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PENNSYLVANIA

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F I N E S E R V I CE S / F I N E D I N I N G / S H O P P ING / U NIQ U E D ES T INA T IO NS / A ND M O R E


Your child is unique, their education should be too. PA Leadership Charter School offers a different approach to education PA Leadership Charter School is a public cyber charter school for students in grades K-12

Explore to learn more! www.palcs.org 1.877.725.2785


WINTER ARTS FESTIVAL FRIDAY, DECEMBER 8 | NOON – 8 PM SATURDAY, DECEMBER 9 | 9 AM – 3 PM

Shop for holiday gifts from 18 artisans and enjoy festive music and decorations.

2301 Kentmere Parkway | Wilmington, DE 19806 | 302.571.9590 | delart.org


September 9-10, 2017

SATURDAY & SUNDAY Ȋȱ›ŽŽȱŽœ’ŸŠ• Ȋȱ ›˜ Ž›Ȃœȱ¡‘’‹’ Ȋȱžœ‘›˜˜–ȱŠ•Žœ Ȋȱ˜˜”’—ȱŽ–˜—œ›Š’˜—œ Ȋȱ’ŸŽȱžœ’Œ Ȋȱ‘’•›Ž—ȂœȱŠŽ ȊȱȱžŽȬœȬȬžĴ˜—ȱȱ Š‹¢ȱ‘˜˜ȱ˜—Žœȱ ȊȱȱŠ’—Žȱžœ‘›˜˜–ȱȱ ’•Ž—ȱžŒ’˜— ȊȱŸŽ›ȱŘŖŖȱ›ŽŽȱŽ—˜›œ SATURDAY ONLY ȊȱȱŠ’˜—Š•ȱ›’Žȱžœ‘›˜˜–ȱ Š’—ȱ‘Š–™’˜—œ‘’™ Ȋȱȱ–ŠŽž›ȱžœ‘›˜˜–ȱȱ ˜˜”’—ȱ˜—Žœ Ȋȱȱ—’šžŽȱŠ—ȱ•Šœœ’Œȱȱ Š›ȱ‘˜  SUNDAY ONLY Ȋȱžœ‘›˜˜–ȱž—ȦŠ•” Ȋȱ˜ž™ȱŠ—ȱ’—ŽȱŸŽ— Ȋȱžœ‘›˜˜–ȱ ž’— Please leave your pets at home.

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CONTENTS 8 Uptown! The Best Seat in Town

10 Brilliant Celebrates Andrew Wyeth

13 Crave Coffee A Tour Through Some of Pennsylvania’s Hottest Coffee Shops Editor in Chief: Maria Santory Layout and Design: Ryan Scheife PHOTOGRAPHERS Steve Lagato Rebecca McAlpin Andrea Monzo Albert Yee WRITERS Leah Blewett Kerry Brown Adam Erace Karen Myers Irio O’Farrill Estelle Tracy

21 Crave’s Best Bites Pennsylvania’s Best Breakfast & Lunch Spots

31 Home Sweet Home Exquisite Antique, Vintage, and Boutique Shops in Pennsylvania

41 Vine to Wine Pennsylvania’s Finest Wine Bars

MODELS FOR PALCS SPREAD (PROVIDED BY CRAVE TALENT) Logan Foraker Zachary Grinberg Jenna Mussaf Liliana Santory Amaya Thomas

© 2017 Crave Magazine Pennsylvania. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Crave Magazine is not responsible for any errors or omissions. Crave Magazine does not endorse or recommend any article, product, service found within articles. Opinions do not necessarily reflect the views of Crave Magazine or its staff.

To advertise in Crave Magazine PA send email to mariasantory@gmail.com or call 484 319 1287

Published by Volare Publishing

For letters from the editor go to www.cravemagazinepa.com

Crave Magazine PA 1101 Ellis Dr Glen Mills PA 19342 Follow us on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter @cravemagazinepa

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Written by Kerry Brown Photography by Andrea Monzo

CYBER SCHOOL THINKING OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM

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ennsylvania Leadership Charter School (PALCS) is a public cyber school for Pennsylvania students in kindergarten through 12th grade. Established in 2004, PALCS connects its 2600 students to state-certified teachers and an innovative curriculum. “Even though we are based online, we are a community-friendly school. We want our students and their families to feel completely integrated with the community as a whole. Outings, field trips, and get-togethers are a fun way to garner support from each other, as well as from the school,” said Dr. Heidi Gough, the school’s Director of Communications. “Leadership Charter School is set apart by a customized school learning management platform and a teacher-created curriculum. Our team reviews core standards to ensure the curriculum meets state requirements and also incorporates enrichment opportunities. When children are really excited about a subject, we can enhance that. When children

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struggle with a subject, we can look at different materials to aid learning moving forward,” Gough said. With administrative offices in both Pittsburgh and West Chester, PALCS ranks first among cyber schools in Pennsylvania for both SAT and ACT scores. “Many people don’t realize we are a public school. We are state funded; the funding carries over from the school district and follows the child to our program,” she said. While 95% of all PALCS instruction is online, the school also offers a center for students of theater and dance, and a blended program for gifted students, which includes offline interaction. “The beauty of cyber school is the ability to take school anywhere with you. You can take school to the beach; you can take it to the mountains. Learning is not confined to a classroom,” Gough said. For more information about Pennsylvania Leadership Charter School, visit www.palcs.org. On the website, families can view the course catalog, find information about enrollment eligibility, and review frequently asked questions (FAQs). “There’s a compatibility test on the site, as well. It provides families insight about the responsibilities associated with attending cyber school, to determine if it’s a good fit,” Gough said.


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UPTOWN! THE BEST SEAT IN TOWN

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ince its opening in January, the Uptown! Knauer Performing Arts Center has proven to be a true community gathering place right in downtown West Chester, PA. Home to eight resident companies, the new venue offers a diverse lineup of theater, music, dance, film, Latin programming, guest speakers, performing arts classes and summer camps. The center was recently named ‘Best New Theater’ by Best of Mainline & Western Suburbs. Beginning September 29th, the Resident Theatre Company (RTC) will open a 3-week run of ‘Next to Normal’. This deeply moving, transformative musical won 3 Tony Awards, including Best Musical and The Pulitzer Prize for Drama. Earlier this year, the company sold out nearly its entire run of ‘Spamalot’! Just in time for the holidays, starting December 15th, the Charles Dickens holiday classic ‘A Christmas Carol’ will be presented as a live 1940s radio play, complete with vintage commercials. Six actors bring dozens of characters alive! The RTC completes the season in March of 2018 with ‘Bullets Over Broadway’. Singers & Songwriters are invited to compete for cash prizes and more in ‘Vocal Challenge’, a signature event planned for October 21st. An exciting evening is on tap for November 4th with ‘Classic Doo Wop’. Joel Katz is the voice of New Jersey Doo

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Wop music, and has been a major force in keeping the music alive. Opening for Joel will be ‘Frankie and Fashions’ from Philadelphia, with flawless acappella harmonies. Audience favorite core programming will continue for the fall season, with monthly performances of the Jazz Cocktail Hour, Opera Tutti!, Dueling Pianos, and the ‘Better Than Bacon’ Improv company. Many of these shows routinely play to sold out audiences, rewarding the performers with standing ovations. Nickerson Rossi Dance will also be featured this fall. The public is invited to enjoy ‘Classic Movie Mondays’, featuring films ranging from ‘To Sir with Love’ to ‘Rocky Horror Picture Show’. Private rentals complement the resident companies’ programming, and any of the spaces are available for corporate and private events. Memberships to the theater are available offering a range of benefits—from discounted bar concessions, ‘members only’ events, ticket pre-sale access, to engraved seat plaques and more!

Uptown! Knauer Performing Arts Center 226 N. High St. West Chester, PA 19380 610.356.2787 uptownwestchester.org

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BRILLIANT CELEBRATES ANDREW WYETH

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ith a legacy started in 1959, Brilliant Graphics has built a reputation as a premier source for commercial print and distribution services. Specializing in exceptional quality and color critical projects, Brilliant services the elite fine art and photography community from their 60,000 square foot facility in Exton and office in New York City. Their latest partnership with longtime clients Chadds Ford Publications and the Wyeth family is an exclusive collection of stunning Andrew Wyeth reproductions available at WyethPrintGallery.com Carefully curated, the collection of fine art archival pigment prints features some of Andrew Wyeth’s most iconic paintings. Including notable scenes painted in the Brandywine River Valley and Maine, many stages of Andrew Wyeth’s prolific career are represented in the collection. This year as we celebrate Wyeth’s 100th birthday, Brilliant is bringing

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his incredible legacy to a new audience of collectors with an online shop at WyethPrintGallery.com and a program for qualified dealers. Striving to embody the original Wyeth painting in every print Brilliant creates, the integrity of these reproductions is astounding. The team worked closely with Chadds Ford Publications and The Office of Andrew Wyeth, carefully considering Andrew Wyeth’s legacy through the color, fine detail, and presentation of each print. Priced between $20$35 and ranging in size from 16”x20” to 24”x30”, these fine art archival pigment prints are produced with high quality archival paper and the best inks available. After a successful first year, Brilliant and Chadds Ford Publications plan to expand their curation to include many more of Wyeth’s most famous paintings. The partners are dedicated to making the finest reproductions available to Andrew Wyeth collectors and fans worldwide. Shop the exclusive Andrew Wyeth collection at WyethPrintGallery .com, or learn more about Brilliant’s extensive services for the art community at BrilliantStudio.com.

Above, lower left: Andrew Wyeth and Brilliant CEO, Bob Tursack. Above, lower right: Detail, Master Bedroom by Andrew Wyeth, 22”x28”, $35


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[1] End of Olsons by Andrew Wyeth, 23.73”x24”. [2] $35; Moon Madness by Andrew Wyeth, 18”x19”, $35. [3] Oliver’s Cap by Andrew Wyeth, 24.8”x24”, $35. [4] Around the Corner by Andrew Wyeth, 16”x20” and 24”x30”, $20-$35. [5] Sailor’s Valentine by Andrew Wyeth, 28”x22”, $35. [6] Berried at Sea by Andrew Wyeth, 16”x20”, $20. [7] Night Sleeper by Andrew Wyeth, 24”x30”, $35. [8] Squall by Andrew Wyeth, 20.6”x30”, $35. [9] Wind from the Sea by Andrew Wyeth, 22”x28”, $35. [10] Christina’s World by Andrew Wyeth, 22”x28”, $40. [11] Master Bedroom by Andrew Wyeth, 16”x20” and 22”x28”, $20-$35. Artwork Images © 2017 Andrew Wyeth, Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY

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PHOTO OF PHILTER COFFEE

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KENNETT SQUARE


Crave COffee A Tour Through Some of Pennsylvania’s Hottest Coffee Shops

Written by Estelle Tracy Photography by Andrea Monzo

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PHILTER COFFEe KenNEtT Square ith its grey painted walls, studious atmosphere, and extensive coffee menu, Philter Coffee is the kind of coffee shop you’d expect to find in a large city. Luckily for Kennett Square, owner Chris Thompson picked the one square mile town as the home of his shop back in 2013. “I wanted to create a place for the community to gather,” Thompson says, “and I felt Kennett Square needed a place like that.” Open the shop’s door on any weekday and you’ll catch local artists meeting at the large corner table, far flung friends reconnecting over a latte, and baristas calling a regular’s name. Another draw of the shop is, of course, the drinks. “I want to offer really well-prepared coffee by bringing the best out of the beans.” To that end, Philter Coffee brews coffee from Ceremony Coffee Roasters, the craft coffee company based in Baltimore. In the hands of award-winning baristas,

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the beans are turned into smooth coffee drinks and artful espresso beverages. The shop has also kept tea lovers in mind, offering a large selection of loose teas from the neighboring Mrs. Robinson’s Tea Shop. The drinks menu is rounded out with inspired breakfast and lunch items, all prepared with the same level of care. For breakfast, choose between a tender muffin, a buttery croissant, or one of the gluten-free quick breads to go along with your latte. For lunch, consider the bahn mi (ish) sandwich, Philter’s take on the famous Vietnamese sandwich, and a bowl of mushroom soup, a popular, broth-based soup that just happens to be vegan. In less than four years, Philter Coffee has become a destination for out-of-state coffee aficionados, some of whom book a hotel room based on its proximity to the shop. To first timers, Thompson recommends a hand-poured coffee made from one of the staff’s latest favorite origin or an espresso, because “it offers a lot of nuance and complexity.” Not ready for a straight shot? Try the cortado: made of equal parts espresso and milk, the frothy drink is another delicious option.


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THE ZEN DEn DoylestOwn cross between Cheers and Central Perk from Friends,” that’s the vision owner Annette Coletta had when she opened The Zen Den in Doylestown. Tucked behind the town’s main drag, the shop’s welcoming vibe has been drawing an eclectic crowd of regulars and out-of-towners for the past six years. “It’s a welcoming place. People come here for business meeting, but we also host parties and showers, and it’s the perfect spot for first dates,” Coletta says, “someone even proposed here.” The décor is reason alone to visit this “Best of Bucks Mont” coffee shop. As Coletta puts it, “nothing matches but it all goes.” If you’re lucky, you’ll score a spot on the large couch, the perfect place to appreciate the shop’s quirky details. There’s a well-stocked free library on the right, a piano you can play right in front, and a selection of paintings from local artists that changes once a month. On weekends, The Zen Den also hosts live music performances featuring local talents. In winter, the shop puts out board games to keep teenagers busy during snow days. The food and drinks are as appealing as the atmosphere. To start the day, try a breakfast sandwich with an expertly crafted cappuccino made of Backyard Beans Coffee

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Company’s locally roasted beans. For lunch, consider one of the popular flatbreads along with one of the 30 kinds of organic loose teas which will be brewed right to your taste. As for dessert, Coletta confides that “every once in a while, I’ll make a banana cream pie.” From the soups to the quiches, most items are made on the premises from scratch, with vegan options and gluten-free baked goods from Doylestown-based Sweetah’s Gluten Free Bakery to accommodate most diets. In the summer, even the lemonade is freshly made from lemons, then flavored to taste with rose or violet syrups. Lulled by the sound of the water fountain, The Zen Den will inspire you to slow down and catch up with those you love around a hot cup of coffee. A cross between Cheers and Central Perk? That sounds about right.

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HOTHOUSE COFFeE Bry n M aw R estled in the newly renovated Bryn Mawr Film Institute, Hothouse Coffee is that neighborhood coffee shop we all dream to live by. For over five years, the bright space has been attracting patrons from all walks of life, from students attending one of the surrounding colleges to late-night movie-goers. With large-lit windows and a thoughtful, straightforward menu, you’ll love the atmosphere as much as the food. Made from roasted-to-order Counter Culture Coffee beans, the coffee drinks boast a familiar flavor profile, with the complexity you expect from a third wave coffee roaster. Enjoy your drink by the large window or pretend you’re in a covered passage in Paris as you sip your coffee inside the institute’s hall. At night, some patrons bring their herbal teas and food right to the projection room. “You’d be surprised,” owner Natalia Carignan says, “at how many people eat their tuna sandwich watching a movie.” Every dish on the menu has a story, which owner Natalia Carignan will gladly share. Take the BLTA, for instance: her twist on the classic bacon, lettuce, and tomato sandwich contains avocado, a nod, she explains, to her Hawaiian heritage.

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The dish made its way to the menu “way before the avocado toast craze.” As for the turkey apple sandwich, it was inspired by a specific turkey breed she discovered in Lancaster County. “They were just so good.” She used to drive every week to the farm, until she could no longer justify the lengthy commute. She eventually found a turkey supplier closer to Bryn Mawr, with whom she still works today. The popular sandwich is made to order from freshly cooked turkey breast. Talking to Carignan, it’s obvious that Hothouse Coffee is more than a coffee shop. Her shop carries a selection of baked goods and juices from emerging food artisans, which she is intent on supporting “because we are small too.” Perhaps more importantly, she’s proud to have created a multi-generational space for the local community. “Students often help older people with their computer and technology, I love that.”

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crave’s Best Bites Pennsylvania’s Best Breakfast & Lunch Spots Written by Karen Myers

Photography by Andrea Monzo

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FAMOUS TOASTERY Exton

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tep inside the Famous Toastery, Exton’s newest entry into the daytime dining space, for a delightful meal flavored with a hint of the south. The menu features a wide range of breakfast options like omelets, egg burritos, flapjacks and a variety of benedicts. Dishes like sausage gravy over biscuits and grits show off their southern roots. The owner of the Exton location, Chris Phillips calls out some customer favorites. “Anything avocado is very popular. Like our avocado benedict—we cut the avocado in half and serve the egg right in it.” The philosophy of every server being your server means that all the wait staff in the restaurant are looking at all tables. As Chris explains, “All servers are scanning your table to make sure you are taken care of.” “Our flavored flapjacks are unique,” Chris says. “We do more than throw in a few berries—the batter incorporates a puree that elevates the flavor. And we offer gluten-free options on both our flapjacks and French toast. The lunch menu is equally varied. Following up on the avocado theme, Chris remarks, “Our popular Left Coast BLT features bacon, lettuce, tomato, brie and avocado.” Other customer favorites are the turkey melt, which features in-house roasted turkey with brie and raspberry puree. “All our dressings are made in-house—so our salads are also very popular.” Asked what makes his restaurant a stand-out, Chris replies, “Scratch-made is my favorite term. It’s like you’d make at home if you had tons of time and all the ingredients. We do

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it for you.” All meals are made to order, from cutting up the fruit to mixing the batter. “We are BYOB. Champagne is popular on weekends with our fresh squeezed orange juice.” Chris points out. On weekends, guests are welcomed with complementary corn bread and a decadent serving of house-made apple butter. Featuring easy parking on Exton’s Main Street, Famous Toastery easily blends modern tastes with southern charm for a delicious breakfast, lunch or brunch.


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TURNING POINT Warrington

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o need to wait for a staycation to get a taste of vacation. A meal at Turning Point, with its soft white wainscoting, abundance of natural lighting and lush greens, will bring back that feeling. Owner Kirk Ruoff made the decision to offer upscale daytime fare to accommodate his wife Pam’s request that he be home for dinner. At Turning Point, all the staff get to be home for dinner. Guests can indulge in a hearty meal like Grande Huevos Rancheros from the ‘Eggceptional Dishes’ section which includes Classic and Big Easy Benedicts. Or choose a “No Yolks” About It Omelet with fresh vegetables from the ‘good and good for you’ section. As Donna Kliener, a regional manager for Turning Point explains. “Guests love our Wilber Skillet’s combination of potatoes with avocado, bacon and tomato, with eggs cooked to your liking. It’s one of our most popular items.” Like their varied breakfast selections, lunch choices range from the nutritious & delicious Zucchini Spaghetti

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with julienned zucchini, portabellos, artichoke hearts, red peppers, and parmesan cheese to temptations like the Gordito Burrito featuring chicken, chorizo sausage, beans, cheese and homemade salsa. “Everything is made from scratch.” Donna says. Fresh fruit and vegetables are brought in daily, and food is locally sourced wherever possible, like the dairy from Krieder Farm. Gourmet French press coffee is served at all their restaurants, but the Warrington location, the first in Pennsylvania, adjoins Cowabunga Coffee Roaster, a full-service coffee shop and roasting operation dedicated to sourcing the highest grade of coffee beans. “You can watch the beans roasting and enjoy the incredible smell,” Donna says. The extensive beverage menu covers multiple iced teas and coffees, shakes and smoothies, fresh juices and soft drinks. On the hotter side, in addition to the French press coffee, there is an espresso bar, loose leaf teas and heavenly hot chocolates. Open for just over a year, this popular destination for breaking from the routine also has locations in Bryn Mawr, North Wales and a new one opening soon in Blue Bell providing the ideal retreat into vacation mode. Turning Point is open daily from 8 am to 3 pm. www.theturningpoint.biz


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THE CLASSIC DINER West Chester

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f diner food has left you unimpressed, one visit to The Classic Diner will be a game changer. Located on Gay Street, The Classic Diner takes your diner favorites and with a deft twist, turns these classics into a delectable feast. As general manager Kat MacNeil is proud to report, “Our customers love our benedicts!” The classic Eggs Benedict with ham is offered along with filet mignon, avocado, sautéed spinach, salmon, asparagus and even crab benedicts. All varieties feature a liberal serving of hollandaise. Indulge in one of four French toast options, pancakes, waffles or a delicious take on oatmeal featuring caramelized pears and dried currants. Portion sizes are generous here. “Our omelets take up half the plate—we don’t want anyone to leave hungry.” Kat explains. “Customers rave about our house-cured, thickly sliced bacon.” To ensure the food is top quality, they use the best ingredients. An extensive lunch menu ensures everyone will find something they like. Whether you choose a simple ham sandwich or spinach salad with asparagus, roasted beets and grapefruit, the fresh ingredients provide a feast for the senses. The first Classic Diner was opened in Malvern in 1995. Two and a half years ago a new diner was opened in West Chester. While both diners have a similar vibe and menu, the tight space in historical West Chester calls for a unique layout. Details like the exposed brick wall remind guests of

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the town’s tie to the past. In addition to intimate seating on the main floor and on the street, upstairs features both an indoor room and a porch. “We are a BYOB.” Kat tells me. “Our guests often bring champagne for mimosas.” With beverage selections ranging from orange juice or a hazelnut latte to hand dipped milk shakes, there is something for everyone. The Classic Diner has definitely upped the ante for breakfasts, lunches and brunches in West Chester. The Classic Diner is open daily from 7 am to 3 pm. theclassicdinerpa.com

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FIRST WATCH Newtown Square

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his daytime café has the perfect formula for combining ultra-fresh ingredients to produce decadent and healthy meals. Guests are welcomed at their table with a fresh pot of hot coffee and a cool carafe of water. The restaurant’s open air design features mellow hues, chalkboard signs and the eclectic touch of horizontal wooden doors suspended from the ceiling. “No two designs are alike in any of our locations,” says Stan Ryback, Regional VP Mid-Atlantic. “But all the designs have the same feel—they make you feel cozy.” The extensive menu features old favorites and new twists. Classic Eggs Benedict stands alongside spinach, bacon and salmon variations. Omelets and frittatas range from a simple ham and gruyere to The Works with ham, bacon, sausage, mushrooms, onions, tomatoes and a pleasing combo of cheddar and Monterey Jack cheeses. Treats from the griddle include mouth-watering Lemon-Ricotta Pancakes. “We post the calories on our menus to help people be conscious of what they are eating.” Stan explains. Customers can choose lower calorie selections, like the Tri-Athlete egg white omelet or a Power Bowl for breakfast. “A lot of our customers want to know what they are eating—it helps them make a better choice.” Occasional moans are overheard as guests bite into food prepped completely from scratch. The team slices fruits all day so they are fresh for each order. In addition, vegetables are roasted in house. Locally sourcing all ingredients

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guarantees freshness. Since the items are all made to order, no heat lamps are on the premises. As Stan points out, “We don’t have fryers or even microwaves here.” Lunch features a tantalizing assortment of sandwiches, inventive salads and soups. First Watch customizes the classic BLT by adding over-hard eggs, elevates veggie burgers with Peppadew peppers and Havarti horseradish cheese complements the roast beef. “We staff our restaurants with smart, friendly, hardworking people.” Stan states, and their upbeat and helpful staff proves his point. Along with the excellent service, free refills are included on iced tea and soft drinks. Locations in Villanova and Wynnewood all feature this winning formula for excellence in daytime dining. Hours 7:00 am to 2:30 pm firstwatch.com


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Exquisite Antique, Vintage, and Boutique Shops in Pennsylvania

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Written by Kerry Brown Photography by Rebecca McAlpin

EASTCOTE LANE Devon

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earching for just the right eye-catching piece to add personality and spice to your home décor? Eastcote Lane at 751 W. Lancaster Avenue in Devon is the place to go. Proprietor Teresa Decker’s captivating shop is a furniture renovation workshop, studio, retail space, and art gallery in one. With associate Jeanne Joseph, Decker showcases a creatively curated mix of accessories, artwork, and gifts. “We have invited some of our favorite artists to join us at the shop,” she said. Her hand-painted vintage furniture is nestled among works by fellow artists including hand-blown glass, original paintings, ceramics, textiles, candles, and more. Eastcote Lane is named for a street in England where Decker lived as a child. She spent time with her grandparents who nurtured her fondness for history and European antique furniture. They taught her how to refurbish pieces in the English way, with non-toxic chalk-based paint. The experience developed in her a passion for saving vintage pieces. Decker now kicks things up a notch with a whimsical sense of style. Decoupage an elephant print onto the side of a dresser, why not? Paint a Union Jack across the front of a dresser, but of course! Using paint, brushes, skill and vision, Decker transforms humdrum looking vintage pieces into show-stopping chests, dressers, armoires, and more. Her process breathes new life into hand-me-down furniture. Eastcote Lane opened in Devon four years ago, followed by co-op spaces at The West End Garage in Cape May and worKS Kennett Square. The Devon store houses Teresa’s

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workshop. “You will find me with an apron on and paintbrush in hand,” she said. She does custom work, and offers classes so others can learn to refurbish their own pieces. The shop stocks a full line of chalk-based paint for sale. “Vintage furniture is often crafted from solid wood and is of much higher quality than much of the newer furniture widely available. I like to call this furniture rescue. With a little paint and imagination, old furniture can be transformed into stunning statement pieces,” she said. Eastcote Lane in Devon is open Sunday, Tuesday and Wednesday 11-4pm; Thursday, Friday and Saturday 10-6pm; Closed Mondays. Phone: 484-580-6421 Visit eastcotelane.com for other locations and details.

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BR A N DY W I N E V I E W A N T I Q U E S , Chadds Ford

S Written by Kerry Brown Photography by Rebecca McAlpin

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troll through Brandywine View Antiques at 1244 Baltimore Pike, Chadds Ford and experience the whispers from bygone eras in every corner. What better way to showcase revered relics from the past than in a spacious farmhouse dating back to1807 and surrounded by world-renowned museums and gardens? Inside the historic brick home situated on three acres of the old William Painter Farm, are three floors encompassing 5000 square feet of antiques and treasures from a wide variety of vendors. At Brandywine View Antiques, the magic is in the search and discovery. Collectors will find a kindred spirit in owner Lisa Vonderstruck, whose passion led her to a career in the antiques trade. “I love the past, and I absolutely love my job”, Vonderstruck states enthusiastically. Her shop’s eclectic mix includes vintage, handmade, salvaged, up-cycled and repurposed wares. “When I was young I was not allowed to touch anything in my grandmother’s house. The result was, I became fascinated,” she said. Each room is peppered with her picks: silvery decanters and sparkling crystal glassware, wooden dressers and shelves, primitive toys, birdcages, lanterns, wall art and much more. “I live for trips to antiques flea markets like Brimfield in Massachusetts. I do a lot of barn picking, and I have great dealers who bring stuff here,” Vonderstruck said. The backyard space is dedicated to garden salvage finds. Those, along with horses, are some of Vonderstruck’s personal favorites. Longtime Brandywine View vendors include “Janet the Trunk Lady” and “Al the Tool Guy”. The shop also carries wooden signs by New Cottage Designs and Savannah House. “We strive to find unique items and hidden gems our customers won’t be able to leave without,” Vonderstruck said. “We are also known for stocking locally-made Candle Crazy hand-poured candles.” Vonderstruck says, “I love this community. I’ve had shops on this road for 20 years. I love saving the past.” Brandywine View Antiques is located at 1244 Baltimore Pike in Chadds Ford. Open Wednesday–Sunday from 10am–5pm (610) 388-6060 Visit them online at brandywineview.com


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Written by Kerry Brown Photography by Rebecca McAlpin

D J W H O M E , Newtown

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JW home, at 22 South State Street in Newtown, offers a unique array of home goods and personal care items—everything you need to create well-appointed rooms full of creature comforts throughout the home. A visit to DJW Home delivers a delightful sensual experience and inspires reimagined home accessorizing. Aromatic bath & body products, sumptuous bedding, elegant dinnerware, delicious gourmet accompaniments, interesting artworks, and more, make it effortless to indulge yourself, impress your guests, or spoil someone you cherish with a stylish gift. David Witchell co-owns DJW Home with his wife Galina. “She and I have the same passions for home decor and personal care. We started out by placing a few choice home decor items we loved in the lobby of our main salon in Newtown. Before long, we completely ran out of space there. As luck would have it, about three years ago the building directly across the street from the salon became available, and we jumped on it! The rest is history,” David said.

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The overall design, look, and feel of DJW Home, is welcoming. The Witchells have filled the space with items for both everyday use and special occasions. The end result is a splendid mix. “We have something for everyone, at every price point and for nearly any occasion,” David said. The merchandise display invites visitors inside, beckoning them to wander. It is easy to get lost in thought and inspiration, imagining various items becoming part of a personal home design. “We have a wonderful and knowledgeable team, led and inspired by Galina. Her influence is evident on every display and item,” David said. “At DJW Home we present a selection of our favorite things to adorn your home and enhance everyday living,” he added. DJW Home is located at 22 South State Street in Newtown Hours are Monday 9am–7pm, Tuesday–Friday 9am– 9pm and Saturday/Sunday 9am–6pm. Visit them online at davidjwitchell.com.


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Written by Karen Myers Photography by Albert Yee

T H E SHOPPE AT A K I N T E R I O R S , Lancaster

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t doesn’t take long to learn that Alison McIndoe is passionate about design. The owner of AK Interiors, a full service interior design firm and The Shoppe, she notes that clients are busy. “Many have full-time careers and/or kids at home. That’s where I come in. Easing stress and helping to make their house a home is just a part of my every day.” Clients include residential customers renovating their homes with a fresh, current look and new construction, where she works with the builders and architects to create the ideal space for each client. Her personal aesthetic is both classic and timeless. “I want my clients to feel an effortless sense of elegance while experiencing the special details that create a unique design.” Alison likes to set her designs apart. “Everyone is doing stationary drapery panels now. I too follow this trend, but add details like an eight inch pinch pleat, or trim detail on a leading edge.” These details have won rave reviews with her clients. AK Interior’s work on commercial spaces include restaurants, offices, and hair salons, to name a few. “For one client, it might be helping to select a paint color. For another, it might be working with my team to create and implement the design.” Recently, AK Interiors opened a boutique home furnishings, accessories and gift shop. The Shoppe is a treasure trove for unique gifts. “For a hostess gift, I suggest combining silver

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toile cocktail napkins with a vintage inspired bottle opener. We also feature local artists’ work.” “And don’t miss First Fridays! The whole town comes to life.” Alison shares her excitement. “There is a gallery row on Prince Street, musicians throughout town and many shops offer wine and cheese. Here at the Shoppe, we debut a local artist, a musician and serve up sips and nibbles.” Located in Lancaster, Alison works both locally and afar—distance is never a problem. “The Shoppe is open Monday through Saturday. Take a scenic drive through Lancaster County and stop in to see us. We would love to show you everything we have to offer!” akinteriorsllc.com


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PHOTO OF HARVEST SEASONAL GRILL AND WINE BAR

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VINE TO WINE PENNS Y LVA NI A’S FI NES T W I NE B A R S

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Written by Irio O’Farrill Photography by Andrea Monzo

H A RV EST SE A SONA L GRILL & WINE BAR

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arvest Seasonal Grill & Wine Bar is a growing restaurant brand with locations already established in Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Florida. The farmto-table connotations in the name are more than just industry posturing; Harvest’s seasonally-changing menu is comprised of fresh ingredients from local farmers and produce purveyors. The core philosophy is a marriage of sustainability and health-conscious cuisine, while offering a range of dining options not typically found in farm-to-table establishments. There is an educational element to the experience, one which introduces patrons to flavors and ingredients found in their own geographic backyard.

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Harvest Seasonal Grill & Wine Bar’s beverage menu follows through on their commitment to sustainability and seasonally-inspired flavors. The wine list is comprehensive, featuring over fifty hand-selected wines that are served by the glass and bottle, many of which are produced through ecologically-friendly, carbon neutral methods. One of the best ways to experience this aspect of the menu is with one of Harvest’s frequently hosted wine dinners, which include a five-course menu that is hand-crafted to be expertly paired with artisanal selections. If your individual tastes are more cocktail-centric, you’re in luck; seasonally-inspired martinis, mojitos, and mimosas are a great way to enjoy Harvest’s Happy Hour and unwind after a long day. Harvest’s atmosphere is “upscale-casual”—an approach that promises exceptional service and ambiance while foregoing the stuffiness that people tend to associate with restaurants of this caliber. Again, the dedication to sustainability is consistent—the cleaning products used are organic, menu’s are printed on recycled and biodegradable paper, and decorum is made from various recycled materials. It’s a detail that is easy to miss, but one that enriches the experience and is an example of the authenticity and transparency that Harvest prides itself upon. Whether you are a health-conscious individual in search of a delicious meal to complement your active lifestyle, or simply an appreciator of local cuisine with an affinity for fine wine, you need to look no further than Harvest Seasonal Grill & Wine Bar. For more information please visit: www.harvestseasonalgrill.com

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Written by Leah Blewett Photography by Steve Legato

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ince opening their first wine, cheese and beer cafe in 2004, Tria has consistently earned critical acclaim and amassed a wealth of loyal fans, and their Wine Director, Michael “The Curator” McCaulley, is a four-time James Beard Award semifinalist for his outstanding wine. Tria’s dynamic, ever-evolving menus of wine, cheese and beer are unusually comprehensive and showcase rare, artisanal food and beverage of consistently high quality. “We take pride in showcasing exceptional products, and in making the unfamiliar approachable,” says owner Jon Myerow. “Our staff members are more than just a smiling face: they’re ambassadors for top-notch winemakers, cheesemakers and brewers, sharing their wares with our guests in a friendly, unpretentious way.” All of Tria’s many wines are available by the glass, grouped into playful categories that include “Zippy Whites” and “Sociable Reds.” McCaulley includes informative oneliner descriptions for each wine, as does Myerow for the beers and Cheese Director Claire Adler for the cheeses. Like the wines and beers, all of the cheeses are available individually, or can be ordered together; the knowledgeable staff are

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also quick to suggest pairings and combinations that highlight each product’s unique characteristics. While Tria’s wine, cheese and beer selections change virtually daily, some of their menu items have quickly become Philadelphia classics. Their Truffled Egg Toast is a masterpiece of simplicity: fluffy brioche is cut from its crust, toasted with melt-y cheese and truffle oil, then topped with a plump egg yolk sprinkled with crystals of salt and grains of black pepper, all on a bed of tender young arugula leaves. And Tria is growing: in 2013, they added Tria Taproom, and all-draft bar and restaurant serving craft beers and ciders, as well as draft wines and cocktails. This fall, Tria Wine Garden will join the group, a “permanent pop-up” serving exceptional wines, cheese and beers al fresco in a stunning 150-seat, indoor-outdoor setting. Tria Cafe Rittenhouse | 123 S. 18th St. | 215-972-8742 Tria Cafe Wash West | 1137 Spruce St. | 215-629-9200 Tria Taproom | 2005 Walnut Street | 215-557-8277 Tria Wine Garden | address | Coming soon… www.triaphilly.com


T R I A T A P R O O M , Philadelphia

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Written by Adam Erace Photography by Andrea Monzo

V INTAGE W INE BA R & B I S T R O , Philadelphia

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ason and Delphine Evenchik own several successful bars and restaurants: Heritage in Northern Liberties, Time, a jazz-and-whiskey bar , Garage saloons in Fishtown and Passyunk, to name a few. But their budding empire began with Vintage, the beloved Midtown Village wine bar that just celebrated 11 years in business. “Eleven years ago, 13th Street was desolate at night,” says Britain Burgos, Vintage’s sommelier, general manager and resident Txakoli enthusiast for the last four years. “You might not have felt too comfortable walking around.”

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Thing have certainly changed—establishments like Vintage being a major catalyst for the area’s revitalization—but eleven years in, the neighborhood wine bar is just doing what it’s always done: “try to be a teaching bar,” says Burgos, by offering as many as 70 wines by the glass, thoughtful flights, an enthusiastic and educated staff, at reasonable prices. “We want to take that intimidation and snobbiness out of it. We wear T-shirts. We’re just a pub for wine.” Customers have responded to that easygoing philosophy, creating a cadre of loyal regulars that gather beneath Vintage’s pressed-tin ceilings and a chandelier of upside-down green-glass wine bottles. Embossed with the names of estates and chateaux, boards pried off wine crates line on wall, facing another of the exposed brick that glows copper and rust when the sun streams in from the storefront windows. Behind the bar, Burogs displays part of his collection on wooden racks: Cune Rosado, a Tempranillo rosé from Rioja, organic Mäyr Gruner-Veltliner, Chilean Carménère, Yakima Valley Lemberger and more. “We look for small, boutique vineyards and esoteric wines, stepping outside the usual Cab-merlot-Chardonnay-sauvignon blanc [circuit]. Because we keep things at a price range, people feel comfortable trying something new. They don’t have to commit to a bottle, so maybe they’ll say, ‘I’ve never heard of ugni blanc or pinot gris, but why not try it?’” Featuring three to four tasting-sized pours, Vintage’s flights are a great way to sample across the stash. “Nine out of ten” flight feature off-menu specials Burgos is excited about, like the aforementioned Txakoli, a family of effervescent sparklers from Spain’s Basque region. And thanks to Mackenzie Hilton, the culinary director for the entire restaurant group, Vintage has food to match its wines, from house-made country pâté to a Morbier-topped burger that pairs beautifully with a glass of Bodega Ruca Malen’s high-altitude Uco Valley Malbec. 129 South 13th Street, vintage-philadelphia.com

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GALER ESTATE VINEYARD AND WINERY is a beautiful boutique winery located just behind Longwood Gardens. With a deck overlooking the Chardonnay vineyards, Galer Estate offers wine tasting and wine sales of its award winning dry wines. Open every weekend, Friday through Sundays, with live music, art shows and hand crafted wines. 700 Folly Hill Road, Kennett Square PA 19348 www.galerestate.com 484-899-8013

www.innatwhitewingfarm.com

INN at

Whitewing Farm Adjacent to Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square, PA 370 Valley Road, West Chester PA 19382 610-388-2013 • innkeeper@innatwhitewingfarm.com

Soak Up the Splendor Summer of Spectacle Celebrating the Return of Our Main Fountain Garden Now–September 30

Chrysanthemum Festival October 7–November 19 PHILIP JAMISON, watercolor

JOHN RUSH, wood, sculpture

Opening reception October 6th, 6-9pm. Exhibit runs through the month of October longwoodgardens.org

200 East State Street, Kennett Square • malagalleria.com • 202 591 6548


Kennett House Bed and Breakfast offers the casual elegance of a magnificent granite foursquare mansion. Built in 1910 and a part of the Kennett Square Historic District. The Kennett House is lovingly restored with all the charms of yesteryear and the modern comforts of today. Located in heart of “mushroom country”, just a few minutes from Longwood Gardens, Winterthur Museum, Brandywine River Museum, Hagley Museum, and Nemours Mansion. We look forward to opening our doors to you. www.kennetthouse.com • innkeeper@kennetthouse.com 503 W. STATE STR EE T, K EN NE T T SQUA R E , PA 19348

October 20-22, 2017

Emilie K. Asplundh Concer Hall, West Chester University

Tickets: www.brandywineballet.org or Box Office: 610-696-2711

2301 Kentmere Parkway Wilmington, DE 19806 302.571.9590 | delart.org

The Buccaneer Was a Picturesque Fellow (detail), 1905, from The Fate of a Treasure Town, by Howard Pyle, in Harper’s Monthly Magazine, December 1905. Howard Pyle (1853–1911). Oil on canvas, 30 1/2 x 19 1/2 inches. Delaware Art Museum, Museum Purchase, 1912.


Boutique Hom me Furnisshiings, Acccessoriees and Giftss creating beautiful spaces Commercial | Residential | Renovations | Shoppe

Shoppe Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00-4:30, Saturday 9:30-2:00 | 246 West Orange St., Lancaster PA 17603

| 717-872-6966 |

akinteriorsllc.com


125 WE ST M I N E R STR E ET | W E ST C H E ST E R, PA 19382

610. 6 92 . 9112

W W W. A R C H E R B U C H A N A N . C O M


Crave  

Summer/ Fall 2017

Crave  

Summer/ Fall 2017