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GEAR GUIDE: OUR FAVORITE PHOTO PRODUCTS FOR BLACK-AND-WHITE PHOTOGRAPHY

TOOLS, TECHNIQUES, CREATIVITY

THE POWER OF BLACK AND WHITE MONOCHROME MASTER MAX VADUKUL SHARES THE STORIES BEHIND HIS ICONIC IMAGES WE TEST

» NIKON D7500 DSLR » SIGMA 100-400MM F/5-6.3 DG OS HSM LENS » EPSON P5000 PRINTER & PRINT LAYOUT SOFTWARE

PLUS

PHOTOGRAPHER SCOTT HOYLE’S TIPS ON HOW TO KEEP IT SIMPLE FOR BETTER BLACK-AND-WHITE RESULTS

© Max Vadukul


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CONTENTS

OCTOBER 2017 • VOLUME 46 • NUMBER 12 • ISSUE 565

56

TOOLS 24 GEARED UP My Favorite Gear for Creating Monochrome Photographs by Joe Farace 30

ASK A PRO Scott Kelby Answers Your Photography Questions by Scott Kelby

32

TECHNICALLY SPEAKING Why There’s No Substitute for a Good Tripod When You Want Your Images Sharp by Seth Shostak

REVIEWS 36 NIKON D7500 Nikon Returns to the Enthusiast Market with This Mid-Range DX-Format DSLR by George Schaub 44

SIGMA 100-400MM F/5-6.3 DG OS HSM CONTEMPORARY LENS Field Testing Sigma’s “All-Around” Super Telephoto Zoom by Joe Farace

50

EPSON P5000 PRINTER & PRINT LAYOUT SOFTWARE Testing Epson’s Latest Flagship 17-Inch Inkjet and “Live” Interface by George Schaub

TECHNIQUES 56 PRO’S CHOICE How Scott Hoyle Creates His Uncomplicated Monochromatic Designs by Jack Neubart © Scott Hoyle

SHUTTERBUG (ISSNO895-321X) is published monthly by TEN: The Enthusiast Network, LLC, 261 Madison Ave., 6th Floor, New York, NY 10016. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send all UAA to CFS. (See DMM 707.4.12.5); NON-POSTAL AND MILITARY FACILITIES: send address corrections to SHUTTERBUG, PO Box 420235, Palm Coast, Florida 32142-0235. Printed in the U.S.A. Copyright © 2017 by TEN: The Enthusiast Network Magazines, LLC. All rights reserved. No portion of this magazine may be reprinted without written permission from SHUTTERBUG. For information on display rates or media kits, please write: SHUTTERBUG, 261 Madison Ave., 6th Floor, New York, NY 10016, (321) 225-3144. Subscriptions: US—One Year (12 issues) $22.95, Canadian $34.95, Foreign $46.95 (including surface mail postage). Payment in advance, U.S. funds only. Single Copies $4.99 (US), $5.99 (Canada). (800) 829-3340.

6 | OCTOBER | 2017


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CONTENTS

OCTOBER 2017 • VOLUME 46 • NUMBER 12 • ISSUE 565 CREATIVITY 20 GOING MOBILE What’s the Real Attraction—the Phone’s Camera or the Creativity of Its Apps? by Barry Tanenbaum 60

TRUE GRIT Capturing American Traditions in Timeless Black-and-White Images by Barry Tanenbaum

66

MONOCHROME MASTER The Black-and-White Magic of Max Vadukul by Suzanne Driscoll

DEPARTMENTS 12 EDITOR’S NOTES 14 FULL FRAME 18 TALKING PICTURES 70 PICTURE THIS! 81 FINAL SHOT READER SERVICES 78 HOT STUFF

© Max Vadukul

8 | OCTOBER | 2017

66

ON THE COVER Our intense cover shot of acclaimed director David Lynch is a perfect example of the power of black-and-white photography. Monochrome master Max Vadukul, best known for his portraits and “arte reportage” style, shot this portrait of Lynch in 2014 for Town & Country magazine, as part of their L.A. portfolio. The portrait was taken at Lynch’s home in Los Angeles and Vadukul says, “This entire shoot was so exciting to do as I love to shoot the city and the life in it…top to bottom.” To view more of Vadukul’s captivating black-and-white portraits, read our interview with him on page 66.


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EDITOR'S NOTES

THE DARK ARTS

THE MAN ON THE COVER OF THIS ISSUE IS, in my opinion, one of the greatest American artists of the last two centuries. If you’re unfamiliar with the work of David Lynch, who directed such movies as Blue Velvet, The Straight Story, and Mulholland Drive (along with the seminal cult TV series Twin Peaks), you really owe it to yourself as a photographer to check them out. While the dark, twisted, and, often, downright bizarre subject matter of Lynch’s films might not appeal to everyone, the artistic way they are shot, composed, and imagined can be inspirational. I remember seeing the disturbingly beautiful Blue Velvet back in the 1980s and wondering why all movies weren’t made this way. The same goes for Twin Peaks, which has recently been revised with a Lynch-led sequel series on Showtime. Lynch’s first two feature films, Eraserhead and The Elephant Man, were both shot in black and white and while pretty much everything he’s done since then has been in color, there’s still a dark, noirish quality to his films and TV shows. Being that the theme of this issue is the “The Power of Black and White,” Lynch is the ideal subject for our cover photographer Max Vadukul to capture. Vadukul’s stunning monochrome portrait of Lynch recalls (consciously or unconsciously) the black-and-white movie poster for Eraserhead, which adorned many college dorm room walls back then, and, quite possibly, still does today. If you’re unfamiliar with it, the poster shows the film’s star Jack Nance with his foot-high hairdo looking intensely into the camera. Google it and see if you notice any similarity to our cover for this issue. Vadukul’s passion for black-and-white photography extends back into the film days, when he would process and print everything himself. His film of choice? Kodak Tri-X, of course, and that stock’s notorious grit and grain still informs his work today even though he’s moved on from an F5 SLR to Nikon’s latest digital offerings. Take a look at our profile of Vadukul starting on page 66 and you’ll learn more about why we call him a “Monochrome Master.” While all the stories in this issue are on point, if you’re interested in black-and-white artistry, read Jack Neubart’s interview with Scott Hoyle on page 56 and Barry Tanenbaum’s profile of Michael Crouser on page 60. These two photographers may use monochrome in different ways—Hoyle is more eclectic while Crouser is something of a traditionalist—but it’s done in service of the same thing: storytelling. I’d also like to note a passing with this issue. It’s not for a person, fortunately, it’s for a piece of software. Google seems to have finally pulled the plug on one of the most popular (and, arguably, the best) apps of all time for converting images to black and white: Nik Silver Efex Pro. While Google, which acquired Nik Software back in 2012, said only that it would no longer update the Nik Collection (which includes Silver Efex Pro, Color Efex Pro, Viveza, and a whole bunch of other goodies) that basically means the apps will eventually stop working with whatever Mac OS, Windows, or Photoshop updates are down the road. Our Geared Up columnist Joe Farace discusses all of this starting on page 24 while offering some good alternatives for when Silver Efex Pro goes kaput. So pour one out for Silver Efex, and then knock one back for the power of black and white. It’s a look that will never get old.

CONNECT WITH SHUTTERBUG editorial@shutterbug.com 12 | OCTOBER | 2017

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CREATIVITY / FULL FRAME

14 | OCTOBER | 2017


BLACK-AND-WHITE WORLD If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again. That was the motto of fine art landscape photographer Michael Ryan while trying to capture this scene at Salt Point State Park in Sonoma County, California. “After several years of unsatisfying attempts photographing this coastal waterfall, my prayers were finally answered when dramatic conditions came together in December of 2014,” Ryan recalls. “The combination of storm clouds, high surf, and increased waterfall flow made for an amazing evening. I really could not ask for anything more.” Ryan shot the image with a Nikon D800 and a Nikkor 16-35mm f/4 lens on a Gitzo GT2530 Mountaineer tripod and a Really Right Stuff BH-40 ball head at 16mm, f/16, 0.4 seconds, ISO 50. “The biggest challenge was to find the right shutter speed that not only showed movement but also preserved enough detail in both the ocean waves and waterfall,” he explains. “I love black and white’s simplicity and how it allows me to push the boundaries of light, shadow, and contrast without the distraction of color.” Ryan offers fine art prints, greeting cards, photography tours, and other services at his website, michaelryanphotography.com. You can also see his work on his Instagram and Facebook pages: @michaelryanphoto. © Michael Ryan

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CREATIVITY / TALKING PICTURES

HOW DAVID INGRAHAM TAKES STREET PHOTOGRAPHY BEYOND TRADITION By Barry Tanenbaum THE IPHONE CHANGED EVERYTHING, including street photography. Inspired by the marquee names of the genre—Henri Cartier-Bresson, Robert Frank, Garry Winogrand—David Ingraham’s street images are, of course, in glorious black and white, and his methods are faithful to the code: stealth is okay, setups aren’t; you walk, mingle, wait, observe, react. But he shoots with an iPhone and calls his efforts mobile street photography. “The iPhone’s enabled me to capture images in the streets in a way I’d been unable to before,” he says. “It gives me a level of invisibility and inconspicuousness that I wasn’t able to achieve with larger cameras, and it’s been my main camera of choice for six or so years. Everybody’s got 18 | OCTOBER | 2017

an iPhone, so I do the pretending-I’m-onthe-phone routine. When people are about to step into a scene I take a quick shot, then put the phone back up to my ear.” Even if people see him taking pictures—and sometimes he’s quite open about it—they seem to be indifferent.

David Ingraham’s website, davidingraham. com, features a selection of images and information about iPhone-related workshops. His most recent photos are at instagram.com/dayzdandconfuzd. At tinycollective.com you can check out his activity with the Tiny Collective, a group of photographers united by iPhone photography and the idea of Instagram “as sort of a worldwide exhibition space in the palm of your hand.” Tech Talk: David Ingraham took the photo with an iPhone 4. He did the black-and-white conversion using the Hipstamatic app, and the app’s John S and BlacKeys SuperGrain options for the lens and film look. The blur effect was added with the BlurFX app.

© David Ingraham

INVISIBLE MAN

“Once in a while they’ll see me and duck,” he says, but most often it’s not a realization that seems to register, or one they take all that seriously. “People just don’t realize I’m a somewhat serious photographer when they see me shooting with the iPhone, and I actually love that.” This picture was taken in downtown Missoula, Montana. “I’m always seeking out interesting backdrops that I can use as a starting point.” Many of his street photos bring to mind ’40’s and ’50’s film noir. He says he’s a big fan of old black-and-white movies—“anything in the Janus/Criterion collection is right up my alley”—but he doesn’t look for any particular subjects or scenes. “I’m just trying to capture a good photograph of whatever seems interesting.” Occasionally the image might not be interesting enough. In this photo the blur was added to the silhouette in post to give the figure a sense of motion. “To get a blurred shot like this in daylight would have been impossible. I come from a traditional background. I studied the work of the decisive-moment greats. I know the tradition, the history, but I’ve got an experimental side as well, so some of my street photography is a combination of traditional and a more contemporary, experimental approach.” He credits the first rangefinder cameras with street photography as we know it—“their small size and ability to capture those decisive moments”—and believes the iPhone takes that to the next level. “Smaller, even more inconspicuous. I can’t imagine Cartier-Bresson not being enthusiastic about the idea of the iPhone. I picture him using one.” Cartier-Bresson photographing with an iPhone. I don’t know about you, but I’m going to take a few minutes to conjure that image. Q


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CREATIVITY / GOING MOBILE « The flowers had been set in a bowl for a studio session of DSLR photography when Harold Davis took a quick, casual iPhone 6S shot. He used Waterlogue to heighten the effect, then took the original and the app-aided photo into Image Blender and gave them 50-50 emphasis.

TREASURE CHEST WHAT’S THE REAL ATTRACTION—THE PHONE’S CAMERA OR THE CREATIVITY OF ITS APPS? By Barry Tanenbaum

HAROLD DAVIS CAME TO IPHONE PHOTOGRAPHY about seven years ago by the usual route: “I’d been hearing about it,” he says, “and I needed a phone. I got the phone, and then it was, Okay, now let’s see what the camera can do.” What’s happened after that may or may not be considered usual. He realized that what the camera could do was okay—“it was a question of the resolution getting to a reasonable point”— but it was what the apps could do that made him a believer. He puts it this way: “I’d been doing a lot 20 | OCTOBER | 2017

of traveling, and I’d sit in restaurants by myself, in train stations, at bus stops, and I was never bored—I had a darkroom in my pocket.” It became apparent rather quickly that the iPhone was a good complementary image-making tool—“less deliberate, perhaps more creative, and totally fun”— due to the “darkroom in my pocket” factor. “The apps were absolutely crucial, with their endless creativity and one-pushbutton features of so many of them,” Davis says. “For me the practice of digital photography—leaving the iPhone out of

SERIOUS BUSINESS Davis licenses his photographs through art publishers/distributors who market them for fine art décor in homes, hotels, hospitals, commercial establishments, and businesses. “They’re now handling my iPhone photos as well,” he says. “Those images are printed on textured paper, framed, and sold as accent pieces. Some of my more conventional works are enlarged up to 60 inches or bigger, but for the iPhone photos they did tests and found that they were okay up to 20x24 inches. That’s reasonable by me, as I print my iPhone pictures smaller than that, mostly to 8x10, on metallic paper.” The sales of the iPhone prints are doing well. “They’ve really started to take off; month after month, their sales have been doubling lately,” Davis says. He also has an iPhone photography book proposal circulating, and he’s added iPhone photography to his workshop topics. “Photography is photography,” he says, “and people who take up the iPhone camera need to understand some of the

Photos © Harold Davis

it—has always been one part software. Postproduction is a significant part of my work.” Because of the apps, he had in his first iPhone a picture-making tool that meshed with his style and his varied interests and subjects. “From the beginning I was interested in it as a serious image-making medium—but a different kind of image making from my 36-megapixel camera.” He set up a rule for his iPhone photographs: their processing has to be done in the phone. “I don’t take images into the computer,” he says, but he has done a bit of vice versa: “I have taken images made with my DSLR into the iPhone and used apps on them. The phone is a darkroom. Really.” His subjects for iPhone photography are as diverse as those for his DSLR work: landscapes, locations, close-ups, night photography, architectural studies. “I’d be bored if I did only one thing. For the most part, I photograph what I want to and figure out later what to do with it. With the iPhone it was really a matter of here’s another image-making tool, let me see what kinds of images I can and want to make, and whatever happens happens.”


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CREATIVITY / GOING MOBILE

Davis has been leading photo excursions to Monet’s gardens at Giverny, France, for years. “I took this iPhone 4 shot as we walked by,” he says. “It’s probably a better image than anything I did with the big camera.” He used two apps, Plastic Bullet and Lo-Mob. The former provides a palette of color possibilities; the latter is a filter selection app.

Hydrangeas on a stairway in Sintra, Portugal, with the 5S and the Waterlogue app. “The composition was what was important to me here.”

Valletta, Malta, from Davis’s hotel room. “I shot one image exposing for the sky and one exposing for the city, both hand-held with the 6S, then put them through True HDR, which aligned them and synced the exposures.”

“This is a Jesuit church in Heidelberg, Germany. I had the big camera and my tripod, but it was so easy to compose this image with the iPhone 4 to isolate the stairs and get the curves and the amazing quality of the light.” Snapseed did the conversion to black and white.

“Out that window is probably the largest Gothic cathedral in Bourges, France. In my hotel room I saw the beautiful light, the view, and snapped an iPhone 4 photo, exposing for the scene outside by pressing on the screen. Later I fine-tuned the exposure using Snapseed.”

basics if they want to do really creative work.” Then there are the aspects specific to the phone—like handling the wide latitude of lighting in a scene; taking advantage of the phone’s near-infinite 22 | OCTOBER | 2017

depth of field; plus the option of auxiliary lenses like macro and fisheye—“Zeiss makes a nice set,” Davis says. And, of course, there are all those post-processing options.

He’s considering leading an iPhoneonly destination workshop, maybe a weekend event in the Napa Valley, north of his California home. “Lots of photo ops, nice meals and glasses of wine along the way,” he says. Which sounds like a pleasant stop on any picture-making route. Q Harold Davis’s website, digitalfieldguide. com, offers images, a link to his informative blog, and information about his workshops and iPhone photography events.


TOOLS / GEARED UP « This black-and-white infrared image of a bicyclist crossing a pedestrian bridge was shot in McCabe Meadows in Parker, Colorado, with a Panasonic Lumix G5 that had the Standard IR conversion from LifePixel. Lens was the wonderfully underrated and image stabilized Lumix G Vario 14-45mm f/3.5-5.6 with a handheld exposure of 1/400 second at f/9 and ISO 400. Image was captured as a Raw file and converted to black and white using Silver Efex Pro.

SEEING THINGS IN BLACK AND WHITE MY FAVORITE GEAR FOR CREATING MONOCHROME PHOTOGRAPHS By Joe Farace

“It’s gotta be rock ‘n’ roll music, if you wanna dance with me.”—the late Chuck Berry There’s more to black-and-white photography than an absence of color. One reason purists refer to black-and-white images as “monochrome” is that it’s a more precise term covering photographs made in sepia and other tones. One advantage of creating a monochromatic digital image is that the original photograph can come from many sources, including a color file. To get out of a rut I sometimes shoot images using my camera’s direct monochrome mode. Wait for it… But I set my camera for Raw+JPEG capture and select monochrome to provide an in-camera preview of what the image looks like in black and white, although the photograph is available as a color Raw file. Traditionalists may still call it “monochrome” while digital imagers prefer “grayscale,” but, to paraphrase Billy Joel, “it’s still black and white to me.”

M IS FOR MONOCHROM Most digital cameras have black-andwhite modes for capturing monochrome images directly but one camera that takes it to extremes is the Leica M Monochrom ($7,550) whose sensor lacks a color filter array, which means it can only shoot in black and white. The M Monochrom’s full-frame 24MP CMOS sensor also lacks an optical low-pass filter and captures images in luminance values, forgoing the need for color interpolation, to produce 24 | OCTOBER | 2017

Leica levels of sharpness and resolution. The camera has a 0.68x optical viewfinder with split and superimposed manual focusing, automatic parallax correction, and manual image field selection. It has a sensitivity range from ISO 320 to 25,000 as well as a 3 frames per second (fps) continuous shooting rate with a 2GB buffer for recording up to 30 frames in a sequence. Interestingly, 1080p HD video recording is possible at 24 or 25 fps frame rates. High rollers will like the gold-toned, limited edition Leica M Monochrom “Jim Marshall Set” ($12,950). Who’s It For: It’s a real magnesium alloy and brass M camera for black-and-white Leica aficionados and perfectionists like my friend Ralph Nelson, a legendary cinema still photographer. Why I Like It: As a longtime monochrome-loving photographer, I love

BLACK AND WHITE AND INFRARED ALL OVER I would be remiss if I didn’t mention black-and-white infrared photography. If you’re new to the concept, light in wavelengths from 700 to 900 nanometers is called infrared and is 1,000 times wider than visible light. Shooting infrared transforms mundane subject matter into unforgettable images. Everyday scenes you might walk right by and never think of photographing take on a more dramatic look when captured in infrared. Instead of putting your old DSLR or mirrorless camera on eBay or Craigslist, send it to a company that will convert it for infrared capture. You can even convert it yourself. Companies such as LifePixel sell the parts ($99) and have online tutorials that are not for the faint of heart. After conversion, you’ll be able to shoot infrared images hand-held with no opaque filters to slow you down, force you to use a tripod, or make it difficult to see what you’re photographing in the viewfinder. Who’s It For: Experimentally minded shooters or photographers who want to try something new by capturing images made with invisible light. Why I Like It: Infrared photography is fun but there’s more to it than that because shooting infrared lets you capture images that cannot be visualized any other way.

© LifePixel

© Joe Farace

the concept of the M Monochrom. I can’t afford one but a used one is on my bucket list.


THE 800-POUND GORILLA BITES THE BANANA The Nik Collection, which includes Silver Efex Pro, is compatible with Mac OS X 10.7 through 10.10; Windows Vista, 7, and 8; and Photoshop through CC 2015. In May 2017, Google announced, “We have no plans to update the Collection or add new features…” There’s no guarantee the

software will support future versions of Photoshop and it’s also possible the next Mac OS or Windows update could break the software. I plan to keep using Silver Efex Pro for monochrome conversions but as Lego Batman said in the movie, “I’ll shop around” for a replacement, just in case. In the meantime… A combination of extensive use of

sliders and presets has made Silver Efex Pro the 800-pound gorilla for monochrome conversions. The presets include preview thumbnails and the conversion options range from historic processes to images emulating specific film. I sometimes use the presets as a starting point but you can create custom black-and-white styles using the software’s controls for color filters, vignettes, and toning. What makes Silver Efex Pro different from the competition is the use of control points that makes its selection based on the object’s characteristics. You can control how large of a selection to create using each control point’s built-in size slider and by adding multiple control points, simultaneously affecting multiple parts of the image. All of this is wrapped in a wonderfully intuitive interface that, so far, nobody has come close to beating. Who’s It For: Photographers who like to create monochrome images. And who doesn’t? Why I Like It: It’s great free software that works…for the time being. THE CONTENDERS Alien Skin Software’s Exposure X2 ($149) is a plug-in/application with roots in

Photos © Joe Farace

TOOLS / GEARED UP


can launch it, and Lightroom. Who’s It For: Ambidextrous photographers who like to create monochrome or color images. Why I Like It: While a great black-andwhite conversion tool, its color effects, especially in the Cinema category, are spectacular. B&W Effects ($59) from Topaz Labs includes over 200 presets in eight collections: Traditional, Stylized, Toned, Albumen, Opalotype, Cyanotype, Platinum, and Van Dyke Brown. Some presets have color capabilities reproducing the digital equivalent of classic Marshall’s Oil colors. The functional interface for this Mac OS and Windows plug-in displays a emulating black-and-white and color film stock. However, it has evolved over many versions to become a full-featured image editor that includes what amounts to its own version of Adobe Bridge, allowing you to view many images at one time. That’s also why it supports many file types, including Raw, TIFF, JPEG, DNG, and PSD. So you don’t have to switch between apps, Exposure X2 has a Spot Healing tool for portrait retouching and a Brush tool that can also be used to retouch portraits

and burn or dodge specific areas of the photograph. There’s a History panel that lets you retrace/retract editing steps along with enhanced export options that offer file renaming and resizing choices. Exposure X2 has what seems like 500 presets that can be applied with a single mouse click. A Full Text Search feature lets you search images using criteria such as camera model, shutter speed, and ISO. It seamlessly integrates with Adobe Photoshop, including Bridge where you

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TOOLS / GEARED UP menu of presets on the left-hand side with sets of controls for type of conversion, creative effects, local adjustments, and finishing touches on the right-hand side. Some of these sliders can be slow to react (depending on file size) so the best thing to do is move them gradually, take a beat, and then view the effect. Then as Emeril says, “season to taste.” Who’s It For: Photographers who like creating monochrome or color images but don’t want to break their piggy banks. Why I Like It: Great price and great effects, and it’s part of a system of clever plug-ins that includes Texture Effects which can be added to your monochrome images. Macphun’s Tonality ($69) combines 16-bit Raw processing with algorithms that include adaptive exposure and smart contrast, user-loadable textures, clarity control as well as structure and grain emulation for more than 20 film types. It comes with more than 100 presets and you can create your own presets or download, as I write this, seven free preset packs for subjects such as Stylising Portraits or Dramatic Landscape. Presets include monochrome HDR effects such as “Hint of Color” and I think the way it’s applied transcends the cliché of this overused effect. For more color you can use filters operating on both Luminance and Saturation to provide unique looks and selective color. Most importantly, Tonality permits the use of layers with blending modes and sharing features, allowing you to export to Facebook, Flickr, 500px, and SmugMug. Who’s It For: Photographers looking for black-and-white conversion software with layers capability. Why I Like It: Tonality is amazingly comprehensive for its price point.

FOR NEWBIES AND BARGAIN HUNTERS Dramatic Black & White from JixiPix Software is the simplest and least expensive way to try monochrome photography. Sure, Silver Efex Pro is free but you need Photoshop, whereas Dramatic Black & White is a Mac OS and Windows application that costs just $17. And it’s easy and intuitive to use, too. The application contains three sets of presets— Black & White, Dramatic Black & White, and Infrared—and supports multiple light sources to create spotlight effects while giving you control over red, green, and blue filters. To add a touch of the original image’s color, there is a black-and-white Strength slider that acts like you’re using layers and fading the opacity. There are also soften, sharpen, and contrast options, plus you can add toning effects. Who’s It For: Photographers wanting to try black-and-white imagery without having to buy Photoshop or spend a lot of money. Why I Like It: It does a heckuva job for the price.

conversion remains Adobe Photoshop because there are so many ways to do it starting with Adobe Camera Raw (ACR). Simply clicking the checkbox “Convert to grayscale” in the HSL/Grayscale tab gets you started and you still have access to ACR’s other tabs to tweak the image further before importing into Photoshop for more manipulation. Another path is the Black & White Adjustments command (Image>Adjustments>Black & White) that opens a dialog box with sliders you can use to interpret an image’s colors while converting them to monochrome. You can also use a pop-up menu that lets you apply a color filter, much like shooting black-and-white film through on-lens filters, while a Tint checkbox digitally tones the photograph using sliders or a Color Picker. Then there’s Channel Mixer (Image>Adjustments>Channel Mixer) that does almost everything that Black & White Adjustments does with, what I feel, is a more straightforward interface.

CALLING CAPTAIN OBVIOUS One of the best tools for black-and-white Who’s It For: Every photographer. Others have tried but the oldie remains a goodie. Why I Like It: Eschewing Adobe’s subscription model, I’m hanging onto version CS6 until the next Mac OS update breaks it. Hopefully that’s not High Sierra. Q Joe Farace is the author of the now out-ofprint Creative Digital Monochrome Effects that’s available used at bargain prices. To shoot his black-and-white portraits, landscape and automobile photographs, he uses Canon EOS DSLRs and Olympus and Panasonic mirrorless cameras. More information about the gear he uses to create monochrome images can be found at joefaraceblogs.com, joefaraceshootscars. com, and mirrorlessphototips.com.

28 | OCTOBER | 2017


© Lindsay Adler

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TOOLS / ASK A PRO

GOT QUESTIONS ABOUT PHOTOGRAPHY? PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHER AND PHOTOSHOP EXPERT SCOTT KELBY HAS GOT ANSWERS. By Scott Kelby

In the July 2017 issue, one of the questions dealt with processing black-andwhite images in Lightroom as opposed to shooting black and white in camera. One of your suggestions was using add-on programs in Lightroom such as Nik’s Silver Efex Pro to “open up a whole new world of black-and-white possibilities.” How much more benefit or advantage do you get from using an add-on program versus just learning the advanced features of Lightroom and creating the effects yourself? Is it worth spending the extra money on the add-ons or should you just learn to use Lightroom more efficiently? Plug-ins like Nik’s Silver Efex Pro make the process much faster and easier, plus you get the benefit of not only the technology behind the plug-in, but the expertise of those who created the presets that come in these plug-ins. I’m fairly competent in Lightroom and can create a pretty solid black-and-white image just within Lightroom, but I prefer the looks that Silver Efex Pro gives me, as many of Nik’s presets are based on recreating traditional black-and-white film looks. If you’re a Lightroom shark, you can get close, but most folks won’t be able to nail film emulation like the Nik folks did, which is why to this day nearly every black-and-white pro I know uses either Silver Efex Pro or Macphun’s Tonality plug-in. By the way, Silver Efex Pro doesn’t require “extra money”—it’s free; its future is uncertain, though, since Google announced they were no longer updating that software, so when it breaks for you, it’s done. How do you organize and save digital shoots on and off the computer? My photos are all over the place and I have trouble finding them when I look back. My shoots are all mixed up with my casual snapshots on my computer. I use Nikon ViewNX and have an Iomega backup. Years ago I tried saving selections on CDs but a whole shoot wouldn’t fit on a CD and now it seems like CDs are becoming obsolete. My whole process is a mess. Please help. OK, it’s time to start from scratch and ditch the whole CD idea. CDs go bad quicker than you might think and when they die there’s no practical way to recover the images on them, so let’s get them backed 30 | OCTOBER | 2017

up now. Start by buying an external hard drive big enough to hold all your images; a Seagate Expansion 4TB Desktop External Hard Drive will cost around $99. Then, move all your images (from your computer, from your CDs, etc.) onto this external hard drive and put everything inside one single folder. While you can have as many subfolders inside that one folder as you want, start with one main folder and drag your other folders inside it. You’ll need categories to sort your images into, so make a folder for each main type of photo you shoot (family, travel, landscape) and drag each folder into the proper category. At least now you know where all your images are: they’re all in one place, inside one folder on that external hard drive, and they’re somewhat sorted into categories inside of that. Now, buy another of that exact same external hard drive and drag your one folder onto that second drive. You must have at least one backup because all storage devices go bad at some point and this way you’ll have a backup copy on your second drive. It’s a start. By the way, this process will take way less time than it sounds like it would, and you’ll be so glad you did it. For the past seven years I have been using Aperture on my MacBook for photo editing. I recently updated my laptop to the latest version 10.12 and in the process lost my Aperture editing capability as Apple no longer supports the program. I am considering using Photoshop or Lightroom for photo adjustments, however, I know nothing about either program. What is the difference between Photoshop and Lightroom, and which is most comparable to Aperture? Lightroom is by far the most comparable to Aperture—in fact, you’ll find so many similarities that I don’t think you’ll have a hard time making the jump at all. Lightroom

actually has a built-in Aperture Library importer for people in your same situation, so I would definitely use it. (And now a little plug for my education: at KelbyOne.com we have a course on how to make the move from Aperture to Lightroom.) As for Photoshop, you’d want to look at it once you’re very comfortable with Lightroom, and only when you find something that Lightroom just can’t do. And Lightroom can do so much that it might be a while before you get to that point. You can get Adobe’s Photographer’s Bundle for $9.99 a month, which gets you the latest versions of Lightroom and Photoshop. So when you’ve got Lightroom down and decide you want to “unleash the beast,” you’ve already got Photoshop waiting for you (and yes, I have a course called “Photoshop for Lightroom Users” that you might find helpful at that time). I was faced with the same problem your reader [August 2017 issue] was faced with—how to fit my digital prints into those standard frames. However, the frames weren’t the problem—it was the mats. Mats come in standard sizes and I had to get expensive custom cuts in order to accommodate my vision of what my photographs should look like. I’m still searching for companies that sell precut mats in the sizes you mentioned. The framing will be the easier part once I can reduce the cost of custom mat cutting. There are online custom mat services, like matboardandmore.com, that make digital print size mats at really low prices. However, like I told my reader in that last response, not only will labs like Mpix and Bay Photo Lab make digital camera size prints, they’ll make mats that fit those print sizes, too, so you’re covered either way. If you’re just looking for mats, give Matboard and More a look; I’ve heard lots of great comments about their work and prices. Q

Scott Kelby is a photographer, Photoshop Guy, award-winning author of more than 50 books, and CEO of KelbyOne, an online education community dedicated to helping photographers take the kinds of images they’ve always dreamed of. You can learn more about Scott at his daily blog (scottkelby.com), or follow him on Twitter: @scottkelby. Editor’s Note: Ask a Pro is a Q&A column from professional photographer, writer, and educator Scott Kelby. Scott is here to answer all your photography-related questions, so if you have something you’d like to know, e-mail him at editorial@shutterbug.com (with “For Scott Kelby” as the subject line) and your query could be featured in the next edition of Ask a Pro.


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TOOLS / TECHNICALLY SPEAKING

WHOLE LOTTA SHAKIN’ WHY THERE’S NO SUBSTITUTE FOR A GOOD TRIPOD WHEN YOU WANT YOUR IMAGES SHARP By Seth Shostak

32 | OCTOBER | 2017

« Resolution quality as function of shutter speed for handheld shots with a 50mm lens. The straight line is a least-squares fit to the data.

rate sharpness hand-held. I clamped a resolution test chart (plenty are available on the web) to a bench, and used it as my subject matter. It filled only the central part of the field of view. To reduce ambiguities, I fixed the aperture and ISO (f/3.2 and 320, respectively). The exposure was kept constant with a dimmer on a lamp. Standing back seven feet (again, a typical shooting distance), I steadied my stance and carefully fired off four or five shots at each shutter setting. I then viewed these pix in Photoshop, zooming in to see the finest resolved lines on the chart. Each shot was given a grade: from A for roughly 55 lines per millimeter, down to E for 31 lines. Check out the figure, and you’ll see that at any given shutter setting, the sharpness varied a lot. This presumably was due to such things as my breathing cycle, muscle spasms, and the alignment of Jupiter’s moons. But the point is, there’s a lot of “noise” in the system, at least at most shutter speeds. Lesson: It pays to make multiple shots, if possible. It also became clear that if I wanted a 50 percent or better chance of a high-res pic, I needed a shutter speed of at least 1/250th of a second. That old chestnut about choosing a minimum speed that’s the reciprocal of the focal length turned

out to be nuts. Using 1/50th of a second with a 50mm lens ensured a blur. It was like trading in my expensive optic for bottle glass. I repeated this experiment with a couple of support aids. First, I tried a monopod. That should eliminate shake in at least one of the three spatial axes, right? Well, indeed: The percentage of sharp shots at any speed was significantly higher than going hand-held. Of course, with a shorter lens, the shutter time could be slower. But for lenses longer than 50mm, I’d need to dial in the fastest speeds I’ve got. Finally, in a salute to Mathew Brady, I brought out a tripod. Nearly all results were crisp at any speed, although a cable release helped very slightly. Perhaps you think, as I did, that your hands are as steady as factory work. It’s possible. But I suggest you do your own experiment. A fine lens is a terrible thing to waste. Q Seth Shostak is an astronomer at the SETI Institute who thinks photography is one of humanity’s greatest inventions. His photos have been used in countless magazines and newspapers, and he occasionally tries to impress folks by noting that he built his first darkroom at age 11. You can find him on both Facebook and Twitter.

© Seth Shostak

HAVE YOU EVER CHECKED OUT THE BATTLEFIELD PHOTOS made by Mathew Brady’s studio during the Civil War? They’re great, right? But why? After all, the equipment was poor, the emulsions were slow, and the subject matter was often dead. Well, these pix were shot on glass plates up to 8x10 inches in size, or roughly 50 to 80 megapixels in today’s terms. They were also the work of professional photographers—not casual snaps by army recruits. And they were all made with tripod-mounted equipment. No camera shake. The results, usually contact prints, had more detail than a Lexus shop manual. Compare that to now: A couple will pose themselves in front of a nondescript background, hand their iPhone to a random passerby, and plead for a pic. The victim obliges by awkwardly holding the phone at arm’s length, and then punching it as if dispatching a wayward ant. The predictable result? A heavily blurred shot, for which the stranger is obsequiously thanked. But that’s not you. You’re an accomplished photog, with the savvy to steady your stance, hold your breath, quiet your bile duct, and gently squeeze the shutter release. You flatter yourself as capable of scalpel-sharp photos at 1/8th of a second, even with a telephoto. Yeah, right. It’s a fact that most serious photographers won’t hesitate to buy the sharpest glass. But I wonder if they think about whether they can hold their camera steady enough to justify the investment. I was one of those people, confident that my practiced shutter squeeze and a decently short exposure would always result in the best that my optics could offer. My assumption was wrong, as I learned after spending some quality time in my garage running a simple experiment. The idea for this impromptu effort was straightforward: I mimicked a typical shooting situation with a 50mm lens, intent on determining the slowest shutter speed at which I could get first-


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NEW LENSES SPECIAL SALE ON AUTOFOCUS LENSES FOR MINOLTA MAXXUM & SONY ALPHA CAMERAS FILM AND DIGITAL CAMERAS New 24-70mm F3.5-5.6 AF Sigma ASPHERICAL zoom lens ....... $149.99 New 28-105mm F4-5.6 AF Sigma UC zoom lens .............................. $99.99 New 28-105mm F3.8-5.6 AF Sigma UC III zoom lens ................... $129.99 New 28-200mm F3.5-5.6 AF Sigma UC zoom lens ......................... $149.99 New 35-135mm F4-5.6 AF Sigma zoom lens ..................................... $99.99 New 28-80mm F3.5-5.6 AF macro Cosina zoom lens ....................... $49.99 New 28-210mm F3.5-5.6 AF Cosina zoom lens ................................. $94.99 New 70-210mm F4-5.6 AF Cosina zoom lens .....................................$79.99 New 100-300mm F5.6-6.7 AF Cosina zoom lens ...............................$99.99 New 35-70mm F3.5-4.5 macro Tokina AF zoom lens ....................... $49.99 New 28-210mm F3.5-5.6 Tokina AF zoom lens ............................... $199.99 New 28-105mm F2.8-3.8 auto MD Cosina lens ............................... $129.99 New 28-210mm F3.5-5.6 auto MD Phoenix lens ............................... $99.99

Traveler 4 Section G-Lock Tripod for Cameras............ $669.99 Gitzo Gk2520ft Tripod ...................................................... $679.99 Gitzo GB3560 Carbon Fiber 6 Section 6X G-Lock Microphone Boom ............................................................. $359.99 Gitzo G349 Circular Camera Platform .......................... $33.33 Gitzo G1373/38B Aluminum Standard Quick Release $39.99 Gitzo Series 5 Systematic 4 Section Tripod GT5542LS ............................................................................ $938.93 GT2542LS Gitzo Ser.2 6x Systematic 4s. Carbon fiber $829.95 Gitzo GT2541EX Series 2 Carbon 6x 4 Section G-Lock Explorer Tripod Black ............................................................................................... $599.00 Gitzo GT1542 Mountaineer Tripod Ser.1 4S (Black) .......................................... $645.49 Gitzo GK1582OT Ocean Traveler Series 1 Carbon Fiber Anti-Corrosion 4 Section Tripod (Black) ........................................................................................................... $1148.99 Gitzo GK1580TQR5 Series 1 6 X Carbon Fiber Traveler Tripod Kit for Cameras ............................................................................................. $899.88 Gitzo GK1580TQD4 Traveler Kit, Series 1 Carbon 4 sections, Ball Head QD (Multi Color) .................................................................................... $717.00 Gitzo GH5750QR Series 5 Magnesium Quick Release Off Center Ball Head ..................................................................................................................... $336.70 Gitzo GH2780FQR Series 2 Safari Ball Head with Quick Release ...................$263.95 Gitzo GH2750 Series 2 Magnesium Off Center Ball Head (Grey) ...................$177.08 Gitzo GH1780QD Centre Ball Head Series 1 Quick Release D ....................... $262.29 Gitzo GC2560 Neoprene Tripod Leg fits Series 1 and 2 Gitzo Tripods ............ $49.95 Gitzo GB1340 Series 1 Microphone Boom 4 Section with G-Lock ................ $134.76 Gitzo GB0330 Series 0 3 Section Microphone Boom with G-Lock .................. $99.95 Gitzo G2180 Series 1 Fluid Head ........................................................................... $259.88

NEW!

NEW LATEST MODEL TILTALL TC-284 Carbon Fiber TRIPOD ....... $355.95 TILTALL TC-254 Carbon Fiber TRIPOD ....... $324.95 TILTALL TC-224 Carbon Fiber TRIPOD ....... $289.95 TILTALL TE-224 TRIPOD ................................ $145.95 TILTALL TE-254 TRIPOD ................................ $158.95 TILTALL TE-284 TRIPOD ................................ $184.95 TILTALL TE-01S Silver Tripod ......................... $174.95 TILTALL TE-01B Black Tripod ......................... $174.95 TILTALL TE-01G Gold Tripod ........................................................ $194.95 TILTALL MP-284C Carbon Fiber MONOPOD .............................. $99.95 TILTALL MP-315C Carbon Fiber MONOPOD ............................ $129.95 TILTALL MP-315 MONOPOD .......................................................... $75.95 TILTALL BH-30 TRIPOD BALL HEAD ........................................ $148.95 TILTALL BH-20 TRIPOD BALL HEAD ........................................ $133.95 TILTALL BH-10 TRIPOD BALL HEAD ........................................ $114.95 TILTALL BH-7 TRIPOD BALL HEAD ............................................ $99.99

Manfrotto MTPIXI-RD PIXI Mini Tripod (Red) ................................... $23.88 Manfrotto MTPIXI-B PIXI Mini Tripod, Black ...... $24.88 Manfrotto MVH500A Pro FluidHead with 60mm Half Ball (Black) ........................................................ $170.41 Manfrotto MT190CXPRO3 Section Carbon Fiber Tripod Legs with Q90 Column (Black) .......................................... $326.99 Manfrotto MT055CXPRO4 055 Carbon Fiber 4-Section Tripod with Horizontal Column (Black.......................................... $459.95 Manfrotto 808RC4 3-Way Standard Head with Quick Release Plate 410PL (Black) .............................................................. $118.99 Manfrotto 755XB MDEVE Aluminum Tripod with Built in 50mm Ball Leveler ............................................................... $299.88 Manfrotto 709B Digi Table Top Tripod with Ball Head (Black) ...................................................................................... $48.13 Manfrotto 496RC2 Ball Head with Quick Release ............ $86.50 Manfrotto 496 Ball Head ....................................................... $79.88 Manfrotto 394 RC4 Low Profile Rectangular Rapid Connect Adapter with 410PL Plate -Black .......................................... $46.90

Kodak TMAX 400 TMY-36 ...................................... $6.38 Kodak TMAX 100 TMX-36 ...................................... $4.94 Kodak Ultramax GC-36 ............................................ $3.28 Kodak TRI-X 36 ......................................................... $4.88 Kodak Portra 800 - 36 ................................................ $9.98 Kodak Ektar 100-36 ................................................... $5.49 Kodak TRI-X 120 - 5 rolls ...................................... $24.24 Kodak Ektar 100-120 - 5 rolls ................................. $24.49 Agfa Vista Plus 400-36 ............................................... $3.08 Agfa Vista Plus 400-24 ............................................... $2.78 Agfa Vista Plus 200-24 ............................................... $2.68 Agfa Vista Plus 200-36 ............................................... $2.98 Agfa APX 400-36 ............................................................................................................. $6.28 Agfa APX 100-36 ............................................................................................................. $6.49 Agfa CT Precisa Color Slide- 100-36 ............................................................................ $9.94 Ilford Delta 100 100’ ..................................................................................................... $64.94 Ilford Pan F 50-120 .......................................................................................................... $4.94 Ilford Pan F 50 100’ ....................................................................................................... $50.94 Ilford Delta 3200-120 ...................................................................................................... $5.94 Ilford Delta 3200-36 ...................................................................................................... $10.98 Ilford XP-2 Super 36 ....................................................................................................... $6.48 Ilford Delta 400-120 ........................................................................................................ $4.94 Ilford HP5-120 ................................................................................................................. $4.08 Ilford FP4 - 120 ................................................................................................................ $4.38 Ilford Delta 100-120 ........................................................................................................ $4.49 Ilford Pan F 36 ................................................................................................................. $6.49 Ilford Delta 400-36 .......................................................................................................... $6.28 Ilford Delta 100-36 .......................................................................................................... $6.24 Ilford FP4 - 36 .................................................................................................................. $4.98 Ilford SFX 200-36 ............................................................................................................ $7.98 Ilford HP5 - 36 ................................................................................................................ $4.74

NEW!

Free Shipping on all Zero Halliburton orders! Zero Halliburton CP3-BK ..................................................... $675 Zero Halliburton CP3-SI ........................................................ $595 Zero Halliburton CP4-BK ..................................................... $695 Zero Halliburton CP4-SI ........................................................ $625 Zero Halliburton CSE3-LPB ................................................ $435 Zero Halliburton CSE3-LSI .................................................. $365 Zero Halliburton CS3-LPB ................................................... $435 Zero Halliburton CS3-LSI ..................................................... $375 Zero Halliburton CS4-LSI ..................................................... $385 Zero Halliburton CP4-Stealth .......................................... $2500 We carry a complete line of all the Zero Halliburton Case and Luggages - Call For Price or e-mail!

NEW SENSOR KCLEAR LOUPE KIT FOR DSLR CAMERAS

Binocular Special! Top Quality Brand New

NEW SPECIAL FLASH ACCESSORIES

$49.99 Panasonic K-KJ17MCC82A eneloop Power Pack, 2100 Cycle, 8AA, 2AAA, 2 “C” Spacers, 2 “D” Spacers, “Advanced” Individual battery charger. $39.99

LumiQuest LQ-145 Mini Kit: with SoftScreen, Mini SoftBox, & UltraStrap.......................... $35.95 LumiQuest LQ-140 Photography Starter Kit (Black) ............ $35.95 LumiQuest LQ-135 Ready for Anything Kit .......................... $67.95 LumiQuest Wedding/Event Kit LQ-134 ................................. $58.95 LumiQuest 9-Piece Colored Gel Strobist Kit LQ-132 ........... $67.95 LumiQuest UltraStrap LQ-126 .................................................. $9.95 LumiQuest SoftBox LTp LQ-124 ............................................. $51.95 LumiQuest SoftBox III LQ-119 ............................................... $43.95 LumiQuest Mini SoftBox LQ-108 ........................................... $25.95 LumiQuest SoftBox LQ-107 ..................................................... $39.95 LumiQuest Pocket Bouncer LQ-101 ....................................... $26.95

Free! Shipping on all LumiQuest items!

NEW! NEW 35mm Auto Focus Film Cameras Konica V-Mini AF 28mm Lens ............................................................ $69.95 Samsung Slim Zoom 1150 38mm to 115mm Zoom ......................... $79.95 Konica A4 35mm Lens .......................................................................... $49.95 Samsung Maxima Zoom 70 XL ............................................................ $59.95 Samsung Maxima Zoom 105 38mm to 105mm Zoom ..................... $69.95 Samsung ECXI Zoom 38-140mm Zoom ............................................ $99.95 Samsung IBEX 3x 38-115mm Zoom ................................................... $49.95 Samsung Fino 70S 38-70mmm Zoom ................................................. $59.95 Yashica Zoom Mate 140 38-140mm Zoom ........................................ $89.95 Nikon Lite Touch Zoom 80 ................................................................... $59.95

7X35 Center Focus with Case .................. $39.95 7X50 Center Focus with Case .................. $49.95 8X20 Center Focus compact with Case .. $39.95 8X30 Center Focus with Case .................. $59.95 10X25 Center Focus with Case ................ $39.95 10X50 Center Focus with Case ................ $59.95 12X50 Center Focus with Case ................ $69.95 16X50 Center Focus with Case ................ $69.95 20X50 Center Focus with Case ................ $79.95

NEW!


New, Used, Refurbished, Preowned Collectables At Discounted Prices We Buy, Trade, Export, Import Anything Photographic, Online Sales & Wholesale

WE WILL BEAT AND MEET DISCOUNT PRICES! CALL OR EMAIL US AND WE WILL SAVE YOU $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$”

NEW DIGITAL & FILM CAMERAS LENSES, FLASHES, SCREENS PAPER AND ACCESSORIES Canon, Casio, Fuji, Hasselblad, Kodak, Leica, Mamiya, Nikon, Olympus, Panasonic, Pentax, Polaroid, Samsung, Sanyo, Sigma, Sony, Vivitar, Etc -

Memory Cards

Delkin, Kington, Lexar, SanDisk, Nikon Fuji, Olympus, Sony, Panasonic, Etc............

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Large selection of BATTERIES available at discount prices....CALL

LARGE SELECTIONS OF NEW AND USED

CLASSIC CAMERAS

LENSES AND ACCESSORIES IN STOCK AT LOW DISCOUNT PRICES! Agfa, Alpa, Ansco, Arca-Swiss, Bolex, Bronica, Canon, Contax, Contarex, Edixa, Exa, Exakta, Fuji, Fujica, Gami, Hasselblad, Kodak, Konica, Kowa, Leica, Leitz, Linhof, Mamiya, Mercury, Minolta, Minox, Miranda, Nikon, Nikonos, Olympus, Pentacon, Pentax, Petri, Plaubel, Polaroid, Praktica, Praktina, Retina, Revere, Ricoh, Robot, Rollei, Rolleiflex, Sea & Sea, Stereo Realist, Tessina, Topcon, Toyo, Voigtlander, Wollensak, Yashica, Zeiss, Etc.

High ResolutionTop Quality Lenese Macro Lens 2X Telephoto Lens Wide Angle Lens All for

$229

25mm T2.1 Xenon FF Lens 35mm T2.1 Xenon FF Lens 50mm T2.1 Xenon FF Lens 75mm T2.1 Xenon FF Lens 100mm T2.1 Xenon FF Lens

Large selections of NEW & USED LEICA cameras, lenses, filters and accessories at low discount prices ASK for Joseph

NEW INSTANT DIGITAL CAMERA Print your pictures 148.99

LARGE SELECTION OF PROJECTION BULBS...CALL ALEX

WE DO HAVE MORE THAN 5000 INSTRUCTION BOOKS IN STOCK CALL US AT 1-800-221-2253 AND ASK FOR PAUL OR EMAIL US AT

NEW SERIES 1 LENSES

650-1300mm F8-16 Zoom Lens...239.99 800mm F8...189.00 8mm F3.8....189.00

NEW FLASHES 16M…………19.95 DF 183 AF….44.95 DF 283 AF…89.95 285HV……...87.00 DF 293 AF…89.95 DF 383 AF…124.95 385 HV.........149.95 DF 483 AF…159.95

Ca n o n , C o si n a, N ikon , P en tax, Olym pus, Le ic a, Sony, M inolt a, V i v i t a r , S c h neid er, Mamiya, Hasse lblad, Rode nst oc k, Ze iss, e t c .

LENSES FOR MOST MANUAL & AUTOFOCUS AF CAMERAS

f rs o e Yea rienc e p Ex

SALES@CAMBRIDGEWORLD.COM

SPECIALS

Happy with the quality, speed of shipping and the price! Cheryl A. Terry Hope Valley, RI See more testimonials on our website.

WE PAY FOR YOUR RETIRED GEAR!

TOP DOLLAR$$$

LEIC HEADQUARTERS!!!

7mm F3.5…..324.95 13mm F2.8…409.95 35mm F1.4…499.95 85mm F1.4…199.99 500mm F8….99.99 500mm F6.3..124.99

LENSES

50mm F1.4..........358.95 50mm F2.8..........234.95 70mm F2.8..........468.95 105mm F2.8........458.95 150mm F2.8.......688.95 180mm F2.8.......1488.95 300mm F2.8.......2998.95 500mm F4.5.......4598.95 10-20mm F4-5.6....478.95 10-20mm F3.5........548.95 10-20mm F4…….398.95 17-70mm F2.8-4.5...458.95 18-35mm F1.8….748.95 18-200mm F3.5-5.6..238.95 18-250mm F3.5-5.6.358.95 24-70mm F2.8.....798.95 17-50mm F2.8 DCOS HSM..548.95 8-16mm F4.5-5.6 DC...618.95 EX 28-70mm F2.8.....318.95 28-70mm F2.8-4....88.95 28-300mm F3.5-6.3...234.95 28-200mm F3.5-5.6...174.95 50-150mm F2.8....698.95 35-135mm F4-5.6...99.95 55-200mm F4-5.6...124.95 50-150mm F2.8…968.95 50-200mm F4-5.6.148.95 70-300 F4-5.6......138.95 70-300mmDGOS.248.95 50-500mm F4-6.3...948.95 70-200mm F2.8....888.95 100-300mm F4-5.6...99.95 70-300 F4-5.6 APO...188.95 120-300mm F2.8...2698.95 70-200/2.8OS…..1148.95 150-500mm F5-6.3...948.95 100-300mm F4....1098.95 120-400 F4.5-5.6...938.95 200-500mm F2.8 APO EX DG...................25998.95 300-800mm F5.6 EX BE HSM.....................7698.95 1.4X APO............218.95 2X APO...............278.95

1-800-221-2253

INSTRUCTION MANUALS/BOOKS

We Offer MORE THAN 1,000 DIFFERENT LENSES at LOW DISCOUNT PRICES!!!

4.5mm F2.8..........838.95 8mm F3.5.............828.95 10mm F2.8...........598.95 15mm F2.8...........568.95 19mm F2.8...........178.95 20mm F1.8...........588.95 24mm F1.8...........498.95 28mm F1.8...........308.95 30mm F1.4...........278.95 30 mm F2.8……174.95 35mm F1.4…….848.95 60mm F2.8...........278.95 400mm F5.6…….299.95 85mm F1.4...........848.95 800mm F5.6.......6698.95 12-24mm F4.5-5.6..748.95 18-50mm F2.8-4........188.95 18-50mm F2.8............375.95

A S K

1-800-221-2253

for the iPhone & Samsung Galaxy includes the iPhone 4, 4s, 5 & 5S & Samsung Galaxy S4 as well as the iPad2, iPad Mini, Mini Retina & iPad Air too.

IF YOU DO NOT SEE IT, IT DOESN’T MEAN WE DO NOT HAVE IT,

50

TESTIMONIAL OF THE MONTH

Nothing is too Small or too Large Anything Photographic !!!!! Estate Sales Welcome!!! You can mail your gear or we can pick your gear up. You can trade-in your gear or we will pay you with a check or with Paypal. CALL 1-800-221-2253 and ask for Simon Or Email us at sales@cambridgeworld.com. Send your equipment for a FREE evaluation to:

Cambridge World 60-18 Fresh Pond Rd., Maspeth, Queens, N.Y. 11378 TOP QUALITY EXPERIENCED

REPAIR SERVICE!

AT DISCOUNT PRICES! Send your equipment for a FREE repair estimate to: Cambridge World 60-18 Fresh Pond Rd., Maspeth, Queens New York 11378

USED DEPARTMENT

We have more than 30,000 Used items. Email us your Wish Listat sales@cambridgeworld.com or CALL 1-800-221-2253 and we will assist you and SAVE you $$$$$$. No item is too small or large. OF THE MONTH Listing is very partial. FRESH COLOR & B&W Bronica S2A, EC...... Call Bronica GSI...............399.50 Olympus XA........79.99 Canon 24mm F1.4 ........989.00 INSTANT FILM for Bronica ETR...........99.95 Bronica SQ camera.....199.99 Minolta 160.......69.99 Canon 50mm F1.4 ..........79.50 Canon 1V....................499.99 Canon A2E .............79.99 Minolta 70........49.99 POLAROID SX70 & Canon 85mm F1.2 .....1,299.00 Canon 1X......................69.99 Canon Elan.....49.99 Canon 120.........79.99 Canon 300mm F2.8 ...2,199.00 POLAROID 600 SERIES Canon rebel 2000......89.99 Canon Elan....................69.99 Canon 105.........49.99 Canon 16-35mm F2.8 ...889.00 Canon VT....................299.99 CAMERAS $24.99 PER BOX Canon F1...............119.99 Leica minilux.....199.99 Canon 24-105mm F4 ....789.00

& Rolleiflex Headquaters

* Large selsctions of new and used Rollei and Rolleiflex cameras,lenses and accessories at discount prices!!!!!

CALL William 1-800-221-2253 8mm F3.5.............199.99 14mm F2.8..........349.99 Special Prices on 24mm F2.8.............79.95 135mm F3.5..........29.95 Rollei 6000 Series 28mm F2.8.............49.95 135mm F2.8..........49.95 35mm F2.8.............39.95 200mm F3.5..........79.95 50mm F1.8.............69.95 300mm F5.6..........99.95 Adapters Lenses Accessories.................. 50mm F1.4...........189.95 400mm F6.3..........99.95 85mm F1.4...........308.95 500mm F8.............99.95 100mm F3.5.........119.95 500mm F6.3........124.95 EXPOSURE LIGHT METERS 800mm F8............219.95 1000mm F11.......799.95 Cambron, Gossen, Kenko, Sekonic, Minolta, Pentax, 500mm 1000mm combination.........................129.95 Polaris, Shepard, Soligor, Spectra, Wein, Etc. - CALL 19-35mm F3.5-4.5....149.95 28-80mm F3.5-5.6...79.95 28-105mm Zoom...99.95 28-210mm F3.5-5.6...99.95 FLASHES Ansmann, BRNO, Canon, 28-300mm F4-6.3..169.95 35-105mm Zoom.....119.95 Cambron, Elinchrome, Gary Fong, Metz, Minolta, 70-210mm Zoom...79.95 75-150mm F3.5.......49.95 Multiblitz, Nikon, Novacon, Norman,Novatron, 75-300mm F4.5 Macro Zoom Lens..................89.95 Olympus, Pentax, Photogenic, Quantum, Sigma, 100-300mm F5.6-6.7....99.95 100-500mm F5.6-8...395.95 Stroboframe,Stratos, Smithvictor, 650-1300mm F8 Long Zoom Lens...................249.95 Sunpak, Sony, Vivitar, Etc. 1000-4000mm zoom.........................................349.95 PROJECTORS & VIEWERS 1.4X Teleconverter..............................................99.95 Braun, Canon, Epson, GEPE, Kodak Carousel & 2X Teleconverter......29.95 3X Converter...69.95 Ektagraphic,Kaiser, Panasonic, Optoma, Sanyo, 1.5X Teleconverter...69.95 1.7X.Converter..99.95 Sharp, Telex, Da-Lite Screens, 0.42X Fisheye Lens............................................39.95 Slide Mounts,Vue-all Etc. 0.45X Wide Angle Lens.....................................39.95

NOVOFLEX

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DARKROOM/ENLARGERS

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TOOLS / FIELD REVIEW « The Nikon D7500 is a new DSLR system with a 20.9MP sensor in APS-C format. It offers a fast AF system, high-speed continuous modes (8 frames per second), comfortable handling, 4K video recording, and much more.

A mode dial on the left-hand side of the viewfinder and a large status display on the righthand side offer comfortable handling.

NIKON D7500 NIKON RETURNS TO THE ENTHUSIAST MARKET WITH THIS MID-RANGE DX-FORMAT DSLR By George Schaub

DESIGN & FEATURES Compared with the D500, the Nikon D7500 body is about 20 percent lighter and slightly smaller overall. Viewing is through a large viewfinder with diopter adjustment or a semi-articulating LCD back, the latter being a bright 3.2-inch 922K dot that can be set up for touch functionality. Happily, both viewers offer a 100 percent field of view. The D7500’s body is fairly substantial and certainly packed with many function buttons and controls. The menu itself is extensive and logical, making setup and option choices easy to access and control. And while the options on this (and other cameras these days) can seem dizzying— and you better read and rehearse them before taking the camera into the field— just take my word for it that whatever you have in mind for an image or effect can be accomplished with this camera. For example, you can set the D7500’s ISO between 100-51,200 (as well as Auto 36 | OCTOBER | 2017

ISO with sensitivity high limit and shutter speed low limit); work with shutter speeds as fast as 1/8000 second or as slow as 30 seconds; shoot 8 frames per second (fps) at full resolution; choose from any number of Scene and Effect modes; do nine frame brackets (as well as bracket D-Lighting); compensate +/- 5 EV; choose numerous AF modes and areas; and more. In short, sum up what you have come to expect from a thoroughly modern DSLR, throw in very good low-light performance and Wi-Fi and Bluetooth capability, very good battery life, and an excellent viewfinder system in both pentaprism and LCD manifestations, and you get a sense of what the D7500 can deliver. HANDLING & LAYOUT For this DSLR test, Nikon sent me the D7500 on loan along with an AF-S DX Nikkor 16-80mm f/2.8-4E ED VR lens (equivalent 24-120mm). The combo is heavier than the mirrorless models I have

The camera offers an eight-way control field on the back for fast and comfortable menu navigation. The “Lv” button and its lever are used to start the live preview on the screen and to switch between photo and video recording.

been testing of late, but the solid feel and strong, well-molded grip gave it a wellbalanced feel. While it has been noted by some that the model does not offer a vertical grip and shutter release I did not find this detrimental in any way, although those doing mainly headshot or couples portraiture might find it so. I tested the D7500 out during a trip to North Carolina and Southern Maryland and concentrated on nature and cityscape imagery. If you like buttons and dials and on-body controls, then you’ll really like the Nikon D7500. The mode dial on the upper left has 10 (lockable) indents on top and seven drive modes, including mirror up, on a surrounding ring. There are seven buttons on the left back and four on the right, along with a cursor field control and command dial. ISO and brackets can be changed with buttons and dials, plus there’s the Menu button that unfolds a well-organized and very extensive list of options and custom functions (see illustrations).

Photos © George Schaub

UP UNTIL RECENTLY, NIKON HAD BEEN RELATIVELY QUIET in introducing DSLRs aimed at enthusiast photographers but that all changed with the new D7500, the company’s latest camera in the D7000 line. As the successor to the D7200, the Nikon D7500 (MSRP: $1,249, body only) joins Nikon’s APS-C (DX format) DSLR camera lineup, which includes the flagship D500, with a 20.9MP CMOS sensor and no low-pass filter. I recently tested the Nikon D7500 out in the field and here’s what I thought.


TOOLS / FIELD REVIEW

The 3.2-inch LCD of the Nikon D7500 can be flipped up- and downward, while the forerunner D7200 used a fixed LCD system. The screen is touch sensitive and can be used to choose the AF area in live preview mode.

The body of the Nikon D7500 is sealed with interfaces and covered by thick rubber caps. The camera offers a built-in flash system and an accessory shoe for external flash systems.

The D7500 is programmable to the nth degree to handle just about any scenario or effect you could want, or imagine. You can read out what you are doing as you go on the top LED and compose through the pentaprism finder or the large LCD, which rotates upward and downward but not side to side (if it did there would be far fewer buttons on the back). It does not rotate the glass into the body for carrying or storage, a nice feature that saves wear and tear over the years.

shutter speeds dropped below 1/30 second. When needed I would lock focus with light pressure on the shutter release when shooting in single-servo AF. The specs reveal that the AF system holds 51 AF sensors (including 15 cross-type sensors) and getting right-on focus quickly and reliably was never an issue. I shot with the D7500 in Standard color mode with Large JPEG/NEF (Nikon’s Raw) sent to the camera’s single-shot SD card slot loaded with a formatted SanDisk Extreme PRO 64GB card. Images were sharp and crisp with little or no oversharpening look (according to image test data supplied to me by BetterNet, the ISO 12.233 chart reproduced with 3,525 of 3,712 lines per picture height, thus the sensor and EXPEED 5 processor converts the nominal sensor resolution almost completely into visible image details). I set my Auto ISO up to the max ISO 3200, but did take some tests at higher sensitivities. The camera’s anti-noise filtering yielded

PERFORMANCE I found the Nikon D7500’s AF system to be very fast and highly customizable. In my tests I worked with both single-point AF and nine-point groups and, as is my wont these days, used the M/A (autofocus with manual override) for fine selection when doing macro shots and tweaking focus to taste. The camera focused well in low light (-3 EV, according to specs), plus I used VR (switchable on the lens) when

Midway between the Smokies and Charlotte I pulled off the road for lunch and made this image of a building that looked like a model of an early 20th-century factory. Colors throughout are rich and saturated and each detail in the building is etch sharp. Exposure at 80mm (effective) focal length was f/10 at 1/125 second at ISO 100. 38 | OCTOBER | 2017

While downtown Charlotte has a decidedly modernist feel, there are many eclectic neighborhoods filled with fun restaurants and numerous microbreweries. These firemen watched the passing scene below from their perch and porch atop their station in the PlazaMidwood section of town. Exposure at 120mm (effective) focal length was f/8 at 1/100 second at ISO 640. (Note: All images made with the Auto ISO setting.)

very good results up to ISO 12,800 with expected deterioration at ISO 51,200, although going to higher “push” speeds yields a decidedly night-vision/ surveillance aesthetic. One thing that really impressed me about images made with the D7500 was the rich and wide tonal range it delivered in a wide variety of contrast and lighting conditions. BetterNet tested the camera at an impressive 11.8 f/stops at ISO 100, an excellent result, and even a 10 to 11 f/ stop range all the way up to ISO 12,800. See accompanying images and captions for additional comments on image quality.

This image of an old painted wall in Charlotte showed me just what the Nikon D7500 could deliver. The colors are rich and highly differentiated, even though the wall was in fairly deep shade, and the bricks are tack sharp. I used the manual focus override working through the pentaprism finder to make sure the focus started on the hanging lamp. Exposure at ISO 1250 was f/8 at 1/100 second. Throughout all my shooting I noticed that there was little or no loss of color richness and virtually no noise even in low light, higher ISO settings.


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TOOLS / FIELD REVIEW

This detail photo of rushing water in the High Falls area in the Pisgah National Forest in North Carolina utilized the Nikon D7500’s highest shutter speed of 1/8000 second and caught the forms and patterns of the rushing rapids as if they were frozen in ice. All photos were made with the Nikkor 16-80mm f/2.8-4 lens (effective focal length is 24-120mm). Exposure was f/3.3 at 1/8000 second.

CONCLUSION In the spirit of full disclosure I have to say that I am highly biased in favor of DSLRs over mirrorless cameras, save one or two exceptions. One of the main reasons is that I can actually see what is in the image, and focus and compose accordingly, with a DSLR finder much 40 | OCTOBER | 2017

better than I can with an EVF finder that, at times and especially in low light, makes me feel like I am watching an old TV in a cheap motel…close up. The Nikon D7500’s large LCD does have, by current standards, a comparatively lower resolution—at least when put up against most high-end mirrorless cameras—

but LCDs are notoriously useless in bright light and not to be counted on for eyeballing fine focus, and that’s where the Nikon’s pentaprism finder scores an advantage. A plus for the D7500 is that both the eyepiece finder and the LCD yield a 100 percent field of view: not rare, but not common either.


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Santa Cruz, California


TOOLS / FIELD REVIEW

Details like this are made easier to frame using the Nikon D7500’s articulating LCD. Shot with the camera held at waist level and the LCD tilted perpendicular to the camera body, exposure was f/10 at 1/100 second at ISO 640.

Charlotte’s center city is a mix of skyscrapers dominated by large banks and financial institutions, high-end shops, and the occasional modernist building like the delightful Mint Museum. This shot was made from the front steps of the latter and was framed using the articulating LCD positioned perpendicular to the camera body. Exposure at the widest lens setting (24mm effective focal length) was f/10 at 1/100 second at ISO 100.


Located along the Patuxent River in Southern Maryland, the Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary offers, among other delights, a boardwalk along the edge of the tidal areas. This image of the many forms and shapes at hand was made using monochrome mode, with some judicious edge burning and use of the Curves Adjustment Layer in Photoshop. Exposure using an 82mm (effective) focal length was f/10 at 1/125 second at ISO 100.

The weight, balance, and feel of build of the D7500 are very good, unlike some lower-priced DSLRs that have a plastic look and demeanor. The grip and controls are classic, offering a sense of control over parameters and options that are well thought out and drawn from lessons learned by Nikon designers and engineers over the years. If anything, cameras like the D7500 are a conglomeration of pro or higher-end models and amateur models, though I have to say that this model leans more heavily toward the enthusiast side. The Nikon D7500’s 350-page instruction book, including the usual index, safety warnings, etc., is hefty and worthy of exploration, though my suspicion is that few will try to make images with all the options and will stick to perhaps five or six overall sets of controls and menu settings. But, as mentioned, the capabilities are there for exploration, and there are few imaging options you won’t be able to explore. As of this writing, the Nikon D7500’s NEF files could not be opened in either

Adobe Lightroom or Photoshop, a situation I am certain will be changed by the time this makes it to print. For that reason I cannot report on the NEF file output. Being 12- or 14-bit (selectable) I imagine that to get the full dynamic range and color richness you should shoot NEF and process. As to video, which I did not test, I rely on BetterNet’s tests that report that the video output is “excellent” in both Full HD and 4K mode, a score that is not often given by that testing service, and one they say is on par with the Sony A9. In addition, video maintains the perfect white balance, low noise, and impressive dynamic range of photo mode, even at higher ISO settings. Q

SCORECARD

“THE GRIP AND CONTROLS ARE CLASSIC.”

PROS i High-resolution images i Nice colors, although slightly

oversaturated i Easy handling with professional features i Fast AF system; fast image processor i High-quality video recording CONS i Swivel monitor isn’t fully articulated i Only one SD card slot (forerunner D7200

offered two slots) i SnapBridge app offers only basic features in remote control mode


TOOLS / FIELD REVIEW

© Mary Farace

Sigma 100-400mm lens has two custom settings that can be programmed using the free Sigma Optimization Pro software to fine-tune lens characteristics after attaching to the optional Sigma USB Dock ($59). The 100-400mm lens is compatible with the optional Sigma 1.4x TC-1401 ($349) and 2x TC-2001 ($299) teleconverters that extend the lens’s reach to 140-560mm f/7-9 or 200-800mm f/10-12.6, while adding one or 1.9 inches respectively to the overall length.

SIGMA 100-400MM F/5-6.3 DG OS HSM CONTEMPORARY LENS FIELD TESTING SIGMA’S “ALL-AROUND” SUPER TELEPHOTO ZOOM By Joe Farace

SIGMA’S 100-400MM F/5-6.3 DG OS HSM LENS ($799) is part of their Contemporary series that the company says blends “refined optical design” with “compact and lightweight construction.” The lens is available for Canon, Nikon, or Sony DSLRs. Although as a DG lens it is designed for full-frame DSLRs, it can also be used with APS-C sensor cameras, where it produces an equivalent field of view of 150-600mm. DESIGN & FEATURES The Sigma 100-400mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM lens is constructed from Thermally Stable Composite material. OK, it’s plastic, but it doesn’t feel plasticky. The mount is brass with a rubber sealing to make the lens dust and splash resistant. To reduce chromatic aberrations and color fringing throughout the zoom range, the optical design incorporates four SLD glass elements with a Super Multi-Layer Coating to increase contrast. The front element has a water- and oil-repellent coating with a 67mm filter size. Sigma offers a 67mm Protector filter for $37; think about it. The lens has a nine-blade rounded diaphragm to produce smooth bokeh. Sigma says the 100-400mm lens is useful for “macro, travel, nature and wildlife, sports and action” photography. In other words, they see it as an allaround lens and that’s how I treated it when shooting with different Canon EOS cameras. Close focusing is 5.25 feet 44 | OCTOBER | 2017

and while the lens may not produce true 1:1 ratio macro images, it doesn’t mean you can’t try. I photographed the tiny blossoms on a Hawthorn tree with the lens set at 400mm using an EOS 60D (or 640mm with the Canon’s 1.6x factor) and it produced images approximating real macro photography. Autofocus is fast, smooth, and quiet thanks to a Hyper Sonic Motor that also permits manual focus override, although you may first want to set the Focus controls on the lens to “O” for override. Other controls on the barrel include focus distance limiting, optical stabilization, and custom. The built-in stabilizer offers two settings: one for general handheld use and the other for panning. As I write this, Sigma hasn’t specified the amount of stabilization this lens produces but their 50-500mm lets you use shutter speeds up to four stops slower than otherwise possible. Based on my testing this lens should perform similarly or close to it. The

REAL-WORLD TESTING Sigma says the 100-400mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM lens is “compact and lightweight” and it measures 3.40x7.18 inches and weighs 2.55 pounds, so it’s no featherweight and on occasion I’ll confess to finding it to be a handful. My friend, landscape photographer Todd Abbotts, thought the BG-E4 battery grip on my Canon EOS 5D unnecessarily added bulk and suggested I remove it, but I didn’t. The lens was easier to handle when mounted on a lighter Canon EOS 60D, even with a BG-E9 battery grip attached. Abbotts, who owns Canon’s EF 100400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM lens (more later), was also impressed by the Sigma’s build quality. With any new lens, my first shots were made during a visit to Parker, Colorado’s O’Brien Park to photograph the gazebo. It was there I noticed a few things about the Sigma 100-400mm’s included lens hood: the hood is reversible and when used this way the lens cap can be tricky to remove and replace because its clips are close to the hood’s edge. Also, when the lens is set at 100mm, the reversed hood blocks the zoom ring. Tip: Just use the hood the way it was designed and you’ll be happy. While in Parker, I went to my standard wall of well-laid bricks and did some lens testing with the full-frame EOS 5D. At 100mm, there is no difference in sharpness, vignetting, or observable distortion between wide open and the typical f/8 “sweet spot.” This is performance at a level I haven’t observed in recent testing even with expensive prime focal length lenses. At 400mm, I noticed slight vignetting in the corners when wide open that disappears by f/8. What was noticeable, though, was a lack of observable distortion and the incredible sharpness of this lens, even compared to similar lenses by camera manufacturers. The Sigma 100-400mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM is lighter than a Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM lens


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The top image was made with a full-frame Canon EOS 5D and the Sigma 100-400mm f/5-6.3 lens at 100mm, with the O’Brien Park gazebo filling the frame. While standing in the exact same place, zooming out to 400mm produced the other (bottom) image. I tried shooting from the other side of the gazebo to see how far away I had to be to fill the frame at 400mm and I would have had to be outside the 8.5-acre park. So it’s obvious the lens’s focal length versatility and long reach is a major asset.

This young mule deer doe is enjoying a repast on my neighbor’s trees (instead of mine). I like the way the Sigma 100-400mm f/5-6.3 lens rendered the deer and a bit of the tree in sharp focus, with the bushes and house in the background just slightly softer, placing the viewer’s emphasis on the deer. She was photographed with a Canon EOS 5D in Program mode with the lens at 302mm and an exposure of 1/400 second at f/7.1 and ISO 400.

Outdoor portraits with the Sigma 100-400mm f/5-6.3 lens are more than possible and I was able to photograph Mary at full length and three quarters without changing camera position by simply zooming the focal length from 100mm to 400mm. Exposure with a Canon EOS 5D was 1/60 second at f/8 and ISO 400, with plus one stop exposure compensation because of the backlighting. 46 | OCTOBER | 2017

(3.5 pounds) and cheaper as well ($2,199). The Sony FE 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 GM OSS weighs three pounds and is more expensive at $2,498, so unless you like to spend money, the Sigma has a lot to offer. Another of my early shoots involved inadvertent cold weather testing by shooting local wildlife in the snow. Sigma says the 100-400mm lens has a temperature working range of 32 to 120 degrees. With light snow falling and temperatures in the low 30s, the lens performed as if it were a sunny spring day. The zoom ring operated smoothly and the optical stabilization functioned well, especially since I just grabbed an EOS 5D off my desk and started photographing a mule deer doe snacking on my neighbor’s trees—instead of mine for a change. While Sigma doesn’t mention portraiture as one of this lens’s suggested uses, the focal length range allowed me to photograph Mary using anything from headshot to full-length poses without changing camera position. During the time I had the 100-400mm lens, I wasn’t able to shoot in my home studio because it’s been difficult to find models willing to pose for trade. If you are or know a female model in the Denver area interested in appearing in the magazine, please contact me via my website. On my car photography website/blog, I recommend using longer than normal focal lengths when photographing cars but at shows I typically use wide-angle lenses because working space is usually tight. One exception is the First Saturday Car Show in Colorado Springs and I brought the Sigma 100-400mm lens to the show and was pleased with how well it did.

Photos © Joe Farace

TOOLS / FIELD REVIEW


TOOLS / FIELD REVIEW I didn’t want to push the focal length too much so I chose an EOS 5D to keep the field of view manageable and although the weight of the camera/lens got to me as the show went on, the lens also delighted me by allowing me to photograph cars the way I prefer—at longer focal lengths. CONCLUSION These days many shooters are obsessed with expensive, fast wide-aperture lenses but I find Sigma’s design philosophy behind the 100-400mm’s f/5-6.3 aperture range refreshing. Why? As the noise reduction capabilities of most DSLRs continue to improve, more photographers are reaching for ISO 400 and higher for day-to-day photography so an f/5-6.3 maximum aperture range is not as offputting as it might have been a few years ago. Viewfinder brightness in both fullframe and APS-C Canon bodies was not an issue, so you could consider the lens useful for making snapshots and I did that as well. While it might be stretching it a bit to call the Sigma 100-400mm f/5-6.3 a compact lens, it is for its focal length range and slower maximum apertures. Is the Sigma 100-400mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM a practical all-around lens? If you don’t mind putting up with a little extra weight, the payoff in versatility and

I came to the First Saturday Car Show expecting to shoot lots of close-up details, such as this Porsche GT3’s rear spoiler, but I ended up shooting at many different focal lengths, including the 400mm used for this shot. Exposure with a Canon EOS 5D was 1/1600 second at f/6.3 and ISO 400.

focal length range is worth it, especially at its price point. Whenever the Sigma 100-400mm lens was attached to either my Canon EOS 5D or EOS 60D, nonphotographers would often approach me and comment about my “really impressive camera,” and I had to correct them every time by saying, “no, it’s a really impressive lens.” Q

To shoot portraits and automobile photos, Joe Farace uses a variety of zoom and prime lenses for his Canon EOS DSLRs and Olympus and Panasonic mirrorless cameras. Info about the specific equipment he uses to create images for Shutterbug and his personal photography can be found at joefaraceblogs.com, joefaraceshootscars. com, and mirrorlessphototips.com.

When shooting with Canon’s EOS 60D the Sigma 100-400mm f/5-6.3 lens produces the field of view of a 150-640mm lens, which was useful in capturing a candid image of two dog walkers around Bingham Lake. The image was captured at 400mm with an exposure of 1/640 second at f/8 and ISO 400. At this focal length the two women are crisply sharp, which is one of the lens’s most notable characteristics. 48 | OCTOBER | 2017


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TOOLS / FIELD REVIEW

EPSON P5000 PRINTER & PRINT LAYOUT SOFTWARE TESTING EPSON’S LATEST FLAGSHIP 17-INCH INKJET AND “LIVE” INTERFACE By George Schaub

The desktop Epson SureColor P5000 handles 17-inch-wide paper through roll, single sheet (cassette or back feed), and thick media through a front feed.

I HAVE BEEN USING EPSON’S ADVANCED B&W PHOTO printing mode for many years in a series of the company’s desktop printers but always wished the print software offered a way to see my image adjustments in real time. So, when Epson announced their new Print Layout software, which offers a “live preview” (among other controls) in Advanced B&W Photo mode, I contacted them to give it a whirl. The bonus was that the company offered their latest flagship desktop printer, the SureColor P5000, as a testing machine. So consider this a “two-for-one” review of both the Epson P5000 and the company’s new Epson Print Layout software. THE SURECOLOR P5000 Available for just under $2,000, the massive Epson SureColor P5000 is a 17-inch desktop printer that offers both roll and cut-sheet capabilities. It contains the latest Epson technology and uses 10 colors in printing (11 inks, including either Matte or Photo Black) of UltraChrome HDX pigment ink that, given the right storage and paper, is said to deliver 200year color and 400-year (!) black-andwhite archival capability when used with Advanced B&W Photo mode. For my tests, Epson supplied a wide variety of roll and cut-sheet papers, including their Exhibition Canvas Natural Satin roll, cut-sheet Hot Press Bright (a favorite matte surface of mine), Metallic 50 | OCTOBER | 2017

Glossy, and Premium Luster 260 gsm: all told, just about every surface type that allowed me to check out both the Matte and Photo Black ink looks and transport capabilities of the printer. I also used a few “third-party” papers, including Red River Paper’s Palo Duro Etching and Hahnemühle’s Glossy FineArt. Overall, I found the Epson P5000 to be a fine quality production machine with an easy-to-follow setup and a richly menued LCD/control panel. There are a number of paper paths: a cut-sheet cassette that takes a thick stack of standard photo inkjet papers; a front load for thick stock (which I did not test); a single sheet top feed slot for fine art weight papers; and a smooth and easy-to-load roll feeder (up to 17 inches)

that offers individual “cut” and “uncut” at the end of the print run. If you find yourself doing mostly production fine art printing, buy and use roll paper as the single sheet feed can get tiresome, although for one-offs and proofs it is fine. The P5000’s printing speeds are impressive, even at “highest quality” at quite large image file sizes: naturally this will vary depending on how fast your computer gets the info to the starting gate. I should mention that it is a hefty beast, weighing in at about 115 pounds (though the shipped box weight is more like 135 pounds) and measuring 34x30x16 inches, so phone a friend, or two, to unpack and set it up. The P5000 is a serious printer for enthusiasts and pros alike who will find it more than meets needs and expectations. Print quality and image detail are very impressive: its smallest droplet size is 3.5 picoliters with Variable Droplet Technology that can disperse three different sizes per line; it shows deep blacks and rich color when desired (for me a hallmark of Epson printers); and while colors are rich, there is also subtle color differentiation in reds and blues throughout. Another feature of the Epson P5000 that will appeal to experienced printers is the efficiency of paper handling via the four optional paths: you can switch back and forth between cassette and roll without unloading one to use the other. The roll printer allowed me to output very wide panoramas while the cut-sheet cassette let me print one after another image in a queue so I could start work on the next image while the sent image worked its way through the printing path. While those with printing experience using Epson machines could basically take the P5000 out of the box and get to work, there have been numerous additions to the LCD menu options and some new wrinkles in power management. In any case do check the updates and download the full user manual online and take the tour. One other thing: Epson’s oneyear limited warranty gets you in-place service and a visit by an Epson rep should something go really wrong, a good thing as you don’t want to be shipping this big boy back and forth. PRINT LAYOUT SOFTWARE Available as a free download, the Epson Print Layout (EPL) software is, for me, essentially useful as a live preview of the Advanced B&W Photo mode workspace that, as mentioned, previously had me


TOOLS / FIELD REVIEW

flying blind. It can be used for color images as well: it worked fine when using Epson and other papers, since when choosing surface in the interface you are essentially feeding the ICC profile and (usually) platen height information to the printer. (Note: As of late more and more paper makers bundle the platen height into their profiles.) The software can be used “freestanding” or you can transfer from an opened file in Photoshop by using File>Automate>Print Layout, which evokes and loads the image into Print Layout; or right-click and use “Open With” from Bridge for flattened TIFFs and JPEGs; or open any browser from within the freestanding setup and import the image. Now don’t get me wrong: this is in no way a substitute for Photoshop, but more a simplified interface for those with Epson printers, one that has been compared to similar functionality in Canon’s Print Studio Pro. It has some spec requirements: Windows 7+ and Mac OS X 10.10.X+, and, for a plug-in, Adobe CC 2015 or higher. It is designed for use with Epson SureColor printers only, including the P400, P600, P800, and P5000 through P9000. When you first open the software you can use “Browse” or “View” from the menu to import an image. It detects the attached printer and then you use a drop-down menu to choose paper surface and size, the paper source (where you are accessing paper), and printing quality. The software peeks into your Profile Library and offers options of all you have loaded. You then have layout options (standard, gallery wrap, panorama, or a template you have created), then orientation (portrait or landscape), then print positioning on the paper, including inset margins. All of the above are both utilitarian (and necessary) and straightforward. In addition, and helpfully, there’s a small readout of paper size and resolution 52 | OCTOBER | 2017

at print size (ppi) at the bottom left that will manifest itself on the preview screen: in other words, you see how the image fills the page at the current file size/ ppi resolution. If it seems too small, you can use the Layout sliders to decrease the margins and get an instant readout of the resultant ppi, a good indication of how far to take it (I’m a base 220 ppi guy myself) and whether to consider using an upsample route in Photoshop to get the image up to a good printing resolution. COLOR AND ADVANCED B&W PHOTO MODE OPTIONS The Color Settings are the next and star attraction of the EPL’s menu. Under “Type” you can use Printer Managed Color (best for Epson papers), ICC profiles (sort of a Photoshop-managed color that uses the profile you input under Media Type), or Advanced B&W Photo. Choose Advanced B&W Photo and the familiar

This photo of Peggy’s Cove was imported as a color image, then given a sepia cast using the Advanced B&W Photo mode controls. As you change setting options the image window shows the effects of your decisions.

Photos © George Schaub

« The workspace is clear and straightforward. After loading an image (via the freestanding program or as a plug-in via Photoshop) it displays on the screen, with menu options on the right and a readout of file and output size at the base, lower left.

control panel appears, albeit with a live preview in the image window: overall print color bias can be neutral, warm, or sepia, and you can modify any and all via the “Tone” drop-down menu. There are also a series of sliders for brightness, contrast, shadow and highlight tonality, optical density (which I always maxed out, as lesser settings “paled” the image too much), and something called Highlight Point Shift, mainly for suppressing “paper white” (spectral) highlights by adding a bit of Light Light Black ink to those areas in the image—my advice is to use this sparingly. As a last important feature, you can also customize print bias (warm, cool, coloration) using the familiar color wheeltype control. As you move the sliders the interactive image is quick to change, and you can really nail the look. There are some caveats. The preview is not high res, to say the least, and when comparing it to a Photoshop preview it is sharp enough but often quite grainy, making some of the adjustments, such as contrast, hard to pin down, especially when the image has lots of fine details. In essence, it restrains you from making some (not all) adjustment decisions in that you will not fully know exactly what you will be getting in the final print. The program does not link in with Photoshop’s rendering engine. More of a problem is that any changes you make in EPL are not added to the image processing instructions and should be thought of as more of a temporary “filter” that you place over the image prior to printing, one that goes away when you finish printing and close the


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TOOLS / FIELD REVIEW

The Color Settings menu grants access to Epson’s Advanced B&W Photo mode that allows overall image settings as well as a color wheel to help set subtle image color bias, all of which read “live” in the image window. (See text for more.)

program. There is no Save As in the File menu: the only way to save the changes is by going to the top of the menu, to Preset, and saving that distinct image as, say, “Tree 3,” and then opening that preset when you reload the image. In short, if you want the same look on the print you must it run through EPL again with that preset because Photoshop does not record the changes and EPL sans preset will not recognize the changes. Awkward. Finally, there is no Help option in the top menu, something beginners or even more experienced printers would find, well, helpful, even if it steered you to an online PDF. CONCLUSION The EPL is a very good first step in finally making the Advanced B&W Photo mode a more visceral and interactive affair, as well as offering a fairly simple workflow to Epson printmakers. On the plus side, it greatly expands the simplicity of use for Epson printmakers and fosters liberal use of both Epson and third-party papers: the interface is simplicity itself and taking the tour will impress you with the software’s ease of use. The plug-in feature hands off images from Photoshop with ease. Overall, this is not just an aid to monochrome printmakers: it can be put to good use with color images as well, and in both cases can be applied to work with any paper, regardless of surface or maker, sheet or roll. On the minus side, its preview does not make use of Photoshop’s processing power, and can be troublesome with 54 | OCTOBER | 2017

Here’s a print made using an ICC profile for Hahnemühle’s Glossy FineArt paper. As long as you have downloaded the profile from the paper company’s site for the P5000 you will have drop-down access to load it.

images with fine details, making some offered controls more approximations than not. The fact that changes made in the software do not attach to the image processing instructions and that there is no Save As is to me a serious omission that hopefully will be addressed in future versions. As it stands, I feel that the software is a fine tool for those who are challenged in setting up a proper printing workflow, since it takes the user step by step through the process. It will be fun for those who, like me, always wanted to have a preview image of their work in Epson’s

Advanced B&W Photo printing mode. Yet, the printers on which it works, the SureColor P series, are aimed at those who generally have a bit more experience with printmaking or who have at least made the commitment to step up in class. And while the image resolution of the preview may be an issue for some, the temporal nature of the processing is, for me, okay for one-offs and single-date editions, but otherwise a detriment. Regardless, the software is free and intriguing, and will certainly aid many printmakers in learning about and hopefully following a well-thought-out workflow. Give it a try. Q


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TECHNIQUES / PRO'S CHOICE

LIVIN’ PORTLANDIA “I like a challenge which is why I decided to shoot this series on young homeless people in Portland who call themselves ‘travelers.’ I’d never done anything like this before so it was awkward when I first approached them. After I told them about how my life story had paralleled theirs in part, they started loosening up and allowed me to peek into their world.” Technical info: Canon EOS 5D Mark II, 24-105mm lens at 58mm; ISO 1250, f/11, 1/400 second.

SIMPLY BLACK AND WHITE HOW SCOTT HOYLE CREATES HIS UNCOMPLICATED MONOCHROMATIC DESIGNS WHEN HE GRADUATED WITH A BFA FROM KENDALL COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN, Scott Hoyle would have been very happy purely pursuing a career in graphic design and illustration. But along the way, something happened. In his senior year, he’d borrowed a camera from a classmate, entered a photo contest—and won a Mamiya Sekor SLR. While this event did not alter the course of his job history, the camera did provide him with material on which he based his illustration and graphic design work. And, whereas photography continued to play a role throughout his life, it wasn’t till he retired that he pursued it with a passion. Over the years he’d transition from film to digital. But the move to black and white was more sudden. SEEING IN MONOCHROME Hoyle was initially intimidated by black and white. He had launched his photographic career by winning photo competitions and organizing showings of his work—but that focused entirely on the color image. It was at one of these one-man shows that gallery visitors criticized him for a lack of black-and-white imagery. That was the spark he’d needed to ignite a continuing passion for the monochrome image. With a firm grasp of 56 | OCTOBER | 2017

photographic composition already in hand, what he needed now was to find a toehold in black and white. That came when he discovered Black & White magazine. “My mouth started watering about being featured in this magazine,” Hoyle recalls. “So I took it as a challenge to start shooting black and white.” Before long, Hoyle found his images featured on the pages of this prestigious publication, as well as on two special-edition covers back to back.

THE THRILL OF BLACK AND WHITE What excites Hoyle about black and white? The answer to that question is simple really. He takes great satisfaction from being able to change the tones in the picture, and specifically in being able to burn and dodge precise areas, so the image appears as he actually sees it. For a time he did have a fascination with black-and-white infrared, and had converted one of his Canon EOS 5D bodies for that purpose. But that fascination has waned, as he sees the false tones often appearing as artifice, rather than art. Instead, he’s chosen to stick with more traditional black and white. Even when he felt driven to render images to monochrome, the process was not initially automatic—it was tedious and involved. He’d study the images after uploading them to his computer. He would even occasionally take that one step

Photos © Scott Hoyle

By Jack Neubart


TABLES & CHAIRS The Getty Museum provides Hoyle with endless challenges to find something new or to render the familiar in a different way. In this instance an observant eye grabbed onto the seemingly chaotic pattern of chairs, tables, shadowy shapes, and lines in the scene, or as Hoyle simply but poignantly pointed out, “What really makes the shot for me is the lighting and the shadows.” Technical info: Canon EOS 5D Mark III, 24-105mm lens at 75mm; ISO 100, f/11, 1/250 second.

A WALK ALONG THE BEACH Scott Hoyle shot this scene at Cannon Beach, a popular tourist attraction in Oregon. This was rare, with the beach being wet this far out, and it produced some great reflections, Hoyle noted. He’d observed all the silhouetted figures and recognized that this would make a dynamic monochromatic composition, with Haystack Rock, a noteworthy feature in this landscape, looming in the background. Remaining unseen by the crowd, he continued to shoot, tracking the movements until all the pieces fell into place. Technical info: Canon EOS 5D Mark III, 24-105mm lens at 105mm; ISO 400, f/14, 1/1600 second.

further, opening the images in Google Nik Silver Efex Pro. However, he rarely used the Nik renditions. For the most part, they served as a guide for the conversions carried out in Adobe Photoshop. EVOLVING DESIGN SENSE Hoyle’s black-and-white photography is characterized by a strong sense of design. “All my photographs have a heavy design orientation, which comes from working as a designer and illustrator,” he explains. “Much of my work has a graphic edge to it.” Hoyle, we should note, is also a painter. His sensibilities have been fine-tuned over the years and he can recognize what will work as black and white and what won’t. “Now that I’ve been shooting so much black and white, I have an eye for it in advance. I know that black will be black and white, white, and I know the tones are going to be right. Still there are instances where I like the color and I like the black and white, so I use both.” Case in point, one of the shots featured here, of an arrangement of tables and chairs. The graphic elements are simple

enough to hold up under either rendition: the similarity and pattern of tones (or colors, as the case may be), together with the cohesive flow of shapes and lines holding the image together, give it impact and strength. Incidentally, this image also garnered notoriety in international photo competitions.

WALT DISNEY CONCERT HALL Immediately recognizing that the strong design elements clearly lent themselves to a study in black and white, Hoyle was quick to capture this scene while he had the light. Technical info: Canon EOS 5D Mark III, 24-105mm lens at 75mm; ISO 100, f/18, 1/20 second.

HOYLE’S BLACK-AND-WHITE PROCESS When Hoyle decides an image will be black and white, the first thing on his mind is achieving a strong tonal contrast. “I prefer subjects that are contrasty, so they jump out at you,” he says. “I like to see a strong black and a strong white, and if I can get all the grays in between, fantastic! I make sure the file has all the information—all the tones, with nothing dropping out.” He continues: “I’m pretty basic with what I do in Photoshop. People have commented, saying, you have to be doing more than what you describe, and my answer is simple: No, I don’t. When I open a file in Photoshop, if I don’t have all the blacks and all the whites, I don’t use it. I don’t mess around with it. If it’s not a good

shot, it’s not a good shot. What I emphasize to anyone who asks is, take a good photograph and you’re not going to have to do much in Photoshop.” There is one addendum to that dictum. “I tend to go darker than I originally did with my black-and-white images. I leave the whites white but I make the blacks blacker. So the midtones tend to go more toward black. I picked that up from Brooks Jensen (editor at LensWork). When I first got into black and white, Jensen critiqued my portfolio of images from Hawaii. I asked him what I was doing wrong, and he said, I don’t see a thing wrong. The only thing he added was, Take everything as dark as it can go, and then come back. I’ve followed that advice, and it works.” SHUTTERBUG.COM | 57


TECHNIQUES / PRO'S CHOICE

WAVE PACIFIC #1 “During a horrific storm, I was climbing cliffs in Yachats, Oregon, and was being pelted by rain and pounded by high winds. I’m wet, my camera’s wet; I’d wipe the camera off and continue shooting. I had positioned myself so I could get a dark sky behind the waves. In post, I burned in the sky so it formed a completely black backdrop. It was so overcast that I didn’t have a problem with the exposures and getting that milky texture in the water without doing any tonal manipulation to the sea foam.” Technical info: Canon EOS 5D Mark II, 70-300mm lens at 120mm; ISO 800, f/16, 1/1000 second.

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i Canon EOS 5D Mark III i Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM i Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L USM i Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM i Canon EF 2x extender i Lowepro backpack i Manfrotto 055MF3 tripod with

410 geared head

WINTER MELT #1 Taking his dog to see a specialist on Sauvie Island, outside Portland, Oregon, Hoyle was struck by this high-key scene. “The weather had changed; it was getting warmer and raining, and half the snow had already melted. Within a two-minute span, the scene had changed.” Hoyle adeptly captured this scene as is, without making any tweaks in post. Technical info: Canon EOS 5D Mark III, 24-105mm lens at 28mm; ISO 320, f/9, 1/320 second.

HOYLE’S FAVORITE GEAR “That has to be my Canon 24-105mm lens because of its versatility.” 58 | OCTOBER | 2017

For Scott Hoyle, the world is not simply black and white, while, at the same time, it is. When he chooses to convert a color image to monochromatic shades of black, gray, and white, he does so with a designer’s vision. He focuses on the elements within the frame and how they relate to each other. He doesn’t simply capture a mood. He captures an intricate tapestry, and makes it his own. Q Scott Hoyle operates out of the Portland (Oregon) area. To see more of his work, visit scotthoyle.com. Jack Neubart (jackneubart.com; Instagram: @jackneubart) has authored numerous books and articles on photography over the years.


CREATIVITY / PERSONAL PROJECT « “People call him Cowboy Dave. He’s a local guy everybody knows, a hard-working ranch hand who works with different ranchers.” Michael Crouser made the portrait with his Pentax 67.

TRUE GRIT

didn’t feel I covered well enough, I’d think, Well, I’ll go back next year at this time. At one point I was way up on a rise, watching some of the ranchers on a cattle drive. It was beautiful, but when I got home I found my camera had malfunctioned. They weren’t going to do that drive again for another year, so I knew that in a year I’d be sitting on that mountain again, taking that picture again. And that’s what I did.” He learned the rhythms of their life and work—“they don’t work on a schedule, they work seasonally”—and he learned to adapt. “At first I was getting a lot of pictures of their backs, so I learned to be where they were going. But sometimes they’d have to tell me to get out of the road—cows don’t want to go where there’s some mysterious thing standing in their way, waiting to take pictures.” He rarely asked them to repeat something he’d missed. “And when I did, they’d just laugh. On the other hand, I opened a lot of gates. Sitting in the front seat of their trucks, offering to get out and open them—that’s a big thing.” So was providing prints. “I did that throughout the project. They’re all hand-made, so it takes time, but I always set aside a box of prints for the people I visited. I wanted to do it, and I also knew it helped to have a good relationship with the people I was working with.”

CAPTURING AMERICAN TRADITIONS IN TIMELESS BLACK-AND-WHITE IMAGES By Barry Tanenbaum

His images, made with film cameras, chronicle the yearlong cycle of the ranchers’ lives, during which he avoided “evidence of modernity.” You’ll see no sunglasses, tennis shoes, or baseball hats; none of the things, he says, “that would yank the viewer out of the story.” Crouser, who lived in New York at the time he started the project, headed to northwestern Colorado at the suggestion of a friend who lived near the ranchers. Introductions were made, and though at 60 | OCTOBER | 2017

first they wondered what a New Yorker was doing there, he entered the lives of nine different ranching families. “Eventually I became quite good friends with them,” he says, “as I watched their families grow and documented what I think is an important part of American culture.” SEASON TO SEASON He set no time limit on the project. The goal was to get it right. “If I saw a certain aspect of their lives I

Crouser used his Nikon F4 and 300mm lens for this image of barbed wire stretched tight before nailing. “As much as I love the look of medium format, there are times when the long lens gives you the compression to make the photograph dramatic. The wire coming toward the lens would look completely different with the Pentax 67.”

Photos © Michael Crouser

IN 2006, MICHAEL CROUSER TOOK THE FIRST PHOTOGRAPH in his mountain ranch project. Ten years later he took the last image to complete Mountain Ranch, the book that grew from the project. He calls the book “an exploration of the disappearing world of cattle ranching in the mountains of Colorado,” but it’s more than that: it’s a story of the ties and traditions of families, and a story of an America that was, struggling to still be.


“The Schlegel brothers—Jerad, taking the pull from the bottle, and Joel—are rodeo competitors as well as ranchers. They were taking a break from rounding up cattle. I didn’t include their cousin Todd in this photo—that’s his horse; he’s just out of the frame—because he was wearing sunglasses.”

Most of the ranchers didn’t notice him all that much. “They’re very focused on what they’re doing—and my methods made it okay for me to be there. I didn’t ask them for anything. I didn’t need them to do anything differently. It was an observational project; I was present but inconspicuous. I didn’t talk a lot or move a lot. Some of the ranchers were more involved and interested in what I was doing, and said things like, ‘Do you want to get up on that barn? Here’s a ladder.’” PHOTO METHODS Michael Crouser shoots with digital cameras for his commercial work; for personal projects, it’s film. He shot the Mountain Ranch photos with either a Pentax 67 or a Nikon F4. His film was Kodak Tri-X. He used two lenses: an SMC 200mm f/4 for the Pentax, an AF-S Nikkor 300mm f/2.8D for the Nikon—until it bounced out of his four-wheeler, crashed to the road and was replaced by an AF-S 300mm f/4D. It turned out the replacement was “much

more usable—I didn’t need anything lower than f/4 and the thing weighed about half as much as the broken lens.” His tripod was a Gitzo Traveler, and he used two light meters at different times on the project, a Minolta Flash Meter IV and a Sekonic Flash Master L-358. “I could use the Pentax for so many things—portraits, landscapes, even action—it does have a shutter speed of 1/1000 second—if I got close enough. That became a challenge: about halfway through I started seeing that my pictures weren’t as interesting to me as I wanted them to be, so I started getting a lot closer with the Pentax to subjects in motion. If I couldn’t get close enough, I’d use the Nikon with the 300mm lens.” He would always try to shoot at 1/500 second at f/11 or f/8, or 1/1000 second at f/8 or f/5.6. “I wanted to narrow the range of what I brought into the darkroom— either this f/stop or that one. If you’re paying attention to your exposures and your processing, you should be getting consistent negatives to work with.”

“I asked the rancher to wait a moment until I got set before calling his dogs off the truck. These are Australian Heelers—cattle herding dogs. They’re not pets, they’re more like co-workers.”

SHUTTERBUG.COM | 61


CREATIVITY / PERSONAL PROJECT

“This is Steve and Taylor Hammer, father and son. Steve’s the rancher I photographed most often and spent the most time with over the years. He became a friend. He was very interested in what I was doing and had a lot of questions. I love this picture because it kind of illustrates the whole story. I first photographed Taylor when he was 12 years old. He’s 16 in this picture, 22 now, and wants to be a rancher.”

He shot his 400-rated film at 320, “overexposing just a hair.” If he had to go up a stop he’d rate his light meter at 800 and figure out the processing—“I have a chart”—to compensate for the push. “I 62 | OCTOBER | 2017

don’t think I ever pushed it past 800, and I had to mark the roll I shot at the 800 meter setting. Have Sharpie, will travel.” That’s the how of it. The why—why photograph in black and white, on film—

comes down to nothing more complicated than what feels right to him. The means fit the subject, and for the traditional elements in lives lived according to tradition he created images that could have


« One of the most important days of the year for the ranchers is the spring branding of new calves. Crouser used the Pentax 67 to take the photo. “I got close enough using my foot zoom,” he says.

» “This is Todd Schlegel, riding around checking on the cows. I took this photo on my first visit, in 2006.”

been taken today or unknown yesterdays ago. “I consider myself a film person and a black-and-white person, traditional and basic,” Crouser says. “For these personal projects, I don’t know what comes first— my picking a subject or picking a medium.” When he got back from every trip to Colorado he couldn’t wait to see the results of the shoot. “It wasn’t a chore—I’d get off the plane and the same day get into the darkroom and process film. What I first loved about photography was the darkroom, and I still do.” Q You can find examples of Michael Crouser’s photography at michaelcrouser.com, along with information about workshops and his books, including Mountain Ranch, just published by the University of Texas Press.

“I knew the ranchers were off gathering cattle. I knew where they’d gone, and where the corrals were, so I guessed they’d be coming around the outside of those woods. I found the spot where I wanted to make a picture and I waited. Sometimes you guess right.” SHUTTERBUG.COM | 63


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CREATIVITY / PROFILE

Amy Winehouse on her wedding day for Rolling Stone magazine, Miami, 2007.

MONOCHROME MASTER

THE BLACK-AND-WHITE MAGIC OF MAX VADUKUL By Suzanne Driscoll

Vadukul’s father sold photographic equipment throughout the eastern coast of Africa in Tanzania, Zanzibar, Uganda, and Kenya. He often wanted a traveling companion and would take his son out of school for many of his business trips. “Looking back, this might have been the inspiration for my love of photography,” Vadukul says. “I remember seeing beautiful landscapes that hadn’t been homogenized, wandering Maasai and camels, and on one occasion driving through a sandstorm.” His father lent him his Rolleiflex when he was very young and Vadukul still puts the photo of him holding the camera on his business cards. 66 | OCTOBER | 2017

Then the violence started in Nairobi: people’s heads were being slashed open with machetes while others were set on fire. When Vadukul was just 9 years old, he vividly remembers being in the shower when his father yanked him out and said, “We’re leaving now and you can’t take anything with you.” The family emigrated to North London where his father had a difficult time finding a job. Moving from place to place, Vadukul attended four schools in six months, and was frequently bullied for being “different.” His older sister felt sorry for him and bought him his first Olympus camera and a darkroom, as well as karate lessons.

Max with Rolleiflex, photographed by his father, Nairobi, Kenya, 1965.

Photos © Max Vadukul

MAX VADUKUL HAS COME A LONG WAY since growing up in Africa. Known for his creative black-and-white portraits and innovative fashion photography, he was born in Nairobi, Kenya, to Indian parents in 1961. “The Sixties were the golden years for the National Geographic,” Vadukul recalls. “They were spending a lot of money to educate the public and the photographers were the best of the lot.”


James Brown for The New Yorker, New York City, Pier59 Studios, 1999.

TRIALS BY FIRE While other kids were out dating and getting drunk, Vadukul spent his free time in the library studying photography books and taking pictures on a trialand-error basis. Since going to college to study photography was frowned upon at the time, and photographers such as David Bailey and Terence Donovan were running their own studios when they were as young as 18, Vadukul decided to find an apprenticeship. Going through the yellow pages of the phone book, he called 500 photographers and all said that at age 15 he was too young, not to mention he had an unusual sounding last name. Finally, a shellshocked American veteran named Jay who ran a studio in London said he would be willing to take him on with one condition—Vadukul would have to learn to ride a unicycle in two days. “There was no reason for this except that it was something he made all his assistants do,” Vadukul recalls. “So I practiced very hard and after many, many falls I was able to move in a straight line and stop. I was hired at 30 pounds a month which just about covered my train fare for the twohour ride each way.”

Iggy Pop and Anthony Bourdain in Pop’s backyard, Miami, 2017.

In addition to learning to make coffee, balance a checkbook, and pay bills, Vadukul worked in the darkroom to process film and enlarge prints to look a certain way. He also learned to drive a car and be an electrician, and helped to build sets, load film, and set up lighting and exposures. But when Jay started doing

porn shoots Vadukul decided he’d had enough and quit. His boss was so angry after training him for six months that he blacklisted Vadukul with all the other studios. So Vadukul saved enough money working menial jobs and moved to New York City for a few years, taking photos on the streets and sleeping on benches in SHUTTERBUG.COM | 67


CREATIVITY / PROFILE

Cartoon story for Italian Vogue, New York City, Central Park, 1985.

Tompkins Square Park. Upon his return to England when he was 21, Vadukul decided to contact David Puttnam who had produced awardwinning films such as Chariots of Fire and The Killing Fields, as well as represented Richard Avedon and David Bailey. “I just wanted to know if I had something—if I should give it all up or if I had a chance,” Vadukul says. Puttnam replied that he didn’t do that sort of thing, but told Vadukul to send him six photos and “if I like them, I’ll give you a call.” Vadukul sent 20 and Puttnam did call, later asking him to photograph his line producers and director and to send him an invoice—“but don’t burn me.” THE FIRST BIG BREAK Vadukul took the 600 pounds he earned from Puttnam and decided to move to Paris. “French Vogue and Marie Claire had some great photographers who were doing amazing work,” Vadukul recalls. “In those days editors would meet with you in person rather than having your photos go to their junk e-mail. They would take a look at your work and say ‘you’re wrong for us, but we know somebody who will like you,’ and they’d make a call right on the spot. They sent me down to Yohji 68 | OCTOBER | 2017

Yamamoto’s art director and after showing him 20 black-and-white images he simply said, ‘You’re the one to shoot our next ad campaign. What do you want to do?’” Vadukul couldn’t believe what he was hearing but managed to say, “I want to go to New York. I want to shoot models falling on the street like birds landing with life all around them.” Yamamoto nodded and said, “That’s it.” A PASSION FOR BLACK AND WHITE As the second staff photographer of The New Yorker (the magazine’s first was Richard Avedon), Vadukul was shooting 52 shoots a year. Today, he has long-standing relationships with French Vogue, Italian Vogue, W Magazine, Interview, Rolling Stone, Town & Country, Egoïste, and The New York Times Style Magazine. He is very proud to be the first Indian photographer to shoot covers for both French and American Vogue. Carla Sozzani of Milan was the first to coin the term “arte reportage” (pronounced ray-por-taj) as “taking reality and making it into art,” which perfectly describes Vadukul’s style. And shooting in black and white certainly helps to make the artistry possible. “Black and white is still my passion,” Vadukul says. “It has always been my

Eleonora Salvatore González, better known as Bimba Bosé, for i-D magazine, “Bondage,” New York City, 2001.

favorite medium and I would process and print all the film myself. Peter Lindbergh was a dominant black-andwhite photographer at the time but I felt my content was more energetic, driven—with very different lines to it. I wasn’t interested in anything dark, sad, or moody.” Vadukul’s work is dynamic and movement-filled, “with almost an elegant


Mother Teresa for The New Yorker, New Delhi, 1997.

President Donald Trump for The New Yorker, Mar-a-Lago, 1997.

violence to it.” He believes, “If it’s static, it’s boring, but it doesn’t necessarily have to be moving. Even in silence there is movement and emotion. What I don’t do is anything vulgar.” Vadukul has made the conversion to digital but hates that “everyone is looking at everything before I’m looking at it. Democratization of photography is the death of photography. Great pictures are made when the photographer has total control. But I don’t miss the smell of the

chemicals, fingers getting numb, or the amount of time it took to get a print right with processing film.” The last time he used his favorite film, Kodak Tri-X, was for three covers in a row for Esquire of Matt Damon, Brad Pitt, and Leonardo DiCaprio. “It just looks and feels different.” Surprisingly, Vadukul does not have much of a preference for the brand of camera he uses. “The camera is irrelevant—it’s a box with a lens.” Out of habit he usually prefers Nikons.

MEMORABLE PORTRAITS One of Vadukul’s biggest challenges was photographing Mother Teresa for an assignment from The New Yorker while he was their staff photographer for a 1997 issue on Indian culture and art. She had agreed to do a photograph but when the time came she kept stalling. After waiting for two days in New Delhi, he suddenly got word that she had changed her mind if it could be quick and nonintrusive. As Vadukul tells The Guardian, “I originally planned to use a Pentax 6x7, a beautiful camera for a portrait, but I thought forget that, we’ll shoot on a Nikon F5, and I bolted on an 85mm 1.4 lens. I just went wide open and started to work my way towards her, shooting all the time. She was standing in a room, surrounded by sisters, so I said, ‘I know you’re very shy and you don’t really want to be part of this, so why don’t you just forget me and talk to your friends?’ And that’s what she did. If it had been me controlling her, it wouldn’t have worked. “I kept shooting away, for about 15 minutes, and at a certain moment I slowed everything down. Normally you’d expose for a very sharp picture, but for some reason I dragged the shutter down, and got this slightly liquidy feel. The emotion was really something. The print was a blow-up, 200 percent from a negative. I knew I had something very strong.” Another timely portrait was of Donald Trump at his Mar-a-Lago resort in 1997. “He was very kind, very positive, and we agreed to meet in the morning on the golf course. I was trying to figure out how to get this businessman to come in to my world, so I jumped into the air. Trump said, ‘I can do way better than that!’” Today Vadukul is striving to get back to the basics and simplify. “I just want to go back to the way I started and not deal with all the clutter. Everything is getting very expensive with overrated budgets and too many people involved trying to control everything. Photography is a psychological state of mind, not how many pixels there are or how sharp the lens is. You need to have a secret and you have to be able to photograph your secret. That’s how your reputation will be made.” Q Additional black-and-white photos can be viewed at Max Vadukul’s website, maxvadukul.com, and in his book, MAX. You can also view an in-depth National Geographic documentary on Vadukul at youtube.com/watch?v=Ngt0ysfGs10; National Geographic followed him around off and on for a year and interviewed his entire family. SHUTTERBUG.COM | 69


© Eduardo S. Seastres

CREATIVITY / PICTURE THIS!—READER’S ASSIGNMENT

OUR FAVORITE READER PHOTOS: THE POWER OF BLACK & WHITE

BABY IN THE BASKET “The ‘Baby in the Basket’ is from Panpet Village or Long-Neck Women Village in Demoso Township, Kayah State, Myanmar,” Eduardo S. Seastres explains. “Most women from their ethnic group followed their tradition and culture of wearing neck rings made of brass and also carrying a child in a basket as a symbol of love for the baby. This is the tradition basket used in the countryside to carry vegetables, fruits, and sometimes a baby.”

BOOTHS » Donna Mullins captured this mysterious image of patrons at a restaurant in Chattanooga, Tennessee, with a Canon PowerShot SX260 HS camera at 1/30 second, f/3.5. 70 | OCTOBER | 2017

© Donna Mullins

DESPITE ALL THE ADVANCEMENTS IN IMAGING—including the advent of color and the now dominance of digital—there’s something about classic black-and-white photography that will never go out of style. That’s not to say that just because a photo has been shot or converted to monochrome it’s guaranteed to be a great photo. The choice to go black and white must have some meaningful relationship to the subject matter or scene to be effective. For this assignment, we asked readers to submit their best black-andwhite photos that use the dramatic impact of monochrome in a powerful way. Our six favorite images here certainly show just that.


© Kathleen Finnerty © Carl Grooms

SKYWAY AERIAL “I love shooting from a helicopter,” Kathleen Finnerty says. “On this particular shoot, I had the pilot fly over my favorite local bridge, the Sunshine Skyway, connecting Pinellas County and Manatee County over Tampa Bay. The image has been converted and contrast added through Photoshop.” She shot it with a Nikon D750 and a Nikkor 70-300mm lens at 1/600 second, f/9, ISO 500.

MOON OVER LOS ANGELES “This shot was taken from the hills in Topanga Canyon, about 20 miles to downtown,” Carl Grooms notes. “It is not usually this clear. The sun had just set a short time before.” He captured it with a Canon EOS 5D Mark IV and a Sigma 150-600mm lens at 1/160 second, f/6.3. SHUTTERBUG.COM | 71


CREATIVITY / PICTURE THIS!—READER’S ASSIGNMENT

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6. 7. 8. 9.

Go to Shutterbug.com and register. Scroll down the page and on the right side you will see a box for entering your username and your password. If you already have registered and/or submitted images for the Galleries you can skip this step. Respond to the activation e-mail. Registration is free. You will use your username and password whenever you visit or, with some systems, it will automatically load for you when you visit Shutterbug.com. Check the assignment and closing dates in the magazine. When the magazine is printed we will create an appropriate gallery for your images. Select and prepare your images. We only accept files at a maximum 20MB size, JPEG format. Save the JPEG at a quality level of 10 or higher. Note that file size in your image folder directory will determine upload size, not the “opened” file size, as JPEG compresses at 1:4 at higher quality ratings. If your images do not load it probably means you have exceeded the file size or have not used JPEG format. Click on the Galleries tab on the homepage. In the Category section use the drop-down menu to select the Picture This! assignment. Note that images are simultaneously loaded into the assignment category as well as your own personal gallery. When the Picture This! assignment deadline date has lapsed the assignment gallery will be removed, but your image will still reside in your own gallery. In the Description box add title, camera, lens, exposure information, and your full name. Also add any other comments or anecdotes you think relevant. If you submit images with an enhancement through software beyond contrast, exposure, and simple saturation adjustments please indicate the software and “filter” used to attain that effect. We reserve the right to edit comments as needed. Click the Save button at the bottom of the page to upload the image. You retain copyright on the image. We will choose the images after close of the due date. Please feel free to comment on images submitted by other readers.

PLEASE NOTE: If the photograph includes a minor or a recognizable individual or group you are guaranteeing that you have a signed model release form, and especially a parental or guardian release form for minors. You should keep a copy of that release in your files. Scan that release and keep it handy. If an image is chosen for publication, failure to provide a form when requested will eliminate the image from consideration. You can find release forms at http://asmp.org/tutorials/model-release-minor-child. html and other resources on the Internet. By uploading images you attest that the model release form is valid, that any depiction of a person is with their consent, that you have a model release form available on request, and that all images you submit have been made by you. If you have any questions or problems e-mail us at editorial@shutterbug.com with Picture This! in the subject line. DEADLINE FOR THE FOUR SEASONS: November 1, 2017. Images will appear in our February 2018 issue. UPCOMING TOPIC: Trees, Woods, and Forests DEADLINE: December 1, 2017 PUBLICATION DATE: March 2018 PLEASE NOTE: By submitting you agree to give us the right to show the image(s) on the web and for publication. You give us publication rights in the magazine and on the website(s) of TEN: The Enthusiast Network, LLC.

WANT TO SEE IMAGES SELECTED FOR PAST PICTURE THIS! ASSIGNMENTS?

Go to Shutterbug.com and click on Picture This! in the “Features” menu at the top of the homepage. 72 | OCTOBER | 2017

THE FOUR SEASONS

There’s a thin line between seasonal photographs being cliché or stunning. We, obviously, are asking you to come up with something stunning for this assignment. As the name suggests, your images can showcase any of the four seasons: spring, summer, winter, or fall. (Or if you’re feeling adventurous, you can submit images for all four seasons, or even try to show all four seasons in one image…though we’re not sure how that would look.) We all have our favorite seasons to photograph, with fall being a perennial choice thanks to all those gorgeous autumn leaves. Winter has its deeps snows; summer, its sunshine and beaches; and spring, its fresh flowers and plant life. But like we said, try to resist the clichés in your images for this assignment. Give us images of the four seasons we have not seen before because they should be coming from your own unique point of view. Q Deadline for submissions: November 1, 2017 (Images will appear in the February 2018 issue.)

© Dan Havlik

© Cecil Thomas

« ARKANSAS VALLEY RAIN Steve Gandy shot this image of sheets of rain falling on the hills near Buena Vista, Colorado, with a Nikon D800E and a 70-200mm f/2.8 lens on a tripod at 1/500 second, f/4.5, ISO 100.

HOW TO SUBMIT ONLINE

« THE GRAND TETONS FROM THE SNAKE RIVER Cecil Thomas captured this image while rafting down the Snake River in Grand Teton National Park. It was shot with a Nikon D700 and a Nikkor 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6 lens at 1/1600 second, f/16, ISO 2500.

© Steve Gandy

Picture This!—Our Next Assignment

SWING INTO SPRING This image was shot in the spring but it sure felt like the summer because I was in Palm Springs, California, with temperatures cresting 100 degrees Fahrenheit. No, this pretty lady didn’t just randomly pose for me while holding a croquet mallet. She’s a model and I was in Palm Springs to test out the then new Nikon D500 DSLR. I did, however, almost miss this shot. We had been out in the hot sun for over an hour and I was getting ready to put the camera down and get a cool glass of lemonade when I noticed that the setting sun was producing some amazing backlight through the trees. It turned out to be my favorite image of the whole session, which once again goes to prove you should never put your camera down, even if you’re feeling thirsty.


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CREATIVITY / FINAL SHOT

SUMMER STORM Shutterbug reader Kathleen Finnerty confesses that she “loves the drama of incoming summer storm clouds, especially over bodies of water,” so we can imagine her excitement when she spotted this scene on the horizon. “On this particular day,” Finnerty says, “I observed the darkening skies and headed to the Gulf to see if I could capture some interesting images.” This dramatic photo was shot from Madeira Beach, Florida, with a Nikon D300 and a Tokina 12-24mm f/4 lens at ISO 200, f/8, and 1/2000 second in aperture priority mode. The image was later converted to black and white in Photoshop. As to what inspired that blackand-white conversion, she says, “My all-time favorite landscape photographer is Clyde Butcher. I truly believe his black-and-white landscape images of Florida have inspired many to revere and respect what’s left of our state’s precious wild places, which are dwindling fast. Black and white makes you ‘view’ the image, not be enthralled by some bright spot of color.” To see more of Finnerty’s work, visit her nature website, finnertyimaging. smugmug.com, and her architectural website, bestlightimaging.com. © Kathleen Finnerty Every month we feature an image in Final Shot from Shutterbug’s online Galleries on Shutterbug.com.

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ISO: 100 SS: 1/160 sec Aperture: f/4.5 Focal Length: 50mm


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