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DIGITAL ART CR E ATION AUGUST 2012

W H AT ’ S I N S I D E : Digital Paint-The New Medium

Settling Your Copyright Infringement Claim Defeating the Fine Art Reproduction Paradox Selecting Rendering Intent

the truth

about the color wheel


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THE PUBLISHER’S CORNER

Summer is cranking out high heat and forcing me inside more of the time so I have not been capturing as much imagery. The flip side of that is that I have been sitting at the monitor more and creating more post capture work as well as more time working with silk, canvas, oil and dyes. Fun stuff! This month we have a nice variety of information for you. We are still trying to get our hands and heads wrapped around the techy stuff involved with publishing on the iPad. Ugh. It has been a steep learning curve with a ton of mistakes, be gentle. I think we have the first batch of them ironed out. This month Skip Allen shares a nice bit of information specific to palettes, Carol Wright shares some images and legal information and we profile Melissa Gallo’s paintings. We have some other information inside from cartoon master Victor, Color theory continuation from Scott Naismith and a cool article on printing about selecting rendering intent We are still looking for contributors, proof readers and creatives in general that have a passion for digital art creation. We need ideas for people to profile and interview, how-to information, videos and nice imagery to share with our readers. If you have any interest, let us know. We have a page on the website at digitalcreation. com just for that. It is up now, if it does not show up when you check it means we have more work going on. Live well, Love much and Laugh often This magazine link is free to distribute. You may however not edit any part of this PDF, copy the content, or split the pages. This PDF must remain whole at all times, the content of which belongs to Digital Art Creation. All art and trademarks contained herein are the property of their respective owners..

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Tim

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In This Issue 5 10

DIGITAL PAINT-THE NEW MEDIUM by Melissa Gallo

Settling Your Copyright Infringement Claim: Specific vs. General Releases By Carolyn E. Wright, Esq.

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Old Masters Pierre-Auguste Renoir By Nadia Lim

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Right Click Corel Painter 12 Real Watercolor Painting Demo By Skip Allen

20 24 26 Cover

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“Harrison”

Cartoon By Victor Lunn-Rockliffe

Marketing Buzz: Happy Little Clouds Post Print The Truth About the Colorwheel By Scott Naismith

Melissa Gallo

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Defeating the Fine Art Reproduction Paradox and Selecting Redering Intent

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DIGITAL PAINT-THE NEW MEDIUM By Melissa Gallo

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uscious “oil” paint, a myriad of surfaces to work on, a thousand brushes and “control z” ...That’s why I love digital oil painting!

But it wasn’t always that way.... I was a paperback romance illustrator for 20 years, working for major publishing houses such as Dell, Harlequin, and Warner Publishing in New York, and Mondadori Publishing in Milan. That was before the age of computers. I worked in acrylics, applying them using a watercolor method on matte illustration board, and I can tell you that when a painting was done, it was done. There was no way to correct it, or move everything over to the left at the behest of the art director, without causing major problems. I would literally have to erase and scratch away the acrylic paint from the board, or start the painting all over again--a tremendous waste of time and money!

on being a full time mom to our five children. Eventually After many years of this I I grew more and more took a break to concentrate interested in photography

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Pink Rose by Melissa Gallo

and started my own photography business in 2007, ravenously devouring everything that had to

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do with cameras and Photoshop. Then, one day along the way, I picked up a Photoshop magazine that had a digital oil painting on the front cover. I was a purist at the time (shameful) and believed that digital painting could never match the beauty and elegance found in traditional painting. This particular cover painting truly looked as though it had been painted using real oils on canvas, and I was intrigued. “How could that possibly be a digital painting?� I wondered. So I opened the magazine, turned to the article where the technique was explained in Photoshop, and fell in love. I became obsessed with digital oil painting. I worked on replicating the look of a traditional oil portrait and discovered that I could create one in a fraction of the time that it took to do a traditional oil painting. I could also erase anything and change the color of the entire image with ease. It was amazing and wonderful! Krystle by Melissa Gallo

Silk and Roses by Melissa Gallo

Now I work primarily in Corel Painter 12 and paint from my own images that I take, shooting with very directional lighting, which lends an Old World feeling to my paintings. I can do things that I was never able to do before, changing my linen canvas to a watercolor surface, flipping, skewing, and embellishing my creations in unimaginable ways, replicating color schemes and textures from other favorite images and developing

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my “paint tubes” away. Working as a digital artist, combining my photography I believe that the computer, with digital oil painting, a graphics tablet, and a I find that I have more painting program such as freedom than ever before. Corel Painter or Photoshop now constitute the new art I still must contend with medium. I won’t let anyone those who insist that digital artwork cannot hold tell me that traditional a candle to traditional painting methods are media. However, it should better. How could that be be remembered that oil when we now have more paints did not become tools at our disposal? popular in Europe until Painting with traditional the 15th century. Before media feels as though then,everyone was working someone took some of a myriad of my own digital brushes.

Melissa Gallo is the owner of Melissa Gallo Photography© and Painted Textures©. She lives and works in central Florida as a fine art photographer and digital oil painter where she resides with her husband and their two remaining children at home.

http://www.melissagallophotography.com

Mount Vernon by Melissa Gallo

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in tempera and resisted working with the new oil medium. So, I say to artists everywhere, “Wake up to the 21st century! The possibilities are endless!”

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The ballerina by Melissa Gallo

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You can see more of Melissa’s artwork on melissagallophotography. com and paintedtextures. com Find her on Facebook at: facebook.com/ portraitureandpainting facebook.com/ paintedtextures Still Life by Melissa Gallo Seattle Park by Melissa Gallo

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Sow fight by Carolyn E Wright

SETTLING YOUR COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT CLAIM: SPECIFIC VS. GENERAL RELEASES By Carolyn E. Wright, Esq.

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t’s great to settle a copyright infringement claim. You’re finally going to get paid for that unauthorized use. But don’t move too fast. The dispute may not be over. When settling a copyright infringement claim, many infringers will ask you to sign a written settlement agreement and/or a

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release. The document usually states the claim that you’ve made, identifies the parties, and tells how much the infringer is going to pay you. The important part of the document is the release of your claim. In sum, you’re giving up the right to sue the infringer for the copyright infringement in

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exchange for money or some other consideration. But some infringers will ask you to sign what is known as a “General Release,” which is a release of all claims – and may include claims that you don’t even know about. The language often looks like this: Except for the agreements, obligations and covenants

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arising under this Agreement, [Photographer] releases, remises and forever discharges [Infringer] from any claims, demands, damages, losses, costs, expenses, fees, actions, agreements, promises, debts, causes of action or suits of any kind or nature whatsoever, direct or indirect, known or unknown, suspected or unsuspected, that [Photographer] has, claims to have, or at any time hereafter may have or claim to have against anyone released by this paragraph, by reason of any matter, cause, omission, or commission occurring from the beginning of time to the date of this Agreement. If you sign this document and the infringer has infringed other of your photographs, has keyed your car, has defamed you, or has done other bad things to you that you may not even  know about, you cannot recover or sue the infringer for any of it. If the infringer is paying you enough Lion Water Approach by Carolyn E Wright Merlin in Rain by Carolyn E Wright

money and you’ve done your due diligence as to how the infringer may have otherwise damaged you, then you may agree to sign a General Release. Otherwise, you likely will want to limit the agreement to a Specific Release — that is, a release only for the claim that you have made against the infringer. For example, in the Settlement Agreement and Release available here, the “Claim” is identified as the specific copyright infringement claim made against the infringer for the unauthorized use of your photograph  and the release is limited to claims and damages related to the Claim. That way, if you later find that the infringer also previously infringed another of your photos, then

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you may make another claim or sue the infringer for the unreleased claim. So, while you may want to quickly endorse that settlement check, don’t be so quick to sign the release that goes with it.

Wolfshadow by Carolyn E. Wright

Wild dogs swim by Carolyn E. Wright

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Elephant Dust Up by Carolyn E. Wright

Copyright Carolyn E. Wright, Esq. www.photoattorney.com Carolyn E. Wright is a licensed attorney dedicated to the legal needs for photographers. Get the latest in legal information at Carolyn’s website, www.photoattorney. com. These and other legal tips for photographers are available in Carolyn’s book, The Photographer’s Legal Guide, available on her website. http://www.photoattorney.com   NOTE: The information provided here is for educational purposes only. If you have legal concerns or need legal advice, be sure to consult with an attorney.

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ABO UT CAR O LYN Carolyn E. Wright is an attorney whose practice is aimed squarely at the needs of photographers and other copyright owners.  Carolyn understands the special issues that confront both professional and amateur photographers alike. A professional photographer herself, Carolyn has the credentials

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photo book, “Captivating Wildlife - Images from the Top 10 Emerging Wildlife Photographers,” by Scott Bourne and David Middleton. In addition, she is working on a photo book documenting the beauty and strength of wolves.

and the experience to protect your rights. Carolyn previously practiced law with the Atlanta law firms of King & Spalding, one of the top 50 firms in the nation, and Neely & Player for more than 10 years. She has represented major clients in multimillion dollar litigation, but now helps photographers with their careers. Carolyn also is the author of the “Photographer’s Legal Guide” and she provides free legal information for photographers on her blog: www.photoattorney.com. While her legal credentials are among the best in the business, Carolyn thinks it is important to keep ties with the photographic community. That’s why she maintains an active wildlife photography business at www.vividwildlife.com. Her photos are included in the D I G I TA L A R T C R E AT I O N

Carolyn also enjoys teaching, writing and speaking about photography. She is a regular leader of photography workshops, a moderator and columnist for www.Naturescapes. net (an online resource for nature photographers), and on the Advisory Council for the Picture Licensing Universal System (PLUS) (www.useplus.org), a worldwide coalition to define and standardize the core aspects of image licensing and its management. Education and Honors:  Carolyn graduated from Emory University School of Law with a Juris Doctor. She earned an American Jurisprudence Award for Legal Writing, Research and Advocacy and was awarded second place in the Nathan Burkham Legal Writing Competition on Copyright. She was the President of the Sports and Entertainment Law Society, Executive Candidacy Editor for the Emory Bankruptcy Developments Journal, and was selected the “most

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outstanding female law student.” Carolyn also graduated from Tennessee Technological University with a Masters of Business Administration degree and a Bachelor’s of Science degree in music.  She was a member of Omicron Delta Kappa (national leadership honor society), was an Outstanding Young Woman of America and was awarded a four-year music scholarship. Areas of Practice:  Intellectual property, including copyright and trademark law, rights of privacy and publicity, contracts and licensing, general business and commercial law, and commercial and tort litigation. Professional Associations and Memberships:  North American Nature Photographers Association, Editorial Photographers, Women in Photography International (Charter Member), Picture Licensing Universal System (PLUS) (Advisory Council), American Society of Media Photographers (ASMP) (Associate Member), the Copyright Society of the U.S.A.

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PIERRE-AUGUSTE RENOIR By Nadia Lim

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of his art works showcase very day people the effect of sunlight on breathe in and out art in their lives. Many different objects with people won’t see it that way but even a simplest glance defines art. Art is a form of expression reflected on different medium. And one very popular medium when it comes to art is painting. Painting on its own contains a lot of genre as well. One of which is the impressionist art. On this style of painting, the artist confines the image of the subject in a way how a simple glimpse on the subject would look like. Just like the word impression means, it is the feel or sense we get upon looking on something. When we talk of impressionist art the name Pierre-Auguste Renoir would probably be the greatest way to describe it.

vibrant and saturated colors. He also loved working people especially

Renoir was one of the greatest impressionist artists in the world. He has done many masterpieces in the impressionist mode. Most

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on the physique of a female subject. The details on his work blended in natural way that leaves a sense of softness and comfort that is very relaxing to the eye. ‘Two Sisters (On the Terrace)’ is one of his works. He made this oil painting on the year 1881. The painting suggests that the scene was taken on a spring time because the vines in the terrace rail have just bloomed. The harmony of light and dark shaded colors further highlights the girls in the image. He also obviously used contrasting colors on the girls’ dress to further create balance on the painting. A decade after he made the ‘Two Sisters (On the Terrace)’, the French government summoned Renoir to create a painting for the then newly built museum which is the Musee du Luxemburg. You can see how the emotion of the subject was dinsctictively captured in this painting. The details and shading are flawless and you can see in this picture the amount of effort he put into this painting. He did a great job in creating the innocent and domestic theme. The choice of colors he used also sets a light but sincere tone in this work of art.

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Among Renoir’s well known art works, ‘The Boy with the Cat’ is probably the most significant in his career as a painter. He made this painting on the year 1868. This marked the turning point of his career after experiencing rejection from the Salons on the years before he completed oil painting. The devious look on the boy’s eyes remains to be a mystery until today. You can see the shading he used to define the boy’s toned body is so simple yet so natural. You can sense the passion the cat and the boy share on how the boy embraced the cat and the way the cat laid its hand on the boy’s arm. The choice of color he used suggests strong emotions of melancholy.

and frequently-replicated works in the history of art. He left young artist an inspiration that despite the obstacles that may come their way, they could still be successful in their craft if they just persevere and believe in themselves.

As a creative artist, he was able to complete thousand paintings. The affectionate sensuality and passion of Renoir’s style made his work some of the most popular

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COREL PAINTER 12 REAL WATERCOLOR PAINTING DEMO BY SKIP ALLEN Hello Everyone,

this class I am going to demystify brush making It is amazing how easy it During the first part of the and turn it into a fun is to emulate traditional watercolor class, as we experience. Do plan to watercolor in Painter 12, would do if we were taking experiment in this class and and it is a lot of fun. I a traditional watercolor keep a sense of discovery decided to do another class, we will focus on brush in your attitude. Brush painting demo for a couple use and how to develop making is like panning of reasons. The first is I love washes and other typical for gold, but you are painting with the new real watercolor marks. I find guaranteed to strike it rich. watercolor brush engine, that most, including me, and I am having a blast Follow me as I create Bud have difficulty because making new brushes. The Vase. The last time I tried we do not play with the second is to let everyone to demo a painting, it took brushes enough and know that I am teaching develop a feel for how they 7 videos, which is way over a class at the Digital Art the top too many. This time behave. Is it wet, is it dry, Academy called The Basics will it run, will it diffuse, can I painted the image and of Watercolor in Painter then in the video, explained it pick up color, and many 12, which begins Oct 22; other questions need to be the process by revealing registration is now open. My answered. Little by little, layers in the order they custom watercolor brushes we build our knowledge were done. I have posted that I keep promising will the video on my blog, Skip of how real watercolor be ready by then, hopefully brushes emulate the look, Allen Paints. To get to the sooner. You do not have to video on my blog, click not necessarily the feel, of join the class to get them; I traditional watercolor. here. While you are there, will post them on my blog. look around and download But before I forget, I want my brushes; all are free. With the basic class in to mention that I am also mind, I did this very simple going to teach a class Skip watercolor. called The Basics of Brush Making in Painter 12. In

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Bud Vase 1

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DEFEATING THE FINE ART REPRODUCTION PARADOX AND SELECTING RENDERING INTENT

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ne of the most common problems experienced in the fine art reproduction workflow is making the original artist happy with the reproductions you are able to create. Artists expend a lot of time, effort and talent creating an original piece of art, so it may be difficult to get them to accept a reproduction that doesn’t match their original exactly. There are two things that you can do to make the artist more excepting and grateful of your version of their work: Set their expectations and use materials with a large color gamut. Setting Expectations Setting expectations is the most important thing that you can do for an artist. By properly setting D I G I TA L A R T C R E AT I O N

Sunset Reserve Matte Canvas Print

expectations, they are more likely to accept a print that is not an exact match of their original. More importantly, you will prevent them from taking their business elsewhere.

your printer only has 7-11 colors (depending on the make and model), you will not be able to re-create their print exactly.

A good idea is to buy a 16-color and 64-color box of crayons and show them Many times an artist will to the customer. Explain create his or her original piece using a large amount that they created the art with the 64-color box, but of different colors. Since

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Therefore, you have artists you only have the 16-color box available to re-create it. who demand the largest color gamut possible That usually hits home. requesting their work be Now your customer should reproduced on materials easily understand that with the smallest color your printer does not have gamut. an unlimited color gamut. The next step is to reassure The easiest way to increase the output color gamut them that no such printer is to change the material exists. If you have a wide you are using to print. format inkjet printer from Luster and gloss materials Canon, Epson or HP that has been manufactured in have a larger color gamut because those surfaces the last two or three years, are usually smoother than then you can tell your matte finish surfaces. This customer with confidence smoothness allows more that there are no other light to bounce off of the printers out there that can print and directly back into do a better job than the one your currently own. This the viewer’s eyes, creating richer colors, including will keep your customer blacks. from looking to your competition. If your customer wants a print on canvas, then In order for you to be able to make this promise, however, you must update your printer if the newer technology offers a significant increase in color gamut.

print it on a gloss canvas instead of a matte canvas. Your color gamut increases significantly with this simple switch (see Figure 1). If your customer absolutely has to have a matte finish canvas, then you can use a matte coating on the canvas. If your customer wants a print on fine art paper, then print it on the awardwinning Sunset Fibre Papers, which come in various finishes: Sunset Fibre Satin, Sunset Fibre Gloss, Sunset Fibre Gloss Natural and Sunset Fibre Elite. They offer an elegant, high-end finish that emulates the fibre prints of the traditional darkroom. Compared to a watercolor

Selecting Material with a Large Color Gamut The paradox of fine art printing is this‌ Materials with matte finishes are usually preferred when doing fine art reproductions. Most of the time an artist will specify a matte canvas or matte water color paper. Due to the coatings of these materials and the physics of light, they traditionally Figure 1: Sunset Select Gloss Canvas has a 305% larger color have a smaller color gamut gamut than a typical matte canvas. than all other papers. D I G I TA L A R T C R E AT I O N

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them to use and then think nothing more of it. It turns out that this selection can have a huge effect on how your image appears, and should therefore be understood fully. Rendering Intents are mathematical rules on how to deal with out-of-gamut colors when moving from one color space to another. In other words, chances are that when you print an image there will be colors that your camera captured that are impossible for your printer to reproduce. Figure 2: Sunset Fibre Elite has a 157% larger color gamut than a typical matte fine art paper. paper, their color gamut is significantly larger (see Figure 2). There’s also Sunset Fibre Matte if your customer insists on using a matte fibre paper, but they’ll need to keep in mind that its color gamut is less than that of the other Sunset Fibre papers. Again, it’s about setting expectations. With a larger color gamut, your printer or RIP’s color engine will have to remap fewer colors. That means more of the artist’s original colors will be hit by the printer. Your customer may not like the finish of the gloss canvas or fibre papers unprinted; it’s quite subjective. However, they will most likely appreciate the fact that these materials produce a copy D I G I TA L A R T C R E AT I O N

closer to their original art.

The printer driver can’t just delete the sections of the images it can’t reproduce or you would get images with large sections of nothing. Therefore, the driver changes those outof-gamut colors to colors it can actually hit. The method it uses to do this is a Rendering Intent.

To be sure, print their image on matte and gloss canvas, Sunset Fibre Elite and fine art paper and let them make the decision. I am sure they will pick the paper with the larger color gamut You may or may not have almost every time. noticed that every time you Also, try the relative hit print, there’s a Rendering colorimetric rendering Intent option. You can see intent when reproducing it in the Photoshop print fine art, as it shifts fewer window. If you open up that colors in the process. drop-down menu you will see there are four options… How to Find the Right Rendering Intent

Many people who print see the Rendering Intent option and are not exactly sure what it is and how it works. They usually select a Rendering Intent option a friend or colleague tells

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Perceptual: The Perceptual Rendering Intent is a good option for photographers. When using this option, the driver will take the out-of-gamut colors and move them to the closest in-gamut colors, which is a good thing. It

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will then shift the in-gamut colors so the relationship between all the colors remains the same. For example, let’s say you have a dark blue next to a red in a picture and that dark blue is out of gamut but the red is in gamut. The Perceptual Rendering Intent will change that blue to a blue that it can hit. However, it will also change the red (even though it could reproduce it because it is in gamut) so that the relationship between the red and blue is maintained. Most color gamuts get larger when you go to lighter colors. A printer can’t hit that many dark rich colors, but it can hit a large number of pastels. Therefore, in order to bring colors in gamut and maintain relationships the Perceptual Rendering Intent will often lighten or de-saturate the image. It is the best rendering intent for printing transitions and gradients because its main goal is to preserve the color relationships. Therefore, a gradient moving from dark blue to light blue will appear smooth with this rendering intent. Relative Colorimetric: The Relative Colorimetric Rendering Intent is also a good option for photographers, but it comes with certain risks. Relative Colorimetric will

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also move the out-of-gamut colors to the closest ingamut color. However, it will not change any of the ingamut colors. As in the example above, let’s say you have a dark blue that is out of gamut next to a red that is in gamut. The Relative Colorimetric Rendering Intent will also change that blue to the closest blue it can hit, but it will not change the red that is in gamut. Therefore, the red is closer to the red you originally shot, but the relationship between that red and blue has been visually compromised. The goal of Relative Colorimetric Rendering Intent is to alter the colors in the image as little as possible. Therefore it will be less likely to desaturate an image to bring it into gamut. It is not a good option for printing gradients, however, because the gradient will appear rather choppy.

papers since matte images naturally look less saturated. If you print with the Perceptual Rendering Intent it may de-saturate that image even further, leaving the print looking washed out. Saturation: The Saturation Rendering Intent’s main goal is to preserve saturation over color. So if there’s a dark blue that is out of gamut, then the driver may switch it to a dark green because it has a closer saturation. This option is to be used only for charts and graphs, like pie charts. I can’t imagine a situation where a photographer or other graphics professional would see a blue sky shift to a green sky in certain areas and be happy with that result.

Absolute: This is used for proofing. Let’s say you want to proof a newspaper print that is done on a yellowish or warm stock by an offset press. You are printing the proof on your inkjet printer Picture a front-lit head onto a bright white stock. shot… As the light fades You can set the white point away toward the side of the of an ICC profile so that head, the flesh shifts from it replicates that warm or highlights to midtones to yellow white point of that shadows. Perceptual will newspaper stock. In order handle this shift smoothly. to use that custom white With Relative Colorimetric point you would select you might get weird lines Absolute Colorimetric. where it makes sudden This is also not useful for jumps in the dark areas. photographic output. However, it’s nice if you’re printing on matte

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Victor Lunn-Rockliffe

http://cargocollective.com/victorlunnroc

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M

HAPPY LITTLE CLOUDS

uch of our ability to succeed in our various business ventures will come directly back to understanding our market. PBS has in my opinion an uncanny ability to solidify the current membership while at the same time reaching out to a new and growing generational demographic. Admittedly I was a PBS kid and loved watching some of the mainstream programming. PBS a few weeks back released a few youtube videos that went viral. These vids were aimed at the new demographic by used content that most boomers will remember.

If you are having an off day or just need a pick me up check out the Happy Little Tree video featuring my favorite instructional painter, the afro laden Bob Ross. The inspirational lyrics also cater to the NLP (neuro linguistic programming) gurus and serve to lift a heavy spirit, check ‘em out.

step by step instructional canvas. Believe that you can do it, because you can videos geared towards the aspiring painter and to do it.” release them to the masses. While many have criticized I still would watch him and the Painting talent of Bob my 13 year old and 8 year Ross I think the bigger old love him. I think the Bob picture is being overlooked. Ross phenomenon is worth Bob inspired, instructed and a marketing case study encouraged thousands on its own. I won’t switch of artists. He was one of gears on you though. Take the first artists to produce

“You can almost paint with anything, all you need to do is practice. There are no limits here. This is your world, you are the creator. You have freedom on this

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a peek at the other two PBS releases that are geared for bolstering membership of an internet generation. PBS gets it. John Boswell a sound artist from Symphony of Science, aka melodysheep is the creator of the remix. Boswell is responsible for a variety of creative digital remixes including Yoda, astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson physicist Stephen Hawking. Following are a few other PBS mixes starting with Mr. Rogers. And Sesame Street standout Cookie Monster The videos are unique, creative and effective. Everything an artist needs for a superb marketing campaign.

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THE TRUTH

AB O U T T H E C O LO R WH E E L Scott Naismith

It’s a color wheel taught to everyone in schools and colleges around the world and it is, in fact, lies, technically.

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i, My name is Scott Naismith. I’m a landscape painter. You may have seen my color tutorial, “Hue and Saturation.” The color wheel that I talked about in the last video is a conventional color wheel. It’s a color wheel taught to everyone in schools and colleges around the world and it is, in fact, lies, technically. So you have a choice: you can take the blue pill and you switch off this video in

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blissful ignorance and still struggle to make a bright green or mix a vivid purple, or you can take the red pill, and I’ll show you just how deep this rabbit hole goes. To explain the true color wheel, we’ve got to explain the difference between an additive color and subtractive color. Let’s take additive color first. Additive color is the term used for color created by light. The primaries of additive color cannot be disputed.

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They can be seen at play in your TV screens and your monitors, and those primaries are red, green, and blue. Abbreviated to RGB. With additive color, we start with complete darkness: black. When these primary light sources overlap, they start to mix to get the secondary colors. When light is added together like this, the resulting mix will always be brighter. We can view these secondary’s at equal value

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color that most of us would consider to be a primary color. Looking back at the RGB light diagram, we know that if we see a blue object, it must be absorbing all the red and green light leaving only blue reflected. The conventional color wheel tells us that when we mix primary yellow with primary blue, we get secondary if we reduce the intensity of the two lights that make green. But this can’t be that secondary color. When true, because if we take yellow paint, it absorbs blue all the primary color lights light, and if we add the are mixed, we get white, absorption properties of which you can see in the blue, red, and green light, middle of this diagram. we will now have a paint So what about subtractive that absorbs all three lights, color? When we see an to some levels, which would object or substance or make that color a tertiary paint, we only see the color color, or a color that you that is not absorbed by that might call, as a painter, a substance. Black objects are absorbing all light. White objects are reflecting all that light and absorbing no light. What’s important to know when mixing paint is that absorption properties of two different colors added together, which muddy color. subtracts the amount of So the definition of a light reflected to our eyes, primary color is a color hence the subtractive color system. So let’s take a that cannot be mixed, and on the subtractive color blue object; blue being a system, i.e. mixing paint, a primary color must be a color that only absorbs one of the RGB lights. Lost? Don’t worry. Here are the real primaries for paint mixing: cyan, magenta, yellow. Some of you are familiar with CMYK, the type of color used in printers, and here’s

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a subtractive color diagram for how these colors mix, and all three of the colors mixing in the middle to make black. Black being a color that absorbs all light. So we start with white and begin to subtract the three primaries, one by one, by absorption. Cyan absorbs red; magenta the green and yellow the blue from the light until all light is absorbed, and the black. So let’s meet the true color wheel. Primaries: cyan, magenta, yellow. Secondary’s: RGB, red, green, and blue. Fill in the missing parts with the transitions between the secondary’s and primaries, and there we have it, the CMY color wheel. A little bit different to the color wheel in my previous video and you can see that there is a direct difference here. So some of you may be thinking, what about purple, what about orange? They’re important colors, they should be represented. Well they are, they’re represented

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in the transitions between the secondary’s and the primaries. We only consider orange and purple to be important because

we’ve got early-learned vocabulary that describes these two colors. We’ve even got a fruit named after one of them. And because most of us don’t learn the terms of cyan and magenta when we’re two years old learning our colors, it’s possible that we perceive these colors differently. It’s possible that we don’t realy see the significant enough differences between the colors cyan and blue, and the colors magenta and red because of a lack of vocabulary from a young age.

bright secondary’s with the correct primaries. Ever used an introductory set of paints which only has the primary’s in it? Useless, aren’t they? I mean some of them even give you green, because theres no chance of making a green with the blue and the yellow that they give you. So when mixing secondary’s you should be looking to magenta and cyan and yellow. Since we all knew yellow was a primary color,

we’re going to be looking at magenta and cyan. You can’t just go into your local arts store and they’ve got loads of paints that are magenta and cyan. There’s very few of them that are actually called magenta and cyan. We have magenta options

of permanent magenta, quinacridone red, rose lake, permanent rose, and even alizarin crimson as an option for a magenta. Cadmium red is not a primary color. For cyan, Lukas oil paints actually do a transparent cyan. Two more conventional options for cyan are cerulean blue and manganese blue. Both of these paints, ironically, are wrongly called blue. They’re cyan. Ultramarine blue is not a primary color. So using these tubes of paint that I’ve talked about, for magenta and cyan, you can actually mix a secondary blue and a secondary red. Yes, blue and red are secondary colors. Don’t believe me? Here’s a demo. Okay in this demonstration I’ve used a cerulean blue to get something close to cyan, and I’m going to be using a permanent magenta for the other primary color. The resulting color should be, by our

So what does all this mean for color mixing? Well this true color wheel is important for mixing

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is I’m going to glaze using an oil painting medium. I’m going to glaze the magenta on top of t cyan. A little bit of medium first, and then I’m just going to add my paint. Still think ultramarine blue is a primary color? And just to prove what color I’ve added to the top of this, I’m just going to wipe it clean. That there is magenta. So that’s why red, and blue are not primaries. Thanks a lot for watching the video. My name’s Scott Naismith. You can follow me on Twitter, Facebook, and, indeed, this channel.

ABO UT S COT T Since graduating Scott has been a full time artist, working from his studio in Glasgow. Much of his time is spent travelling around the country looking for inspiration for another take on the Scottish landscape. The many lochs, glens and isles of the West coast are amongst his favourite subject matter for his vibrant and atmospheric oils. Since 2003 Scott has also been a part time lecturer at the Creative Arts Department of Reid Kerr College, Paisley. new color wheel, blue. Blue being conventionally known as a primary color which can’t be mixed. Okay, the method I’m going to use to show you this color mixing,

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Scott uses vivid colours in a vigorous application to represent the fast changing light conditions of the West coast of Scotland. Colour use often becomes

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http://www.scottnaismith.co.uk/#!scottishlandscapepainting/mainPage I have become increasingly interested in catching AR TI S T S S TATE M E NT the moment when heavy After 10 years of painting overcast clears to reveal the Scottish landscape, my clear blue sky, a cool colour The love he has for his recent work now becomes that complements the native Scottish countryside more involved with warmth it brings. While the is portayed in his work cloudcover and its effect through an ebullient energy on light and colour through most obvious manifestation of light refraction at this with which he handles the both its translucent and time would occur in colour with pallette knife opaque properties. Clouds the form of a rainbow, I and brush. are visible masses of water will be concerned with droplets or frozen ice Scotts recent work accentuating the infinite, concentrates on transitional crystals suspended in the more subtle effects. skies and the many colours atmosphere . They have the ability to refract and reflect, I find myself inspired involved when light breaks creating an ever changing increasingly by the works through cloud. These perception of light which of Turner, who created changing skies from dark inspires my use of colour. ephemeral atmospheric to light are a metaphor for effects using large washes optimism and hope. After I am constantly refering to of liquid paint. Other a miraculous recovery the  paradox of a cloud’s influences include Francis from cancer by his father, peceived weight and its recent marriage and birth fragility and the relationship Cadell, Glasgow boys: Guthrie Lavery, Henry... and of his first child, Scott draws between the cool and upon a great positivity and warm colours created by it. Joan Eardley. an entirely emotional response to the subject while tone can remain representational.

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energy.

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Artistic Impressions Post Print

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August Issue of Digital Art Creation