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November 2011

Martin Addison Readers’ Gallery Blast from the Past


Winter is here! Curl up with your favorite beverage, relax and have a good time reading this month’s magazine. Inside Martin Addison provides some tutorials on painting pets. Martin and Focal Press also are sponsoring an enter-to-win giveaway for Martin’s latest book, Painter 12 for Photographers. You can find all of the details and the entry form at Martin Addison’s book. The biggest news this month is pertaining to the forum, we made it free. There is an article that explains some of the new changes in the magazine. So far there has been a flurry of new activity and a bunch of new people come on board as well as a host of veterans coming back in to check things out. You can sign up for free at Digital Painting Forum. The Digital Art Summit planning is moving along nicely. We are still finishing up negotiations with the last few artists. So far presenting this year with us are: Heather Michelle, Darrell Chitty, Cher T. Pendarvis, Donal Jolley, Odwin Rensen, John Stevenson, Michael Campbell, John Cunningham, Jeremy Sutton, and Larry Lourcey. That is a great line-up of artists! If you know of someone you think I should be speaking with let me know. We are shooting for 12 presenting artists plus a few vendors who will provide us with some great free webinars also. Next month we will have some more information about the summit. Stay tuned! 50% OFF the day after Thanksgiving. Many of the products that we offer will be greatly reduced for 24 hours starting the day after Thanksgiving. Most of our webinars, Painter instructional DVDs, books, marketing DVDs will all be on sale that day. I will send out an email the night before and in the morning as reminders. If you don’t get anything for some reason you can write to me at tim@ digitalpaintmagazine and put SALE in the subject so I can see it easily. We are also doing this on our Studio website for the second year in a row. Even though most artists don’t like to do this during this really busy time of year, I believe it is a great way to thank those that support you. There may be things a person has been saving money for and this pricing is timed perfectly for gift giving. As always we are looking for more images for the readers gallery. Please send them to tim@ digitalpaintmagazine with a short bio, a headshot and public contact information. Have a GREAT Thanksgiving! Live simply, Love generously, Care deeply and Speak kindly. This magazine is free to distribute by any medium. You can print it, email it, upload it on your web server. You may however not edit any part of this PDF, copy the content, or split the pages. This PDF must remain whole at all times, the content of which belongs to Digital Paint Magazine. All art and trademarks contained herein are the property of their respective owners.

Digital Paint Magazine - November 2011

Tim ONeill

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In This Issue

Painter 12 for Photographers

14. FIG 10.15 Completed picture (below) FIG 10.16 (Opposite) Detail of finished picture

Excerpt of Painter 12 for Photographers Animals by Martin Addison

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Changes at the Digital Forum by Tim O’Neill Cartoon

by Victor Lunn-Rockliffe

Animals

Readers’ Gallery by Rick Parker 

CHAPTER 10

Old Masters - J.M.W. Turner By Nadia Lim A Blast from the Past - An Angel by Annell L. Metsker Animals

Cover

By Martin Addison

Marketing Buzz:

Digital Paint Magazine - November 2011

Tutorials include using a smeary brush to get a smooth finish to dog hairs and a palette knife to get some distinctive marks. The Sargent brush takes a lot longer to use than most, but the end result is worth it for the interesting textures you can achieve.

15.

Amount 30%, Picture 100% and Shine and Reflection 0%. This will add an appearance of depth to the brush strokes. Now to add a canvas texture, create another copy layer then select Artists Canvas in the Papers panel and increase the Scale to 200%. Go to Effects> Apply Surface Texture and in the top box select Paper, Amount 50%, Picture 100% and Shine and Reflection 0%. If either of these textures are too intrusive you can reduce the layer opacity.

4 9 10 11 12 15

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Video Marketing And Its Advantages - Part One by Tim O’Neill

Animals are always very popular subjects for both photography and painting and in this chapter are a wide variety of techniques and brushes to use to transform your photographs.

Animals

13. Go to Effects> Apply Surface Texture and select Image Luminance,



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Martin Addison is a well known British photographer and enthusiast, he has been active in photography for over 40 years and has lectured and run courses on a variety of photographic subjects and programs including Corel Painter, Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom and ProShow Producer. Martin has always been interested in creating pictures which intrigue, sometimes using close up techniques to explore subjects in depth. In camera multiple exposures are used to add texture and slow shutter speeds create mystery. Martin’s inspiration comes from everything around him and in particular the natural world. Martin has published four instructional books on Corel Painter, the most recent being Painter 12 for Photographers which was published in 2011 and is extensively illustrated to show the techniques and methods required to master the program. The book also contains a companion website with video tutorials. Painter 12 for Photographers ISBN: 978-0-240-52271-5, C4to (189x246mm) paperback, matt lamination

Spine 22mm

PhoToGRAPhy/TechNIques/DIGITAL

Transform your photographs into stunning works of art with this fully-updated, authoritative guide to the all-new Painter 12. Whether you are new to Painter or a seasoned pro wanting to go further with your digital art, Painter 12 for Photographers will show you how to get the most out of the latest edition of Corel’s powerful painting software. Starting with the basics and moving on to cover brushes, textures, cloning, toning, and other effects, Martin Addison helps you master the techniques needed to create beautiful painterly images.

What’s new in Painter 12 for Photographers:

• • • • •

Animal portraits, including cats, dogs, and horses Creative montage Portraits of people, including children and adults A revised and expanded chapter on Painter basics An extended tutorial on taking a picture from the camera stage through printing

Painter 12 for Photographers

Reading this book will make you feel like you have a Corel Painter Master looking over your shoulder and anticipating your next question. It will be one of your most well-loved books in your collection. Marilyn Sholin, Corel Painter Master

Painter 12

for Photographers Creating painterly images step by step

Packed with vivid images to illustrate what can be achieved with the right skills and know-how, Painter 12 for Photographers will inspire you to get creative with your photographs. Get the most out of this creative guide with the accompanying website (www.painterforphotographers.com), featuring over two hours of clear, no-nonsense video tutorials and downloadable, high-quality, original photographs to accompany the tutorials.

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LeveL: BeGINNeR/INTeRMeDIATe

u.s. $47.95 I S B N 978-0-240-52271-5

9

Digital Paint Magazine - November 2011

780240 522715

Addison

Martin Addison received his Fellowship of the Royal Photographic Society in 1995. A professional photographer with over 35 years’ experience, Addison runs courses and demonstrations on Corel® Painter™ and lectures on creative photography across the UK.

54795

Martin Addison

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for Photographers Painter 12 for Photographers

oto-

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Smeary Bristle brush: Smeary Dog Bristle brush: Dog The brush used for this demonstration The brush is in used thefor Cloners this demonstration brush category is and in the Cloners brush category and is an easy brush to use which is gives an easy somebrush very attractive to use which brush gives strokes, someideal very attractive brush strokes, ideal for animals. for animals.

1.

Open ‘Dog’

1.

Open ‘Dog’

FIG 10.1 Original photograph

Animals

the lighter hair which hangs over thethe lighter eyeshair afterwards. which hangs Thisover will establish the eyes afterwards. This will establish which pieces of hair are actually which on top. pieces of hair are actually on top. 10. Switch the Tracing Paper 10. on and Switch off constantly the Tracing to Paper see where on and youoffneed constantly to see where you need to paint and what you have already to paint painted, and what this you is the have onlyalready way topainted, get this is the only way to get it looking good. If you haven’t already it looking set good. up aIfone-key you haven’t shortcut already for set up a one-key shortcut for Tracing Paper I suggest you doTracing so now, Paper it is very I suggest easy and you allows do so now, you to it is very easy and allows you to hold the pen/mouse in one hand hold and theturn pen/mouse the Tracing in one Paper hand on and and turn off the Tracing Paper on and off with the other. See the Painterwith basics thechapter other. See for how the Painter to customize basicsyour chapter for how to customize your keyboard shortcuts. keyboard shortcuts. FIG 10.3 Hair shown in 11. Continue all over the dog,11. paintContinue the hairsallthat over gothe over dog, thepaint background the hairsbythat go over the background original photograph, step by 6 sweeping out the brush outwards. sweeping out the brush outwards. and step 23

2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

File> Quick Clone. 2. File> Quick Clone. Select Cloners> Smeary Bristle 3. Select Cloner. Cloners> Smeary Bristle Cloner. Reset Brush to the default4.settings. Reset Brush to the default settings. Size 48.2 Opacity 30%. 5. Size 48.2 Opacity 30%. Clone the dog, roughly following 6. Clone the lines the dog, of the roughly hair, clone following overthe thelines edgeof the hair, clone over the edge to include the background. Usetothe include Tracing thePaper background. for this Use stage. the Tracing Paper for this stage. 7. Roughly fill in the background, 7. Roughly at the bottom fill in the of the background, picture useatvertical the bottom of the picture use vertical paint strokes to allow an impression paint strokes of grasstotoallow show. an impression of grass to show. 8. Change the brush size to 8. 25 and Change enlarge thethe brush picture sizetotoaround 25 and75% enlarge the picture to around 75% magnification, enough to see the magnification, head of the enough dog clearly. to see the head of the dog clearly. FIG 10.2 Steps 6 & 7 9. Paint over the dog, this time 9. following Paint over thethe lines dog, of the this hair timevery following closely. the lines of the hair very closely. When you paint around the eyes, When paint youthe paint darker around areas thefirst eyes, thenpaint do the darker areas first then do theInhair thegoes areasstraight under the down chin butthe there hairare goes straight down but there are 12. In the areas under the chin 12. other hairs on top which sweepother round hairs to the on right. top which Paintsweep the downwards round to the right. Paint the downwards hairs first and then lightly sweep hairs over first theand brush thentolightly include sweep the loose over the brush to include the loose hairs. hairs. 13. The hairs on the back are13. longer Thesohairs make onlonger the back brush arestrokes longer so to emmake longer brush strokes to emphasise the length of the hair. Look phasise for the every length darker of the or lighter hair. Look variation for every darker or lighter variation and make sure you pick these and out. make Continue suredown you pick the legs. these out. Continue down the legs. 14. Make the picture full screen 14.again Make and thepaint picture some full additional screen again grasses and paint in some additional grasses in at the base, but leave the otheratareas the base, diffused. but leave the other areas diffused. 15. The background grass is a 15. littleThe toobackground insistent, sograss to tone is ait little downtoo slightly insistent, so to tone it down slightly first make a new layer, then gofirst to the make Airbrushes> a new layer, Softthen Airbrush, go to the sizeAirbrushes> 149 Soft Airbrush, size 149 opacity 4%. Pick a light color from opacity the 4%. dog’s Pick back, a light I used color Hue from 109the Sat dog’s back, I used Hue 109 Sat 113 Value 176 in the Color panel. 113Paint Valueall 176 over in the Color background panel. including Paint all over the background including close to the dog so as to reduce close the to green, the dog but so don’t as paint to reduce over the the green, grass but don’t paint over the grass

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Digital Paint Magazine - November 2011

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FIG 10.3

original p and step


Painter 12 for Photographers Painter 12 for Photographers

Animals

An

at the base. The color is likely to be too strong, so reduce the layer opac-

FIG 10.4 Head shown at steps 7, 12 and 23

FIG 10.4 Head shown at steps 7, 12 and 23

to about 60%. This step will harmonise the color of the background atity the base. The color is likely to be too strong, so reduce the layer opacwith the dog. ity to about 60%. This step will harmonise the color of the background 16. To add the finishing touches to the dog, return to the previous Smeary with theCloner dog. brush, reduce the size to 6.0 and the opacity 100%. Paint Bristle 16. Toover addparts the of finishing to light the dog, return to this thewill previous Smeary the face,touches picking out strands of hair, add definition and contrast to thereduce head. the size to 6.0 and the opacity 100%. Paint Bristle Cloner brush, 17.over Open the Underpainting panel (Window> panels) parts of the face, picking out lightAuto-Painting strands of hair, thisand will add definiincrease the Saturation about 52% tion and contrast to thetohead. 17. Open the Underpainting panel (Window> Auto-Painting panels) and increase the Saturation to about 52%

18. In the Layers options panel menu select Drop All to flatten the layers. 19. Make a copy of the layer by Select> Select All, activate the Layer

FIG 10.5 (Opposite) Detail from completed picture

Adjuster tool in the Toolbox and click in the picture area. This will move the picture from the Canvas onto a layer. Then right click the layer and select Duplicate Layer. 20. With the duplicate layer active, Effects> Equalize, move the Black slider Layers options menu 18. Intothe 100% and the White panel slider to 12% select Drop All to flatten the layers. 19.21.Make copyMask of thebylayer byon Select> Select All, activate activatethe the Layer Add aaLayer clicking the mask icon and mask by clicking on theinmask in the Layers Adjuster tool the Toolbox and palette. click in the picture area. This will move 22.the In picture the Colorfrom palette, the cursor the Black andlayer and themove Canvas onto aposition layer. to Then right corner click the then Edit> Fill> Fill with Current Color, which will hide all of the adjustselect Duplicate Layer. ment. 20. With the duplicate layer active, Effects> Equalize, move the Black slider 23. Select the Tinting> Basic Round brush and change the painting color to toWhite. 100%With andthe thelayer White slider topaint 12%over the face of the dog, this will mask active 21. Add a Layer MaskAdjust by clicking the mask icon and activate the mask by brighten the face. the layeron opacity if required.

clicking on the mask in the Layers palette.

22. In the Color palette, move the cursor position to the Black corner and 4

FIG 10.5 (Opposite) Detail from completed picture

then Edit> Fill> Fill with Current Color, which will hide all of the adjustment. 23. Select the Tinting> Basic Round brush and change the painting color to White. With the layer mask active paint over the face of the dog, this will brighten the face. Adjust the layer opacity if required.

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Digital Paint Magazine - November 2011

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Painter 12 for Photographers

Sargent brush - Boxer Animals In this project the brush used is one that breaks up the original very strongly but after the initial painting the details will be brought back without losing the distinctive brush strokes of the variant. This is not an easy brush to use and it will take quite a while to complete the picture, but it will give a very distinctive finish which is completely different to the original photograph.

1. Open ‘Boxer’ the original very strongly ht back without losing the an easy brush to use and it t will give a very distinctive hotograph.

rongly ng the e and it tinctive

Reduce the brush size to 20.4 and paint over again, paying especial attention to following the lines of the hair and the variations of light and dark. It is important to remember that this brush drags one color into the next, so take care not to drag light areas into dark and vice versa. The best way to avoid doing this is to make short brush strokes and using only one tone or color.

7.

Reduce the brush size to 10 to add more detail. Start with the eyes and carefully define the shapes, enlarge the image on screen to see clearly and switch Tracing Paper on and off to check the progress. When you have done the eyes, move on to the white of the nose, this is a difficult part to paint, you will need to pull the white in amongst the black and vice versa to get the right mix of tones. Pick out the ear on the right by running the brush down the edge and then use the brush in the other direction, pulling away from the line on

FIG 10.13 Picture at steps 5 and 6

FIG 10.11 Original photograph

Animals FIG 10.11 Original photograph

2. 3. 4. 5.

File> Quick Clone. Select the Artists> Sargent brush, size 56.2 strength 22%. Use the Clone Color option in the Color palette. Paint over the whole photograph, follow the lines of the hair at all times. This will result in a very rough first step as you can see in Figure 10.12.

FIG 10.12 Picture at step 5

FIG 10.11 Original photograph

rength 22%. e. nes of the hair at all times. u can see in Figure 10.12.

times. 10.12.

6.

FIG 10.12 Picture at step 5

8. 9.

FIG 10.12 Picture at step 5

Digital Paint Magazine - November 2011

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Animals

Painter 12 for Photographers

13. Go to Effects> Apply Surface Texture and select Image Luminance,

10.

each side, this removes the hard line but emphasises the edge. Make the brush smaller again to 5 and paint carefully over the eyes, then over the edges of the white nose, work the brush backwards and forwards over the edge always following the hair direction, this size brush will pick up small white or dark hairs and drag them out. Continue over selected parts of the head, picking out areas of light and dark.

14. FIG 10.14 Picture at steps 7 and 10

FIG 10.15 Completed picture (below) FIG 10.16 (Opposite) Detail of finished picture

15.

Amount 30%, Picture 100% and Shine and Reflection 0%. This will add an appearance of depth to the brush strokes. Now to add a canvas texture, create another copy layer then select Artists Canvas in the Papers panel and increase the Scale to 200%. Go to Effects> Apply Surface Texture and in the top box select Paper, Amount 50%, Picture 100% and Shine and Reflection 0%. If either of these textures are too intrusive you can reduce the layer opacity.

11. At this stage it can get addictive and it is difficult to know when to stop, if

12.

it is now 3.00am I guess you should stop and get some sleep! Seriously, every time you reduce the brush size, you are painting less and it is usually better not to be tempted to over paint too much, but is your choice. I think this picture could benefit from adding some textures, this is covered in more detail in the Paper Textures chapter. It is better to apply this to a copy layer so that your original remains unaltered, so create a copy layer (With the Canvas active, Select> All, Edit> Copy and Edit> Paste)

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Changes at the Digital Painting Forum A few months ago we purchased the Digital Painting Forum from good friend and creator Marilyn Sholin. Our reasoning behind the purchase was fairly simple; I did not want to see the forum and all of the awesome content created there disappear. Marilyn was a vigilant hostess and spent a tremendous amount of time developing the forum to a healthy and robust conversation place for digital artists. It was a great place to drop by and get involved in a conversation and learn a bit at the same time. The forum had not been doing as well in last few years and most notably the last year conversation had gone down substantially to where it is virtually non-existent. Our early efforts to try and revive the forum have been fruitless. So we are making a few more changes to see where this will lead. The changes are simple. We have made the entire forum free. Ken Foster is the administrator of the forum and he just went in and updated the software for us, took the price buttons off, upgraded and made available the new galleries and made a few other small changes. The forum has few costs, a license for the software which is roughly $125 a year and hosting and storage which is about $500 or so. I am willing to bear these costs provided we can get lively, inspired and helpful conversations going. With the forum being free it does mean there is more time involved trying to keep it free from spammers. Ken has put a few things in place to help with that. I will be posting and commenting on work that is shared. We have a few contests scheduled starting this month with a giveaway for Martin Addison’s book, Painter 12 for Photographers. Specific to privacy, the forum is still not public. What I mean is the information you share and the images you put up are not available to the Google bots or any other search engine for that matter. This is a double edge sword. It means that the forum can’t be ranked using all of the great content and information inside, the only way people will find out about the forum is from other members or from seeing it on the magazine site or somewhere else. So your content is private, one has to be a member to access anything. Digital Paint Magazine - November 2011

So bottom line is that this is a last ditch effort to keep this awesome resource alive and kicking. If there is value for you there please visit and get involved in the conversation. If you are a veteran or old timer to the forum you will see and appreciate the changes that Ken has spent a tremendous amount of time putting together. If you are new to digital art or digital painting, ask questions. If you are an experienced painter share your successes and failures. Literally thousands of folks have used the forum and the information contained within to learn digital painting or to improve their painting. There is also information specific to marketing, embellishment and a host of other topics. I know people are busier now than ever before. My personal focus and time changes greatly depending on the year and even season. More commissions mean less time to teach, learn and explore; finding a good balance has always been an issue for me as it is for most people. The forum has its own ebb and flow of traffic and conversation. If you would like to see it grow again and be of continued value, stop in and get involved. If you are not a member you can join for free here http://www. digitalpaintingforum. com/forum/index. php?showtopic=14384 9


http: //cargocollective.com/victorlunnroc “Turner’s Knowing Sea” Turner’s riposte to criticism that he had painted a ship with no portholes Digital Paint Magazine - November 2011

Victor Lunn-Rockliffe

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Rick Parker Rick Parker is a photographer and digital artist. Over the last twenty years Rick has acquired skills from studying with several world renown portrait artists and master photographers. He specializes in one of a kind heirloom and portrait paintings. www.virtualgraphicsbyrick.com

“Companions�

Digital Paint Magazine - November 2011

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The Old Masters J.M.W. Turner, (1775-1851) By Nadia Lim Renowned English painter and watercolorist, Joseph Mallord William Turner also known as J.M.W Turner is mostly distinguished for his exploration of the effects of light. His work has influenced the great Impressionists during the later 19th century such as the well-known painters Monet and Pissarro. His paintings made him the most famous figure in English landscape painting in the first half of the 19th century. J.M.W Turner was the son of a wig-maker and barber. He was born in London and during the late 1780s he took lessons from the draughtsman and watercolorist Thomas Malton. During his early lessons with Malton, he showed that he was extremely gifted in the arts and by the age of 14, got into the Royal Academy schools. His first exhibit of artworks with watercolors as the medium includes architectural subjects like the Archbishop’s Palace in Lambeth which dates back to 1790. His first exhibited oil painting which is the Fishermen at Sea was first seen in the Tate Gallery in London in 1796. During the year 1793, he became friends with the Dr. Thomas Monro, a well known art lover.It was in Dr. Monro’s house that he worked with Thomas Girtin in replicating the landscapes made by the principal watercolorist of the mid 18th century, John Robert Cozens. Several of the aristocrats including the Earl of Harewood and the Earl of Essex took notice of Turner’s talent and it was Turner who specially made the paintings showing the topographical views of their estates. During the late 1790s he embarked on Digital Paint Magazine - November 2011

Angel standing in the sun

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Calais Pier

Digital Paint Magazine - November 2011

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a journey throughout northern England and Wales. In this journey otherwise known as sketching tours, he created stunning views of the abbeys, castles, bridges and cathedrals. One of his works, the Dolbadarn Castle in Northern Wales which showed the influence of the magnificent landscapes of the English painter Richard Wilson became his diploma piece to become a full Royal Academician in 1802. It was also in this work that Turner, as an artist, was mounting a certain interest in the effects of natural light. His famous works include Shipwreck and Calais Pier for its dramatic seascapes which imitates the styles of the Dutch marine painters in the 17th century, the Hannibal and his Army Crossing the Alps and Dido Building Carthage which influenced the works of Claude Lorrain. Turner opened his own gallery in 1804 in Central London. While having his own gallery behind his house in Harley Street, he still continued to showcase his works at the Royal Academy. In 1807, he was voted Professor of Perspective at the Royal Academy which he held until 1837. He and his followers were given the term “white painters” by reactionary critics after Turner began using white and light tones instead of the earthcolored grounds in the 1810s.

Dido Building Carthage

Digital Paint Magazine - November 2011

Rain, steam and speed

During his lifetime, J.M.W Turner’s work was always maligned by critics. However, he was always admired and commended by his colleagues in the Arts. He was particularly defended by John Ruskin who made a survey of landscape painting in Modern Painters of which Turner was the principal figure. J.M.W Turner’s works had increased public appreciation after the survey was published in 1843. Turner was always proud of his achievements and knew that one day he would become a famous figure in the history of English painting. Before his death, Turner planned in his will to leave all his finished oil paintings to the nation. The family contested his will and in 1856 a settlement was made. All the works in the artist’s possession, which includes 20,000 of his drawings and 300 paintings, were donated to the National Gallery in London. The Turner collection was displayed at the Tate Gallery in London from 1897 and in 1987 the collection was transferred to the Clore Gallery, an extension built solely for the Turner Collection. The Turner Prize was established in 1984 and was named after J.M.W Turner. This annual prize is awarded to the person who has made the greatest contribution to art in Great Britain. 14


An Angel By Annell L. Metsker “She’s a little angel,” I remember thinking as I created the painting found on the cover of this issue. It was commissioned by a client right after the baby’s second birthday. This image is particularly sentimental to me, and brought home the importance of our work to our clients and their families in a compelling way. I had photographed this child about twice a year from the time she was three months old, and had created a mother-baby painting from an earlier session. I did not realize how attached I had become to this family until I got a call one Sunday morning: the mother and child had been killed in a car accident the night before. Those images and paintings were a tangible part of the family’s memories and became so much more important following their loss. What we do as photographers and painters in creating portraits of our

An Angel, 01

Digital Paint Magazine - November 2011

m o r f t s a l A B ast the P An Angel, 02

clients captures the essence of who they are. How shocking it was to receive that phone call and realize that little girl really is an angel now! At one of my outdoor sets at my home studio, I wanted back-lighting to create more depth in the portrait of this little girl, and I used natural light with a warm reflector. In the original image I increased the density and saturation in Photoshop. I also duplicated the image and took some extra flowers from that image and added them to the lower right foreground and upper right background, visible in “An Angel-01-color.” When painting, I don’t worry much about cleaning up the added pieces as they will be blended in as the work progresses. I wanted to increase the softness around her with the foreground flowers, create more depth, and tone down that hot spot in the background. I next took the image into Corel Painter and added color to the image using Den’s Oil Bristle Brush, as is visible in “An Angel-01-color.” The addition of color in the highlights and shadows adds great dimension. I then made a clone copy, (“An Angel-02-paint”) and painted the entire image. I used Den’s Oil Bristle Brush, then switched to Sable Chisel Tip Water Brush for details on the subject’s face. I blended parts of the image with Darrell’s Bristle Blender where I wanted more softness. 15


An Angel, 03-muck

An Angel, 05-texture

An Angel, 04-emerge

I cloned the painted image, (“An Angel-03-muck”) and made an abstract out of it using Den’s Oil Funky Chunky. I used a combination of color modes on the clone to create an overall soft blended abstract. In the next version, (An Angel-04-emerge) using the soft cloner over the mucked image, I created a soft wash over the entire painting. I started with the subject’s face and the area close to it using an opacity of about 5 - 7% and gradually worked out to the borders. Next I cloned that image and created texture using image luminance as is visible in “An Angel-05-texture.” Again, I used a clone copy of the emerge version to clone texture into specific areas of the image with the soft cloner, visible in “An Angel-06-emergetex.” The final version was created in Photoshop by adjusting levels, curves, hue and saturation to put the ‘punch’ back in the image. This image was signed and saved as final. My painting was printed with an Epson 9800 printer on Lyve canvas from Breathing Color, sealed with Glamour II Gloss Veneer and embellished with water-mixable oils to create more depth and brilliance. Producing a finished, painted canvas from a photographic image is

Digital Paint Magazine - November 2011

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An Angel, 06-emergetex

a multi-step process that requires practice, experimentation, and command of a wide array of skills. In addition, it is an art unto itself. If interested in a collegial consultation or commissioning a painting of your image, I will be happy to help. Please contact me at Annell.com, or at my studio: 704.847.8281 Annell has received many State, Regional and National Awards. Named “Photographer of the Year� by PPNC in 1995 and 1999, her awards have included many first place awards in the categories of pictorial, groups, illustrative and women. She has been honored with a Kodak Epcot Award, a Fuji Masterpiece Award and a Kodak Gallery Award. Her work has been published in Art Acquisitor, Professional Photographer, Rangefinder, Rainbow, and Carolina Photographer. Her art has been exhibited by PPA, Epcot, B. Brown Gallery, Amsterdam Whitney Gallery and hangs in many private collections across the U.S. Annell has a portrait studio in Charlotte, N.C. where she specializes in heirloom portraits of children and families. Her work can be seen at Blue Valley Gallery in Cashiers, NC, Hawkins Studio Gallery in Charlotte, NC and at www.annell.com. Digital Paint Magazine - November 2011

A Night at the Library Club

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Left: With The Wind Below left: The Port at Positano Below: Showtime

A Girl’s First Love Eyes of Innocence

Digital Paint Magazine - November 2011

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Annell has received many State, Regional and National Awards. Named “Photographer of the Year� by PPNC in 1995 and 1999, her awards have included many first place awards in the categories of pictorial, groups, illustrative and women. She has been honored with a Kodak Epcot Award, a Fuji Masterpiece Award and a Kodak Gallery Award. Her work has been published in Art Acquisitor, Professional Photographer, Rangefinder, Rainbow, and Carolina Photographer. Her art has been exhibited by PPA, Epcot, B. Brown Gallery, Amsterdam Whitney Gallery and hangs in many private collections across the U.S. Annell has a portrait studio in Charlotte, N.C. where she specializes in heirloom portraits of children and families. Her work can be seen at Blue Valley Gallery in Cashiers, NC, Hawkins Studio Gallery in Charlotte, NC and at www.annell.com.

Digital Paint Magazine - November 2011

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Marketing Buzz By Tim O’Neill

Video Marketing And Its Advantages • Part One What Is Video Marketing? Let me explain why video marketing is so important and why you absolutely need to factor a video marketing strategy into your marketing agenda. Businesses are now spending more money advertising online than they are on TV. Over 20 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube every minute. Over 1 billion videos are viewed on the popular video sharing website every day and people now spend more time watching video content online than they spend watching TV. It’s not surprising then that video marketing is the fastest growing area on the web. Nothing else comes close to the effectiveness of this medium as a marketing tool. If you are not promoting your business now using video marketing you are in serious danger of being left behind by your competition. So what exactly is video marketing and why is it so popular? At its simplest level, video marketing involves taking video content and distributing it widely on the Internet in a very focused and very structured way. The popularity of video as a viable marketing strategy is largely due to Google’s universal search feature. Universal search was introduced by Google in 2007. Universal search meant that when you typed your query into Google the results the search engine delivered were not just webpages, but a mix of webpages, photos and video results. Type any search directly into Google and you are likely to find that image and video results rank at the top of the page, often ahead of heavyweights such as Amazon. This prominent placement of video clips right at the top of Google’s search results has contributed to the explosion in video marketing. Using video to promote your product, brand or service is one extremely low Digital Paint Magazine - November 2011

cost way of promoting online.  Production costs need not be through the roof. There are many free tools available to help you create video content at zero cost. The popularity of video has exploded over the past year and is only set to grow in the future. No other medium has the global reach you get with video at such a low cost. Video is a powerful SEO tool but the point is that not only Google and search engine loves Google but people do too. So why is video so popular with viewers? It’s simple. Video is far more engaging than text. Whatever you want to explain you will explain much better with video. Whatever you’re selling, video will show your customers how it works and explain it better than any other medium. Provide high quality interesting content and you’ll start to bring viewers into your sales funnel and build relationships with them. Video marketing is an extremely cost effective way of ranking highly in Google’s search results and therefore a low cost way of generating new sales and inquiries for businesses. It is also an effective way of raising your reputation, and pushing ahead of your competition. It’s not surprising then that many businesses are now taking advantage of the competitive edge they can gain from video marketing. As a visual artist we have even more reason to use video than a business that is not based on aesthetics. It is a perfect way to show case your work while at the same time giving your blog or website some serious Google mojo. If you’re not yet using video marketing, ask yourself this important question. Would you prefer the 1000s of potential customers you wish to attract watching what you do or watching the videos of your competitors? Stay with us as we venture into video marketing how-to’s in upcoming issues of Digital Paint Magazine.

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November Issue of Digital Paint Magazine  

Martin Addison, Tim ONeill,, Victor Rockliffe and other artist are featured in this issue

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