economical with words, and lacking emotion. I was none of those things—I was passionate, abundant with words, and completely lacking a poker face. It wasn't until years later, when I faced an incredible challenge, that I learned what inclusive leadership looks like. In 2009, after stepping onto a stage at a bank in London, I froze. After I said welcome, everything I had prepared to say left my head. I had to exit the stage in a walk of shame. The next day I tried to resign. I thought I would make it easy for my manager. I was clearly not right for the role. She declined, and told me something I will never forget. She said, “I see something

in you that you cannot yet see." I thought she was crazy. I decided to stay, but only with the understanding that I would never have to get on a stage again. She agreed as long as I sought help to heal the traumatic experience. For two and a half years, I avoided the stage and went to a somatic fear coach, speech coach, holistic therapists, and healers—I even joined a private support group for people who had fears. When I began again to speak to groups, it was terrifying but my passion for diversity and inclusion overrode my fear. Everything changed in 2014. While speaking to a group of engineering students in Sweden, all of the fear left my body. I began to speak everywhere and to anyone who would have me. I also began to see that leadership comes in all shapes and

sizes. I've had many managers since I was young. Some have been amazing and inspiring, and others, not so much. However, from every single one, I’ve learned something. I began to emulate the behaviors I admired and discard the behaviors I did not. I began to see the potential in others, despite what they saw or what belief held them back. I learned that what we perceive as a weakness might, in time, actually be a strength. I also learned that leaders are human. I don’t always get it right, but I've learned that making mistakes is part and parcel of growing, and that we’re always learning. I believe the greatest growth often happens, not when we get everything right, but rather when we mess up, and we see a better way to do something. When we allow others to see our humanity, we give them permission to show theirs.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Brooke Lively President and Founder

Education: BBA, Randolph Macon Woman's College; MBA, finance, Texas Christian University Company Name: Cathedral Capital, Inc. Industry: Financial Consulting Company CEO: Brooke Lively Company Headquarters Location: Fort Worth, Texas Number of Employees: 7 Words you live by: Function in disaster, finish in style. Personal Philosophy: Failure is the path to knowledge, improvement, and success. What book are you reading: What Got You Here Won't Get You There by Marshall Goldsmith What was your first job: Babysitting Favorite charity: Amon Carter Museum of American Art Interests: Travel anywhere and everywhere as often as possible Family: Dog, Katie

Working at Home and other Changes that Work Workplaces changed drastically and overnight with the advent of Coronavirus, which created a lot of opportunity. Leaders realized over three months of lockdown that some long-held beliefs about remote workers aren’t true. The first is that people need to be in the office, the second is that it is expensive to have people working from home, and the third is the impact this will have on corporate travel. The biggest lesson many businesses learned is that location is less important than they thought. The technology now available means that you don’t have to have your whole team in one room to have a productive meeting. You also don’t have to have employees in the office to get work done. There have been great articles in the HBR (Harvard Business Review) and Inc. about a study out of Stanford, and others, that found that remote

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workers were more productive than in-office employees. Reading a study is one thing, the experience many companies have had in the past three months makes the increase in productivity real. For this reason, I think you will see companies gravitate slowly back to the office—and some may never go back. It’s great to have higher productivity, but there has been a myth that it is expensive to have people working from home. While this may have been true 10 to 15 years ago, innovations in technology, the prevalence of the Cloud, and VoIP phones nullify that. And when you remove workers from the office, you need less space. Rent is often the second most expensive line item on a P&L, after people. If half of your team is working remotely, you can have half the office space and

cut that expense. I believe you will see a trend of companies letting employees work from home—even encouraging it—and having an office for client meetings or projects, operated like WeWork and other flexible workspace solutions. Just as employers are finding that employees don’t need to be in the same room for a productive meeting, the same goes for visiting other offices and even clients. Zoom meetings allow people to connect and get to know people. Zoom offers the benefit of being a visual medium, so you can read people’s expressions and body language. The number of trips that will be deemed “necessary” going forward is going to fall. And that means the travel budgets will fall too. All three of these items have a positive effect on the bottom line.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Brenda Dennis Vice President, Customer and Partner Services

Education: MBA, international business, Marymount University; BS, international business & behavioral science, Oregon State University; international business, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia Company Name: Cisco Systems, Inc. Industry: Technology Company CEO: Chuck Robbins Company Headquarters Location: San Jose, California Number of Employees: 75,900 Your Location (if different from above): Hainesport, New Jersey Words you live by: Be intentional: If you don’t ask, you don’t get. Personal Philosophy: If it doesn’t challenge you, it won’t change you. Embrace challenge and change. Take risks. What book are you reading: Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well by Douglas Stone & Sheila Heen; Be Board Ready: The Secrets to Landing a Board Seat and Being a Great Director by Betsy Atkins What was your first job: Gyros Gyros Restaurant at age 15 Favorite charity: Big Brothers Big Sisters; Alice Paul Institute Interests: Hiking, scuba diving, anything with my family, mentoring, and keynote speaking Family: Husband of 24 years, Doug, and 3 college-aged sons, 2 dogs, and a cat

Leading in the New Normal As we face history-defining moments for public health, the economy, and equality, innovative leadership has never been more necessary. Qualities that predominate in female executives—resilience, adaptability, collaboration, and creativity—have given us the opportunity to shine in the face of unprecedented uncertainty. I’m embracing the unknown and taking a flexible and agile approach to how I work with people, how I leverage technology, and how I strategically approach the business. As Cisco’s CEO Chuck Robbins said recently, “Some of the most challenging times in history have been the catalyst for some of the world’s greatest innovation.” As we face new and unique challenges, I’ve learned that people react very differently in the face of crisis. Leading with empathy and compassion has never been so important. In addition to my regular cadence of All-Hands and staff meetings, I’m leveraging Cisco’s WebEx technology

to increase touch points with my employees in a multitude of ways— more small-group check-ins on video, video-on-demand recordings, and increased communication through email, TeamSpace, and instant messaging. With all employees working from home, though, it’s giving way to 14-hour days with few breaks. Emphasizing the importance of creating balance, avoiding burnout, and having fun is also critical! I now start meetings with a round robin check-in on how everyone is doing or begin with a scavenger hunt or trivia game, and sometimes we do the entire meeting while walking outside wearing headphones. It’s a great way to get people to relax and have fun—it also spurs energy and creativity. Giving all employees a “Day on me” day off also helps! Cisco has implemented weekly check-ins with all employees globally and tackled injustice

head-on with multiple communications highlighting the role each of us plays in working toward an inclusive future for all. To paraphrase a familiar quote, we’re not letting this challenge go to waste and are rethinking how we get work done and how we engage with our customers, partners, and employees. How I plan for and run the business has fundamentally changed. Shorter planning cycles and increased scenario planning gives me the ability to turn on a dime and react in different ways, depending on yet unknown circumstances. The current crisis has given us a new vision for our business strategy. As we emerge from these challenging times into the new normal, these lessons will continue to influence my leadership style: face the unknown with courage; adapt in real time; lead with empathy and compassion; and always look forward, no matter what the environment around us looks like.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Lauren K. Schwartz General Counsel & Corporate Secretary — cleverbridge, Inc Education: JD cum laude, Northwestern Pritzker School of Law; BS magna cum laude, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign Company: cleverbridge Industry: e-Commerce Company CEO: Criaig Vodnik Company Headquarters Location: Cologne, Germany Number of Employees: ~300 Your Location (if different from above): Chicago, Illinois (U.S. headquarters) Words you live by: “Life is what happens to you while you're busy making other plans.” –John Lennon, “Beautiful Boy” Personal Philosophy: “Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better, it’s not.” –Dr. Seuss, The Lorax What book are you reading: Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow What was your first job: Debate camp counselor Favorite charity: Center for Conflict Resolution Interests: Yoga, cooking, nail art design, gardening, and home improvement projects that I that I promise will take “only 5 minutes.” Family: One husband, two rambunctious boys, two dogs, one cat, and zero sanity

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When I am devoted to the causes and people I work with and for, there is nothing I cannot accomplish. I genuinely care about people. That is my strength, not my weakness.

How Did I Help Today? My professional passion is service, service to others—cleverbridge’s corporate clients, internal stakeholders, my team, or my community. I am a problem solver by nature, and there are few things I derive more joy from than making other people’s lives easier. I have always been a people pleaser, so to speak. As I began my career and started to see the less than positive impact being a woman can have on one’s career, I began to view that side of me negatively. Was I falling into some gender norm? Was I sacrificing my own

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ambition for someone else’s? Was I losing my voice? But the older I get, the more I find that I feel like my truest self when I am serving others. And candidly, I do my best work then, as well. When I am devoted to the causes and people I work with and for, there is nothing I cannot accomplish. I genuinely care about people. That is my strength, not my weakness. And if caring for and nurturing people and relationships is viewed as “typically female,” then so be it—I embrace that too. Because at the end of the day, life isn't about the

work you do per se, but the impact that work has on individuals and society as a whole. I am constantly asking myself: How did I help today? How did I make something better? How did I improve something? How did I make someone’s day brighter? If I can pinpoint one thing that made something better on any given day, then that day is a success. I suppose Maya Angelou got it right when she said, “At the end of the day people won’t remember what you said or did, they will remember how you made them feel.”

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

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Carol Widger Partner

Education: Bachelor of Civil Law & Post-graduate Diploma, financial services, University College Dublin Company Name: Dechert LLP Industry: Law Company CEO: Henry N. Nassau Company Headquarters Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Number of Employees: Over 2,000 Your Location (if different from above): Dublin, Ireland Words you live by: Make sure you see the wood for the trees, don’t lose sight of the bigger picture. Personal Philosophy: Be true to yourself and be kind to others. What book are you reading: My choice of reading tends to be easy escapism; the last book I read was Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens. What was your first job: First ever job was babysitting; first “official” job was in a bookstore Favorite charity: Peter McVerry Trust Interests: Pilates, gym, and spending quality time with my kids (if my teenage daughter can fit me into her schedule!) Family: Married to Malcolm; one daughter (Lea) and son (Robert)

The Best Advice I Ever Received I have received lots of helpful advice over my 20-year career, but here are two pieces that stand out for me: Everyone needs to have a mentor and a sponsor. People often ask me what the difference is between a mentor and sponsor, and I would say a mentor is someone who speaks to you and a sponsor is someone who speaks for you. I believe that, in anyone’s career journey, it is important to build a support network. Your mentor could be someone who works with you (and indeed could also be your sponsor), but you can find a mentor outside your organization (which can often bring an element of objectivity). Having a sponsor within your workplace is essential in my view to succeeding. You could be doing a stellar job, but if no one is speaking

up for you, promoting you, and helping you push yourself forward, then you can find yourself being left behind. Throughout my career I have had very supportive sponsors who perhaps believed in me more than I believed in myself. I am now very conscious of my responsibility to be an effective sponsor for the associates who work with me—the obligation I have to help them flourish in their careers and make them feel supported.

Throughout our careers, opportunities present themselves that we know are going to be a big challenge and the fear of not nailing it makes us hesitate. However, we stagnate if we don’t move forward. So if we don’t put our hand up for things that make us feel a little insecure

about our ability to do a good job, we will never know what our true potential is. While there have been multiple instances where I have challenged myself, for me, the ultimate leap out of my comfort zone was to take on the role of managing partner in Dechert’s Dublin office. I had never been head of a practice group before or run an office and Dechert was a new firm to me. Of course I checked in with my mentors and my wider support network, which really helped me look at things objectively, but more importantly I thought about what would happen if I didn’t take the role—nothing! At that point I realized that I did want to make a change, to push myself to the next level and hopefully beyond that. Eighteen months later, I have no regrets. My new role has been the challenge I expected, but the firm has also lived up to expectations.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

www.womenworthwatching.com

Push yourself out of your comfort zone.

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Anna M. Maiuri Member (Co-Chair Energy & Environmental Group)

Education: JD, Wayne State University Law School Company Name: Dickinson Wright PLLC Industry: Law Company CEO: Michael Hammer Company Headquarters Location: Detroit, Michigan Number of Employees: 898 Your Location (if different from above): Troy, Michigan Words you live by: You make your own luck. Personal Philosophy: Pray for health, strength, and patience; with those three you can accomplish anything. What book are you reading: Fire and Fury by Michael Wolff What was your first job: Clerk at a variety store Favorite charity: National Kidney Foundation of Michigan Interests: Just moved to a lake house so anything outside—fishing, paddling, gardening. Family: Husband, Joseph, 3 children, and 4 grandchildren (keep them coming!)

Perseverance Pulled Me Through Perseverance. As I was reflecting on my career choice and what career advice I could give to those facing similar decisions in these uncertain times, that word kept popping up. From the time I was 10 years old, I always wanted to be a lawyer. It was a strange choice for a daughter of two Italian immigrants who never finished middle school, let alone college. I did not know any lawyers, except for those I saw on television. In school, I found I had an affinity with the written and spoken word, and loved the art of persuasion. My parents valued education, but felt being a hairdresser was an appropriate profession for a girl "who was going to get married and have kids." I had other ideas. I decided to go to college while working in a hardware store, so I could graduate debt-free. Through hard work and perseverance, I

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graduated and started working for the U.S. General Accounting Office doing program evaluation for the U.S. Congress. It was a great job that allowed me to travel and sharpen my analytical and writing skills. In my spare time, I got married and had two children. I continued to work full-time and, even though I was promoted each year, I still wanted to go to law school. I took the LSAT and applied. I started law school in August 1988 and shortly thereafter realized I was pregnant. I generally feel better when I am pregnant, so I thought it was no big deal. Baby in March, finals in April—it would all work out. And it would have if that was all that happened. Unfortunately, our 7-year-old son was stricken with kidney disease and went into renal failure two weeks before our daughter was born. He needed constant hospital care. With two other children and

law school finals looming, I went to the guidance office for advice. I was told by my female counselor that law school grades are important and that I should quit! I was devastated. However with the encouragement of other professors, I decided to persevere and take my finals. I made it through and started back to school in the fall, but had to stop because our son needed a kidney transplant. He received his dad's kidney in November of 1989, but complications kept him hospitalized till March. In the meantime, I continued a few classes and finally returned to school full-time in 1991. I graduated in 1992 and landed a job with the then largest law firm in Michigan—perseverance pulled me through. Lesson Learned: You never know what life will throw at you. But with perseverance, any goal is achievable!

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Mandy Fields Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Officer Education: Bachelor of Science, finance, Indiana University Bloomington Kelley School of Business Company Name: e.l.f. Beauty Industry: Beauty Company CEO: Tarang Amin Company Headquarters Location: Oakland, California Number of Employees: 209 Words you live by: “I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” –Maya Angelou I always want to treat people with respect. When you build relationships based on that, those that you’ve touched will remember that long after everything else. Personal Philosophy: No one can be a better you than you. So be true to who you are. What book are you reading: If I’m being honest, Encyclopedia Brown. I’m reading the series with my 8-year-old this summer. What was your first job: Telemarketer selling fudge for a local high school. Favorite charity: College is Real, a charity that provides scholarships and mentorship to underprivileged high school students here in the Bay Area. Interests: Singing, watching singing competitions, karaoke—all those fun things Family: Husband, Gary, and two boys, Noah 8 and Nathan 6

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My takeaway for all aspiring leaders is to: Stay focused on what you want to achieve, regardless of what others believe and regardless of the challenges you may need to overcome.

No One Can Take Your Dream Away I started my career in investment banking in New York City more than 15 years ago. To say that there were not many faces that looked like mine—as a woman and as a woman of color—would be an understatement. That fact did not deter me from pursuing the goals I had set for myself at an early age. I wanted to be the best, and I knew that it meant I had to prove myself, not only against my peers, but also against the preconceived notions that came with my gender and the color of my skin. As a young black female, the cards were stacked against me. I had to work harder, show up stronger, and always have the correct answers, in order to hold my seat

at the table and my rung on the corporate ladder. I dedicated myself to my work. While working closely with several chief financial officers and taking companies public during my banking days, I realized my passion and focused on becoming a CFO. After holding several management roles in corporate finance, I had a development conversation with one of my managers. I told him I would be a CFO by the age of 40. The skepticism in his face said it all. Let’s just say his reaction made it clear that he thought it was an overly ambitious goal. That discussion took place when I was 30 years old. Five years, later, I became CFO of a company generating nearly $800 million in revenue.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

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Today, I am the CFO of e.l.f. Beauty, a public company, where I have continued to increase my financial prowess as I evolve as a leader in the organization. Under my leadership, and that of our amazing executive team, e.l.f. Beauty has seen positive net sales growth for five consecutive quarters. It makes me incredibly proud. My takeaway for all aspiring leaders is to: Stay focused on what you want to achieve, regardless of what others believe and regardless of the challenges you may need to overcome. Hard work, strong performance, and supportive mentors will help pave the way for you. If you believe you can achieve it, no one can take your dream away from you.

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Rachel Ziolkowski Ullrich Partner

Education: JD & BS, hotel restaurant mgmt, University of Houston Company Name: FordHarrison LLP Industry: Law Company CEO: Allen J. McKenna, Managing Partner Company Headquarters Location: Atlanta, Georgia Number of Employees: 256 Your Location (if different from above): Dallas, Texas Words you live by: “She believed she could, so she did.” –R.S. Grey Personal Philosophy: Live (to your fullest potential), laugh (at yourself), love (one another). What book are you reading: How to Be an AntiRacist by Ibram X. Kendi What was your first job: Library page for Richardson Public Library Favorite charity: Local school peace pantries, North Texas Food Bank, Lupus Foundation Interests: Ending food insecurity for local school children, cooking Family: My husband, Brian, my stepson, Nick, and our 2 rescue dogs, Olive and Kiki

Best Advice I Ever Received: Learn to Rest When I was about to turn 40, I was diagnosed with lupus SLE, an incurable autoimmune disease that impacts more than 1 million Americans, mostly women. That first year was very hard for me physically, yet I continued to work over 50 hours per week. The only time I took time off was when I was in the hospital. I even returned to work the day after I was discharged and went on a work trip the next week. I was single at the time and I'd supported myself financially since I was 19 years old, so the idea of not working never occurred to me. I needed this job and the health insurance that came with it. Besides, work had always made sense to me, even when everything else in my life was falling apart. I was at an appointment with my rheumatologist with yet another random inflammation that we were having difficulty controlling, even with high doses of steroids. My doctor

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looked at me and asked, “Rachel, do you know how to rest?” I looked at him like he was crazy and retorted, “I can rest when I’m dead, Doc.” He was not amused. Instead, he looked me straight in the eye and said, “Rachel, if you do not learn to rest, you are going to get there sooner rather than later.” It was a wake-up call for me and the best advice I ever received. Learning to rest did not come naturally to me. I have always been on the go from the moment I get up to the time I go to bed at night. Between billable hours, marketing, client development, and my social, community, and family commitments, I didn't think there was any time in the day for "me time." But I stopped and made the time. In the beginning—I was literally entering "rest time" in my calendar. Soon, it became more natural, as I quickly realized that a rested Rachel was an overall better Rachel. I was able to become more engaged because I

wasn't always running on empty. I was more productive and focused because my mind was clearer. I became a better lawyer, counselor, wife, friend, sister, daughter because I was able to be fully present due to the fact that I wasn't so tired and sick all the time. And my lupus finally got under control. I still struggle at times, and being an employer-side employment lawyer in the middle of a pandemic and economic crisis has definitely added to that struggle, but I've become better at listening to my body. And when it's telling me to rest, I do. I've applied this concept to my practice. I realize that many of my clients have similar busy jobs and family lives that make rest difficult to obtain, particularly during this pandemic. I will often ask my clients, “What can I do to make your job easier?” If I do my job and make their job a bit easier, maybe they can find some much needed rest time as well.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


2020

ER LEAD Watching Worth

AWARD

B L A C KS

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2020 BLACK LEADERS Worth Watching Awards TM

NOMINATION DEADLINE: September 22, 2020

For more than two decades Profiles in Diversity Journal has showcased and honored individuals who have blazed new trails, led the way, mentored others, advanced diversity and inclusion in the workplace and the community, and excelled in their chosen fields. In the upcoming fall issue of the magazine, PDJ will recognize Black Leaders with our first ever Black Leaders Worth Watching Awards.

Profiles in Diversity Journal is proud to honor these individuals who contribute to the success of your organization. We invite you to join us in this endeavor by nominating a member of your team who, through their advocacy, perseverance, legacy, or professional achievements, has addressed racism and bias to become a Black Leader Worth Watching. Your nomination of a Black Leader Worth Watching, or multiple Black Leaders Worth Watching, affords you an important opportunity to recognize and showcase the talents, ambition, and achievements of these exceptional people, while also voicing your support of a truly diverse and inclusive workplace.

Who Are these Outstanding Individuals? Black Leaders Worth Watching are confident, determined, high-performing, purpose-driven professionals who create value for their coworkers, customers, community, and of course the organizations where they contribute their talents. Throughout its history, Profiles in Diversity Journal has recognized thousands of men and women from around the world who are making a difference. The profiles that will appear in this important edition will recognize and celebrate our inaugural group of Black Leaders Worth Watching awardees, and enhance the reputations of the organizations that encourage, empower, and support these trailblazing individuals.

NOMINATION DEADLINE: September 22, 2020 Visit www.diversityjournal.com today to nominate!

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ÂŽ

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Nora E. Loftus Partner

Education: JD, Cleveland-Marshall College of Law at Cleveland State University; BA, Miami University Company Name: Frantz Ward LLP Industry: Law Company CEO: Christopher G. Keim, Managing Partner Company Headquarters Location: Cleveland, Ohio Number of Employees: 112 Words you live by: "The person who says something is impossible should not interrupt the person doing it." –Chinese Proverb Personal Philosophy: Always keep learning, and laughter really is the best medicine. What book are you reading: Hymns of the Republic by S.C. Gwynne What was your first job: Babysitter Favorite charity: Friends of Breakthrough Schools Interests: Hiking, travel, and history Family: Husband, Michael, and daughter, Ileana

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Life is full of challenges. One person’s challenges may seem easier than yours, when you’re looking from the outside. But we can never know another person’s challenges, so we need to be careful not to judge others in comparison to ourselves or ourselves in comparison to others.

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You Just Need to Do Your Best One of the best pieces of advice I’ve ever gotten was many years ago from my mother who told me not to worry about someone else and just to worry about myself. As the mother of seven kids, my mom often had to hear us complain that one of us got to do something another one of us didn’t get to do. Or she would hear one of us trying to get another one in trouble for doing something he or she shouldn’t have been doing. My mom's response was always the same: Don't worry about your brother (or sister); you just worry about yourself. While that advice was frustrating at the time, it has proven invaluable to me as I navigate through life.

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It’s very easy and tempting to want to compare ourselves to others, whether in school, in our careers, or in our personal lives. But every one of us has his or her own journey, and it isn’t fair to yourself or the other person to gauge your life against someone else’s. It distracts from the real goal in life, which is to always work toward self-improvement, while at the same time celebrating where you are in a particular moment. Life is full of challenges. One person’s challenges may seem easier than yours, when you’re looking from the outside. But we can never know another person’s challenges, so we need to be care-

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

ful not to judge others in comparison to ourselves or ourselves in comparison to others. This advice ties well into one of my favorite sayings: We don’t need to be the best, we just need to do our best. And every day, each of us should try to be a better person than we were the day before. Measuring success against your own accomplishments and goals is truly the only way to live a happy and satisfying life. Admittedly, this is much easier said than done, but the older I get the easier it is to see just how important it is to not only reach your potential, but to help others celebrate and reach theirs.


Congratulations, Nora!

Some people dream about a better world. You help build one. Nora exemplifies leadership, vision and tenacity. She works tirelessly every day to build a more compassionate and inclusive world, whether it’s breaking barriers in the construction industry, chairing the firm’s Diversity & Inclusion Committee, serving as a member of the board of directors of non-profit organizations or promoting and advancing professional women through mentoring and work for national organizations. It’s a privilege to call her partner.

FrantzWard.com


Lynn Longo Senior Vice President, Connected Car, Digital Cockpit

Education: Bachelor of Science, Michigan State University; MSMIT, Carnegie Mellon University; Executive Education, Transformational Leadership Program, Stanford University Graduate School of Business Company Name: HARMAN Industry: Technology Company CEO: Michael Mauser Company Headquarters Location: Stamford, Connecticut Number of Employees: 30,000 Your Location (if different from above): Novi, Michigan Personal Philosophy: I get to do the hard things, not I have to…. What book are you reading: Measure What Matters by John Doerr What was your first job: Papergirl for my neighborhood Favorite charity: The American Cancer Society; my father is a two-time cancer survivor and I am seven years post-breast cancer treatment. Interests: I love spending time with my husband, three sons, and two dogs. We are avid travelers and have seen the world! Family: I am a mother to three sons, ages 23, 21, and 17, and am married to Kevin Longo, who has been my partner in crime since our college years at Michigan State University.

Be True to Yourself and Find Your Passion “The glass ceiling is a metaphor referring to an artificial barrier that prevents women and minorities from being promoted to managerial- and executive-level positions within an organization,” writes Julia Kagan, personal finance editor with Investopedia. I was first invited to the table in 1998, when I was hired as an engineer to “support” the team at General Motors, which at the time was predominately male. While this may sound like a meaningful role, I was often asked to fax documents, take notes, and ignore the big picture. Whenever I asked questions about the strategic drivers behind certain decisions, my male colleagues would respond, “Why are you concerning yourself with problems so big?” I listened and learned and pretended I didn’t know how to work the fax machine, so I could set my sights on something bigger. I loved technology. I was a developer. I wrote code. But I also had to earn 54

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my seat at the table by taking a lot of notes during meetings. I wrote everything down for two reasons: to serve the team and to absorb as much knowledge as possible. Thankfully, because of the hard work and savvy of progressive individuals and organizations, the workplace has become a much more inclusive place over the past two decades. At HARMAN, Diversity & Inclusion isn’t just something we talk about, it’s what we do, Bringing underrepresented voices to the table is a priority for us, from the top down, and is supported through several resources, including the HARMAN Women’s Network and the HARMAN Young Professionals resource groups. I recall when there was still a big question about whether or not women could really “have it all.” As mother to three boys, I chose to fill my bucket with equal parts work and parenting—both things I am incredibly passionate about. But, when I was carrying my third

son in 2003, a colleague said, “It is so nice to finally see you start a family.” This was someone I’d worked closely with for years, but I never shared a story about my children or being a working mother. At the time, I thought it would be perceived as a weakness, but, in retrospect, I realize that talking about my family at work is an asset. My family is one of my greatest passions, and they inspire me to think outside the box and consider alternate viewpoints. Today I have achieved many of the professional goals I had when I first took my seat at that table. I have lived around the world and carried the title president, executive chief engineer, and senior vice president. I also start every engagement defining myself as Lynn Longo, the mother of three sons, married to Kevin Longo, lover of technology, and automotive executive. There is no barrier—metaphorical or physical—when you know who you are and what your passion is.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Amory W. McAndrew Associate

Education: BA, Brown University; JD, Boston University Company Name: Hoguet Newman Regal & Kenney LLP Industry: Law Company CEO: N/A Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Number of Employees: 30 Words you live by: Hold fast. Personal Philosophy: You get what you give. What book are you reading: Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson What was your first job: Salesperson at an art gallery Favorite charity: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Interests: Travel, reading, and tennis Family: Thankful for my 3 children (9, 7, and 5 years old) and husband

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I would suggest that more women incorporate “if you don’t ask, you don’t get” into their approach to career advancement.

If You Want to Get, You Have to Ask The best advice I ever received was given to me by my colleague, mentor, and previously recognized Woman Worth Watching. She said, “If you don’t ask, you don’t get.” I apply this advice when counseling my clients in their employment negotiations, encouraging them to ask for more—whether it is compensation, severance, or other benefits. I am passionate about advocating for my clients and helping them advocate for themselves. One of my goals in providing employment counseling is to encourage my clients to take stock of their achievements and determine what they are looking to accomplish— not just at that particular crossroad, but also in the future. An employment negotiation can be unsettling, but it

is also an opportunity to reevaluate goals. New York law prohibits employers from asking about prior salaries, and this creates an opportunity to start fresh and ask for more. I would suggest that more women incorporate “if you don’t ask, you don’t get” into their approach to career advancement. There is still a pay gap between men and women, and one thing we can do to close that gap is to be confident regarding our value and ask to be compensated accordingly. Whether it is asking for a raise, a desirable assignment, or a flexible work schedule, we must advocate for ourselves and set ourselves up for success. I have been closely monitoring the U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team’s Equal Pay Act case

and I am inspired by their willingness to highlight the disparities in pay structure and fight for pay equality in their sport. We women who are both professionals and caregivers can also apply this advice to our personal relationships by asking our partners to bear more of the childcare responsibilities, so we don’t find ourselves the “default” parent who sacrifices career advancement to be the primary caregiver. Having a dialogue and encouraging discourse around pay equality along gender lines is still a hurdle for women, and asking for more from our partners and employers is a way to break through the glass ceiling and the pay disparity. Because if we don’t ask, we won’t get.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

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Margot Hoppin Associate

Education: JD, New York University School of Law; AB, Harvard College Company Name: Holwell Shuster & Goldberg LLP Industry: Law Company CEO: N/A Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Number of Employees: 85 Words you live by: “Yes”; “No” Personal Philosophy: I don't have one; all the most important moments and decisions in my life thus far have been wordless. What book are you reading: The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov What was your first job: Policy analyst at the New York City Economic Development Corporation Favorite charity: Planned Parenthood Interests: Literature, outdoor physical activities (hiking, biking, etc.), urban infrastructure, and design

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It takes courage to tell people with power that they have unwittingly hurt you or that the institutions they lead and love have done so, and it takes courage to ask for things.

In 2020, a Young Lawyer Needs Courage I urge every lawyer to regularly and critically consider how effective lawyers look, sound, and behave. Are they assertive and confident? Scholarly and even-tempered? What does each of those look and sound like? Not to put too fine a point on it: Can you imagine a peak performance of lawyering by a person who isn’t white, male, gender-conforming, and physically able? Do the mannerisms, intonations, language choices, and thought structures strike you as “white” or “male”? To be persuasive, must lawyers project confidence that their viewpoints are sound and ultimately correct? More fundamentally, must they speak with an implicit expectation that others will listen? On the flip side,

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how do lawyers honestly project those things if they have been shaped in part by shame, fear, alienation, deprivation, bullying, neglect, systemic and innate racism or sexism, stereotyping, or any one of the many social experiences that teach people that they are powerless, and that their powerlessness simply drowns out the effect of anything they may have to say? There are many noble contenders for the foremost ideal of the legal profession, among them: fairness, intellectual honesty, and reason. Each of these is so important. But as I observe young lawyers (including me) develop against the backdrops of the Black Lives Matter and Me Too movements, the Trump presidency, and the un-

folding reckonings that each of these is eliciting, I think the single most important quality in a young lawyer in 2020 is courage. It takes courage (and energy) to pay close attention, to say what you think, to disagree, and to risk disagreement. It takes courage to think, speak, and behave differently from those who seem to lead the profession. It takes courage to tell people with power that they have unwittingly hurt you or that the institutions they lead and love have done so, and it takes courage to ask for things. I have witnessed so many courageous acts along these lines in recent years, and I hope to witness countless more. I think the future quality and strength of the legal profession may depend on it.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

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Patrice P. Jean, JD, PhD Partner

Education: JD, Columbia Law School; PhD & MA, Princeton University; BS, Xavier University of Louisiana Company Name: Hughes Hubbard & Reed LLP Industry: Law Company CEO: Theodore V.H. Mayer, Chair Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Number of Employees: 253 attorneys Words you live by: Be good, do good, and always make others look better than you. Personal Philosophy: Get up and get it done. What book are you reading: Pandemic 1918 by Catharine Arnold What was your first job: Research assistant in a laboratory studying kidney disease Favorite charity: The New York Intellectual Property Law Education Foundation (provides scholarship funds to diverse, outstanding law students) Interests: Cooking, reading, and spending time with family Family: Husband (Darren), daughter (Scarlett), and son (DJ)

Listening, Learning, and Leading Through a Crisis This pandemic is a reminder that as leaders we must be adaptable and draw from all of our past experiences in order to be effective. It is a reminder that teams that are diverse in background and experience are very powerful and must be cultivated so that organizations can survive—and even thrive—during challenging times. I have found that the more diverse the pool of experience I have been able to draw from, the more successful I have been. Listening and learning are the keys to my success. I am passionate about science and the law. These passions led me to obtain a PhD in molecular biology from Princeton University in 1999 and a law degree from Columbia Law School in 2002. Since then, I have welcomed every opportunity to make science and the law easy to understand and accessible for everyone. I regularly sit on panels

directed at introducing STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) and legal careers to underrepresented youth. These occasions allow me to hone my ability to explain complicated concepts in a way that someone with no science or legal background can understand, while having an impact on diverse communities. Twenty years after finishing my PhD, the basic concepts and skills I learned as a scientist have become extremely relevant during the COVID-19 pandemic. My experience as a scientist has created additional opportunities for me to lead during this time by teaching my colleagues what they need to know in order to stay safe. It also allows me to evaluate and appreciate scientific data, so that I can anticipate scenarios that will exist weeks in advance to steer teams in directions that will benefit my organization.

This pandemic has also been a reminder that teams diverse in background and experience are critical to competent leadership during a crisis. I have found this to be especially true when all team members feel included, respected, and engaged. I make it a priority to reach out and carefully listen to everyone on my team. With each interaction, I aspire to learn at least one new piece of information from each team member that will strengthen and broaden my perspective. I firmly believe that great leaders are skilled at learning what each team member can best contribute and encouraging that contribution. The current pandemic has influenced my leadership style by reminding me how important it is to remember that everything I have experienced in my life is just practice and preparation for the next challenge or the next crisis.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

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Deidre Duncan Partner

Education: JD, University of Cincinnati College of Law Company: Hunton Andrews Kurth Industry: Law Company CEO: N/A Company Headquarters Location: Washington, DC Number of Employees: 1000+ Words you live by: Keep it simple stupid (KISS). Personal Philosophy: Don't compare yourself to others; simply be the best you can be. What book are you reading: Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell What was your first job: Reporter for The Morehead News, in Morehead, Kentucky Favorite charity: ASPCA Interests: Swimming and baseball Family: I am married and have two children, two dogs, and two fat cats.

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I would encourage any attorney with an interest in working on relevant, real-life issues to consider a career in environmental law. How we manage and care for our world’s environment is going to be increasingly important in the future.

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Why I Chose Environmental Law I earned my BA on an Army ROTC scholarship and then deferred my required military service until after law school. With my JD in hand, I was accepted to a government honors program in environmental law with the Army as assistant general counsel of the Army at the Pentagon. That’s when I took my first deep dive into the Clean Water Act, advising the secretary of the Army on environmental and land use issues involved in the Corps of Engineers’ civil works projects. These projects involved everything from ambitious envi-

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ronmental restoration ventures and flood risk management initiatives to hydroelectric dams and municipal water supply systems. I also learned the nuts and bolts of the Corps’ 404 regulatory program—the portion of the CWA that governs discharge of dredge and fill materials into navigable U.S. waters. I enjoyed applying my legal skills to real-world environmental problems presented by high-impact infrastructure, water, and energy projects, and I thrived while mastering environmental rules and laws. When I decided to move into private

practice, I couldn’t imagine being anything other than an environmental lawyer. I’m very enthusiastic about the future of environmental law. I would encourage any attorney with an interest in working on relevant, real-life issues to consider a career in environmental law. How we manage and care for our world’s environment is going to be increasingly important in the future. I see environmental law continuing to evolve and taking on a more pronounced role in business operations and policy.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Amber M. Rogers Partner

Education: JD with honors, The University of Texas School of Law; BA cum laude, political science, Trinity University Company Name: Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP Industry: Law Company CEO: Wally Martinez, firm Managing Partner Company Headquarters Location: Washington, DC Number of Employees: 1,000+ Your Location (if different from above): Dallas, Texas Words you live by: Begin each day with a grateful heart. Personal Philosophy: Five years from now, you will be the same person, except for the books you read, the places you go, and the people you meet. What book are you reading: How Not to Die by Michael Greger, MD What was your first job: Box office cashier Favorite charity: Oak Cliff Bible Fellowship Interests: Yoga, golf (a new hobby), meditation, reading, and Bravo reality TV (a shameful habit) Family: Zoe, my beloved and very spoiled puppy

The NEW Roundtable: Empowering Black Women Lawyers I am passionate about seeing Black women attorneys thrive in their careers. Despite diversity and inclusion being a daily topic in the legal community, the needle is barely moving, particularly for Black attorneys, and even more particularly for Black women at large law firms. To combat this consistent problem, five years ago a group of law school friends and I cofounded The NEW (Network of Empowered Women) Roundtable, a nonprofit organization, to focus on influencing, empowering, and impacting members’ careers. The NEW Roundtable’s mission is to empower Black women lawyers, enhance our careers, and influence the wider legal profession to improve the hiring, retention, and promotion of Black women. The members, who are in-house and outside counsel, and government employees, are intentional and strategic about developing each other’s careers through hiring,

business development, professional promotion to board appointments, and public relations opportunities through speaking and publishing. The group also holds members-only events with general counsels, judges, and senior partners in the local legal community. From the beginning, we decided to be unapologetic and public about supporting each other. Rarely a week goes by that The NEW Roundtable is not celebrating a success of one of its members. Our goal was to see each member flourish in her organization, enjoy longevity in the organization, and help create a pipeline. The NEW Roundtable has had extraordinary success. It has seen numerous members promoted to partner (or equity partner); promoted in-house, including to the role of general counsel; win countless awards; and refer and hire each other

for business opportunities. The NEW Roundtable’s members were instrumental in bringing the Diverse Attorney Pipeline Program (DAPP) to Dallas, which paired law firms with in-house legal departments to provide summer clerkships for women of color. As the current social atmosphere demonstrates, allies are important and play a critical role in progressing Black women’s careers. The NEW Roundtable has worked to create a network of influencers (general counsels, members of the judiciary, and senior partners) who have bought in to the organization’s mission and are working together to enhance and grow the careers of Black women attorneys. I remain hopeful that improvements will occur. I have many years (or decades) left in my career, and I believe we will see a day when it is normal to have more than one Black woman at the table.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

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Emily Burkhardt Vicente Partner, Co-Chair Labor and Employment Practice

Education: JD with honors, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Order of the Coif; Order of the Barristers; BA summa cum laude, St. John Fisher College Company Name: Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP Industry: Law Company CEO: Wally Martinez, firm Managing Partner Company Headquarters Location: Washington, DC Number of Employees: 1,000+ Your Location (if different from above): Los Angeles, California Words you live by: See the world as it is, not as you wish it to be. Then figure out how to change it. Personal Philosophy: Always act from personal integrity. What was your first job: Grocery store cashier at Wegmans in Upstate New York Favorite charity: Pasadena Humane; Dress For Success Interests: Theatre, baking, and watching documentaries

When We Stand Together, We Can Make a Difference I grew up in a family of women. I have four sisters and four nieces. My mother’s only sibling was her sister, and she too had a daughter. Being among so many strong women, I learned to speak up because, if I didn’t, my voice would never be heard. I was pushed to say what was on my mind and to stand my ground, even when others disagreed. I learned to negotiate and compromise, and I saw that kindness and compassion are values that matter. I also learned that when we, as women, stand together, we can make a difference for one another, and in the way women are viewed and treated. In America, women are graduating college at a rate of two to one over men, yet women still lag behind in most business markers, including wages, management positions, board representation, and accessing venture capital. In law firms, women still only make up about 20 percent of equity

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partners, even though we enter law school at a rate equal to men. Yet, study after study shows that companies that have diverse workforces outperform those that don’t. McKinsey research found companies in the top quartile for gender diversity experience above-average profitability. A Gallup study found gender-diverse business units have higher average revenue. And, a study by the CCL found organizations with more women leaders had higher employee engagement and retention. Traditionally, women have been taught to be competitive with one another because of a belief that there was a scarcity of jobs at the top. In reality, research shows that women benefit from collaboration over competition, and women who support women are more successful in business. I can recall countless times when the women in my family cheered each other on, pushed one another

not to give up, and helped each other accomplish their goals. Together, we went farther and accomplished more. When I look back on the milestones in my own career, often it was women who were helping me move to the next level. We all must think beyond our personal agendas and ambitions, and recognize we will go farther when we choose to pull in the same direction. It is our responsibility to leverage our influence to support and champion other talented women. To that end, I encourage you to think of five women you could support in some way, and then take action to do so—maybe by making an introduction, shining a light on a woman’s success, making sure her ideas are heard, referring an opportunity, sharing a useful resource, or giving a few words of encouragement. Helping other women get ahead won’t diminish your own success—it will enrich and enhance it.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Bonnie C. Hong Director, International Programs, Nuclear Science & Technology Education: MEngr, systems engineering, University of Idaho; Executive MBA, Boise State University; BS, computer science, University of Idaho; AS, nuclear engineering, Idaho State University Company Name: Idaho National Laboratory Industry: Energy Company CEO: Dr. Mark Peters (Laboratory Director) Company Headquarters Location: Idaho Falls, Idaho Number of Employees: 5,000 Words you live by: Be dependable, take responsibility, communicate effectively, follow through and deliver, and pay it forward. Personal Philosophy: “I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” –Maya Angelou What book are you reading: Talking to Strangers by Malcolm Gladwell What was your first job: Cashier (age 7) at my dad's restaurant (unpaid); Intern at Microsoft Corporation (paid) Favorite charity: Intermountain Therapy Animals, Wreaths Across America for U.S. Veterans, and Hospice of Eastern Idaho Interests: Therapy animal team visits, dog training, bicycling, and classic cars

Careers Aren’t Always Linear … and that’s a Good Thing When I was in junior high school, I delved into software engineering and computer programming. Identifying a root cause, devising an approach to resolve issues, articulating it in another language—all while understanding how it fit into the bigger picture—intrigued me and inspired me to pursue an undergraduate degree in computer science. My career at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has given me a plethora of opportunities to make the most of my computer science degree. I installed a new system for in-core experiments in a research reactor, initiated and established a counterintelligence and cyber intelligence program that became a model for the U.S. Department of Energy national lab complex, identified/tested electrical grid vulnerabilities, and now am the director for international nuclear

programs. Each new position has provided me with opportunities to learn more and grow as a leader, colleague, and professional. Understanding strengths and weaknesses, discovering new experiences, and being willing to grow and learn could and should guide career choices and decisions. Not all career paths are linear. The twists and turns lead to exciting growth opportunities. Humans are not linear, so why should careers be? Throughout my career, my mentors have given me recommendations and advice that helped me during challenging moments. Here’s my advice to students and those already in the workplace: • Take advantage of learning and growth opportunities, including any formal education program a company or organization offers, professional

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

development and training, and working in other divisions.

• Be open to new experiences and opportunities. Do not dismiss them because they appear to be outside your field of study or are in a different division or department. • Look out for one another—be kind, patient, and respectful to others. • Be willing to not only share your knowledge with colleagues, but also to listen and learn from them. This is important to building strong teams and achieving results.

Working at the INL offers unlimited directions for careers with a mission that is important to the world: To discover, demonstrate, and secure innovative nuclear energy solutions, other clean energy options, and critical infrastructure.

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Kimberly Evans Ross, Esq. Senior Council

Education: JD with honors, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; BA cum laude with distinguished honors, English language & literature, Boise State University Company Name: Idaho National Laboratory Industry: Energy Company CEO: Dr. Mark Peters (Laboratory Director) Company Headquarters Location: Idaho Falls, Idaho Number of Employees: 5,000 Words you live by: Nice matters. Personal Philosophy: “We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence then, is not an act, but a habit.” –Aristotle What book are you reading: Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens Favorite charity: Ronald McDonald House Charities Interests: Gardening, hockey, and Agatha Christie novels Family: Husband and two sons

Start by Treating Everyone with Dignity, Respect, and Courtesy The legal profession is one of the least inclusive careers in America. In 2017, the American Bar Association found women were 54 percent of first year law school students, but only 35 percent of active lawyers and 20 percent of partners. This lack of diversity is troubling, as the legal system impacts all Americans regardless of wealth, income, background, belief, education level, or political affiliation. But it is also self-defeating because, in the end, the practice of law always comes down to an understanding of people, and the personal experiences and perspectives each client, attorney, judge, and juror brings to the courtroom. Fresh out of law school in 1997, I clerked for the Hon. William Stocks, perhaps the wisest and most gracious person I have ever known. He was chief judge of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Middle District of North Carolina. Every day, his 62

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courtroom in Greensboro played host to the extremes of American society. At 10 a.m., a fleet of high-powered lawyers flown in from New York would argue over millions of dollars in a Chapter 11 case. One hour later, an elderly woman would stand by herself in a Chapter 13 case, trying to protect her home from seizure due to medical debts. Judge Stocks taught me that every citizen brought before the court is entitled to a baseline level of dignity, respect, and courtesy. If success in law depends on understanding people, then dignity, respect, and courtesy are the entry fees for building the meaningful connections this success requires. When I joined the legal team at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), I quickly learned how non-litigation settings are all about people, too. Knowledge of law is only the beginning of the solution to any problem, because business planning

and conflict resolution still depend on who is involved, how they show up, what they bring with them, and how open they are to hearing different perspectives. Because of this, the value of corporate cultures embracing inclusion and diversity cannot be overstated. To be successful, we must be able to hear and understand one another, to see each other as people, and be willing to extend the same baseline level of dignity, respect, and courtesy to everyone. I am proud to work at INL because this organization understands that game-changing science and next-generation energy solutions depend on great people bringing their best selves to work every day. My advice to young lawyers is to seek to understand people as much as case law. And start by treating everyone with dignity, respect, and courtesy. Your hard work, compassion, and ideas are critical to making the legal profession more inclusive.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Jennifer Turnage Department Manager, Emergency Response and Readiness

Education: MS, environmental engineering, BS, engineering Company Name: Idaho National Laboratory Industry: Energy Company CEO: Dr. Mark Peters (Laboratory Director) Company Headquarters Location: Idaho Falls, Idaho Number of Employees: 5,000 Words you live by: Perseverance and empathy. Personal Philosophy: “The difference between a successful person and others is not a lack of strength, not a lack of knowledge, but rather a lack in will.” –Vince Lombardi What book are you reading: The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein What was your first job: Summer Intern (Argonne National Laboratory–West) Favorite charity: American Red Cross; anything related to youth extracurricular activities Interests: Travelling, going to concerts, cooking, and watching my kids’ activities (being a mama!) Family: Husband, Randy; Son, Seth (20); Daughter, Avery (18); Son, Hayden (16)

A Little Discomfort Is a Good Thing When people want you to grow or meet new opportunities, they say “seek discomfort.” This is because anything that is too easy will cause you to stagnate. I often have to push myself to be uncomfortable; getting complacent means I am not growing, learning, and becoming my best self. This is something I am passionate about because all too often I observe those around me taking the easy route, the path of least resistance, and presumably one in which they might have the greatest chance of success. Taking risks is scary. Choosing to go to college, incurring debt, surrounding yourself with people who seemingly are so much smarter than you, wondering if you have it within yourself to grind it out a minimum of four or five years after high school can be scary.

Selecting engineering as my major, where I was clearly in the minority—an 18-year-old woman learning among mostly men—was one of my first introductions to “seeking discomfort.” This was after I had made the decision to not commit to military service and attend a military college because it was too great a leap for me at the time. I didn’t have the confidence in myself to recognize that being uncomfortable was not necessarily a bad thing. By the time I graduated from college, I was accustomed to often being the only woman among my colleagues, and most of the time it just didn’t occur to me to be uncomfortable in that situation anymore. This would suit me well in my career as it progressed, and the trend of me usually being one of the few females in

programs that were largely dominated by males continued. Nowadays, I “seek discomfort” in other ways. Projects that are not easy, that don’t necessarily guarantee success, are the ones I most often find myself drawn to. If solutions can be identified and there is a need, I do my best to find a way to make it happen. Thinking outside the box is something my team and I do on a daily basis. Just because something is difficult or hasn’t been done before is not a reason to not try. Being uncomfortable as you forge a new path can lead to some of the most fulfilling and satisfying experiences. Not being afraid to fail and continuing to try has been something I’ve strived for, not only in the workplace and my career, but also my life in general.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

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Lynn Wendt Senior Research Scientist

Education: PhD candidate, environmental science, University of Idaho; MS, biology, Idaho State University; BS, biochemistry, University of Minnesota Company Name: Idaho National Laboratory Industry: Energy Company CEO: Dr. Mark Peters (Laboratory Director) Company Headquarters Location: Idaho Falls, Idaho Number of Employees: 5,000 Words you live by: Take a deep breath and jump in. Personal Philosophy: Show kindness and compassion to others. We can achieve great things by supporting each other. What book are you reading: Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking by Susan Cain What was your first job: I spent my summers in high school and college as a camp cook in McCall, Idaho Favorite charity: Idaho Public Broadcasting Service Interests: Gardening, cooking, hiking, and knitting Family: My husband and two sons

What Makes a Person a Leader? As leaders, our strength comes from engaging, inspiring, encouraging, and thoughtfully challenging our peers. Leading requires us to listen, to learn, to contemplate, and to make recommendations that we believe are the right approach. I know many leaders in my profession that exhibit these qualities, but only a handful of them are women, given that I work in the male-dominated field of science and engineering. One thing we women generally do better than our male counterparts is multitask, which gives us an upper hand when dealing with the complex roles a leader must face. We possess the inherent ability to excel as leaders if we have the confidence to do so. Building confidence as a leader is not a trivial process, and for me it has taken many years. My youngest

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son, now six, was a baby when a project was funded in my research group at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and needed a lead. Despite more than 10 years of achievements as a junior scientist at INL, self-doubt loomed. I also knew managing this project would be a considerable increase in my workload and strain on my family. However, I took a deep breath and jumped in because I knew I was the most qualified in my group. That decision immediately led to new responsibilities that challenged my abilities and were admittedly daunting. However, each hurdle passed gave me confidence that I had made the right decision. I am now in a leadership position that allows me to develop and communicate INL’s vision of enabling a sustainable bioeconomy. I now understand that the revolutionary

changes I have made as a leader during my tenure at INL were due to the high-profile nature of the risks I’ve taken and the hard work that has established my technical competency. Being a leader takes guts and requires us to take risks. It means stating an opinion or proposing an idea that most certainly will be challenged. But each time we do it, we gain confidence. Two comments I recently received from my senior leadership that resonate and encourage me daily are: “You got this” and “You earned this.” These comments remind me that I do have the confidence and the skills to excel as a leader. My vision is that my female colleagues across professions will find this strength and potential within themselves, and that together we can break the glass ceiling that currently holds us down.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Vivian Kelly CEO and Founder

Company Name: Interprose Inc. Industry: Public Relations Company CEO: Vivian Kelly Company Headquarters Location: Reston, Virginia Number of Employees: 17 Words you live by: Respect. Dignity. Kindness. Empathy. Personal Philosophy: Listen. Treat everyone equally. Always try to be the best version of yourself. What book are you reading: The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini What was your first job: Marketing specialist at a computer company Favorite charity: FACETS (http://facetscares.org) Interests: Spending time with family, going to the movies, and eating in restaurants (pre-COVID!) Family: Live with my wonderful husband and elderly mother who I’m carer for. The rest of my amazing family lives in England.

This Ignites My Professional Passion I had a very privileged upbringing. I grew up on a culturally diverse street of a working-class neighborhood in Reading, a large urban town in England. In my formative years, I was surrounded by people who were young and old, black, white, Asian and mixed race, female and male, religious and agnostic, employed and unemployed. I didn’t have any reason to think that every community wasn’t like mine. I’ll always be grateful for that rich start in life, as it gave me an appreciation for everyone’s point of view. What it didn’t provide was an understanding of racism, sexism, ageism, etc. I was blissfully unaware of these negative forces and how they were creating a generational disadvantage for some of my neighbors. However, in adulthood, the rose-colored glasses came off, and I was able to put both my formative foundation and new social awareness to good use. My career path led me to public

relations. My job is reputation management for technology companies and individuals, which means I help raise their profile—or “brand”—through storytelling in the media. What motivates me the most is seeing talent and nurturing it to thrive and shine. That includes always challenging myself to hire the best-skilled applicant for the job in my own PR company, regardless of background, and enabling them to expand their horizons. I believe industry experts should reflect society as a whole, and I’m passionate about creating opportunities for anyone who can speak as an authority about a particular topic, regardless of their gender, race, ethnicity, age, or anything else. Readers, viewers, and listeners are inspired when someone who looks and sounds like them is given a platform to showcase their expertise. What matters is what they have to say and the credentials they’ve earned through hard work.

Companies that create a culture of diversity and have spokespeople of all backgrounds represent their brand will achieve long-term success. Businesses that don’t will lack different perspectives and innovative ideas. Women are inspired by other women; young people are inspired by other young people, and individual ethnicities resonate with each other. And there are excellent industry groups that celebrate diversity and provide a platform for their voices, such as Women in Technology, and IEEE’s Women in Engineering, and Women in Power. I am committed to getting mainstream exposure for the unique storytellers involved in these organizations and for those who work for our clients. By helping lift the voices and faces of people from every background, I get to play a role in achieving more equality and respect in our world. This ignites my professional passion every day.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Krystal Pfluger Scott Partner

Education: BA, business, BA, communication, Trinity University; JD, University of Houston Law Center Company Name: Jones Walker LLP Industry: Law & Legal Services, Energy Company CEO: Bill Hines, Managing Partner Company Headquarters Location: New Orleans, Louisiana Number of Employees: 650 Your Location (if different from above): Houston, Texas Words you live by: Comparison is the thief of joy. Personal Philosophy: Above all else, love others. What book are you reading: Dare to Lead by Brené Brown What was your first job: Mascot for a Rainforest Cafe knockoff restaurant in a mall Favorite charity: The Rise School of Houston Interests: Supporting The Rise School, cooking mostly edible meals, palindromes, and soccer Family: Wife to a loving husband and partner, mom to three energetic kids

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I firmly believe it to be true that each of us has a responsibility to evaluate the ladders in our company, determine if there are broken rungs, and then personally work to fix them.

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It’s Time to Fix the Broken Ladder I work at the intersection of law and energy, two male-dominated fields. Serving on my firm’s Mentoring Committee and Diversity and Inclusion Committee, I see the challenges women face firsthand. They are vastly different from those faced by their male peers, particularly in retention and advancement. That is, though many firms recruit and hire women at equal percentages to men, they are unable to retain or are unwilling to promote women at even close to the same rate as men. Though not the person to coin this phrase, I have found that much of what makes it difficult for women to reach the highest levels of leadership in the legal industry is not so much a glass ceiling as it is a broken ladder.

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The broken ladder issue I most often confront is a misinformed construct of a linear career trajectory. Many of the most talented attorneys I have worked with—both male and female—have not followed traditional career paths. They have worked flexible or reduced schedules to accommodate personal or family needs. They have written books or taken sabbaticals to study things that interest them. They have chosen community leadership over billing more hours. By recognizing that excellent lawyers and leaders do not all look the same or follow any one path, law firms open opportunities to advance more diverse attorneys. I firmly believe it to be true that each of us has a responsibility

to evaluate the ladders in our company, determine if there are broken rungs, and then personally work to fix them. In law firms, these challenges are often things like origination, client development, first-chair experience, and sexual harassment. I have benefited greatly from the committed mentorship, encouragement, and steadfast support of colleagues, male and female alike, who recognized these broken rungs and actively helped me overcome them. I encourage my fellow female, and male, lawyers and leaders to look at their own company ladders and take actionable steps to repair them. With those repairs, we can rise to new levels of leadership.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Kelly A. Frawley Partner

Education: JD, St. John's University School of Law; BA cum laude, St. John's University Company Name: Kasowitz Benson Torres LLP Industry: Law Company CEO: Marc E. Kasowitz, Managing Partner Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Number of Employees: 389 Words you live by: Know in whose shoes you have not walked. Personal Philosophy: Never lose your sense of humor. What book are you reading: The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah What was your first job: Waitress Favorite charity: St. Michael’s Church Interests: Cooking and volunteering Family: My husband, Greg, and our toy poodle, Ted

Kindness Has a Seat at the Table Throughout my life, I have focused on making sure I do the right thing. By that, I mean making decisions that are rooted in integrity and always looking for the good in people. When I started my legal career, anytime I said I would be guided by what is “right,” the overwhelming response was that I would be “swallowed up.” As it turns out, while I may have been nipped a couple of times, I have never come close to being swallowed up. After law school, I served as an assistant district attorney, handling narcotics cases where I had the privilege to protect not only the community but the criminal defendant. While I was known as a skilled trial attorney, the position was more to me than just that. I never lost sight of the fact that the defendants were people who had life stories and that how I handled their prosecutions could have a meaningful impact on their lives. I listened to them,

not with skepticism, but with integrity and kindness. I was moved when defendants told me I was the first person to ask them about their goals or the circumstances leading to our meeting. That meant more to me than a conviction. Now, as a partner at Kasowitz Benson Torres LLP, where I focus on matrimonial and family law matters, I continue to try to do what is right, without sacrificing my clients’ goals, and obtaining great results for them. Matrimonial law has unique challenges: the cases are often driven by the clients’ desire to achieve their definition of justice—to right the wrongs of their marriage. It takes integrity to redirect clients from emotionallydriven litigation. Moreover, I have found that being guided by doing what’s right achieves successful results beyond my cases. In the workplace, it has enabled me to

cultivate a positive work environment among my colleagues. While this approach may seem obvious, it is often forgotten due to the demands of our workloads and our personal lives. I also am committed to doing the right thing outside the workplace. I believe that having food and shelter are human rights, and that people who are in a position to help someone or their community should do so. For me, that means volunteering with a food pantry and other organizations where I teach children about nutrition and healthy eating by preparing meals with them. By having these human rights met, they too, will have the strength to focus on doing what’s right. When I have questioned my abilities or have lost my footing, I remind myself to do what is right: to be guided by integrity and see the good in people. Afterwards, I always stand up taller.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Olga Lucia Fuentes Skinner Partner

Education: JD, University of California–Los Angeles School of Law; BA magna cum laude, Boston University Company Name: Kasowitz Benson Torres LLP Industry: Law Company CEO: Marc E. Kasowitz, Managing Partner Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Number of Employees: 389 Words you live by: Ask for forgiveness, not for permission. Personal Philosophy: Do unto others as you’d have done to you. What book are you reading: Disappearing Earth by Julia Phillips What was your first job: A department store cashier in high school Favorite charity: New York Lawyers for the Public Interest Interests: Fiction, crossword puzzles, jigsaw puzzles, and Boston sports Family: Proud Colombian immigrant born to parents who were professionals in Colombia, but immigrated to the U.S. so their three kids could have a better life. I’m married with two children: our daughter is 10 and our son is 9. We also have a dog who is 3 years old.

The Power to Make the World a Better Place The day I knew I wanted to become a lawyer was when I was watching Eyes on the Prize in a high school classroom in Marlboro, Massachusetts, where I was one of a handful of non-white students in my class and in Marlboro. The documentary, chronicling the Civil Rights Movement, left an indelible impression on me: it showed me people had the power to change laws to make the world a better place. A pivotal moment for me was the film’s discussion of the landmark decision Brown v. Board of Education in which the U.S. Supreme Court held that segregated schools were unconstitutional. That decision ignited my passion for educational justice, as it caused me to reflect on the role of education in my life. As an immigrant from Colombia whose parents cleaned houses, I attended college and law school alongside classmates who were born in America with economic and social

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advantages I never knew existed. It was then I realized that I was able to excel in college and law school, in part, because I had obtained a solid primary school education. Ever since then, I have been a zealous advocate for educational justice. In law school, as an ACLU of Southern California extern, I worked on a lawsuit against the State of California for its failure to provide its students with a free and appropriate public education. And when I joined the private sector, advocating for educational justice and other civil liberties became the cornerstone of my pro bono practice, which continues to this day as a partner at Kasowitz Benson Torres LLP. With Kasowitz’s unwavering support, I have been able to build and maintain a robust public interest practice, while practicing corporate law. I handle cases advocating for access to a free and appropriate public education for special educa-

tion students in New York City. I also represent individuals and families in proceedings against the Department of Education, handle class action work on behalf of students who are denied services or otherwise discriminated against, and engage in policy work to help improve accessibility, in addition to cases involving domestic violence, asylum, and sex-trafficking. I recognize that I’m fortunate to be living the dream that Eyes on the Prize put in my heart decades ago. While I thought that I had to be a public interest lawyer to do that, the private bar has been and continues to be an instrumental, critical partner in remedying social injustices in our country. I am incredibly proud to be among the members of this community, fighting hard to enforce laws that help achieve educational equality and change those that do not—which will have a profound impact on students across the nation.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Tammy Browning President, KellyOCG (formerly Vice President, Global Operations for KellyOCG) Company Name: Kelly Services Industry: Workforce Solutions Company CEO: Peter Quigley Company Headquarters Location: Troy, Michigan Number of Employees: 6,800 (Kelly and KellyOCG's global network) Your Location (if different from above): California Words you live by: Create your own destiny. Personal Philosophy: Every obstacle should be looked at as an opportunity to do your best. What book are you reading: Ride of a Lifetime by Robert Iger What was your first job: I worked as a server for large events — weddings, parties, and corporate meetings. Favorite charity: I support the well-being of young mothers and advocate for victims of domestic violence. Interests: Spending quality time with my family, traveling to tropical places, and mountain biking. Family: I’ve been married for 24 years, and have one daughter and two sons. I’m also a proud grandma to three granddaughters and one grandson.

I Wouldn’t Change a Thing I never dreamed of working in the staffing industry. There was no carefully plotted career path, no graduate program, no grand design. I wasn’t aware there was a “staffing industry” until I started as a temp at Kelly. However unconventional my path, I genuinely feel the staffing industry found me as much as I found it. The opportunity to contribute in the workforce solutions space has given me so much. I help people connect with work in ways that change lives; it’s an incredible privilege. My journey wasn't easy having lost my father when I was very young, which shattered our family structure. At 18, I was a divorced, single mother with two children and no family network. I was told I wouldn’t amount to anything and that my children wouldn’t succeed either. Those harsh words lit a fire in me—I controlled my destiny and quitting wasn’t an option. I worked three jobs to support us. A year later, I worked as a commission-only sales

rep, selling artwork from the trunk of my car. Although it wasn’t the most appealing job, I had a simple mission: sell, because food and shelter depended on it. It wasn’t easy, but that job taught me fundamental life skills. The next four years, I learned about people— emotional intelligence, listening, relationship building, and understanding what value means to your customer. As my life evolved, I remarried and worked as a general manager in the restaurant industry. Empowered by a supportive and stable family unit, I searched for a career that recognized the importance of work/life balance. I started a temporary role with Kelly, with the intention of moving to permanent employment with the customer. Working for Kelly was not my long-term plan. Almost immediately after starting, I developed a passion for the workforce solutions business. I fell in love with helping people connect with work and

connecting employers with talent. I’d found my niche. Now my life journey, defined by many challenges, seems purposeful—it prepared me to be who I am today. All those real world “jobs of necessity” provided me the business administration education I wasn’t afforded when I was younger. The passion to succeed, the leadership and sales skills, and a solid understanding of business and operational excellence have given me the ability to make a difference. I began this journey 21 years ago as an entry-level temp and have risen to a senior executive at Kelly, leading 1,200 employees across the globe and placing more than 250,000 temporary employees on assignments annually. The challenges I’ve faced have taught me empathy, humility, courage, perseverance, and much more. As a happily married mother and grandmother, my path to leadership may not have been easy, but I wouldn’t change a thing.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Megan E. Marsh Cofounder & CFO

Education: Bachelor’s & Master’s degrees, business & accounting, University of Connecticut Company: Keystone Alliance Mortgage & Capital Industry: Real Estate & Finance Company CEO: Megan Marsh Company Headquarters Location: Erie, Pennsylvania Number of Employees: 26 Words you live by: Temporary discomfort is necessary for achieving big dreams. Personal Philosophy: It takes courage to step out into the world on your own without the support of others and weighted down with your own decisions. Know that courage is not the absence of fear. Courage is taking action and moving forward in the face of fear. Courage is making the decision to own your choices no matter the outcome. What book are you reading: Sacred Success: A Course in Financial Miracles by Barbara Stanny; Exactly What to Say: The Magic Words for Influence and Impact by Phil M. Jones What was your first job: Ernst & Young, Financial Services, Manhattan Favorite charity: Drilling For Hope Interests: I love helping others find success and build confidence, which is why I have been devoting my time to a new Podcast & Community, The Co’Lab. I also love to garden & cook, spend time with my family, and travel. Family: Laban Marsh, husband of 16 years, and 4 kids: Mackenzie (12); Drew (9); Lincoln (4); and Makayla (2)

Ending the Mommy Tax I have spent too much of my career talking to women who control all of their household spending and budget, but still take a backseat when it comes to investing, finances, and budgeting a business. Men still run that world, but only because young women have not been taught that we could and should want wealth and power. Instead, we fall prey to the “Mommy Tax,” even before we decide to have children. After working harder than I thought possible for ten long years, building a brand, a team, and a company, the owners decided to merge with a larger firm. Overnight, I was the only woman on the management team and got hit with the Mommy Tax. This tax isn’t just about 12 weeks of unpaid leave to have a child or the additional expense of raising children. It’s also about the opportunity-cost career moms pay in the

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form of lost promotions, lost raises that go to those who can work longer hours, and being left out of the weekend leaders’ circles. It is the unconscious assumption that we won’t want the grueling assignment or the overnight trip; it’s the unconscious bias that believes once a woman has a child she won’t be as dedicated to her career. Women in the workforce are watching opportunities flow to those who are less qualified and then watching them get paid more just because they aren’t mothers. The same thing happens when women go to get business financing. Defeating this double standard has been a driving force in my career. There are currently more mothers working than at any other time in our history. Most families can’t make it if the mother doesn’t go back to work. As a friend of mine said, “The days of my income not being as important as my husband’s

are over.” But it’s not a level playing field. Women in the U.S. made an average $41,000 annually, whereas men averaged $52,000. At the same time, the wage gap between working mothers and childless women under 35 is now even greater than the gap between men and women overall. Today, women are starting businesses five times as often as men, but in 2018 they captured only 2.2 percent of the $130 billion given out in venture capital. And that was a $1 billion improvement over the prior year. On the debt-funding side of things, a Lendio study found that only 24 percent of the businesses accessing capital in the past year were owned by women. By helping women understand the financial resources available to them, I’m empowering them to change their lives and helping all the little girls and women out there finally avoid the “Mommy Tax.”

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Malissa A. Osei Associate

Education: JD, Cornell University Law School; BA, Fordham University Company Name: Krauss Shaknes Tallentire & Messeri LLP Industry: Law Company CEO: N/A Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York & Greenwich, Connecticut Number of Employees: 8 Your Location (if different from above): New York, New York Words you live by: “Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced” –James Baldwin Personal Philosophy: “Develop enough courage so that you can stand up for yourself and then stand up for somebody else.” –Maya Angelou What book are you reading: Half of a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie What was your first job: Wait staff at an assisted living facility Favorite charity: Safe Horizon Interests: Gardening, home design, and traveling. Family: One of six. I reside in Brooklyn with my boyfriend and 2 dogs, Clementine & Mavis

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Finding your voice—and having the space to speak up and be heard—is essential to having self-respect, agency, and power in any work setting.

Paving the Way Authentically Many Black women often go to great lengths to demonstrate that they are as intelligent, competent, trustworthy, and reliable as their non-Black friends and coworkers. We sometimes find ourselves expending significant energy to create an image that, while meant to dispel these unfair myths about us, is still beholden to them. As a result of this great effort to prove ourselves as equals, in addition to the energy devoted to our basic responsibilities, we often struggle with feeling inauthentic at work. Rather than fighting to conform to the expectations set by the traditional power structure, I believe embracing our authenticity, and demanding that our whole selves be accepted and respected, is the more effective path to meaningful change. We should not

feel pressured to bend ourselves to fit the role we are expected to fill; rather, workplaces themselves must be reshaped to make space for Black women. We deserve the right to bring our whole selves to the work that we do. This means having the courage to speak up, voice one’s concerns, and ask for help without fear of judgment. Finding your voice—and having the space to speak up and be heard—is essential to having self-respect, agency, and power in any work setting. I am lucky enough to work in an environment where my identity as a Black woman is not overlooked or ignored but valued. Not feeling like I have to put on a performance when I walk into the office leaves room for

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

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real career development and growth. In recent months, we have witnessed many Black professionals speak out about the ways in which they have been shortchanged, micro-aggressed, or even targeted by racial violence in the workplace. Unwilling to suppress emotions related to the systemic and ongoing racial injustice in this country any longer, many confident voices have opted to confront these issues in their professional environments, thereby promoting real conversations regarding the impact of race in their workplace and the nation at large. I am committed to this ongoing effort and believe that those of us who find ourselves in prominent roles are in the best position to lead this critical change.

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Jennifer L. Barry Global Vice Chair, Intellectual Property Litigation Practice and Deputy Office Managing Partner, San Diego office

Education: JD, Duke University School of Law; MBA, University of Texas–San Antonio; BA, Duke University Company Name: Latham & Watkins LLP Industry: Law Company CEO: N/A Company Headquarters Location: N/A Number of Employees: 5,000+ Your Location (if different from above): San Diego, California Words you live by: “Be so good they can’t ignore you.” –Steve Martin Personal Philosophy: Make sure you enjoy what you do, otherwise why are you doing it? What book are you reading: Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling (for the third time) What was your first job: Cleaning and restocking airplanes for Delta Favorite charity: San Diego Food Bank Interests: Running, reading, and Duke basketball Family: A very patient husband and two adorable cats

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... remember the face time, whether in person or through a video chat (or even occasionally through a well-curated meme).

My Pandemic Life Lesson The COVID-19 pandemic and transition to working from home posed a lot of professional challenges to our industry. For me personally, being physically remote from my amazing teams challenged me to step up my communication. In the early days of the pandemic, lots of leaders identified the importance of regular interaction and video calls with our teams to combat the fear, uncertainty, and isolation people felt from staying home, and often staying alone. Very quickly, I realized this need for focused human contact was not just a pandemic issue. Before the pandemic, I had fallen into a pattern of leaving my teams to run themselves, because they were

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so capable. But I realized I was neglecting some of the most important aspects of teamwork and mentoring: being there, listening, and guiding. Faced with the video screen of myself and my teammates, I reevaluated how I was communicating, what support I was lending, and how I was showing my appreciation for their tremendous work and loyalty. To be a good leader, I long ago learned to give people space and freedom to work independently, trusting them to do things right and come to me with questions or issues. But getting out of colleagues’ way is not the same as being out of touch. Once the quarantine spurred me to start regular video and phone

calls with my teams, I understood they could feel just as isolated when working in the office if I didn't make an effort to stay in touch and be present in our work together. Clearly, not everyone needs a daily or even weekly call, but as my teams continue to show up and deliver great work, I need to show up and deliver feedback and support, praise and thanks, and a regular dose of humor. So my Pandemic Life Lesson, for which I am grateful, is to remember the face time, whether in person or through a video chat (or even occasionally through a well-curated meme). And I will be on the lookout for the next Life Lesson without waiting for a global crisis.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Robin M. Hulshizer Partner

Education: JD, University of Iowa College of Law; BS, Northwestern University Company Name: Latham & Watkins LLP Industry: Law Company CEO: N/A Company Headquarters Location: N/A Number of Employees: 5,000+ Your Location (if different from above): Chicago, Illinois Words you live by: Be kind, be a leader, show compassion, and choose to be happy. Personal Philosophy: Everyone is important. What book are you reading: Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson What was your first job: I rogued soybeans and cleaned the house of a neighboring farmer. Favorite charity: It's a tie: The Reach Institute and Do the Write Thing Interests: Photography, running, and wine tasting Family: My husband, Sean; daughters, Jamee, Hannah, and Kate; son, Dale; and granddaughters, Leila and Sloane

It’s Time to Turn Privilege into Action I still remember racing around a field with a gaggle of other young teens, chasing a greased pig thinking that I just had to catch her, before the others. Somehow, smothered in grease, I did. The “prize” was the pig itself, which I proudly brought home to the farm, naming her “Gloria Steinem.” To anyone who chose to listen, she was proclaimed the first liberated pig! I was out to liberate every female. Of course, I had no idea how. It was 1980, I was a farm girl in Iowa and the Great Jones County Fair week was always the highlight of my year. I doubt anyone who crossed my path would have guessed I’d venture on to Northwestern University (the first in my family to attend college, let alone graduate), then proceed to law school, and eventually, to “Biglaw,” as they like to say. But, I did. Somehow.

That “somehow” was not only the encouragement of my amazing parents but the people who mentored me along the way. My acting and English teachers in high school and college (thank you Ms. Cratsenberg, and Messrs. Downs and Nims) who worked hard to help me develop confidence on the stage (a skill which translates quite well to the court room), as well as persuasiveness with the pen. Environmental law professors who helped “cultivate” my upbringing (i.e., my love for animals and the land) into a practice specialty in environmental law. My many “bosses” in the multiple jobs I undertook while trying to pay my way through it all. They came from different backgrounds, races, and sexual orientations than mine, but importantly, they were my allies, they helped me dream, they believed in me, and they didn’t judge me.

That is the best advice I’ve ever had—the actions of the people who raised me up. And that distinction―actions rather than words alone―is critical. This holds especially true in today’s world, when we look around and see so much pain, animosity, racism, and despair. No one person can fix it all. But in our profession, we are blessed with privileges that allow us to make a difference. People do look to us for advice, for assistance. We can be leaders. We can advocate for those who need a voice. We can be inclusive of others’ views and cultures, and demand diversity in the workplace, before the courts, and in our world. Most important, we can take action by mentoring others each and every day. I’ll be the first to admit that on some days I fail. But as lawyers, as humans, we must keep trying and turn our privilege into action.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Karla Munden Senior Vice President and Chief Audit Executive

Education: BBA, accounting, College of William and Mary; MBA, general, University of Phoenix; Certificate, cyber-risk oversight, Carnegie Mellon University Company Name: Lincoln Financial Group Industry: Life Insurance Company CEO: Dennis Glass Company Headquarters Location: Radnor, Pennsylvania Number of Employees: 11,000+ Words you live by: Focus on being effective instead of fighting to be right! Personal Philosophy: Treat everyone with dignity and respect! What book are you reading: Biased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and Do by Jennifer Eberhardt What was your first job: Cashier at Burger King Favorite charity: March of Dimes—they do tremendous work for women and children Interests: Mentoring, spending time with family, movies, wine tasting

Gender and Racial Bias Merge to Impact Women of Color Imagine being the only woman in a room full of men. No matter how hard they try not to make judgments based on gender, their minds are immediately flooded with deeply ingrained implicit biases. Now, imagine yourself as a woman of color in that same situation. We’re no longer talking about a flood of biases. It’s been upgraded to a full-on tsunami! This scenario has played out many times throughout my career. When I walk into a room, people don’t see my 20-plus years as an accounting professional with Ernst & Young, Nationwide, and Lincoln Financial Group, where I currently serve as senior vice president and chief audit executive. Nor do they see me as a veteran, despite the 14 years I spent in the U.S. Navy Reserve. They see me as a woman…a Black woman. This intersection of racial and gender stereotypes clearly impacts how women of color are viewed in the workplace. While a deter74

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mined white woman is perceived as assertive, a determined black woman is branded aggressive. Most concerningly, our true worth often goes unrecognized, resulting in a dearth of women of color in the senior management ranks. I’m not suggesting our destinies have been predetermined by our gender, compounded by the color of our skin. While we’re clearly fighting some powerful headwinds, the ultimate determinant of success (or failure) lies within each one of us. Granted, employers have an important role to play in laying a framework and holding people accountable, but it’s up to us to chart our own path to success. That begins with bringing our authentic selves to work. As a young woman, that would have terrified me, but as I’ve progressed in my career, I’ve become more comfortable voicing my opinions. You’d be surprised how many times brainstorming sessions have been punctuated with, “Wow, we hadn’t thought of

that,” in response to ideas informed by my unique experience. I’m fortunate to work for a company that takes its commitment to diversity and inclusion seriously, which encourages the involvement of employees at every level. At Lincoln, support of D&I begins at the very top, but bottom-to-top initiatives are just as important in helping to advance those principles. Personally, I am proud of the diverse workforce I have cultivated within Finance, as well as my participation in Town Hall and Leadership panel discussions on issues surrounding race, and why silence is the enemy of advancement. As women of color, we have to work harder to prove ourselves, but there’s nothing inherently holding us back. By focusing on our diversity as an asset, sharing our unique perspective, and speaking with our true voice, there’s no mountain too high for us to climb.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Congratulations, Karla! Lincoln Financial congratulates Karla Munden, Chief Audit Executive, and all of the 2020 Women Worth Watching® honorees. It’s your perseverance and hard work that continue to make a difference in the world and inspire people everywhere to take charge of their future.

To learn more about Lincoln Financial, visit LFG.com.

LFG-KARLA-ADV002 LCN-3178883-072720 Lincoln Financial Group is the marketing name for Lincoln National Corporation and its affiliates. ©2020 Lincoln National Corporation.


Rosanna Durruthy VP, Global Diversity Inclusion and Belonging

Education: Stanford University Graduate School of Business; Harvard University Company: LinkedIn Industry: Information Technology Company CEO: Ryan Roslansky Company Headquarters Location: San Francisco, California Number of Employees: 16,000 Your Location (if different from above): New York, New York Words you live by: You are never your circumstances. Personal Philosophy: “Life isn’t about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself.” –George Bernard Shaw What was your first job: I worked in my father’s medical practice. (Yes, it was the ultimate connection.) It was also no pay, high expectations from my boss, and the opportunity to build skills in communication and customer service.

This Moment Offers Us a Unique Opportunity The unconscionable fatal attacks on Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, Rayshard Brooks, and George Floyd, coupled with the COVID-19 pandemic, have illuminated the longstanding racial divide in the U.S. and continued inequalities across health care and economic opportunity in this country. We’re now at a unique juncture in history that allows us to reflect, unlearn, and educate ourselves regarding the structures of racial oppression, and evaluate how to pursue a more equitable future for all. Change doesn’t happen in moments of strength, it happens in moments of vulnerability, and businesses can and must play a leading role in addressing racial equity and driving meaningful progress. I am a leader of Diversity, Inclusion, and Belonging at LinkedIn, but the onus of this work is not just on me. It’s on leaders across organizations and on all of us to foster a culture of belonging. This is a time for critical conversations about the real work we have to do, the journey ahead, and

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how we’re measuring our progress along the way. Acknowledgement and Allyship Before enacting change, we must acknowledge the inequities that have lasted for ages within our societal and corporate structures. We also need to look inward at biases that may be present in the practices and cultures in our own corporate structures and organizations. It will likely be uncomfortable, but it’s a crucial first step. Leaders must also act as role models who operate with intention and conviction to continuously practice and learn the art, science, and skills of inclusive leadership. Building a Diverse Talent Pipeline When people from diverse backgrounds and cultures work together, everybody succeeds. We must not only evolve the way we hire, but also ensure we’re retaining and promoting employees by building programs

across the employee lifecycle that create a culture of belonging. In addition to an increased focus on diverse candidate slates and new investments in onboarding and mentorship, one of the key focus areas for us at LinkedIn is a company-wide learning curriculum and accountability framework for our people managers. These training programs help to ensure that managers are equipped with the skills needed to be inclusive leaders, to understand and confront bias, and to actively create a culture of belonging. Leading the fight against racism and injustice takes more than just lending your voice to the cause. It takes courage, vulnerability, and most of all, action. Companies, and the people who work for them, can use this pivotal moment to enact real change that’s long overdue. Those that take specific, pointed actions to build an equitable workplace that enables all people to thrive will come out of this period of unrest more successful and stronger than ever before.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


2020

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2020 BLACK LEADERS Worth Watching Awards TM

NOMINATION DEADLINE: September 22, 2020

For more than two decades Profiles in Diversity Journal has showcased and honored individuals who have blazed new trails, led the way, mentored others, advanced diversity and inclusion in the workplace and the community, and excelled in their chosen fields. In the upcoming fall issue of the magazine, PDJ will recognize Black Leaders with our first ever Black Leaders Worth Watching Awards.

Profiles in Diversity Journal is proud to honor these individuals who contribute to the success of your organization. We invite you to join us in this endeavor by nominating a member of your team who, through their advocacy, perseverance, legacy, or professional achievements, has addressed racism and bias to become a Black Leader Worth Watching. Your nomination of a Black Leader Worth Watching, or multiple Black Leaders Worth Watching, affords you an important opportunity to recognize and showcase the talents, ambition, and achievements of these exceptional people, while also voicing your support of a truly diverse and inclusive workplace.

Who Are these Outstanding Individuals? Black Leaders Worth Watching are confident, determined, high-performing, purpose-driven professionals who create value for their coworkers, customers, community, and of course the organizations where they contribute their talents. Throughout its history, Profiles in Diversity Journal has recognized thousands of men and women from around the world who are making a difference. The profiles that will appear in this important edition will recognize and celebrate our inaugural group of Black Leaders Worth Watching awardees, and enhance the reputations of the organizations that encourage, empower, and support these trailblazing individuals.

NOMINATION DEADLINE: September 22, 2020 Visit www.diversityjournal.com today to nominate!

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ÂŽ

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Ann R. Knox Partner

Education: JD, Columbia University; BS, Cornell University Company: Mayer Brown LLP Industry: Law Company CEO: Paul Theiss Company Headquarters Location: N/A Number of Employees: 1,500 + Your Location (if different from above): New York, New York Words you live by: If not you, then who? What book are you reading: The Lemonade War by Jacqueline Davies; I’m reading this with my daughter as is a fabulous book about business and competition. What was your first job: Working in a sandwich shop Favorite charity: The Innocence Project Interests: Gardening and podcasts Family: My husband and I have a 9-year-old daughter.

Working Remotely May Bring Us Closer We hear so much about resilience as a key to success in work and in life—this has never been truer than during the current shelter-in-place environment. For those who are fortunate enough to still be employed and have jobs that permit a remote work environment, the nature of work is likely to change permanently. It will be interesting to see if a combination of work in the office and a virtual environment allows us to emerge as stronger teams. The culture of many work environments has been rigid, and many employees are not comfortable openly discussing aspects of their personal lives. They are concerned that they will be judged negatively—as being less committed to the job or capable of handling particular responsibilities. As a result, employees, and women especially, have either suffered in silence, doing their best to make their lives fit the demands of work, or even

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gone so far as to leave their chosen profession. While the current circumstance is unprecedented, if offers one potential silver lining: an opportunity for many important conversations regarding caring for families. Those conversations are being brought forward, not by the typical group of employees, but by a more diverse one. Work and home have needed to change to accommodate caring for those who are ill, children, or elderly relatives who are now sheltering at home. I hope this ultimately results in a culture where the safe discussion of employee needs is the norm, rather than the exception, and we can understand each other better as individuals. We each bring our “whole self” to work every day, and that includes our diverse individual and family circumstances. I have been pleasantly surprised at the resourcefulness and resilience of my colleagues in using technology, such as Zoom and Webex.

Until now, many of us had never seen the inside of each other’s homes, met roommates or pets, or done virtual happy hours. We are indeed sharing a more personal side of ourselves, and that sharing has fostered relationships. For those who manage teams, the transition will require a shift in leadership style and the shouldering of additional responsibilities, as we will need to better understand the individual circumstances of team members. Moreover, it will require managers to be more organized and more purposefully consider how to adapt to the needs, strengths, and weaknesses of individuals on our teams. This means support in the form of adequate opportunities for training, as well as internal and external visibility. Making team culture more proactive is important if we are to rise to the challenges we currently face and a future where work may not solely be in the office.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Sarah H. “Sally” Caver Columbia Office Managing Partner

Education: Juris Doctor, University of South Carolina School of Law; Bachelor of Arts, political science and psychology, Clemson University Company Name: Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Industry: Law Company CEO: James K. “Jim” Lehman Company Headquarters Location: Columbia, South Carolina Number of Employees: 357 (in Columbia office) Words you live by: “We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.” –Albert Einstein Personal Philosophy: Live curiously and never stop learning. What book are you reading: For fun, A Breath of Snow and Ashes by Diana Gabaldon (Book 6 of the Outlander series); for my own education, How to be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi What was your first job: The first job I secured on my own was tutoring Clemson University athletes in calculus. Favorite charity: St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital Interests: Traveling (pre-COVID), hiking, working out, and good food and wine Family: Husband, John; sons, Jack (10) and Sam (8), and our dog Callie (12)

How COVID-19 Revealed My Leadership Style I have taken my share of professional personality tests over the years—Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, DISC Behavior Inventory, etc. While I find them interesting and sometimes useful tools, I have always been a little sheepish about sharing my results. More than a small part of me has felt as if being an “intuitive introvert” meant that I could not be—or could not be viewed as—an effective leader, especially in a profession and a workplace that is dominated by strong male voices. As I have learned through leading my office of 350+ through the COVID-19 crisis, however, both of those fears were misplaced. My personal set of leadership traits, including those I viewed as weaknesses—my nurturing personality, along with my desire to build consensus and inclusion, and seek advice from

others—has been valuable and valued during this difficult time. It is well documented that countries with female leaders— namely New Zealand, Germany, Iceland, Norway, Denmark, Taiwan, and Finland—have responded exceptionally well to the COVID-19 crisis. While some news sources have tried to downplay the commonality of female leadership among these countries, others have posited that traditional feminine leadership skills are a difference-maker in times of crisis. These female leaders’ responses to COVID-19 were guided by compassion, empathy, and humility, as well as a willingness to collaborate with and listen to scientific experts. Without consciously doing so at the time, these are the same traits that I employed in making decisions

relating to closing our office, staggering our staff, and taking other measures to protect my colleagues and our business during the crisis. Through the uncertainty and anxiety of the crisis, I was able to communicate to our office in a way that was informative and instructive, as well as reassuring and calming. Looking back at the last four months, I am surprised at how natural it felt to lead in this manner. As Henry Kissenger once said, “A diamond is a chunk of coal that did well under pressure.” While the pressure and the challenges of the COVID-19 crisis have not changed my leadership style, they have revealed it and have given me the confidence to lead unapologetically in my own way, knowing that compassion and empathy make me strong, not weak.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Patty Arvielo Cofounder and President

Company Name: New American Funding Industry: Mortgage Lending Company CEO: Rick Arvielo Company Headquarters Location: Tustin, California Number of Employees: 3,800+ Words you live by: If you see it, you can be it. Personal Philosophy: Always take responsibility for yourself. What book are you reading: Translation Nation: Defining a New American Identity in the Spanish-Speaking United States by Hector Tobar What was your first job: Clerical position at TransUnion Credit Favorite charity: Big Brothers Big Sisters of Orange County Interests: Traveling and spending time with my friends and family Family: My husband Rick; daughter, Tara; and my two sons, Trevor and Dominic

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What drives me professionally in the mortgage industry is the tremendous opportunity to increase homeownership in minority communities, which have long been underserved in our country. That drives me to create change and offer everyone the opportunity to buy a home, the American Dream, if they choose to.

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For Me, it’s All about Helping People I am a giving person by nature. I love nothing more than to give to others. What drives me professionally in the mortgage industry is the tremendous opportunity to increase homeownership in minority communities, which

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have long been underserved in our country. That drives me to create change and offer everyone the opportunity to buy a home, the American Dream, if they choose to. Beyond that, I love the human aspect of this industry. I love

people, and I value being able to lead people. It drives me to give back and mentor others, providing insight and guidance to both those who have just joined this wonderful industry and those who want to progress in their careers.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ÂŽ


Heather Nesle President, New York Life Foundation; Vice President, Corporate Responsibility, New York Life

Education: BA& MA, George Washington University Company Name: New York Life Industry: Insurance Company CEO: Ted Mathas Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Number of Employees: More than 8,000 Words you live by: Don't let perfect be the enemy of the good. Personal Philosophy: Act like your parents are watching. What book are you reading: On the Other Side of Freedom by DeRay McKesson & Midnight at the Bright Ideas Bookstore by Matthew Sullivan What was your first job: Hair washer in a salon Favorite charity: My job prevents me from saying! Interests: My family, reading, volunteering, dogs, meeting new people, and good conversation Family: Husband, Steve, son, Ben (8), and daughter, Paige (4)

COVID-19 Is Making Me a Better Leader I used to think in terms of “before 9/11” and “after 9/11.” But that has evolved. I can now add “pre-COVID” and “post-COVID” to the timeline of my life. While this time has been challenging for me, it has been earth-shattering for so many others. There may be reason to despair, but I prefer to look at the positive changes I see arising from the crises we are confronting. While I can only speak from my vantage point as it relates to COVID, and the social justice issues that have taken their rightful place in our public discourse, I do recognize that not everyone has the privilege that I possess as a white woman in a position of power. Truly acknowledging my privilege will be the most important thing influencing my leadership style going forward. This means that I need to reevaluate the processes and methods I and my team use to do our

work, and how I speak with and listen to my colleagues. It means taking on the responsibility of hearing from the people who don’t feel as if they have a voice and, in some cases, being their voice. It means working with others at my company to continue to move us forward to a place of greater equity and understanding. Working from home these last few months, we have lost the opportunity to celebrate together in person, to casually stop by someone’s desk to chat, and to work face to face. But in many ways, I’ve found this time to be more intimate—offering glimpses into the lives of my coworkers that I would not normally see. The ability to see a family member, a pet, where someone spends the “life” part of their “work/life balance” has been illuminating and humanizing. I feel more empathy than I have ever felt

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

before, and I believe this will lead to closer bonds that will follow us back into the office when the time comes. The current situation reminds me that my team has a myriad of responsibilities and priorities outside of work, and that constantly needs to be in my mind. I’ve always tried to see the larger picture, but this time has made it more vivid and proven that work gets done well when we treat people as people, not as roles on an organizational chart. I will be forever grateful to have worked at New York Life, a company that puts its people first and took quick and decisive action to protect and care for us during this uncertain time. And, I will move into our post-COVID world (that sounds nice!) committed to becoming a more open-minded, supportive, and bold leader for everyone.

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Shareen Luze Senior Director of Human Resources

Education: JD, Hamline University School of Law; Bachelor of Arts, University of Michigan Company Name: RBC Wealth Management–U.S. Industry: Financial Services Company CEO: Michael Armstrong Company Headquarters Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota Number of Employees: 6,000 Words you live by: I am my own harshest critic. I try to live by Brené Brown's quote, “Talk to yourself like you would to someone you love.” Personal Philosophy: Treat everyone with kindness, respect, and compassion, and fight fiercely for those I love. What book are you reading: How to be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi What was your first job: I like to call it “Landscape Beautification Specialist”—I mowed lawns. Favorite charity: Tubman—I am on the board of directors and am a passionate supporter and advocate. Interests: I love sports, especially baseball, football, and basketball. I also really enjoy documentaries. Family: My husband, Chad (my better and wilder half), and my little dudes, Levi and Luke

Remember, You Can Do This Throughout my career, I’ve learned that you never reach the point of knowing it all. Instead, it’s about getting comfortable saying, “I don’t know.” Of course, this is easier said than done. Which is why 10 years after joining RBC, when I was approached about a role as head of HR, my answer was a visceral “NO!” It’s not that I wasn’t interested in the job. I knew the incredible impact HR could have on employees’ lives, and that my upbringing and years in employment law would offer a unique lens. I didn’t think I was ready, qualified, or good enough. And then there was my family. With two small children, I came in early and left early. Would I need to compromise that schedule? Would I see less of my kids? After some soul searching and an honest reassessment of my skills, I realized that I wanted to go for it. I called my manager and told her I changed my mind. I was convinced

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not only that I could do this job, but that I might actually be able to make a difference. After what seemed like a neverending interview process, I got the job! A week later, I was diagnosed with breast cancer. I was sitting at my desk at work when I got the call. My immediate response was, “I can’t tell anyone at work. I don’t have time for this!” So I dusted myself off, wiped my tears, and headed to my next meeting. At that point I thought I’d have to back out. I couldn’t stand the thought of having to tell all the people counting on me that I couldn’t take the role. But then I thought about my mother. At age 27, she was diagnosed with a severe form of cardiomyopathy, a disease that severely limited her mobility. Despite her limitations, she always faced hardships with positivity and humor.

When I thought about what she went through and the grace she showed, I decided I could take on this new role AND beat breast cancer. But I was going to have to let go of the notion that I could do it all at the same time. I worked with my oncologist to safely push my surgery back far enough that I could transition out of my old role and lay some ground work for the new one. Then I had my surgery and spent six weeks at home healing. I didn’t work—not one bit. When I came back, everything was okay. I’m okay too, and so is my family. I still leave by 4 p.m. nearly every day to get my kids. On those days, I fight the urge to sneak out unseen and instead announce my departure. I want other women to see that I’m sticking to my core principles in my new role. Because when it comes to principles, NEVER compromise!

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Tracey Morant Adams Chief Community Development and Corporate Social Responsibility Officer

Education: BBA, University of Montevallo; MBA, Samford University, Certification in Qualitative Economics, Temple University; Doctoral Candidate, Alabama State University Company Name: Renasant Bank Industry: Banking and Finance Company CEO: C. Mitchell Waycaster Company Headquarters Location: Tupelo, Mississippi Number of Employees: 2,500 Your Location (if different from above): Birmingham, Alabama Words you live by: Courage and conviction. Standing up for what you believe in is not always easy, but recognizing when it is the right thing to do can lead to a better future for everyone involved. Personal Philosophy: “If I can help somebody as I pass along … then my living shall not be in vain.” –Harry Secombe What book are you reading: Currently, I am reading The Tale of Two Americas: Stories of Inequality in a Divided Nation by John Freeman. What was your first job: Management Associate–Bank Operations, Amsouth Bank Favorite charity: The Women's Fund of Greater Birmingham Interests: Walking trail excursions, southern cooking and hospitality, reading, and studying board governance and parliamentary procedure Family: Happily married to Jeff Adams, bonus mom to JJ Adams, and devoted daughter of Callie W. Morant

Overcoming Bias at the Nexus of Gender and Race As responsible leaders, we must recognize that there is no gender justice without racial justice. The structures of racism and sexism have persisted in America since its beginning, and therefore, the solutions to assure a diverse workplace for women of color, will involve synergizing the two. We must adopt a fundamental understanding that achieving gender equity will require dismantling structures of racial oppression. The unfortunate reality of gender and race inequality has adversely impacted the upward mobility of women of color in the workplace by stifling their performance and, ultimately, their professional success. In recent months, we have seen and felt the unrest in our communities, and across the country,

resulting from the issues of racial injustice and inequality. We recognize the impact of this unrest at an individual and collective level, and we understand how it disproportionately impacts women of color in career advancement. It is proven that racial and gender bias at work is hugely harmful to the professional, social, and emotional wellbeing of women of color, limiting their effectiveness and productivity. Therefore, companies must take intentional and deliberate action to overcome the negative impact resulting from racial inequity in the workplace. Women of color have unique talents and valuable characteristics to offer an organization. It is right to draw from the strengths of this remarkable culture of leaders to create a diverse and inclusive

environment; thus, building healthy and more influential organizations. These skilled professionals must be given an equal opportunity for advancement into senior and executive leadership positions. Again, this is great for the individual and great for the company. As we continue to evolve today's workplaces as centers of excellence by offering growth opportunities for women leaders of all cultures, backgrounds, and experiences, it is important that we speak boldly, with courage and conviction, regarding our belief in gender equity and racial equity in the workplace. Our voices must be authentic, and the results therefore, must be conclusive in demonstrating a sincere commitment to an inclusive workplace for all.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Rebecca Wilson Motion Graphics Designer for the Learning Solutions Department

Education: Bachelor of Arts, film, Arizona State University Company Name: Republic Services Industry: Recycling and waste solutions Company CEO: Don Slager Company Headquarters Location: Phoenix, Arizona Number of Employees: 37,000 Words you live by: (Platinum Rule) Treat others how they wish to be treated. Personal Philosophy: “For what it’s worth ... it’s never too late, or in my case too early, to be whoever you want to be. There’s no time limit. Start whenever you want. You can change or stay the same. There are no rules to this thing. We can make the best or the worst of it. I hope you make the best of it. I hope you see things that startle you. I hope you feel things you’ve never felt before. I hope you meet people who have a different point of view. I hope you live a life you’re proud of, and if you’re not, I hope you have the courage to start over again.” –F. Scott Fitzgerald What book are you reading: So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo & I'm Judging You: The Do-Better Manual by Luvvie Ajayi What was your first job: Food Server at the original Pappasito's Cantina in Houston, Texas Favorite charity: Black Trans Advocacy Coalition Interests: Fitness (spin and barre class), self development, brunches, happy hours, hiking, swimming, and Netflix marathons Family: My mother, Carolyn, and older brother, Nathaniel—I love you both very much

Be Kind to Yourself When I meet new people, the first thing that comes to mind is what they’d tell a younger version of themselves if they had the chance. It’s a question that demands vulnerability on the part of responders, and it’s a most rewarding one, because I catch the light in their eyes as they think back on precious moments and hard times, and what they learned from them. As they reply, I listen and take notes. Something that holds true for everyone I’ve come across is that there’s never just one thing or one lesson that changed it all. I have pages of notes I’ve taken, with quotes, affirmations, lessons, you name it, that I reflect on all the time. They help ground and remind me that we’re all yearning for the same things: to be loved and accepted as we are and to be happy, whatever that means for each of us.

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One of the best pieces of advice I’ve received has helped me understand that in order for others to love us as we are, we must first love and accept ourselves. I’m a perfectionist—I’m sure many of you can relate—and I’m very critical of myself. I pick at my appearance, performance, and relationships. Because I’ve gotten wrapped up in the weight I haven’t lost, the skills I have yet to learn, and the times I wasn’t so graceful, I’ve missed out on the milestones I surpassed to get where I am. It leaves me feeling as if I haven’t accomplished anything at all, when in reality, I’ve come a long way. When I went to a dear friend and expressed sadness about my weight, she told me she wished she had appreciated how she looked when she was younger because she now recognizes how beautiful she

was. This hit me, and I realized that it applies to much more than my appearance. She taught me a lesson in self-love that I’ll never forget: Love yourself and give yourself grace because one day you’ll remember yourself fondly and wish you were her again. There’s always something we can change or tweak, and in the moment, it may be the only thing we see, but in the grand picture of life, it won’t matter. Years later, when we look back at a picture of ourselves, we won’t remember such petty things—only the great memories we have and how we felt living them. We all want to be loved and accepted for who we are, and we all want to be happy, but happiness starts from within. Give yourself grace and be kind to yourself in the moment because ten years from now, you’ll look back and wish you were living it again.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Jamie A. Schafer Partner

Education: JD, George Washington University Law School; AB, University of Chicago Company Name: Richards Kibbe & Orbe LLP Industry: Law Company CEO: Jennifer Grady, Managing Partner Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Number of Employees: 90 Your Location (if different from above): Washington, DC Words you live by: Measure twice, cut once. Personal Philosophy: Do what you love and do your best every day, every task. The rest will sort itself out. What book are you reading: Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson What was your first job: Scheduling consultations for insulation, cabinets and windows at the Michigan State Fair and local malls Favorite charity: National Women's Law Center Interests: Camping, cycling, theater, travel, Cub Scouts, and pro bono legal work for the National Women's Law Center and Human Rights First Family: My husband is a lawyer with the federal government; we have three children, ages 3, 7, and 9, and a dog and two cats.

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The best lawyers are able to step back and see the forest for the trees, even when the trees seem to be on fire all around them. Those lawyers make better decisions for their clients and themselves.

The Best Advice I Ever Received The best career advice I ever received came from one of my mentors, when I was a brand-new associate at a law firm and also a brandnew mother. She called me into her office the morning after our first big client meeting together, thanked me for having been so prepared for the meeting—which I stayed up half the night preparing for—and then admonished me to remember that the practice of law is a marathon, not a sprint. It became clear as we grew closer throughout my career that she pegged me immediately as a prime candidate for burn out (and rightfully so). Her words that morning have helped guide me to not just survive but thrive both personally and professionally in the practice of

law. Her perspective and support throughout my career emboldened me to think strategically about the people I worked for and the matters I worked on, rather than just logging as many hours as I could on whatever work came through my door. I thought critically about the type of work I was passionate about and the kind of practice I envisioned building for myself in the next decade. Then, I proactively found opportunities and experiences that would help me build the skills and connections I would need to be where I wanted to be in the long term. I have repeated those words mentally to myself many times since that morning to keep the idea of sustainability and long-term career development front of mind. This can

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

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be exceedingly difficult in a highstakes, crisis-driven legal practice, such as mine. Sometimes it feels as if all one can do is run around putting out fire after fire. But that’s no way to practice law. The best lawyers are able to step back and see the forest for the trees, even when the trees seem to be on fire all around them. Those lawyers make better decisions for their clients and themselves. Because of her advice, I have approached my career as a longterm proposition at every step. That has helped me avoid many common pitfalls (not the least of which is burn out, of course) and also steered me toward building a legal practice about which I am truly passionate and excited.

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Teresa Fariss McClain Partner

Education: Juris Doctor, William Mitchell College of Law Company Name: Robins Kaplan, LLP Industry: Law Company CEO: Ron Schutz, Chair of the Executive Board Company Headquarters Location: Minneapolis, Minnesota Number of Employees: 250+ attorneys Words you live by: Choose to do work that you love and that is meaningful and you will never be concerned about work/life balance. Personal Philosophy: Work hard and be nice to people. And, always strive to under-promise and over-deliver. What book are you reading: Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates What was your first job: Picking wild strawberries, blueberries, and blackberries, and selling them in our neighborhood Favorite charity: Avenues for Homeless Youth, Minneapolis Interests: Travel, cooking, and cheering on my kids playing basketball and baseball Family: Husband, Gary Fariss; daughter, Meghan Gardner; and sons, Jack, Ben, and Will Fariss

Beast Mode for Gender Equity I’m a civil trial lawyer. I’m usually the only woman lawyer in the courtroom. Despite women graduating from law school in roughly equal numbers to men for nearly twenty years, research from 2013 revealed that women are lead counsel in only 13 percent of civil cases. Aspiring women trial lawyers are offered well-meaning advice to get more trial skills training or to “strive to maintain a calm demeanor” in the courtroom, to modulate their voices to be lower and louder, and to be aware of how their hair style, shoe selection, and wardrobe can affect their success. Aspiring women trial lawyers don’t need advice—they need sponsorship by a successful trial lawyer. It isn’t crucial that the sponsor be a woman, but research reveals that implicit bias causes male sponsors to sponsor men most often. For like-minded women trial lawyers who want to see greater gender diversity in the courtroom, we

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must step up. It is magical thinking to believe that the courtroom will become gender diverse based only on the fact that women are graduating from law school in equal numbers with men. We know that without a sponsor, the likelihood of a woman becoming lead trial counsel is remote. We understand that the life of a trial lawyer isn’t for everyone. We have been bruised and bloodied (sometimes literally) as we slug it out in the courtroom. We invest endless hours, energy, and heart in our clients and their cases, particularly at trial. Our relationships can suffer. But for those aspiring women who have the desire, ability, and the drive to do what it takes, they need opportunity and sponsorship to succeed. Beast mode refers to a state of performing something, especially difficult activities, with extreme power, skill, and determination. While the term gained popularity on the football

field, neither the term nor the mindset is confined to sports. Beast mode is regularly on display in courtrooms by skillful trial lawyers battling their way through trial. It is a mindset that is usually unstoppable. I challenge all women trial lawyers to channel their inner beast mode— their power, skill and determination—to sponsor an aspiring woman trial lawyer. Show her that success isn’t about remaining “calm,” or “modulating” her voice, and that personal authenticity wins over hairstyle and wardrobe. Invest in her success by offering meaningful representation opportunities. Ask her to argue the motions she briefed and examine the witness she has prepared. Without each of us taking tangible steps to make an investment in the success of an aspiring woman trial attorney, our collective hope for gender equity in the trial bar is nothing more than “thoughts and wishes.”

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Carrie O’Hara Systems Engineer

Education: MA, organizational learning and instructional technology, and BS, business education, University of New Mexico; U.S. Department of Energy Professional Protection Specialist Diploma, DOE National Training Center; Special Response Team, Firearms and Tactics Instructor, Armorer, and Defensive Tactics, DOE NTC; Assoc. Survival, Evasion, Resistance, Escape Specialist, Community College of the Air Force; SERE Instructor, USAF Company: Sandia National Laboratories Industry: U.S. Government, National Security Company CEO: Dr. James S. Peery Company Headquarters Location: Albuquerque, New Mexico Number of Employees: 12,000+ Words you live by: “And when you stand praying, if you hold anything against anyone, forgive them, so that your Father in heaven may forgive you your sins.” –Mark 11:25; “In war-time, truth is so precious that she should always be attended by a bodyguard of lies.” –Winston Churchill. Personal Philosophy: Life has a lot of challenges; take personal responsibility for my own actions; avoid victim mentality. What book are you reading: The Unseen Realm by Michael S. Heiser What was your first job: Western wear sales Favorite charity: Child, Youth, and Families Services of New Mexico Interests: Yeshua/Jesus, family, geopolitics and history, mountain biking, backpacking, and world travel Family: Widowed, one daughter, and extended family

“No” Is for Other People When I joined the U.S. Air Force, I was told that a 5’4”, 110 pound woman would surely not be admitted to the elite Survival, Evasion, Resistance, Escape (SERE) program, which teaches air crews and special forces the survival techniques needed to stay alive and return with honor when they are forced to evade capture behind enemy lines. “No?” I said. With hard physical and mental training, I was admitted and eventually became a SERE instructor. When I applied for a position at the U.S. Department of Energy National Training Center (DOE NTC), which trains teams that implement physical security at facilities that house sensitive or radioactive materials, I was told that they only hired men with extensive military and firearms experience. “No?” I said. I pursued the advanced training

required, got the job, and became the lead instructor and instructional systems designer for the DOE NTC. I am proud that the training I developed helped advance the security techniques and safety of hundreds of federal and state law enforcement organizations. The next position I sought, with Sandia National Laboratories, was the longest long shot of all—only one position, and it wasn’t even open at the time. “No?” I said. I met with the manager and made a list of job requirements. Then I trained and worked to check the items off that list, and I sent emails to that manager after each success. When the position opened, I was the first person called. I served as Sandia’s security systems and technology training project lead for the U.S. Navy Strategic Weapons Facilities Physi-

cal Security Engineering programs for both Atlantic and Pacific fleets, where I was honored to develop and lead training for U.S. Navy and Marine security forces. Today, I work at Sandia as a subject matter expert and course developer in multiple physical security disciplines, and lead the National Nuclear Security Administration’s Security Training and Risk Analysis functional team. I feel blessed to play a role in national and international nuclear security, and to help make the world a safer place. My advice to young women is this: never take “no” for an answer. Never let someone else hold you back. Put in the work and get the training you need to pursue your goals. Your success is a direct result of your efforts. It won’t be easy, but “no” is for other people, not for you.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Felicia M. Gilbert Managing Partner, San Francisco office

Education: JD, Columbia Law School; BA, MA, Stanford University Company: Sanford Heisler Sharp, LLP Industry: Law Company CEO: David Sanford (Chairman) Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Number of Employees: Approximately 100 Your Location (if different from above): San Francisco, California Words you live by: “Never be limited by other people’s limited imaginations.” –Dr. Mae Jemison Personal Philosophy: In the service of others, be mindful, courageous, and resilient. What book are you reading: Invisible: The Forgotten Story of the Black Woman Lawyer Who Took Down America's Most Powerful Mobster by Stephen L. Carter What was your first job: Office automation clerk for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Favorite charity: Legal Aid at Work Interests: Long bike rides with my partner, entertaining friends and family (pre-COVID19), trying new recipes, and walking my dog Family: My partner, Ja, and our Rottweiler, Jax

Dismantling the Discrimination Wall I am passionate about my work as a civil rights plaintiffs’ attorney because it enables me to assist and empower people who have experienced mistreatment by their employers on the basis of race, gender, or other protected statuses. The majority of clients my colleagues and I have been privileged to represent share a common story: After working assiduously to obtain the education, experience, and credentials necessary for their chosen career path, they hit a proverbial wall of disparate treatment and bias. The “wall” can include being denied the same resources, compensation, and career advancement opportunities that the employer provides to their (often, white and/or male) counterparts, or being subjected to sexual harassment or sexual assault. It is a jarring and disorienting experience to, for example, face repeated and unwarranted scrutiny from

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supervisors despite one’s exemplary job performance and output, or to be disciplined for exhibiting the same type of proactive and assertive behavior that is encouraged among one’s white male counterparts. From what I have observed and experienced, it is virtually impossible to overcome this type of discrimination merely through assimilating behaviors and hard work, without sacrificing one’s professional stature, reputation, and dignity. Because so many of the clients my colleagues and I represent have become accustomed to “toughing it out” to grow and progress in their careers, it is not uncommon for them to endure months, or years, of illegal disparate treatment before seeking legal counsel. The injuries that clients face in such circumstances are exacerbated when their efforts to address discriminatory conduct by reporting it to management and Hu-

man Resources results in retaliation and further unwarranted criticism. As a black and Latina woman among the American Bar Association’s reported five percent African American and five percent Hispanic lawyers in the United States—where these statistics have remained static over the past decade—my practice and business acumen are informed in part by my own past experiences with disparate treatment and bias in educational and corporate settings. It has been the most rewarding work of my career to advocate on behalf and in support of clients, as they face the emotional (and sometimes, physical) toll of discrimination and unchecked bias in the workplace. Their courage, determination, and resilience inspire me to approach impediments with optimism and creativity, when working to achieve outcomes that enable them to get their lives and careers back on track.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Deborah Yeh Chief Marketing Officer

Education: BA, Harvard University Company: Sephora Americas Industry: Retail/Beauty Company CEO: Jean Andre Rougeot Company Headquarters Location: San Francisco, California Number of Employees: 10,000+ What book are you reading: Finishing the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling with my daughter What was your first job: Day camp counselor Favorite charity: Worldreader Interests: Dreaming about a time when international travel is possible again Family: Currently "sheltering in place" with a husband, two kids, and two newly adopted cats

The Power of More than One One of the things I’m passionate about is finding the diversity in diversity. I’ve been lucky to work in industries where there’s a strong representation of female-identifying executives. I’ve enjoyed mentorship. I’ve appreciated the creativity, collegiality, and customer-centricity that emerge when we’re tackling business challenges together. But over the past few years, I’ve noticed another benefit: I’ve been able to see that there’s not one way to be a female executive of color. I’ve witnessed multitasking single moms take meetings on the way to daycare. I’ve seen C-level moms model the importance of time off. I’ve been inspired by women who’ve made giving back to their communities their lives’ work. If I hadn’t seen more than one female executive in my career, how could I appreciate the diversity behind these paths?

We’re aware of the dangers of tokenism, and yet, how many of us have been in an awkward meeting when the conversation turns to us, and we’re asked to answer for millions of people:

Rather than obligingly attempting a response, perhaps we should pause. If we had just one other perspective, our replies would be 100 percent better! Recently, I’ve been meeting with other chief marketing officers with Asian backgrounds, finding shared community in this group, but also enjoying our differences. East Asians, Southeast Asians, South Asians, and Pacific Islanders have different immigration paths, different histories of acceptance or rejection in this country, different myths

around our strengths as a people, and different prejudices to overcome. How can we tackle these challenges without an appreciation for our diverse stories? I am fortunate to be in a professional community of women. The beauty industry is a place where I’m in rooms with powerful women every day. But there is always space for more. More acceptance of nonbinary identities. More age diversity. More intersectional diversity in general. And true equity for all. We have to keep pushing. I appreciate all those who have fought so hard for people like me to have a seat at the table. I am beyond inspired by those who’ve had to star in the role of The First/ The Only fill-in-the-blank. I thank you for your courage and leadership. Now, how do we repeat the process? We’ll all be stronger if there’s more than one of “us” in the room.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER

www.womenworthwatching.com

• What do women think? • What do Asians think? • What do “minorities” think?

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Renata Hesse Partner, Co-head of S&C’s Antitrust Group

Education: JD, UC Berkeley School of Law; BA, Wellesley College Company: Sullivan & Cromwell LLP Industry: Law Company CEO: Joseph Shenker Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Number of Employees: 875 lawyers Your Location (if different from above): Washington, DC Words you live by: No news is ... no news. Personal Philosophy: The most important thing that you can do is be genuine in your interaction with people, whether personal or professional. What book are you reading: Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage by Alice Munro What was your first job: Associate at Brobeck, Phleger & Harrison Favorite charity: The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Interests: Spending time with my kids, reading for pleasure when I can, music, and wine Family: Husband, Josh; son (13) and daughter (12)

Gender Bias and Women Attorneys So much has changed about women in corporate roles since I first began practicing as a young lawyer in California in the 1990s. But, while increasing numbers of women graduate from law schools, this fact has not moved the needle very much as regards the number of women leaders in law firms. I ask myself, what keeps women from moving into leadership positions, and most important, what can we do about it? This is a multi-pronged and complex issue, and I wouldn’t dare try to address it all in a short essay. But one of the most urgent issues I see is the expectations we place on women to change to fit the mold of male-dominated workplaces and industries. In my experience, these expectations have often undermined the confidence of our younger peers and affected their ability to be effective advocates for themselves in the workplace.

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Women often are made to feel that they should try to be someone they aren’t. Conventional wisdom tells young women to be more aggressive, more like a man, or to lean into traditional femininity and be attentive but silent. But anyone who puts her whole being into negating who she is cannot fully manifest her talents and abilities. A woman who is comfortable being herself is naturally more confident, more earnest and, frankly, more effective. But we can’t expect younger women to instantly know themselves and understand their place in an organization without example and direction. There is an unfortunate drought of women sponsors and mentors in the workplace. And even in the face of willing guidance, I find that women in junior roles are sometimes afraid to talk about challenges and difficulties they encounter for fear that they will be viewed as weak

or complaining. It’s a cycle that must be broken. So what can we do? We can make the workplace open to all types of women. What some may view as weak might actually be subtly persuasive or better at building consensus. So I challenge all of us to rethink our preconceptions. I urge more experienced women to get to know a younger colleague, not because she is a carbon copy of our expectations of how a woman should be, but because she is different and that difference adds value. Mentorship is the gift that keeps on giving. You will be surprised by how something as simple as a listening ear can have a deep effect on the work life of a young woman. And you’ll be doubly surprised to see how when you open yourself up—without preconceptions—to your younger colleagues, you start to see the bigger picture, and things start to change.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Rachael L. Rodman Partner

Education: JD, BA, University of Cincinnati Company: Ulmer & Berne LLP Industry: Law Company CEO: Scott Kadish, Managing Partner Company Headquarters Location: Cleveland, Ohio Number of Employees: 310 Your Location (if different from above): Columbus, Ohio Words you live by: Do the best you can each day and then, let it go. Personal Philosophy: Stand up for what is right, even if you stand alone. What book are you reading: Know My Name: A Memoir by Chanel Miller What was your first job: Babysitting Favorite charity: YWCA Interests: Art, books, movies, and fountain pens Family: Husband (45) is an architect; and 3 kids: Jack and Anna (twins, 12); and Ellie (6)

Embrace Failure We need to talk more about our failures, our hardships, our bumps in the road. The biggest gift we can give to those who come after us is the example of what we’ve overcome and how we’ve overcome it. In our society, and particularly in the legal profession, we are reluctant to talk about failures. We try to maintain an illusion of perfection, and we fail our mentees and employees by not showing them that everyone hits rough spots. As a result, too many young lawyers— particularly women—conclude that they cannot be successful in this profession long term. I started my first post-law school job (a judicial clerkship) a week before 9/11. As a senior associate, I had my first children—twins—expecting to come back after maternity leave and make partner in my

firm. That was in 2008. Instead, I came back to a merger that left me an unknown associate in a satellite office of a satellite office, and to a economic recession. I did not make partner for four more years. The year I made partner, I had a third child and transitioned to a different practice area that left me feeling like a brand-new lawyer again. It was easy to be frustrated during those times, but with hindsight, I can see how each laid the foundation for exciting new opportunities. Experiencing 9/11 with my new colleagues forged lifelong bonds. Being forced to hustle at a new firm during a recession gave me great networking experience and, ultimately, rounded out my skills as a trial lawyer. Moving into a new practice area as a partner forced me to grow my skill set and

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

experience beyond anything I had ever anticipated when I started practicing law. Having three children required me to let go of perfectionism and remember to embrace fun and chaos. Any one of those years, in a vacuum, did not look like my best year, but together, they are the years I credit with providing the most growth in my career. It is critical that we share these experiences. The young lawyers with whom I share my story may not encounter the same challenges, but they will encounter challenges. By sharing my story, I give them the knowledge that they are not the first to hit a bump, that there are experiences you can learn from—even in your worst year, and that sometimes the worst days bring the greatest successes.

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Chandra Holt Executive Vice President and Chief Merchandising & Integration Officer, Walmart.com Education: Bachelor of Arts, advertising, public relations & communications, University of Minnesota–Twin Cities; MBA, business strategy and marketing, University of Minnesota, Carlson School of Management; HBX, Harvard Business School Company Name: Walmart Inc. Industry: Retail Company CEO: Doug McMillon Company Headquarters Location: Bentonville, Arkansas Number of Employees: 2.3 million (worldwide) Words you live by: Always try to make an impact and leave something better than you found it. Personal Philosophy: Define success on your own terms. What book are you reading: On the Brink: Inside the Race to Stop the Collapse of the Global Financial System by Henry M. Paulson, Jr. What was your first job: Receptionist at a hair salon (in high school) Favorite charity: Boys and Girls Clubs of America Interests: Running, CrossFit & being a golf caddie for my daughter Sophia Family: I have a husband, Matt, and a nine-year-old daughter, Sophia.

Overcome Gender Bias and Become the Leader You Want to Be The simple fact is that women and men are perceived differently from the day they walk in the door for that very first interview to the day they retire. And that difference in perception is rooted in the gender bias we, as women, work every day to overcome. We’re told good leaders are assertive, decisive, and bold. When men display these qualities, they’re great leaders. When women display these same qualities, they risk being perceived as “too rough.” Often, for women to progress and be socially accepted in their careers, they’re told they need to be nicer, more pleasant, softer—not too abrasive or in your face. That double standard is why we see so few female CEOs of Fortune 500 companies. However,

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great female leaders are where they are because they’ve figured out how to overcome that barrier. I’ve learned the most effective way to do this is set bold goals and deliver. Drive results that no one can dispute. Let your achievements speak for themselves. I’ve also learned to strike the right balance and adapt my style to what my team needs and what the situation requires. Good leaders, regardless of gender, lead with balance and empathy to make an even greater impact on their teams, companies, and communities. But in this kind of environment, it’s incredibly important that there’s universal allyship in the workplace, and that we, as women, lead from the front by supporting other

women. All of us are facing the same challenges every day, and we need to show up for each other along the way. For me, personally, this means finding ways to support our Women’s Associate Resource Groups and participating in a mentor circle for young women. As female leaders, we need to be a resource others can go to when they need us—just by having a conversation about gender bias, we’re taking a step toward overcoming it. We need to be role models, and show smart, sharp, young women that it is possible to overcome something as pervasive as gender bias in the workplace. Because, after all, seeing is believing. If they see enough of us do it, I hope they’ll believe they can do it too.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Kerry Kotouc Senior Vice President and General Counsel, Walmart U.S.

Education: JD, University of Missouri at Kansas City; Bachelor of Arts, English, The Ohio State University Company Name: Walmart Inc. Industry: Retail Company CEO: Doug McMillon Company Headquarters Location: Bentonville, Arkansas Number of Employees: More than 2.2 million (worldwide) Words you live by: Be kind and be positive; leave people better than you find them. Personal Philosophy: Use your voice, lead change, never be complacent, and never stop learning. What book are you reading: The Other Wes Moore by Wes Moore What was your first job: I had a thriving babysitting business as a teenager, but my first job as an adult was as a county prosecutor. Favorite charity: Children’s Advocacy Center of Northwest Arkansas Interests: Raising two teenage boys, gardening, outdoor activities (hiking, water skiing, and fishing), and volunteering on my children’s school board Family: Mother of two teenage boys

Investing in Today and Tomorrow I would not be where I am today without the support of the network of people who have invested in me. From mentors and teachers to bosses and friends, people have taken chances on me and made investments in my future; and that influence reinforced in me a passion for developing and promoting opportunities for others. I believe in empowering people and ensuring everyone gets an equal opportunity—whether it’s through my involvement in the education system or with associates on my team. Shortly after joining Walmart Legal in 2004, I was sent on a twoyear recruiting journey in an effort to bring top diverse talent to our legal department—namely women and people of color. At the time, our team didn’t reflect our customer base, and that needed to change. Over

an 18-month period, we worked with diversity organizations and national minority bar associations to hire about 50 attorneys, diverse in ethnicity, geography, and backgrounds. We transformed the makeup of an entire team, and that experience had a profound, lasting impact on our business and on my approach to recruitment and development. Leaders have a responsibility to be intentional about diverse and inclusive hiring practices, and identify the unconscious biases that could influence decisions. But it is more than just being intentional about hiring diverse talent. You also have to be deliberate about developing and promoting your talented associates after they are hired. I seek out people who bring something to the

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

table that I don’t already have and assemble teams that will challenge me and illuminate my blind spots. Leaders should hire great people and empower them to find the best solutions—an empowered team with diversity of thought, background, and experience is a business imperative for problem solving in today’s fast-paced retail environment. Workplace diversity, inclusion, and development are talked about time and again because they are critical to successful societies and businesses. By recruiting, retaining, and developing diverse teams, we help unleash each associate’s full potential and drive business results. When we commit to diversity, inclusion, and development, we are not only investing in today but also in the future.

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Erika Hickman Assistant Vice President & Assistant General Counsel

Education: JD, University of Miami School of Law Company: Wellstar Health System, Inc. Industry: Healthcare Company CEO: Candice Saunders Company Headquarters Location: Marietta, Georgia Number of Employees: Approximately 24,000 Words you live by: This too shall pass, so cherish the good times and know that the hard times are not permanent. What book are you reading: A Fearless Heart: How the Courage to Be Compassionate Can Transform Our Lives by Thupten Jinpa, PhD What was your first job: Retail associate in a children’s clothing boutique Favorite charity: The Drake House Interests: Design/art, entertaining, gardening, craft coffee

Keep Learning, Stay Flexible, and Do the Work Growing up, I was surrounded by strong, passionate women who impressed upon me the importance of believing in myself first, and that anything you really want in life requires hard work and determination. There were no defined gender roles in our house—we were taught that everyone was equally capable and expected to do the work at hand. My father supported and reinforced these ideas with me and my sisters. He also believed you should always aim to give more than 100 percent. He recognized it would not be possible to do so every day, for you or for others, but the goal was to give more than 100 percent effort to the task at hand. If you did, then when others could not give their all, the work would not suffer because the team would get the job done. My mother believed in life-long learning and that your education is never finished. To stay engaged, you must always be willing to learn new things and seek opportunities to do so.

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These valuable lessons helped shape my approach to work and my career. I entered the job market when the economy was still reeling from an economic downturn, and there have been additional downturns since then. During these times, I learned the importance of being flexible and giving more than 100 percent, regardless of the work environment. I strive to be fully present in whatever I am doing to ensure I enjoy the good moments and grow during the hard times. I also continuously search for opportunities to learn new things. My commitment to my role in helping others solve legal and business problems remains the same regardless of external factors— and my ability to be flexible in hard moments has created unanticipated opportunities in my career and personal life. Current events in our country are hard, but they provide us with an opportunity to learn and grow in new

ways if we are willing to stay committed, do the work, and be flexible in how we get there. At Wellstar, one of our core values is to honor every voice. All women bring unique gifts to the workplace. Their voices deserve to be heard because we need their input to effectuate positive change and work through these challenging times. The current pandemic is forcing workplaces to change and adapt in ways they may not have thought possible. This creates tremendous opportunity to do things differently, and we need women to use their voices to bring creative solutions forward for everyone's benefit. If you find yourself on what looks like a different path now due to external factors beyond your control, this may be an opportunity for you to try something new or work in a different way. In the meantime, keep learning, be flexible, and do the work. You will be rewarded for your efforts; it just may look different than you expected.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Chalyse Robinson Partner

Education: JD, Columbia Law School; BA, University of Utah Company: WilmerHale Industry: Law Company CEO: Susan Murley & Robert Novick Company Headquarters Location: Boston, Massachusetts; Washington, DC Number of Employees: 1,914 Your Location (if different from above): Denver, Colorado; New York, New York Words you live by: Life is short, live it. Love is rare, grab it. Anger is bad, dump it. Fear is awful, face it. Memories are sweet, cherish them. Personal Philosophy: Always stretch and challenge yourself. What book are you reading: Sister Citizen by Melissa Harris-Perry What was your first job: Housekeeper at a hotel at Snowbird Ski Resort in Utah Favorite charity: Legal Aid Foundation Interests: Anything outdoors, hiking, skiing, and spending time in the mountains Family: My wonderful and supportive husband, Christian, and two beautiful children, Sebastian (age 8) and Alexianne (age 6)

I Thrive on Challenge I live by my personal philosophy of taking risks and challenging myself. One example of this is after my first year of law school, I decided to challenge myself by spending my summer in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, interning at a women’s rights NGO. During this summer internship, I was in a serious car accident. After arriving back in the U.S., doctors told me I would not be able to go back to law school in the fall. I refused to accept that prognosis, and was able to find a way to go back and graduate on time and at the top of my class. With each challenge I faced, my self-confidence grew. I have taken these lessons into my professional practice and have welcomed what may have seemed to be daunting challenges. I had previously been a partner in the Denver office of Hogan Lovells, one of the largest law firms in the city, and built their Denver banking practice group from

scratch, beginning while I was still an associate of the firm. As a mid-level associate, I recognized that there was a need for a robust and sophisticated banking practice in the Denver market. I saw this as an opportunity and decided I would build this practice. I succeeded and built a talented team with an extremely sophisticated practice. With that challenge behind me, and the Hogan Lovells banking team running smoothly, I knew I was ready for a new challenge. When WilmerHale presented me with the unique opportunity to establish a new practice, I was eager to accept the challenge. To date, that experience has been incredibly successful. The practice has attracted innovative and influential Colorado and national clients. It has also established a culture that values respect, diversity, equity, inclusion, independence, professionalism, and camaraderie.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

I was the most senior woman in my practice from the time I was a fairly junior-level attorney. Partly because I always wished I had more women role models in my own career, I have prioritized being a role model to other female attorneys—helping them find paths that allow them to balance professional success with personal priorities. I have mentored countless women, and I remind them that there are many ways to succeed. Despite my work demands, which prior to the pandemic included an active travel schedule, I am an engaged and active parent to two young children. During the pandemic, I have managed the challenge of parenting, homeschooling, and working. I am dedicated to making this profession a much more inclusive and supportive work environment than it was when I began my career.

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Carolina Bravo-Karimi Partner

Education: JD, University of San Diego, School of Law; MSc, London School of Economics and Political Science; BA, Harvard University Company: Wilson Turner Kosmo Industry: Law Company CEO: Claudette Wilson Company Headquarters Location: San Diego, California Number of Employees: 71 Words you live by: “When they go low, we go high.” –Michelle Obama Personal Philosophy: I strive to always be unapologetically authentic. What book are you reading: Biased by Jennifer Eberhardt, PhD What was your first job: Preschool teacher in Trieste, Italy Favorite charity: Turner Dream Foundation Interests: Flamenco, traveling, and hosting dinner parties Family: Husband, Andrea Petri; 10-year-old daughter, Ana Sofia; and 5-year-old son, Santiago

The Power of Devoted Mentorship A lot of people have gone further than they thought they could because someone else thought they could. –Zig Ziglar Thanks to my multicultural upbringing, I have always had a front seat to the true power of diversity. It therefore makes complete sense that my greatest passion as a lawyer is to authentically and permanently diversify our profession. I sincerely believe the soundest legal decisions are made, and most innovative legal strategies executed, when a variety of voices and perspectives impact the decision-making process. It’s my belief that the best way to accomplish this much needed diversification is through what I call “devoted mentorship.” Devoted mentorship is committed mentorship for life—to being a sounding board and a friend, a sponsor and a cheerleader. At so many pivotal moments in my professional career, I have

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leaned on, and learned from, my mentors. However, quite candidly, not until recently did any of my attorney mentors look like me or have backgrounds similar to mine. Now I know half-Chilean, half-Persian attorneys are hard to come by. By no means does a mentor need to look like you or have your same background to be helpful, but there is something truly magical about the bond I have made with my female mentors of color. There is so much unspoken understanding and shared experience that has helped shape me as an attorney. I strive every day to create similar magical bonds with my diverse mentees—creating safe spaces for open dialogue, opportunities to share concerns, and to simply listen. Truly listen. Whether it is talking to a first-generation lesbian, gender non-confirming Latina law

student about her father proudly taking her shopping for a business suit and tie when she started working at our firm, or talking to an African-American single father about how to balance a legal career with raising a kindergarten-age son, I do my best to connect and encourage, knowing our conversations are never just about the law. So often—nearly always—they are about so much more. The beauty of devoted mentorship is that it flows in two directions. Devoted mentorship also builds devoted mentors. I learn from my mentees just as much as I hope they learn from me. It is my hope that the law students and attorneys I have mentored over the years will dedicate themselves to supporting and advising other diverse students and attorneys. Only then will our profession start to look like the communities we serve.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Christy Horn Executive Vice President, Bank Operations

Education: BA, accounting; CPA Company: Wintrust Financial Corporation Industry: Financial Services Company CEO: Ed Wehmer Company Headquarters Location: Rosemont, Illinois Number of Employees: ~5,500 Words you live by: Random acts of kindness provide more for the soul than those that come with grand accolades. Personal Philosophy: Feedback is a gift—embrace it. What book are you reading: Deliberate Discomfort by Jason B.A. Van Camp, with Andy Symonds What was your first job: Babysitting Favorite charity: St. James School and Parish; CARA Interests: Volleyball (coaching and playing); watching my daughters’ sporting events Family: Husband, Don, and daughters, Alexis (13) and Lia (9)

You Can Do Amazing Things It is an incredible honor to be selected as a Woman Worth Watching in Leadership. Looking back on my career, I have been blessed to work with amazing leaders who significantly influenced my personal and professional growth and development. The list is long, and I am grateful for their investment and belief in me, even when I was not so sure I was on the right path. Learning opportunities present themselves every day. For me, it is about getting good at the basics, as they are the foundation of continued growth and development. Here are a few tips I have learned along the way: • Mentors: Be one and have many. Mentors are critically important to your development, as they provide honest and constructive feedback. We all need them; and at times, mentors may have more confidence in you than you have in yourself. I have had the opportunity to mentor individuals, and what fills my bucket is a mentee sharing

his or her success story, sometimes even years later. Mentors are personally invested in you; lean in and make the most of the opportunity. • “It’s not the critic that counts...the credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena...who at the best knows high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly.” This is an excerpt from a speech by Theodore Roosevelt, and it is on a little piece of paper in my office. The leader who shared this quote asked me to stretch and leave what I was convinced was the career milestone I was striving to achieve. Not only was he right, but more important, I learned there was a new path I enjoyed even more. When opportunity knocks, take the leap. It is better to have tried and failed than not to have tried at all.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

• “Find the right church and sit in any pew…you can always change pews later.” This advice came much later in my career and at an inflection point for me. I have shared this many times while interviewing candidates and during networking opportunities. It is quite simple really: Find an organization that aligns with your vision and values, regardless of the role. You will be much happier when you do. • Feedback is a gift. I provide feedback all the time, some might say too much, because I want employees to be their best selves. When you find someone who gives feedback, embrace it, as you will miss it when it is no longer given. Each interaction, conversation, and coffee with a colleague is a time for us to engage, listen, and learn. When you are open to the challenge, you will find you can do amazing things.

www.womenworthwatching.com

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Michele Golden Chief Human Resources Officer

Education: MBA, human resources, accounting, Vanderbilt University; BS, communications, The University of Texas at Austin Company: Xandr Industry: Advertising Company CEO: Jason Kilar Company Headquarters Location: New York, New York Number of Employees: 1,900 Words you live by: Perseverance, positivity, and patience Personal Philosophy: I always seek to follow the Golden Rule: “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.” (Matt. 7:12) What book are you reading: Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson What was your first job: My first job after business school was working for Ford Motor Co in Human Resources; my first job after college was working as a flight attendant for American Airlines; my first job ever was a ride operator on the Texas Cyclone at Astro World in Houston when I was 16. Favorite charity: Girls Who Code Interests: Baseball, yoga, and hiking/biking Family: I have been married for 24 years. My husband and I have three amazing children: Mitchell, 22 and is a graduate student at Georgia Southern; MacKenzie, 21 and a rising senior at Georgia Tech; and Summer, 20 and a junior at Texas Christian University.

Putting People First and Driving Positive Change It is incredibly rewarding to work for an organization that holds the same values as you do and puts people first. One of the reasons I entered the human resources profession was to make an impact on people, and Xandr places a great deal of importance on using its place in the industry to drive positive change. The impact of the coronavirus has been harder on certain communities, so this is an important time to come together and contribute however you can. Recently, Xandr donated $200,000 across several wonderful organizations, such as Save the Children, and our Employee Resource Groups have been hard at work supporting vulnerable communities and those affected most by the coro-

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navirus. Our Tech for Good team has also been providing public health and safety PSAs. Our mission is to make advertising better, so I’m proud to be a part of a company culture that can inspire positive change. We have also been working on an ongoing effort to embed antiracist and inclusive practices and policies into our systems and everyday lives. Our approach to diversity and inclusion is to create equal opportunities for everyone, both within Xandr and in the communities and industries where we operate. To do this, we call on all employees from the executive level to entry level to participate, and the dedication and hard work of our Employee Resource Groups at Xandr truly shows. These groups play a critical role in helping foster a diverse

and inclusive culture by creating spaces for people of all backgrounds to feel a sense of belonging, advocating for change, providing skills development, and supporting our communities. We will continue to work on new programs and policies designed to take care of our Black employees, leverage leadership, engage partners and allies to create meaningful change, and ensure sustained corporate engagement. This word “sustained” is critical because we must sustain the conversation, momentum, and action. We cannot become complacent. This is the key to driving long-term change, both within the company and outside our walls, when it comes to diversity and inclusion initiatives.

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


2020

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2020 BLACK LEADERS Worth Watching Awards TM

NOMINATION DEADLINE: September 22, 2020

For more than two decades Profiles in Diversity Journal has showcased and honored individuals who have blazed new trails, led the way, mentored others, advanced diversity and inclusion in the workplace and the community, and excelled in their chosen fields. In the upcoming fall issue of the magazine, PDJ will recognize Black Leaders with our first ever Black Leaders Worth Watching Awards.

Profiles in Diversity Journal is proud to honor these individuals who contribute to the success of your organization. We invite you to join us in this endeavor by nominating a member of your team who, through their advocacy, perseverance, legacy, or professional achievements, has addressed racism and bias to become a Black Leader Worth Watching. Your nomination of a Black Leader Worth Watching, or multiple Black Leaders Worth Watching, affords you an important opportunity to recognize and showcase the talents, ambition, and achievements of these exceptional people, while also voicing your support of a truly diverse and inclusive workplace.

Who Are these Outstanding Individuals? Black Leaders Worth Watching are confident, determined, high-performing, purpose-driven professionals who create value for their coworkers, customers, community, and of course the organizations where they contribute their talents. Throughout its history, Profiles in Diversity Journal has recognized thousands of men and women from around the world who are making a difference. The profiles that will appear in this important edition will recognize and celebrate our inaugural group of Black Leaders Worth Watching awardees, and enhance the reputations of the organizations that encourage, empower, and support these trailblazing individuals.

NOMINATION DEADLINE: September 22, 2020 Visit www.diversityjournal.com today to nominate!

www.womenworthwatching.com WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ÂŽ

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The D&I Journey in Italy: How Far Have We Come? By Claudio Guffanti www.unlimitedviews.it/en

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ack when I began to study Diversity and Inclusion topics, I noticed a trend with Italian companies unaware of the intrinsic commercial value that D&I provides. Likewise, I was unable to find training courses in Italy that I considered worthwhile. Therefore, instead, I turned to the US and UK markets for case studies to research, with the latter presenting itself as a European leader and beacon of what was being studied and put into practice abroad. From this, I founded Unlimited Views. Created with the objective of helping companies effectively approach an array of viewpoints and develop a more successful decision-making process, I support companies’ D&I efforts as a trainer, consultant, and coach. In recent years, I have observed a growing commitment from Southern European companies concerning D&I initiatives. However, more often than not, these changes occur in the local offices of Anglo-American organizations rather than “home grown” Italian companies. In any case, the first steps usually consist of smaller D&I projects, entrusted to members of the HR team, regardless of their roles (training and development, employer branding, selection, etc.). Following this, if the company pushes on, seeing the great advantages of such

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Diversity, Equity and Inclusion expert Claudio Guffanti. Founder of Unlimited Views - Diversity Management and Coaching in Milan, Italy.

initiatives, a diversity manager is hired. Subsequently, the D&I team begins to grow, albeit remaining within the HR division. This progression can be seen in several Italian companies today. From my point of view, keeping the D&I team confined within the HR department has two distinct disadvantages. First, there is a risk that attention to its work is limited without a structure in place for direct reporting to the CEO. Second, if D&I remains part of HR, a bias may develop in which D&I initiatives are perceived as devoted to HR activities rather than applied across all departments

and activities of the company. Of course, it is essential to attract a wide array of talents and build a selection process that hires without prejudice, and so Human Resources should be strongly connected with D&I initiatives in order to function effectively. However, this should not detract from the point that other activities within an organization are equally connected. For example, Marketing has a responsibility to develop inclusive products and services to broaden its consumer base, and Procurement and Supply Chain teams may benefit from working with a wide and diverse

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spectrum of suppliers, from corporate partners to individual freelancers. Moreover, the organization as a whole must be actively involved in both fighting stereotypes and cultivating a leadership mentality that maximizes inclusivity. For this reason, I believe that forming an independent D&I department is a winning strategy for organizations. This should include resources and investment on par with Marketing, Sales, and HR, and work alongside all departments, at every rung of the corporate ladder. To date, I have only come across two Italian companies that have

upside that is stimulated through increased creativity, innovation, and talent acquisition. Also, US companies understand that the ethical and social effects of D&I initiatives are positive by-products, with priority and focus remaining on doing business and targeting financial growth. On the contrary, in Italy, there is a sense that few companies truly appreciate the commercial value brought to the table through investment in D&I. Many organizations continue to consider only the social aspect and not the benefits to their core business. For this reason, there is a struggle to distinguish Corporate Social

dent that a period of uncertainty, and distorted perspectives, has greatly disadvantaged women. Taking care of home and family has reversed what was previously achieved, impacting career ambition significantly. Where is Italy today on its D&I journey? Personally, I believe that there is still a long way to go. Compared to the United States, Italy has indeed encountered ethnic diversity much more recently. But, in the near future, second-generation immigrants, with heritages outside the EU, will be empowered educationally and find themselves competing for management positions against

"Some companies pride themselves on being extremely inclusive. However, a quick delve deeper and it's often the case that what is called “inclusion” is in fact “non-discriminatory” practice, without even knowing the difference between the two definitions." a chief diversity officer who reports directly to its CEO: Barilla (FMCG industry) and Gucci (fashion industry). Though I do see progress by certain companies in Italy, many organizations still remain at Step 1—working toward smaller on-off projects. Meanwhile, in the United States, Diversity initiatives are shown to be a useful competitive lever for businesses in the medium-term, backed up with numerous studies by global consulting companies such as McKinsey, Deloitte, and Boston Consulting Group. In this way, the American economy is continuously working on its strategy and action toward key issues, sensing the financial

Responsibility from D&I. Investments in D&I are scarcer and tend to focus on smaller projects rather than long-term strategies. Then there is another issue: self-referencing. Some companies pride themselves on being extremely inclusive. However, a quick delve deeper and it's often the case that what is called “inclusion” is in fact “non-discriminatory” practice, without even knowing the difference between the two definitions. The COVID-19 emergency made it apparent that some progress in the last decades, considered significant, was actually rather sterile. For instance, consider gender equality. It is evi-

Caucasian men with inherited privileges. Furthermore, society itself is growing in terms of its inclusiveness toward macro-diversities such as the LGBT+ world and the disabled, exerting pressure on corporate organizations to follow suit. In addition, with increasing life expectancy and retirement ages, the workforce is more diverse in terms of age. There are already many examples of colleagues with a forty-year age gap sharing the same work environment. Ultimately, it is becoming increasingly important to speed up D&I action, so that we are prepared for a new world that will soon find us even more diverse, working together. PDJ

www.womenworthwatching.com WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

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D&I journey in Italia: qual è lo status? A cura di Claudio Guffanti www.unlimitedviews.it/

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nni fa, quando ho iniziato a studiare i temi di Diversità e Inclusione, la mia percezione era che in Italia fosse poco chiaro alle aziende quale grande opportunità di business si celasse dietro questo tema. Allo stesso modo, dopo aver cercato invano dei percorsi di formazione in Italia che ritenessi all’altezza, mi sono concentrato sullo studio da autodidatta del mercato americano e del mercato UK, faro e apripista europeo di ciò che veniva studiato e sperimentato oltre oceano. E’ in questo contesto di scarsa consapevolezza che ho creato il brand Unlimited Views, con cui aiuto le aziende a considerare una pluralità di punti di vista alternativi per sviluppare un processo decisionale più corretto e vincente. Supporto le aziende in D&I come formatore, come consulente e come coach. Negli ultimi anni la situazione è parzialmente cambiata: sebbene il Sud Europa resti su alcuni fronti il fanalino di coda del mondo occidentale, a partire dal 2018 ho visto un impegno crescente da parte di alcune aziende. Spesso si tratta di chapter locali di organizzazioni anglo-americane, più raramente si tratta di aziende italiane. Il primo passo di solito consiste nell’avviare piccoli progetti D&I affidandoli a membri del team HR, qualunque sia il loro ruolo (formazione e sviluppo, employer

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Claudio Guffanti, esperto di Diversità e Inclusione. Fondatore di Unlimited Views - Diversity Management and Coaching a Milano, Italia.

branding, selezione…). Dopodichè, se l’azienda crede nei reali vantaggi di questi progetti, si istituisce una figura di Diversity Manager e successivamente un team più consistente di D&I che tuttavia resta confinato all’interno della funzione HR. Diverse aziende italiane oggi vedono uno scenario di questo tipo. Dal mio punto di vista lasciare il team D&I all’interno della funzione HR ha due svantaggi: da un lato si rischia un focus minore, non costituendo una funzione D&I con diretto riporto al CEO; dall’altro la funzione HR stessa non appare nei confronti del team D&I - come

un cliente paritetico a tutte le altre funzioni aziendali. E’ certamente vero che la necessità di attrarre talenti diversi e di costruire processi di selezione privi di pregiudizi rende le Risorse Umane una funzione significativamente coinvolta nei progetti D&I. Ma allo stesso tempo altre funzioni sono altrettanto intensamente coinvolte: il Marketing ha la responsabilità di sviluppare prodotti e servizi inclusivi per allargare la consumer base; Procurement e Supply Chain devono dotarsi di una pluralità di fornitori diversi, dalla società corporate al singolo freelance… Non solo: tutta

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l’organizzazione deve essere coinvolta sia nel processo di lotta agli stereotipi sia nel coltivare uno stile di leadership il più possibile inclusivo. Per questo credo sia vincente creare una funzione D&I a se stante, con risorse e investimenti esattamente come per le funzioni Marketing, Sales o HR, che abbia come clienti interni in modo paritetico tutte le altre funzioni aziendali ad ogni livello. Ad oggi, per quanto mi risulta, solo due aziende italiane hanno un Chief Diversity Officer a riporto diretto del CEO: Barilla (settore FMCG) e Gucci (settore moda). Se da un lato assisto a progressi importanti da parte di

che D&I hanno un ruolo eticosociale solo come side effect: le aziende devono per prima cosa fare business. Al contrario in Italia ho spesso la sensazione che poche aziende abbiano compreso il reale valore in termini di business che un investimento in D&I porta con sè. Molte organizzazioni ne vedono ancora solo l’aspetto sociale ma non i vantaggi di business; per questo faticano a distinguere la Corporate Social Responsibility dalla D&I e gli investimenti per l’inclusione sono spot e orientati a piccoli progetti piuttosto che ad una strategia a lungo termine. Esiste poi un altro nemico:

casa e famiglia a discapito di qualsiasi ambizione lavorativa, facendoci assistere a qualla che definirei una regressione rispetto a quanto raggiunto in precedenza. In conclusione, dove è arrivata l’Italia oggi nel suo D&I journey? Personalmente credo che ci sia ancora parecchia strada da fare. Rispetto agli Stati Uniti, l’Italia ha vissuto più recentemente la diversità etnica, ma molto presto le seconde generazioni di extracomunitari avranno un livello di scolarizzazione tale da trovarsi a lottare per posizioni di management contro uomini bianchi e i loro privilegi all’anagrafe. Inoltre, la società stessa sta crescendo in

"Alcune aziende si vantano di essere estremamente inclusive. Tuttavia, basta un rapido approfondimento per accorgersi che spesso ciò che viene chiamato «inclusione» sia in realtà solamente un approccio «non discriminatorio», senza nemmeno conoscere la differenza tra le due definizioni." alcune aziende, dall’altro invece molte organizzazioni in Italia sono ancora ferme a piccoli progetti on-off. Nel mercato US nessuno si chiede più se la Diversity sia una reale leva di business nel medio termine: le numerose ricerche da parte di realtà globali della consulenza (Mc Kinsey, Deloitte, Boston Consulting Group… solo per citarne alcune) hanno messo tutti a tacere e l’economia americana lavora in modo strategico e continuativo su questi temi in funzione del reale vantaggio finanziario che ne consegue (frutto di maggiore creatività e innovazione ma anche di una maggiore capacità nell’attrarre talenti). Allo stesso modo in US è noto a tutti

l’autoreferenzialità. Alcune aziende vivono con la fierezza di credersi estremamente inclusive, ma basta davvero poco per accorgersi che in molti casi chiamano “inclusione” ciò che in realtà è “non discriminazione”, senza neppure conoscerne la differenza di significato. L’emergenza Covid-19 - infine - ha reso evidente come alcuni progressi degli ultimi decenni, ritenuti significativi, siano stati in realtà dei passi avanti piuttosto sterili. E’ evidente come, ad esempio nella parità di genere, un periodo di incertezza e di prospettive non chiare abbia sfavorito il genere femminile relegandolo ad occuparsi ancora di più di

termini di inclusività verso alcune macro-diversità (come il mondo LGBT+ o le persone con disabilità), esercitando pressione anche sulle organizzazioni aziendali affinchè si muovano di pari passo. Infine, con il prolungamento dell’aspettativa di vita e dell’età pensionabile, già oggi condividono lo stesso ambiente lavorativo persone che hanno fino a quaranta anni di differenza. Diventa quindi estremamente necessario velocizzare questo percorso, per non farsi trovare impreparati ad un mondo del lavoro che ci metterà - quanto prima e ancora più diversi - a lavorare insieme. PDJ

www.womenworthwatching.com WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

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VIEWPOINTS OVER THE YEARS

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WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


VIEWPOINT 2005 Nov/Dec p.14-15

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his is a most important edition of Profiles in Diversity Journal: it celebrates the accomplishments of 77 senior women leaders, and it is the gateway for understanding PDJ’s ongoing focus on promoting women in senior leadership. So many women leaders featured at one time—77—the most ever celebrated in the magazine’s history! As you examine their stories, you will find these leaders come from all sizes of companies, all disciplines, and many industries. Obviously we are making progress, real progress, in gender diversity at senior levels. But we still have a long way to go in gender parity in leadership; if you doubt that, just consider how impressed you would be if we featured 77 men as leaders—not very, I would suggest. The point being that, while we celebrate these leaders and our progress, we are just beginning to make real traction toward gender parity. Why is parity important? A number of business cases can be cited or developed, but for me there are three overarching reasons: • the unique and growing heterogeneity of the American population; • the pervasiveness of globalization; and • competition in the 21st century based upon intellectual property as opposed to brick and mortar. The emerging demographics of America are virtually unique in the world as to diversity and complexity. Much of America’s future

Steven L. Miller Retired Chairman and CEO, Shell Oil

preeminence and success as a culture will depend on our ability to take advantage of the possibilities this diversity offers for the common good. A good first step on this journey is success with gender diversity. Globalization is here for the duration and cannot be sidestepped. Success for businesses, non-profits, and nations will depend on operating well in an all-inclusive worldwide marketplace for goods, services, and ideas. Learning from our domestic diversity opportunities can provide us a “leg up” in the world of globalization. And finally, in the intense competition of intellectual ideas and leadership which will be the business reality for the coming decades, how can we not bring to bear all our nation’s human resources? As we work to leave no child behind, we must endeavor as well to leave no citizen behind. Success in gender diversity would be a major step to ensuring a competitive America in the years ahead. Now, how do we get to gender parity? As we reflect on these leaders’ stories, we notice the common theme of mentoring in their narratives. Leaders do not just happen. They are nurtured. They are challenged in constructive environments. In a word, they are mentored—elevated and molded by farsighted leaders who care about the future of the enterprise long after they themselves will have left the stage. It is a primary responsibility of the current “generation” of leaders of an organization to make the right succession happen, and happen well. Our 77 women leaders in this issue

have had the benefit of mentoring by preceding leaders who took the time, interest, and risk to help develop these women’s careers, their futures. We honor more women today than in previous years because more senior leaders have become engaged in gender diversity development this last decade. Today we are getting traction like never before in moving toward gender parity, because increasing numbers of today’s senior male leaders are engaged in making diversified leadership a reality. Now that band of enlightened standard-bearers will be joined by these honored women leaders who accept the commitment to extend the mentoring and diversity development that got them where they are today. The pace of progress toward diversity parity will depend on successful leaders who remember their journey, who helped them get there, and why. So today let us celebrate these 77 senior women leaders. Let us read and learn from their experiences. Let us resolve to turn our learnings to action and thereby speed the progress. And if we do this, and are successful at gender diversity, we will be better able to tackle the more difficult diversity challenges of ethnicity, GLBT, and those with special needs and skills. You see, gender diversity is just the beginning of the journey! PDJ

www.womenworthwatching.com WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

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2006 Nov/Dec p.21

Ilene H. Lang

Former President of Catalyst

VIEWPOINT

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ecently, I asked the CEO of a Fortune 500 company what he thought was the most important factor enabling the United States to stay ahead in this increasingly competitive, global business environment. I expected a long and complicated response. Instead, he answered in just one word: Women. For this CEO, the answer is that simple. He’s right. In today’s competitive marketplace, women represent a vital talent pool—one that smart companies know they cannot ignore. Women in senior leadership positions bring a diversity of thought, perspective and expertise. They even bring enhanced financial performance, as Catalyst’s recent study of Fortune 500 companies revealed. The study found that companies with the greatest representation of women in senior management financially outperformed those with the least, with a 35 percent greater return on equity and a 34 percent better total return to shareholders.

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Indeed, the answer is women! But most importantly, more women in senior leadership positions bring…more women in senior leadership posi-tions! It is for this reason in particular that I’m delighted to celebrate Profiles in Diversity Journal’s 5th annual Women Worth Watching issue. The women in these pages are truly worth watching. Their stories are inspira-tional, their achievements extraordinary. As that CEO would attest, these women lead us into the 21st-century global marketplace. These women show us the way. They demonstrate what can be achieved when companies look to gender diversity not as a nice thing to have, but as a strategic business imperative. I am honored to introduce these Women Worth Watching, but I do look forward to the day when these women’s accomplishments are no less extraordi-nary, but far more commonplace. I fear that day is too far off. While the number of

Fortune 500 CEOs has inched higher this year, we’re still building on a small base. This year, Catalyst released its 10th-anniversary Census of Women Corporate Officers and Top Earners in the Fortune 500. While the census revealed some progress in the percentage of women in top business leadership ranks, the rate of growth over the last decade has averaged 0.82 percentage points per year. At that rate, it could take 40 years for women to achieve parity with men in these top positions. The women profiled in these pages aren’t willing to wait. And neither should we. Let’s celebrate these women—their outstanding accomplishments and their proven expertise. Let’s thank them for all they’ve achieved individually and all they make possible collectively. As leaders, as success stories, as mentors to future generations of women in the work-place, these individuals are, indeed, women to watch! PDJ

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Women Worth Watching

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WILL CONTINUE TO GROW www.womenworthwatching.com WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

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2007 Sept/Oct p.18-19

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t’s worth noting that nearly 100 years ago, women were marching in the streets of New York City for voting rights and better pay. So, in a year when one woman is Speaker of the House of Representatives and another is the front runner for the Democratic party’s candidacy for president of the United States, it’s clear that progress has been made. However, it’s also clear that women still have a way to go. We are still celebrating too many “firsts” and “seconds”—and within the top leadership ranks of corporations, we’re still building on a small base. That’s why I appreciate having this opportunity to celebrate the accomplish-ments shared in Profiles in Diversity Journal’s 6th annual Women Worth Watching® issue and to add some word of encouragement to women who are breaking down barriers, taking companies to higher levels of per-formance and inspiring the next generation of leaders. Authenticity: Bringing Your Whole Self to Work Who you are is as important as your formal education and your professional skills. If that sounds simplistic, consider how long women were given career advice instructing them to emulate men. At PepsiCo, we strive to create a work environment that encourages every associ-ate to bring his or her whole self to the workplace. Not just because it’s the right thing to do.

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Indra K. Nooyi

Chairman & CEO, PepsiCo

But also because diversity of thought unleashes creativity and the power of innovation. Having teams of people with different backgrounds and different experiences gives us marketplace insights that enable us to better serve our consumers, retail customers and commu-nities. In fact, many of our new flavors and products had their origins in these discussions. And, several years ago, we noticed that our attrition rate among women of color was the highest of any employee group. Through research, we found they felt less connected, less satisfied and less committed than any other group. And their numbers were small. A major reason was that a lack of “authentic relationships” existed between women of color and their managers. They wanted to be understood and valued for who they were, to be true to themselves and to use the best of their skills and experience. Through the efforts of a cross-geographical, cross-divisional program, guided by a steering committee and executive sponsors, we launched a Women of Color Multicultural Alliance to focus on attracting, retaining and developing this crucial group. As a result, at the senior man-ager, director and VP levels, women of color have increased from 4 percent to just under 7 percent in four years. We also imple-mented a coaching program that has halved our turnover rate among the women of color who participated. We applied these insights and

some of the same coaching programs to all women at PepsiCo, through our Women’s Initiative Network (WIN). We also added a few new channels of connection—networking pods, frequent interaction with leadership and social networking. The WOC numbers and the early WIN results clearly show the importance of authenticity and its link to performance, talent sustain-ability and much more. Amplifying Performance with Purpose Performance must be complemented by purpose. All of us come to work each day looking for meaning. We want to con-struct a life as well as make a living; we want to make a difference, as well as earn a paycheck. While that’s true of most individuals, I think it’s especially true of women. Without a larger purpose to give our lives meaning, we can never reach our fullest potential or achieve deep satisfaction. Recognizing this, we’re raising awareness and understanding about “Performance with Purpose.” We’re challenging our employees to find creative solutions that leave to our children a healthier planet than the one we inhabit now and provide foods and beverages that taste great and are healthier.

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VIEWPOINT Using Focus and Flexibility to Balance the Short and Long Term Another significant trend I see is the need to be focused and flexible. To balance pri-orities and schedules is key. Setting expectations for yourself, and others of you, is absolutely crucial. And it’s important to be accountable: to yourself, your family and your professional goals. This year, our WIN has launched a work-life harmony program to focus on career effectiveness, tradeoffs, managing transitions, timing and career cultivation. Part education, part common sense and part mentoring, the program helps associates understand what our own natural tendencies and needs are, while using them strategically to make the most of our careers—and to identify and to be clear about work style options and career choices. Being in a Position to Contribute to the Bottom Line It’s clear that women are becoming ever more important to our operations, to our return on equity and to our total return to shareholders. Women increasingly are in positions affecting profit and loss: contributing to a company’s bottom line pays professional dividends. It’s certainly true at PepsiCo where, since 2001, the number of women in our sales, general manager and operations roles has increased an average of 6 percent. Second, women executives make up 54 percent of associates in

marketing, a function which generates about half our senior leaders. Third, women have increased among the highest paid executives at PepsiCo in North America—growing 31 percent from 2001 to 2005. Sponsoring Those who are Different: Harnessing a Variety of Perspectives Regardless of gender or background, at PepsiCo our top leaders sponsor our employee networks, and they sponsor a group that is dissimilar from them. We’ve found this relationship—of a senior leader who drives crucial business decisions and the ability to gain funding and raise awareness of priorities—can empower the network, making things possible that never seemed so before. We hold all leaders and managers accountable for supporting our company-wide diversity and inclusion initiative, whether through training, representation and sponsorship, support and mentoring, or participation in events. Then we measure their impact and progress and recognize success. In our last major organizational survey, we saw a dramatic improvement in the inclusiveness of the environment for all executives—39 percent since 2003. And with these changes, overall satisfaction with PepsiCo has increased among women of color (12 percent) and white women (4.3 percent) since 2004. Making Diversity a Global Priority with Women as a Unifying Focus Much of what I have talked about

here is North American in focus, but as a global company, our diversity and inclusion effort crosses almost 200 countries and touches approximately 168,000 associates. The cause of women serves as a global unifying focus for us—our only common D&I target across vast areas that have no affirmative action laws and which forbid many of the practices we regard as standard in the U.S. We set targets to ensure global representation of women in our management ranks. And we’ve had some dramatic results. The number of women in management in our international busi-nesses has grown from 13 percent in 2003 to 19 percent at the end of 2006. Serving Market Diversity with Employee Diversity Global companies like PepsiCo need a lot more great people to drive growth. To be successful, we must understand and serve the world’s many markets. We must be able to tap into a wide, deep and diverse talent pool and then retain the people we hire. I congratulate and celebrate the women recognized in this issue. They have recognized that diversity is a business strategy and that certain key trends can propel them to success. I want to thank them for their commitment to growing their careers and at the same time helping others move ahead. I challenge them to make the most of their continued focus on purpose and to change the workplace for the women who come after them. PDJ

www.womenworthwatching.com WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

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2008 Sept/Oct p.34-35

Bill George

Professor of Management Practice at Harvard Business School

All you have to do is to open the doors and let them walk through.

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his is my response to questions I get about what it will take for women to reach the highest ranks of American business. No special favors. No unique programs. Just open the doors. In my classes at Harvard Business School, which are fifty percent female (well above the school average of 38 percent), the overall performance of females and males is equivalent. The interactions between the genders are completely natural, as the females bring a great sense of passion, openness, and insight to the classroom. The women are clear that they don’t want any special privileges, nor do they expect to have to jump over higher hurdles. A level playing field is all they seek. The good news is that we don’t have to wait for these future female stars to reach the top. As this issue of Profiles in Diversity Journal illustrates so well, there are a large number of talented women on the verge of reaching the highest ranks of American business. After supporting women in business for the past forty years in their strug-gles to gain acceptance and advance in male-dominated envi-

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ronments, I find it very gratifying to see so many extraordinary female leaders having a very positive impact on the leadership of American companies. Some people think the “glass ceiling” is still intact. They believe that women don’t have a chance to reach the top, because they are viewed by males as either too aggressive or too meek. Not anymore. These days, the invisible ceiling has been shattered into thousands of little pieces. To be fair to the skeptics, they may not know such extraordinary females as Meg Whitman, Marilyn Nelson, Anne Mulcahy, Andrea Jung, Indra Nooyi, Irene Rosenfeld, Paula Rosput Reynolds, or Brenda Barnes—and many others like them. These superstars of the business world have not only risen to the top of major corporations but are setting new standards for exceptional performance. In succeeding so spectacularly, they are paving the way for this next group of 108 rising stars, as selected by Profiles in Diversity Journal. Let me be clear about the rise of talented women: gender equity is not just an issue of fairness. Much more important are the better leadership and

” superior performance that result from having more women in senior executive roles. In a decade where failed leaders have become all too common, how could any rational person exclude half of the eligible population from taking on important leadership roles? Only an organization prepared to enter into long-term decline would do so. In the future, the highest performing organizations will be those who attract the most talented leaders, female and male. American business needs all the talented leaders we can develop to be competitive in the global world. These 108 females have plenty of talent, certainly equal to their male counterparts. They are bringing a deep sense of passion, compassion, and empathy to the workplace, as well as exceptional abilities to empower people throughout their organization—precisely the qualities needed for organizations to succeed in the 21st century. Note that I am not suggesting that this approach to leadership is the unique province of females. The most successful male leaders these days exhibit similar leadership styles. Rather, I am asserting that the rise of female

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


VIEWPOINT

I am asserting that the rise of female leaders is enhancing the leadership of organizations for both males and females, and improving their long-term performance.

leaders is enhancing the leadership of organizations for both males and females, and improving their long-term performance. Let’s look at a few examples of star female leaders who have already reached the top of America’s greatest corporations: Anne Mulcahy, Chair & CEO, Xerox. This spring Mulcahy was named “CEO of the Year” by CEO Magazine, a recognition that was timely and well-earned. Mulcahy took over the reins at Xerox in 2000, when the corporation was facing a liquidity crisis and possible bankruptcy. With $18 billion in debt, a rapidly declining stock price, and a major investigation by the SEC, Xerox was on the verge of collapse. Instead of going to Wall Street, Mulcahy focused her energies on regaining customer confidence and building the morale of her organization. It wasn’t the classic “quick fix,” but her approach re-stored Xerox to its leading role in the copier field. Meg Whitman, former Chair & CEO, eBay. Credit Whitman with building one of the greatest electronic suc-cess stories of this century. Taking over as CEO in 1998 when eBay had only thirty employees, she built the

world’s leading online trading market, with 84 million users and an inspired organization as well. These days eBay has revenues of $8 billion and represents the sole distribution network for more than 1.5 million small business owners. Andrea Jung, Chair & CEO, Avon Products. Jung runs the largest organization in the world: six million people who represent Avon Products. Becoming CEO in 1999, Jung immediately changed Avon’s vision to “the empowerment of women.” Following five years of spectacular growth, Avon’s revenues flattened out, and its stock price dropped 40 percent. Jung reinvented her leadership, trimming back Avon’s multi-layered organization and investing the savings in future growth. Since acquiring China’s first-ever direct selling license in 2006, Jung has ramped up to 600,000 sales people there. Her passion is in helping women from modest economic means achieve self-sufficiency. Marilyn Carlson Nelson, Chair, Carlson Companies. Nelson recently stepped aside as Carlson’s CEO after a spectacular decade of growth. Taking over an

organization rigidified by her father’s “command-and- control” style, she built an empowered organization around the world by demonstrating personally inspiring leadership wherever she went. Her efforts at organizational transformation have paid handsomely for Carlson in terms of growth and customer satisfaction. These are just a few of the leading examples of female CEOs who are starring on the main stage these days. Others include Pepsico’s Indra Nooyi, who took over the reins last year from Steve Reinemund, himself a passionate advocate of diversity; Irene Rosenfeld, who is growing a powerful business at Kraft; Brenda Barnes, who is transforming Sara Lee; and Paula Rosput Reynolds, who is building Safeco. The 108 Women Worth Watching who are featured throughout this issue are not far behind these female stars. Soon they too will be taking over the top positions in American business. The United States will be that much more competitive in the global economy for having opened the doors of its executives to such extraordinary leaders. We need them—now! PDJ

www.womenworthwatching.com WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

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2009 Sept/Oct p.24

Ilene H. Lang

Former President of Catalyst

VIEWPOINT Women in Leadership: Why Not?

A

s Catalyst’s President and CEO, I’m often asked why we at Catalyst think it’s so important to advocate for women’s advancement. I answer that question with a question of my own: Why not? It’s the right thing and the smart thing to do. Catalyst studies demonstrate a direct correlation between women in senior leadership and better financial performance. But asking, “Why not?” isn’t just about financial outcomes. Women in leadership are proof of organizational meritocracy, where differences are valued and celebrated. These are organizations that are open to new ideas, foster innovation, and embrace more perspectives in decision-making. Perhaps most important, these are organizations where the decision-makers inside reflect the decision-makers outside in the marketplace. We know that women make or influence 80 percent of buying decisions. Reflecting them in senior management and on corporate boards shows a respect for customers, and that’s just good business.

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These days, I find myself frequently asking why more companies aren’t stoking the pipeline of future leaders with the best and brightest women. Our recently released report on high-potential women and men during the economic downturn shows that women in senior leadership were—shockingly—three times more likely to have involuntarily lost their jobs because of company downsizing or closure than their male peers. How short-sighted! We’re seeing an inevitable increase in the diversity of our population, our markets, and our workforce. Women, and women of color in particular, represent the fastest growing segment of the educated workforce in the United States and around the world. As individuals, as leaders, and as companies, we have a great opportunity—to leverage the extraordinary value of diversity for our companies and for society as a whole. I’m delighted to introduce you to the women honored here in Profiles in Diversity Journal’s 8th Annual WomenWorthWatching® issue.

These women represent the best of what is possible for organizations that embrace gender diversity–not as a “nice to have” but as a strategic business imperative. They also, unfortunately, represent a vastly untapped resource. According to the 2008 Catalyst Census of Women Board Directors of the Fortune 500 and the 2008 Catalyst Census of Corporate Officers and Top Earners of the Fortune 500, women held just 15.2 percent of board director positions and just 15.7 percent of corporate officer positions—stagnant compared to the previous year. Women’s advancement belongs in every smart company’s playbook. A 21st-century economy demands leadership that reflects a 21st-century workforce and 21st-century marketplace diversity. These high-achieving WomenWorthWatching® are role models and mentors to future generations of women and men in the workplace. So as you read about and celebrate their remarkable achievements and inspirational stories, please. PDJ

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


VIEWPOINT 2010 Sept/Oct p.11

Edie Fraser

Senior Consultant, Diversified Search, Odgers Berndtson

Celebrating Success Stories of Achievement

C

ONGRATULATIONS to Profiles in Diversity Journal in its WomenWorthWatching® (WWW) annual editions – nine years of WomenWorthWatching® and 11 years when Profiles introduced its leading women in the Glass Ceiling issue. (I am proud to have been on the side of Jim Rector when his vision was to do WomenWorthWatching®). It is special to go back and read the breath of who were selected and what they wrote, what they read and what they think. Celebrate these women of 2010; read and reread the messages. Good news is reflected in their selection by the companies. Good news is demonstrated by their success stories of achievement. Good news is part of their mentoring and support of others along the way. As we celebrate another WWW issue, let’s reflect on certain progress over a decade though many would say that there are still “miles to go before we sleep.” We are cracking the glass ceiling and putting a sledge

hammer through the concrete. To the women executives profiled, we all are proud. These are the “good news” women in leadership being celebrated, role models recognized by their organizations and their colleagues. Women are supporting women, and men are supporting women to insure that we have women worth watching and women business leaders, as mentors and in professional advancement. Organizations are endorsing women of color. Talent officers and executives alike are advocating women advancement. Success is best represented in these stories. I find it intriguing to also read more than 70 of the advertisements in this issue. They tell stories of promoting women, of the women worth watching and of business pride in these women’s advancement. Women are closed to 14% executive officer positions. Approximately 52% of management professional and similar positions are held by women. Read these profiles again

and realize that these women are worth watching for movement to the executive suite. We applaud their success and their support of other women along the way. We review the studies about the strong correlation between shareholder return and a higher proportion of women executives. We know these women profiled each year are exemplary of the financial success they help bring to their companies and organizations. It is with a sense of reflection after reading these annual issues of Women Worth Watching®, that they bring us inspiration and a sense of accomplishment that makes us all proud. With WomenWorthWatching®, think success and good news and circulate this particular issue to many of your colleagues and friends. To the companies who nominated these women as role models in the pipeline of success, you make it easier to recruit women into your organizations. You make us all proud. PDJ

www.womenworthwatching.com WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

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VIEWPOINT 2011 Sept/Oct

Ilene H. Lang

Former President of Catalyst

p.12

If Not

Now, When?

A

s s Catalyst’s president and CEO, it’s my job to expand opportunities for women and business. Catalyst works on behalf of women, but we do not work for women alone; what we do also benefits men, families, businesses, and communities. We strengthen organizations by empowering people of every gender, race, ethnicity, and sexual orientation to achieve their full potential and demonstrate the value of inclusion. And we understand how vital women’s progress is to the global economy. When corporate leaders explain that women will surely advance if we just give it time, I ask the famous question: “If not now, when?” Because Catalyst’s latest statistics on women in business reveal that change hasn’t just been slow to come – it’s been practically nonexistent. According to our research, women held just 0.9 percent more board seats in 2010 than they did in 2007 (15.7% vs. 14.8%) and just 0.9 percent more executive officer positions in 2010 than in 2009 (14.4% vs. 13.5%).

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We cannot take even min-iscule increases for granted; in several instances, women’s representation has remained the same or declined. Change this slow is in no one’s interest. In order to counter this discouraging data, Profiles in Diversity Journal continues to identify and promote companies that create opportunities for women leaders. Catalyst research shows that, on average, companies with more women in senior executive positions tend to financially outperform those with fewer. What can smart companies do to ensure that talented women advance? Our research shows that traditional mentoring, including career advice and guidance, is not as effective as sponsorship. Sponsorship occurs when high-level executives advocate for specific high-performing women, often behind closed doors. According to Sponsoring Women to Success, the latest in Catalyst’s groundbreaking series of reports on women and sponsorship, effective sponsorship is crucial to accelerating a woman’s career, from getting her

trusted by senior-level executives to being considered for her company’s top jobs. Organizations must create an environ-ment where sponsorship thrives, educating senior executives about its importance to the leadership pipeline and to their own effectiveness as developers of talent. I commend Profiles in Diversity Journal for its ten years of advocacy on behalf of women leaders, and I’m thrilled to introduce you to the inspiring women featured in PDJ’s 10th Annual Women Worth Watching issue. Over the last decade, PDJ has featured nearly 1,000 women leaders in its influential pages. These women are leading the way to a brighter future – one in which every company recognizes the value of inclusion and every talented person is given equal opportunity to advance. As our global workforce expands and diversifies, smart business leaders have an unparalleled opportunity to tap into a fast-growing pool of talent: women like those featured here. I wholeheartedly encourage them to seize it. PDJ

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


www.womenworthwatching.com www.womenworthwatching.com WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

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VIEWPOINT 2012 Sept/Oct

Ilene H. Lang

Former President of Catalyst

p.12

Why Education is Integral for

Women’s Success

A

S PRESIDENT AND CEO OF CATALYST, AN ORGANIZATION WITH A MISSION OF EXPANDING OPPORTUNITIES FOR WOMEN AND BUSINESS, I AM HONORED TO CONTRIBUTE AN INTRODUCTION TO PDJ’S WOMENWORTHWATCHING ISSUE—ESPECIALLY BECAUSE THIS YEAR’S THEME IS EDUCATION. Education is fundamental to women’s advancement into leadership; after all, in their thirst for talent, employers know that they cannot afford to overlook women whose stellar academic credentials suit them for leadership positions in today’s complex global marketplace. As I review the list of nearly 200 highly successful women featured in this issue, I am deeply impressed by the array of professions in which they excel, including law, nonprofit, finance, academia, industry, and tech-nology. These talented women give us much to celebrate. I’d also like to commend Profiles in Diversity Journal for its crucial work in highlighting women’s advance-ment over the past fourteen years. With each WomenWorth-

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Watching issue, the list of women and companies deserving of celebration grows, showcasing how far professional women have come. However, we must not lose sight of how much progress we have yet to make. For example, despite the fact that women in the United States and most developed countries are now outpacing men in earning bachelor’s degrees, master’s degrees, and doctorates, Catalyst research shows that as of 2011, only 14.1 percent of Executive Officers at Fortune 500 companies were women. And the gender gap is particularly notable in STEM fields: in the sciences, women represent only 21.6 percent of all managers. Why do these gaps persist, regardless of women’s educational achievements? Sadly, the answer still boils down to gender bias: many of us continue to picture men when we hear “scientist,” “programmer,” “doctor,” or “CEO,” and unfortunately this has a real—albeit often unconscious—influence on decisions about recruitment, hiring, and promotion, particularly for senior roles. One of the best ways to counter

these biases—and to develop accomplished women graduates into accomplished leaders across all fields—is to showcase impressive women like those featured in this issue. Catalyst research continues to demonstrate how critical sponsors and role models are to advancement, and women establishing their careers today will benefit tremendously from these examples of women who have the achievements to inspire them, the experience to “show them the ropes” and the influence to guide them to plum assignments and promotions. While education may not be the last step in advancing women to leadership, it remains an integral first step. These “women worth watching” have clearly benefited from both educational opportunities and career opportunities, with the help of mentors and sponsors who have rewarded their talents and diligence with support and encouragement. Now let’s bring those advantages to a new generation of women leaders, and finally close the gender gap—for the benefit of women, men, families, communities, businesses, and the global economy. PDJ

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


VIEWPOINT 2017 Summer p.10

Deborah Gillis Former CEO and President of Catalyst

Advancing Women in Business... ...around the world

O

ne of the most rewarding parts of my job as president and CEO of Catalyst is meeting hundreds of inspiring women each year. Advancing women in business has been our mission for more than 50 years. And I can proudly say that I’ve never seen more women worth watching than I do at this moment. So I’m certainly not surprised that the Profiles in Diversity Journal’s 16th annual Women Worth Watching list is an exceptional one. All of these women are inspiring leaders who are overcoming barriers, forging new ground and carving a path to success. This is no easy feat, because Catalyst research reveals there simply isn’t enough diversity and inclusion at work and this is holding women back. Women often face gender-based stereotyping and are unfairly evaluated by their likeability or appearance. Another barrier is an embedded culture

of exclusion that means women face death by a thousand cuts—scores of daily micro-aggressions sending the message that they simply don’t belong. And women of color continue to deal with some of the workplace’s most entrenched hurdles. If women hit a glass ceiling, women of color hit a concrete one. Despite all these barriers, the women featured in this issue are excelling. We are so proud of our colleague Dnika J. Travis, Ph.D., for making this year’s list. Dnika is a pioneering thinker and contributes so much to our organization’s thought leadership. In 2016, she led Catalyst’s groundbreaking research on the “emotional tax” that is levied on black employees—specifically black women. This tax is a psychological burden that leaves black professionals feeling like they have to outwork, outperform and constantly be “on

guard” to prepare for potential discrimination or bias. Dnika’s work has helped to shine a spotlight on the critical need to take action to eliminate this unfair tax. That’s the good news for those of us who care about diversity and inclusion; we can all take action right now, in our own way and in our own communities. Change doesn’t happen by accident—it happens with courageous, intentional and inclusive leadership. That powerful kind of leadership is needed at every level, from the cubicle to the corner office. Inclusive leaders don’t just get more women and women of color in the room; they make sure every person’s contributions are valued and respected once they are there. Together, if we collectively redefine leadership in this way, we can redefine the future of work. We can begin to change the world, one workplace at a time. PDJ

www.womenworthwatching.com WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

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2019 Summer p.18-19

Lorraine Hariton

CEO and President Catalyst

Knocking Down the Barriers to Gender Equity

A

s President and CEO of Catalyst, a global nonprofit organization that works with some of the world’s most powerful CEOs and leading companies to help build workplaces that work for women, I am delighted and honored to introduce the 18th annual Women Worth Watching® issue of Profiles in Diversity Journal. The 166 accomplished women featured in these pages are an inspiration to me, and they are role models for colleagues in their organizations and communities. These women come from all industries and regions, and their profiles demonstrate the variety of skills, expertise, insights, and life experiences that have helped them achieve success. As I read through them, I am reminded why it’s so important to create inclusive workplaces where remarkable women like these can thrive.

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Many companies are making significant progress in cultivating inclusive environments at work, and some of them employ the women we’re celebrating here. For others, there’s work yet to do before the playing field is truly level for all their employees. Unfortunately, the reflex to “think leader, think male” in the workplace continues to prevail. Antiquated notions about women, and especially women of color, continue to pollute our talent pipelines, our organizations, and our judgment, preventing us from seeing them as leaders. In fact, these ideas remain so pervasive that most of us never realize their negative impact on how we work and how we perceive women at work. Catalyst research has identified three significant and insidious ways these perceptions hinder women in the workplace: 1. Stereotypes: Women are judged to be good at “taking care,” while

men are judged to be good at “taking charge.” Despite multiple studies failing to support these perceptions, people tend to think of women as being compassionate and collaborative, while men are viewed as ambitious and aggressive. Together with outmoded ideas about desirable leadership qualities that dismiss the importance of emotional intelligence and communication, we can see how men are considered default leaders, even in 2019. 2. Unconscious Bias: We all have biases. These biases affect our day-to-day decisions and often insinuate themselves into our larger organizational cultures and systems. People in power naturally like and promote others who share similar qualities or remind them of a younger version of themselves, and they embed those qualities

WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


Many companies are making significant progress in cultivating inclusive environments at work, and some of them employ the women we’re celebrating here. For others, there’s work yet to do before the playing field is truly level for all their employees.

VIEWPOINT into company values and human resource functions. So it’s no surprise when the new crop of leaders looks a lot like the old guard, while others struggle to achieve basic inclusion. 3. The Double Bind: We’re all familiar with the story of Goldilocks and her search for a bed that wasn’t too hard, wasn’t too soft, and instead was “just right.” Women in the workplace experience this story in a different way: we’re always searching for how we can be “just right.” We’re found competent, but not likable, or likable, but not competent. This double-bind is a nowin situation. No matter what we do and how we act, we’re never “just right.” These barriers affect women in different ways, and women of color often find themselves dealing with

yet another obstacle–the dreaded Emotional Tax. Catalyst researchers have found that many women of color report being highly “on guard” at work to protect themselves from slights related to their race or gender. Some of these slights appear benign, from observations about a woman’s hair or her tone of voice. Others may be more antagonistic, like not being invited to the meeting or not being considered for a high-profile opportunity or promotion. Cumulatively, these women experience a workplace very different from a white man, which can take its toll, from sleep deprivation to contemplating quitting. But momentum for equity is growing every day in organizations around the world. I know from my own conversations with corporate leaders that they are committed to removing barriers that limit women in the workplace, and to reengi-

neering their corporate cultures to accelerate women’s careers at all levels. They are being proactive as leaders, by sponsoring women into leadership; evaluating recruitment, promotion, and talent development systems for gender bias; setting and defining goals and targets for diverse representation; and holding themselves accountable. Profiles in Diversity Journal has featured more than 2,000 Women Worth Watching over the past 18 years, including several who have gone on to Fortune 500 CEO positions. They are proof that our efforts to advance women in the workplace continue to pay off and that broader cultural change requires persistence. The 2019 Women Worth Watching represent the best of who we are today, and who we strive to be. We are watching you and are excited to see where you’ll lead us next. PDJ

www.womenworthwatching.com WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®

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CORPORATE INDEX

BOLD DENOTES ADVERTISER BLUE PAGE NUMBER OF AD

Adam Law...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 28 Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP.................................................................................................................................................................................................. 33 AliveCor........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 34 Allstate............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 35 AMD............................................................................................................................................................................ inside front cover, 29, 30, 31, 32 Ares Management....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 36 Arrow Electronics........................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 37, 38, 39 Axinn Veltrop & Harkrider LLP................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 40 Best Best & Krieger LLP.............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 41 BlackNorth Initiative....................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 16, 19, 24 Bridging Finance Inc................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 25 Bristol Myers Squibb................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 42 Catalyst................................................................................................................................................................................................... 26, 43, 108, 114, 116, 118, 119, 120 Cathedral Capital, Inc................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 44 CIBC Bank........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 17 Cisco Systems, Inc....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 45 cleverbridge, Inc........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 46 Dechert LLP.............................................................................................................................................................................................. 47, back cover Dell Technologies.......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 17 Dickinson Wright PLLC.............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 48 Diversified Search....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 115 e.l.f. Beauty..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 49 Ernst & Young Canada............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 22 Fairfax Financial Holdings......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 17 FordHarrison................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 50 Frantz Ward LLP.................................................................................................................................................................................................... 52, 53 Google Canada............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 22 HARMAN......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 54 Hoguet Newman Regal & Kenney, LLP................................................................................................................................................................................................. 55 Holwell Shuster & Goldberg LLP............................................................................................................................................................................................................ 56 Hughes Hubbard & Reed LLP................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 57 Hunton Andrews Kurth............................................................................................................................................................................................................... 58, 59, 60 INNOV-8 Legal Inc........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 21 Isiah International......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 18 HARMAN................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 42, 43 Harvard Business School........................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 112 Idaho National Laboratory................................................................................................................................................................... 3, 61, 62, 63, 64 Interprose Inc................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 65 Jones Walker LLP......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 66 Kasowitz Benson Torres LLP............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 67, 68 Kelly Services................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 69 Keystone Alliance Mortgage & Capital................................................................................................................................................................................................. 70 Kingsdale Advisors....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 12 Krauss Shaknes Tallentire & Messeri LLP............................................................................................................................................................................................... 71 Latham & Watkins................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 72, 73 Lincoln Financial Group......................................................................................................................................................................................... 74, 75 LinkedIn........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 76 Mackenzie Investments............................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 18 Mayer Brown LLP.......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 78 Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP............................................................................................................................................................................................. 79 New American Funding............................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 80 New York Life............................................................................................................................................................................... 81, inside back cover PepsiCo........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 110 RBC Wealth Management...................................................................................................................................................................................... 9, 82 Renasant Bank.............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 83 Republic Services........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 84 Richards Kibbe & Orbe LLP..................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 85 Robins Kaplan, LLP...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 86 Rogers Sports & Media.............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 25 Sandia National Laboratories.................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 87 Sanford Heisler Sharp, LLP....................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 88 Scotiabank....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 18 Sephora Americas....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 89 Shell Oil.......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 107 Sullivan & Cromwell LLP............................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 90 The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids)........................................................................................................................................................................................... 22 The Schulich Foundation.......................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 20 TWI Inc............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 24 Ulmer & Berne LLP....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 91 Unlimited Views................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 100, 102 Walmart, Inc............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 92, 93 WellStar Health System, Inc..................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 94 WilmerHale.................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 95 Wilson Turner Kosmo................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 96 Wintrust Financial Corporation.............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 97 Xandr................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 98

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WOMEN WORTH WATCHING AWARD WINNER ®


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Profile for Diversity Journal

Diversity Journal Summer 2020 - Women Worth Watching  

Profiles in Diversity Journal Summer 2020 Magazine, featuring Women Worth Watching in Leadership. We also have a special feature about Black...

Diversity Journal Summer 2020 - Women Worth Watching  

Profiles in Diversity Journal Summer 2020 Magazine, featuring Women Worth Watching in Leadership. We also have a special feature about Black...

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